April_2015 - Church of the Ascension

Spring 2015
THE ASCENT
A QUARTERLY P UBLICATION
OF
CHURCH
OF THE
ASCENSION
IN THIS ISSUE:
LeƩer from Father Tom
Page 3
The Scapular by Father Nathan
Page 4
Year of Consecrated Life by Father Alessandro
Page 5
My Faith Journey by Courtney (Rager) Grimaldi
Page 6
Welcome to our New Catholics
Page 7
Mary’s Garden
Page 8
VisitaƟon in Bloom by Sarah Streitwieser
Page 10
School AdministraƟon
Page 11
A PropheƟc Mantra About the Poor
Page 12
The Solemnity of Corpus ChrisƟ
Page 14
Summer at Ascension
Page 15
Pentecost Word Search
Page 16
(913) 681-3348
•
9510 West 127th St. • Overland Park, KS 66213
www.kcascension.org • [email protected]
LETTER
FROM THE
PASTOR
BY FR. TOM TANK
Dear Parishioners:
This coming Fall the Synod on the Family will reconvene at the Vatican to
continue its discussions and deliberations on the sanctity of marriage and family
and the challenges encountered in today’s culture for these fundamental
institutions. The press has covered some of the more controversial elements, but
unfortunately they have not reflected the more basic dimensions of marriage and
family.
Up to the time of Vatican II the only primary reason for marriage was seen
as the formation of the family through procreation and care for the young as the
future of society and the Church. With Vatican II two primary purposes were
recognized – the development of strong families for the good of future generations and the mutual support
and companionship of spouses. Over the years with a changing culture the second of these has been
emphasized almost exclusively with the family placed on the back burner. This in turn has led to many
cultural changes such as widespread acceptance of premarital sex and cohabitation, no fault divorces, single
parent households, same sex ‘marriages’, often with little or no regard for the welfare of children and the
future good of society.
The purpose of the Synod on the Family is to address some of these current challenges, but to do so
not by capitulating to the current culture, but by reaffirming the deeper purposes and importance of
marriage and family life.
Couples desire to have happy marriages and the Church wants to be ever more effective in helping
them develop healthy, happy, holy marriages. Often this means taking a stand against some of the current
negative trends, but more importantly it requires positive action to affirm the God-given dignity of marriage
and to assist couples in strengthening their relationships by working through their challenges and
developing marriages that are personally and spiritually strong and life-giving. The on-going challenge is
to provide better marriage education/formation for young people, stronger marriage preparation for the
engaged, and marriage enrichment and counseling opportunities for those living in the married state.
Spouses need to be supported and assisted in going beyond their own needs and expectations to become
mutually self-giving in their marriage and family relationships.
Strong marriages in turn produce strong, healthy, holy families. The family is the basic expression of
society and of the family of God. It is directed primarily to the healthy formation and nurturance of
children. The family is the domestic church. A healthy, holy family is one centered on God in which
Christian discipleship is reflected through family prayer, religious and personal character formation of
youth, loving care for each member and positive action for the less fortunate. It is a community within
which spouses feel mutually affirmed and appreciated and children, living within a secure environment,
experience unconditional acceptance and love and are challenged to become the best reflection of God’s
goodness that they can be.
These are high ideals, but they are so very important for the happiness and health of spouses and
families as well as the future good of society and the Church. God bless spouses and parents who are so
generously striving to live the sacrament of matrimony and develop strong faith-filled families. I am so
edified at the beautiful family life of so many families within our parish including single parents who
exhibit such great love and care for their children with great personal sacrifice. Pray that the Holy Spirit
through the Synod on the Family will bring healing to the broken and the hurting, strength to those
struggling and renewed spirit and life to all spouses, parents and families.
God’s blessings!
3
Fr. Tom
THE SCAPULAR
BY FR. NATHAN HAVERLAND
The wearing of the scapular is a
popular devotional practice by Christians that
dates back to the Middle Ages. These small
scapulars developed out of the large scapular
worn by religious. The word ‘scapular’
comes from the Latin word scapula, meaning
shoulder, and beginning with St. Benedict, many religious
have worn a large scapular as a part of their religious habit.
This scapular consisted of a large piece of cloth suspended
on the shoulders of the religious. Although the exact timing
of when the small scapulars became popular is not known, the
wearing of the small scapulars by the lay faithful was widespread by the end
of the sixteenth century.
The small scapular consists of two rectangular pieces of woolen cloth
connected by two strings or bands in such a way that, when the bands rest
on the shoulders, one piece of wool rests on the chest while the other piece
of wool rests on the back. The color and size of the scapular varies
significantly, with each type of scapular representing a particular type of
devotion, spiritually, or religious community, but the most popular type of
scapular is called “the scapular of Our Lady of Mount Carmel,” or more
briefly, the “brown scapular.” According to pious
tradition, the Blessed Virgin Mary is said to have
appeared to St. Simon Stock and promised great
blessings to those who wore this scapular connected
to the confraternity of the Carmelites.
St. John Paul II
wearing a scapular
4
YEAR OF CONSECRATED LIFE:
A YEAR OF GRACE FOR ALL
BY FR. ALESSANDRO
In the Year of Consecrated Life (November 2014-February 2016), Pope Francis clearly states ways and
expectations through which God’s grace can flow in the Church and in the life of every member of the
Church. How is this year going to engage me, my family and my parish community? Four major cardinal
points can guide us.
JOY. God is able to fill your hearts to the brim with happiness - you don’t need to
seek happiness elsewhere. Serving the Church and your neighbor bring life-long
personal fulfillment. It’s a call to find joy even in the hardship of life, “to recognize
the face of Christ, who became like us in all things, and to rejoice in the knowledge
that we are being conformed to him who, out of love of us, did not refuse the
sufferings of the cross”.
The Church grows by attraction (cfr. Evangelii Gaudium 14). Our lives, more than
our words, need to be eloquent, to radiate the joy and beauty of living the Gospel and
following Christ to the full.
PROPHETIC SIGN. The distinctive sign of consecrated life
is prophecy, but living the Gospel in a radical way is for
everyone. Prophets read from within the times in which they
live and interpret events: do not be afraid to denounce the evil
of sin and injustice. Be bold in your faith and participate in
waking up the world from the numbness imposed by our
culture. You will experience that true freedom which comes
from your desire to please no one but God alone. “If you
remain in my word, you will truly be my disciples, and you
will know the truth, and the truth will set you free” (Jn 8:31-32)
COMMUNION. We are men and women of relationship. Communion starts in your homes, work places,
parish, groups. Many times Pope Francis has warned us about the harm caused by criticism, gossip, envy,
jealousy, hostility, and judgments. Take communion to heart and work to make it possible.
APOSTLE IN THE WORLD. Come out of yourself and go forth to
the existential peripheries. This is the call of the New Evangelization.
Men and women who have lost all hope, families in difficulty,
abandoned children, young people without a future, the elderly, sick
and abandoned, those who are rich in the world’s goods but
impoverished within, men and women looking for a purpose in life,
thirsting for the divine.
Don’t be closed in on yourselves, don’t remain a hostage to your own
problems. These will be resolved if you go forth and help others and
proclaim the Good News. You will find life by giving life, hope
5
by giving hope, love by giving love.
MY FAITH JOURNEY
BY COURTNEY (RAGER) GRIMALDI
T
he Easter Vigil Mass will always be a special Mass to me because
it is the Mass that brought me to the Catholic Church, the Mass I
was baptized and confirmed in the Catholic Church, and the Mass the
week prior to my wedding.
I had never been a very religious person and did not grow up in a
religious family. I was born into a Baptist family who rarely attended
church. When I was seven my parents went through a divorce and we
stopped going to church completely. I grew up without any religious
teachings but somewhere in my childhood I started praying and never
stopped. I also never stopped looking for a church or the presence of God.
Attending college at K-State University, I tried to find a church that
felt right but was continuously left disappointed and eventually stopped
Courtney & Nancy Harrison
looking. After moving back to Overland Park I felt the urge to continue
(her Godmother)
looking for a church and a community that felt like I belonged. At the time
I never considered the Catholic Church because of the stereotypes I had
heard. I was afraid, being non-Catholic, that I would not be welcome, I wouldn’t know when to stand,
when to kneel, or how to follow along with the prayers. Again, I just couldn’t find what I was looking for
and nothing seemed like the right fit.
Unbeknownst to me, I would not find the right fit until the Easter Vigil, 2013. At the time, I had only
been dating my now husband for two months. Before every Saturday date night, Gabe would go to Mass
before picking me up. I was curious about his experience and would ask him to tell me about the homily.
Still believing I wouldn’t be accepted in the Catholic Church I was hesitant to ask Gabe if I could join him,
but something kept telling me that I should go with him. I eventually worked up the nerve to ask to join
him and we went to the very first Mass that following week which just so happened to be Easter Vigil
Mass – a Mass Gabe nor I had ever attended.
While Gabe apologized for the Mass being long, I shushed him as I sat on the edge of my seat in awe
at the beauty of the Mass beginning in darkness, the passing of the light, the readings, the symbolism of the
baptisms and confirmations, and the church as a whole called to join at the sacrificial table that Christ
prepared for us through his death and resurrection. It was in that Mass, as I watched the men and women
being baptized into the Catholic Church that I knew I would be in the same spot the next year.
So that is exactly what I made happen – before summer began I had contacted Liz Willman
regarding the RCIA program at Ascension and anxiously waited for the first class to begin. Taking the
RCIA classes only affirmed my belief that I had finally found what I was looking for when I had been
looking for a church community and presence of God in my life. My second Easter Vigil Mass I was
blessed to be baptized and confirmed in the Catholic Church with Gabe as my sponsor. Gabe and I quickly
became involved in the church volunteering as Eucharistic ministers and Sacristans. This year Easter Vigil
fell on the week before our wedding, creating another symbolic Easter season for us. I have found a
permanent home, a security in my faith, eternal life and a reminder to do good. Our favorite line in Mass is
the very last one, “Go in peace, glorifying the Lord by your life.” A reminder that we continue to live the
Mass long after the service has ended.
6
WELCOME
TO OUR
NEW CATHOLICS
BY LIZ WILLMAN
Profession of Faith:
Robert E. Bowen, Sara Boyer, Stephanie Halley, Kyle Komarek, William Koski,
Laura Lovett, Mike O'Dell, Bryan Robbins, Jessica Swaters, Steve Tholkes,
Harlan Urwiler, Elizabeth Weaver, Angela Zimmer.
Baptisms:
Melissa Bowen, Craig Fischman, Haley Freemen, Brian Gump, Kaley Lancaster,
Jacob McFarland, Jesse McPhail, Shannon Williams.
At this year’s Easter Vigil, we welcomed 21 Men and Women into the
Catholic Faith. These individuals have been meeting each Monday evening to
learn more about the Catholic faith and to strengthen their relationship with Jesus
Christ. Please continue to pray for our newest members, that they may continue to
find grace in their journey!
If you or someone you know is interested in learning more about the process
of becoming Catholic, please contact Liz Willman, RCIA Director at (913) 6813348 ext. 139 or [email protected]
7
MARY’S GARDEN
Create a Mary Garden this Spring
The joy over the appearance of new plants and flowers in spring prompted
man to attribute to them a special power of protection and healing. People
planted special spring flower gardens; they brought branches of earlyblossoming plants, like pussy willows, into their homes; they decorated
themselves and their living rooms with wreaths of flowers and clusters of
blossoms. A striking Christian variation of these nature rites was the
medieval custom of planting "Mary gardens," which were made up of all the
flowers and herbs that are ascribed by love and legend as a special tribute to
the Blessed Virgin. This charming and inspiring tradition has been revived in
many places in Europe and more recently in this country.
DIRECTIONS
In a typical Mary garden the statue of the Madonna occupies a place of honor, either in the center
or in a grotto against the wall, with, usually, a birdbath or bubbling fountain built in front of it. Some
of the more familiar plants of the many that belong in a typical Mary garden are:
Columbine and Trefoil are said to have sprung forth at the touch of Mary's foot,
and consequently bear the popular names Our Lady's shoes or Our Lady's
slippers.
Marigold (Mary's bud) has bell-shaped blossoms of vivid yellow. An old
legend says, "Her dresses were adorned with Marigold." This flower was
used to decorate her shrines for the Feast of the Annunciation (March 25)
and during the month of May.
Lily-of-the-valley (Our Lady's tears). This delicate flower is still widely used in
Germany, there it is called Maiglockchen (May bells), to decorate the Mary
shrines in churches and homes during the Virgin's month (May).
Foxgloves thrive in moist and shaded places; they blossom in many colors and
present a most attractive sight with their clusters of little bells, which were called Our
Lady's thimbles in medieval times.
8
MARY’S GARDEN (CONTINUED)
Snowdrop. This charming flower is the first herald of spring in Europe. It often blossoms as early as Candlemas (February 2) between batches of melting snow; hence the name. In Germany it is called "Snow
bell" (Schneeglocklein). Little bouquets of snowdrops are the first floral tribute of the year at the shrines of the Madonna on Candlemas. It is a popular
emblem of Mary's radiant purity and of her freedom from any stain of sin.
Lily. This stately and dignified flower has been associated from ancient times
with Jesus and Mary, and is called Madonna lily in many parts of Europe. At
Easter its brilliant and fragrant blossoms symbolize the radiance of the Lord's
risen life. Later in the year it is used to decorate the shrines of Mary, especially
on July 2, the Feast of the Visitation. It also is an old and traditional symbol of
innocence, purity, and virginity.
Rosemary produces delicate and fragrant blossoms of pale blue color in early
spring. according to legend, the plant originally bloomed in white; however, it
turned blue (Mary's color) in reward for the service it offered when Our Lady
looked for some bush on which to spread her Child's tiny garments after having washed them on the way to Egypt. The bushes do not grow very tall but
as they grow older they spread out and thicken, forming a dense bush. There is an old superstition
that "the rosemary passeth not commonly the height of Christ when he was on earth."
Violets are dedicated to Mary as symbols of her humility. They are said to
have blossomed forth outside her window when she spoke the words,
"Behold, I am a handmaid of the Lord." Leaving her, the angel of God
blessed the little flowers in passing, thus endowing them with the tenderest
and most beautiful fragrance of all plants.
Roses were associated with Mary from early times. Saint Dominic (1221) is
credited with the spreading of the familiar devotion called the "Rosary
(rosarium) of the Blessed Virgin Mary." The word "rosary" originally meant a
rose garden but was later used in the sense of "rose garland." Three colors
are especially consecrated to Mary: white roses as symbols of her joys, red
roses as emblems of her sufferings, and yellow (golden) roses as heralds of
her glories.
Activity Source: Easter Book, The by Francis X. Weiser, S.J., Harcourt, Brace and Company, New York, 1954
9
VISITATION
F
IN
BLOOM
BY SARAH STREITWIESER
or a few glorious days each spring, the Bradford Pear trees that line our neighborhood street and fill our
backyard bloom out in little white flowers. Fluttering and twirling, petals fill the springtime air around our
house and cover our lawn. They conceal our outdoor blemishes -- our untended weeds, our plastic flowerbed liner
(showing through too-thin mulch), and our sod worn by five little sets of feet.
“It looks like magic, Momma,” Lillian tells me, and she is right. Our poorly tended lawn seems flawless with
the blossoms covering it. The effect fades quickly with fast-wilting petals, but for a short while it is breathtaking.
Spring blooms in our family with little girls eager to wear new cotton sundresses and ruffled socks to Mass.
We clamor into our 8:15am pew only moments before the procession, despite our efforts to arrive early. Vivian
loses a shoe that is mysteriously recovered two pews in front of us. Cecilia spits up on my only pair of dry cleanable
pants, I having dared to wear them for the first time in years. Rosemary and Lillian bumble and giggle together, in
distinct twin-sister fashion. After Mass Timothy fusses over a botched donut order.
We are so ordinary. Now five children into parenthood, I don’t know why our imperfections still surprise me,
but they do.
As a mother, I long to blossom like our neighborhood trees. I long to parent perfectly, with loving reminders,
gentle corrections, and unending motherly endurance. But just like the fast-wilting Bradford blossoms, I fade and
wither thin too quickly. With my oldest child just six years in age, I am a novice to motherhood, but even so I
thought I would be better at it by now. I am so ordinary. I suppose that still surprises me too.
Each spring I wait for Mary’s May Visitation as I do the pear trees. I imagine her journeying toward simple
Elizabeth and doubting Zechariah. I imagine her subtle yet immaculate beauty, clothing all she encounters. I
envision St. Elizabeth overcome, the first of many saints to profess Marian devotion, “How does this happen to me,
that the Mother of my Lord should come to me?” “To ordinary me,” I imagine her implying. And I feel the same.
As an outsider looking in on the faith, before my conversion to Catholicism eight years ago, I never knew
Mary this way. I mistook her beauty by worldly definition. I imagined her as an impossible standard of feminine
perfection. I thought her immaculate brilliance and unwavering purity were towering pillars, by which all else faded.
At only eight years a Catholic, I am as much a rookie in my faith as I am in my vocation to motherhood.
Nevertheless, this much I know: Our Lady is nothing like I first expected. In her motherly embrace, beauty is always
warm and inviting, always near and attainable, never looming or aloof. She is loveliness embodied in humble
circumstances and everyday people. Her Visitation makes the simple wise, fills the empty, and turns bareness to
bloom. In her presence the ordinary appears more beautiful, never less.
Christ is transforming me; it is true. His love is always efficacious. Through sacrament and prayer he is
changing me and perfecting me. I know he will make a saint out of me if I let him, but it is slow progress, with much
work still pending.
I need Our Lady now in the meantime, while I am still so far from completion. I need her in my failings and
inadequacies. I need her delicate white petals swirling around me in gentle breeze, showering over my weeds and
wear. I need her both as a mother and to be a mother. I need her perpetual, springtime blossoms to cover me where I
lack.
Our Lady clothed in flowers, make your Visitation in my ordinary mother’s heart. Blossom where I wither; flower
where I only begin to bud; grow around me in motherhood. Wrap my imperfections in the petals of your immaculate
beauty.
10
PRINCIPAL
BY BECKY WRIGHT
My name is Becky Wright and I am the proud principal of Ascension Catholic
School. I am married to my wonderful husband, Steve, and we have three
children, Jackson, 12, Matthew, 11, and Alex, 9. We live in Eudora and are
members of Holy Family Parish. We have been “on the road” traveling to
Ascension for school for 6 years. Five years have been as Assistant Principal
and this year as the Principal. Coming from a family of seven, my Catholic
faith and education was an important part of our everyday life. I soon realized
that my educational career was destined for Catholic education. I began
teaching third grade for the Archdiocese of St. Louis. Soon after, I moved to
Kansas and started teaching for the Archdiocese of Kansas City, Kansas at St.
Paul’s in Olathe. I have been in the Archdiocese for almost 20 years either as
a teacher or administrator. I love being with the teachers and students that I
consider my second family. I must admit that celebrating my faith with the
Ascension community is one of the highlights of my position.
On the weekend and even weeknights you will find our family enjoying the outdoors camping or attending different
sporting events in both Eudora and Overland Park. People often joke that we need to buy a second home in Overland
Park for the many nights we are here late! I feel that being at Ascension is a blessing in my life and I look forward
to the many adventures that lie ahead!
ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL
BY ANDREW LEGLER
Hello! I have been honored this year to call Ascension more than just my
home parish. When my wife Lynn and I joined the Ascension parish in
2008 I never could have imagined that one day I would be coming here
every day to do what I love best, working with children and young
adults. Faith has always been an integral part of my life growing up as an
Episcopalian and so when Lynn and I got married in 2006 I wanted to
make sure that I didn’t just jump on board the Catholic ship without it
being the right time and place. That all changed though after attending a
men’s CRHP weekend where the power of the Holy Spirit led me to the Catholic church and to some of the most
amazing disciples of Christ- parishioners who I now call friends. Within days of the CRHP weekend I signed up for
RCIA and joined the Catholic community. Around that same time Lynn and I also had our first child (coincidence?)
and we began participating in different church ministries and groups. We now have two beautiful daughters and
couldn’t be happier in the Ascension community. In my professional career I had worked in several different school
districts at the Elementary level, had completed my Masters in Educational Leadership and was looking for an
Administrative job. After having a candid conversation with Fr. Tom at a Fish Fry last year it was only a short time
later that I was called and being offered a job as the new Assistant Principal of the school. It has been a true blessing
for me to be able to combine both my personal/spiritual life together with my professional career and I look forward
to many wonderful years to come!
11
A PROPHETIC MANTRA ABOUT
THE
POOR
BY RON ROLHESIER, OMI
Nobody gets to heaven without a letter of reference from the poor! That's a quote attributed to James
Forbes, an interdenominational pastor in New York City, and it wonderfully captures something that the
ancient prophets of Israel underlined many centuries ago.
The great prophets of Israel had coined this mantra: The quality of your faith will be judged by the quality
of justice in the land. And the quality of justice in the land will always be judged by how "widows, orphans,
and strangers" are faring while you are alive. That phrase, "widows, orphans, and strangers", was code for
the three weakest, most-vulnerable, groups in society at the time. For the great prophets of Israel, ultimately
we will be judged religiously and morally on the basis of how the poorest of the poor fared while we were
alive.
That's a scary thought which becomes scarier when we see how Jesus strongly endorsed that view. While
this needs to be contextualized within Jesus' message as a whole, we have in Matthew's Gospel the famous
text about the Last Judgment where Jesus tells us that, at the end of day, when we stand before the great
King on the day of judgment, we will be asked only one set of questions and they all will have to do with
how we treated the poor: Did you feed the hungry? Give drink to the thirsty? Welcome the stranger? Clothe
the naked? Visit the sick? Visit prisoners? I doubt that any of us would have the raw courage to preach
this, just as it is written in the gospels, from any pulpit today. And yet Jesus meant it. Nobody gets to
heaven without a letter of reference from the poor.
Now there's a whole series of challenges in this.
First: The demand to live lives that reflect justice and real concern for the poor is an integral and nonnegotiable part of Christian discipleship. It's not something that is grounded in some particular ideology
which I can buy into or neglect, as long as I am living honestly and prayerfully in my private life. It's an
essential part of the gospel, equal in demand to praying, going to church, and keeping my private moral-life
in order. For a Christian, it is not enough just to be pious, good, and church-going. We need too a concrete
letter of reference from the poor.
12
A PROPHETIC MANTRA ABOUT
THE
POOR
(CONTINUED)
Next: What that mantra of the prophets and Jesus' teaching on the Last Judgment also teaches is that
charity alone is not enough. Charity is a great virtue, integrally part of the greatest virtue of all, love. It
may never be downplayed. But charity isn't necessarily justice. I can be a wonderfully charitable, kind,
moral, and generous person in my own life and still be unfairly profiting from an historical, social,
political, and economic system that is unduly rewarding me even as it is unfairly burdening and robbing
others. The things that I attain honestly through my own hard work and which I am very generous with in
terms of sharing with others, can at the same time be the product of a system which is unfair to others.
Taking care of "widows, orphans, and strangers" requires not just personal goodness and charity, but
requires too that I have the courage to look at how my honest wealth may also be partially the product of a
dishonest system. Who loses while I gain?
Finally: The mantra of the prophets and the teachings of Jesus about the Last Judgment should be a
challenge to perennially scrutinize myself with the question: Am I actually reaching out to the poor? Do I
have real "orphans, widows, and strangers" in my life? Is my commitment to the poor something only in
theory, an ideal that I uphold but something that never actually impacts the poor? It is easy to pay lipservice to this ideal and it is even easier to write it into my curriculum vitae so that I look good to others
and feel good about myself. However, as Ruth Burrows asks: Does our rhetoric about the poor actually
help them or does it just help us feel better about ourselves?
I concede that these are not easy questions and we should be slow to answer them. Sometimes all we can
do is admit our helplessness. I was once at a talk given by Gustavo Gutierrez where, after the presentation,
a man stood up and, with pained honesty, shared about his own helplessness in reaching out to the poor:
What can one person do in the face of all the global issues of injustice that beset us?
Gutierrez acknowledged the complexity of the question and sympathized with the man's helplessness, but
then added: "Minimally, make sure that you always have at least one concrete poor person in your life to
who you are specially attending. This will ensure that your commitment will always at least have some
concrete flesh!"
A single letter of reference from the poor is better than no letter at all.
13
THE SOLEMNITY
OF
CORPUS CHRISTI
W
e are blessed with a very rich and meaningful Liturgical year in the Catholic Church that seeks to lead us
to a deeper more fruitful faith. On Ash Wednesday we leave ordinary time to remember that “we are
dust and to dust we shall return” and acknowledge we are the created and our Creator is an amazing and wonderful
God who loves and forgives us. Our Lenten journey ends with the paschal mystery that is the Blessed Triduum. We
sing Alleluia on Easter Sunday and praise God that He raised Jesus from the tomb. It is the story of our salvation.
The very next Sunday we celebrate Divine Mercy Sunday. What a beautiful way to express the love and grace we
have been given at Easter than by accepting the mercy God has given to us, and likewise celebrate our call to share
that mercy with everyone we meet. We don’t celebrate Easter for ourselves. Our Easter calling is to take that love,
mercy and forgiveness to the world. On the Solemnity of the Ascension (our parish feast day!) we recognize that
Jesus ascended to heaven to sit at His Father’s right hand. He sent the Holy Spirit, the paraclete as promised upon
the apostles like tongues of fire and so we celebrate Pentecost Sunday the following Sunday. Next is Trinity Sunday
where we recognize the beautiful communion of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.
The last “special” Sunday before we begin ordinary time again is the Solemnity of Corpus Christi
(Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ). Jesus ascends into Heaven, we receive his Holy Spirit
and we then celebrate this holy Eucharistic gift wrapped in mystery. We receive the very body and blood of our
Lord. He gave himself so freely in his life, death and resurrection and then he wasn’t finished! He now comes to us
every time the Sacrament of the Eucharist is celebrated. How amazing is his love for us! How wonderful that he never leaves us just as he promised he wouldn’t. He gives us his very self as often as we receive. Thanks be to God for
this wonderful culmination and celebration of the Holy Eucharist.
The next week after Corpus Christi we are back to Ordinary Time. But this time, this year, our hope is that it is
not “ordinary” or the same as all years past. This time we pray that the liturgical journey in the holy wisdom of the
Church through which we have walked, prayed, fasted, and given, turns that next Sunday after Corpus Christi into an
extraordinary experience of sharing all we have been given through the incomprehensible love to which we have
been called. May the Holy Eucharist be our strength to be Christ’s body in the world!
A few facts about the Solemnity of Corpus Christi:
• This year it falls on June 7, 2015
• The actual date falls on the Thursday after Trinity Sunday but in the US we celebrate it on the next Sunday
• Outdoor processions of the Blessed Sacrament are common in some churches as a way to celebrate Corpus
Christi. Eucharistic Exposition and Benediction are also common Corpus Christi devotional practices
in many churches
• Ignatius of Antioch (105 AD) referred to the Eucharist as the "medicine of immortality" (Ephesians 20:2)
• Ephrem the Syrian (373 AD) taught that even crumbs from the Eucharistic host could sanctify thousands and
thousands (Homilies 4,4).
The Catholic Catechism summarizes this teaching of the importance of the Eucharist: The Eucharist is "the
source and summit of the Christian life." "The other sacraments, and indeed all ecclesiastical ministries and works of
the apostolate, are bound up with the Eucharist and are oriented toward it. For in the blessed Eucharist is contained
the whole spiritual good of the Church, namely Christ himself, our Pasch" (1324).
A Short Novena for the Solemnity of Corpus Christi:
O Lord Jesus Christ, You who have given us Your precious Body and Blood to be our meat and drink, grant
that through frequent reception of You in the Holy Eucharist, I may be strengthened in mind and body to do Your
holy will. Amen. Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament, have mercy on us.
14
June 15 – 26
June 8 -12
June 21 – 26
and
July 12 – 17
August 14 - 16
June 16 - 22
June 7 – 14
Various
Camp InvenƟon
Prayer & AcƟon
Summer Mission
Trip
Kairos
Retreat 26
Mission Trip to
Guatemala
Annual Parish
Garage Sale
MANY, MANY
Service
OpportuniƟes
June 1 – 5
VacaƟon Bible
School
Summer School
of Religion (SOR)
Dates
Activity
$35
$110
4 year olds— 5th grade
(need older students &
parent volunteers)
Incoming 1st,
3 through 6th grade
Everyone!
Everyone to volunteer or
shop!
Adults & teens with
parent
N/A
N/A
$1200
(includes
airfare)
$100
$200
Gradua ng 8th grade
through gradua ng
Seniors
Incoming Juniors through
gradua ng Seniors
$220
Open to all Incoming 1st
through 6th grade
rd
Cost
Who
See Website for
Details
More details
coming
Now!
681-3348
Register by
August 1st
Taking names for
wai ng list and
looking for
chaperones
Now!
Now!
Now! AM & PM
Sessions
Registration
www.Archkck.org/
prayerandac onkc
or 681-7683
[email protected]
Campinven on.org or
or 851-2531
[email protected]
kcascension.org/2015-summersor-registra on/
or 681-7683
kcascension.org/
summer-programs/
or 681-7683
For More Information
Various
Ascension
Lower Level
San Lucas
Toliman &
Xecocol
kcascension.org/getinvolved/serviceopportuni es
Check kcascension.org for more
details
kcascension.org/interna onalmissions-mission-trip-2015/
Ascension /
kcascension.org/Kairos/
Savior Pastoral or 681-7683
Center
[email protected]
Atchison, KS
Ascension
Ascension
Ascension
Location
There are many ac vi es occurring throughout the parish for ages 4+. All we need is YOU!
Summer at Ascension
C P F E A R O F T H E L O R D E R
H N S T U B A M O D S
O E D U T
I
I W E Y Y A
T R O F B U H S T R P
L T C N W R C H R I S T I F E G I
Y H O D E T O M N R L S T K I J T
S G R E L H U U S E L T S O P A S
P N A R V D N V C D G F U J
I
E S S E A S A W R T
R R E T F Y E B Y
I
T U A R C L
R K O
I N L E N C
I N G D M A O E
F E H J
T S G N U S A N C T
I
L A K C W T
F Y O H L N
W P N D
I
G E O I
T P C O R T N E C S E D P
A E N A B L E V P O E E
A A T N S E P T G C H U R C H G R
D K D G N S E V E N G I F T S E T
Apostles
Fearo heLord
Pentecost
Strengthen
Birthday
Fire
Piety
Third
Christ
For tude
Preach
Tongues
Church
Gi s
Red
TwelveFruits
Counsel
Grace
Sanc fy
Understanding
Descent
HolySpirit
SevenGi s
WhitSunday
Enable
Knowledge
Speak
Wisdom