…The Finial… Volume 21/03 January/February 2011

…The Finial…
ISSN 1742-156X
Where Sold £8.50
Volume 21/03
January/February 2011
‘The Silver Spoon Club’
OF GREAT BRITAIN
___________________________________________________________________________
26 Burlington Arcade, Mayfair, London. W1J 0PU
Tel: 020 7491 1720
Fax: 020 7491 1730
V.A.T. No. 658 1470 21
www.bexfield.co.uk/thefinial
E-mail: [email protected]
Hon. President: Anthony Dove F.S.A.
Editor: Daniel Bexfield
Photography: Matthew Raymond
& Oliver Newton
Volume 21/03
January/February 2011
CONTENTS
Macaroni servers – an American speciality by Miles Harrison
1739-1755 London hallmarking by David McKinley
Museu da Quinta das Cruzes by Cathy Chivers
A piece of Carden Terry’s personal flatware by Trevor Downes
A brief review of three Scottish Sales by Mr M.
The Auchentorlie spoon
Feedback
Results for the Club Postal Auction – 16th December 2010
The Club Postal Auction
The next postal auction – Thursday 14th April 2011
Postal auction information
-o-o-o-o-o-oCOVER
•
A Cork Silver Fiddle Pattern Tablespoon, with Dublin Hallmarks For 1807
By Joseph Kinselagh of Cork
Retailed by John Whelply of Cork
See: The Postal Auction, Lot 65, page 19
-o-o-o-o-o-o-
Yearly Subscription to The Finial
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In PDF format by email - £30.00
-o-o-o-o-o-oThe Finial is the illustrated journal of The Silver Spoon Club of Great Britain
Published by Daniel Bexfield Antiques
26 Burlington Arcade, Mayfair, London, W1J 0PU.
Tel: 020 7491 1720
Fax: 020 7491 1730
Email: [email protected]
All views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of The Finial.
.2.
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Macaroni Servers – An American Speciality?
By Miles Harrison
From the 1850s onwards one finds references in American silver catalogues and American patent documents
to silver macaroni servers, knives, forks and spoons. All four terms refer to more or less the same object: a
nine to ten inch utensil with a slightly concave and partly serrated blade/bowl.
Please go to our Order Form to purchase a complete copy of this Finial
References
•
Cramer, Diana; Macaroni Servers: Knives, Spoons and Forks; Silver; Jan-Feb 1992.
•
Holmes, Colin; John Bull's Island: Immigration and British Society, 1871-1971; 1988.
Macaroni server, Towel catalogue, 1905.
Macaroni server, Reed & Barton catalogue, 1911.
.3.
1739 – 1755 London Hallmarking Cycle Research
By David McKinley
Further to my article on this subject in the May/June, page 12, issue of The Finial, I would like to
thank David Whitbread, Michael Baggott and Malcolm Rice for their e-mail correspondence and
Richard Stagg for his contribution and excellent picture in the July/August issue. As promised, here
are my findings resulting from all this input which, I am afraid, are as yet not conclusive.
I have now had the chance to examine the marks on several cauldron salts, a caster, a bun pepper,
tablespoons, a porringer, a salver and a cream pail and have been given information on tablespoons,
dessert
spoons,
a
caster
and
a
sauce
ladle.
The
dates
involved
are
1740/43/44/45/46/47/48/49/51/52/53/54 and 55. In each case the lion is not top indented whereas,
as shown in my introductory article it was so treated in 1755 on a cauldron salt.
As I have already stated there appears to be some controversy about the year, or years, in which the
outline to the lion in the London date cycle 1739 to 1755 was top indented. David Shlosberg, in his
book on tea tongs, makes the following statement: “It used to be thought that there were two
distinct shapes for the punch - one from 1739 to 1750 and the second from 1751 to 1755. However,
research undertaken by the Wine Label Society has shown that the latter was simply a variant of the
first”1. My own findings, however, lead me to believe that the problem is a little more complicated
than would appear from the findings of the Wine Label Society. Jackson identified 1751/2 as the
only year in which this feature is exhibited but I have not been able to establish this by observation.
In fact the only year in which I have observed this feature is 1755/6 although, as can be seen, I have
not as yet been able to examine items of plate for every year in this cycle. As I have seen marks for
1751/2, which do not exhibit this feature I am led to the conclusion that reference to Jackson can be
misleading and I must confess that I can offer no explanation for this.
There are two difficulties with this research; firstly I find myself at variance with Jackson, which I
find confusing, and secondly, as stated in my previous article, I cannot refer to the records at
Goldsmiths’ Hall to clarify things since no record of the punches used, other than the date letters,
was kept until 1760.
Richard also draws attention to the punch outline to the leopard’s head, which is very clear on his
porringer of 1754 and is also discernable on the bun pepper of the same date which I examined, that
appears to differ from the norm as shown in Jackson. I have to confess that most of the leopard’s
head marks for this cycle that I have examined have either been too distorted or too rubbed to come
to any conclusion about their outlines but I notice that the quadruple peaked leopard’s head, which
Richard refers to as ‘standard’, is shown in an early edition of Jackson, like the top indented lion, as
relating to 1751 although in the case of this mark it is shown as being used in the following years as
well. A footnote reads: “Although a punch for the leopard’s head mark different in form from that
of 1739-40 was used between 1751 and 1756, its use was not entirely general, …….” In this
connection I have to report that the only clear evidence I have so far found for this feature relates to
the isolated years 1740, 1753 and 1755 and it is clear from Richard’s picture and the bun pepper
mentioned here that it was not a feature of the 1754 leopard’s head punch.
It seems that, without the ability to examine every single item of plate still extant that was marked
during this period, some confusion concerning the leopard’s head mark must remain unresolved. I
am led to the belief, however that the reasons for creating alternative punches for the leopard’s head
were not the same as those concerning the lion and that the dates relating to each do not therefore
conform. Although I can show that there were specific years in which alternative punches were
used, there is not enough evidence to be able to be categorical about which years these were or on
which items of plate they were used. In the case of the lion however I have to say that 1755 is the
.4.
only year in which I have observed a top indented punch outline and although I can offer no
explanation for the use of variant leopard’s head punches I can offer a possible explanation for the
use of a top indented lion if, in fact, 1755 proves to be the only year in which it was used.
During the period 1739 to 1754 Thomas Long was the Company’s engraver and he was therefore
responsible for introducing the new indented punches on 18th July 1739. However Long died in
1754 and the Company engaged an engraver by the name of Henry Yates to take his place.
Therefore it was Yates who made the punches for 1755. Unfortunately for Yates, The Company
found his work to be of indifferent quality; “......And it being observed that the marks of late have
been engraved in a very ordinary manner,………”2 and sought to engage the services of the well
established engraver and medal maker Thomas Pingo in his stead; “……the Court ordered that Mr.
Thomas Pingo do engrave Two Sizes of each of the marks......”3. Pingo produced trial punches for
1756 which were approved by the Company and he was engaged as their engraver accordingly.
Pingo therefore took over from Yates in 1756 for which year he produced punches, which under
instruction from the Company, had a completely different outline from those of the previous cycle
so that the last year in which the indented outline punches were produced was 1755.
My theory is that Yates wanted to differentiate between the punches he had made and those made
by his predecessor, Long, and the indenting of the upper surface of the lion outline was the method
he chose. Thus 1755 would have been the only year in which there were lions that did have this
distinctive feature. That there were flat topped lions also used in this year (on a caster and the sauce
ladle) presumably indicates that the punches were 1754 punches which were considered to be still
in sufficiently good condition that they could be used in 1755.
If I’m right in this, and I suppose only time and further observation will tell, then any teaspoon, tea
strainer (mote) spoon, sugar nips, condiment spoon and the like that is struck with a top indented
lion can safely be dated to 1755. All comments and observations by fellow members will be most
welcome even if they blow my theory out of the water!
Acknowledgements
I am indebted to The Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths for allowing me research facilities and to reproduce extracts
from their records.
Notes
1. Dr. David Shlosberg - Eighteenth Century Silver Tea Tongs - p96.
2. Court Book 16. 8th April 1756. p69.
3. Ibid
-o-o-o-o-o-o-
Museu da Quinta das Cruzes
An Unexpected Delight
By Cathy Chivers
On a recent visit to Funchal in Madeira we visited the gracious Madeiran mansion, built on the site where the
first ruler Joao Zarco had his home, Museu da Quinta das Cruzes, (Mansion of the Crosses). In the 17th
century it became the elegant home of the Lomelino family and is now a museum full of antiques and fine
art. In their dark blue, purposely designed, air conditioned basement there is a rich collection of historic
silver. Room 17 houses Portuguese and European/English Goldsmiths from 16th to 19th centuries. The pieces
come from bequests by Cesar Gomes (1946) and Joao Wetzler (1966) and illustrate the diversity in silver
production over that time. Notable are two silver and coral English babies rattles, silver and ebony Mexican
slave figures. There are standing cups with covers, tankards and coffee pots as well as spoons and fine
ecclesiastical objects.
Overall there are more than 200 silver pieces. The rest of the Museum houses furniture, pictures, ceramics,
etc. set in a stunning location overlooking the town and surrounded by a delightful garden with teahouse. It
is well worth a visit.
.5.
A Piece of Carden Terry’s Personal Flatware
By Trevor Downes
I recently acquired this pickle fork from an online auction. The seller, fortunately for me, had not
provided clear images for their listing, but as a lover of Irish Georgian silver, I could see enough to
make my heart thump, for, unless a set of marks had completely worn away, then this fork bore
only the maker’s mark of Carden Terry and Jane Williams of Cork. Could this possibly be a piece
of personal flatware owned by the Terry family? Similar examples of silverware struck with the
maker’s mark only and for the personal use of the silversmith can be seen on the Chawner family’s
flatware (see Ian Pickford’s Silver Flatware p.33).
My bid was successful and a few days later I took delivery of what was to prove a most interesting
item. A close inspection revealed no trace of any previous marking, neither that of official Dublin
hallmarks or the Cork ‘Sterling’ mark, just the ‘CT’ over ‘IM’ maker's mark.
Now, I’m the eternal optimist, and being aware of that fact, I started to think of all the reasons that
may have caused me, by wishful thinking, to maybe jump to the wrong conclusion. I first wondered
if such a piece would have been made and in use at Cork at this time. This fear was allayed by
finding two similar examples, one by Samuel Reily that was exhibited at the ‘Four Centuries of
Craftsmanship’ exhibition at Cork in 2005, and another by Terry & Williams themselves that was
assayed at Dublin in 1813.
The next seed of doubt that entered my head was the possibility that this piece may have been
intended for assay at Dublin and was perhaps lost or stolen en route or even possibly that the
customer who had ordered the fork had suddenly had need for his order and persuaded Terry to part
with the fork without having to wait for the undoubted delay that the journey to Dublin would have
caused.
.6.
Please go to our Order Form to purchase a complete copy of this Finial
-o-o-o-o-o-o.7.
A Brief Review of Three Scottish Sales
By Mr M.
Snow, Ice and more Snow!
Unfortunately I was unable to either view or attend the three sales in Edinburgh at the end of
November and the beginning of December. The reason for this, as you probably saw in the media,
being the weather around Edinburgh and the central belt of Scotland was extremely bad. Roads
blocked and extremely low temperatures.
Lyon & Turnbull Sale, Edinburgh – 30th November
There was only one lot of provincial silver in this sale, a Forres toddy ladle (Fig. 1), matching one
sold there in the August sale. Comparing the photos of the marks it would appear that they were
better on this ladle. This was reflected in the price attained being £2,200 compared with the
previous example of £2,100. Members may be interested to know that the Commonwealth silvergilt slip top spoon in that sale did not sell.
Fig. 1
Thomson Roddick Sale of Provincial Silver – 2nd December
With only between fifty and sixty lots of provincial silver, including Glasgow, I would suggest that
this was the smallest offering that has been seen at these bi-annual sales. The obvious highlight of
this sale was a Wick toddy ladle by John Sellar (Lot 81). As expected it attained the highest price of
£1,100. An interesting two Lots 93 & 94 were a matching pair of teaspoons, which sold for £230
each. A good price for teaspoons as long as you know to whom and where this mark can be
attributed!
Bonhams Edinburgh Silver Sale – 8th December
There appeared to be no obvious reportable items amongst the few lots of provincial silver.
However there were a couple of items of Edinburgh flatware that may merit a mention.
Lot 581 (Fig. 2): This set of six mid 18th century dog nose tablespoons sold for £550 against an
estimate of £4-600. Possibly a higher price may have been attained (not knowing their condition) if
they had had a contemporary crest/monogram?
Lot 589 (Fig. 3): From the catalogue photo this matched set of six Queen Anne table forks looked in
reasonable condition but the marks did look as if they were worn. They also had a later monogram.
They sold at £1500 against an estimate of £2-3000.
Fig. 2
Fig. 3
-o-o-o-o-o-o.8.
The Auchentorlie Spoon
Sells For £28,800.00 at Dreweatts Bloomsbury
1st December 2010
Catalogue Description
The Auchentorlie Spoon, an extremely rare and important mid 17th century Scottish silver slip-top spoon by Alexander
Scott, Edinburgh, deacon Andrew Burrell, the back of the bowl inscribed 'M' over 'AA' and 'M' over 'MA', 17.1cm
(6.8in) long, 56g (1.8 oz) With Scott's mark nearest to the bowl it is most probable he was the maker and that Andrew
Burrell was the deacon. He was deacon for 1653-1655 and 1659-61. Scott was deacon himself from 1667 to 1669. This
then covers the end of the Commonwealth and beginning of Charles II's reign. See How 'English and Scottish Silver
Spoons' Vol. II, London 1953, p. 350/1. See also Dalgleish & Fothringham 'Silver: Made in Scotland', National
Museum of Scotland exhibition 2008, catalogue p. 45 where the authors note: 'There are five different patterns of spoon
in Scotland before the introduction of the trefid after the Restoration: seal-top; disc-end, puritan; slip-top and box-top,
there being only a single surviving example of the last two.' Also on p. 51 where the (previously) only known example
is illustrated, cat. no. 3.45, by Gilbert Kirkwood, Edinburgh 1608-10 (lent from a private collection at Mount Stuart).
The 'Bute collection' example from Mount Stuart however is of French type with a lozenge section stem. Provenance:
The Ferguson-Buchanan Family of Auchentorlie, Nr Bowling, Dunbartonshire (they lived at Auchentorlie from the
early 1800s until the house was demolished in the 1970s); by direct descent to the present vendor. According to
information supplied from the family, this spoon originally came from Auchentorlie House, Dunbartonshire. The initials
on the back of the spoon would suggest that it probably entered into the family through a marriage and further research
may bring to light the original owners of the spoon.
The stem is strong, widening towards the finial to 24 mm circumference from 20mm at the base of the stem. The line of
the stem slightly misshapen about the punches caused by the strike. Minor nicks and scratches on the side of the stem.
Burrell's mark is struck 4 cm up the stem, the top LH corner slightly obscured, a gap of 4mm between his mark and the
town mark, which is slightly obscured and off set. There is a gap of 6mm between the latter mark and Scott's, whose is a
little rubbed but still clear. The bowl is of a good and relatively even gauge, although appears slightly thicker on the
right hand shoulder (as viewed from the back). There is no thinning at the lip of the spoon. There is a small pinhead
dent 18 mm into the drop of the bowl and three other very minor ones about, possibly tooth marks, otherwise the inside
of the bowl with light scuffs and scratches commensurate with age. The back of the bowl is clean of any dents or flaws
except for expected light areas of pitting.
.9.
Feedback
Anne Graham responds: What a delight to open December’s Finial to read Jurgen Beyer’s article
Andrea Sperl – Maker of Captain’s Spoons, page 9 – 11, and many thanks to him for his dedicated
research revealing the identity of the Pernau silversmith Andreas Sperl.
It was very interesting to read how Jurgen had traced Andreas Sperl from his arrival from Turku, his
marriage, his move to the countryside to run a large dairy farm, hard work I imagine, and his return
perhaps for retirement.
Andreas Sperl died in 1841 at the age of 71. This would suggest that my Pernau spoon dated 1839,
by the prick-dot script alone1, was made much earlier as it seems doubtful he was still
silversmithing at the age of 69. Jurgen’s article quotes Hamran as suggesting that each firm used a
special design for its spoons, which remained unchanged for a long period even if another
silversmith started to produce them. Maybe the ship broking firm placed orders in dozens in order
to have a supply on hand. Walter Brown’s Sperl Pernau forks2 must be earlier than he has
provisionally dated them and I look forward to reading his comments.
I agree with Jurgen that it is unlikely these spoons were handed out as bribes or rewards, their value
was insufficient for that purpose, and all the spoons I have handled are very lightweight. In part, I
agree that these were promotional gifts, but far superior to the ballpoint pen example. I think these
spoons were given by the shipbrokers to establish a friendship, over and above commercial
payment, to the Captains who were entrusted with the responsibility of precious cargoes.
Dutch museums in the Groningen area have numerous examples of captains’ spoon which can be
viewed on line and some of the silver internet forums (or fora) discuss them. It seems to be mainly
Dutch captains who collected the spoons to take home although occasionally mention is made of
Danish recipients as well.
Henrik Hachmer’s charming book Greetings from Riga3 outlines the history of trade between the
Dutch and Baltic countries and has a chapter devoted to Captains’ spoons. Interestingly it shows the
engraving on a spoon given by the ship broking firm Jacob Jacke in 1843, two years after Sperl’s
death, and four years after my spoon’s date. This one bears the maker’s name of J. Nagel4 so
presumably the batch made by Sperl had by then run out.
A Baltic holiday calls reading the records of Jacob Jacke to try to establish the identity of ‘RJB’ on
the front of my Pernau spoon – these initials are in prick-dot writing, which I believe peculiar to the
Baltic regions, so perhaps his name is in the ledgers somewhere.
Notes
1. The Finial March/April 2010 – A captain’s spoon from Pernau?
2. The Finial November/December 2008 : Collecting Russian flatware.
3. ISBN 978-90-77548-50-9.
4. Johan Diedrich Nagel (1840-1894).
-o-o-o-o-o-oKirkpatrick Dobie writes: In the current edition of The Finial (Nov/Dec ’10, A Path Through The
Thistles by Laurence Joyce, page 4 & 5) there is mention of William Craw who was a silversmith in
Dumfries 1769-1798. Below is an extract from the Tailors minute book of 1773, which may be
worth printing.
‘John Taylor, no connection in the trade, working in the house of William Craw, silversmith, in
Dumfries at making some cloake for him particular turning an old coat which by the power
committed to them, they seized in the name of the incorporation’.
-o-o-o-o-o-o.10.
Michael Baggott emails some feedback: I was delighted to read Richard’s article in The Finial
(Nov/Dec ’10, York: Edward Jackson by Richard Jonas, page 8) and must congratulate him on the
discovery of an example of Jackson’s mark alongside the gothic ‘d’ date letter. I certainly have not
observed another example (though one hopes another will turn up). I'm so pleased that the
transcription of the Assay Office Ledger is proving useful, not just a dusty relic!
It’s not surprising that the gothic letter ‘d’ punch was used in 1817, it is not unusual to find date
letters (particularly in the 1800–20 period) running on a little in use, the only conclusion being that
the date letter changed with very little regularity. Another example of this happening can be seen in
a pair of muffineers bearing the gothic ‘a’ for 1812-4, though they were submitted for assay on 13th
February 1815 (York Hallmarks, page 84).
Also on a related but slightly different tack: Recently a pair of butter shells or ‘escallop shells’ as
they are referred to in the Assay Ledger, have turned up on the open market, sadly the dealers who
had them had sold them before an image of the marks could be obtained and the new owner wishes
not to have them reproduced. However what is fascinating and instructive is that they bore the
seldom seen maker’s mark of Robert Cattle. They were not part of the single parcel submitted by
him at the end of 1807 (until now the only pieces thought to bear his single ‘RC’ mark). The first
entry for escallop shells is the first entry for the partnership of Cattle and Barber on the 27th
December 1807 (page17 of the Assay Office Ledger), clearly illustrating that upon the change of
partnership a new mark wasn’t immediately produced and that some or all of the wares in this first
early parcel will bear the ‘RC’ only maker’s mark of Robert Cattle.
Note: if any member does know of the whereabouts of these pieces or other distinctive ‘RC’ marked
wares and can supply an image of the item and marks please do not hesitate to let me know.
-o-o-o-o-o-o-
N. & I. FRANKLIN
Fine Antique Silver
The Longleat Salts
A magnificent & sculptural pair of Victorian silver salt cellars
Made by Royal silversmith Robert Garrard of London in 1853
Height: 5 1/4 inches Weight: 75 oz
11 Bury Street, St. James’s, London SW1Y 6AB
Tel: 020 7839 3131
[email protected] [email protected]
www.franklinsilver.com
.11.
Results for the Club Postal Auction
16th December 2010
Please note that the results price does not include the 10% buyer’s premium.
Lot
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
19.
20.
21.
22.
24.
25.
26.
27.
31.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
Result £
16.00
35.50
28.00
10.00
17.50
27.00
5.00
21.00
6.00
12.50
26.50
8.50
11.50
47.50
75.00
51.00
26.50
20.50
20.50
56.00
13.00
275.00
45.50
23.00
13.00
205.00
172.50
220.00
180.00
441.00
50.00
15.00
42.00
10.00
89.00
20.50
17.00
45.00
21.50
Lot
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
59.
60.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
70.
71.
72.
73.
74.
79.
80.
81.
83.
84.
85.
86.
88.
89.
90.
91.
93.
94.
95.
Result £
Lot
96.
97.
99.
100.
101.
102.
103.
104.
105.
107.
108.
109.
110.
111.
112.
113.
114.
115.
116.
117.
118.
119.
121.
122.
125.
126.
131.
132.
133.
134.
135.
136.
137.
138.
139.
140.
141.
143.
145.
25.50
11.00
10.00
11.00
26.00
15.00
13.00
14.00
24.00
66.00
63.50
42.50
25.50
35.50
15.50
17.50
21.00
20.00
57.00
45.50
230.00
19.50
15.50
191.50
337.50
30.00
9.00
9.00
9.50
8.50
57.50
35.50
220.00
24.50
21.00
95.00
57.50
17.50
15.00
Result £
20.00
30.00
16.50
25.00
18.50
50.00
20.50
36.50
107.50
176.50
21.00
20.00
297.50
521.50
47.50
15.00
60.00
58.00
10.00
20.00
42.00
27.00
40.00
65.00
43.00
78.00
6.00
45.00
30.00
32.50
135.00
23.00
25.00
12.50
15.00
15.00
13.00
150.00
68.00
Lot
146.
147.
148.
150.
151.
152.
153.
154.
158.
159.
160.
164.
165.
166.
167.
168.
169.
170.
171.
172.
174.
175.
176.
178.
179.
180.
181.
182.
183.
Result £
63.00
98.50
60.50
38.00
160.00
446.00
43.50
45.00
53.50
37.50
26.00
83.00
462.50
50.00
18.00
26.00
29.50
28.50
19.00
18.50
31.50
135.00
157.50
93.00
265.00
265.50
65.00
45.00
195.00
-o-o-o-o-o-oMembers are invited to submit their Lots (max. 10) for the next postal auction by posting or
delivering by hand up until the 10th February. Please provide clearly a numbered list and
comprehensive description, if possible, of your various Lots, remembering to note all relevant facts
such as makers, dates and interesting features etc. and reserve. Also please clearly state your name,
address and telephone number. Please never intentionally submit repaired, damaged, burnished or
mediocre items, as such will not sell.
.12.
‘The Silver Spoon Club’
OF GREAT BRITAIN
___________________________________________________________________________
26 Burlington Arcade, Mayfair, London. W1J 0PU
Tel: 020 7491 1720
V.A.T. No. 658 1470 21
Fax: 020 7491 1730
www.bexfield.co.uk/thefinial
E-mail: [email protected]
POSTAL AUCTION
(For members and subscribers only)
To take place on Thursday 10th February 2010
Your written, email or faxed bids are invited for the following lots – bids to be with us, please, by no later
than 12.00pm, on the day of sale. Please note that purchase prices are subject to a 10% buyers premium, plus
VAT on the premium and £6.00 for U.K. postage & packing per consignment, see page 35 for details.
Members are welcome to come and view the lots on offer at 26 Burlington Arcade (if you are making a special journey, please do
check availability with us first to avoid disappointment).
Lot 1
•
Lot 2
Lot 3
Lot 4
Lot 5
Lot 6
Please note: due to the weight of some books the postage, packing & insurance has been individually priced as opposed to the
normal single cost of £6.00 per parcel, or, as always, they can be collected from Burlington Arcade. (Postage shown is within
the UK, for overseas we can arrange separately).
Lot
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Lot 7
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
Description
Reserve
Book: Fairbairn’s Book of Crests, Revised and Enlarged, 2 Volumes, Hardback, 1905, pp 759 & 314 plates.
(Post £32.00). ~ Est. £200-250.
Book: Hester Bateman, Queen of English Silversmiths by David S. Shure. Hardback, DJ, 1959, pp 206. (post
£12.00). Est. £75-100.
Book: English Goldsmiths and Their Marks, by Sir Charles Jackson. Hardback, DJ, 1964, pp 747. (Post
£18.00). Est. £20-30.
Book: Investing In Silver by Eric Delieb. Paperback, 1970, pp 158. (Post £8.00). Est. £20-30.
Catalogue: The Chen Collection – Part 1, 23rd November 2008 by Lyon & Turnbull. Paperback, pp 359. (Post
£12). Est. £15-25.
Book: Old Scottish Communion Plate by Thomas Burns. Hardback, 1892, pp 651. ~ signed & numbered by
author. (Post £12.00). Est. £60-80.
Lot 8
Lot 9
Lot 10
Lot 11
Lot 12
£50
£10
£10
£8
£40
Lot 13
Trade Catalogue: Walker & Hall Ltd, Sheffield and Branches. Hardback, circa 1935, pp 176. (Post £6.00).
Est. £50-75.
Book: The Sheffield Assay Office Register by Sheffield Assay Office. Hardback, 1911, pp 129. (Post £6.00).
Est. £25-45.
Book: The Insignia and Plate of the City of Westminster. Hardback, 1931, pp 25. Est. £25-45.
Exhibition Catalogue: Chester Silver, The Grosvenor Museum. Paperback, 1984, pp168. (post £6) £10-20
Catalogues: Bound copy of the Ellis catalogue. Hardback, 1935. pp 205. ~ with signed letter from How of
Edinburgh. (Post £6.00). Est. £100-125.
Catalogue: Beckford and Hamilton Silver from Brodick Castle. Paperback, 1980, pp 92. Est. £15-25.
Book: Omar Ramsden, 1873-1939 by K.B. Barton. Paperback, 1973, pp 84. Est. £35-65.
.13.
£70
£40
£20
£4
£5
£90
£5
£5
Lot 14
Lot
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
Lot 15
Lot 16
Lot 17
Lot 18
Lot 19
Description
Book: George Wickes, Royal Goldsmith 1698-1761 by Elaine Barr. Hardback, DJ, 1980, pp 210. (Post
£12.00). Est. £35-65.
Exhibition catalogue: Silver and the Church, to mark the 1400th anniversary of the Diocese of London by
Timothy Schroder. Paperback, 2004, pp 48. Est. £15-25.
Exhibition catalogue: Church Plate in England: Treasures of the English Church 2008 & Silver and the
Church 2004. Paperback, 2009, pp 104. Est. £15-25.
Exhibition catalogue: Silver Treasures from English Churches. Paperback, 1955, pp 76. Est. £20-40.
Book: Anglican Church Plate by James Gilchrist. Hardback, DJ, 1967, pp 120. (Post £6.00). Est. £15-25.
Book: Old English Plate by Wilfred Joseph Cripps. Hardback, DJ, 1968, pp 540. (Post £8.00). Est. £10-20.
Reserve
£20
£5
£5
£10
£10
£5
Scottish silver Unknown pattern basting spoon, Glasgow 1861 by ‘MS&B’?. L-30.3cm; W-120g. ~ minor
wear to bowl tip and marks, otherwise reasonable condition. Est. £100-140.
£90
Birmingham, George III silver Old English Shell-back pattern tablespoon, 1776, by Edward Sawyer. L20.5cm; W-51g. ~ bowl and shell worn, otherwise reasonable condition. Est. £90-100.
£90
Silver Old English pattern patent mint sauce ladle, London 1936 by Josiah Wiliams & Co. L-12.5cm; W-35g.
~ reasonable marks and condition. Est. £55-75.
£45
Georgian silver Picture-front & Shell-back Hanoverian pattern teaspoon, circa 1760 by ‘IS’. ~ wear to bowl
tip and mark, otherwise good gauge and condition. Est. £40-60.
£40
24.
Georgian silver marrow scoop, circa 1810, not marked. L-16.9cm; W-13g. ~ good condition. Est. £60-80.
£30
25.
Georgian silver & mother of pearl pocket fruit knife, circa 1770, not marked. L-15cm (open). ~ crack to both
pieces of mother of pearl, otherwise good condition. Est. £40-60.
£40
Victorian silver Princess No.2 pattern table fork, London 1849 by George Adams. L-21.2cm; W-99g. ~ good
weight, tines, marks and condition. Est. £60-80.
£50
21.
22.
23.
26.
.14.
Lot
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
Description
Reserve
Victorian silver Grecian pattern child’s fork, London 1858 by George Adams. L-15.3cm; W-34g. ~ good
marks and condition. Est. £25-45.
£18
Victorian silver Queens pattern child’s fork, London 1876 by Henry & Henry Lias. L-15cm; W-31g. ~ good
marks and condition. Est. £25-45.
£18
Victorian silver Unknown pattern child’s fork, London 1856 by Elizabeth Eaton. L-14.6cm; W-28g. ~ good
marks and condition. Est. £25-45.
£18
York, silver Old English pattern tablespoon, 1810 by Robert Cattle & James Barber. L-21.6cm; W-58g. ~
good marks and condition. Est. £75-95.
£65
Scottish silver Old English pattern tablespoon, Glasgow c.1780 by Robert Gray. L-21.6cm; W-67g. ~ small
minor soft dent to bowl, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £65-85.
£55
George III silver Hanoverian pattern tablespoon, London 1769 by Robert Swanson. L-20.7cm; W-60g. ~
good marks and condition. Est. £65-85.
£55
Pair of American silver Basket-front & Shell-back Fiddle pattern teaspoons, New York c. 1830 by Jared L.
Moore. L-13.6cm; W-26g. ~ soft knocks to bowls, wear to pictures, otherwise reasonable. Est. £40-50.
£40
Set of 6 George III silver Bright-cut Old English pattern teaspoons, London c. 1775 by George Smith. L13cm; W-97g. ~ good gauge, marks and condition, very pleasing set. Est. £125-150.
£100
William IV silver Scroll Rosette pattern teaspoon, London 1833 by William Eaton. L-14.5cm; W-36g. ~ good
gauge, marks and condition. Est. £25-35.
£20
.15.
Lot
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
Description
Reserve
Irish silver Fiddle pattern tablespoon, Dublin 1820 by J. Buckton. L-22.6cm; W-56g. ~ good marks,
reasonable condition. Est. £35-55.
£35
George II silver Hanoverian pattern tablespoon, London 1739 by James Wilks. L-20.5cm; W-73g. ~ couple of
small soft knocks to bowl, otherwise good gauge, marks and condition. Est. £60-90.
£40
George II silver Hanoverian pattern tablespoon, London 1731 by ‘I.S’. L-21g. W-59g. ~ very minor knock to
bowl, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £45-75.
£35
Portuguese silver Old English pattern tablespoon, Oporto c.1790 by ‘RC’ or ‘PC’. L-22.3cm; W-56g. ~ dent
to bowl, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £40-60.
£40
Chinese Export silver Fiddle, Thread & Shell pattern teaspoon, circa 1820 by Cum Shing. L-13.9cm; W-31g.
~ wear to shell & bowl tip, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £25-35.
£20
George III silver ‘Falstaff’ pattern table fork, London 1780 by George Smith. L-19.2cm; W-59g. ~ date letter
worn, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £45-65.
£40
George I silver Hanoverian Rattail pattern tablespoon, London 1724 by James Wilks. L-19.8cm; W-46g. ~
good marks, reasonable condition. Est. £75-95.
£75
Aberdeen silver Old English pattern dessert spoon, circa 1830 by James Begg. L-16.5cm; W-22g. ~ bowl a
little battered, marks a little worn, otherwise reasonable. Est. £40-50.
£40
Victorian silver Bright-cut Old English pattern tablespoon, London 1844 by William Eaton. L-20.7cm; W55g. ~ presumably made to match earlier example, good bowl, decoration, marks and condition. Est. £45-65.
£38
.16.
Lot
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
Description
Reserve
Exeter silver Feather-edge pattern teaspoon, circa 1775 by Thomas Eustace. L-13.3cm; W-13g. ~ small knock
to bowl, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £20-30.
£10
George III silver Double-headed Eagle picture-back pattern teaspoon, London c.1770 by ‘G.S’. L-11.8cm; W12g. ~ some wear to picture but easily seen, some wear & knocks to bowl, reasonable condition. Est. £35-55.
£10
George III silver single-struck Fiddle & Thread pattern dessert spoon, London 1812 by Mary & Elizabeth
Sumner. L-17.4cm; W-42g. ~ good marks and condition. Est. £25-35.
£15
Silver ‘H.K.C.B.A’ (Hong Kong Colony Bridge Association) cocktail spoon, circa 1930. L-19.1cm; W-17g. ~
only marked ‘Silver’, good condition. Est. £30-50.
£20
Pair of silver ‘Rifle Club’ teaspoons, Birmingham 1911 & 1912, by Elkington & Co. L-11.1cm; W-30g. ~
good marks and condition. Est. £30-50.
£28
Silver ‘Society Miniature Rifle Clubs’ teaspoon, Sheffield 1924 by W. Turner. L-11.2cm; W-15g. ~ good
marks and condition. Est. £20-30.
£15
Silver ‘Portsmouth & H.MS Victory’ teaspoon, Birmingham 1915 by ‘?.S’ or ‘S.?’ L-10.4cm; W-11g. ~
maker’s mark worn, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £25-35.
£20
Edwardian silver ‘Lower Stoft Harbour’ teaspoon, Birmingham 1902 by Levi & Salaman. L-11.3cm; W14g. ~ good marks and condition. Est. £25-35.
£15
Victorian silver ‘Folkestone’ teaspoon, Birmingham 1899 by T.H. Hazelwood & Co. L-11.7cm; W-10g. ~
maker’s mark worn, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £20-30.
£12
.17.
Lot
54.
Description
Reserve
Pair of Victorian silver Grecian pattern salt spoons, London 1885 by J. Aldwinkle & T. Slater. L-10.6cm; W39g. ~ good gauge, marks and condition. Est. £35-65.
£30
55.
Continental .830 silver sugar tongs, circa 1920. L-9.1cm; W-16g. ~ good marks and condition. Est. £25-30.
£15
56.
Edwardian silver Queens pattern teaspoon, Sheffield 1903 by John Round. L-13.2cm; W-30g. ~ thick gauge,
good marks and condition. Est. £20-30.
£19
Edwardian silver Kings pattern teaspoon, Sheffield 1903 by John Round. L-13.7cm; W-34g. ~ thick gauge,
good marks and condition. Est. £20-30.
£19
German silver Fiddle pattern tablespoon, Hamburg c.1825. L-23.5cm; W-69g. ~ good bowl, reasonable marks,
excellent condition. Est. £45-65.
£34
Exeter silver Fiddle pattern tablespoon, 1816 by ‘Joseph Hicks’. L-23.6cm; W-64g. ~ wear to bowl tip,
otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £45-65.
£36
Sheffield, silver Fiddle pattern tablespoon, 1837 by Patrick Leonard. L-22.2cm; W-72g. ~ good marks,
excellent condition. Est. £45-75.
£38
Newcastle silver Fiddle pattern tablespoon, 1848 by David Reid. L-22.3cm; W-71g. ~ good marks and
condition. Est. £45-75.
£38
Exeter silver Fiddle pattern tablespoon, 1814, by George Turner. L-22.2cm; W-72g. ~ good marks and
condition. Est. £50-75.
£38
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
.18.
Lot
63.
64.
65.
Description
£38
William IV silver Old English pattern tablespoon, London 1833 by Charles Boyton. L-22.4cm; W-65g. ~
minor small dent to bowl, otherwise good crest, bowl, marks and condition. Est. £45-65.
£37
Cork, silver Fiddle pattern tablespoon, by Joseph Kinselagh of Cork and retailed by John Whelply of Cork,
with Dublin marks for 1807. L-22.8cm; W-67g. ~ excellent bowl, marks & condition. Est. £300-500.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
Reserve
George III silver Hanoverian pattern tablespoon, London 1761 by William Cripps. L-20.6cm; W-68g. ~ long
heel, minor wear to bowl tip and date letter, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £50-80.
£240
Maltese silver Fiddle pattern tablespoon, 1827 by Andrea Naudi. L-20.6cm; W-62g. ~ typical Maltese round
heel, minor wear to bowl, otherwise good gauge, marks and condition. Est. £45-75.
£38
Exeter, pair of Fiddle pattern tablespoons, 1827 by Simon Levy. L-22cm; W-115. ~ very minor wear to bowl
tip, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £80-110.
£72
Newcastle, pair of silver Fiddle pattern tablespoons, 1808, by Alexander Kelty. L-22.6cm; W-118g. ~ marks
worn, otherwise good bowls and condition. Est. £75-95.
£68
Silver ‘B.G.C’ golf club teaspoon, Birmingham 1937 by Vaughton & Son. L-11.1cm; W-18g. ~ thick gauge,
good marks and condition. Est. £20-30.
£15
Silver & enamel (red & blue) ‘Silver Jubilee 1935’ teaspoon, Birmingham 1934 by ‘D.V.C’. L-12.1cm; W13g. ~ good marks and condition. Est. £25-35.
£15
.19.
Lot
71.
72.
73.
74.
75.
76.
77.
78.
79.
Description
Reserve
Victorian cast silver-gilt ‘Seaweed/leaf stem’ teaspoon, London 1870 by Richard Sibley. L-10.7cm; W-16g. ~
good marks and condition. Est. £45-55.
£45
Newcastle, set of 6 silver Bright-cut pattern teaspoons, circa 1790 by Christian Ker Reid. L-13cm; W-81g. ~
some dents to bowls, otherwise a lovely set, crisp, good marks and condition. Est. £55-75.
£55
George III cast silver pierced sugar tongs, London. c.1770 by ‘WH’. L-13.1cm; W-40g. ~ one old and very
good repair to arm, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £60-70.
£60
Victorian silver marrow scoop, London 1849 by George Adams. L-22.2cm; W-51g. ~ good marks, excellent
condition. Est. £100-140.
£80
Irish, pair of Fiddle pattern salt shovels, Dublin 1846 by Peter Wingfield. L-10cm; W-17g. ~ wear to marks,
otherwise good condition. Est. £55-75.
£45
Chester silver Fiddle pattern dessert spoon, 1833, by ‘JC’ (unkown maker). L-17.4cm; W-41g. ~ minor wear
to bowl tip, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £50-75.
£45
Scottish silver Oar pattern salt spoon, Edinburgh 1810 by ‘WM’. L- 9.5cm; W-7g. ~ good marks and
condition. Est. £35-55.
£35
Danish heavy silver spoon, Copenhagen 1968 by ‘A.M’. L-14.7cm; W-84g. ~ good weight, marks and
condition. Est. £55-75.
£48
Silver ‘A.P.B.C’ badminton club teaspoon, Birmingham 1934 by ‘M&B’. L-10.9cm; W-15g. ~ good marks
and condition. Est. £15-25.
£10
.20.
Lot
80.
81.
82.
83.
84.
85.
86.
87.
88.
Description
Reserve
Silver ‘English Invitation Tournament Mens Doubles 1954-55’ badminton Trefid pattern spoon, Sheffield
1954 by Harry Atkins. L-13.6cm; W-25g. ~ bowl tip worn, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £15-25.
£12
Silver ‘Royal Wimbledon Golf Club’ Trefid spoon, London 1932 by Richard Comyns. L-16.3cm; W-38g. ~
good gauge, marks and condition. Est. £25-35.
£15
Silver ‘Chorlton-cum-Hardy Golf Club, Barlow Hall’ teaspoon, Birmingham 1913 by Levi & Salaman. L12.7cm; W-20g. ~ good marks and condition. Est. £25-35.
£12
Silver golf club handle teaspoon, Birmingham 1933 by Barker Brothers & Sons. L-12.2cm; W-14g. ~ good
gauge, marks and condition. Est. £20-30.
£10
Silver & enamel ‘Manchester, M.G.C’ golf club teaspoon, Birmingham 1933 by ‘M.B. Ltd’. L-12.1cm; W21g. ~ reasonable condition, good marks. Est. £15-25.
£9
Silver & enamel ‘Maidstone Harriers’ teaspoon, Birmingham 1937 by ‘B.BS’. L-13.1cm; W-18g. ~ good
marks and condition. Est. £15-25.
£10
Silver & enamel ‘Stanley A.C’ athletic club teaspoon, Birmingham 1921 by Vaughton & Sons. L-11.1cm; W15g. ~ good marks and condition. Est. £20-30.
£10
Silver & enamel ‘The Black And White Cat Club’ teaspoon, Birmingham 1931 by ‘J.A.R’. L-11.6cm; W18g. ~ good marks and condition. Est. £25-35.
£10
Victorian silver Old English Bead pattern butter knife, engraved on blade with Cambridge University Crest,
London 1880 by George Adams. L-15.9cm; W-36g. ~ good gauge, marks and condition. Est. £40-60.
£25
.21.
Lot
89.
90.
91.
92.
93.
94.
95.
96.
97.
Description
Reserve
Irish silver Bright-cut Celtic-point pattern teaspoon, Dublin c.1800 by William Ward. L-13.6cm; W-15g. ~
good marks and condition. Est. £20-30.
£10
Irish silver Bright-cut Celtic-point pattern teaspoon, Dublin 1814 by John Bolland. L-14cm; W-12g. ~ good
marks, reasonable condition. Est. £20-30.
£10
George III silver Old English pattern tablespoon, London 1793 by Peter & Ann Bateman. L-22.2cm; W-69g.
~ good marks and condition. Est. £35-55.
£25
George III silver Old English pattern tablespoon, London 1804 by Richard Crossley. L-21.6cm; W-68g. ~
good marks and condition. Est. £35-55.
£25
George IV silver Old English pattern tablespoon, London 1820 by William Bateman. L-21.5cm; W-66g. ~
good marks and condition. Est. £35-55.
£25
George III silver Old English Thread pattern tablespoon, London 1787 by George Smith & William Fearn.
L-21.6cm; W-67g. ~ good marks and condition. Est. £35-55.
£25
George III silver Old English pattern tablespoon, London 1785 (incuse duty), by William Sumner. L-21.5cm;
W-68g. ~ good bowl, marks and condition. Est. £40-60.
£35
George III silver Old English pattern tablespoon, London 1785 (incuse duty), by William Sumner. L-21.5cm;
W-61g. ~ good marks and condition. Est. £35-55.
£30
George III silver Old English pattern tablespoon, London 1785 (incuse duty), by William Sumner. L-21.4cm;
W-61g. ~ soft knock to bowl, wear to date letter, otherwise good condition. Est. £35-55.
£30
.22.
Lot
98.
99.
100.
101.
102.
103.
104.
105.
106.
Description
Reserve
Exeter silver Old English pattern dessert spoon, 1813, by William Welch. L-17.7cm; W-39g. ~ good marks
and condition. Est. £20-40.
£15
Pair of George III silver Bright-cut Old English pattern teaspoons, London 1790 by Thomas Wallis. L12.6cm; W-23g. ~ slight wear to bowl, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £20-30.
£18
Pair of George III silver Bright-cut Old English pattern teaspoons, London 1794 by Thomas Streetin. L12.2cm; W-19g. ~ unusual design, good marks and condition. Est. £25-45.
£18
Large silver ‘Samuel Crompton, Centenary 1927’ spoon, Sheffield 1926 by Cooper Brothers & Sons. L22cm; W-97g. ~ good gauge, marks and condition. Est. £55-75.
£45
Perth silver Fiddle pattern teaspoon, circa 1840 by Robert Keay. L-14.4cm; W-17g. ~ soft knocks all over
bowl, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £25-35.
£15
Victorian silver ‘Victoria 1837-1897’ teaspoon, Birmingham 1896 by ‘E.G.T’. L-13cm; W-15g. ~ good marks
and condition. Est. £25-35.
£12
Silver & enamel ‘London’ teaspoon, Birmingham 1921 by Levi & Salaman. L-12cm; W-12g. ~ good marks
and condition. Est. £25-35.
£12
Silver & enamel ‘Coventry’ teaspoons, Birmingham 1923 by Sydney & Co. L-12cm; W-12g. ~ good marks
and condition. Est. £20-30.
£12
Silver & enamel ‘Hereford’ teaspoon, Birmingham 1925 by William Manton. L-12.2cm; W-12g. ~ good
marks and condition. Est. £20-30.
£12
.23.
Lot
107.
108.
109.
110.
111.
112.
113.
114.
115.
Description
Reserve
George III silver Shell-back Hanoverian pattern tablespoon, London 1769 by Elizabeth Tookey. L-20.2cm;
W-62g. ~ excellent marks and condition. Est. £80-100.
£75
American silver Kings pattern tablespoon, Philadelphia c.1935 by J.E. Caldwell & Co. L-20cm; W-47g. ~
good marks and condition. Est. £30-50.
£28
Victorian silver tea/sugar shovel with embossed and chased decoration, London 1823 by William Eaton. L12.5cm; W-25. ~ unusual, good marks and condition. Est. £150-250.
£75
George I silver Onslow pattern sauce ladle, London 1725 by possibly Charles Hadfield. L-17.5cm; W-52g. ~
with scarf joint, maker’s mark worn, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £175-225.
£120
Victorian silver Fiddle, Thread & Shell pattern tea caddy spoon with shell bowl, London 1855 by Elizabeth
Eaton. L-10.2cm; W-15g. ~ good marks and condition. Est. £100-150.
£75
Victorian silver Trailing-vine pattern child’s fork, London 1859 by Edward & John Barnard. L-16cm; W-34g.
~ crisp, good marks and condition. Est. £55-75.
£52
Scottish silver Bright-cut Celtic-point pattern teaspoon, Edinburgh c.1790 by William Auld. L-13.6cm; W10g. ~ numbered ‘10’; good marks and condition. Est. £25-35.
£22
Liverpool, silver Fiddle pattern dessert spoon by John Sutter, with Chester marks for 1815. L-17.8cm; W-31g.
~ reasonable condition, good marks. Est. £30-50.
£28
Aberdeen silver Fiddle pattern dessert spoon by George Jamieson, with London hallmarks for 1854. L-18cm;
W-43g. ~ good marks and condition. Est. £45-65.
£38
.24.
Lot
116.
117.
118.
119.
120.
121.
122.
123.
124.
Description
Reserve
George II silver marrow scoop, London 1757 by Ebenezer Coker. L-20.7cm; W-40g. ~good gauge, marks and
condition. Est. £140-180.
£115
George II silver marrow scoop, London 1744 by Ebenezer Coker. L-21.6cm; W-56g. ~ good gauge marks and
condition. Est. £140-180.
£115
George I silver Hanoverian Rattail pattern tablespoon, London c.1725 by William Toone. L-19.5cm; W-55g.
~ old repair to stem, worn bowl, otherwise good maker’s mark, one for the kitchen drawer! Est. £25-45.
£20
Victorian silver candle extinguisher, London 1898 by Sampson Mordan & Co. L-30.2cm; W-45g. ~ to be
pedantic this is an oil lamp extinguisher; date letter a little worn, otherwise good condition. Est. £125-175.
£110
Irish silver Fiddle pattern table fork, Dublin 1813 by Richard Whitford, retailed by M. West. L-20.4cm; W64g. ~ good marks and condition. Est. £35-55.
£20
Irish silver Hanoverian table fork, Dublin 1775 by Michael Keating. L-20.4cm; W-60g. ~ minor wear to tines,
otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £35-55.
£25
Irish silver Old English pattern dessert spoon, Dublin 1803 by William Law. L-17cm; W-34g. ~ date letter
worn, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £30-50.
£20
Irish silver Fiddle pattern dessert spoon, Dublin 1804 by John Shields. L-17.3cm; W-28g. ~ bowl a little
battered, otherwise reasonable condition and good marks. Est. £25-45.
£20
Irish silver Celtic-point pattern teaspoon, Dublin c.1775 by John Pittar?. L-14.1cm; W-15g. ~ good marks and
condition. Est. £25-35.
£15
.25.
Lot
125.
126.
127.
128.
129.
130.
131.
132.
133.
Description
Reserve
Irish silver Fiddle pattern teaspoon, Dublin 1817 by James Scott. L-14.3cm; W-18g. ~ reasonable condition,
good marks. Est. £25-35.
£15
Irish silver Old English pattern teaspoon, Dublin c.1780 by Michael Keating. L-10.8cm; W-9g. ~ wear to
marks and bowl, otherwise good condition. Est. £25-35
£15
Irish silver mustard/egg spoon, Dublin 1819 by Samuel Neville. L-12.4cm; W-14g. ~ minor wear to bowl tip,
otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £25-35.
£15
Irish silver Celtic design belt buckle, Dublin 1905 by ‘WP’. W-7cm; W-43g. ~ good marks and condition. Est.
£50-90.
£20
Exeter silver Fiddle pattern dessert spoon, 1827, by Thomas Welch. L-16.5cm; W-31g. ~ good marks,
reasonable condition. Est. £30-50.
£20
Exeter silver Fiddle pattern mustard/egg spoon, 1850 by W.R. Sobey. L-12.7cm; W-16g. ~ good marks and
condition. Est. £25-35.
£18
George III silver Shell & Scroll-back Hanoverian pattern teaspoon, London c.1770 by Hester Bateman. L11.2cm; W-10g. ~ good shell & scroll, bowl, marks and condition. Est. £30-50.
£20
George IV silver Old English pattern mustard spoon, London 1824 by John William Blake. L-12.2cm; W13g. ~ good marks and condition. Est. £25-45.
£15
George III silver Shell & Scroll-back Hanoverian pattern teaspoon, London c.1760 by William Turner &
James Williams. L-10.8cm; W-8g. ~ good shell & scroll, reasonable marks and condition. Est. £30-50.
£30
.26.
Lot
134.
135.
136.
137.
138.
139.
140.
141.
142.
Description
Reserve
Victorian silver Fiddle &Thread pattern salt spoon, London 1856 by Elizabeth Eaton. L-11cm; W-22g. ~
maker’s mark worn, otherwise reasonable marks and condition. Est. £20-30.
£13
Victorian silver Albert pattern pickle spoon, London 1849 by Robert Wallis. L-14.4cm; W-38g. ~ reasonable
marks, good gauge and condition. Est. £55-95.
£35
Victorian silver Kings Husk pattern dessert fork, London 1837 by William Bateman. L-17.3cm; W-63g. ~
good gauge, marks and condition. Est. £45-65.
£25
George III silver Old English Bead pattern salt spoon, London c. 1775 by John Lambe. L-10cm; W-10g. ~
maker’s mark worn, otherwise good condition. Est. £20-40.
£20
Newcastle silver Hanoverian pattern salt shovel, circa 1797 (double duty marks) by John Robertson. L8.6cm; W-5g. ~ repaired shovel, otherwise reasonable. Est. £45-55.
£34
Set of 3 silver Dove & Olive Branch teaspoons with maker’s mark for Robert Cook & Thomas Gurney (circa
1760) and London hallmarks for 1900. L-11.6cm; W-44g. ~ interesting!, good condition. Est. £45-75.
£40
Edwardian silver pierced sugar tongs with cast arms, London 1906 by Goldsmiths & Silversmiths Co. L12cm; W-37g. ~ manufactured as 18th century examples, excellent condition. Est. £65-95.
£18
Silver ‘SIRA’ teaspoon with elephant finial, Birmingham 1911 by Levi & Salaman, retailed by Barton,
Bangalore. L-11.8cm; W-17g. ~ kink to stem, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £25-35.
£12
American silver Coffin-end pattern large teaspoon, New York c.1820 by William Garret Forbes. L-16cm; W19g. ~ good marks and condition. Est. £25-45.
£12
.27.
Lot
143.
144.
145.
146.
147.
148.
149.
150.
151.
Description
Reserve
Silver ‘1910-1935 Jubilee’ teaspoon, London 1934 by William Hutton & Sons. L-10.8cm; W-9g. ~ wear to
bowl tip & maker’s mark, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £10-20.
£8
York silver Fiddle pattern teaspoon, 1821, by James Barber & William Whitwell. L-13.8cm; W-20g. ~ wear to
bowl tip and date letter, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £30-45.
£30
Silver Trefid Rattail pattern dessert spoon, London 1991 by Guild of Handicrafts. L-13.9cm; W-26g. ~ good
marks and condition. Est. £70-80.
£70
Irish silver Fiddle pattern teaspoon, Dublin c.1810, by J. Henzell, retailed by Law. L-15cm; W-22g. ~ wear to
bowl tip & crest, slight kink to fiddle, otherwise reasonable marks and condition. Est. £35-45.
£35
Silver Trefid pattern dessert spoon, cased, Sheffield 1952 by Roberts & Belk. L-17cm; W-41g. ~ with
coronation mark, good marks and condition.
£105
Silver ‘Plymouth’ spoon, cased, Sheffield 1970 by Richard B. Wigfull & Son. L-15.3cm; W-39g. ~ crisp
detail, good gauge, marks and condition. Est. £65-95.
£65
Scottish silver double-struck Scottish King’s Shape Rococo End pattern toddy ladle, Glasgow 1840 by
Robert Gray. L-17.5cm; W-53g. ~ rare pattern, reasonable marks, good gauge and condition. Est. £160-200.
£150
Irish silver Fiddle pattern tablespoon, Dublin 1805 by William Ward, retailed by Law. L-22.6cm; W-93g. ~
excellent gauge, marks and condition. Est. £150-175.
£150
Silver ‘Londonderry’ teaspoon, Chester 1919 by Stokes & Ireland Ltd. L-11cm; W-11g. ~ good marks and
condition. Est. £25-35.
£15
.28.
Lot
152.
153.
154.
155.
156.
157.
158.
159.
160.
Description
Reserve
Edwardian silver ‘Isle of Man’ teaspoon, Birmingham 1904 by Robert Pringle. L-9.9cm; W-6g. ~ slight kink
to legs, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £15-25.
£14
American silver Fiddle pattern salt spoon, Bridgeport, Connecticut c.1840 by John Clark Blackman & Co. L9.5cm; W-6g. ~ dent to bowl, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £25-35.
£25
Victorian silver Fiddle pattern pickle spoon, London 1858 by Henry Holland. L-14.7cm; W-29g. ~ good
gauge, marks and condition. Est. £45-75.
£40
Victorian silver Fiddle & Shell pattern egg spoon, London 1856 by John Whiting. L-12.8cm; W-17g. ~ good
marks and condition. Est. £25-45.
£15
Pair of Victorian silver Old English Shell Bright-cut pattern teaspoons, London 1887 by James Wakely &
Frank Clarke Wheeler. L-11.5cm; W-27g. ~ good marks and condition. Est. £25-35.
£16
Set of 6 silver Nail-head pattern teaspoons, cased, Birmingham 1938/9 by F.H. Adams & Holman. L-10.8cm;
W-64g. ~ good marks and condition. Est. £55-75.
£50
Set of 4 Victorian silver Apostle pattern teaspoons, Sheffield 1875 (with registration lozenge), by Thomas
Hall. L-10.6cm; W-55g. ~ good gauge and marks, reasonable condition. Est. £40-60.
£40
Exeter, set of 6 silver Fiddle pattern teaspoons, 1847, by Robert, James & Josiah Williams of Bristol. L13.4cm; W-96g. ~ good marks and condition. Est. £60-90.
£50
Edwardian silver ‘W.B.R.C’ rifle club Old English pattern teaspoon, London 1906 by Charles Boyton &
Sons. L-13.3cm; W-17g. ~ good marks, reasonable condition. Est. £15-25.
£10
.29.
Lot
161.
162.
163.
164.
165.
166.
167.
168.
169.
Description
Reserve
Large silver ‘West Middlesex Golf Club’ spoon, Birmingham 1932 by Liberty & Co. L-15.7cm; W-36g. ~
good marks and condition. Est. £45-75.
£30
Set of 10 different silver replica 17th century knop-end spoons, London 1976/7 by C.J. Vander. L-12.7cm; W302g. ~ good gauge, finials, marks and condition. A pleasing collection. Est. £250-350.
£225
Georgian silver marrow spoon, circa 1810, not marked. L-11.4cm; W9g. ~ unusual, probably from a travelling
compendium, minor dent to bowl, otherwise good condition. Est. £120-160.
£80
George III silver Reverse Old English pattern dessert fork, engraved ‘Royds’, London 1818 by T. Wallis & J.
Hayne. L-16.4cm; W-31g. ~ Royds Bank of Rochdale, reasonable marks and condition. Est. £60-90.
£50
Victorian silver salt spoon, London 1857 by Charles & George Fox. L-7.2cm; W-6g. ~ reasonable marks, good
condition, unusual shape. Est. £30-50.
£25
Silver ‘Daily Mail Empire Day Rifles Overseas Competition’ spoon, Birmingham 1908 by Elkington & Co.
L-14.2cm; W-31g. ~ engraved ‘1910 Best Score in India, 2nd C.V.R, Corpl, A. Preminger’, good cond. £40-60
£30
Victorian cast silver shell-bowled salt spoon, London 1839 by George Frederick Pinnell. L-10.8cm; W-25g. ~
old repair, a few pin prick holes due to hallmarking, otherwise a good spoon. Est. £30-50.
£25
Pair of American arts & crafts silver-gilt & enamel teaspoons, Rhode Island c.1890 by Gorham & Co. L11.9cm; W-24g. ~ good marks and condition. Est. £45-75.
£35
Silver ‘Mappin & Webb Ltd, 172 Regents St W.’ business card display stand, London 1919 by Mappin &
Webb. W-7.7cm; W-44g. ~ very unusual, good marks, reasonable condition. Est. £100-200.
£35
.30.
Lot
170.
171.
172.
173.
174.
175.
176.
177.
178.
Description
Reserve
Sheffield, silver Old English pattern tablespoon, 1799, by Thomas Law. L-21.5cm; W-56g. ~ small dent to
bowl & edge, otherwise good condition, excellent marks. Est. £35-55.
£30
Chinese Export silver Fiddle pattern dessert spoon, Canton c.1810 by Cumshing. L-17.4cm; W-38g. ~ wear to
bowl tip, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £25-45.
£18
Exeter silver Fiddle pattern dessert spoon, 1858, by Josiah Williams & Co. L-18.6cm; W-45g. ~ griffin-wing?
crest, good marks and condition. Est. £25-45.
£22
Exeter silver Old English pattern dessert spoon, circa 1800 by ‘RJ’. L-17.3cm; W-30g. ~ soft knock to bowl,
otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £25-45.
£22
George III silver Hanoverian Rattail pattern tablespoon, London 1775 by Hester Bateman. L-22.4cm; W61g. ~ may have been turned from O.E. Rattail?, long rattail, good marks & condition. Est. £45-75.
£38
Birmingham, George III silver Old English pattern tablespoon, 1816, by ‘E.T’. L-21.3cm; W-52g. ~ good
condition, excellent marks. Est. £35-55.
£30
George I Britannia silver Hanoverian Rattail pattern tablespoon, London 1717. L-19.8cm; W-58g. ~ marks
very worn except date letter, knock to bowl tip, otherwise good condition. Est. £45-65.
£32
Victorian silver & mother of pearl butter knife, Birmingham 1845 by George Unite. L-19.7cm. ~ferrule
loose, very slight kink to blade, otherwise good gauge, marks and condition. Est. £30-60.
£24
Pair of Scottish silver Oar pattern dessert spoons, Edinburgh 1811 by ‘Z’. L-18.1cm; W-66g. ~ good bowl
and condition, excellent marks. Est. £50-80.
£35
.31.
Lot
179.
180.
181.
182.
183.
184.
185.
186.
187.
Description
Reserve
Set of 4 George III silver Old English egg spoons, London 1808 by Peter & William Bateman. L-10.5cm; W39g. ~ unusual crest (coastal warning/signalling fire beacons), gilded bowls, good marks & condition. £65-95.
£35
Danish silver serving slice with cannon shaped handle, Copenhagen 1895 by possibly A. Fleron. L-27.4cm;
W-105g. ~ good marks and condition, a useful server. Est. £100-150.
£85
Edwardian silver & wood toasting fork, Sheffield 1908 by Thomas Bradbury & Sons. L-36cm. ~ wooden
finial broken/missing, otherwise good gauge, marks and condition. Est. £85-125.
£65
Pair of Edwardian silver & ivory butter/tea knives, Sheffield 1905 by Allen & Darwin. L-16.8cm. ~ good
gauge, marks and condition. Est. £30-50.
£28
Art Nouveau silver teaspoon, Sheffield 1903 by James Dixon & Sons. L-11.7cm; W-12g. ~ good marks and
condition. Est. £25-35.
£15
Pair of silver & mother of pearl butter/tea knives, Sheffield 1928 by Thomas Bradbury & Sons. L-15.5cm. ~
good marks and condition. Est. £30-50.
£28
Set of 6 Swedish silver-gilt teaspoons, Stockholm 1894 by G.G. Hallberg. L-9.9cm; W-99g. ~ good gauge,
marks and condition. Est. £85-125.
£70
Danish .830 silver Child’s knife & fork with fable? finial of a girl/house/Christmas tree?, Copenhagen c.1950
by W & S Sorensen. L-14.8cm; W-61g. ~ good marks and condition. Est. £65-95
£45
Irish, set of 4 silver Fiddle pattern dessert spoons, Dublin 1852 by J. Smith. L-17.8cm; W-157g. ~ good
bowls, marks and condition. Est. £120-160.
£90
.32.
Lot
188.
189.
190.
191.
192.
193.
194.
195.
Description
Reserve
Irish silver Old English pattern dessert spoon, Dublin c.1780 by Michael Keating. L-17.6cm; W-32g. ~ good
bowl, marks and condition, pleasing. Est. £65-95.
£60
Set of 6 Victorian silver Apostle pattern teaspoons, Birmingham 1899 by Miller Brothers. L-good marks and
condition. Est. £45-65.
£40
Danish silver Bernadotte pattern pickle/seafood fork, Copenhagen c.1950 by Georg Jensen. L-15.2cm; W26g. ~ good marks and condition. Est. £45-65.
£35
Victorian silver Bright-cut Old English pattern child’s fork, London 1872 by The Barnards. L-15.6cm; W28g. ~ good gauge, marks and condition. Est. £25-45.
£18
Victorian silver Unknown pattern child’s fork, London 1863 by Francis Higgins. L-15cm; W-32g. ~ good
gauge, marks and condition. Est. £25-45.
£18
Victorian silver Queens pattern child’s fork, London 1874 by Charles Boyton. L-15.3cm; W-34g. ~ maker’s
mark worn, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £25-45.
£18
George III silver picture-front dessert spoon, with fig shaped rattail bowl, London 1761 by William Tant. L17.5cm; W-44g. ~ unusual, with scarf joint, reasonable marks and good condition. Est. £100-150.
£57
Victorian silver & green onyx pistol-grip handle, London 1898 by Sampson Mordan & Co. L-11.5cm. ~
excellent condition, good marks. Est. £55-85.
£45
.33.
Lot
196.
197.
198.
199.
200.
201.
202.
203.
Description
Reserve
Dutch .833 silver ‘Windmill’ sauce ladle, Schoonhoven 1925by ‘G.B’. L-13.7cm; W-27g. ~ moving sails on
windmill, good marks and condition. Est. £55-95.
£40
Pair of Scottish silver Oar pattern dessert spoons, Edinburgh 1806 by Alexander Henderson. L-17.1cm; W55g. ~ one bowl with a few soft knocks, otherwise good bowls, marks and condition. Est. £45-75.
£38
Scottish silver Onslow pattern toddy ladle, Edinburgh 1812 by Marshall & Sons (the ‘S’ being over-struck
with a single ‘B’). L-16.2cm; W-31g. ~ kink to stem, otherwise good marks and condition. Est. £45-85.
£35
George III silver Old English pattern tablespoon, London 1777 by Hester Bateman. L-21.7cm; W-59g. ~ good
bowl, marks and condition. Est. £55-95.
£55
Aberdeen silver Celtic-point pattern dessert spoon, circa 1795 by James Erskine. L-16.7cm; W-28g. ~
excellent bowl, marks and condition. Est. £75-125.
£75
Scottish silver Celtic-point pattern teaspoon, Edinburgh c.1790 by Alexander Zeigler. L-13.3cm; W-11g. ~
good bowl, marks and condition. Est. £25-35.
£16
Canadian silver Fiddle pattern teaspoon, Saint John c.1840 by John Barry, L-14.9cm; W-22g. ~ good bowl,
marks and condition. Est. £25-45.
£18
North American? silver Fiddle pattern teaspoon, circa 1820 by ‘D’. L-15cm; W-17g. ~good bowl, marks and
condition. Est. £25-45.
£18
-o-o-o-o-o-o.34.
The next Club Postal Auction will take place
on Thursday 14th April 2011
Members are invited to submit their Lots (max. 10 & no ‘job Lots’) for the next postal auction by
posting or delivering by hand up until the 10th February. Please provide clearly a full and
comprehensive description, if possible, of your various lots, remembering to note all relevant facts
such as makers, dates and interesting features etc. and reserve. Also please clearly state your name,
address and telephone number. Please never intentionally submit repaired, damaged, burnished or
mediocre items, as such will not sell.
-o-o-o-o-o-o-
POSTAL AUCTION INFORMATION
Your written, email or faxed bids should be with us, please, by no later than 12.00pm, on the day of the sale. Please note
that purchase prices are subject to a 10% buyers premium (plus VAT on the commission) and £6.00 for postage &
packing per consignment.
Members are welcome to come to view the lots on offer at 26 Burlington Arcade, London.
Bidding
The Lot is offered to the top bidder on approval, at a figure that is 50% the difference between that bid and the under
bid or, where only one bid is received, at 50% the difference between that figure and the reserve. Should two or more
members submit an identical top bid the Lot is offered to the member whose bid was received first, at that price. The
Lot will be sent to you for approval where you can decide to either purchase or return the Lot.
When submitting your bid(s) please make sure you clearly state the Lot number, a brief description, your bid (excluding
premium), name & address and a telephone or fax number.
If you are successful we will telephone you on the day of the sale from 6pm to confirm your purchase(s) and at what
price. Also to confirm that someone will be at home the following Thursday morning, to receive the lot(s), sent by
guaranteed delivery.
We request payment within 48 hours of your receiving the lot(s), or their immediate return (together with a refund of
the postal and packaging charges (£6.00) incurred in the failed transaction) should you decide not to take up your option
to purchase.
Overseas Based Bidders
• If successful, we will notify you by fax or email.
• Please note that Lots are not dispatched until payment in Sterling has been received, also that postage/ packing is
charged at £12.00 per package regardless of weight or destination.
• Although every assistance will be provided to trace missing packages, please note that our responsibility ends once
a package leaves the United Kingdom.
Vendors
All members are invited to enter Lots (max. 10) for the Silver Spoon Club Postal Auction.
• Commission is charged at 10% (minimum £2.50) & £2.50 per unsold Lot plus VAT of the sale price.
• Vendors are paid when we have received payment; please note that there may be a delay in settlement where lots
have been purchased by overseas members, or where a lot has been rejected by a U.K. member thus necessitating a
further offer to an under bidder.
• Items for which no bids have been received will be posted back to you, and charged £6.00 for postage &
packaging.
General Information
• The Auction results will be printed in the next Finial.
• All measurements are approximate.
• The Silver Spoon Club holds no responsibility for description. All purchasers must satisfy themselves on their
lot(s) prior to payment.
• Members participating in the auction are deemed to have accepted that we are not to be held personally responsible
for any losses incurred by members, for whatsoever reason.
-o-o-o-o-o-o.35.
Daniel Bexfield Antiques
Fine Quality Silver
Silver 'Stag' Centrepiece/Candlestick
Made London in 2002 by J.A.C.
Height 15.5" (39.5cm); Weight 120 troy oz. (3732g)
Price £5,950.00
26 Burlington Arcade, Mayfair, London. W1J 0PU
Tel: 020 7491 1720
Fax: 020 7491 1730
E-mail: [email protected] Web: www.bexfield.co.uk
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