Everything DiSC Classic Assessment - Feedback Manual

Everything DiSC® Classic Assessment - Feedback Manual
The manual contains suggested guidelines on how you may structure and deliver personal feedback on the basis of
DiSC® Classic results, including creating relevant hypothesis about the respondent’s behavior, strengths and
challenges.
During the session, focus mainly on the elements which are relevant to the respondent. Allow the respondent to
confirm, reject and/or comment on your assumptions and flexibly adapt your approach. Remember that DiSC
measures some important elements of personality and that characteristics not measured by DiSC are also likely to
come into play.
Always use Graph III as the basis for interpretation as this is the best indicator of a respondent’s DiSC style. For
extended feedback sessions, you may use Graph I and Graph II as optional, supplementary interpretation tools.
When discussing the respondent’s behavior, use words that describe the behavioral characteristics associated with
the DiSC styles and avoid ‘technical’ expressions such as “You show high-D behavior”.
Brief Feedback Session
A. Briefly explain the four DiSC styles, and what the respondent’s score on each dimension suggests
B. If relevant, explain what the respondent’s combination of high scores suggests
C. Optionally, include an extract of the respondent’s Classical Pattern
A. Briefly explain the four DiSC styles and what the respondent’s score on each dimension suggests
The DiSC Classic Graph III suggests how you perceive yourself when you are at work. DiSC measures four traits
discussed as “styles”:
Dominance (D): direct, strong-willed, and forceful
A person who displays high D behavior typically prefers to be in control.
D
This person is results-oriented, determined, decisive and direct when communicating. He/she
will often be competitive, take up challenges and does not see problems as obstacles but as
things to solve and/or fix.
(Feel free to describe other examples of characteristic D-behavior)
Your high/moderate/low score on the D scale may suggest that:
High D-score:
Your behavior may resemble the behavior outlined above.
Low D-score:
You may be less competitive and not as results-oriented. On the other hand, perhaps you are
more modest, undemonstrative or quiet, and may display organized and calm behavior.
Moderate
D-score:
Your score in the middle area of the graph suggests that you neither clearly display nor reject
D-behavior. It may also suggest that you are flexible, and can choose to display some Dbehavior in some situations, and/or display moderate D-behavior in other situations.
© 2008 Inscape Partners International. Revised 2009.
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Influence (i): sociable, talkative, and lively
A person who displays high i behavior is typically outgoing and enthusiastic.
i
This person tries to persuade others and creates results by getting others involved in tasks
or projects. He/she is happy to express emotions, thoughts and ideas and often uses many
words. He/she can be good at making contact with others.
(Feel free to describe other examples of characteristic i-behavior)
Your high/moderate/low score on the i scale may suggest that:
High i-score:
Your behavior may resemble the behavior outlined above.
Low i-score:
You may be more reserved and not have much of a need to influence others. In addition,
You may be less emotional and prefer to meet new people in a quiet and controlled setting.
Moderate
i-score:
Your score in the middle area of the graph suggests that you neither clearly display nor
reject i-behavior. It may also suggest that you are flexible and can choose to display some ibehavior in some situations, and/or display moderate i-behavior in other situations.
Steadiness (S): gentle, accommodating, and even-tempered
A person who displays high S behavior typically likes to work on tasks that he/she can
complete while working with others.
S
This person tends to be patient and loyal, and prefers things to be predictable and stable.
He/she typically likes to work following a certain method or approach and may be good at
dealing with other people.
(Feel free to describe other examples of characteristic S-behavior)
Your high/moderate/low score on the S scale may suggest that:
High S-score:
Your behavior may resemble the behavior outlined above.
Low S-score:
You may be more spontaneous and change-oriented and may not have a great need for
predictability and stability.
Moderate
S-score:
Your score in the middle area of the graph suggests that you neither clearly display nor
reject S-behavior. It may also suggest that you are flexible, and can choose to display some Sbehavior in some situations, and/or display moderate S-behavior in other situations.
Conscientiousness (C): reserved, analytical, and logical
A person who displays a high C behavior typically likes to work to improve already
established products or services.
C
This person tends to be analytical, conscientious and likes to be able to have a
comprehensive view of a task. Most often he/she works systematically, and has a good grasp
of the details involved with a task.
(Feel free to describe other examples of characteristic C-behavior)
Your high/moderate/low score on the C scale may suggest that:
High C-score:
Your behavior may resemble the behavior outlined above.
Low C-score:
You may be informal and might prefer to develop ideas and strategies independently of those
that already exist. You may also be unstructured in your way of working.
Moderate
C-score:
Your score in the middle area of the graph suggests that you neither clearly display nor
reject C-behavior. It may also suggest that you are flexible and can choose to display some
C-behavior in some situations, and/or display moderate C-behavior in other situations.
You may also consider the respondent’s level of intensity, using the adjectives in the Intensity Index which describe High,
Medium and Low behavior for each DiSC® style.
© 2008 Inscape Partners International. Revised 2009.
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B. If relevant, explain what the respondent’s combination of high scores suggests
You have 2 high scores – a primary and secondary style. This combination typically suggests that you focus on:
D+i
action and extroversion
D+S
control and relations
D+C
tasks and facts
i+S
people and relations
i+C
extroversion and analysis
S+C
organizing and analysis
Take into account that a high D with a backup i does not manifest itself the same way as a high D with a low i or as a high
D with a backup C – the behavior of these persons may be quite different.
If the respondent only has a primary style use the description in section A above. If the respondent has three high scores,
you may find it useful to include extracts from the Classical Pattern description.
C. Optionally, include an extract of the respondent’s Classical Pattern
The Classical Profile Patterns represent a DiSC® profile that is informed by each of the four styles, not just one, and a way to
provide a more holistic and integrated picture of the respondent.
© 2008 Inscape Partners International. Revised 2009.
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Extended Feedback Session
Start with the Brief Feedback Session described in section A, then continue with:
D. High/low scores on the scales and the number of high scores
E. The Classical Profile Patterns
F. Optionally, exploring Graph 1 and Graph II Differences
D. High/Low Scores on the scales and the Number of High Scores
‘Characteristic Profiles’
‘Flexible Profiles’
(The respondent has scores in
segment 6-7 and 1-2)
(The respondent has scores in
segment 3, 4 and/or 5)
Your combination of very high
and very low scores on the scales
suggests that your behavior is
probably more distinct in relation
to each of the particular styles.
Your scores are all positioned in
the middle area of the graph at a
moderate level, suggesting that
your behavior is probably more
flexible.
Continue by discussing the respondent’s number of high scores. Most people score high on a combination of the four
scales; 2 high scores is the most common DiSC® Classic result∗.
1 high score
2 high scores
3 high scores
Your behavior may be evident and
unambiguous to others. Your
behavior will probably be distinct in
relation to …. (describe the
behavioral style associated with the
respondent’s highest score).
Your level of flexibility in your
behavior and how evident and
unambiguous your behavior is to
others depends on whether your
scores are very high or closer to
the middle area of the graph.
Your behavior may be more flexible
than the behavior of persons with
only 1 or 2 high scores. Also, others
may find you less easy to read as
your behavior may vary in different
situations.
On the other hand, it may be more
difficult or stressful for you to
adjust and adapt your behavior to
the needs of a given situation than it
would be for persons with e.g. 2 or
3 high scores.
(Describe the respondent on the
basis of their two highest scores).
You are probably flexible and can
choose to … (describe the respondent
on the basis of their three highest
scores).
∗
© 2008 Inscape Partners International. Revised 2009.
Based on US Sample.
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E. The Classical Profile Patterns
In general, consider which assumptions you may have about the respondent’s behavior based on their Classical Pattern.
As the description of the Classical Pattern is based on the exact Classical Pattern profile, you may need to adjust your
interpretation to the respondent’s specific profile, taking into account any differences in scores on each scale. Remember
that there will be individual differences in how a Classical Pattern is expressed depending on the particular shape of the
respondent’s profile.
F. Optionally, Exploring Graph I and Graph II Differences
Graph I (most responses) and Graph II (least responses) may be used as optional, supplementary tools for interpretation,
building on the differences between the respondent’s two graphs.
When a respondent has a moderate score or a characteristic score on any given DiSC® scale on Graph III, you may further
compare the Graph 1 and Graph II scores to create additional hypotheses and questions for the feedback session.
Moderate Scores
Clear responding ≈ Average on style
High score
Mixed responding ≈ Variable on style
Higher (or
moderate)
score
Lower (or
moderate)
score
Low score
Graph I
Graph II
Graph I
Graph II
In this situation, the respondent consistently responds
to (almost) no questions on a given scale as Most or
Least – resulting in a moderate score in Graph III.
In this situation, the respondent responds to the questions
on a given scale as both Most and Least – also resulting in a
moderate score on Graph III.
This suggests that the person is neither high nor low in
this area; you may assume that he/she will be roughly
average on this particular DiSC style.
This suggests that the person has some characteristics that
are high in this area and some that are low; you may
assume that he/she will be (very) variable on this particular
DiSC style.
To others, the person’s behavior related to this style
will probably seem middle-of-the road.
Consider exploring these areas during the feedback session:
• In which situations is this middle-of-the-road style
an advantage? In which situations is it a
disadvantage?
• How is this middle-of-the-road style integrated
with the other three styles?
To others, the person’s behavior related to this style will
probably seem either very flexible; in some contexts the
person will show a lot of this style, in other contexts very
little, varying and adapting their behavior according to the
situation.
Alternatively, the person’s behavior will seem very selective.
Each of the four DiSC styles contain smaller facets within
them; this person may display only some select facets of
the particular style while not displaying other facets of the
style at all. E.g. having the directness and strong will of a
high D without the forcefulness.
Consider exploring these areas:
•
Which behavior is displayed in which situations?
•
To which extent is this behavior deliberately adapted
to the situation?
And/or:
• Which facets of the style are more relevant to this
person?
• How are these facets integrated with the other styles?
© 2008 Inscape Partners International. Revised 2009.
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Characteristic Scores
Marked responding (high) ≈ demonstration of style Marked responding (low) ≈ absence of style
High score
High score
Low score
Graph I
Graph I
Graph II
Low score
Graph II
Here the respondent responds to (nearly) all questions on
a given scale as Most and (almost) no questions on the
same scale as Least – resulting in a characteristic, high
Graph III score.
The respondent responds to (almost) no questions
on a given scale as Most and (nearly) all questions on
the same scale as Least – resulting in a characteristic,
low Graph III score.
This suggests that the person is characteristic in this area;
you may assume that he/she will show a marked
demonstration of this particular DiSC® style.
This suggests that the person is characteristic in this
area; you may assume that he/she will show a marked
absence of this particular DiSC style.
To others, the person’s behavior related to this style will
probably seem very clear, clearly displaying the
characteristics of the style in most contexts.
To others, the person’s behavior related to this style
will probably seem very clear, clearly not displaying
the characteristics of the style in most contexts.
In both situations, consider exploring these areas during the feedback session:
•
•
In which situations is this clear behavior an advantage? In which situations is it a disadvantage?
When is a clear behavior a sign of priorities? When does it become too much/too little?
Feedback on Special Patterns
In addition to the Classical Profile Patterns, there are three special patterns:
G. The Tight Pattern
H. The Undershift Pattern and the Overshift Pattern
In these cases, the respondent’s pattern of responses does not match any of the commonly occurring profiles. This
situation occurs infrequently and a personalized report is not available for the DiSC Classic online versions.
When giving feedback to a respondent with a Special Pattern include the hypotheses and descriptions below.
G. The Tight Pattern
Tight Patterns occur when all four plotting points are positioned in the middle area of the graph or close to it. This
situation occurs infrequently; typically in ½ to 2% of a given population∗.
Generally speaking a Tight Pattern may indicate flexibility or doubt:
a) General flexibility, ability to adapt and balance between the four behavior styles.
b) A temporary picture due to a period of transition or feeling unsure about current requirements.
c) The respondent felt pressured to respond to the assessment in a certain way, unsure of how to respond
or changed focus while responding.
Always consider the first hypothesis and avoid implying to the respondent that a Tight Pattern is ‘wrong’.
∗
© 2008 Inscape Partners International. Revised 2009.
Based on indications across the DiSC Classic language versions.
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Tight Pattern indicating flexibility
You show a roughly equal preference for each of the different DiSC® styles.
You probably find that you are equally motivated by a number of different tasks and that you
are trying to adapt to changing demands. You can probably draw from each of the four
DiSC styles as needed.
In some situations, your adaptability may have some limitations. Your perspective may at
times be neglected or disregarded. Also, you may find it difficult to stand out from the
crowd and identify a single solution about which you’re passionate.
(Elaborate and explore as needed).
Also consider exploring these areas during the feedback session:
•
•
•
How natural is each of the four styles for the person? How well does each DiSC style
describe the person?
Is the person very flexible at adapting to all four styles – or are two or three of the
styles a better fit than others?
Might this flexibility be stressful in certain situations, the person feeling like he/she is
adapting too far and trying to be everything to everyone?
Temporary Tight Pattern
Sometimes the reason for an equal DiSC pattern is a period of transition or upheaval due to
significant changes in a person’s life.
As a result, you may be re-thinking some of your ideas about yourself and how you relate to
others but a more clearly defined behavioral style may again emerge.
It could be appropriate for you to retake the profile after a few weeks or to retake it now
with a clearer focus.
Also, consider exploring these areas:
•
•
•
•
Is the person in a period of transition for external or personal reasons?
For some reason, does the person currently feel particularly required or motivated to
behave flexibly and adapt to different situations?
Is the person feeling unsure about which behaviors the current situation requires e.g.
due to ongoing changes?
Under more usual circumstances, which style(s) would be a better fit than others?
Tight Pattern caused by an unclear focus
It may be helpful for you to retake the profile again with a clearer focus.
H. The Undershift Pattern and the Overshift Pattern
The Undershift and Overshift Patterns
Overshift
Pattern
Undershift
Pattern
Classical Patterns represent combinations of high and low scores, whereas an Undershift
Pattern or Overshift Pattern occurs when all four scores are positioned in the lower or
upper portion of the graph. This might indicate that you consider all four behavioral styles
to be of equally low or high importance.
However, this situation occurs very infrequently, and is unlikely to reoccur when you
respond to the instrument again.
The Undershift Pattern or Overshift Pattern can be caused by the fact that you have been
unsure of how to respond to the profile or have changed focus while responding. It may be
helpful to retake the profile now with a clearer focus.
Also, you may review graph scores for the possibility of errors made when computing or plotting the
scores.
© 2008 Inscape Partners International. Revised 2009.
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