Bracelets, Bangles & Cuffs www.BeadAndButton.com

Bracelets,
Bangles
& Cuffs
www.BeadAndButton.com
618252
A supplement to
Bead&Button magazine
Y
ou can never have too many
adornments for your wrists!
Bracelets, bangles, and cuffs are
fun to make and a joy to wear.
They’re versatile accessories to change on
the go, updating your office outfit for a
casual night out or a special occasion.
To help you enrich your wardrobe,
we’ve assembled a jewelry-box mix of
wristwear in silver and gold tones and
embellishments to accompany many
different clothing styles. Plus, as you
make the projects, you will practice six
essential beading techniques! Whether
you are new to any one or more of these
techniques or have been beading for a
while, you will find much to glow about
in this special silver-and-gold collection.
Golden glow
3
A metalsmith’s match
4
Refined netted cuff
6
Gemstone crochet bangle
8
Web of silver
10
Dimensional diamonds
12
Basics
14
– The editors of Bead&Button magazine
www.BeadAndButton.com
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CROSSWEAVE TECHNIQUE
1
Golden glow
Glittering beaded beads take center stage in this regal bracelet.
Use contrasting 6 mm
round crystals for a
different look.
designed by Jenjen Bai
stepbystep
Beaded beads
[1] Thread a needle on each
end of 24 in. (61 cm) of Fireline, and center a 4 mm
bicone crystal, a 6 mm round
crystal, and a 4 mm. With
one needle, pick up a 6 mm,
cross the other needle
through it, and pull tight
(photo a).
[2] With each needle, pick
up a 4 mm, and cross the
needles through a 6 mm.
Repeat once. With each needle, pick up a 4 mm.
Cross the needles through the first 6 mm picked up in
step 1 (photo b), and pull the
beads tight to form a ring.
[3] With each needle, pick up
four 150 Charlottes. With one
needle, pick up another 150,
and cross the other needle
through it (photo c). With
each needle, pick up four
150s, and cross the needles
through the next 6 mm
(photo d). Repeat around
the ring until you’ve gone
through the first 6 mm again.
Sew through the ring of
4 mms on each end. End the threads (Basics, p. 14).
materials
[4] Repeat steps 1–3 to make
a total of six beaded beads.
Bracelet
[1] Cut a 12-in. (30 cm) piece
of beading wire. On one end,
string a crimp bead, a 4 mm,
a wire guard if desired, and
half of the clasp. Go back
through the 4 mm and the
crimp bead, tighten the wire,
and crimp the crimp bead
(Basics). Trim the short tail.
[2] String a 4 mm, an 8 mm
bicone crystal, a 4 mm, and a beaded bead (photo e).
Repeat this pattern five more
times, and then string a 4 mm,
an 8 mm, and a 4 mm.
[3] String a crimp bead, a
4 mm, a wire guard if
desired, and the other half of
the clasp. Go back through
the 4 mm and the crimp
bead, tighten the wire, and
crimp the crimp bead. Trim
the short tail. Use chainnose
pliers to close a crimp cover
over each crimp if desired. w
Jenjen Bai teaches classes in
Springfield, Ill., in the U.S.
Contact her at [email protected]
mustbead.com.
• 2 wire guards (optional)
• Fireline 6 lb. test
• flexible beading wire, .012–.015
• beading needles, #10 or #12
• chainnose pliers (optional)
• crimping pliers
• wire cutters
bracelet 73⁄4 in. (19.7 cm)
• 7 8 mm bicone crystals
• 24 6 mm round crystals
• 64 4 mm bicone crystals
• 4 g 150 Charlottes,
gold plated
• clasp
• 2 crimp beads
• 2 crimp covers (optional)
a
b
c
d
e
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3
Right-angle Weave
A metalsmith’s match
This beaded bracelet simulates granulation,
the ancient art of fusing tiny metal
spheres into intricate patterns.
designed by Shelley Nybakke
a
stepbystep
d
c
b
e
Base layer
[1] Center a needle on 4 yd. (3.7 m) of
10 lb. Fireline. Working with doubled
thread, attach a stop bead (Basics, p. 14),
leaving a 6-in. (15 cm) tail.
[2] Work in right-angle weave (see p. 5,
steps 1–3) using color A seed beads to
create a row six stitches long.
[3] Continue in right-angle weave (p. 5,
steps 4–7) until you have a band that is
six stitches wide and 70 rows long or
the desired length, ending and adding
thread (Basics) as needed.
[4] Remove the stop bead, and join the
band into a ring by working six stitches
of right-angle weave off of the end beads
in the first and last rows, using two As
for the first stitch and one A for each
subsequent stitch.
Second layer
[1] To build a foundation for the second
layer, add As to the rows across the width
of the base, ending and adding thread as
needed: Exit an edge A (figure 1, point a),
then sew through the adjacent A (a–b).
Pick up an A, and sew through the next
A in the row (b–c), pulling the thread
tight until the A clicks into place. Continue to the end of the row (c–d), adding
a total of five As. This foundation layer
decreases
the stitches in the rows of the
a
d
c five instead of six. Sew
second blayer to
through the next two As in the base
e (d–e).
[2] Repeat step 1 (photo a) until you’ve
added foundation As to each row of the
base layer. Sew through the beadwork to
exit an A in the foundation layer.
[3] Pick up an A, and sew through an
adjacent A in the foundation layer (figure
2, a–b). Pick up an A, and sew through
the A your thread exited at the start of
this step and the next three As (b–c).
Continue working in right-angle weave
to finish the row, adding one A per
stitch (c–d) and making sure each stitch
is snug before adding the next. Repeat
(d–e) to complete the second layer.
a
b
c
d
Third layer
[1] Build a foundation for the third
layere lengthwise around the band: Add a
doubled length of 6 lb. Fireline to the
beadwork, and exit at figure 3, point a.
Pick up a color B 110 seed bead, and
sew through the next A in the round
(a–b), pulling the thread tight until the
B clicks into place. Repeat to complete
the round (b–c).
a
a
b
b
d
c
a
e
b
c
d
e
d
c
figure 1
4
Bracelets, Bangles & Cuffs
figure 2
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figure 3
[2] Sew through the beadwork to exit an
a
A in the adjacent round. Add a B as in
step 2 (c–d), and repeat to complete the
round. Add a total of four B foundation
rounds (photo b), decreasing the stitches
in the rows of the third layer to three
instead of five.
[3] Work as in step 3 of the second
layer (photo c) to complete the third
layer, using Bs instead of As.
b
Fourth layer
[1] To build a foundation for the fourth
c
d
Materials
e
two-tone bangle
• 50 g 110 metal seed beads, color A
(thebeadparlor.com)
• 10 g 110 Japanese glass or metal
seed beads, color B
• Fireline 10 lb. and 6 lb. test
• beading needles, #10
Editor’s Notes:
• Smoke-colored Fireline appears as a patina between the metal beads.
• You can use all glass seed beads, but use 6 lb. Fireline for all of the
layers. If you use all metal beads, use 10 lb. Fireline for all the layers.
layer, add As to the rows across the width
of the third layer: Add a doubled length
of 6 lb. Fireline to the beadwork, and
exit a B added in step 3 of the third
layer. Pick up an A, and sew through the
next B in the row, pulling tightly until
the A clicks into place. Repeat to complete the row. Repeat around, decreasing
the stitches in the fourth layer to two
instead of three (photo d).
[2] Sew through the beadwork to exit
an A in the foundation layer. Work as in step 3 of the second layer, using Bs
along the edges and As in the center of
the stitches (photo e). Repeat to complete
the fourth layer, and end the thread. w
Contact Shelley Nybakke at [email protected]
thebeadparlor.com or (309) 827-7708,
or visit thebeadparlor.com.
Right-angle weave
[1] To start the first row of
[4] To begin row
right-angle weave, pick up
four beads, and tie them
into a ring. Sew through the first three beads again.
[2] Pick up three beads. Sew through
the bead your thread exited at the start
c
of this step (a–b), and
continue through the
b
first two beads picked
a
up in this stitch (b–c).
[3] Continue adding three beads per
stitch until the first row is the desired
length. You are using a figure-8 thread
path, alternating
direction with
each stitch.
2, sew through
the next beads of
the last stitch,
exiting the first
edge bead.
[5] Pick up three beads, and sew
through the
c
bead your
b
thread exited
a
in the previous step (a–b).
Continue
through the first new bead (b–c).
[6] Pick up two beads, and sew through
the next edge bead in the previous row
and the bead your thread exited in the
previous stitch (a–b). Continue through
a
the two new
b
beads and
c
the next
edge bead of
the previous
row (b–c).
[7] Pick up two beads, and sew through
the last two beads your thread exited in
the previous stitch and the first new
bead. Continue using a figure-8 thread
path, picking up two beads per stitch to complete the row.
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5
PEYOTE STITCH / NETTING
3
Refined netted cuff
A platform of two-drop peyote peeks
through open netting sprinkled with
lustrous pearls or glittering crystals.
designed by Barbara Klann
A monochromatic palette (above)
lends sophistication to this bracelet
while contrasting netting (left)
accentuates the finer details.
stepbystep
are commonly called “up-beads.”
[3] For each subsequent row, pick up
To work another peyote stitch project,
see “Dimensional diamonds” on p. 12.
Base
[1] On a comfortable length of
conditioned thread (Basics, p. 14),
attach a stop bead (Basics), leaving a
6-in. (15 cm) tail. Work in flat two-drop
peyote stitch: Pick up 24 color A 110
seed beads; these beads will shift to
form the first two rows as you work
row 3.
[2] To work row 3, pick up two As,
skip the last two As added in the
previous step, and sew through the next
two As. For each subsequent stitch in
the row, pick up two As, skip two As,
and sew through the next two As. The
pairs of As added in row 3 offset the
stitches in the first two rows, and they
6
Bracelets, Bangles & Cuffs
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two As, skip two As, and sew through
the next two up-beads. Repeat to complete the row.
[4] Work as in step 3 until the base is
the desired length, ending and adding
thread (Basics) as needed. Make sure
the number of rows along each straight
edge is divisible by three.
[5] Remove the stop bead, and end the
working thread and tail.
Netting
Maintain consistent tension while
stitching the netting, but don’t pull too
tightly, or the base may curl.
[1] Add 2 yd. (1.8 m) of conditioned
thread to the beadwork, and exit an end
two-bead stack on one edge of the cuff
(figure 1, point a).
[2] Pick up six 150 seed beads, a
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4 mm crystal or pearl, six 150s, a 4 mm,
six 150s, a 4 mm, and six 150s (a–b).
Sew through the base as shown to
exit the fourth bead stack on the same
edge (b–c).
[3] Pick up six 150s, and sew back
through the last 4 mm added in the
previous step (c–d and photo a). Pick up
six 150s, a 4 mm, and six 150s, and sew
through the first 4 mm added in the
previous step (d–e). Pick up six 150s,
and sew through the fourth bead stack
on the opposite edge (e–f and photo b).
Sew through the base to exit the seventh
bead stack along the same edge (f–g).
[4] Pick up six 150s, a 4 mm, and
six 150s, and sew through the center
4 mm added in the previous step (g–h).
Pick up six 150s, a 4 mm, and six 150s,
and sew through the seventh bead stack
along the opposite edge (h–i). Sew
through the base to exit the 10th bead
i
d
b
j
c
i
h
d
b
a
e
h
f
a
e
g
c
d
f
a
g
stack along the same edge (i–j).
[5] Repeat steps 3 and 4, skipping
two bead stacks with each netted row,
until you’re 1⁄4 in. (6 mm) from the
end, allowing room for the overlap of
the snaps.
[6] Retrace the thread path, and secure
a 4 mmcto the base
each end’s center
e
with a few thread paths to maintain the
b the thread.
d
netted spacing (photo c). End
Edging
[1] Add 2 yd. (1.8 m) of thread to the
base, and exit an end bead stack along
one edge (figure 2, point a).
[2] Pick up five color B 110 seed beads,
skip three bead stacks, and sew through
the fifth bead stack (a–b).
[3] Gently tighten the loop. Sew
through the base to exit at point c.
Make sure to always exit in front of the loop you’ve just made.
c
a
figure 1
e
b
[4] Pick up five Bs, skip three bead
stacks, and sew through the seventh
bead stack from the end, gently tightening the loop (c–d).
[5] Sew through the base to begin
another loop (d–e), and continue in
this manner until you reach the other
end of the base. End the thread.
[6] Repeat steps 1–5 along the
remaining edge.
Clasp
Add 1 yd. (.9 m) of thread to the base,
and sew the corresponding halves of
three snaps to each end of the bracelet
(photo d).
Contact Barbara Klann in care of
Bead&Button.
d
figure 2
Materials
bracelet 71⁄2–81⁄2 in. (19.1–21.6 cm)
• 49–55 4 mm bicone crystals
or pearls
• 110 seed beads
25–35 g color A
10 g color B
• 5 g 150 seed beads
• 3 sew-on snaps, or alternate clasp
• nylon beading thread, size D,
conditioned with beeswax or
Thread Heaven
• beading needles, #12
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7
BEAD CROCHET
4
Gemstone crochet
bangle
Combining natural stone and sterling silver
gives this bracelet substance and style.
designed by Stephanie Riger
stepbystep
The ends of this
tube are seamlessly
joined to create
a solid, slip-on
bangle.
[1] Thread the Big Eye
needle on the spool of cord,
and pick up eight 4 mm
round sterling silver beads,
a 4.5 mm silver accent bead,
a 5 mm gemstone bead, and
a 4.5 mm accent bead. Repeat
until all the beads are strung.
Do not cut the cord from
the spool.
[2] Leaving a 10-in. (25 cm)
tail, work in bead chain stitch
(see p. 9) to crochet the first
five beads (photo a).
[3] To form a ring, connect
the last stitch to the first by
inserting the hook to the left
of the first bead (photo b).
Slide a new bead down, and
work a bead slip stitch (p. 9
and photo c).
[4] Insert the scrap wire into
the center of the ring to help
materials
bangle 7 in. (18 cm)
• 24 5 mm round gemstone
beads
• 48 4.5 mm silver accent
beads
• 192 4 mm round sterling
silver beads
• 4 in. (10 cm) scrap wire
• Tuff-Cord, size #2
• Big Eye needle
• tapestry needle
• 10 mm steel crochet hook
8
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identify where your stitches
will go (photo d). You may
wish to curl the end of the
wire to keep it from slipping
out of the beadwork. Remove
the wire after a few rounds.
[5] Continue to work in bead
slip stitch, using medium tension, until all the beads are
used. Work one slip stitch
without a bead, pull through
a 6-in. (15 cm) tail, and cut
the cord from the spool.
[6] Thread the tapestry
needle on the 6-in. (15 cm)
tail, and sew into the center
of the crochet rope 2 in.
(5 cm) from the end. End
the tail (Basics, p. 14),
and trim the cord close
to the rope.
[7] Thread the tapestry
needle on the 10-in. (25 cm)
tail. To position the tail, sew
into the cord loop next to the
first bead added (photo e).
[8] Hold the two ends of the
rope together to align the
pattern (photo f). Determine
which bead in the last round
matches the bead the cord is
exiting in the first round. Sew
through to the left of that
bead, where you would insert
the crochet hook if
you were adding another
bead slip stitch (photo g).
Push that bead over to the
right, and pull the end rows
together. Sew through the
cord loop next to the next
bead in the first round, and
pull (photo h). Repeat around
until the ends are joined. End
the tail. w
Visit Stephanie Riger’s
website, stephanieriger.com.
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
Choose gemstones
that contrast with the
silver beads for an
eye-catching effect.
Editor’s note: To make this version of the
bangle, I substituted 4 mm round crystals for the
gemstones, 4 mm bicone crystals for the 4.5 mm
silver accent beads, and 110 silver-plated seed
beads for the 4 mm round sterling silver beads.
h
Bead chain stitch
Bead slip stitch
Make a loop in the cord, crossing the ball end over
the tail. Put the hook through the loop, yarn over the
hook, and draw through the first loop.
Slide a bead down to the hook. Yarn over the hook,
and draw through the loop. Repeat for the desired
number of chain stitches. The bead chain will curve
slightly.
Insert the hook to the left of the next bead, and flip
that bead to the right. Slide a bead down to the hook,
yarn over, and bring the yarn through both the stitch
and the loop on the hook.
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9
NETTING
Web of silver
Highlight a favorite focal bead and colorful captured gemstones
in a bracelet that’s rich with detail and simple to stitch.
designed by Marla Gulotta
Choose a clasp to
balance the weight of
the focal bead.
Use a
unique
focal bead
for your
centerpiece.
10
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Materials
bracelet 8½ in. (21.6 cm)
• 15–20 mm silver focal bead
• 160–190 3 mm gemstone beads
• 2 5 mm silver beads
• 2–4 3 mm silver beads
• 20 2 mm silver beads
• 3 g 110 seed beads
• 5 g 150 seed beads
• clasp
• 2 12–15 mm bead caps
• 10 in. (25 cm) 18-gauge silver wire,
half-hard
• Fireline 6 lb. test
• beading needles, #12
• chainnose pliers
• roundnose pliers
• wire cutters
a
b
stepbystep
Netted tubes
[1] On a comfortable length of Fireline,
pick up an alternating pattern of a 2 mm silver bead and an 110 seed bead
five times, leaving a 6-in. (15 cm) tail.
Tie the beads into a ring with a square
knot (Basics, p. 14). Sew through the
beads again, and continue through the
next 2 mm and 110 (figure, a–b).
[2] Pick up three 150 seed beads, an 110,
and three 150s, and sew through the next
110 in the previous round (b–c). Repeat
around the ring, and step up through the
first three 150s and 110 added in this
round (c–d).
[3] Pick up a 3 mm gemstone bead,
and sew through the next 110 in the
previous round (d–e). Repeat around
(e–f). The beads will form a tube.
[4] Repeat steps 2 and 3 until the
tube is approximately 2½ in. (6.4 cm)
long, substituting 2 mms for the 3 mms in the last round, and ending
and adding thread (Basics) as needed.
End the working thread and tail.
[5] Make a second tube.
Assembly
[1] Cut a 10-in. (25 cm) piece of
18-gauge wire. Center the focal bead on the wire.
[2] On each end, string a 3 mm silver
bead, a bead cap, a netted tube, and a 5 mm silver bead. If your 5 mm will not
sit nicely on the end of the tube, string a 3 mm before the 5 mm on each end
(photo a).
[3] At one end of the bracelet, make
the first half of a wrapped loop (Basics),
slide half of the clasp into the loop, and
complete the wraps (photo b). Gently
shape the bracelet into a circle, snug up
the beads as needed, and repeat on the
other end. w
Marla Gulotta came to beading
through her love of vintage jewelry.
She enjoys the creative process of bead
weaving and designing with gemstones.
Contact Marla via e-mail at [email protected]
sbcglobal.net.
a
b
f
d
c
e
figure
EDITOR’S NOTE: If the loop of your clasp is not large enough
to accommodate the 18-gauge
wire, complete theBracelets
wrapped loops on
PLEASE PROOF:
Illustrator Kellie J
Title
illustrators,
each end of the bracelet, Individual
and use
jump ringsIssue
to attach
half of the clasp
April
2011
Designer
designers, art directors,
to each end.
Art Dir.
Job # CIR-PRM-BNB1104
and editors must proof
Story Ed.
Code BNB-PB-618252
Copy Ed.
Proof 1
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12-1-11
Bracelets, Bangles & Cuffs
Ed.
11
Man.
Date
Editor
Return
and sign this form.
Hard lines of the
diamond motif blend
easily with soft
curves when you
combine two sizes
of seed beads.
PEYOTE STITCH
Dimensional diamonds
Stitch diamond shapes into a peyote pattern to create a textured cuff.
designed by Angie Weathers
materials
cuff 8 in. (20 cm)
• 10 g 110 cylinder beads, color A
• 5 g 110 seed beads, color B
• 4 g 150 seed beads
• Fireline 6 lb. test
• beading needles, #12
12
Bracelets, Bangles & Cuffs
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stepbystep
Maintain even tension as you work.
If your stitches are too tight, your
diamond sections will pucker, and if
your stitches are too loose, the thread
will show. Work with comfortable
lengths of Fireline, ending and adding
thread (Basics, p. 14) as needed.
[1] Attach a stop bead (Basics) to a
comfortable length of thread, leaving
a 10-in. (25 cm) tail.
[2] Work in odd-count peyote stitch:
Pick up 23 color A cylinder beads, which
will shift to form the first two rows as the
third row is added. To work an evencount turn (after each even-numbered
row), pick up an A, skip an A in the first
row, and sew through the next A (figure
1, a–b). Repeat to complete the row, stopping short of the last bead (b–c). To work
the first odd-count turn, pick up an A,
and sew back through the remaining A in
the first row (c–d). Flip your beadwork so
the working thread faces your dominant
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hand. Continue working in peyote stitch
(figure 2, a–b), but for subsequent odd-
count turns (at the end of each odd-numbered row), pick up an A, sew under the
thread bridge between the previous two
edge As, and sew back through the last A
added (b–c).
[3] Referring to figure 3, continue working in peyote stitch for a total of 15
rows using As.
[4] To work a diamond section, refer to
figure 3, picking up one bead per stitch
as follows:
Row 16: Five As, one color B 110 seed
bead, and five As.
Row 17: Five As, two Bs, and five As.
Row 18: Four As, three Bs, and four As.
Row 19: Four As, four Bs, and four As.
Row 20: Three As, five Bs, and three As.
Row 21: Three As, six Bs, and three As.
Row 22: Two As, seven Bs, and two As.
Rows 23–28: Work rows 21–16 to complete the second half of the diamond.
[5] Repeat steps 3 and 4 for a total of
nine diamond sections.
a
d
c
a
b
c
b
figure 1
figure 2
figure 3
figure 4
c
a
editor’s cnote:
b
a
I am always
looking for ways
to make a project
in half
the
c
b a
time (and sometimes with
b I made
half the materials). So
a cuff with 100 cylinders in
place of the 110 cylinders,
80 seed beads in place of
the 110 seed beads, and 110
cylinders in place of the 150
seed beads. I started with 11
100 cylinders for my first
row. – Anna
[6] To create the cuff, zigzag through
www
View a demonstration of odd-count
figure 5
DESIGNER’S NOTE:
To avoid the
odd-count turn, omit the row of As
along one edge of the pattern. Work
steps 1–5, then add a round of As in
brick stitch along the same edge to
center the diamonds: Pick up two As,
sew under the thread bridge between
the first two As along the edge row,
and sew back through the second A
just picked up. For each subsequent
stitch, pick up one A, sew under the
next thread bridge, and sew back
through the A just picked up.
the end beads in the first and last rows peyote at BeadAndButton.com/videos.
(figure 4), and end the working thread
and tail.
[7] To make the edge embellishment,
add 1 yd. (.9 m) of Fireline, leaving a
6-in. (15 cm) tail. Sew through the beadwork to exit an A along one edge of the
cuff (figure 5, point a). Pick up four 150
seed beads, and lay the beads along the
edge of the cuff. Sew through the edge A closest to the last 150 picked up (a–b).
Sew through the previous edge A and
the last two 150s again (b–c). Repeat,
adding the edge embellishment around
the cuff, and end the working thread
and tail. Repeat the edge embellishment
along the remaining edge. w
Contact Angie Weathers via e-mail
at [email protected], or visit her
website at picturetrail.com/wowmaw.
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13
Basics
Conditioning thread
Use either beeswax (not candle wax or
paraffin) or Thread Heaven to condition
nylon thread. Beeswax smooths the
nylon fibers and adds tackiness that will
stiffen your beadwork slightly. Thread
Heaven adds a static charge that causes
the thread to repel itself, so don’t use it
with doubled thread. Stretch the thread,
then pull it through the conditioner.
Ending/adding thread
To end a thread, sew back into the
beadwork, following the existing thread
path and tying two or three half-hitch
knots (see Half-hitch knot) between
beads as you go. Sew through a few
beads after the last knot before trimming the thread.
To add a thread, sew into the beadwork several rows prior to where the
last bead was added. Sew through the
beadwork, tying half-hitch knots as you
go, and exit where you left off.
Half-hitch knot
Pass the needle under
the thread between two
beads. A loop will form
as you pull the thread
through. Cross over
the thread between the
beads, sew through the
loop, and pull gently to
draw the knot into the
beadwork.
Stop bead
Use a stop bead to
secure beads temporarily
when you begin stitching. Choose
a bead that is distinctly different from
the beads in your project. String the
stop bead about 6 in. (15 cm) from the
end of your thread, and sew through it
again in the same direction. If desired,
sew through it one more time for added
security.
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Bracelets, Bangles & Cuffs
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Square knot
[1] Cross the left-
Wrapped loop
[1] Using chainnose
hand end of the
thread over the right,
and bring it around
and back up.
[2] Cross the end
that is now on the
right over the left,
go through the loop,
and pull both ends
to tighten.
pliers, make a rightangle bend in the
wire at least 1¼ in.
(3.2 cm) from the
end of the wire.
[2] Position the jaws
of the roundnose
pliers in the bend.
[3] Curve the short
end of the wire over
the top jaw of the
roundnose pliers.
[4] Reposition the
pliers so the lower jaw
fits snugly in the loop.
Curve the wire downward around the bottom jaw of the pliers.
This is the first half
of a wrapped loop.
[5] To complete the
wraps, grasp the
top of the loop with
chainnose pliers.
[6] Wrap the wire
around the stem
two or three times.
Trim the excess wire,
and gently press the
cut end close to
the wraps with
chainnose pliers. w
Crimping
Use crimp beads to secure flexible beading wire. Slide the crimp bead into
place, and squeeze it firmly with chainnose pliers to flatten it. For a more
finished look, use crimping pliers:
[1] Position the crimp bead in the hole
that is closest to the handle of the
crimping pliers.
[2] Holding the
wires apart, squeeze
the pliers to compress
the crimp bead,
1
making sure one
wire is on each side
of the dent.
[3] Place the crimp
bead in the front hole
of the pliers, and
2
position it so the
dent is facing the tips
of the pliers. Squeeze
the pliers to fold the
crimp in half.
[4] Tug on the wires
3
to ensure that the
crimp is secure.
1
2
3
4
5
6
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