Document 96743

'
THE
(i
NEW
YORK
SUN,
SATURDAY,
JANUARY
V
23, 1932.
•'/TM.I/'-PT
l
'\
WHERE SANDWICH GLASS WAS MADE IN THE FACTORY'S PALMY DAYS
PRESSED GLASS AT ITS BEAUTIFUL BEST
Sandwich Glass 1825-1888,
Its History in Brief Outline
$ X VIBWrOV THE B O S I O N & S A N D W I C H C L A S S Cf" V O r J w
Labor Troubles Forced Abandonment of Enterprise That in Sixty-three Years Produced
$30,000,000 Worth of Wares.
\jf
I
By CHARLES MESSER STOW.
On September 4, 1920, I published in the Boston Evening;
Transcript the results of certain researches into the history of [
the Boston 4 Sandwich Glass Company, a subject at that time j
just beginning to receive attention from collectors in general.,
For a long while this remained the only available source sfi
data and was quoted at some length by N. Hudson Moore in
her book "Old Class, American and European." The article
has, of course, long been out of print, but there has been a \
continued demand for it and in response to many requests,
f'*n4t*t*T* / *
Sandwich jewel casket in the Peacock Feather and Shield pattern mad*
£*.-&»
with due acknowledgments to the Transcript, I am glad to
about 1835. Now in the collection of Warren B. Nash, New York.
reprint its substance here as follows:
Lithograph taken iron* a hill head, bearing the date 1844, showing the works of the Boston A Sandwich Glass Company. Incidentally this invoice
—
During its long career, from 1825
Sandwich
,
which
was
used to the company's
to 1888, the works at
turned out all sorts of glass for all profit both for tableware and other
sorts of uses
In the early day* commercial uses. At one time the
came the articles of pressed glass factory was turning out gas shades
now called "lacy," which are in de- in from forty to fifty patterns, and
mand, and indeed it has been said many of these were etched.
that this factory was the first in the
Glass In various colors was also
United States to make pressed glass. made, and many articles of opalesIt made also some of the curious cent glass were also sent out, among
millefioti paper weights. Later it them lampshades from six to sixmade full sets for the table—goblets, teen inches across, very difficult to
tumblers and all kinds of wine blow. Besides the opal there was
glasses, with finger bowls and other m uch ruby glass^turned ^out^ which
accessories. These were plain, cut. was colored by the use of gold, and
etched or engraved. About I860 the also blue, canary and black. A few
management sent a man to Europe ruby lantern globes were made.
to study the process of acid etching.
In the later years of its existence
and he brought back a machine the company did a large export business, especially In kerosene lamps.
iinilliHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIiltllHIIIHIIIIHttlWIIHttfHItllWlliHIIIIIIII fl||!l!!|||l!! For certain styles brass standards
were bought and the bowls and
chimneys fitted at Sandwich, while
others were all of glass. There were
also cruets made for various purposes as well as tumblers-at one
time 500 tumblers every five-hour
shift—and jars and bottles of all
sizes.
months from first breaking ground, ! ing of the workere to Inquire if it
was for a shipment of glass to India.
commenced blowing glass."
j were true. The union leaders corThe beginning was modest, just an I toborated the report, whereupon the
nihility of his having made a genuine ter Is also known as the HamiItet
eight-pot furnace, holding 800 pounds company announced that it had
"find." One instance of this irreg- pattern. It consists of very fine inp.
each which melted 7,000 pounds been running for several years with
ular manufacturer is a Horn-of- converging to points and is though!
weekly
The location at Sandwich j little or no profit and offered to open
Plenty butter dish with a design of to have been a copy of the Ins/
was not on account of the sand there, its booke to a committee of the union
the head of George Washington for Waterford cutglass design.
but there was a large amount of tim- j to prove Its statement. It said that
The Sandwich Star might he mes
ber available" near by and the works! it could not continue under the old ; I o a : r . l
D e i C r i D t i v e T i t l e s U a U i & l l v G i v e n t o I5 ^ S t * " ^
The Horn-of-Plenty
ined wood for fuel The policy of \ scale and besides it had on hand an j 1 - O g l C a i L / C » C n p « V C
1 H i e s U S U A l i y V J l V e n \0
design is on the outside of the cover, tioned here. It is a favorite wiU)
p
•*"'*»J D » ~ 1 . . * . » .
1 whereas, usually, in covered dishes collectors. Much of the clear flin;
Mr. Jarves was to buy land with order for a large number of lamps
t ^ a p e V*OCl J r r o a U C I S .
| 0 f this pattern the deilgn is on the glass shown in this, accentuating ta
timber on it, and the agent who was j for which the materials were all
central design.
inside.
in charge of the works, besides hav-1 ready. If the men would only finish
Everyone is familiar with th
j j n ^ authority to buy land, had also J this "order they might strike" for as
The
lacy
glass
patterns
are
easily
By LAVINIA WALSH.
,t h e m o s t d i a t i n g u i g h e d of t n e S a n d .
j l h < ; d u t y o f ; e e i n ( r t o t h e erection of ] long as they liked and the plant
Continued on Following Pave.
The purpose of making a collection of old Sandwich glass wich pressed designs. So exquisitely
| n o u s e , f o r t h e workmen. It seems i would be closed until they returned,
fin
r the8e
h el
that he exceeded his authority some-1 Otherwise, if unable to make the \ o n c e f o r m e d , t h e n e x t S t e p , a n d a n i m p o r t a n t o n e , i s t o a c * * f
*g* * ******
** )
what and soon Mr. Jarves found . lamps, the company would have to I
.
. .
...
, . .
_ . ,
seems to cover the entire surface of
THE
that he needed more capital than he buy them elsewhere to fill the order. j q u i r e a k n o w l e d g e 0 1 t h e p a t t e r n s , DUt S i n c e n o OttlCial Cata- the object. Conventional and floral
es, n9
possessed to carry out the ambitious j thereby losing several thousand dol- \ o e h a s b e e n f o u n d d e a l i n g s p e c i a l l v w i t h t h i s d e t a i l of p r o - dspecialty
* 4 ««med
to have been a
of lacy manufacture.
v
plans which had been developed. He '• lars.
j • .
• J
*
soecialt
Fine Collections.
therefore formed a stock company j The spokesman for the company d u c t i o n , t h e k n o w l e d g e m u s t d e p e n d On t h e w o r d , o r q u o t e d
their
best
friend,
the
company
or
the
Company
was
incorporated
on
Feb
and the Boston & Sandwich Glass asked the men who they considered ' w oCollections
e f e wone
s u rpattern
v i v i n g for
w o r k m e n Or t h e i r d e s c e n d a n t s .
r d , o f t h with
What may be accomplished in the
tuary 22. 1828. bv Deming Jarves. union. There could be but one |
INC.
way of a collection of this lacy glass
Andrew T. Hall and answer to that, btit they said that a basie are generally artistic and I creation, while the blundering lay- may be seen in the "Nickerson" colHenry Rire
I E d w a r d Monroe. At this time from they had been ordeied to strike and genuine, and there Is nothing by i man picks his misnomer without lection, made by Thomas H. NickerSpecializing in Antique
sixty to seventy men were employed they would have to obey the union. which we can trace this glass so j e v e n * n «y« t o common sense.
son of Harwlchport. It is said that
and Modern
and the manufactured goods proevery pattern Is represented. It took
P l a n t Closed A f t e r s t r i k e
Collection of Goblets.
well as by the pattern, for Sandduced
yearly
amounted
to
about
him fifteen years to acquire its two
Some M a t t e r s of H l a t o r r .
Then the glass company issued an wich molds were used nowhere else.
These
pressed
glass
patterns. hundred pieces.. These range in size
$7f>,000 worth.
71 EAST 57TH ST.
During the eighteen-eighties the
The glass works prospered from
m ! ultimatum of its own. if the fires I The patterns were often copied, j products of the middle years of tt« | ZZTXJ^ZL
ofTttc^eTfrorrTs
tad
Boston & Sandwich Glass Company the start and regularly and grad „ | were snows* J S go out they would | h o w e v e r .
j Boston A Sandwich Glass Works' , « « »
^ ' ' t V t S S ^ , , ;
i was employing something like three ally expanded, employing more and I never be built again. There was
hundred men and boys, and these more men and turning out more and not enough profit In the business as
A ™ * t h e older p a t t ^ ^
; workers were making wages of from more glass. By 1854 the capitaliza-' it was run under existing conditions l
a
^
i
S
^
^
S
E
spoonholders. sugar bowl,, ZO^>.
^
S ^ iVl&s^
Z ^ "
*"""* ° ' ° " *
trp villi?
Unutual Values
four to six dollars a day. But on tion had reached $400,000 and 500 ' for it to continue and If there was favorites, and some have found the
and
often
one
may
complete
a
set
I
distinguished
specimen of
A
n
Horn-of-Plenty
an
exhilarating
purJanuary 1. 1888. the glass works men and boys were employed. The ! a strike it would close the plant. One
r
,s t hat o f t h e
deai
\ were closed and the affairs of the value of the goods manufactured big fellow intimated that It was a suit. That these names not only from pieces collected at various parts ; S a n d w i c h ,
1358 6th Ave., cor. 55th St.
of
the
country.
One
woman
was
i
.
^
a
w
e
l
c
a
a
k
e
t
f
D
e
c
o
c
k feather dewere
factory
names
but
held
good
I
Boston
&
Sandwich
Glass
Company
Telephone*:
Circle 7-3781—3781
bluff,
that
the
company
could
not
each
year
had
reached
$600,000.
REDUCTIONS
p r o p e r t y of Warren B. Nash of
the trade is evidenced by an successful in acquiring a collection ,
J were wound up. But for a certain 111In 1858, after a quarrel among the afford to close the plant, that all owith
• advised strike Sandwich might have directors, Deming Jarves left the the" workers'had Vo'do'was to "standll l d b i n o f l a d , n * w h , c h t h e w r l t e r of goblets of the various patterns, j S J J | yg-jj
advanced to be one of the major company and formed the Cape Cod firm and call the bluff. So the had the privilege of exsmlning. It The collection would have proved
rather a harrowing display had she
Perhaps we should mention here
I manufacturing towns of the State, Glass Works, to run In competition strike was on.
shows that shipments of glass were not confined it to one tvpe of ob- : t h a t snakesktn glass and lacy glass
This little-known chapter of Massa- with the factory he had started, but
It was not a bluff, however, and made to India under some of them.. ject, for the mingling of odd pat- i a r e sometimes mistaken for each
chusetts industrial history runs it was never a great factor In the when, on January 1. 1888, the plant notably the Ivy and Bellflower.
terns on odd pieces leaves no under- j o t h e r - T h , s e r r o r , s d u e . "° doubt,
somewhat as follows:
was
closed,
it
was
not
reopened.
glass industry of the Cape and conlying motive for the beholder to t o t h e f a c t t h a t * a c h h a s • frosted
Pattern 5 s n * i Deaerlntlro.
Early in 1825 a Boston man named tinued only a short time after the The company wound up its affairs
grasp, and at best is a tower of Ba look. Seen together, the pattern disand Ht.r.m
the dif- .
A word of warning to the collector DP i achievement.
,j tinction .is readily
. . . made,
„i a i„i„
Jilllllllllllllllilllllllllll'lll!!n!!"':iihll!!!!!li!S!!!!:! ,.:i..-. Deming Jarves, who had been con- death of Mr. Jarves In April, 1869. end went out of business.
ference in aunace
surface isis piamiy
plainly oiscerndiscern- {
nected with the New England Glass
The closing of the works wrought concerning common mistakes should j T h e value of a collection of old |I1ferencejn
W o r k e r * J o i n 1'nlon,
ible.
Snakeskin
glass
Is
dull
and ' RUSSIAN ROYAL PALA.CES
Company and who is said to have
on the men who ; not be amiss. There seems to be an | Sandwich pressed glass from an arThings ran smoothly
for town
town I a great hardship
rough
of
surface
while
lacy
glass
has
jouuy both
coin ior
homes.
So
much
real'
uncertainty
in
the
minds
of
many
tistie
point
of
view
must
depend
had a great fondness for that part
V
0wned their
of Cape Cod. called a meeting of the and works unt il a delegation of P S t a t e thrown on the market at one interested people who are hovering largely upon the qualities of the a satiny sheen. The snakeskin deworkers
from
Pen
'ennsylvania visited , i m e f o r c e d , h e p , i C P 9 down, and between a desire to collect and a p e i s o n who makes it, for it is In- sign is a good imitation of the
citizens of Sandwich and told them
plant and urged
workmen
broken scaly lines on a snake's body
jrged the
the workmen
that he had recently been on a trip the
t h e men
f o i i n { j t n a t t n e y c o u i , j ob _ fear that the objects of their choice variably an expression of the col• ah'tho w*Vt'Vnd"Vad"ohs"ervedl,,t S a n d w i c h t 0 organize themselves t a i n b , l t „ 8 m a l , p g r t o f w n a t t h e i r ; may not prove to be genuine sped- , ] ec tor. to his glory or his discredit
(another instance of excellent name
throu_
into a union
This waS a
ideH n e W
choosing), while the lacy glass pat\l
other
thinethat'
'
"
Property
was
worth,
much
less
what
!
mens.
These
should
take
into
conamong
interesting
tntngs
a a a connoi^seur-and the latter, unJanuary IS to February 12.
terns are exquisitely regular, showthe men
working
in the glass
ig omer
imeresung
inn K.work* | g ( h e C a p e B n ( J | n p e r p l e x i t y the , ( h e y h a d p u t , n t o | t
D u i i n g t h p sideration the fact that the factory fortunately, is often the case.
of Pittsburgh were making from $2 men sought the advice of Mr. Jarves year 1888 some ten of the workers names for patterns were remarkably I This does not apply to the collec- ing definite purpose in design.
Cup plates of Sandwich manufacto $2.50 a day and that the labor was
k
eces ture provide a most interesting field I
neither arduous nor dangerou
emoc-' for the glass enthusiast. Among the j
Jarves told the meeting that
were sufficient interest man
_
_.
„
...
__.back
rarest cup plate patterns are the
9
Origimal LUkttgrmfhi m* itlsufrafed)
in Sandwich he would build a glass care. He was concerned only with The venture did not succeed, how-1 sense, should in most cases solve the n e r e > for l n i a c y g ] a a 9 t h e r e u an Chancellor
Livingstone.
George
In i*» t e * * a*
getting
a
fair
day's
work
for
a
fair
works there In order that the citiever. During the sixty-three years difficulty.
| aristocracy upheld by the humblest Washington. Victoria. Ben Franklin,
day's
pay.
He
could
not
see
what
zens might profit by the employR t R R V T. FETTERS.
of its existence the Boston A Sand- i A goblet or a sugar bowl that car- : m e m b e r of the lacy product. Here the Eagle, the Beehive. This last is
307-9-11 EAST 53rd ST.
ment. Now. $2 a day was a high wage advantage a union would be to wich Glass Company had paid out ried the factory name of Hobnail | beauty and art go hand ln han.d.
especially beautiful. The design of :
them,
for
their
wages
were
satisfacin those times, and Sandwich proin wages about $22,000,000 and had has a design that looks like hob-1 A s l d e f r o m t h e l a c y sp< > c j m ens the > a beehive stands in relief on clear!
Importers of
ceeded to show that It was interested tory and their living conditions were produced about $30,000,000 worth of nails and like nothing else under the i sandwich pressed glass has not so flint glass. All these designs were
hetter
thnn
those
of
the
operatives
and the glass works were built.
sun. It does not look like Diamond m u c n n beauty of artistic value as it , among the early products of the facin Pittsburgh or any other glass glass.
Point. thouRh. strange to say, these n a» a character expressive of a place j tory.
The year 1831 is known
center.
MndeM R e s i n n i n g * .
two patterns are continually con-1 a n ( i its people. It reflects a certain i definitely as the date when the
However, the men were swayed by
fused. The Hobnail pattern has an ruggedness that fits admirably into i Eagle was manufactured,
As Mr. Jarves himself writes of 1 n e smooth-tongued organizers and
all-over design of uniform projec- t h e N e w England scheme of things, j Cup plate designs more commonly
it: "Ground was broke In April. [ they formed their union. From that
tions with rounded heads-hence
Some old records reveal the check j seen ars the Leafy Border with
1825, dwellings for the workmen time things began to go less
hobnail. The Diamond Point design "undersold" against various prod- j daisy center, the Constitution, the
C ^ ^ ^ G ^ e r r y r/ee«» rXratman ^ ^ ^ O
smoothly.
There
were
numbers
of
built and manufacture completed;
Wholesale
is likewise an all-over design but the u c t a , significant of the competitive Cadmus, the Thistle, the Butterfly
ty» Lexington Ave at -»oth Si..-Arm york> and on the fourth day of July, three iules and regulations which they
projections are not rounded, but struggle of the times surrounding the and Daisy, the Opalescent, the
Prices in line with present
had to abide by, and which had
conditions.
•
.
i n
pointed, as the name Implies. Quite civil war: but, although the com- Fleur-de-lis, the Sunburst. The latnever been found necessary before. f% , i
frequently the Diamond Point pat- pany lessened Its output to meet the
The company made no complaint O e n t l e d W e e rp i n g a n d vOOaO
v u
In turn
turn ia
is mistaken
mistaken for
for the
the falling off in trade, the best of these
•
r : »tern
in
about the restrictions Imposed, but
pr „
Grant
pattern. This error is per- patterns were continued, and with
met all the demands of the men
The Following Dealers Arc Members of
haps more excusable, for the Grant no deterioration In quality. The
and watched its profits being cut
pattern
is
a
modification
of
the
writer's
authority
for
this
statement
down and its production slowed up.
Cleaning preserves Oriental rugs. Diamond Point, in fact, is the same is the word of Elliot W. Spurr of
For mutual protection and trade
It
also improves their looks, in the design on a smaller scale. It Is said Maiden, whose father. Henry Spurr,
advantage the Sandwich company
MICHAELYAN. H.
ACKERMANN GALLERIES
that Abram French, the company's was associated with the factory manC0U
6 unt
had""fo"rmed " a working agVe'ement I , r fFa "c o f "™
**thZr*°\*r
*h* largest wholesale purchaser, sug- agement. The son recalls that the
Orienlol Run* and Tap«.*trir«
4ntiQU« Furvilur* and ANRHR0S
d d t, r t
nd
V-20 Wast 47th Str..'
60 Eaat 6Tth Street
with other glass manufacturers of , "
« ™
, • , f «* « " * £ « ' gested that the factory manufacture elder Spurr frequently voiced the
BERNSTEIN,
D.
A.
MOORE.
ROLAND.
INC
wa"s Z ^ ^ W & a S S V S S
" « » 5 l S t ' Sra^uan^wm T e s ^ -rnethlng in honor of President fact that the company insisted, to
American auit Fnplish Antiqum
Chine** Anti'i'-r'—0;a
Fum'trr
the
end.
that
only
the
best
ingre10
1
114
K.est
STth
Street
42 Eaat 57th St- •
r a c t u r ^ ^ A s s ' o d a U r ^ t t T S ff f^ "
?' " " T * "
^
*>i I • * • " < the pattern bearing hi. dients should be used. Purity of maname was the result.
T h e Saturday Sun includes each week two or more
DAVIES. TURNER fr CO.
of December. 1887. the association j to_£" r "*» p ! ° p « r l y '
NEWTON. ARTHUR U.
terial was always urged by Deming
raikino— Delii erlea
Old u»rf Mnitern MOt'-ft
Varloaa r m c r m .
presented
a
new
scale,
which
'
The
dust
should
be
removed
with
a
w
a
8
SB
Pearl
Htreat
Jarves.
pages devoted to Antiques and Interior Decoration.
4 Eaat 3Gth Su<•:
to he uniform in all the factories, broom, he says, sweeping with the
DAWSON
What does the Loop and Jewel
and
contained,
among
other
details,
OLD
PRINT
SHOP.
Inc.
n p gently. Vacuum cleaners do ex- pattern resemble* Just that and j
These pages, copiously illustrated, contain reliable
AntUpttHfD-Obiectii nl Art
K«P#rlmenia1 r i e c « .
the demand that the right of the cellent work in this respect.
tarly Amrrtran PriafJ
19 East ciith Streat
The nothing else—a loop and a spear- ! Here is a point which should be
i.'iO URlngtea A-t.
manufacturer to employ or discharge soot that lodges In the fabric of the
and informing articles on antiques and decorative
EHRICH GALLERIES
raitifit'ps, Antique B»oK«h Fiirn«fur«
employees must be acknowledged rug should be washed away at Inter- shaped jewel alternating on some- held in mind by collectors. SomeOLD ENGLISH GALLERIES
3« K**t r>*th Street
accessories. They also keep their readers abreast of
Enolieh Anita*** >i»tt Kmly
titrn
and that employers or employees I vals. A good quality of soap and times a stipple, sometimes a clear | times one comes upon a piece of
New Voik: 1.11 Eaat • r.li .••'.
glass which seems to have no dupliFARMER, EDWARD I., INC
must not disciiminate for or against warm water are all that Is necessary glass ground.
Itneton:
M
end
M
Cheatnul
,w<
the news of these fields. They are edited' by Charles
Chine** Ceromics— Kno/isft Furniture
The Cable pattern shows, unmls-i c a t e , however much he may search
\ I
any individual because of his mem- for ordinary cleaning, after which
16 East SCth Street
! and he passes It up as modern. The
PLAZA ART CALLERIES. INC
bership in any organization. There the rug should be rinsed thoroughly! | takably, a solidly twisted rope.
Messcr Stow, an antiquarian of national reputation.
FRENCH b CO.
A • i .4 »i I 111 " " ' i ' i
If
possible,
the
rug
should
be
dried
I
A
very
common
error
Is
that
whlcb
explanation
of
the
existence
of
sucn
:
was also a readjustment of wages.
KipMlnij, Furrtttire, Worlrn at Art
o
E«»t sots Btreat
in
the
sun
I
confuses
Thumbprint
with
Bullseye.
i
|
e
s
.
as
told
by
an
old
glassonft p M
If you live otitside Greater N e w York you may have
At once there was a clamor from
210 Eaat r.Tih street
Be
gentle
and
kind
to
your
rug
I
The
former
has
a
surface
of
Joined
j
maker
in
Sandwich,
Is
that
they
are
ROBINSON.
(AMES
every glass works where it was proGINSBURC & LEVY
'• i l i f t i A v e n g e
the Saturday Sun with these pages mailed to you
,l>n-ii tin and Ktiotiih Antiqvm
posed to put the new rules Into ef- says Mr. Michaelyan. A good rug is "at impressions which, in a malle- ( experimental products, made by
a
treasure.
It
is
an
Investment
where
!
able
substance,
might
easily
be
made
,
curious-minded,
ambitious
workmen,
S15 Madlaon Avenna
fect. The company at New Bedford
R0SENBACH COMPANY
(THE)
each week for $1.50 a year.
GRIEVE, M COMPANY
did not agree with the other manu- the principal never depreciates and by the thumb, while the Bullseye i w h o were ever striving for progresI 'ltyt|'lf,^ iiinit»»e— |i«iini."«ri
the
dividend,
ln
pleasure,
never
Is
surface
consists
of
ovals
of
about
,
ive
effects;
but
as
merchandise
IS Kaal M-'.'iC i:.'»i 4t'l\ streit
jSnhgiie Jrojmit ef AH Pfrtrxtn
s
facturers and was not insistent on
?.'!4 Ban! Mliti Ktr.'M
,
,»n loch in diameter, or frequently these objects were never distributed
SELICMAN. ARNOLD. REY & CO.
the adoption of the new scale, con- pnnntA
,*y'fj
A*t>vr*tt
HIGGS, r. IACKS0N, GALLERY OF
Kather than pass such pieces by, the
Oriental rugs are classified first by I smaller,
sequently there was no trouble there.
Please use the coupon below
11 rn»t &:•! Street
PalNlmpa ond IVorfra at A^t
the
country
of
origin,
such
as
Per-|
Acanthus
pattern,
sometimes
called
collector
should
he
alert
to
the
posThe company got wind of this imS2-34 Kaat STiti Klrmt
SNEDEKER. MILTON CORP.
Tht Sun, Subscription Department, Sevi York Citf
pending trouble and called a meet- slan. Indian, Chinese. Turkish. Turko- Chrysanthemum, might refer to the
HUDSON
FORWARDING
& SHIPCiiatoiii* ISniiitit-Irtinlit
PerfrSrdf.*
msn. Caucasian. Then each rug is | shape of the mold which often took
44 Whitehall S t i n t
PING CO.. Inc.
Gentlemen: I am enclosing check for $1.50 for one years
named according to the city or vil-|the form of a bell-shaped flower, alCusfam Nouns flrnfrera.
SYM0NS. INC.
Packer.* end Shippr**
inscription to the Saturday Edition of The Sun, containing
lage or district where It is woven though there Is a surface design j
Enaliih and French Wnmttnf*
17
Slate
Btrret
Tnpcstii"
Thus, a Kerman rug is Persian, known as Acanthus. Incidentally. ;
the Antiques and Interior Decorations Paget.
KN0EDLER,
M
.
&
CO.
;r,
<
i
t'lftn
A\e:n.e
C0«-Cn« Itrt Ka»t 47th St.. New Tork City
the
last
piece
of
pressed
glass
made
,
woven In or around the city of KerPomlinoa— Etr.hino*—Fnornrln)).*
VERNAY. ARTHUR S. INC
In
the
Sandwich
factory,
according
man.
Oushak
is
a
Turkish
rug
OPENING AUCTION SALE woven In the city of Ouahak. Kazak to a workman's statement, was made
14 TCnst oTth Street
17f/i and ist/i CtKlaii tunnfw* «'•!
Name
LAVEZZO
&
IRO..
INC.
Inttrfi '*
COUNTESS SIKORSKA SZANIAWSKA
is a Caucasian rug, woven in the in one of these flower-shaped molds.
19 Laat M'.h •trtai
Italian AntttfMe»
AND
FURNISHINGS
FROM
THE
COROM woman collector told the
Kazak district of the Caucasus.
INC
I'll Eaat :>4Ui Street
Street and Number
WEIL. HENRY V.
LEVY, JOHN. CALLtRIES
NING FSTATE OF ROCHESTER. N. Y..
It is Impossible to mistake rug Walter that she had pictured the
Amrr<ran Antique*
PiUnffnea
consisting of Early American, English.
217 E.iat u7lh S-:."•
types, once you are familiar with Pineapple pattern as an all-over de1 Eaat STth Street
City and State
French, Spanish and Italian Furniture,
WEYMER b YOUNG. INC.
their distinguishing marks. For in- sign with a rough, scaly surface
LORD & TAYLOR
Old Euyl.-.h Pemtta't, Sllie*
alsn a large collection of Silver. China,
l*i* e//«r sol god in Grtnttr Xew York
stance. Feraghan has a little fish- which perfectly Imitated that of the
alsffsjirM
14J F.aat I'Xn 6tr*.-l
Oriental and Hooked Rugs, Paintings
like pattern which Is also called the fruit for which It was named. This
454 Fifth Avenue
WHITE
ALLOM
&
CO.
in Oil, Bric-a-Rrac, Art Goods, etc.
mistake Is perhaps excusable owing
Hprntl design.
LYON. CHARLES WOOLSEY. INC.
Interior Decomlne'—I'anrV.rd Kaefin*
Unlr |>fii m
8I7-S!',l Urn: *nn A\en •
The Serebend type Is easily memo- to the existence of such a type of
jlmenean Anti>/v*»
SI Kaat futa Street
THURSDAY. FRIDAY AND SATURDAY rized by its pear shape, sometimes surfacing as Hobnail, Diamond Point
WILDENSTEIN
b CO., INC.
MCCLELLAND, NANCY, INC.
jnnuaiy ;<tfii, Win O.K| rtinh, i»;i2
Old .Modem / ' m i i i i » ( \ - l l i i i n r* A':
called the palmleaf motif, placed in and like patterns.
4nltgua Furnitutm * tVoll Pape*
at | /•. HI. ftmtn ;>iiu
HIT I'f !i A\em»
There seems to have been a promls15 Eaat r.Tth Strr-rl
a row across the rug, In each row
.EDWARD RESNIK. Auctioneer
WILSON.
ELSIE
COBB.
INC.
the stems of the pear facing in op- I cuous public coining of pattern
MEDINA. LEON
dn'igue riii.'Knie it rtrrimttrm*
™
KXMttTioy /Mia
4ti(jg«e* 4 t r m k i at Art
poslte directions to the preceding names outside the official pronounceTh» Ntwnfofirr ef Dinlinttiem •'» lit Renders,
S'.M Madiaon Avenn
Hotel Plara
TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY
row. Kerman rugs are well-known , ment -Sawtooth for Diamond Point,
Us A'evs and in Advertising
WYLER.
SIGMUND
METROPOLITAN
CALLERIES
J i i f i / f n l ; CUfh nnif : T M I , \Wi
for their floral effect, the delicate Split Leaf for Double I^eaf. and
/ , - ) ( . ; v - . « , ) . r — An><"'.'»
Pimm D A. w. to « /'. u.
Painlinoi-Art
OMeeta
NEW
YORK
tiacerv of their leaves, various forms many others. It Is true that the fac,A!«o a larire etnrk cf «e\ei*l hiinitr'rl
Tia M j i l . i f i A v e i i *
7,"..i Fifth Avenu*
glraettfvt**, elwraleiwrs anil litOitinn fi«of flowers and often hlrds, reflect-j tory workman Indulged In slang
MEYERS. HARRY CO.
YANDELL. CHARLES R„ b CO.
Itirea In cry«lal and hvnn?'* from (Mr*»r'
ing the gorgeous gardens of south- | names, hut these names were to the
af/jra. of SVenlfsie'atsflneM
CeciMOdie . V ' K f p . i - i " ! . " " *»'»
* P-Miii, T;f> Third Avenue, N*W Yerk City.
IM r.ast sun atrtet
| S | Weat 55n«1 Sireet
nliiih mu«l t<» anlrt m asteelftee i n n «,
east Persia, whore these rugs are j point and denoted the aptness with
*<ir in ih« f a n thM Ihe'r |pa.«e |i exp nnr.
woven,
'
whl-h
the
worker
eould
label
his
»
..n.
„
n
.
—
..I
^
J
l
a
f
t
i
'
tii
^ L ~ :
I'j^GE
55?
Naming Sandwich Patterns
$arfe
CuTiorftp fcfcop
STAIR
ANDREW
SILVERWARE
ANTIQUE
FURNITURE
JEWELRY
20% to 40%
REMOVAL
SALE
f
ICONS
ItecfijfArt.
GRAND
EXHIBITION
c/auenesM
LOUIS & CO.
I
A COSKOftAHA
OF AMERICA
ANTIQUES
FABRICS
ORIENTAL RUGS
NEED CLEANING
She OLD PRINT SHOP
and Water Required.
The Antique & Decorative Arts League, Inc.
H50 A YEAR
i
1
JCufcor !3rt (ftallmrs
FRENCH
AND COMPANY
ANTIQUE
TAPESTRIES
FURNITURE
TEXTILES
WORKS <*ART
uu
2iO EAST 572! ST.
i
Untitled Document
i* «v*w
/v
<.
)
J
/
1
Thomas M. Tryniski
309 South 4th Street
Fulton New York
13069
il""-"" ftf m.«>www.fultonhistory.com
A
K,
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