SERVICE DOG ISSUE 55 PRICE £2.50 Free to Members

The British Police and Services Canine Association
SERVICE DOG
Magazine
w w w. b p s c a . c o . u k ISSUE 55
PRICE £2.50 Free to Members
Contents
The British Police and Services Canine Association
Contents
Editor
Keith Long ISM
42 Greenacres
Ossett
West Yorkshire
WF5 9RX
Tel: 01924 264110
Mobile: 07712 129984
email:
[email protected]
Membership Secretary
John Warbutton
6 Meadway Crescent
Selby
North Yorkshire
YO8 4FX
Tel 07841 472 542
email: [email protected]
4
Editorial
4
New Members
4
BPSCA Committee
6
Australian Prison Service
8
Brave Dogs 12
David the Dog Man
14
Full Sutton Dog Trials
16
MDP Dog Handlers
18
South Yorkshire Service Dog Competition
22
H.M.P. Whitemoor Dog Trials 2009
26
Service Dog of The Year
33
Vets Corner
34
BPSCA Club Shop
37
British Police Canine Association Application
P26
Secretary
Dave Fletcher
BPSCA
PO Box 5277
Rugeley
WS15 9BU
Tel 07887 804998
email: [email protected]
On the cover:
This year's winner of the Service
Dog Mick Tustain.
P22
The copy deadline for next issue is 9th October
Any articles, statements or intentions expressed in this magazine
may not necessarily reflect the view of the BPSCA. The Editor.
© This magazine contains official information and should be treated with discretion by the recipient. No responsibility
for the quality of goods or services advertised in this magazine can be accepted by the publishers or printers.
Advertisements are included in good faith. Published by Forces and Corporate Publishing Ltd, Hamblin House,
Hamblin Court, 92-94 High Street, Rushden, Northamptonshire, NN10 0PQ . Tel: 01933 419994. Fax: 01933 419584.
Managing Director: Ron Pearson
Sub Editor/Design: Hayley Smith Advertising Manager: Heather Branchflower
The Service Dog 3
British Police and Services Canine Association
Editorial
The 2009 Service Dog competition has come
and gone. The idyllic setting of Newbold
Revel was our venue of long standing.
Congratulations to those competitors who
won a prize or two and we hope that
everyone, winner or not, enjoyed their selves.
Congratulations to Mick Tustain who once
again won the event. There was only one
point difference in the overall score between
Mick and Mark Adams who won the Mick
Smith working Dog of the year. If that isn’t
close I don’t know what is. Congratulations
also to the Heath Working Dogs, who won the
Obedience, Criminal Work, Agility and Search
for Articles. Ron Stanley of Heath Working
Dogs and Vice Chairman of the BPSCA was
awarded a plaque for his contributions and
work over many years to the BPSCA.
A record number of entries this year tested
both the judges and competitors. Luckily
everything ran smoothly. So my first thank
you is to the judges for being on their feet for
quite a few hours. Also a big thank you to all
the contributors to the magazine. It is quite
evident that it is a busy time of year for those
competing in the various trials throughout
the UK (Hence the trial articles). Last but not
least on behalf of the committee a special
thank you to Nestle Purina for hosting the
event. It Goes without saying how much
their help is needed without which it would
not be possible to present the event in the
same way everyone expects. All the very
best to everyone and hopefully I might see
some of you at the Prison Service National
Trials in September.
Re Join and
New Members
BPSCA
Committee
- from 05 May 2009
Subscribing Members:
Association of Fire
Investigation Dog Handlers
Members:
Mr S. Barker, Mr R. Nunn, Mrs S. Whyatt,
Mr A Bernard. Mr D. Clark, Mr P. Wootton,
Mr T. Guilder, Mr A. Turner.
Mr S.A. Paynter, Mr P. Morgan.
Associate Members:
Mrs J.R. Bayston, Mr P. Calam, Mr M.
Adams, Mr G. Garner. Mrs S. Walker, Mr
D. Walker, Mr S. Boardman,
Mr. D. Jakobocki. Mrs A. Jakobocki,
Mr A. Jakobocki, Mr J.W. Olave,
Mr D. Allen. Mr R. Vnar, Miss M. Docherty,
Mr S.K. Lim, Mr R. Zembrzuski.
Mr M. Miller, Mr P. Basra, G. Rochfort-Tree,
Mr H.G. Fish. Mrs K Taylor, Mr A. Morris,
Mr A. Wooster
4 The Service Dog
KD Long ISM
(Editor of The Service Dog)
Members:
President Steve Allen MBE
Chairman
Sam Mackay
Vice Chairman
Ron Stanley
Secretary
Dave Fletcher
Membership Secretary John Warbutton
Editor
Keith Long ISM
Treasurer
Steve Ferguson
Seconded Website
Manager
Andrew Sanderson
Committee:
Sam Perrie
Jim Nunn
Billie Kramer
Michael Forbes
Colin Huskins
Mark Adams
Mark Brittle
Security and Emergency Services
Group-Victoria Australia.
During my trip to Australia in April 2009 I was
invited by Rick Kaliszewski a Supervisor K9
handler of the Security and Emergency
Services Group in the State of
Victoria State to visit the Prison
at Ararat and see the dogs
working there. It was an
extremely interesting and
enlightening visit where
I was shown around the
Kennels and watched
the dogs training and
working and had a most
interesting chat and a frank
and stimulating exchange of
views about dog training and
deployment with Rick and a
visiting Council Ranger Greg
Taylor. The dog demonstrating
Area search was a Malinois a lean hard
muscular dog which had only recently been
introduced to the unit. Like many of the breed it
had shown very aggressive tendencies from the
outset. It was very keen to bite but not so keen
on being controlled by a handler and told what
to do. It had, in fact, bitten a couple of handlers
before being taken under Rick Kaliszewski’s wing.
Rick’s first introduction to the temperament and
reaction of the dog was when he accidentally
trod on its toe as it was trying to push its way
past him through the gate to the training field.
The dog immediately whipped round and reared
up at him biting him quite badly on the upper
arm. This was a few weeks before I arrived there,
by which time the dog was, apparently learning
better manners before being moved on to more
skilful and useful disciplines Most of the dogs
they have are multi purpose animals mainly
German Shepherds and Malinois. These are
trained in Obedience, Agility and Criminal work,
including the searching of premises, outbuildings
and open areas, for concealed persons, they are
also trained for Drugs detection and for Property
Search which is the searching of an area for all
concealed items bearing human scent (commonly
6 The Service Dog
referred to in the UK as The Search Square in
order to differentiate this exercise from a search
of property for hidden intruders.) They
also have some Labradors which are
trained as “passive alert” drug
detection dogs. I was most
impressed by the keenness
shown by “Bronx” the
Malinois during the whole
of the search exercise, in
spite of the temperature
being in the high eighties,
he was virtually tireless and
unstoppable! I was even
more impressed when Rick
told me that all their dogs
are expected to work in all
the weather conditions that
they may be faced with in the
course of their duties. Part of their area
of operations includes the Grampian Mountains
where snow is often an additional test of their
mettle and the temperature can be as low as 4
degrees below zero. The SESG is administered
by Corrections Victoria which is a Government
Agency and I as such, is intended to work quite
independently of the Prisons themselves. There
are 13 such prisons within the State and the dogs
are held at only four locations Ararat, Barwon,
Metropolitan Remand Centre and Loddon Prison.
They have a staff of 60 personnel in aliI 26 of
whom are trained dog handlers. There are at
present 19 multi purpose dogs which are a
mixture of German Shepherds and Malinois.
They also have 7 Labradors which are trained as
ilpassive alert” drugs detection dogs. There is a
standing commitment to have a multi purpose
dog on duty to respond to incidents during out
of cell hours at both Barwon Prison and the
Metropolitan Remand centre. A large part of the
job revolves around carrying out drug searches
at all of the 13 State Prisons. There is also a list
of minimum requirements which have to be met
as regards to how often attendances are made.
Searches are either carried out randomly or as a
result of received intelligence.
They may be carried out upon a request being
made from the Prison concerned, or alternatively
undertaken completely unannounced. Dog
teams and other staff from the various dog
holding locations will travel to the targeted
prisonl and take over the whole establishment
or the area of the prison to be searched. Other
responsibilities include the security of all prisoners
on the high security list whilst they are outside the
prison. Eg. Transfers between Prisons, Hospital
visits, Court appearances, Funerals or other
specially granted times of temporary release from
the prison for compassionate reasons. Most of
these escort duties are carried out by non-dog
handler staff within the unit although on every
occasion each unit is obliged to have an armed
dog handler and dog in the tail vehicle. For
these duties the dog handlers are armed with
Remington pump action shotguns and Hechler
and Koch 40 calibre handguns. It is anticipated
that in the very near future that the Remington
will be superseded by the Hechler and Koch
semi automatic rifle. All of the dogs are kept at
the handlers homes with at least three being
on standby every night to respond to incidents
after hours. Every dog handler -whether a multi
purpose dog handler or a passive alert drug
detection dog handler receives a dog handler
allowance. They reason that they all need looking
after with equal care and ,of course, they all
have to be fed, exercised groomed and their
maintenance training kept up to the mark no
matter what their duties may be. The most likely
after hours deployment would be to deal with
escapes from minimum security facilities or of
removing violent offenders from their cells. All
of this begins to gain some sort of perspective
when you consider that the distance between
some of the prisons the Dog Units are expected
to cover can be as much as 500 kilometres (or
a 1000 km round trip) A bit different from our
own Prison Service , Eh ? Rick tells me that they
are anticipating increasing the number of Dogs
and handlers to about another 150 so if any of
the BPSCA members fancy a life “down under”
there are openings to be filled.
Sam Perrie
8th June 2009
Brave Dogs
and Medal Winners
I have recently been asked whether I could
contribute an article on “Brave Dogs” in Malaya,
referring to especially brave Army Dogs that
I may have come across whilst serving in the
Anti-Terrorist Campaign there from 1957 -1964
in order that they might copy it and use it in a
book they are going to write.
However, apart from the fact that I can see
neither point nor merit in writing articles for
others to publish in a book of their own (and ,
presumably to sell at a personal profit) I have very
strong views about the practice of giving medals
to animals for “bravery” as such. Because, to
me, the whole idea of animals having these
finer feelings is basically flawed in its concept.
To single out any animal and to make an award
to it for “conspicuous gallantry and devotion to
duty” is , in my opinion a typical example of the
anthropomorphic attitude that many people have
towards animals and demonstrates an erroneous
and illogical interpretation of the actions of the
animals so honoured and the reasons behind
their, apparently. “Courageous” behaviour.
For example there have been 32 awards of the
Dickin Medal made to carrier pigeons.
Every year, for many years now, literally
thousands of these birds have been released
from sites many miles away from their lofts
and have flown back to their destinations.
They have all faced high winds, snow and hail,
violent electrical thunderstorms, predatory birds
wildfowlers and hunters intent upon shooting
them down en route.
They have all performed these flights as a
matter of course and whereas they may be
considered to be extremely courageous from a
human point of view generally, there appears
to be very little difference, if any, between these
birds and the one’s which were singled out to
receive the Dickin Medal.
Consider the Explosives Detection dog that
finds his hidden “explosives training device”
every day, sometimes twice or three times a
day during his training period exercises and is
suitably rewarded for so doing.
8 The Service Dog
He is eventually posted out on active service
where he continues to follow the same training
routine on a daily basis in order to maintain his
keenness and efficiency. During the whole of this
time no-one ever seems to even contemplate
that there is anything unusual or brave about
what he is doing whatsoever.
Yet, one day whilst he is on duty, he comes
across yet another device of exactly the same
nature as the one he has been trained to detect.
He treats it in precisely the same way as he has
always done and is suddenly singled out and
given an award for “bravery” for doing exactly
the same thing that he has been doing for
months, possibly years; merely as a matter of
course and all for the pleasure of a game with
a tennis ball.
There are, literally, hundreds of service dogs
that have carried out this identical task over the
years and, although they are all perfectly capable
of carrying out the duties for which they have
been trained, many of them have never had the
good fortune to even come across a live explosive
device under operational conditions during the
whole of their operational service. Let alone
win a medal for showing his handler where it is.
These dogs do not have any concept of the
fact that what they are doing is in any way brave,
or that they are in any danger as they carry out
their duties. All they are aware of is the fact
that when they find the device and indicate its
presence to their handler they are going to be
rewarded with a game of chase with a tennis ball.
There is no doubt whatsoever in my mind that
the men and women who handle these dogs
are fully aware of the dangers to which they are
being exposed and every one of them who even
steps out into that hostile environment with a
dog to search for explosive devices is extremely
brave. This is because of the fact that they are
all fully aware that they are in danger of losing
their lives. Because no matter how well trained
their dog may be or no matter how carefully it
indicates the explosive, the device could explode
and kill, not only the dog and its handler but
also many other servicemen and women who
just happen to be present in the area and who
are obliged to depend almost entirely upon the
expertise of the dog and his handler
Such a weapon does not even need to be
disturbed by the finder in order to go off. It can
be detonated electronically by the enemy from
a concealed position of safety, from hundreds
of yards away. Which increases the danger
immeasurably
The same applies with the trained Guard dog.
Such an animal has been specially selected for
its inherent guarding qualities and its suitability
to become a guard dog. It possesses a high
degree of natural aggression which is nurtured
and encouraged until it becomes a force to be
reckoned with. Such a dog enjoys the excitement
and pleasure of biting an assailant; the more it
is practised the more aggressive and formidable
it becomes.
If anyone; friend or foe, approaches him
unbidden, the dog will defend his handler
vigorously unless and until he is ordered not
to do so.
This he will do spontaneously either during a
training exercise or on active service Bravery and
devotion to duty does not even come into it.
He is a selected and fully trained guard dog and
that is simply what he does. If anyone were to
shoot his handler , thereby removing the dog’s
controller and is killed by the dog it would be
foolish to say that the dog was so very brave.
Because he attacked and killed the man who
shot his handler, he would, no doubt, have done
that in any case, even if he had not shot him. It
is what he is trained to do.
If any act is committed by anyone who has
no reason to suspect that there is the slightest
likelihood of danger being encountered then this
act cannot in all honesty be considered to be an
act of bravery, gallantry, courage, or devotion
to duty, by any stretch of the imagination. This
is why I feel that these awards are somewhat
over stated and the result of misplaced ideology
about nonexistent anthropomorphic qualities
which some people erroneously believe that all
animals possess.
All of the instances quoted have been
carried out by the animal as a normal everyday
occurrence and are the result of careful selection
and intensive training.
The trained horses that panicked in the first
instance when bombs went off and showered
them with broken glass and sparks and were
then subsequently calmed down by their riders
and carried on almost as though nothing had
happened, only did so because of the steady
temperaments they possessed in the first place
- which was one of the reasons that they were
selected for the work they were carrying out.
That and the rigorous training they had been
given in order to turn them into the steady and
reliable animals that they undoubtedly were.
Sometimes we hear that the awards that have
been given to one specific animal and its handler
are really meant to bring to the attention of the
general public the fact that every other dog and
handler employed in the same way and carrying
out the same duties are possessed of precisely
the same character and qualities which earned
that chosen animal its prestigious award. Often
even the recipient’s handler will be heard to say
“This medal is not just for me and my dog, but
for all the other dogs and handlers too, who
are all doing the same sort of work as we are”
Every dog handler would obviously be delighted
to have a memento of some kind or another
just as tangible evidence and a reminder of the
dog (or the dog’s) that he or she has handled. A
small keepsake a token to treasure and to keep
long after the dog has died , along with the
photographs and fond memories of him, even
if they had never been lucky enough to have
the opportunity to prove how good they were
at their job, and why not indeed?
In that case would it not be much fairer and
make much more commonsense to award a
campaign medal to every dog that has served
in any particular theatre of war in exactly the
same way as their handlers are given them? Or
is this thought to be too expensive a project to
contemplate? Or, perhaps, that the dogs are not
really worth the expenditure of all that money?
At the outbreak of the Second World War the
War Office appealed to the general public for
dogs to serve in the Armed Forces. Many civilians
offered their dogs and many were accepted for
training. The owners were promised that they
would only be required for the duration of the
War, after which time it was planned to hand
all the dogs back to their owners.
For obvious reasons, by the end of the war
many of the dogs concerned were found to be
unsuitable to be handed back to civilian families,
The Service Dog 9
especially those that had been employed as
VP Dogs
( Vulnerable Point Dogs) and which, by this
time had been highly trained and had become
extremely aggressive guard dogs;
Apparently no one had thought the whole
project through logically and so far ahead as
that. Obviously no one had had the foresight
to visualise the problems that civilians may have
been likely to encounter as result of military
war dog training and so, in spite of all the good
intentions the scheme fell rather flat
However, special collars had been manufactured
to be handed out to these families together with
a Certificate of Service and a covering letter. Some
were handed over with their repatriated dogs
and some, where it was simply not possible to
return the dog, were given out on their own,
purely as mementoes.
The Collar was of a one inch wide leather
construction and had a pattern part of the way
along its length of diagonal Red White and Blue
stripes and a metal plate with the WD arrow and
the date 1939 - 1945 stamped upon it.
I remember seeing some of them which were,
10 The Service Dog
obviously, surplus to requirements, actually
being used as working collars at the War Dog
Training School at Melton Mowbray in 1950.I
have a feeling that the words “War Dog” also
appeared upon the plate, but of this I cannot
be absolutely certain.
Recently The Australian Armed Services have
started to issue campaign Medals to dogs which
have been seconded to Units on active service
and a parade was held recently in Melbourne
where a number of such dogs were presented
with their medals. The fact that the dogs actually
served in the active service zone is deemed to
be sufficient to entitle them to their medals.
How much more sensible and logical is that
than to delude oneself that animals have these
finer qualities of bravery, gallantry and devotion
to duty which is almost impossible to prove and
is much more likely to be the result of proper
selection and intensive training rather than some
altruistic imagined qualities that are human
characteristics rather than those attributable to a
dog, a horse. A cat or thirty two homing pigeons.
Sam Perrie
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The Service Dog 11
David The Dog Man
SLEEPING RIGHTS
Many of my clients tell me that their dog is allowed to jump up next to
them on the settee or chair whilst they are watching the television.
Most of them are smaller breeds, but a 10th of larger breeds are
afforded the same privilege.
The majority of these dogs are also allowed onto the bed, if only
for a cuddle in the morning.
Almost all of these dogs have their own baskets or bean bags
to sleep on.
Many of them also like to occupy another area in the house
as a favourite resting place; under the kitchen tablelP or
behind a chair in the lounge etc.
When I ask my clients if these places are comfortable, they
tell me that they assume so; they have never tried them
It is the right of the Alpha figure to sleep where he wants,
but nobody sleeps in his bed.
STRENGTH GAMES
One of the most popular games to play with any young
dog is tug-of -war, in fact there are tug toys available in
pet shops that are designed to give both the human and
the dog their own end to hold. These games are invariably
won by the dog. It is we who usually allow them to win,
because we admire the tenacity and dedication that they
put into the game, despite what we see as our superior
strength. Similarly, rough and tumble games are great fun
to play, until the youngster starts to get a bit aggressive
and then we give up before it gets out of hand. Being a
predator and part of a hunting unit, the instinct not to get
injured is very much to the fore. It is for this reason that
all dominance/submissive levels are decided through play.
To teach a young dog that to growl, pull and persevere
brings the reward of winning; or to engage upon a rough
and tumble and
then to give up, are not the lessons that we should be
teaching him. They are certainly not the games that we
should allow him to win.
YOUR MAJESTY GAMES
Contrary to popular opinion, in the wild the Alpha figure does not maintain that
rank through constant displplays of aggression towards the underdogs. On a
daily basis, the rest of the pack show deference towards the leader. Canine,
or lupine (wolf) displays of deference are exhibited by low head carriages
coming towards and upwards but avoiding eye contact. Many of my clients
admit that when they are going upstairs their dog rushes in front
of them and then turns on the top step and waits for them
to come up towards it. We think nothing of it and usually
glance down at the step in front
Look how this must appear to the dog. The maintenance of rank docs not
necessitate displays of aggression!
12 The Service Dog
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The Service Dog 13
Full Sutton Dog Trials
The Full Sutton Dog Trials took place on the 22nd of April
2009 judged by Senior Officer John Stiff.
Colin Huskins and myself made our usual track to Wilberfoss
and were made welcome as usual by Senior Officers John
Drewery and Bob Banford.
The wood search was done on Tuesday the 21st with
obedience, agility and manwork on Wednesday the 22nd.
The send away, speak and retrieve seemed to cause problems
for some of the competitors. The heelwork though was definitely
worth watching with every dog performing brilliantly.
The eventual winner of the competition wasOfficer Dog
Handler Pat McGloughlin and dog Yogi (GSD). They scored 648
marks and also winning the Obedience. Nose work and Criminal
work. What a team! one of the best recalls from a running
man I have seen in a long time. best of luck in the Nationals.
In secon place was Dog Handler Garry Butler and Bella (GSD)
bitch with 498 marks. I watched Garry at his first trial. This
was a vastly improved team. Well done Garry.
Ron Stanley-vice Chairman of the BPSCA
14 The Service Dog
MDP dog handlers
do well in regional trials
Scotland
The 43rd Scottish Regional
Police Dog Trials were hosted
by Grampian Police at Balmoral
Castle in the Balmoral Estate,
Aberdeenshire.
Her Majesty The Queen’s
Scottish residence proved to be a
truly majestic setting for the trials,
dramatic scenery combined with
glorious sunshine and blue skies
over the three days making it a
very memorable occasion.
This is the first time that the
MDP had been invited to compete
in the Scottish Regional Trials and
special thanks to the MDP for our
support was given by Chief Constable Colin
McKerracher, Grampian Police.
In order to maintain an efficient dog team
and dog section, a high level of training and
commitment from both staff and dogs are
required to develop the skills and expertise
necessary to perform effectively and consistently.
The annual Scottish Police Dog Trials provides
the opportunity for Forces to demonstrate these
skills and compete against each other in a highly
competitive, but friendly environment.
A total of 14 dog teams were competing,
with representation from Strathclyde Police,
Grampian Police, Lothian and Borders Police,
Tayside Police, Central Police, Police Service
Northern Ireland and MDP.
PC Billy Ritchie and General Purpose Police Dog
‘Baby’ from Three Section at RNAD Coulport were
selected to represent the MDP.
Sgt Charlie McGinn MDP DDA
Scotland provided additional
support as trials tracklayer.
Day One’s programme consisted
of crowd control; all dogs and
handlers were required to deal
with a hostile crowd of 12 people.
PC Ritchie and Baby did very
well, despite being first team to
perform.
Day Two and Day Three saw the
introduction of the main events i.e.
Phase One (Tracking and Property
Search), Phase Two (Person Search
and Weapon Attack) and Phase
Three (Control, Agility and Use of
Force). The MDP pair were drawn to perform
first in Phase Three, placing them at a slight
disadvantage, particularly as it was their first
trial together. With no previous run through
or demonstration allowed, PC Ritchie and
Baby were entering unknown territory. They
hadn’t even had the benefit of seeing another
competitor perform prior to their performance.
That aside, they performed well, despite some
minor difficulties regarding different working
practices between Home Department Forces and
MDP; the Home Department Forces do not use
leather collars, so the Judge asked PC Ritchie
to remove Baby’s collar prior to commencing
Phase Three.
They were asked to demonstrate obedience,
agility, send away, redirect, emergency recall,
chase and detain, gun attack, weapon attack
and chase and stand off. Both handler and dog
e part in ACPO
MDP dog handlers were invited to tak
and acquitted
Regional Police Dog Trials in March
stiff opposition.
themselves very well against some
enjoyed the experience.
For the Phase One event, the track was high
in the hills of Balmoral Estate, a very picturesque
location; but difficult tracking ground, with
herds of roaming wild Red Deer commonplace.
The MDP partnership started tracking on the
edge of woodland, which then led to open
ground and across the hillside. They worked
together as a team and successfully completed
the track, dealing with the suspicious person at
the end. A good property search was then carried
out, with all property recovered.
Later that day, they participated in the Phase
Two event. They were transported in a 4x4
vehicle to a location within the ancient forest at
Balmoral. Upon arrival they were asked to deal
with a scenario involving two hidden suspects
and a weapon attack. They did very well, located
both suspects, dealt with the weapon attack,
finishing a creditable eighth overall in Phase Two.
This was fantastic experience for PC Ritchie
and Baby. It was their first ever trial together and
they represented the MDP in a highly professional
manner. Well done to both!
Eastern Region
For the first time, the Eastern Region Dog Trials
took place at MDP HQ, Wethersfield, which was
the venue for the trials opening, Phase Three
crowd control and final presentation ceremony
and meal.
It was also where the competitors were
accommodated for the three days of the trials,
as well as being the
base for the trials
officials.
The tracking
phase took place in
Suffolk; the search
venue was a disused
electronics factory in
Chelmsford, Essex,
whilst the obedience
stage took place at
the Essex Police HQ,
also in Chelmsford.
PC Brian Marks, with Police Dog Sash was
selected to represent MDP and finished a
creditable sixth out of 13 teams.
Suffolk Constabulary swept the board, taking
first and second places, with Cambridgeshire
finishing third.
There were a number of trophies up for grabs
and each competitor received a commemorative
certificate. All the trophies and certificates were
handed out by MDP ACC Operational Support
John Bligh at the final dinner.
Force Dog Officer Inspr Bruce McMurchy was
the host representative, with Mrs Lindsey Barber
in charge of administration for the event.
Helping out with the judging were MDP officers
Sgt Matt Robertson (Attack on Handler) and Sgt
Andy Gaunt (Gun Attack).
Many thanks for the permission to print this
article from the MDP (Ministry of Defense
Police) and the editors of Talk Through (The
Official MDP Magazine)
The Service Dog 17
South Yorkshire
Service Dog Competition
As I looked out of my bedroom window on that
cold wet wintry morning I thought to myself
“No surely not”.
It was the day of the South Yorkshire Service
Dog Competition at Arthur and Carol Rivers
kennels at Oxpring and I was judging the
obedience and criminal work elements with
competitors travelling from far and wide.
It was hard to believe that it was the beginning
of June but never the less I set off with the rain
still pouring down and arrived to see that some
competitors had already arrived .
With the weather not baiting the competitors
were briefed. I thought it prudent at that
stage to keep it short and sweet, so a starting
handle shape taking in all three paces, speak
on command recall and retrieve at the end was
the order of the day. Even this was proving to
be difficult to deal with both for my steward
for the day
Insp. John Warburton from MPGS and the
competitors who were having to deal with
driving wind and rain .
The obedience phase was completed by all
with it still pouring down. These were the worst
18 The Service Dog
conditions I have ever seen on a competition
day but this did not detract from some really
nice obedience being displayed. The afternoon
brought better weather albeit cold for the
manwork exercises . These were judged by Tim
Wells From South Yorkshire Police and myself.
The order was chase and attack search and
escort , emergency recall ,stick and gun attack
The recall proved to be the most arduous
exercise with most dogs failing to stop and one
or two of the competitors failed to find the
knife after the search but overall a very good
standard and all
round good fun.
Yet again the event was a pleasure to judge
and again fantastic being part of a growing
competition attracting teams from all over
the UK.
A big thank you to all concerned especially
Arthur and Carol who always put a fantastic
day on, and one that could not be spoilt by
the weather.
Pc Denis Attard Instructor Dog Training West
Yorkshire Police Winner of competition Mark
Adams and dog Tyson (GSD) also winner of
The Control Trophy Runner up Jim Szmidt and
dog Simba (GSD)
Third place Keely Powles (Cheshire Police) and
dog Griff (GSD) Won Criminal Work Trophy
Fourth place Garry Garner and dog Xena (GSD)
Won Agility Trophy
The Service Dog 19
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ood House, Lincoln Road, Faldingworth, Market Rasen, Lincs LN8 3SF
H.M.P Whitemoor
Dog Trials 2009
22 The Service Dog
D
ue to operational and detail restrictions,
this years local trials were held at very
short notice on the 13th and 14th of May.
It was good to see S/O Steve Hooper back to
judge the trials in his own inimitable way.
Over the two days; all the dog teams that took
part put on an excellent performance and did
both themselves and Whitemoor proud.
Most of the teams managed to get a send
away, with a few of them achieving a redirect
and nearing maximum points. Some of the dogs
when redirected, did however get their left mixed
up with their right, much to the amusement of
the watching spectators.
Officer D/H Joe Crawley got the award for
the best ‘Benny Hill impression’ when he set off
running after his dog on the recall exercise; it
was an impressive sight to see, nearly as good
as his dogs bite!!!
All the dogs put on a very good round of man
work with some committed bites being taken by
the two decoys. All handlers maintained good
control and professionalism throughout, a point
that was commented on not only by Steve Hooper
but also by the invited guests.
At the end of the two days Officer D/H Carl
Young, who in the past has been the Prison
Service National champion with his previous dog
Bex, pulled off an impressive victory and won
the trials with a very good score of 611.5. This
is made all the more impressive by the fact that
Carl only passed out with his new dog, Mido,
in December of last year. Mido is only 18mths
old, and was bought as an 8 week old pup
from P.C Graeme Jones and run on by S/ O Ian
Fletcher before been handed over to Carl. Carl
then took up the gauntlet and has since put in
a lot of his own time and effort to enable him to
come away with yet another local trials win. D/H
Lester Cobley, or ‘Sheriff Cobley’ to his friends,
and Zero, put on a well rounded performance
to come in a close second, with Ian Davidson
and Barney coming a very close third.
At the presentation, Dog Section Manager P/O
Clive Dodd made a short speech congratulating
all who had taken part, thanking Steve Hooper
for judging the trials, and also thanking myself,
The Service Dog 23
and D/H Paul Nicholson for undertaking
the decoy work, coffee making and taxi
services. He went on to thank Chris
(Sticky) Bunn for organising the trials
before handing the floor over to Governor
Debbie Rodgers, who kindly presented
the individual trophies and competitors
trophies.
On behalf of the dog section management
and the rest of the section I would like to
wish Carl and Mido the very best of luck in
winning their first Prison Service National
trials together - so there is no pressure Carl!
John Farrar
Prison Officer Dog handler
H.M.P Whitemoor
The individual trophy winners
Overall winner:
Runner up:
Third place:
are as follows:
611.5 points
D/H Carl Young and Mido
584.0points
Zero
and
ey
Cobl
r
D/H Leste
0points
D/H Ian Davidson and Barney 573.
D/H Lester Cobley and Zero
Man-work trophy:
Lester Cobley and Zero
):
seek
n
Maverick cup (ope
Ian Davidson and Barney
Nose work trophy:
Carl Young and Mido
hy:
trop
ce
Obedien
Urbanowicz and Rambo
:
Best Presented Dog Team Paul
h and Zac
Smit
Ian
hy:
trop
es
Judg
24 The Service Dog
The
BPSCA
Service Dog
of the
Year
This year’s Competition was
a resounding success for the
BPSCA. The efforts put in by
the committee has paid off
and proved to be a better
competition than any of the
preceding ones.
The amount of competitors
was higher than ever with
27 entrants for the Service
Dog. In addition there
was also the drugs dog
competition with 6 entries.
The organization had to be
spot on so as not to run too
long. This was achieved by
the willingness of the judges
and competitors to keep to
the schedule.
26 The Service Dog
ANNUAL COMPETITION
The Competitors this year were:
1 Bernie McCourt N.I.P.S. his dog Sol is a G.S.D. Bernie & Sol are regular competitors at the
‘Service Dog’ where they have been placed 2nd & 3rd. They have competed 4 times at Prison
Service National Trials. Sol is trained to Prison Service standards and is also qualified as an AES dog.
2 P.C. Steven Burt his dog Dude is a G.S.D. This is the first attempt at trials for both Steven & Dude.
Dude is Steven’s first Police Dog & have been together 31/2 years. Dude is also a vehicle search dog.
3
Ron Stanley. Ex Royal Air Force Police his dog Duke is a G.S.D. Ron has competed for many years
in the Service Dog trials being placed many times with his old dog Zak. Duke won the Yorkshire
Working & Service Dog Trial in 2007. He has also been placed, winning the Agility Trophy in 2006
& has had 2 second places in The Service Dog. Ron is an Instructor with Heath Working Dogs.
4
John Davidson. His dog Dennis is a Malinois. John is a trainer of security dogs & an Instructor
for B.I.P.D.T. John trains at Heath Working Dogs.
5 Colin Huskins. His dog Chuck is a G.S.D. Chuck & Colin won the best criminal work trophy at
the Yorkshire Working & Service Dog Trial in 2007. Colin is an instructor at Heath Working Dogs.
6 Garry Garner. His dog Xena is a G.S.D.(Bitch). Garry is a Traffic Police Officer with 12yrs service.
Dog training is purely a hobby. Xena is 2 yrs old & this is her second time at the Service Dog
competition. They train at Heath Working Dogs.
7
Jim Szmidt. His dog Simba is a G.S.D. Simba is qualified CDex UDex WDex in working trials.
They were the winners of this trial 2006/7 & won property search in 2008.
8
Mark Adams. His dog Tyson is a G.S.D. This is Mark’s 5th appearance at this trial. They have
been 2nd three times & won the property search in 2006.
9
Prison Officer D/H Shaun Wall. His dog Kes is a G.S.D. Shaun & Kes work at HMP Frankland
in County
Durham.
10
Garry Butler H.M.P. His dog Bella is a G.S.D. bitch. Bella is 22 months
old & came from a family in Hull who had her given as a wedding present.
She was reserve Champion at this years trials at Full Sutton.
11
Arthur Rivers his dog Blitz is a G.S.D. Arthur has competed here
many times, winning the Working Trials Cup, the Obedience &
Agility Trophies.
12 Damian O’Donnell his dog Clive is a Malinois. This is
Damian’s third time at the Service Dog Trials, and has had
a couple of placing. He is Bite Development Instructor
for Heath Working Dogs.
13 Scott Boardman hid dog Gwen is a Malinois
bitch. 2nd A1K9 2007, winner Best Criminal
Work Trophy, Service Dog 2007, winner
continued over page >>
The Service Dog 27
14
P.C. Mick Tustain Parks Police his dog Ike
is a Malinois.
Ike is 7 yrs old & been operational from the age
of 1 yr. Ike is a pleasure to work as a police dog
& is a good sports dog. He is the first & only
Malinois Working Trials Champion. Ike is not
always successful but is always exciting!
15
S/SGT Spike Forbes MPGS his dog Seb is
a G.S.D. Spike is serving with Military Provost
Guard Services. Seb is his civilian dog that he
is training for Working Trials. This is their first
entry in the Service Dog.
16 David Robinson his dog Babu is a Malinois/
G.S.D. Babu is 2yrs old, first time of competing
in Service Dog.
17 Guy Morgan his dog Buck is a G.S.D. he is
2 years old and it’s his first time in Service Dog.
He competed in the Yorkshire Working & Service
Dog Trial 2008.
18
P.C. Richard Burley M.O.D. Police his dog
Barney is a G.S.D.
In June 2005 Barney suffered a gastric torsion
but after successful surgery returned to duty
and competed in the 2008 Service Dog. He also
competed in South West & Wales Regional Police
Dog competition.
21 Officer DH John Rowlands H.M.P. Full Sutton
his Dog Beau is a G.S.D. Beau is 6 yrs old. John
has been on dogs for 12yrs. In 2008 Beau & John
were Reserve Champions at Full Sutton Trials.
22 P.C. Dave Clark Wandsworth Parks Police
his dog Asko is a G.S.D. and is three & 1/2years
old. Dave has been a dog handler for 25 yrs.
2nd Service Dog 2007, Winner 2008.
23 CPL STEW MURRANT with his dog TYE
24 L/CPL Alan Wright with his dog Ben
25 l/cpl Gaz Wright with his dog Jay
26 PTE Toby Guilder with his dog Aslan
27 P.C. Dave Robinson. his dog Hamish is
a Spaniel.
Dave is a drugs dog handler with Durham Police,
and has won the Drugs Test last year.
28
Miss Joanne Cooksey her dog Sky is a
Labrador. Joanne has been handling Sky for
4years in the private Security Industry.
29
Paul Hymen his dog Stripes is a German
short haired Pointer. This is the first competition
for Stripes & Paul.
30
19 Officer DH Carl Young H.M.P. Whitemoor
his dog Mido is a G.S.D. This is his first time in
the Service Dog competition.
P.C. Colin Jones his dog Harry is a Labrador.
Colin is a dog handler with Durham Police.
They have competed here last 2 years & had 2
second places.
20
31 Officer D/H A Fletcher N.W.A.S.T. with his
Officer DH Lester Cobley H.M.P. Whitemoor
his dog Zero is a G.S.D. This is his first time in the
Service Dog competition.
dog Tye He has been a Dog handler for 13 years
patrol handler & drugs. Has worked with Tye for
5 yrs. Qualified for prison service national drug
trials since he began. National champion passive
drugs dog in 2005. Also competed prison service
national patrol dog trials.
32
PC Paul Hugget. Cambridge police. his
dog Ozzie is a Labrador. Ozzie is 18
months old. Paul has been a Drugs
handler for 3 years and has had Ozzie
from 6 month old. Although only
operational for 3 months he has
had a lot of successful finds.
Judges
Property Search:
S.O. Steve Hooper N.D.T.S.G.
Drug Search:
Dave Fletcher H.M.P. Woodhill
Obedience & Criminal Work:
P.C. Tim Wells South Yorkshire Police
Agility and Criminal Work:
P.C. Bob Vaughan
Trophies
Trophies to compete for:
BPSCA Service Dog of the Year Coat & Trophy
Editors Cup for the dog & handler scoring
most points
Reserve Champion Cup for runner up
Trophy for third place
BPSCA Working Trials Coat & Mick Smith Trophy
for winner
Trophies for second & third place
Presidents Cup for first place in Obedience
Zak & Scruff Trophy for first place in Agility
Neil Yates Trophy for first place in Criminal Work
Secretaries Cup for first place in Property Search
Trials Results
Service Dog of the year
1st Mick Tustain with dog “Ike”
Wandsworth Parks Police
2nd Carl Young with dog “Mido”
HMP Whitemoor
3rd Dave Clark with dog “Asko”
Wandsworth Parks Police
Mick Smith Working Dog of the Year
1st Mark Adams with dog “Tyson”
Heath Working Dogs
2nd Jim Szmidt with dog “Simba”
Heath Working Dogs
3rd Damian O’Donnel with dog “Clive”
Heath Working Dogs
Best Criminal Work: Damian O’Donnel & Clive
- Heath Working Dogs
Best Obedience: John Davidson & Dennis
- Heath Working Dogs
Best Agility Gary: Garner & Xena
- Heath Working Dogs
Best Property Search: Colin Huskins & Chuck
- Heath Working Dogs
Colin Huskins 1st Property
Gary Garner Agility Winner
Mark Adams Mick Smith Trophy
Awards…
Service Dog Winner Mick Tustain
Drugs Search Winner A Fletcher
John Davidson Best
Obedience
Mark Adams & Jim Szmidt
Damian O'Donnel best
Criminal Work
Service Dog of the Year
Scoreboard 1
Scoreboard 1
Name
Dog1
Scoreboard
No.
1
2
9
No.
10
14
1
18
2
19
9
20
10
21
No.
14
23
18
1
24
19
No.
2
25
20
9
26
21
1
10
27
23
2
14
24
9
18
25
10
19
26
14
20
27
18
21
19
23
20
24
21
25
23
26
24
27
25
26
27
McCourt
Burt
Wall
Name
Buttler
Tustain
McCourt
Burley
Burt
Young
Wall
Cobley
Buttler
Name
Roland
Tustain
Clark
Burley
McCourt
Murrant
Young
Name
Burt
Wright
Cobley
Wall
Wright
Roland
McCourt
Buttler
Guilder
Clark
Burt
Tustain
Murrant
Wall
Burley
Wright
Buttler
Young
Wright
Tustain
Cobley
Guilder
Burley
Roland
Young
Clark
Cobley
Murrant
Roland
Wright
Clark
Wright
Murrant
Guilder
Wright
Wright
Guilder
H/Work
Retrieve
Speak Agility
Property
Service
Dog Criminal
of the Year
Sol
38
Dude
Kes
Dog
H/Work
Beau
46
Criminals
Ike
40
Sol
38
Barney
40
Dude
Mido
46
Kes
Zero
33
Beau
46
Dog
H/Work
Beau
38
Ike
40
Asko
47
Barney
40
Sol
38
Tye
32
Mido H/Work
46
Dog
Dude
Ben
Zero
33
Kes
Jay
37
Beau
38
Sol
38
Beau
46
Aslan
Asko
47
Dude
Ike
40
Tye
32
Kes
Barney
40
Ben
Beau
46
Mido
46
Jay
37
Ike
40
Zero
33
Aslan
Barney
40
Beau
38
Mido
46
Asko
47
Zero
33
Tye
32
Beau
38
Ben
Asko
47
Jay
37
Tye
32
Aslan
Ben
Jay
37
Aslan
7
5
6
77
Recall
14
15
7
13
15
12
14
Recall
13
15
13
13
7
10
15
Recall
12
13
77
14
13
15
10
13
14
15
7
15
12
13
13
15
13
12
10
13
13
7
10
Retrieve
0
20
5
0
20
50
Retrieve
0
20
23
0
05
20
Retrieve
5
500
0
23
20
0
0
0
20
0
20
5
0
0
20
23
5
0
0
23
0
0
Speak
10
86
8
6
8
10
Speak
48
88
656
Speak
8
644
10
8
85
8
10
6
84
8
8
4
6
8
8
5
4
8
4
5
Agility
47
98
77
66
77
24
47
Agility
64
98
66
66
77
36
77
Agility
24
30
64
77
47
66
98
36
66
47
77
30
98
24
66
64
77
66
24
36
64
66
30
36
H/Work
48
50
48
H/Work
45
48
48
46
50
46
48
45
45
H/Work
40
48
46
46
48
43
46
H/Work
50
41
45
48
40
48
45
46
50
48
43
48
46
41
45
46
48
45
Scoreboard 1
Scoreboard 1
Scoreboard 2
Year
Scoreboard 2
Dog
YearName
No.
3
Stanley
4
Davidson
5
Huskins
No.
Name
6
Garner
73
Szmidt
Stanley
84
Adams
Davidson
11
Rivers
5
Huskins
12
O'Donnel
6
Garner
13
Boardman
No.
Name
7
Szmidt
15
Forbes
8
Adams
3
16
Stanley
Robinson
11 Name
Rivers
No.
4
17
Morgan
12 Davidson
O'Donnel
5
Huskins
13
Boardman
3
Stanley
6
Garner
15
Forbes
4The Davidson
30 16
Service
7
Szmidt
Robinson
5
Huskins
8
Adams
17
Morgan
6
Garner
11
Rivers
7
Szmidt
12 O'Donnel
Recall
Duke
Dennis
Chuck
Dog
Xena
Simba
Duke
Tyson
Dennis
Blitz
Chuck
Clive
Xena
Dog
Gwen
Simba
Seb
Tyson
Duke
Babo
Blitz
Dog
Dennis
Buck
Clive
Chuck
Gwen
Duke
Xena
Seb
Dennis
Dog
Simba
Babo
Chuck
Tyson
Buck
Xena
Blitz
Simba
Clive
Scoreboard 2
Year
Scoreboard 2
Year
7
Work
157
Criminal
147
Work
215
157
148
178
220
147
Criminal
215
Work
165
148
157
154
178
Criminal
220
Work
110
157
147
165
215
154
148
147
178
110
215
220
148
178
165
220
154
43
Property
26
37.5
43
42
42
34
26
Property
31
37.5
41
42
43
42
Property
34
31
43
26
41
37.5
42
26
42
37.5
34
42
31
42
41
34
31
41
Service Dog of the Year
Service Dog of the Year
Mick Smith Working165
Dog of the
110
154
Total
290
No. Name
Total
1
McCourt
2264 Burt
396
290
9
Wall
275
10
Buttler
342
14
Tustain
302
264 Burley
18
Total
264
396
19
Young
322
275 Cobley
20
290
237
342 Roland
21
Total
302 Clark
23
187
264 Murrant
24
290
264
322 Wright
25
396
237 Wright
26
275
27
264 Guilder
342
187
396
302
275
264
342
322
302
237
264
322
187
237
Dog
Sol
Dude
Kes
Beau
Ike
Barney
Mido
Zero
Beau
Asko
Tye
Ben
Jay
Aslan
Scoreboard 2
187
Mick Smith Working Dog of the Year
0
4
30
110
Recall
Retrieve
Speak
Agility
13
15
13
Recall
15
15
13
15
15
13
13
13
15
Recall
15
15
13
15
13
14
13
Recall
15
13
13
13
15
13
15
13
15
15
14
13
15
13
15
13
15
13
21
23
20
Retrieve
20
23
21
20
23
20
20
18
20
Retrieve
18
23
0
20
21
4
20
Retrieve
23
0
18
20
18
21
20
0
23
23
4
20
20
0
20
20
23
18
8
10
8
Speak
8
58
10
10
48
78
Speak
10
5
4
10
84
Speak
10
57
8
10
8
84
10
5
88
10
85
4
5
7
36
80
40
Agility
99
67
36
84
80
92
40
63
99
Agility
89
67
49
84
36
80
92
Agility
80
66
63
40
89
36
99
49
80
67
80
40
84
66
99
92
67
63
Criminal
Work
149
184
220
Criminal
178
Work
215
149
220
184
113
220
226
178
Criminal
174
215
Work
43
220
149
152
113
Criminal
184
156
226
Work
220
174
149
178
43
184
215
152
220
220
156
178
113
215
226
Property
32
Total
275
No. Name
362
47.5
Property
Total
3349 Stanley
29
4365 Davidson
45
32
275
5373
395 Huskins
41
6362 Garner
32
288
47.5
7349 Szmidt
31
29
365 Adams
8372
Property
Total
45
373 Rivers
11346
395 O'Donnel
41
12155
32
275
36
301
32
288 Boardman
13
Property
Total
362
24
31
372 Forbes
15281
47.5
349
346 Robinson
16275
32
29
365
155 Morgan
17362
45
373
36
301
47.5
349
395
41
24
281
29
365
32
288
45
373
31
372
Mick Smith Working Dog of the
Mick Smith Working Dog of the
Dog
Duke
Dennis
Chuck
Xena
Simba
Tyson
Blitz
Clive
Gwen
Seb
Babo
Buck
Colin
2nd Jim Szmidt
3rd place Dave Clark
Carl Young 2nd
Place
Garner
Ron Stanley with
comemerative Salver
Awards…
Judge Nunn
McCourt
Judge 1
Judge Hooper
Mick Tustain
The Service Dog 31
Do you have any questions for our Vets Corner expert, or would
you like to see something covered in a future issue? If so, contact
the editor with your questions and suggestions.
Vets Corner
By
Philip Kilkenny
Common poisons in dogs
D
ogs due to their inquisitive nature are
relatively commonly poisoned, over the
past 17 years I have seen many confirmed
cases & the following seem to be the most
persistent offenders.
Ibuprofen/Paracetamol -It can be very tempting
to give an unwell dog one of these common
anti-inflammatory drugs. Ibuprofen in particular
is extremely toxic & is probably the most
common cause of poisoning seen in our clinic.
Just a couple of tablets can be fatal to a large
dog causing stomach ulcers & kidney failure.
Paracetamol is less toxic than Ibuprofen but is
still dangerous at much lower doses compared
to humans. These drugs are part of the family
known as Non Steroidal Anti - Inflammatories
(NSAIDs) & the pathways used to metabolise this
type of drug differs between people & dogs. As
a result of this not only are human preparations
dangerous to dogs often the reverse applies &
canine NSAIDs can be very toxic to humans.
Slug pellets (Metaldehyde)- Dogs often find
slug pellets very palatable & will ingest large
quantities. Metaldehyde causes excitement
& fitting & is frequently fatal. The first line of
treatment for metaldehyde & NSAID poisoning is
to induce vomiting but this is only helpful if the
substance was eaten within the last hour or so.
Rat poisons - Most rodenticides contain
coumarins such as warfarin which interfere with
normal blood clotting. The effects of poisoning
may not be seen for several days & repeated small
doses are often worse than single large doses.
Signs include weakness, breathing difficulties
& prolonged bleeding from minor wounds.
Sometimes bruising is seen on the animals gums.
Vitamin K can be useful as an antidote but may
have to be given for months afterwards. As rats
become resistant to toxins the chemicals used
against them have become much more powerful
over the last 20 years making it much more
difficult to treat cases of accidental ingestion.
Anti-freeze (Ethylene Glycol) - Antifreeze is
sweet tasting & readily drunk by dogs. Any
spillages should be promptly cleared up. As
little as 100ml could be lethal to a large dog.
In confimed cases Ethanol can be used as an
antidote to block the action of the ethylene
glycol. Ethanol is basically alcohol & in emergency
situations we have on occasion given intravenous
vodka to poisoned dogs with great success
(although I suspect they have horrendous
hangovers!) The signs of poisoning include
vomiting, weakness,fitting & the poison itself
causes acute kidney failure.
Philip Kilkenny
The Service Dog 33
British Police and Services Canine Association
BPSCA CLUB SHOP
V-NECK ACRYLIC JUMPER (BPSCA LOGO ROUND STANDING GSD, SPRINGER, LABRADOR)
Colours:
Sizes:
Chest (to fit):
Price:
Black, Bottle, Burgundy, and Navy
S
M
L
XL
36/38” 40/42”
44”
46”
£21.50
XXL
48”
XXXL
50”
FLEECE FULL ZIP (BPSCA LOGO ROUND STANDING GSD, SPRINGER, LABRADOR)
Colours:
Sizes:
Chest (to fit):
Price:
Black, Navy, Forest Green, Red, Royal Blue, Crimson, Grey
S
M
L
XL
XXL
38”
40/42"
44/46"
48/50"
52" £35.00
FLEECE HALF ZIP (BPSCA LOGO ROUND STANDING GSD, SPRINGER, LABRADOR)
Colours:
Sizes:
Chest (to fit):
Price:
Black, Navy, Forest Green, Red, Royal Blue, Crimson, Grey
S
M
L
XL
XXL
38”
40/42"
44/46"
48/50"
52" £34.00
SWEATSHIRT (BPSCA LOGO ROUND STANDING GSD, SPRINGER, LABRADOR)
Colours:
Sizes:
Chest (to fit):
Price:
Black, Navy, Bottle, Red, Royal Blue, Jade, Maroon, Grey, Purple, White
S
M
L
XL
XXL
XXXL
38”
40”
42”
44/46”
48/50” 52/54” (Royal/Navy Only)
£20.50
POLOSHIRT (BPSCA LOGO ROUND STANDING GSD, SPRINGER, LABRADOR)
Colours:
Sizes:
Chest (to fit):
Price:
Black, Navy, Bottle, Red, Royal Blue, Jade, Maroon, Grey, Purple, White
S
M
L
XL
XXL
36/38” 40”
42/44”
46”
48”
£19.50.
LAPEL BADGE New style on gold background.
Price:
Members:
£2.00
ROUND CLOTH SEW ON BADGE (BPSCA WITH GSD HEAD)
Colour:
Price:
Black
Small £6.50 Large £10.00
NEW CLOTH SEW ON PAW BADGE (WITH BPSCA INITIALS)
Colour:
Price:
Black background with Silver Metallic thread
£2.50
ROUND CAR STICKER (TAX DISC TYPE) (BPSCA PAW))
Price:
£4.50
BPSCA PEN (Good Quality Refillable)
Price:
£4.50
BASEBALL CAP
Colour:
Black 34 The Service Dog
Price: £8.50
British Police and Services Canine Association
BPSCA CLUB SHOP
TIE
Colours
Navy or Brown
Price: £6.00
SHIELD (Wooden) (With BPSCA Logo with insignia CANUM AUXILIO SERVIMUS - with the
help of dogs we serve)
Price:
£18.00
UMBRELLA
Price: £18.00 plus postage and packing.
WALL CLOCK (BPSCA LOGO ROUND STANDING GSD)
Price:
£39.00
WRIST WATCH (BPSCA LOGO ROUND STANDING GSD)
Price:
£39.00
MUGS (BPSCA Crest)
Price:
£5.50
COASTERS (BPSCA Crest)
Price:
£4.50 each
KEYRINGS (BPSCA Crest)
Price:
£3.50
Please send orders to:
John Warbutton, 6 Meadway Crescent, Selby, North Yorkshire, YO8 4FX
FOUNDED 1974
BRITISH INSTITUTE
of
PROFESSIONAL DOG TRAINERS
(Security Division)
For details of:
INSTITUTE MEMBERSHIP
SECURITY DOG HANDLER’S
ACCREDITATION
INSTRUCTORS COURSES
Please contact:
BIPDT
PO Box 5894
MILTON KEYNES
MK10 1FJ
Tel:- 01908 526 856
The Service Dog 35
36 The Service Dog
British Police and Services Canine Association
APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP
Mr/Mrs/Ms/Miss……Initial……..Surname…………………………………………………………
Address:………………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………
Town: …………………………………………………………………………………………………
County:………….……………………………………………………………………………………
Country: ………….………………… Post Code:…………………………………………………..
Tel No. (Daytime)………………………… (Evening)……………………………………………...
E-mail: ………………………………………………………………………………………..………
Name Force/Unit:.....................................................................................................................
Rank (where applicable):..........................................................................................................

Specialised Service Dates........................................................................................................
Course Qualifications (may be required):..................................................................................
Signed:....……………………………………................................. Dated:…………………………
Membership: (* Delete as applicable)
£15.00
£50.00
per annum*
per five years*
Please make cheques payable, in sterling, to B.P.S.C.A.
Please forward to:
The Membership Secretary
British Police and Services Canine Association
Mr J Warbutton
6 Meadway Crescent
Selby, North Yorkshire, YO8 4FX
Tel: 07841 472 542
email: [email protected]
The Service Dog 37
British Police and Services Canine Association
APPLICATION FOR ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIP
Mr/Mrs/Ms/Miss……Initial…… Surname…………………………………………………………
Occupation:…………………………………………………………………………………………..
Address:………………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………
Town: …………………………………………………………………………………………………
County:………….……………………………………………………………………………………
Country: ………….………………… Post Code:…………………………………………………..
Tel No. (Daytime)………………………… (Evening)……………………………………………...
E-mail: ………………………………………………………………………………………..………
PROPOSED BY:
Full Members Name…………………………………………………………
Membership Number…………
Expire Date:…………………………………………………..
Associate Membership: (*Delete as applicable)
£15.00 per annum*
£50.00 per five years*
Please make cheques payable, in sterling, to B.P.S.C.A.
Please forward to:
The Membership Secretary
British Police and Services Canine Association
Mr J Warbutton
6 Meadway Crescent
Selby, North Yorkshire, YO8 4FX
Tel: 07841 472 542
email: [email protected]
38 The Service Dog

Signed:…………………………………Date:……………………………………………………....
`