Document 95344

Health and Safety
Executive
Changes in shift work patterns over
the last ten years (1999 to 2009)
Prepared by Office for National Statistics for the Health and Safety Executive 2011
RR887
Research Report
© Crown copyright 2011
First published 2011
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ii
Health and Safety
Executive
Changes in shift work patterns over
the last ten years (1999 to 2009)
Matthew Steel
Office for National Statistics
Government Buildings
Cardiff Road
Newport
NP10 8XG
The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) have approached the Office for National Statistics (ONS) to carry out
an updated analysis of shift work in the UK based on the last ten years worth of data (1999 to 2009) from
the Labour Force Survey (LFS). This paper examines changes in shift work patterns across the UK workforce
over the last decade. The report investigates differences in the reporting of shift work based on gender, age,
region, occupation and industry and also compares engagement in the different types of shift patterns.
This report and the work it describes were funded by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). Its contents,
including any opinions and/or conclusions expressed, are those of the author alone and do not necessarily
reflect HSE policy.
HSE Books
Background
The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) have approached the Office for
National Statistics (ONS) to carry out an updated analysis of shift work in the
UK based on the last ten years worth of data (1999 to 2009) from the Labour
Force Survey (LFS). This paper examines changes in shift work patterns
across the UK workforce over the last decade. The report investigates
differences in the reporting of shift work based on gender, age, region,
occupation and industry and also compares engagement in the different types
of shift patterns.
Summary of Key Findings
The overall proportion engaged in shift work has remained consistent across
the past decade. Where gender differences were identified, it continues to be
males rather than females that are more likely to be engaged in any form of
shift work pattern (irrespective of whether the frequency reported is ‘most of
the time’ or some of the time’). Where we compare the proportional data
between 1999 and 2009, a downward trend is evident among males in the
number that have reported working shift work ‘most of the time’ across the
time series.
Where we consider age, it continues to be individuals grouped within the
youngest age band (16 to 24 years of age) that are most likely to report
engaging in shift work patterns. The number of males within the youngest age
band engaging in shift work ‘most of the time’ has increased across the
decade in question where we compare the proportions between 1999 and
2009. Although an increase was also seen in reported shift work ‘most of the
time’ among females in the youngest age group, this increase was not
statistically significant.
Across the time series it was individuals working within the countries Wales
and Scotland that were most likely to report engaging in any pattern of shift
work. It was consistently the country Northern Ireland that displayed the
lowest reported levels of any frequency of shift work. Where we consider
government office regions, the highest levels of reported engagement in shift
work were in the North East of England and Scotland. The lowest levels of
shift work participation were reported in Northern Ireland and London.
Those working within the Personal protection occupations remain the most
likely to engage in any form of shift work pattern. Individuals employed within
the transport and communication industry classification were the most likely to
be working shift patterns.
The most prevalent form of shift work pattern reported by those engaging in
shift work was the two shift system. This pattern often comprises of two shifts
of eight hours in duration which are usually alternated weekly or over longer
intervals.
2
Methodological considerations
In attempting a time-series analysis of LFS data spanning a decade, a number
of issues required careful consideration. One particular issue concerned the
re-weighting exercises which have been performed on the LFS datasets in the
years of 2007 and 2009. For current analytical purposes, datasets between
1999 and 2006 have been weighted using the 2007 person level weights.
Datasets between 2007 and 2009 have been weighted using the 2009 person
level weights.
Further consideration was necessary following revisions to the structure and
frequency of the LFS. In 2006 the survey switched from a seasonal-quarter to
a calendar-quarter basis, in order to fall in line with EU Regulation. As a
consequence of the shift work questions appearing only in a single LFS
quarter, the realignment from seasonal to calendar quarters altered the
months where the question would be asked. Where the variable was originally
asked within the seasonal quarter of spring (March – May), from 2006 it would
be administered in the calendar quarter of April-June. A major change such as
this clearly presents difficulties for analysis of trend data.
The aforementioned re-weighting exercises were performed only on a limited
series of LFS back data on a calendar-quarter basis. As a direct result, March
data on shift work were omitted from datasets prior to 2006. Where only two of
the three months worth of shift work data were present, the decision was
made to apportion the observed ratio in the two month’s for which data was
present to the month where data was missing. The current paper therefore
makes the assumption that the reporting of shift work patterns would remain
consistent across the three months and that similar reporting would occur in
June as it would in April and May.
In 1999 LFS response options for the frequency of shift work at the variable
SHIFTWK altered from ‘occasionally’ and ‘sometimes’ to ‘usually’ and ‘most of
the time’. The variable name altered to reflect this change from SHFTWK to
SHFTWK99. Although this should not impact on current analysis, any attempt
to compare current analysis with the previous report (McOrmond 2004) may
prove difficult due to the potential discontinuities (Please refer to Appendix i
for further information about the shift work questions which are administered
on the LFS).
Background – shift work
Shift work can be thought of as a work pattern under which different groups of
workers succeed each other in the same job at the same site or location. At
the beginning of the shift work, the work of the previous shift is taken over and
at the end of the shift, the work is handed over to the next shift. Shift work can
often entail working during unsocial hours in the early morning, at night or
during the weekend and the weekly rest days do not always coincide with
normal rest days (i.e. weekends).
3
Shift work can be prevalent in firms or organisations which remain open and
working or providing services outside of the expected working hours. We often
tend to treat expected working hours as those conforming to the parameters
of 8am and 6pm on weekdays.
Individuals whose work pattern may vary to suit day-to-day needs but, who
are not part of any regular schedule do not fulfil the LFS criteria for shift work.
Some respondents, especially on covering duties in the health sector, may not
recognise that they are working as part of a larger shift pattern. LFS
interviewers are trained to be aware of this potential under-reporting and
encouraged to probe to ensure complete coverage.
Respondents who reported engaging in shift work were able to categorise this
frequency under the response options ‘most of the time’ or ‘occasionally’.
Where respondents were unable to distinguish between these two options,
advice was provided by interviewers to treat more than fifty per cent of their
employment hours as ‘most of the time’.
Frequency of shift work
As shown in Table 1, the overall proportion of respondents who reported
engaging in shift work has remained largely consistent across the previous
decade. Having said this, there does appear to be a slight reduction in the
overall number of respondents reporting working shift patterns ‘most of the
time’. This downward trend, where we compare the proportions engaging in
shift work ‘most of the time’ between 1999 and 2009, is only statistically
significant among men.
Table 1: Proportions of people in employment working shift patterns by sex;
United Kingdom; 1999 to 2009
Per Cent
Males
1999 1,2 2009 3
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
16.0
4.0
80.0
14.8
4.1
81.1
Unweighted base
22,465 22,448
1
Weighted base (000s) 9,559 12,942
Females
1999 1,2 2009 3
13.3
2.1
84.6
13.0
2.8
84.2
19,939 20,978
8,071 11,331
All
1999 1,2
2009 3
14.7
3.2
82.1
14.0
3.5
82.6
42,404 43,426
17,630 24,273
1
Weighted to 2007 population totals
Following realignment from seasonal to calendar quarters, data for June was assumed to follow the same pattern as
that of April and May.
3
Weighted to 2009 population totals
2
In previous analysis by McOrmond (2004), the proportion of individuals never
working shift patterns were compared in an attempt to identify changes in shift
work. Figure 1 illustrates the proportion of individuals that never participated
4
in shift work as part of their main job across the last ten years. This graph
supports the finding that overall proportions engaging in shift work related
behaviour have remained relatively consistent across the last decade (For full
results see Table A and Table B in Appendix iii).
Figure 1: Proportions of people in employment who never do shift work;
United Kingdom; 19991,2 to 20093
88
Per cent
86
Men
Women
All
84
82
80
19
99
20
00
20
01
20
02
20
03
20
04
20
05
20
06
20
07
20
08
20
09
78
Year
1
Weighted to 2007 population totals
Following realignment from seasonal to calendar quarters, data for June was assumed to follow the same pattern as
that of April and May.
3
Weighted to 2009 population totals
2
Shift work by Gender
In every year of the previous decade, men were more likely to report engaging
in shift work ‘most of the time’ when compared with women (Figure 2). This
difference was most pronounced for the year 2005 where 15.7 per cent of
males reported working shift work ‘most of the time’ compared with 12.2 per
cent of women.
It is interesting to note that among men, the proportion working shift work
‘most of the time’ has fallen from 16.0 per cent in 1999 to 14.8 per cent in
2009. The proportion of women has remained more consistent across the
decade and unlike males, has not declined by a statistically significant level –
13.3 per cent worked shift work most of the time in 1999 compared with 13.0
per cent in 2009.
5
Figure 2: Proportions of people in employment who report working shift work
‘most of the time’ by sex; United Kingdom; 19991,2 to 20093
17
Per cent
16
15
Males
14
F emales
13
12
09
20
08
20
07
20
06
20
05
20
04
20
03
20
02
20
01
20
00
20
19
99
11
Year
1
Weighted to 2007 population totals
Following realignment from seasonal to calendar quarters, data for June was assumed to follow the same pattern as
that of April and May.
3
Weighted to 2009 population totals
2
A similar pattern is present when we consider those who report engaging in
shift work ‘occasionally’. A higher number of males declared working shift
patterns at this frequency when compared with women across each of the last
ten years (For full results see Table B in Appendix iii).
McOrmond (2004) was able to explain this higher propensity for males to
engage in shift work through their greater likelihood to work in manufacturing
based industries. Such industries are renowned for shift work patterns.
Shift work by Age
Among men, the age group most likely to be engaged in shift work ‘most of
the time’ were those aged 16-24 (Table 2). The proportion of males within this
age group who reported working shift patterns ‘most of the time’ has
increased from 17.7 per cent in 1999 to 20.6 per cent in 2009. In each year of
the last decade, employed men over the age of 50 were the least likely age
group to report shift work as their regular work pattern. The proportion of
males aged between 25 and 49 and reporting shift work ‘most of the time’ has
declined from 17.2 per cent in 1999 to 15.3 per cent in 2009. (For full results
see Table C in appendix iii).
Among women, it was also the youngest age group that were the most likely
to report working some form of shift pattern. Those aged between 16 and 24
had the highest percentage engaged in shift work ‘most of the time’. This
proportion has increased, although not by a statistically significant level, from
20.1 per cent in 1999 to 22.1 per cent in 2009. Women aged 50 years and
over were the least likely of the three age bandings to report working shift
patterns (For full results see Table D in appendix iii).
6
Table 2: Proportions of people in employment working shift patterns by sex
and age group; United Kingdom; 1999 to 2009
Per Cent
Males
19991,2
Age Group
16-24
2009
3
Females
19991,2 2009 3
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
17.7
3.8
78.5
20.6
4.5
74.9
20.1
3.0
76.9
22.1
3.4
74.6
25-49
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
17.2
4.5
78.2
15.3
4.2
80.6
12.9
2.0
85.1
12.4
2.8
84.8
50+
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
12.0
2.9
85.1
11.5
3.7
84.8
10.0
1.9
88.1
10.1
2.5
87.4
22,465 22,448
9,559 12,942
19,939
8,071
20,978
11,331
Unweighted base
Weighted base (000s)
1
1
Weighted to 2007 population totals
Following realignment from seasonal to calendar quarters, data for June was assumed to follow the same pattern as
that of April and May.
3
Weighted to 2009 population totals
2
Shift Work by Region
In order to prevent any risk of disclosure when analysing the regional
breakdown of shift work patterns it has been necessary to amalgamate the
categories for working shift work ‘most of the time’ and ‘occasionally’.
Following this decision, regional analysis will compare those who have
engaged in shift work patterns, irrespective of frequency, with those never
engaging in shift work at all in their main job.
At the beginning of the time series those individuals working within the
countries of Wales and Scotland reported the highest levels of shift work
engagement. Within Wales 22.8 per cent of workers reported some frequency
of shift work pattern. Within Scotland 21.8 per cent of workers reported some
frequency of shift work in their main job. Individuals working within Northern
Ireland were the least likely to report any form of shift pattern in their main job,
with 14.6 per cent of individuals working some frequency of shift work.
Across the decade the levels of reported shift work within Wales declined from
22.8 per cent in 1999 to 18.2 per cent in 2009 (Figure 3). A slight decline was
also identified where we compare the proportion engaging in any frequency of
shift work in Northern Ireland in 1999 and compare this with the number
engaging in 2009 although this was not statistically significant (14.6% in 1999
compared with 12.1% in 2009).
7
In 2009, we see that those individuals working within Scotland are the most
likely to report engaging in any form of shift work pattern (21.3% of individuals
reported working some amount of shift work in their main job). It remains
Northern Ireland where the lowest levels of shift work are recorded (12.1% of
individuals reported working some frequency of shift work in their main job).
(For full results see Table E in appendix iii).
Figure 3: Proportions of people in employment engaging in shift work by
country; United Kingdom; 20011,2 to 20093
25
20
Per Cent
15
1999
2009
10
5
0
England
Wales
Scotland
Northern Ireland
Country
1
Weighted to 2007 population totals
Following realignment from seasonal to calendar quarters, data for June was assumed to follow the same pattern as
that of April and May.
3
Weighted to 2009 population totals
2
Where we then move on to consider the prevalence of shift work by
Government Office Region, we see that the highest reported levels of shift
work engagement in the year 1999 were present in the North East region of
England (24.2% of respondents reported engaging in some frequency of shift
work in their main job). The lowest proportions of shift work were reported in
the regions of London and Northern Ireland in the year 1999 (13.9% and
14.6% respectively)
A downward trend was identified in the levels of shift work reported in the
region Yorkshire and Humberside from 20.6 per cent in 1999 to 18.4 per cent
in 2009. A decline was also witnessed in the proportions engaging in shift
work in the North East region although this drop was not statistically
significant (24.2% in 1999 compared with to 21.9% in 2009).
In the year 2009, it was the Government Office Regions North East England
and Scotland that reported the highest proportions of workers engaging in
some frequency of shift work (21.9% and 21.3% respectively). Northern
Ireland continued to display the lowest proportion of workers engaging in any
form of shift work (12.1% of respondents recorded any form of shift work) (For
full results see Table F in appendix iii).
8
Shift work by Occupation
The new SOC2000 variables were introduced into the Labour Force Survey in
2001, because SOC90 became outdated. The revisions, which included
tighter definition of managerial occupations and the movement of many job
titles between major job groups, make analysis of occupation across the
previous decade difficult. A decision was therefore taken to exclude data for
the years 1999 and 2000 from analysis which reported existing SOC1990
variables.
Where we consider the prevalence of individuals who report working shift
patterns, irrespective of whether this is ‘most of the time’ or ‘occasionally’, it is
those workers in the personal protection occupational grouping who were
most likely to report engaging in shift work. Among males within this
occupation, a consistent proportion of at least two-fifths reported working any
patterns of shift work in their main job (Figure 4). The years 2001 and 2006
contained the highest proportions of shift work among males in the personal
protection occupations, with 47.4 per cent and 46.9 per cent of workers
engaging in any form of shift work respectively. The percentage of males
working in the personal protection industry and engaging in shift work has
dropped slightly, but not at a statistically significant level, from 47.4 per cent in
2001 to 45.3 per cent in 2009.
Two occupations which displayed a rise in the number of males engaging in
shift work were sales and clerical/secretarial. Within sales, the proportion of
men engaging in shift work has increased from 18.1 per cent in 2001 to 26.0
per cent in 2009. Within the clerical/secretarial occupational grouping, the
proportion of men engaging in shift work increased from 12.7 per cent in 2001
to 15.4 per cent in 2009 although this particular increase was not statistically
significant (For full results see Table G in appendix iii).
Among females, it was similarly those working in the personal protection
occupation who reported the highest propensity for shift working (Figure 4).
The highest proportion was reported in 2002 where 31.0 per cent recorded
working some form of shift pattern. Although the percentage of women
engaging in shift work has remained highest for those in personal protection
occupations, this proportion has displayed a downward but not statistically
significant decline (30.7% in 2001 compared with 26.9% in 2009).
Women working in sales displayed a rise in the number reporting shift work
patterns. The overall proportion increased from 15.9 per cent in 2001 to 21.2
per cent in 2009.
In 2001 the proportion of women engaged in shift work in the associate
professional/technical occupation was 26.0 per cent. In 2009 this proportion
had reduced to 22.2 per cent. In 2001, 14.2 per cent of women working within
craft and related occupations reported engaging in shift work. In 2009 this
proportion had decreased to 11.9 per cent. This change was not statistically
significant. (For full results see Table H in appendix iii).
9
Figure 4: Proportions of people in employment engaging in shift work by
occupation; United Kingdom; 20011,2 to 20093
Men
50
45
40
Per Cent
35
30
2001
25
2009
20
15
10
5
0
All
Occupation
Managers
and Admin
Professional
Associate
Prof and
Tech
Clerical,
Secretarial
Craft and
related
occupations
Personal,
Protection
Sales
Plant and
machine
operatives
Other
Occupations
Occupation
Women
35
30
Per Cent
25
20
2001
15
2009
10
5
0
All
Occupation
Managers
and Admin
Professional
Associate
Prof and
Tech
Clerical,
Secretarial
Craft and
related
occupations
Personal,
Protection
Sales
Plant and
machine
operatives
Other
Occupations
Occupation
1
Weighted to 2007 population totals
Following realignment from seasonal to calendar quarters, data for June was assumed to follow the same pattern as
that of April and May.
3
Weighted to 2009 population totals
2
Where we consider just those who report working shift patterns ‘most of the
time’, the personal protection occupation had the highest reported levels of
shift work. About two-fifths of male workers within this occupation reported
working shift work ‘most of the time’. Men working in professional occupations
were the least likely to report working shift patterns ‘most of the time’.
Although among women, the personal protection occupation was again the
most likely occupation for respondents to report working shift work ‘most of
the time’, the actual proportions were considerably lower than for males.
Approximately a quarter of female workers in the personal protection
occupation reported working shift work ‘most of the time’. Similarly to males,
10
women working within the professional occupation were the least likely to
report working shift patterns ‘most of the time’.
Shift work by Industry
The new SIC2007 variables were introduced onto the Labour Force Survey in
2009, as an update to the existing SIC92 classification. As data for 2009 was
classified using SIC2007 rather than SIC92 a decision was made to exclude
this year from analysis.
Where we consider the prevalence of individuals who report working shift
patterns, irrespective of whether this is ‘most of the time’ or ‘occasionally’, it is
those workers in the transport and communication industry where we find the
proportion of workers engaged in shift work to be highest. Among males within
this industry, a consistent proportion of at least one third reported working any
patterns of shift work (Figure 5). The proportion of men in this industry
engaged in shift work has decreased slightly, although not by a statistically
significant level, from 37.2 per cent in 1999 to 35.2 per cent in 2008. (For full
results see Table I in appendix iii).
Among females, the transport and communication industry also accounts for
the highest proportion of women in shift work. Just over one fifth of women
within this industry reported engaging in shift work and this figure has
remained stable across the time-series (Figure 5) (For full results see Table J
in appendix iii).
Among both men and women, the proportions engaging in shift work within
the manufacturing industry has shown a small decline. In the year 1999, 28.2
per cent of men in this industry were working shift patterns compared with
25.4 per cent in 2008. For women, although not a statistically significant
decline, 11.5 per cent were working shift work in this industry in 1999
compared with 9.4 per cent in 2008.
Where we consider the distribution, hotels and restaurants industry, the
proportion of men engaging in shift work has increased across the time series
(18.4% in 1999 compared with 23.1% in 2008). An increase can also be seen
among females – the proportion working within this industry and engaged in
shift work has increased from 15.8 per cent in 1999 to 19.2 per cent in 2008.
11
Figure 5: Proportions of people in employment engaging in shift work by
industry; United Kingdom; 19991,2 to 20083
Men
40
35
30
25
1999
2008
20
15
10
5
*
*
0
Agriculture and
Fishing
Energy and
Water
Manufacturing
Construction
Distibution,
hotels and
restaurants
Transport and
communication
Banking,
finance,
insurance etc
Public
adminstration,
education and
health
Other servies
Women
25
20
15
1999
2008
10
5
*
*
*
0
Agriculture and
Fishing
Energy and
Water
Manufacturing
Construction
Distibution,
hotels and
restaurants
Transport and Banking, finance,
communication
insurance etc
Public
adminstration,
education and
health
Other servies
1
Weighted to 2007 population totals
Following realignment from seasonal to calendar quarters, data for June was assumed to follow the same pattern as
that of April and May.
3
Weighted to 2009 population totals
*Sample size too small for reliable estimate
2
Among males, almost one-third of workers in the transport and communication
industry reported working shift work ‘most of the time’. This proportion has
dropped slightly over the past decade from 31.1 per cent in 1999 to 29.5 per
cent in 2008. This downward trend is not statistically significant.
Approximately one fifth of women working within the transport and
communication industry were doing shift work ‘most of the time’ and this
proportion has remained stable.
Within the manufacturing industry, the proportion of males working shift work
‘most of the time’ has shown a decline. In 1999, 24.0 per cent of males
reported engaging in shift work ‘most of the time’ compared with 21.8 per cent
in 2008. A similar decrease but not at a statistically significant level can be
12
seen among women - the proportions working shift work most of the time has
decreased from 10.1 per cent in 1999 to 7.9 per cent in 2008.
In 1999, 14.7 per cent of males working within the distribution, hotels and
restaurants industry reported working shift patterns ‘most of the time’. This
proportion has increased to 18.6 per cent in 2008. A slight rise in the
proportions is also evident among women (13.3% in 1999 compared with
15.7% in 2008).
A reduction in the proportion of women reporting shift work ‘most of the time’
was identified in the public administration, education and health industry. The
proportions have dropped from 18.3 per cent in 1999 to 15.7 per cent in 2008.
Type of Shift Work
Where respondents indicated working shift work in their main job, either ‘most
of the time’ or ‘occasionally’, a further question investigated the actual type of
shift work that they engaged in (For some further information about the
different types of shift work please refer to Box 1 in appendix ii).
Across the previous decade, the most common type of reported shift pattern
among those engaging in shift work was the two shift system (Figure 6). This
result is again directly comparable with that found by McOrmond (2004).
Across the last ten years the proportion of those reporting shift work and
working this type of shift pattern has remained consistent at approximately 30
per cent. Across every year of the decade in question, women were more
likely than men to report working the two shift system (33.3% compared with
26.2% in 1999 and 31.6% compared with 25.4% in 2009).
13
Figure 6: The type of shift work reported by those working any frequency of
shift work in their main job; United Kingdom; 19991,2 to 20083
30
25
20
1999
2009
15
10
5
0
Three-shift Continental
Two shift Sometimes
night/
Sometimes
day
Split
Morning
Evening or
twilight
Night
Weekend
Other
1
Weighted to 2007 population totals
Following realignment from seasonal to calendar quarters, data for June was assumed to follow the same pattern as
that of April and May.
3
Weighted to 2009 population totals
2
The number of shift workers reporting a three shift working pattern has
declined from 15.4 per cent in 1999 to 9.5 per cent in 2009. A decline in the
proportions working a night shift pattern is also evident although this change is
not statistically significant (10.0% in 1999 compared with 8.3% in 2009).
The response ‘other type of shift work’, which is used by respondents when no
other response option will suffice has seen an increase in reporting from 18.4
per cent in 1999 to 25.5 per cent in 2009. Such a finding helps to suggest that
new patterns of shift work may be emerging (For full results see Table K in
appendix iii).
14
References
McOrmond, T (2004) ‘Changes to working trends over the past decade’,
pp 11, vol 112, no 1, Labour Market Trends.
Appendix i
SHFTWK99
Administered in the April to June LFS quarter only
Do you do shift work in your (main) job…
1.
Most of the time
2.
Occasionally
3.
Or never?
Applies to all respondents in employment during the interviewing reference week
excluding college based government schemes.
SHFTYP
Administered in the April to June LFS quarter only
What type of shift pattern do you work?
1.
three-shift working
2.
continental shifts
3.
two-shift system with ‘earlies and ‘lates’/double day shifts
4.
sometimes night and sometimes day shifts
5.
split shifts
6.
morning shifts
7.
evening or twilight shifts
8.
night shifts
9.
weekend shifts
10.
other type of shift work.
Applies to all respondents in employment who may do shift work (SHFTWK99 = 1
or 2)
15
Appendix ii
16
Appendix iii
Table A
Proportions of people working shift patterns ; United Kingdom; 1999 to 2009
1999
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Unweighted base
Weighted base (000s)
1,2
14.7
3.2
82.1
1
42,404
17,630
2000
1,2
15.0
3.2
81.8
2001
1,2
14.5
3.1
82.4
41,259 40,598
17,652 18,067
2002
1,2
14.3
3.1
82.6
2003
1,2
14.4
3.2
82.3
2004
1,2
14.5
3.2
82.3
2005
1,2
14.1
3.1
82.8
2006
13.9
3.3
82.8
Weighted to 2007 population totals
2
Following realignment from seasonal to calendar quarters, data for June was assumed to follow the same pattern as that of April and May.
Weighted to 2009 population totals
Table B
2007
3
14.1
3.3
82.6
2008
3
14.1
3.4
82.4
2009
3
14.0
3.5
82.6
40,619 37,991 36,500 36,140 50,464 49,253 46,596 43,426
18,060 17,798 17,954 18,059 25,940 25,693 24,885 24,273
1
3
1,2
Proportions of people working shift patterns by sex; United Kingdom; 1999 to 2009
1999
1,2
2000
1,2
2001
1,2
2002
1,2
2003
1,2
2004
1,2
2005
1,2
2006
1,2
2007
3
2008
3
2009
3
Males
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Unweighted base
Weighted base (000s)
1
16.0
4.0
80.0
16.2
3.8
80.1
15.7
3.6
80.8
15.6
3.7
80.7
15.4
3.9
80.8
15.7
3.9
80.3
22,465
9,559
21,880
9,577
21,259 21,281
9,714
9,719
19,932
9,609
19,036
9,670
13.3
2.1
84.6
13.5
2.5
83.9
12.8
2.4
84.7
13.3
2.5
84.2
13.0
2.4
84.6
19,939
8,071
19,379
8,075
19,339 19,338
8,354
8,341
18,059
8,189
17,464
8,284
14.7
3.2
82.1
15.0
3.2
81.8
14.5
3.1
82.4
14.3
3.1
82.6
14.4
3.2
82.3
14.5
3.2
82.3
42,404
17,630
41,259
17,652
40,598
18,067
40,619
18,060
37,991
17,798
36,500
17,954
15.7
3.6
80.7
15.1
3.9
81.0
15.1
3.8
81.1
15.3
4.1
80.6
14.8
4.1
81.1
18,770 26,135 25,581 24,136 22,448
9,693 13,898 13,862 13,357 12,942
Females
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Unweighted base
Weighted base (000s)
1
13.2
2.5
84.3
12.2
2.5
85.3
12.6
2.6
84.8
12.8
2.8
84.4
12.8
2.7
84.5
13.0
2.8
84.2
17,370 24,329 23,672 22,460 20,978
8,366 12,042 11,832 11,528 11,331
Total
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Unweighted base
Weighted base (000s)
1
1
14.1
3.1
82.8
13.9
3.3
82.8
14.1
3.3
82.6
17
14.0
3.5
82.6
36,140 50,464 49,253 46,596 43,426
18,059 25,940 25,693 24,885 24,273
Weighted to 2007 population totals
Following realignment from seasonal to calendar quarters, data for June was assumed to follow the same pattern as that of April and May.
3
Weighted to 2009 population totals
2
14.1
3.4
82.4
Table C
Proportion of males working shift patterns by age group; United Kingdom; 1999 to 2009
1999
1,2
2000
1,2
2001
1,2
2002
1,2
2003
1,2
2004
1,2
2005
1,2
2006
1,2
2007
3
2008
3
2009
3
Males
16-24
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
17.7
3.8
78.5
19.3
3.9
76.8
19.7
3.5
76.8
18.3
3.6
78.1
18.5
4.7
76.8
20.5
4.2
75.3
18.8
4.4
76.8
20.0
4.1
75.9
18.2
4.0
77.7
19.2
3.8
77.0
20.6
4.5
74.9
17.2
4.5
78.2
17.3
4.1
78.6
16.2
4.1
79.7
16.7
4.0
79.3
16.4
4.1
79.5
16.4
4.2
79.3
16.6
3.9
79.5
15.8
4.2
80.1
16.0
4.0
80.0
16.1
4.5
79.4
15.3
4.2
80.6
12.0
2.9
85.1
11.7
2.9
85.4
12.3
2.4
85.3
11.8
2.8
85.4
11.7
2.8
85.4
11.8
3.1
85.1
12.1
2.5
85.5
11.4
3.2
85.4
11.8
3.2
84.9
12.1
3.3
84.6
11.5
3.7
84.8
25-49
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
50+
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Unweighted base
Weighted base (000s)
1
2
3
1
22,465 21,880 21,259 21,281 19,932 19,036 18,770 26,135 25,581 24,136 22,448
9,559 9,577 9,714 9,719 9,609 9,670 9,693 13,898 13,862 13,357 12,942
Weighted to 2007 population totals
Following realignment from seasonal to calendar quarters, data for June was assumed to follow the same pattern as that of April and May.
Weighted to 2009 population totals
Table D
Proportion of females working shift patterns by age group; United Kingdom; 1999 to 2009
1999
1,2
2000
1,2
2001
1,2
2002
1,2
2003
1,2
2004
1,2
2005
1,2
2006
1,2
2007
3
2008
3
2009
3
Females
16-24
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
20.1
3.0
76.9
18.9
3.4
77.7
19.6
3.0
77.3
18.9
2.9
78.2
19.7
2.9
77.5
19.5
3.4
77.1
19.6
3.3
77.1
19.0
3.2
77.8
20.6
3.4
76.0
20.3
3.5
76.2
22.1
3.4
74.6
12.9
2.0
85.1
13.7
2.6
83.7
12.8
2.5
84.7
12.4
2.6
84.9
12.9
2.7
84.4
12.6
2.4
85.0
11.7
2.4
85.8
12.5
2.6
84.9
12.3
2.8
84.8
12.2
2.8
85.1
12.4
2.8
84.8
10.0
1.9
88.1
9.8
1.9
88.3
10.2
1.9
87.9
10.1
1.7
88.2
10.7
1.9
87.4
10.3
1.9
87.8
9.4
2.1
88.5
9.5
2.0
88.5
9.9
2.3
87.8
10.3
2.2
87.5
10.1
2.5
87.4
25-49
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
50+
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Unweighted base
Weighted base (000s)
1
19,939
8,071
19,379 19,339
8,075
8,354
19,338 18,059 17,464 17,370
8,341 8,189
8,284 8,366
24,329 23,672 22,460 20,978
12,042 11,832 11,528 11,331
1
Weighted to 2007 population totals
2
Following realignment from seasonal to calendar quarters, data for June was assumed to follow the same pattern as that of April and May.
3
Weighted to 2009 population totals
18
Table E
Proportions of people working shift patterns by country; United Kingdom; 1999 to 2009
1999
England
Wales
Scotland
Northern Ireland
Unweighted base
Weighted base (000s)
1
1,2
2000
1,2
2001
1,2
2002
1,2
2003
1,2
2004
1,2
2007
3
2008
3
2009
3
17.1
18.7
22.2
11.1
17.0
20.0
24.3
12.8
17.2
19.8
23.8
8.8
16.7
19.5
20.9
13.9
16.8
20.0
21.7
12.3
16.9
20.9
22.1
12.6
17.2
19.7
22.0
11.6
17.2
18.2
21.3
12.1
7,555
7,437
7,087
7,020
6,620
6,342
6,120
8,532
8,387
7,995
7,399
3,156
3,206
3,177
3,146
3,147
3,180
3,097
4,466
4,469
4,371
4,223
Weighted to 2007 population totals
Following realignment from seasonal to calendar quarters, data for June was assumed to follow the same pattern as that of April and May.
Weighted to 2009 population totals
Proportion of people working shift patterns by Government Office Region;
United Kingdom; 1999 to 2009
1999
North East
North West
Yorkshire and Humberside
East Midlands
West Midlands
Eastern
London
South East
South West
Wales
Scotland
Northern Ireland
Unweighted base
1
1,2
2000
1,2
2001
1,2
2002
1,2
2003
1,2
2004
1,2
2005
1,2
2006
1,2
2007
3
2008
3
2009
3
24.2
18.7
20.6
17.5
17.3
15.6
13.9
16.3
17.9
22.8
21.8
14.6
25.0
19.0
20.1
19.0
18.5
16.3
14.2
16.6
17.1
20.6
23.1
11.7
23.6
19.4
20.0
18.6
17.8
15.3
13.3
15.3
16.8
20.1
22.8
12.3
21.4
19.0
18.7
17.7
17.5
16.6
14.5
14.9
17.9
18.7
22.2
11.1
22.5
18.1
17.9
17.6
19.7
14.8
15.4
15.1
17.3
20.0
24.3
12.8
22.2
18.8
18.9
17.6
17.6
15.3
15.1
16.4
17.1
19.8
23.8
8.8
22.2
18.4
18.5
19.1
17.4
15.2
13.2
15.1
17.1
19.5
20.9
13.9
23.0
19.2
17.4
18.1
18.0
15.4
14.2
14.9
16.1
20.0
21.7
12.3
22.7
19.0
17.9
17.3
17.3
15.5
15.1
14.6
17.6
20.9
22.1
12.6
22.0
17.6
17.8
18.9
17.8
15.8
15.8
15.8
17.8
19.7
22.0
11.6
21.9
19.0
18.4
18.3
17.6
16.2
14.6
16.3
16.6
18.2
21.3
12.1
7,555
7,437
7,087
7,020
6,620
6,342
6,120
8,532
8,387
7,995
7,399
3,156
3,206
3,177
3,146
3,147
3,180
3,097
4,466
4,469
4,371
4,223
2
Weighted to 2007 population totals
Following realignment from seasonal to calendar quarters, data for June was assumed to follow the same pattern as that of April and May.
3
Weighted to 2009 population totals
19
1,2
17.1
20.1
22.8
12.3
3
1
2006
17.7
20.6
23.1
11.7
2
Weighted base (000s)
1,2
17.3
22.8
21.8
14.6
1
Table F
2005
Table G
Proportion of males working shift patterns by occupation; United Kingdom; 1999 to 2009
2001
1,2
2002
1,2
2003
1,2
2004
1,2
2005
1,2
2006
1,2
2007
3
2008
3
2009
3
Males
Managers and Admin
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
5.6
3.3
91.1
6.2
3.1
90.7
6.5
3.4
90.1
6.6
3.3
90.1
6.3
2.9
90.7
6.7
3.0
90.3
6.7
3.4
89.9
6.8
3.4
89.9
6.7
3.6
89.7
2.9
2.9
94.1
4.1
2.9
93.0
3.3
2.3
94.3
3.6
2.9
93.5
3.9
3.3
92.8
4.1
2.7
93.2
3.9
3.2
93.0
4.8
2.8
92.4
3.7
3.2
93.1
18.8
3.8
77.4
18.6
4.5
76.9
19.1
4.2
76.7
18.9
4.8
76.3
19.1
3.6
77.3
17.7
4.2
78.1
17.3
4.1
78.6
17.8
5.1
77.1
18.2
4.8
77.0
10.7
2.0
87.4
9.6
2.0
88.4
11.4
2.4
86.2
11.7
2.5
85.8
10.2
1.3
88.5
9.1
1.8
89.0
11.4
1.7
86.9
11.1
2.2
86.7
12.7
2.7
84.6
11.9
3.9
84.2
11.6
4.3
84.1
11.3
5.0
83.6
10.3
4.1
85.7
10.5
3.7
85.9
10.9
4.4
84.7
11.1
4.2
84.7
11.0
3.9
85.1
10.2
4.5
85.3
42.4
5.0
52.7
41.2
2.8
56.0
39.0
3.9
57.1
40.3
3.3
56.4
40.5
1.7
57.8
42.1
4.8
53.1
44.1
2.7
53.2
41.5
5.1
53.4
40.3
5.0
54.7
15.6
2.5
81.9
15.5
2.6
81.9
18.1
3.7
78.2
21.3
4.6
74.1
17.4
4.0
78.6
20.2
3.8
75.9
17.3
4.3
78.4
20.1
4.9
74.9
22.0
4.0
74.0
31.1
4.5
64.4
30.1
4.1
65.8
29.2
4.2
66.6
30.8
5.1
64.1
30.9
5.2
63.9
28.8
6.3
64.9
28.3
4.7
67.0
28.3
5.5
66.2
26.5
5.6
67.9
27.8
4.0
68.2
27.8
4.2
68.0
26.8
4.2
69.0
27.7
4.3
68.1
28.2
4.0
67.8
26.2
3.8
70.0
27.4
4.2
68.3
26.7
4.4
68.9
25.7
3.1
71.3
21,249 21,273 19,918
9,709 9,715
9,602
19,030
9,666
18,755
9,684
26,120 25,557 24,106
13,890 13,848 13,338
22,433
12,933
Professional
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Associate Prof and Tech
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Clerical, Secretarial
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Craft and related occupations
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Personal, Protection
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Sales
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Plant and machine operatives
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Other Occupations
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Unweighted base
Weighted base (000s)
1
1
Weighted to 2007 population totals
2
Following realignment from seasonal to calendarquarters, data forJune wasassumed to followthe same pattern asthat of April and May.
3
Weighted to 2009 population totals
* Data for1999 and 2000 excluded asdata were classified using SOC1990
20
Table H
Proportion of females working shift patterns by
occupation; United Kingdom; 1999 to 2009
2001
1,2
2002
1,2
2003
1,2
2004
1,2
2005
1,2
2006
1,2
2007
3
2008
3
2009
3
Females
Managers and Admin
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
7.4
4.1
88.5
7.2
3.2
89.6
8.8
4.0
87.2
7.7
3.7
88.6
6.6
3.8
89.6
7.9
3.2
88.9
7.9
3.4
88.7
7.9
3.8
88.3
7.8
3.4
88.8
2.0
1.0
97.0
2.2
1.5
96.3
2.4
1.6
96.0
2.9
1.2
96.0
2.7
0.9
96.4
2.5
1.5
96.0
2.2
1.7
96.1
2.7
1.5
95.8
2.5
1.8
95.7
22.3
3.7
74.0
20.9
3.9
75.2
21.7
3.7
74.7
19.1
3.7
77.2
18.9
3.1
78.0
18.8
3.6
77.6
19.2
4.2
72.6
17.7
3.5
78.8
18.6
3.6
77.8
4.6
1.2
94.2
4.5
1.0
94.6
4.5
1.1
94.4
4.6
1.2
94.2
4.3
1.4
94.2
4.5
0.9
94.6
4.3
0.9
94.8
4.3
1.3
94.4
5.1
1.1
93.8
11.1
3.1
85.8
10.0
1.8
88.1
12.5
2.3
85.2
11.6
4.0
84.3
8.9
1.6
89.4
9.0
3.0
88.0
11.8
2.2
86.1
9.1
3.2
87.7
7.8
4.1
88.1
27.2
3.5
69.3
27.4
3.6
69.0
27.3
3.4
69.3
27.0
2.6
70.3
25.5
3.4
71.2
25.6
3.3
71.1
25.6
3.6
70.7
24.8
3.1
72.1
23.5
3.4
73.2
13.4
2.5
84.0
13.1
2.8
84.0
14.1
3.2
82.7
14.7
2.9
82.5
13.9
2.8
83.3
13.6
2.8
83.6
14.4
3.7
81.9
15.9
3.5
80.6
17.4
3.8
78.8
19.5
1.7
78.8
22.6
2.1
75.3
22.3
2.0
75.7
20.2
1.7
78.1
20.5
2.1
77.4
25.3
2.7
72.0
25.5
3.5
71.0
20.9
2.1
77.0
18.9
3.8
78.8
16.2
2.5
81.3
15.0
2.4
82.6
15.4
2.0
82.6
15.7
2.5
81.8
15.0
2.8
82.2
15.5
3.5
81.1
15.5
2.8
81.7
17.0
2.9
80.1
17.6
2.9
79.4
19,335
8,351
19,337
8,341
Professional
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Associate Prof and Tech
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Clerical, Secretarial
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Craft and related occupations
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Personal, Protection
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Sales
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Plant and machine operatives
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Other Occupations
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Unweighted base
Weighted base (000s)
1
2
1
18,054 17,461
8,187 8,283
17,360 24,317 23,657 22,448 20,971
8,361 12,036 11,824 11,521 11,327
Weighted to 2007 population totals
Following realignment from seasonal to calendarquarters, data forJune wasassumed to followthe same pattern asthat of April and May.
3
Weighted to 2009 population totals
* Data for1999 and 2000 excluded asdata were classified using SOC1990
21
Table I
Proportion of males working shift patterns by industry:
United Kingdom; 1999 to 2008
1999
1,2
2000
1,2
2001
1,2
2002
1,2
2003
1,2
2004
1,2
2005
1,2
2006
1,2
2007
3
2008
3
Males
Agriculture and Fishing
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Energy and Water
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Manufacturing
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
24.0
4.2
71.8
24.6
3.9
71.5
22.8
3.6
73.6
22.2
3.9
73.9
21.3
3.9
74.8
22.4
3.5
74.2
23.0
3.4
73.6
21.6
3.9
74.5
22.3
3.0
74.7
21.8
3.6
74.6
1.7
5.2
93.1
2.0
5.7
92.2
1.3
4.7
94.0
1.8
4.6
93.6
1.5
4.2
94.3
1.3
4.0
94.7
1.3
4.0
94.7
1.4
4.7
93.9
1.6
4.5
93.9
1.7
4.2
94.1
14.7
3.7
81.6
16.5
3.1
80.5
16.4
3.0
80.6
16.9
3.0
80.1
16.4
3.8
79.8
18.3
3.5
78.1
17.4
4.0
78.7
18.0
3.4
78.6
18.2
4.2
77.5
18.6
4.5
76.9
31.1
6.1
62.9
30.3
4.3
65.3
31.1
4.9
64.0
29.8
4.9
65.4
29.9
5.1
65.0
30.5
5.2
64.4
31.2
5.0
63.8
31.6
6.0
62.4
29.1
6.2
64.7
29.5
5.7
64.9
6.3
2.4
91.3
6.7
2.1
91.2
6.6
2.1
91.3
6.8
2.0
91.2
6.9
2.2
90.9
6.7
2.7
90.6
6.9
2.2
90.9
5.7
2.2
92.1
6.6
2.0
91.5
6.0
2.6
91.4
20.0
4.1
75.9
19.1
4.4
76.5
17.8
4.7
77.5
19.1
4.5
76.4
19.7
4.5
75.8
19.7
5.2
75.1
18.9
3.8
77.2
17.9
4.3
77.8
18.9
4.2
76.9
20.0
4.8
75.2
11.3
3.9
84.8
10.9
3.0
86.1
11.8
2.7
85.5
11.6
2.8
85.5
11.9
3.6
84.4
11.8
3.9
84.2
11.7
2.5
85.7
13.7
3.5
82.8
11.0
3.9
85.1
12.3
4.0
83.8
Construction
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Distibution, hotels and restaurants
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Transport and communication
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Banking, finance, insurance etc
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Public adminstration, education and health
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Other servies
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Unweighted base
Weighted base (000s)
1
22,457 21,868 21,243 21,271 19,927 19,027 18,756 26,115 25,560 24,108
9,555
9,571 9,706 9,715 9,606 9,665 9,684 13,887 13,849 13,340
1
Weighted to 2007 population totals
2
Following realignment from seasonal to calendarquarters, data forJune wasassumed to followthe same pattern asthat of April and May.
3
Weighted to 2009 population totals
* Data for'Agriculture and Fishing' and 'Energyand Water' exluded due to disclosive base numbers
22
Table J
Proportion of females working shift patterns by industry;
United Kingdom; 1999 to 2008
1999
1,2
2000
1,2
2001
1,2
2002
1,2
2003
1,2
2004
1,2
2005
1,2
2006
1,2
2007
3
2008
3
Females
Agriculture and Fishing
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Energy and Water
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Manufacturing
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
10.1
1.4
88.5
9.7
1.6
88.7
10.6
1.2
88.2
10.4
1.2
88.4
9.2
1.6
89.3
9.0
1.4
89.6
8.3
1.6
90.1
10.5
1.7
87.9
9.2
1.9
88.9
7.9
1.5
90.6
Construction
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Distibution, hotels and restaurants
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
13.3
2.5
84.2
13.2
3.4
83.4
12.9
3.2
83.8
13.7
2.9
83.5
14.9
3.3
81.8
14.0
3.4
82.7
13.9
3.0
83.0
14.1
3.3
82.6
15.2
3.8
81.0
15.7
3.5
80.8
19.9
2.1
78.1
22.0
1.6
76.4
20.6
3.3
76.1
19.9
2.2
77.9
18.2
3.0
78.9
20.0
3.3
76.8
16.9
3.1
80.0
21.6
2.4
76.1
18.7
4.1
77.2
20.0
2.5
77.4
4.5
1.4
94.1
5.1
1.6
93.4
5.2
1.5
93.3
4.6
1.1
94.3
4.6
1.3
94.1
4.6
1.4
94.0
4.0
1.3
94.7
4.6
1.4
94.1
4.1
1.3
94.6
4.5
1.2
94.2
18.3
2.4
79.3
18.3
3.0
78.8
17.4
2.7
80.0
16.6
3.0
80.4
17.2
2.8
80.0
16.6
2.6
80.8
15.8
2.6
81.6
15.6
2.7
81.7
16.1
3.1
80.8
15.7
3.1
81.2
10.1
2.4
87.6
10.6
1.9
87.5
10.3
2.5
87.1
9.8
2.5
87.7
10.8
2.7
86.6
10.1
1.8
88.1
8.4
3.4
88.2
8.7
3.2
88.1
9.8
2.2
88.0
9.7
3.0
87.3
Transport and communication
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Banking, finance, insurance etc
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Public adminstration, education and health
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Other servies
Most of the time
Occasionally
Never
Unweighted base
Weighted base (000s)
1
19,934 19,368 19,329 19,332 18,057 17,462 17,363 24,310
8,069 8,074 8,349 8,341 8,187 8,283 8,362 12,032
1
Weighted to 2007 population totals
2
Following realignment from seasonal to calendarquarters, data forJune wasassumed to followthe same pattern asthat of April and May.
3
Weighted to 2009 population totals
* Data for'Agriculture and Fishing', 'Construction' and 'Energyand Water' exluded due to disclosive base numbers
23
23,652 22,438
11,820 11,516
Table K
Proportion of shift workers by shift pattern type and sex;
United Kingdom; 1999 to 2009
1999
1,2
2000
1,2
2001
1,2
2002
1,2
2003
1,2
2004
1,2
2005
1,2
2006
1,2
2007
3
2008
3
2009
3
Males
Three-shift working
Continental Shifts
Two shift system
Sometimes night/ Sometimes day
split shifts
morning shifts
evening or twilight shifts
night shifts
weekend shifts
other type of shift work
Unweighted base
Weighted base (000s)
1
16.3
5.0
26.2
13.9
2.6
2.5
3.8
10.5
1.0
18.2
14.6
4.9
27.2
14.3
2.9
1.9
3.8
10.0
0.9
19.5
13.2
5.2
25.6
14.2
3.5
2.0
4.2
10.4
1.0
20.9
13.4
4.9
26.1
14.5
3.4
2.2
3.6
9.8
0.9
21.1
12.6
4.1
27.1
14.8
2.6
2.4
3.8
9.5
0.8
22.2
12.2
4.3
25.8
13.9
3.2
2.3
4.7
10.2
1.2
22.3
12.4
3.8
25.5
14.7
3.7
2.6
4.7
10.6
1.3
20.7
11.1
3.4
25.3
15.4
3.6
2.7
4.2
10.2
1.1
23.0
10.1
3.5
26.4
15.6
3.9
2.6
4.8
9.5
1.5
22.0
9.6
3.3
26.3
15.5
3.7
2.5
4.3
9.9
1.6
23.3
9.8
3.4
25.4
14.4
3.5
2.3
4.6
9.3
1.4
26.0
4,495
4,325
4,071
4,084
3,775
3,667
3,565
4,858
4,734
4,554
4,129
1,911
1,902
1,866
1,870
1,845
1,892
1,858
2,623
2,611
2,571
2,429
14.0
1.3
33.3
6.9
5.0
2.5
8.0
9.3
1.1
18.7
11.4
0.8
32.5
9.4
4.2
2.7
7.7
9.2
0.8
21.5
11.0
1.3
32.8
8.7
3.5
2.5
7.1
9.4
1.3
22.4
12.1
1.1
31.7
9.5
4.7
2.6
6.2
8.9
1.6
21.5
10.9
0.9
30.7
12.0
3.9
2.7
6.0
8.6
2.0
22.2
10.1
1.0
31.8
10.2
3.5
2.6
7.3
9.0
2.0
22.5
10.6
0.8
28.4
11.7
4.7
3.4
7.4
7.6
2.0
23.5
10.4
0.9
31.1
12.1
4.3
2.3
6.2
8.6
1.7
22.5
10.3
0.9
30.1
12.9
4.4
2.9
6.3
7.6
1.8
22.8
9.5
0.9
28.8
12.7
5.2
2.9
6.5
7.6
2.0
23.8
9.2
0.9
31.6
11.7
4.1
3.1
5.6
7.0
2.0
24.7
3,052
1,242
3,095
1,296
3,004
1,306
2,926
1,272
2,829
1,295
2,649
1,274
2,526
1,225
3,625
1,818
3,617
1,837
3,397
1,777
3,226
1,775
15.4
3.6
29.0
11.2
3.5
2.5
5.4
10.0
1.0
18.4
13.3
3.2
29.4
12.3
3.4
2.2
5.4
9.6
0.9
20.3
12.3
3.6
28.6
11.9
3.5
2.2
5.4
10.0
1.1
21.5
12.9
3.3
28.4
12.5
4.0
2.4
4.7
9.5
1.2
21.3
11.9
2.8
28.6
13.7
3.1
2.6
4.7
9.2
1.3
22.2
11.4
3.0
28.2
12.4
3.3
2.4
5.7
9.7
1.5
22.4
11.7
2.6
26.6
13.5
4.1
2.9
5.8
9.4
1.6
21.8
10.8
2.4
27.7
14.0
3.9
2.6
5.0
9.5
1.3
22.8
10.2
2.4
27.9
14.5
4.1
2.8
5.4
8.7
1.6
22.3
9.6
2.3
27.3
14.4
4.3
2.7
5.2
8.9
1.8
23.5
9.5
2.3
28.0
13.3
3.8
2.6
5.0
8.3
1.7
25.5
7,547
7,420
7,075
7,010
6,604
6,316
6,091
8,483
8,351
7,951
7,355
3,153
3,198
3,172
3,142
3,139
3,167
3,083
4,442
4,449
4,348
4,204
Females
Three-shift working
Continental Shifts
Two shift system
Sometimes night/ Sometimes day
split shifts
morning shifts
evening or twilight shifts
night shifts
weekend shifts
other type of shift work
Unweighted base
Weighted base (000s)
1
Total
Three-shift working
Continental Shifts
Two shift system
Sometimes night/ Sometimes day
split shifts
morning shifts
evening or twilight shifts
night shifts
weekend shifts
other type of shift work
Unweighted base
Weighted base (000s)
1
1
Weighted to 2007 population totals
2 Following realignmentfrom seasonal to calendar quarters,data for June was assumed to follow the same pattern as thatofApril and May.
3
Weighted to 2009 population totals
24
Published by the Health and Safety Executive
09/11
Health and Safety
Executive
Changes in shift work patterns over the last ten years (1999 to 2009)
The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) have
approached the Office for National Statistics (ONS)
to carry out an updated analysis of shift work in
the UK based on the last ten years worth of data
(1999 to 2009) from the Labour Force Survey (LFS).
This paper examines changes in shift work patterns
across the UK workforce over the last decade. The
report investigates differences in the reporting of
shift work based on gender, age, region, occupation
and industry and also compares engagement in the
different types of shift patterns.
This report and the work it describes were funded
by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). Its
contents, including any opinions and/or conclusions
expressed, are those of the author alone and do not
necessarily reflect HSE policy.
RR887
www.hse.gov.uk