Wall of Bones See Vernal’s World Famous Featuring Uintah County!

See Vernal’s World Famous
Wall of Bones
Discover
Dinosaurland
Featuring Uintah County!
You’ll want to stay forever...the dinosaurs did!
Fall/Winter 2012
A publication of the
Discover Dinosaurland
Page 2
Fall / Winter 2012
Uintah Basin
Health&Healing
Healthcare
EVERY PERSON, EVERY TIME.
Our mission as Uintah Basin Healthcare is to foster health & healing… every person, every time.
Our mission is to foster health & healing… every person, every time. Uintah Basin Healthcare
We strive to
be a standard
of excellence
and cooperation
in assisting
has progressively
expanded
by adding
more physicians
and specialties,
and by
the
people
of
the
Uintah
Basin
in
becoming
the
healthiest
people
in
Utah.
expanding our facilities. We are happy to provide quality healthcare for our
area!
Our organization has been striving to serve the needs of our region since we were
established in 1944. We are proud to be an integral part of this community
and to provide health services you can depend on.
Provider Services
Hospital Services
24-Hour Emergency Services
Audiology
Dialysis Centers
Dermatology
Home Care Services
Ear, Nose & Throat
ICU
Family Practice
Urgent Care & Occupational Medicine
Uintah
Basin
Healthcare
Foundation
Laboratory
Gastrointestinal Medicine
The Clinic (Altamont, Duchesne, Manila,
Uintah Basin Medical Center
Medical/Surgical
General
Surgery
Roosevelt, TabionaUnit
& Vernal)
Emergency
Services
The Villa Medicine
(Rehabilitation & Senior Villa)
OB Women’s Health
Internal
The Dialysis Center (Roosevelt & Vernal)
Home Care Services (Home Health, Hospice and
Pathology
Nephrology
Medical Equipment serving the entire Uintah Basin)
Pharmacy
Occupational Medicine
Physical Therapy
Ophthalmology
83%
of
the
Basin
households
utilize
a
service
provided
by
Uintah
Basin Healthcare each year including:
Radiology
Orthopedics
106,000 visits to our primary care clinics
2800 surgical
performed
Respiratory
&procedures
Sleep Lab
Pediatrics
550 babies delivered
9,000 dialysis treatments performed
Surgery
Physical
Medicine
&joints
Rehab
75 hip, knee
or shoulder
replaced
12,000 visits to the Emergency Room
The Villa (Sr Center & Rehab)
Podiatry (Foot & Ankle)
Women’s Imaging
Urgent Care
Uintah Basin Healthcare provides over $6 million annually in charitable healthcare to Basin residents.
Urology
Uintah Basin Healthcare is one of the largest employers in the Basin with over 700 employees and
Women’s
Healthof over $20 million. (127 of our employees come in from Uintah County to work.)
an annual payroll
Uintah Basin Healthcare provides $50,000 annually to support medical
and education.
“Like”scholarships
us on Facebook!
Uintah Basin Healthcare consists of:
Uintah Basin Healthcare proudly supports their local community.
Clinic locations in Altamont,
Duchesne, Manila, Roosevelt,
Tabiona & Vernal.
View a complete listing for
our hospital and physicians
at www.ubmc.org.
facebook.com/UintahBasinHealthcare
Uintah Basin
Healthcare
Uintah
250 W 300 N - Roosevelt,
UT Basin
I Healthcare
435-722-4691 I www.ubmc.org
250
W 300 N - Roosevelt I www.ubmc.org
facebook.com/uintahbasinhealthcare
435-722-4691
Fall / Winter 2012
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Discover Dinosaurland
Index
Welcome
Dinosaur National Monument
Holiday events in Uintah County
‘Rock Stars’ ready to awe
Flaming Gorge recreation year-round
Natural history museum expands
Snowmobilers find paradise
Cross-country skiing adventures
Stay in a yurt
Lodging
Campgrounds/Guides & Outfitters
Area Dining
Area visitor information
Ice fishing
Mountain Biking opportunities
Hiking and backpacking
Up close and personal with wildlife
Outlaw trail
Museums, more than dinosaurs
Holly Days celebrate holiday spirit
Red Fleet State Park
Make your next ADVENTURE in Dinosaurland
www.dinoland.com
800-477-5558
Uintah County Travel & Tourism
Page 3
Everything you’re
looking for in Utah you’ve found it
It’s the world-famous “Wall of bones” and so much
more. It’s the best of everything Utah has to offer, from
spectacular cliffs to arches to high mountain scenery.
This is Dinosaurland – the Uintah Basin, and this is the
perfect time to visit.
The Uintah Basin is known for its bustling energy-based
economy, but there is so much more to the area. From
mountains and meadows to ice fishing, snowshoeing and
cross-country skiing, outdoor lovers can find something to
thrill them no matter the season.
Dinosaurland is so named because of the world-famous
Dinosaur National Monument.
The Dinosaur National Monument is the only place in
the world where you can view and even touch more than
1,500 dinosaur bones all in their original resting place.
Uintah County is home to three State Parks. The Utah
Field House of Natural History Museum, Steinaker and
Red Fleet Reservoir State Parks. During the winter, each
offers ice fishing and spectacular scenery.
Red Fleet has been referred too as the “Little Lake
Powell” with its gorgeous scenery and huge red cliffs. Don’t
forget to watch out for Dinosaur Tracks as you play and
explore the land around the lake.
The Field House museum is a hands on experience
where visitors
can learn more
about the history
of the area, view
rocks in the mineral room, watch
a movie about
the fossils that
are found in the
area, and coming in the fall
of 2012 you will
be able to view
paleontologists
as they work on
newly discovered fossils from
the observation
window in the
new curatorial
facility.
So
Welcome, we
hope you enjoy
your experiences here!! Get
out and play in
Dinosaurland
and find out just
what all we have
to offer!
Page 4
Discover Dinosaurland
Fall / Winter 2012
Over 400,000 visit Dinosaur National
Monument quarry, visitor annually
Dinosaur National
Monument covers an
ancient era, with fossils
and geological formations dating back to the
epoch of dinosaurs.
But visitors coming to
the Monument’s headquarters this summer
will find some brandnew facilities.
The world-famous
“wall of bones,” housed
in the old Quarry Visitor
Center, is now enclosed
by a new structure.
Visitors can get up
close and personal with
the fossils. It’s one of the
few places in the world
where people are allowed – even encouraged
– to touch real dinosaur
bones.
Unlike the old layout,
the new quarry enclo-
PHOTO: JEFF EDWARDS
The ‘Wall of Bones’ is now housed in a brand-new building, allowing visitors to get up-close and
personal with dinosaurs.
• Hottest and friendliest bartenders
• Vernal’s Largest Selection of
Domestic & Imported Beer
• Live Entertainment & Theme
Parties on Weekends
• Check out our Facebook Page
• Daily Food and Drink Specials
• Cabs Available (435) 790-1212
• Most Hotels Are Within Walking
Distance
• $1.00 Tacos Every Wednesday
• Billiards
The little bar with big spirits
(435) 789-9963
65 South Vernal Ave.
Fall / Winter 2012
Discover Dinosaurland
Page 5
A family meets the Allosaurus skeleton housed in the quarry enclosure at Dinosaur National Monument.
sure is separate from the visitor center.
The new visitor center welcomes visitors by having them
walk across a new bridge and then past the stegosaurus
that was present at the 1964 World’s Fair in New York.
There are new displays, a multipurpose area and restrooms.
The new center also highlights areas of the monument.
It’s a way to keep tourists in the area longer looking at
other park resources that include paleontology and rock
art, she said.
Both buildings were constructed with as much recycled
material as possible and are designed to use passive light
and heat. The pedestrian bridge is made out of recycled
railroad boxcars and the tongue and groove ceiling in the
visitors center is lumber salvaged from the exhibit hall.
A solar power system provides much of the needed electricity.
In the summer, shuttle buses leave the visitor center every 15 minutes for the Quarry Exhibit Hall. At other times
of the year, rangers lead car caravans to the Quarry on a set
schedule.
The quarry is known for its wall of bones. The rock face
displays hundreds of dinosaur fossils, ranging from huge
sauropods, to stegosaurs, to meat-eating therapods.
Visitors can see an overview of the wall from the upper level, as Monument staff showcase the different fossils
embedded in the stone.
On the lower level, people can get up close and personal
with the bones.
Several fossil displays showcase species that have been
found in the Monument, including a meat-eating Allosaurus and one of the few baby Stegosaurus fossils ever found.
PHOTO: JEFF EDWARDS
The famous “Wall of Bones” allows for up close inspection by
visitors to the Monument.
Page 6
Discover Dinosaurland
Fall / Winter 2012
PHOTO: JEFF EDWARDS
A new visitor’s center welcomes young and old alike to the first class Dinosaur National Monument located near Vernal.
Marion’s Variety
“Your Old- Fashioned Soda Fountain”
Celebrating 77 years of service
• Homemade Soups • Malts
• Shakes • Delicious Burgers
• Wonderful Sandwiches • Sodas
• Banana Splits • Fresh Limes
HOME OF THE UINTAH
BASIN’S MOST AMAZINGLY
UNIQUE GIFT SHOP
29 N. 200 E., Roosevelt, Utah • 722-2143
Fall / Winter 2012
Discover Dinosaurland
Page 7
PHOTO: JEFF EDWARDS
The near-vertical ‘Wall of Bones’ was once a streambed where hundreds of dinosaur bones were washed into.
Dinosaur National Monument operating hours
Planning a winter visit? Don’t worry – Dinosaur National Monument is open all year, though certain roads and
facilities are closed during the winter months.
Operating hours for Quarry Visitor Center
From September through Dec. 31, the center is open
daily, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
It is closed on Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s
Day.
Operating hours for the Quarry Exhibit Hall
Open daily, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. (last shuttle up to the fossils is
at 4:30 p.m.)
Also closed on Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s
Day.
For access to the dinosaur quarry in early fall
and late spring
First, stop at the Quarry Visitor Center. You will be
given a park pass and then you can drive your personal ve-
hicle up to the Quarry Exhibit Hall anytime between 9 a.m.
and 4:30 p.m.
In Winter, late Fall and early Spring
Canyon Visitor Center, two miles
east of Dinosaur, Colo.
Due to both lower visitation and reduced staffing levels,
access to the quarry will be by car caravans. Rangers guide
car caravans to the exhibit hall at the following times: 9:30
a.m.,10:30 a.m.,11:30 a.m.,1 p.m., 2 p.m., 3 p.m., and 4 p.m.
If you arrive after the previous group has departed, you
may have to wait up to an hour before the next departure.
There is a 12 minute film, exhibits, and a bookstore in the
visitor center to occupy your time while you wait. Last
caravan goes to the quarry at 4 p.m.
Open Daily, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. until early/late October.
(Visitor center may occasionally be closed during lunch).
Closed during winter.
Monument Fees
All monument visitors are required to purchase a recreational use pass upon entering Dinosaur National Monument.
Dinosaur National Monument participates in the congressionally authorized Federal Recreation Lands Enhancement Act. Funds generated by the fees are used to accomplish projects the parks have been unable to fund through
annual Congressional allocations. Entrance fees help support projects in the monument to improve the experience
for visitors. For more information, call 435-781-7700.
Entrance fees are valid for
seven consecutive days.
Private vehicle (14 passenger capacity or less): $10.
Motorcycle: $5
Per person (walk-in or bicycle): $5
Youth 15 and under admitted free.
Annual passes:
Lifetime passes:
Dinosaur National Monument Annual Pass: $20
Interagency (multiple federal fee areas: $80
Interagency senior (age 62 or above): $10
Interagency access (permanently disabled): Free
The monument accepts cash, credit cards, traveler’s
checks, money orders, cashier’s checks, gift checks, personal checks and business checks.
Discover Dinosaurland
Page 8
Fall / Winter 2012
In the cold of winter or the heat of summer, Red Fleet State Park offers grand, sweeping vistas.
Red Fleet home to
biking, hiking trails,
dinosaur tracks
[email protected] www.CaroNorton.com
280 W. 100 N. Vernal, UT 84078
Spoofs
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with Great beans
Specializing in Frappe,
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38 East Main • Vernal • 789-1154
Red Fleet State Park is located in the heart of Dinosaurland, 12 miles north of Vernal on Utah Highway 191. The
park name was inspired by three large Navajo sandstone
outcrops jutting up from the landscape as if a fleet of ships.
At an elevation of 5,600 feet, Red Fleet offers camping,
picknicking, swimming, fishing and boating. Red Fleet
State Park is also known for the Dinosaur Trackway. Two
hundred million years ago, this area looked like the Sahara
Desert. And like the Sahara, the area had oases of shallow
desert lakes called playas. Dinosaurs journeyed to the small
playas among the dunes. We know this from the tracks left
behind in the wet sand. Hundreds of dinosaur tracks now
lay exposed for you to see in the Navajo sandstone.
Juniper, sagebrush, native grasses, and cactus dominate
the area. Red Fleet is home to mammals such as rabbits,
ground squirrels, bobcats, badgers, coyotes, and mule deer.
Golden-eagles can be seen sunning themselves on sandstone cliffs. Other birds include magpies, hawks, mountain
bluebirds, pinion jays, vultures, owls, and an occasional
osprey. Bald eagles visit the area during winter months.
Fall / Winter 2012
Discover Dinosaurland
‘Rock stars’ awe in Dinosaurland
A
bout 1,000 years ago, the Fremont
people lived in this area leaving evidence of
their presence in the form of petroglyphs
(patterns chipped or carved into the rock)
and pictographs (patterns painted on the
rock). Although much of this region’s early
history is recorded on remote, hard to reach
rock walls, Dinosaur National Monument
contains several areas where visitors can
easily access these images to ponder their
mystery.
Archaeologists first studied the Fremont
culture along the Fremont River in southcentral Utah and traced it through much
of the Green and Colorado River drainages.
The lifestyle of the Fremont people varied
considerably throughout the area, reflecting
the diverse environments they inhabited.
In general, the Fremont people lived in
small bands or family groups, grew crops to
supplement native foods, but did not build
large permanent dwellings.
In the Dinosaur National Monument
area, archaeological evidence of the Fremont dates from about 200 A.D. to about
1300 A.D.
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Page 9
Page 10
Discover Dinosaurland
Fall / Winter 2012
Year’s Flaming Gorge visitor count up
Gorge offers recreation year-round
By Kevin Ashby
Express Publisher
“It is so beautiful up
here.”
“I wish Germany had
Utah’s deserts and mountains and sunshine.”
These comments are
plentiful when talking to
Flaming Gorge visitors and
in this case two visitors from
Germany, Torben Schipper and Kirstin Fuchs, who
started a two-week vacation
in Salt Lake City after renting a motorhome and traveling through Bryce, Zions,
Arches, Flaming Gorge and
Yellowstone. And they like
Flaming Gorge so much they
returned there to finish off
their vacation before returning to Germany.
The Flaming Gorge
National Recreation Area is
located in the northeast corner of Utah and the southwest corner of Wyoming.
Flaming Gorge is north
of Vernal and extends into
Wyoming between Rock
Springs and Green River.
The area is a mixture of
climate, topography, and
recreation opportunities
well suited to a variety of
summer and winter interests.
With 43 campgrounds
hosting more than 700
individual campsites and 27
group sites, all spread over
nearly 91 water-miles (with
360 miles of shore line) plus
countless mountain retreats,
there is plenty of room for
everyone.
There is also the opportunity to set up “primitive”
camping for those wishing
Discover Dinosaurland
Fall / Winter 2012
a more secluded adventure,
or river camps for those
extending their river runs
for more than a day. Close
at hand are the quaint
communities of Manila and
Dutch John, Utah to offer
accommodations and other
services for more traditional
vacationers.
Flaming Gorge National
Recreation Area has a use
fee of $5 per day; $15 for
seven days or $35 for an annual pass.
“The great thing about
Utah is that there is so
much to experience and the
Flaming Gorge area offers
much,” said Mark Wilson,
president of Red Canyon
Lodge.
Wilson explained that
this year the fishing attraction of Flaming Gorge has
been great in attracting
better than normal crowds
to the lake.
“Whether you are a
fisherman or you just want
a great family vacation, then
Flaming Gorge is the place
to be,” said Wilson.
And Sandy Collett of
Flaming Gorge Resort
agrees.
“We have had a wonderful spring,” said Collett.
“It is exciting to see people
come and be so happy to be
here. And the good weather
we have been having helps.”
Collett also commented
on the greater number of
spring anglers in the area
this year and expects the
trend to follow with families
coming to the Gorge during
the summer months.
“People love our ability to
provide an amazing weekend for families and individuals,” said Wilson. “People
are ready to come out and
play and this is a great place
to play.”
But Wilson doesn’t stop
with just promoting the
Flaming Gorge area. He
talks of what people can experience from Fort Bridger
and the Wildhorse loop on
Page 11
An ice fisher carries his sled full of equipment on the frozen
Flaming Gorge Lake.
said Wilson. “We have some
very compelling reasons to
come on out here to visit
and vacation. Our ability to
offer an amazing vacation
here is unparalleled and
they are not restricted to
the summer months only.
We are a year-round destination.”
over to the White Mountain
area north of Rock Springs,
down to Browns Park and
the outlaw heritage there,
going south to Dinosaur
National Monument and
finishing up in Nine-Mile
Caynon.
“We have some fascinating attractions in our area,”
Vernal
Area
Chamber
Of
Commerce
“GOOD FOR BUSINESS, GOOD FOR THE COMMUNITY”
• Networking Opportunities
• Weekly Business Luncheons
Member-to-Member Benefits
• Business Seminars
• Referrals
• Community Events
• Advertising Opportunities
• Business Spotlight
BENEFITTING THE COMMUNITY THROUGH EVENTS:
• Business Symposium
• Health Fair
• Turkey Days
• Water Conference
• Business of the Year
• Recycling Program
• Energy Symposium
• Business of the Month
• Outstanding Public
Service Award
• Holly Days
• Trees for Charity
134 West Main • Vernal, UT • 84078
www.vernalchamber.com • [email protected]
(435)789-1352 • Fax (435)789-1355
Discover Dinosaurland
Page 12
Fall / Winter 2012
Utah Field House Museum named Uintah Basin’s favorite
Museum of Natural History expands
By Dustin Hughes
Vernal Express
The fossils recovered
from the area around Vernal
have helped shape the field
of paleontology and gave
Dinosaurland its name. But
without proper storage facilities, the community was
in danger of losing its new
fossils to other communities.
A new $1.5 million addition to the Utah Field
House Museum of Natural
History should fix that
problem. It is slated to open
in the fall of 2012
In the spring of 2012,
community leaders gathered
to mark the beginning of an
expansion to the museum.
On tap is a large, modern
facility that will allow for
proper space and conditions
to store the nearly 30,000
specimens housed by the
museum, said Steve Sroka,
park manager.
“For the first time in the
history of the Utah Field
House, we’ll be able to store
fossils in the correct condi-
tions,” Sroka said. “We’ll be
able to keep material in the
Basin long-term.”
Sroka said the current
storage location – in the old
museum building, was inadequate for storage, and was
nearing the end of its useful
life.
-11
Amazing
Rafting
Tours!
Rafting expeditions on the Green & Yampa River
from one day to five days.
Call to book at 800-345-RAFT
or www.dinoadv.com
550 E. Main Street Vernal, Utah 84078
Dinosaur River Expeditions is an authorized
concessionaire for the National Park Service
“It’s like an old car,” he
said. “You can’t keep repairing the building.”
The new building is funded by Community Impact
Board funding, and should
be open around October,
said State Parks Director
Fred Hayes.
“This has been a phenomenal ‘get’ for us,” Hayes
said. Hayes said the construction bid came in under
estimate, allowing officials
to add some more features.
The 11,500-square-foot
building, which will be attached to the Utah Field
House, will include a fossil
preparatory lab, which
visitors may view from the
Utah Field House lobby.
“This is a unique opportunity here,” Hayes said.
“It’s because of oil and gas
Ranch Restaurant
& Gift Shop
Serving the area since 1933.
Our Gift Shop has Something for EVERYONE!
Hunting For Dinosaurs?
We have the souvenirs to make your trip
complete. Dinosaurs, T-shirts and so much more!
Welcome to Dinosaurland!
Family Dining at it’s Best!
Featuring Prime Rib Fridays &... Steak &
Seafood
We have an impressive menu filled with delicious
entree’s & mouth watering desserts!
Saturdays!
77 East Main • Vernal, Utah • (435) 789-1170
Monday - Saturday • 6 a.m. - 10 p.m.
Fall / Winter 2012
Discover Dinosaurland
Page 13
processes we’re able
to do this.”
That’s not just because of the funding
– many artifacts were
uncovered during exploration processes.
Vernal City Councilor and chair of the
Impact Mitigation
Board Sonja Norton
noted how the museum is an essential
part of Vernal’s character.
“Growing up, we
referred to it as ‘the
Dinosaur Museum,’”
she said. “It’s a big
part of our area, part
of our heritage. It’s
a treasure for future
generations.”
Norton said the
building would
enhance the experience of residents and
visitors to Vernal.
The Field House
Museum is located
PHOTO: JEFF EDWARDS
at 496 E. Main in
Vernal.
The Field House Museum gives young and old alike a chance to get hands-on with their exhibits.
The Utah Field House Museum of Natural History hosts such specimens as this
Diplodocus dinosaur (above), and a model of a wooly mammoth. Both of these
prehistoric creatures once roamed the Uintah Basin.
Discover Dinosaurland
Page 14
Fall / Winter 2012
Snowmobilers find Uintah County
an unbelievable winter paradise
Come and experience
first hand our snowmobile
trails that snake through
lodgepole pine and aspen
forests leading to quiet
alpine meadows and awe
inspiring vistas.
The stunning landscape
climbs to over 11,000 feet
in elevation along 250
miles of groomed and ungroomed trails offering a
unique challenge for every
skill level.
The combination of
backcountry trails and
modern facilities make for
an undiscovered winter
wonderland. For further
trail information, please
consult the Ashley National Forest District Trail
Maps or call for more
information 435-789-1181.
The ultimate vista is absolutely worth the climb to get there.
A
TAKE K!
PEA
Complete
Bicycle Sales
Service and
Accessories
Owned and operated by former
world champion cyclist
580 East Main Vernal, UT 84078
435-781-2595
www.altitudecycle.com
find us on
1. RESERVATION
RIDGE TRAIL: 22 miles
of a one-way unmarked,
ungroomed trail climbing to
an elevation of over 9,000
feet and traveling westward
along a rolling ridge to the
head of Timber Canyon the
route provides magnificent
views of the High Uintas
and Wasatch mountains.
Due to curving roads and
snowdrifts the canyon is not
recommended. Snow and
wind conditions are subject
to rapid change.
2. BLIND STREAM
TRAIL: 16 miles one-way/
unmarked, ungroomed trail
passing private land until
the forest boundary. The
route then climbs to 10,200
feet where rolling hills and
deep powder provide challenge. The route becomes
steep and winding down to
the Rock Creek trail head.
Rock Creek to Hanna access
can be ridden either direction
3. HELLS CANYON
TRAIL: 9 miles one-way/
unmarked, ungroomed trail
where at 8,000 feet the trail
goes through Hells Canyon
before reaching Center
Park, a large meadow area
at 10,600 feet that borders
the High Uintas Wilderness
Area. Snowmobiles are not
permitted in Wilderness
Area.
4. CHEPETA LAKE
TRAIL: 24 miles one-way/
unmarked, ungroomed trail.
This trail is a ride to true
Uinta high country. It follows Farm Creek Road #117
and is steep before becoming
more gradual. At 13.5 miles
the trail turns right at West
Fork Road, #110 prior to
Pole Creek Campground.
The trail then climbs gradually to Chepeta Lake at an
elevation of 10,560 feet.
5. MOSBY MOUNTAIN
TRAIL: 10 miles one-way
unmarked, ungroomed
trail. This scenic trail
follows forest Road #104
and climbs steeply before
becoming more gradual as
it passes through a lodge-
Discover Dinosaurland
Fall / Winter 2012
pole pine forest, sagebrush
trail is steep at the beginand open meadows, ending
ning, but levels out. From
at Paradise Guard Station
Forest Service boundary
Campground at 10,000 feet.
for approximately 5 miles,
Snowmobilers must stay on
snowmobilers must stay on
road beginning at the Forest road.
Service boundary for ap 8. EAST PARK LOOP
proximately six miles.
TRAIL: 35 mile loop that
6. BROWNIE CANYON
is marked, periodically
TRAIL: 20 miles/marked,
groomed trail. Trail folperiodically groomed trail.
lows East Park Road (Road
Beginning at approximately
#020) 21.5 miles until
7’000 feet the route (a State reaching the Trout Creek
Scenic Backway) starts near Junction. It begins at 8,200
the Forest Service boundfeet and climbs gradually
ary in Dry Fork Canyon
through forests to 9,350
and follows Red Cloud Loop
feet at Trout Creek Guard
road to tie in at Trout Creek Station. The Trail #10 loops
Junction at 9,350 feet. The
from Trout Creek Guard
southern part of the trail
Station for 13.5 miles recontains steep, winding
turning to Road #020.
areas.
9. LEIDY PEAK TRAIL:
7. TAYLOR MOUN9 miles one-way of marked,
TAIN TRAIL: Nine miles
periodically groomed trail.
of marked, periodically
A local favorite, this trail
Trout
Creek
dinosaurgroomed
winter rec trail.
& trailTrail
guide fol'07 2/15/07 begins
2:58 PM at
Page
6
lows Taylor Mountain
Guard Station. At 9,350
Road (Road #044) through
feet the trail follows road
lodgepole pine
s nand
oaspen
w m o#043
b ithrough
l e lodgepole
forests. The 7,000 foot high
pine forests and meadows
6
www.undiscoveredutah.com
Page 15
available. The
trail then heads
west, traveling
on the south
side of Hwy. 44
through open
meadows and
ponderosa pine
offering wide
vistas of the
north slope of
the Uintas. The
trail comes to
another junction where access
and climbs to 11,000 feet at
Hacking Lake at the base of to Red Canyon Lodge and a
spectacular view of Flaming
Leidy Peak.
Gorge Reservoir is available
10. ELK PARK/DON
from the Red Canyon overHATCH MEMORIAL
look. The trail continues
SNOWMOBILE TRAIL
westward traveling through
SYSTEM: 60 miles of
lodgepole pine and aspen
marked and periodically
forests with occasional open
groomed trail. The trail
begins at the Highline Trail- parks and meadows, to Deep
Creek Road #539 (which is
head and travels north on
dinosaur
winter
trail guide
PM cross-country
Page 7
shared2:58
with
the west
siderecof& Hwy.
191, '07 2/15/07
skiers from the highway
passing through lodgepole
junction to Elk Park). This
pine forest until reaching
can a
be p
accessed from
t r toa i ltrailm
a junction where access
the East McKee Trailhead.
Flaming Gorge Resort is
www.undiscoveredutah.com
7
Discover Dinosaurland
Page 16
Fall / Winter 2012
Cross-Country Skiing adventures abound
Cross Country trails offer
skiers and snowshoe enthusiasts an intimate view of
wildlife in winter.
Herds of wintering elk
and lone Bull Moose are
common throughout the
area. Travel through quiet
forests of lodgepole pine and
aspen.
Catch your breath in
serene alpine meadows and
lose it again standing at the
edge of a dramatic canyon
overlook.
Miles of trails unlock a
unique view of the winter
landscape. For complete
regulations, trail description, map and safety guide
consult the Ashley National
Forest District Travel Maps
or visit www.fs.fed.us/r4/
ashley.
trail winds through aspen
groves and open landscapes.
The trip from the trailhead
to the Guard Station is
fairly level with a descent
of approximately 10% near
the Guard Station. The trail
is shared with snowmobilers. Fun trail for novice to
intermediate skiers.
1. COLTON GUARD
STATION TRAIL: 8.5 mile
loop with marked trail. This
3. BASSETT SPRINGS
LOOP TRAIL: 4 miles on
marked trail. The trail
starts at the Range Study
2. LITTLE BRUSH
CREEK LOOP TRAIL: 3.5
mile loop on marked trail.
Trail travels through a narrow dugway on the way to
forests of lodgepole pine and
Douglas fir. The trail climbs
a sagebrush plateau dotted with aspens and pines.
Moderate to steep ascent
and descent for intermediate to advanced skiers. 8,100
– 8,600 feet.
Don Pedro’s
Mexican Restaurant
Favorites like
Burritos
Enchiladas
Tacos
Nachos
Margaritas
Chimichangas
Fried Ice Cream
and More!
3340 North Vernal Avenue • 789-3402
Trailhead then follows an
old jeep trail through aspen,
lodgepole pine, douglas fir
and sagebrush openings.
There is a spectacular view
of Diamond Mountain from
the top of the slope. Moderate to steep ascent and
descent for intermediate to
advanced skier. 8,300 - 8,800
feet.
4. GRIZZLY RIDGE
YURT TRAIL: 6 miles round
trip on marked trail. Access
this trail from Little Brush
Creek Trailhead or Bassett
Springs Trailhead. The trail
follows a jeep trail through
lodgepole pine, Douglas fir,
aspen and sagebrush ending
with a wonderful view of the
Ashley Valley. Moderate to
steep ascent for intermediate skier. 8,400 - 9,200 feet.
5. LIMBER FLAG YURT
TRAIL: 6 miles roundtrip on
marked trail. An enjoyable
route that traverses aspen
and sagebrush. Excellent
telemark turns can be found
in the douglas fir bowls as
the trail ascends again before entering dense timber.
Fantastic views of the Uintah Basin, Split Mountain
and Western Colorado await
you from the yurt deck.
Moderate to steep ascent for
intermediate skier. 8,200 9,150 feet.
6. OLD SKI TOW LOOP
TRAIL: 2.25 mile loop
onmarked trail. The ascending trail winds through
lodgepole pine and aspen to
a point near the top of the
old Grizzly Ridge ski run.
Trailhead is off U.S. Hwy
191. For intermediate skiers. 8,400 - 8.800 feet.
7. BEAR CANYON
BOOTLEG: 3 miles
roundtrip on marked trail.
From the Trailhead, the
AUTO PAINT
SPECIALISTS
Quality Service • Competitive Prices
Auto • Industrial • Custom
630 East Main (Inside NAPA)
Vernal, UT 84078
Locally owned & operated by
435-789-3051
www.BasinAutoPaint.com
[email protected]
Discover Dinosaurland
Fall / Winter 2012
Uintas. After climbing
gradually through open
country the last miles
of the trail enter and
descend a narrow canyon
back to the trailhead. A
strenuous route of varied,
dinosaurmoderately
winter rec
& trail
difficult
trailsguide '07
over flat and steep, rocky
8. SWETT RANCH LOOP
terrain for intermediTRAIL: 7 mile loop on marked
ate and advanced skiers.
trail. This loop takes one
7,560 - 7,980 feet.
around a turn-of-the-century
historic pioneer ranch with
scenic views in all directions.
Elk and moose often frequent
the area. For intermediate skiers. 6,720 - 7,400 feet.
trail travels west, passing the
Amphitheatre and soon after
follows an old road. The ski
route travels through ponderosa pine and at trails end offers
views of Flaming Gorge Reservoir. A great novice route.
c r o s s
2/15/07
Page 17
2:58 PM
c o u n t r y
9. RED CANYON RIM
TRAIL: 4-7 miles one-way on
marked trail. A mix of spectacular canyon views of Flaming Gorge and open stands of
ponderosa pine can be seen
along this trail. Mostly flat terrain for novice to intermediate
skiers. Trailhead parking at
Visitor Center (closed for winter) or at Red Canyon Lodge.
7,200 - 7,450 feet.
10. LAKE CREEK LOOP
TRAIL: 3 mile loop on marked
trail. A serene forest loop, this
trail climbs towards the northern flank of the High Uintas.
After several small drainages
the trail descends gradually
through meadows returning to
the trailhead. Gradual slopes
through elk, deer and moose
habitat for novice skiers. 7,600
- 7,800 feet.
11. ELK PARK TRAIL: 5.5
miles roundtrip on marked
trail. Route winds in and out
of open stands of ponderosa
pine and aspen following
the Deep Creek Road until
reaching Elk Park. Elk Park
is a large open meadow with
views of the north slope of the
Uintas. An excellent flat track
through elk and moose habitat
for novice skiers. This trail is
shared with snomobilers. 7,820
- 8,020 feet.
12. DOWD MOUNTAIN
TRAIL: 11 mile loop on
marked trail. This loop covers
a long route to Dowd Mountain Overlook with outstanding views of Flaming Gorge,
Red Canyon and the High
10
www.undiscoveredutah.com
Page 10
t r a i l s
Discover Dinosaurland
Page 18
Fall / Winter 2012
Yurt, guard station rentals in Dinosaurland
Yurt and Guard Station
rentals provide a one-of-akind lodging experience.
Traditionally covered in
hides, these cylindrical tents
provided a roomy, warm and
highly portable home in the
harsh climate of the Siberian steppes.
Modern yurts and rustic
guard stations are available for rent throughout
Northeastern Utah’s Dinosaurland. Often quite far
removed from any development, they allow for intimate interaction with the
natural surroundings.
Facilities are extremely
limited and in winter many
yurts are only accessible by
snowmobile or non - motorized access.
Call the National Recreation Reservation System:
www.ReserveUSA.com
877.444.6777, 877.833.6777.
Complete details available at www.fs.fed.us/r4/
ashley/recreation/ashguardstationyurts.shtml.
CARTER MILITARY TRAIL
YURT
Winter warming yurt for
snowmobilers. Winter use
Nov 1 - May 15 No electricity or water. Vault toilet
only. 1 double-size bunk bed,
sleeps 4
GRIZZLY RIDGE YURT
Winter use Dec 1 - Apr
30. No electricity or water.
Vault toilet only. 2 bunk
beds, sleeps 8 Non-motorized access only
LIMBER FLAG YURT
Winter use Dec 1 - Apr 30
No electricity or water. Vault
toilet only. 2 bunk beds,
sleeps 8 Non-motorized access only
COLTON GUARD STATION
Winter use Mid-Sept
- March No electricity or
water in winter No indoor
toilet 1 bunk bed, 1 sofa bed,
sleeps 4
Buying or Selling
A Home...
LET US HELP!
Kalene Gamble
Carol Judd
Broker / Owner
Associate Broker
Cell 435-828-7325
Cell 435-828-7038
[email protected]
[email protected]
“ Prosperity
and Freedom
Through Property
Ownership.”
HannaH Kunkel
Taija Bullock
Realtor
Cell 435-219-9057
Realtor
[email protected]
Cell 435-790-0999
[email protected]
Patriot Real Estate
388 West 100 North • Vernal, Utah
Office 435-789-7325 • Fax-1877-828-5232
TROUT CREEK GUARD
STATION
Winter use Mid-Sept
- March No electricity or
water in winter No indoor
toilet 2 bunk beds, sleeps 4
General Information
• Reservations can be made
up to 120 days in advance
and a 3-day minimum reservation window is required.
• Wheeled vehicle traffic is
allowed access to cabin rentals from late spring to late
fall (May 16 to December
19). Snowmobile or nonmotorized travel is required
from late fall to late spring
(December 20 to May 15).
• Off-highway vehicles are
allowed only on authorized
roads, trails, and routes as
identified on the Ashley National Forest, Vernal Ranger
District, Travel Map.
• All dates are subject to
change.
• No pets allowed inside at
guard stations and yurts.
• The cabin rental program
does not honor Golden Passport Discounts.
• Facilities are “Pack it in.
Pack it out.” as there is no
garbage service.
• Cabin rentals are secured
with a combination lock.
The combination is provided
once a confirmed reservation is made.
National Recreation
Reservation System at
www.Recreation.Gov or call
1-877-444-6777 toll-free or
1-877-833-6777.
INFORMATION
The Ashley National
Forest offices are located at
355 North Vernal Avenue,
Vernal, UT 84078
(435) 789-1181; www.fs.fed.
us/r4/ashley
Discover Dinosaurland
Fall / Winter 2012
Page 19
Welcome to
Dinosaurland
a
aur N
s
Dino
nt
nume
l Mo
tiona
iling
ob
owm
Sn
1-800-477-5558
Skiin
g / Sn
owsh
oeing
Muse
ums
www.dinoland.com
PHOTO: JEFF EDWARDS
Discover Dinosaurland
Top Ten ways to make Your Track in DINOSAURLAND!
Page 20
Fall / Winter 2012
Dinosaur National Monument Quarry
1. Play Like A Paleontologist.
Better make sure you have your Dinosaur Hunting License,
cause there’s ever so much dinosaur tracking to do in Northeastern Utah. For starters, there’s the Dinosaur National
Monument Quarry, Utah State Field House Museum, Dinosaur Gardens, and Red Fleet State Park. Stop by the BLM
office and find out where you can even do a bit of digging for
fossils yourself!
2. Take it to the Gorge.
Whether you like to boat, fish, or bike or hike, make your
way up the Flaming Gorge-Uintas National Scenic Byway.
Stop at Red Canyon Overlook, drive the Sheep Creek Canyon
Loop, get a good look inside the Flaming Gorge Dam. Rough
it or live it up. Either way, make sure you leave time for some
serious star gazing.
3. Picture This!
Dinosaurland is home to Nine-Mile Canyon - the longest
corridor of Fremont Indian petroglyphs (carvings in rock)
and pictographs (paintings on rock) in the world. If that isn’t
enough, explore Dry Fork Canyon, Jones Hole, Echo Park,
and you’ll discover even more of these ancient wonders.
Some over 200 feet high!
4. Run the River
Easy or Wild - a river trip down Dinosaurland’s Green or
Yampa River is a thrill you’ll never forget. Make it the perfect
family vacation - or scream for extreme adventure. Whatever
your choice, our guides and outfitters can get you and your
family down the river in style.
5. Take a Hike - or Bike!
Trails, trails, trails, and more trails. In Dinosaurland, you
can cruise through mountain meadows, blaze across high
desert canyons, or climb alpine forests. Need another reason
to head Northeast? Keep in mind, when the weather down
yonder is way too hot, we’re not.
6. Hook a Worm
Catch record-breaking trout at Flaming Gorge. Fly-fish at
Jones Hole. Cast your line into one of our 600 lakes and rivers. The bottom line is - Dinosaurland is the reel deal.
7. Stir-Up the Wild West!
From rodeos to pow wows, from outlaw trail rides to professional bull riding, the Wild West is alive and strong in Dinosaurland. And so is western hospitality. Come join in the
fun as we celebrate our diverse cultures and western heritage.
8. Nuke a Marshmallow
With so much open space and public land, it’s hard not to
find a place to camp in Dinosaurland. Don’t forget to bring
along a scary story or two.
9. Dig up the Past
Shop at John Jarvie’s general store where Butch Cassidy and
the Sundance Kid stocked up on supplies. It’s only one of our
many local museaums and historical sites where you can listen to the tales of Native American Indians, rugged mountain
men, early pioneers, and outlaws of American’s old West.
10. Get Wild!
Big horn sheep, moose, Rocky Mountain goats, elk, deer,
pronghorn antelope, cougars, coyotes, Golden and Bald
eagles. The list goes on and on. So bring along your camera,
your binoculars, your bird lists. Catch a glimpse of Dinosaurland’s wild side.
You’ll want to stay forever...
the Dinosaurs did!!!
1-800-477-5558
www.dinoland.com
Discover Dinosaurland
Fall / Winter 2012
• 17thAnnualUintahArtsCouncil
JuriedPhotoShoot
WesternHeritageMuseum
• BluebellCornMaze
• JensenPumpkinFestival
• Mayor’sHalloweenWalk
• VernalChamber
BusinessSymposium
• FieldHouseMineralRoom
GrandOpening&Celebration
• VernalExcitementOutdoor
Movie-Rango
December
• JohnJarvieRanch-WinterFest
• BreakfastwithSanta
• LightsatDinosaurGardens
• ‘Nativities”ChristmasExhibit
WesternHeritageMuseum
February
1-800-477-5558
November
• “TheArtofBrockThorne”
WesternHeritageMuseum
• VernalCommunityHollyDays
• Santa’sWorkshop
• HolidayParadeofLights
• Tree’sforCharity
January
• UintahHighSchoolTournament
ofChampions
Vernal’sWesternPark
• SolidGoldChampionshipBull
Riding
Vernal’sWesternPark
•
•
•
•
March
Home&GardenShow
St.PatricksDayParty
CommunityEasterEggHunts
22ndAnnualUintaBasinLocal
ArtisitsExhibit
WesternHeritageMuseum
www.dinoland.com
Community Events Calendar for DINOSAURLAND!
October
Page 21
Page 22
Discover Dinosaurland
Fall / Winter 2012
LODGING
Rooms
Pool
H/M
O,HT
251 East Main, Vernal, Utah 84078
800-528-1234 or 435-789-2660
www.bestwestern.com/dinosaurinn
H/M
O, HT
260 West Main, Vernal, Utah
800-329-7466 or 435-789-1011
H/M
Pets
Internet
Dining
Onsite
Free
Breakfast
HA, NS
Yes
Yes
Yes
HA, NS
Yes
Yes
Yes
HA, NS
Yes
Yes
HA, NS
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Access
Best Western Antlers
423 West Main, Vernal, Utah 84078
435-789-1202
www.bestwestern.com
Meeting
Facilities
Best Western Dinosaur Inn
America's Best Value Inn
Econo Lodge
311 East Main, Vernal, Utah 84078
435-789-2000 or 435-789-0947
H/M
Ok
Holiday Inn Express
1515 West US Hwy. 40 Vernal, Utah 84078
435-789-4654 or 800-465-4329
www.hiexpress.com/vernalut
H/M
I, HT
HA, NS
Yes
The Jensen Inn
5056 South 9500 East, Jensen, Utah 84035
435-789-5905 or 435-828-8896
B&B
Ok
HA, NS
Yes
Landmark Inn & Suites
288 East 100 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
888-738-1800 or 435-781-1800
H/M B&B
1500 East 775 South Vernal, Utah 84078
435-789-3277
H/M
HA, NS
Yes
Yes
Yes
Lazy K Motel
Ok
Motel 6
1092 West Hwy. 40 Vernal, Utah 84078
435-789-0666 www.motel6vernal.com
H/M
I, HT
Ok
HA, NS
Yes
HA, NS
Yes
Yes
Reside Inn
1010 North Vernal Ave. Vernal, Utah 84078
435-789-ROOM (7666)
H/M
RodeWay Inn
590 West Main, Vernal, Utah 84078
435-789-8172
H/M
Ok
NS
Yes
Yes
Yes
H/M
Ok
HA, NS
Yes
Yes
Yes
H/M
Ok
HA, NS
Yes
Sage Motel
54 West Main, Vernal, Utah 84078
435-789-1442
www.vernalmotels.com
Split Mountain Motel
1015 East Hwy. 40 Vernal, Utah 84078
435-789-9020
Yes
Springhill Suites
1205 West Hwy. 40 Vernal, Utah 84078
435-781-9000 or 888-236-2427
www.marriott.com/velsh
H/M
I, HT
HA, NS, MK
H/M
I, HT
H/M
I, HT
H/M
I, HT
Ok
HA, NS, MK
H/M
O
Ok
H/M
I, HT
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Studio 6
1935 South Naples, Utah 84078
435-789-6625
www.staystudio6.com
Super 8
1624 West Hwy. 40 Vernal, Utah 84078
800-800-8000 or 435-789-4326 www.super8.com
Ok
HA, NS, MK
Yes
HA, NS
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
HA, NS, MK
Yes
Yes
Yes
HA, NS, MK
Yes
Yes
Yes
Towne Place Suites
1219 West Hwy. 40 Vernal, Utah 84078
435-781-8050
www.marriott.com/velts
Weston Lamplighter
120 East Main Vernal, Utah 84078
435-789-0312
Weston Paza Hotel
1684 West Hwy. 40 Vernal, Utah 84078
435-789-9550
Rooms: H/M=Hotel/Motel
B&B=Bed & Breakfast
Pool:
O=Outdoor
I=Indoor
HT=Hot Tub
Yes
Access: HA=Handicapped Accessible
NS=Non Smoking
MK=Mini Kitchen
Discover Dinosaurland
Fall / Winter 2012
Page 23
Campgrounds
Cabins
Pool
Pets
Yes
Yes
Fishing
Bikes
Playground
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Dinosaurland KOA
930 North Vernal Ave. Vernal, Utah 84078
800-KOA-7574 or 435-789-2148
www.dinokoa.com
Water
Sports
Fossil Valley RV Park
999 West Hwy. 40 Vernal, Utah 84078
888-789-6450 or 435-789-6450
www.fossilvalleyrvpark.com
Outlaw Trail RV Park
9650 East 6000 South Jensen, Utah
435-781-6000
Red Fleet State Park
8750 North Hwy. 191 Vernal, Utah 84078
435-789-4432 or 800-322-3770
www.stateparks.utah.gov/parks/red-fleet
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Steinaker State Park
4335 North Hwy. 191 Vernal, Utah 84078
435-789-4432 or 800-322-3770
www.stateparks.utah.gov/parks/red-fleet
American Land & Leisure
Ashley National Forest Campgrounds
877-444-677 or 435-789-1181
www.reserveusa.com
Yes
Dinosaur National Monument Campgrounds
970-374-3000
www.nps.gov/dino
National Recreation Reservation System
877-444-6777
www.ReserveUSA.com
Bureau of Land Management Campgrounds
435-781-4400
Yes
Guides &
Outfitters
Rafting
Transportation
Fishing
Adrift Adventures
9500 East 6000 South Jensen, Utah 84035
800-758-5161 or 435-789-3600
Rafting
Transportation
Green River Drifters
X
Dutch John, Utah
www.adrift.com
X
435-885-3300
www.greenriverdrifters.com
All Save Car Rental
O.A.R.S.
X
2145 East Hwy 40 Vernal, Utah 84078
800-440-5776 or 435-789-4777
800-346-6277
Altitude Cycle
580 East Main Street Vernal, Utah 84078
435-781-2595
Outward Bound Wilderness
X
5753 South 9500 East Jensen, Utah 84035
800-477-2627 www.outwardboundwilderness.org
Don Hatch River Expeditions
800-342-8243
X
www.oldmoeguideservice.com
www.dinoadv.com
221 North 400 East Vernal, Utah
X
Dutch John, Utah 435-885-3342
Dinosaur River Expeditions
540 East Main Street Vernl, Utah 84078
801-499-9181 or 801-941-0249
www.oars.com
Old Moe Guide Service
X
www.altitudecycle.com
X
X
X
X
X
X
417 East Main Street Vernal, Utah 84078
435-781-4919 or 800-930-7238
www.riverrunnerstransport.com
Enterprise Rent A Car
Vernal Airport 825 South 500 East
Trount Creek Flies
X
800-RENT-A-CAR
Dutch John, Utah 800-835-4551
www.enterprise.com
www.fishgreenriver.com
Flaming Gorge Recreation
1050 South Boulevard
435-885-3191
X
X
X
X
X
X
www.fishthegreen.com
Flaming Gorge Resort
1100 East Dutch John, Utah 84023
435-889-3773
www.flaminggorgeresort.com
Great Lakes Airlines
Uintah County Airport Vernal, Utah 84078
800-554-5111
www.flygreatlakes.com
X
River Runners Transport
X
www.hatchriver.com
Dutch John, Utah 84023
Fishing
X
Vernal Aviation
595 South 700 East Vernal, Utah 84078
435-789-8157
Wilkins Bus Line Inc.
343 South Vernal Ave Vernal, Utah 84078
435-789-2476
X
X
X
Discover Dinosaurland
Page 24
Fall / Winter 2012
DINING
7-11 Ranch Restaurant
77 East Main, Vernal, Utah 84078
435-789-1170
Meals
Served
Children's
Menu
Alcohol
Patio
Dining
Take-Out
Banquet
Menu Features
B-L-D
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
Home Style Country
Cooking
L-D
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Burgers, Fries, Chicken
B-L-D
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Roast Beef, Chicken, Subs
L-D
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Sandwiches, Soups, Salads
D
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
Italian
B-L
No
No
Yes
No
No
Home Style Country
Cooking
B-L-D
No
No
No
No
No
Home Style Country
Cooking
L-D
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Sandwiches, Soups, Salads
B-L-D
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
Burgers, Salads, Fries
L-D
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Mexican Grill
L-D
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Chinese-Hunan, Szechuan,
Mandarin
L-D
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
Authentic Mexican
L-D
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Steakhouse
L-D
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Family Dining, Dancing,
Pool Tables, Games
L-D
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
Hamburgers, Fries, Salads,
Shakes
L-D
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Burgers, Ribs, Fish, Steak
L-D
No
No
No
Yes
No
Pizza - Carry Out & Delivery
L-D
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Authentic Mexican
B-L-D
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Sandwiches, Soups, Salads
L-D
No
Yes
No
No
No
Dining, Pool Tables, Darts
L-D
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
Steak Dinner Buffet
L-D
No
No
No
Yes
No
Pizza, Cinnamon Bakery
A&W / Kentucky Fried Chicken
1260 West 500 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
435-789-9055
Arby's
1141 West Hwy 40, Vernal, Utah
435-789-0292
Backdoor Grille (inside BitterCreek Books)
87 West Main, Vernal, Utah 84078
435-789-4751
Bella's Italian Restaurant
2750 West Hwy 40, Vernal, UT 84078
435-789-0103
Betty's Café
416 West Main, Vernal, Utah 84078
435-789-2728
Betty's Kitchen
4743 South 4625 East, Vernal, Utah 84078
435-789-2233
Blimpies (inside Amoco)
850 West Hwy 40, Vernal, Utah 84078
435-789-6012
Burger King
901 West Hwy 40, Vernal, UT 84078
435-789-1164
Café Rio Mexican Grill
1205 West Hwy 40, Vernal, UT 84078
435-781-8100
Canton City Restaurant
1175 West Hwy 40, Vernal, UT 84078
435-789-3338
Casa Rios Restaurant
2750 West Hwy 40, Vernal, UT 84078
435-789-0103
The Claim Jumper
1684 West Hwy 40, Vernal, UT 84078
435-781-8091
Club XS
1089 East Hwy 40, Vernal, UT 84078
435-781-0122
Country Grub
2419 South 1500 West, Naples, UT 84078
435-789-7000
Dinosaur Brew Haus
550 East Main, Vernal, UT 84078
435-781-0717
Domino's Pizza
895 West Hwy 40, Vernal, UT 84078
435-781-2121
Don Pedros Mexican Restaurant
3340 North Vernal Ave, Vernal, UT 84078
435-789-3402
Gandolfo's New York Deli
1056 West Hwy 40, Vernal, UT 84078
435-789-0999
Gateway Saloon & Café
733 East Main, Vernal, UT 84078
435-789-9842
Golden Corral
1096 West Hwy 40, Vernal, UT 84078
435-789-7268
Hot Stuff Pizza (inside Chevron)
722 West Main, Vernal, UT 84078
435-789-9999
Fall / Winter 2012
JB's Family Restaurant
475 West Main, Vernal, UT 84078
435-789-8722
Discover Dinosaurland
Page 25
Meals
Served
Children's
Menu
Alcohol
Patio
Dining
Take-Out
Banquet
Menu Features
B-L-D
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
Family Dining, Buffet
L-D
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
Authentic Mexican
B-L
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Family Style Dining
L-D
No
Yes
No
No
No
Sports Bar
L-D
No
No
No
Yes
No
Pizza - Carry Out
B-L-D
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Burgers, Shakes, Fries
L-D
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
Pasta, Salad, Burgers
B-L-D
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Home Style Country
Cooking
L-D
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
Southern Cuisine
L-D
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Dining, Pool Tables, Darts
L-D
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
Pizza, Pasta, Salad Bar
L-D
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
American, Burgers, Steaks
L-D
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Sandwiches, Soups, Salads
B-L-D
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
Burgers, Fries, Drinks
B-L-D
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Sandwiches, Salads
L-D
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Mexican Food
L-D
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Chinese Buffet, Mongolian
BBQ
L-D
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
Wings, Signature Asphalt
Pie
L-D
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Burgers, Salads, Fries
L-D
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Burgers, Fries, Shakes
La Cabana Restaurant
56 West Main, Vernal, UT 84078
435-789-3151
Lamplighter Restaurant
120 East Main, Vernal, UT 84078
435-789-0312
Little B's
65 South Vernal Ave, Vernal, UT 84078
435-789-0531
Little Caesar's Pizza
1169 West Hwy 40, Vernal, UT 84078
435-781-0200
McDonald's
1050 West Hwy 40, Vernal, UT 84078
435-789-4007
Mojo's Diner & Deli
831 West Hwy 40, Vernal, UT 84078
435-789-6600
Naples Country Café
1010 South 1500 East, Vernal, UT 84078
435-789-8870
The Porch
251 East Main St. Vernal, Utah 84078
435-781-8877
The New Cassidy's Club
1350 East Main Street, Vernal, UT 84078
435-789-8700
Pizza Hut
1819 West Hwy 40, Vernal, UT 84078
435-781-1048
The Quarry Steakhouse
25 South Vernal Ave, Vernal, UT 84078
435-789-2337
Quizno's
1147 West Hwy 40, Vernal, UT 84078
435-789-4800
Sonic
1192 West Hwy 40, Vernal, UT 84078
435-781-0123
Subway
1205 West Hwy 40, Vernal, UT 84078
(also inside Wal-Mart)
435-781-0711
Taco Bell
898 West Hwy 40, Vernal, UT 84078
(435) 781-1812
Win On Chinese Buffet
578 West Main, Vernal, UT 84078
435-789-0888
Winger's Restaurant
1871 West Main, Vernal, UT 84078
435-781-1923
Wendy's
1120 West Hwy 40, Vernal, UT 84078
435-781-2222
Wimpy's Place
2571 West 500 North, Vernal, UT 84078
435-789-5282
Visitor Information
Uintah County Travel and Tourism
Vernal Area Chamber of Commerce
Utah Welcome Center-Jensen, Utah
Utah Field House of Natural History-State Park
Dinosaur Museum
152 East Main Street, Vernal, Utah
800-477-5558 or 435-781-6765
www.dinoland.com
Official Utah Information Center
435-789-4002
Ashley National Forest
355 North Vernal Ave. Vernal, Utah
435-789-1181
www.fs.fed.us/ashley
Flaming Gorge Area Chamber of Commerce
435-784-3154 or 435-784-3445
134 West Main Street, Vernal, Utah
435-789-1352
www.vernalchamber.com
496 East Main Street, Vernal, Utah
435-789-3799
Hours: Monday-Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
www.stateparks.utah.gov
Dinosaur National Monument
435-781-7700
Hours: 7 day a week 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
www.nps.gov/dino
Discover Dinosaurland
Page 26
Fall / Winter 2012
Fresh, Untouched Snow
Be the first to leave your track
Snowmobiling
Snowshoeing
Cross Country Skiing
where the Dinosaurs once did... Dinosaurland-Vernal, Utah
Uintah County Travel & Tourism
800-477-5558 www.dinoland.com
Fall / Winter 2012
Discover Dinosaurland
Page 27
Gone to the dogs - a look at dog sledding
By RICHARD SHAW
Sun Advocate/Emery County Progress
publisher
I was running a team of
eight Siberian Huskies pulling my touring sled down a
groomed snow mobile trail
just north of Strawberry
Reservoir when an SUV
pulled over on the highway
and began to watch my team
do its thing.
When we reached the
Coop Creek parking area
north of Highway 40 I
noticed the vehicle had
pulled up near my truck and
was watching us come in.
It wasn’t a pretty entrance
as my dogs weren’t used to
the big piles of snow that
are put around the lot each
winter and I tipped over as
they cut the corner.
“I have never seen
anyone do that before, at
least in real life,” said the
man in the car. His kids had
their noses glued to the back
windows of the SUV. “I
thought they only did that
in Alaska.”
I was out of breath, and
the dogs were waiting to get
their usual bowl of water
at the end of a run, but I
was able to talk with him
for a few minutes. The dogs
had stopped at the back of
the truck and kind of got
tangled up as I gave his kids
permission to get out and
pet them.
This reaction to what I
was doing was nothing new.
Most people in the lower 48
are not used to seeing dog
teams pulling sleds along
the side of highways right
next to snowmobilers flying
by and ATV’s with tracks
plowing through the white
stuff.
I truly love it; and the
one reason to love it for
me is the dogs. This sport
is all about the dogs. They
come first. When you come
back from a run you may be
hungry, thirsty and have to
go to the bathroom in the
worst way. But first you feed
the dogs and you make sure
they are watered before you
take care of yourself.
To be a musher (that is
what they call dog sledders)
you must be mechanical,
inventive, cool headed and
think like a dog when you
need to and like a human
when you should.
At night when you get
home from work, whether
it is rain, shine or snow,
whether it is -20 or +100
you need to feed them,
water them and if possible
clean their runs.
In the spring when it
rains you get covered with
brown mud when you feed
the dogs. In the winter the
snow in the kennels needs
to be shoveled or the gates
get jammed by ice. Water
buckets need replenishing
each day. Dog food, even
the low priced kind that is
not the best, can add up to
hundreds of dollars a month
in expense when you have
10 or more dogs.
The vet bills can kill you
too, unless you learn how to
take care of a lot of things
yourself. Luckily my wife is
like a dog whisperer and understands when they hurt,
where they hurt and how to
fix it.
The equipment is pricey
too. You can make some of
your own, but unless you
have a lot of skills you will
find that gang lines that
separate from tug lines just
aren’t worth making when
you have to chase dogs
around for an hour because
of a failed connection. A composite material racing
sled can cost as much as
a expensive ATV. For the
recreationalist (I am not
a racer) reasonable sleds
can be purchased new for
between $800 and $1500.
This is a sport of con-
stant work, not something
you can put down after the
season is over. ATV’s and
motorcycles can be put away
when not in use. Dogs need
24/7 care.
When it comes down to
it, my dogs are happy. They
love to pull as is evidenced
by the barking and the
excitement whenever I pull
up the dog truck (another
expense I have not even
touched on) and they think
they are going to go. When
you hook them up to a sled,
they show their love for
what they do. Most of them
won’t quit until you tell
them to. They may stop and
rest, but they always go on.
The sport is a total commitment. But the joy of
running a sled with eight
powerful dogs through a
light snow that sprays up
over your face as they all
move in unison is worth all
the work. It is a feeling like
no other.
Moon Lake Electric
Association, Inc.
Roosevelt, Utah (435) 722-5400
“Your local electric cooperative serving Northeastern Utah
and Northwestern Colorado since 1938.”
www.mleainc.com
Page 28
Discover Dinosaurland
Fall / Winter 2012
Ice fishing: Hot fun in the cold
When it gets the coldest
in the Uintah Basin, the
fishing heats up.
Locals and visitors know
that ice fishing shines in
the area. Home to several
large reservoirs: Steinaker,
Red Fleet, Flaming Gorge
and Starvation Reservoir,
along with countless high
mountain lakes, area ice
fishers look forward to the
cold weather. That’s because
they know that’s when
things get good.
“In my opinion, Utah has
some of the best ice fishing
in the country,” said Drew
Cushing, warm water sport
fisheries coordinator for the
Division of Wildlife Resources.
Cushing has fished
through the ice in states
across the country.
“Utah provides a wider
variety of fish to catch than
any place I know of,” he
said. “And many of these
opportunities are probably
close to your home.”
Visiting the DWR’s fishing report is one way to
learn which type of fish are
in which waters and where
fishing is the best.
DWR biologists, officers
and outreach personnel
update the report every one
to two weeks. You can read
the report at wildlife.utah.
gov/hotspots.
Other Internet sources—
such as utahwildlife.net and
bigfishtackle.com—are also
good places to visit. And
don’t forget your local fishing tackle shop or sporting
goods store—people who
work at these stores are
often the first ones to know
about good fishing in their
areas.
Cushing said the arrival
of winter doesn’t mean fishing is over until the spring.
“Winter can be the most
fun, the most productive
and the least expensive time
of the year to fish,” he said.
“New lakes, new opportunities and new species of fish
are out there for you to enjoy. Get out there, and take
advantage of it.”
Cutthroat, rainbow,
brown and brook trout,
along with the unique and
tasty burbot fish, are some
of the options awaiting ice
fishers.
Starvation Reservoir, just
west of Duchesne on Highway 40, is home to some
excellent walleye fishing.
It doesn’t have to be all
about relaxation though.
Several derbies offer competition for anglers in the
snow.
The Utah Division of
Wildlife Resources and
the Wyoming Game &
Fish Department, in
coordination with the
Vernal, Green River,
Rock Springs and Flaming Gorge Chambers
of Commerce hold the
“Burbot Bash” on Flaming Gorge Reservoir
every winter.
During the derby,
teams of anglers compete for thousands of
dollars in cash and
prizes in various categories.
Steinaker Reservoir,
just north of Vernal on
Highway 191, is the
home to Steinaker Ice
Fishing Derby. Prizes go
to anglers for different
categories.
Discover Dinosaurland
Fall / Winter 2012
Page 29
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2012
Uinta
h Basin
Real
Estate
Guide
Page 1
FRE
E
Guide
March 6th & 7th, 2012
Duches
ne
Dagget - Uintah t Countie
s
See Listi
ng MLS
#10933
54 on pag
e 37
s
orld Famou
Vernal’s W - NOW OPEN!
es
on
Wall of B
You’ll want
Uinta
o
DO
June 2012
Welcome to Progress 2012, a celebration and recognition of
the people who are moving the Uintah Basin forward in many
fascinating ways.
We encourage you to read these pages and
meet the people of the civic organizations and companies who
continually put forth the effort to improve the quality of life for
basin families.
Dinosaurla
M
CIVIC
The G
reat
See Listi
ng MLS
#10642
14 on pag
e
See Listi
ng MLS
#10954
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e
mmer 2012
Spring/Su tion of the
lica
A pub
Publish
ed by the
Uint
Contact
the
26
35
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ng MLS
#10969
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e 33
Uintah Ba
sin
ah Bas
in Boa
rd of Rea
ltors (435
)789-239
0 if
Board of
Realtors
interest
ed in adv
ertising
in this
guide.
AND WHO WE ARE...
Pick Up a Newspaper Today!
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“Where You Go To Know”
Discover Dinosaurland
Page 30
Fall / Winter 2012
Ice fishing: Tips for finding success
Ice fishing success hinges
on three things
Putting your bait or
lure at the depth the fish
are—and then not moving
it much—are the keys to
catching fish through the
ice.
And using some simple
devices that will help you
know when you have a fish
on the end of your line is a
big help too.
Drew Cushing, warm
water sport fisheries coordinator for the Division
of Wildlife Resources, said
fish become lethargic when
they’re under the ice.
“Fish will often stay at
a certain water depth all
winter long,” Cushing said.
“Also, they aren’t as willing
to move fast to catch their
food.
“Keep those two things
in mind,” he said, “and you
should find plenty of fish
on the end of your line this
winter.”
Technique
As you search for fish,
and also after you find them,
don’t move your bait or lure
much. Keep it still. If you
do want to give your bait
or lure a little action, don’t
move it up and down much.
And move it slowly.
“Remember that fish
under the ice aren’t willing
to expend a lot of energy to
catch their food,” Cushing
said. “If you move your bait
or lure too much or too fast,
the fish might decide it’s
not worth its effort to catch
what you’re offering it.
“The best thing to do,”
he said, “is find the depth
where the fish are. Then
drop your bait or lure right
in front of the fish.”
Water depth
The depth at which you’ll
find fish varies depending on
the species you’re after. No
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matter which water you’re
fishing in Utah, you’ll probably find the following fish
at the following depths:
Yellow perch: Either right
on the bottom of the water
you’re fishing, or no more
than six inches above the
bottom.
Splake: Close to the bottom.
Trout, kokanee salmon:
Suspended at various
depths. You’ll find trout and
salmon just under the ice
to as much as 15 feet below
the ice. “Once you find
the depth at which trout
or salmon are suspended
in a water,” Cushing said,
“there’s a good chance you’ll
find them at that same
depth throughout the winter.”
To catch trout and
salmon, Cushing recommends starting by fishing
your bait or lure just under
the surface. If you don’t
get a bite, lower your bait
or lure a few feet. Try that
depth for awhile. If the fish
still aren’t biting, continue
lowering your bait or lure a
few feet at a time. If you’re
using the right bait or lure,
and you’re still not catching
fish, you’ll know trout and
salmon aren’t using that
part of the lake at that time.
Bluegill, largemouth
bass, smallmouth bass: Near
brush, bulrushes, rocks and
weeds. Look for vegetation
that’s sticking up through
the ice or ridges that extend
down into the water. To find
the depth where the fish are,
start by dropping your bait
or lure all the way to the
bottom of the water you’re
fishing. Then raise your bait
or lure a few feet at a time
until you find the fish.
Burbot, walleye, tiger
muskie, Northern pike:
Near the bottom of the
water you’re fishing. Each of
these fish like to pick baits
or lures up, swim a ways
with them, and then drop
them. Fishing with the bail
on your reel open, or using
a device called a tip up, are
good ways to let the fish run
with your bait or lure before
you set the hook.
If you’re not sure which
depth to try, ask anglers you
see on the ice. “Most anglers
are very willing to tell you
the depth at which they’re
catching fish,” Cushing said.
Cushing also reminds you
that fish aren’t everywhere
in a lake. If you drill a hole
and fish for 30 minutes
without getting any bites,
move to a new spot.
“Once you find a spot
that has fish,” he said, “keep
coming back. More often
than not, an ice fishing
hotspot will stay hot.”
Bobbers
Not only do fish move
less under the ice, they
also don’t bite their food as
aggressively. And that can
make it challenging to know
when a fish is striking your
bait or lure. “If you’re relying on your fishing rod to
tell you when a fish is on the
end of your line,” Cushing
said, “you probably won’t
know it’s time to set the
hook.”
(Setting the hook involve
pulling up on your fishing
rod to set the hook in the
fish’s mouth.)
Fortunately, inexpensive
items such as ice bobbers
are available. Simply measure the amount of line that
will put your bait or lure at
the depth you want to fish.
Then attach your bobber at
that point on your line. The
bobber will sit on top of the
water with your line dangling under it.
“When you see the bobber move,” Cushing said,
“you’ll know it’s time to set
the hook.”
Tip ups
An item that will cost you
about $15, but that’s effective and fun to use, is called
a tip up.
Fall / Winter 2012
Discover Dinosaurland
Page 31
A tip up is a mechanism that you use instead of using a regular fishing rod. When
a fish takes your bait, a mechanism on the
tip up sends a small flag up, letting you
know a fish is on the end of your line.
“Using a tip up makes it easier to fish
in two holes,” Cushing said. “You can drill
two holes a ways apart and still know when
a fish is biting the line in either hole.”
Remember that in addition to your
fishing license, you must have a two-pole
permit to fish with two poles or two tip
ups. Also, your poles or tip ups cannot be
more than 100 feet apart, and you must be
able to see each one clearly.
Ice fishing: Basic equipment varies by lake
Catching fish through
the ice doesn’t require a
lot of fancy equipment. A
short fishing rod and reel, a
few hooks and a package of
worms
are
about
all you
need.
In
fact, if
you just
want to
give ice
fishing a
try, you
don’t
even
need an ice auger.
Drew Cushing, warm
water sport fisheries coordinator for the Division of
Wildlife Resources, says
you’ll usually find plenty
of predrilled holes on the
ice fishing waters you visit.
“If anglers drilled the holes
just a day or two before,” he
says, “they’ll have only an
inch or two of ice in them.
Just break that thin ice, and
you’re in business.”
If you want to drill your
own holes, though, you’ll
need an ice auger or a digging bar. A way to create a
hole—and the most basic
fishing equipment you can
imagine—are all you need
to catch lots of fish and have
lots of fun.
In addition to warm
clothes and waterproof
boots, Cushing says the fol-
lowing gear is all you need
to catch fish through the ice
in the winter:
A short fishing rod and a
small reel.
Fishing
line and some
small hooks.
A package
of wax worms
or meal
worms.
Cushing
says wax
worms and
meal worms
are easy to
keep alive
in the winter, and they’ll last a long
time on your hook. “In the
winter,” Cushing says, “wax
worms or meal worms are
the best worms to use. Any
species of fish that you fish
through the ice for in Utah
will take these worms.”
If you like to fish with lures,
buy some small ice flies or
small jigs. Ice flies and jigs
come in a variety of colors.
“Make sure you buy a
variety of colors,” Cushing
says. “That way, you’ll have
the color the fish want on
any given day.”
Also, placing a small
piece of worm or other bait
on the tip of the lure’s hook
will increase the chance that
a fish bites the lure.
A digging bar or an ice
auger. A manual ice auger
(one you turn by hand) costs
about $50. You can pick up a
digging bar for as little as $5
to $10.
Cushing says some
anglers use gas-powered
augers. But a gas-powered
auger usually isn’t needed.
“If you have a hand auger,” he says, “you can drill
through six to eight inches
of ice in about a minute.
Unless you’re trying to drill
through two feet of ice, a
gas-powered auger usually
isn’t needed.”
Because fish bite softly in
the winter, you may also
want to buy attachments
that will help you detect
the subtle bites of the fish.
Spring bobbers, tip-ups and
various floats are among
the items that will help you
know you have a fish on the
end of your line.
Lunch & Dinner
Steaks • Sandwiches
Salads • Soup • Appetizers
Everything from Scratch
Beer • Cocktails • Wine
25
Vernal
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789-beer
29S.
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Vernal Ave.
Vernal
Ut. 84078
Page 32
Discover Dinosaurland
Fall / Winter 2012
World-class mountain biking trails await
If you really want to ride world-class
trails… Visit Dinosaurland, Vernal, Utah.
You can pick your pleasure: Slick Rock,
Alpine Forests, or Desert Canyons. We
have it all. When the summer months
bring sizzling temperatures to the valleys
below, biking in the Uintas is at its best,
with small crowds and great trails.
The trails in Vernal are quite simply
some of the best in the state, maybe the
west coast, but don’t just take our word
for it. BIKE magazine commented after interviewing and riding the trail system with
Altitude Cycle Owner/trail builder Troy
Lupcho, “Could rival Fruita as the best
single track in the west” and questioning
the trails with statements like “Better
than Moab?”
Trails range in ability from the easier
single tracks such as “Got Milk and Cookies” and “Combo”, or advanced trails such
as “Fire Sale” and “Handsome Cabin
Boy”. If fast flowing single track isn’t your
thing, take your skills to Red Mountain
where you can challenge the climb before
ripping back down, or do the shuttle up
the North Face leaving you with over five
miles of truly amazing room to huck!
Some of the best single-track riding in the country can be found in Dinosaurland.
MAKE YOUR DESTINATION UNFORGETTABLE.
Duchesne County Chamber of Commerce • Roosevelt Utah
Fall / Winter 2012
Discover Dinosaurland
Page 33
Biking Trails:
McCoy Flats
Milk and Cookies
Combo
Retail Sale
Fire Sale
Slippery When Wet
More Hoes
Serendipity
Jackalope
Jensen Area
Race Track
Corkscrew
Chicken Dick
Red Mountain Area
Rojo
Red Mountain Downhill
Flaming Gorge
Bear Canyon Bootleg
Trail, Browns Park
Dowd Mountain
King’s Point
Outlaw Trail
Red Canyon rim
Dry Fork
Dry Fork Canyon
Dry Fork Flume Trail
Red Fleet Area
Jazz Cromoly
Ashley National Forest
Handsome Cabin Boy East Park Loop
Jumps and Ladders
Elk Park Trail
For more trail information, maps, and directions
please contact Uintah County Travel and Tourism
at 800-477-5558 or www.dinoland.com, or Troy
with Altitude Cycle in Vernal at 435-781-2595 or
www.altitudecycle.com.
World-class trails await riders of all skill levels.
MAKE IT
For More Information Call 435-722-4598 or Visit www.duchesne.net
Discover Dinosaurland
Page 34
Fall / Winter 2012
Basin hiking and backpacking
1. The High Uinta
Wilderness Area
Multiple high mountain
trails are accessible from the
Elkhorn Loop Road, north
of Whiterocks, including
the West Fork of the White
Rocks trail, and the trail to
Taylor Lake (described in
our featured article on the
previous page). The High
Uinta Wilderness is remote,
wild and rugged, dotted with
beautiful high mountain
lakes and meadows surrounded by towering peaks
that retain snow late into
summer. It is the perfect
place for a long weekend
backpacking trip, or even an
afternoon jaunt.
Maps: Rasmussen Lake,
Chepeta Lake (USGS 7.5
Minute Quads)
Elevation: Above 10,000 feet
Difficulty: Moderate to difficult
2. The Harpers Corner
Trail
The Harpers Corner Trail
is a short 1-mile (2-mile
roundtrip) hike to a spectacular rocky point overlooking
the ruggedly beautiful Echo
Park, at the confluence of
the mighty Green River and
the wild and scenic Yampa
River. Massive crimson cliffs
and rust-colored sandstone
rise sharply above the river
valley, displaying some of
the areas most interesting
geological features. Access
to the trail is at the end of
the Harpers Corner Auto
Tour, 32 miles from the
Colorado entrance to Dinosaur National Monument,
and a mere 35 miles from
downtown Vernal.
Maps: Jones Hole (USGS
7.5 Minute Quad)
Elevation: 7,500 feet
Difficulty: Easy
3. Split Mountain
Scenic Trail
The Split Mountain
Scenic Trail runs along the
Green River from the Split
Mountain Campground
to the Green River Campground just after the river
leaves the famous “split”
in Split Mountain. It’s a
relatively easy hike along
a beautiful river, offering
abundant wildlife viewing
opportunities, and set with
the rugged Split Mountain
as a backdrop. The trail is
1.8 miles long, and can be
hiked as a through hike if
you leave a car at the end of
the trail and shuttle to the
trailhead, or makes a wonderful 3.6-mile roundtrip. A
stay at either campground
can make for a wonderful
outing as well, or just add
a picnic to the end of your
hike for a fun family afternoon in the Monument.
Maps: Dinosaur Quarry,
Split Mountain (USGS 7.5
Minute Quads)
Elevation: 4,800-5,800 feet
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(435) 789-7011
• Forest Service Wood Cutting Permits
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Difficulty: Easy to moderate
4. Moonshine Arch
Natural sandstone arches
in Vernal? You bet! And it’s
a spectacular one to boot.
Magnificent Moonshine
Arch is a massive natural
stone arch neatly tucked
away in the cliffs and ridges
just north of Steinaker Reservoir off Highway 191. The
arch, and the views of the
valley to the south, is as impressive as they come, with
a tangle of twisting caverns
cut into the sandstone cliffs
behind, setting a vibrant
backdrop for the scene.
You will need a four-wheel
drive vehicle to get to the
trailhead, but it’s well worth
arranging for the necessary
transportation.
Maps: Steinaker Reservoir
(USGS 7.5 Minute Quads)
Elevation: 5,600-6,400 feet
Difficulty: Easy to moderate
5. Red Fleet Dinosaur
Trackway
Not only does this trail
run through some of the
most impressive sandstone
slick-rock in the country
with views of the massive
“red fleet,” a series of buttresses that have the uncanny appearance of a fleet
of naval battleships, but as a
bonus, at the end of the trail
on the shore of Red Fleet
Reservoir are genuine dino-
saur tracks in ancient mudflats buried and petrified
nearly 200 million years ago.
The trail is 1.5 miles long
and relatively easy, with
small red “dinosaur tracks”
painted onto the sandstone
path to help keep hikers on
course. The trailhead is easy
to get to. Just head north on
Highway 191 to the second
entrance to Red Fleet State
Park and follow the signs.
Maps: Donkey Flat (USGS
7.5 Minute Quads)
Elevation: 5,600-5,800 feet
Difficulty: Easy to moderate
6. Flaming Gorge
Canyon Rim Trail
The spectacular Canyon
Rim Trail starts off inconspicuously at a Highway 44
roadside overlook just north
of its junction with Highway 191 north of Vernal.
The trail meanders through
comfortable pine forests
on a relatively level slope,
offering the hiker a peaceful
setting without the promise
of excitement. Then, suddenly the trail breaks out
of the mundane and runs
up against one of the most
gorgeous canyons in North
America, Flaming Gorge.
The gorge, now holding the
waters of Flaming Gorge
Reservoir, got its name from
members of the Powell expeditions due to the vibrant
red-rock walls towering over
continued on next page
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• Full Breakfast Buffet • Wireless Internet
•Guest Laundry • Seasonal Outdoor Pool
• Exercise Room w/ Hot Tub
423 West Main • Vernal, Utah • 435-789-1202
“In the heart of Dinosaurland!”
Discover Dinosaurland
Fall / Winter 2012
Page 35
7
6
1
4
5
8
9
2
10
3
11
the boaters below. The trail
is 4.5 miles long and meanders along the canyon rim,
ending at the Red Canyon
Overlook. It can be hiked
as a 9-mile round trip, or as
a 4.5-mile one-way hike if
cars are shuttled.
Maps: Flaming Gorge,
Dutch John (USGS 7.5
Minute Quads)
Elevation: 7,000-7,400 feet
Difficulty: Easy to moderate
7. Little Hole Trail
The Little Hole Trail
runs for nine miles along
Utah’s beautiful Green
River, beginning just below
Flaming Gorge Dam and
ending at the Little Hole
recreation area. Wildlife
abounds along the canyon
floor, with ducks, eagles,
trout, river otters, and more
creating a racket that echoes
off the canyon walls. And
the Green River lives up to
its name, cascading through
rapids and slipping beneath
stone ramparts as it glides
on its way to the mighty
Colorado. The trail is wellmarked and maintained,
and can be hiked partially,
or as a 9-mile through trip
with shuttled cars. Or, for
the truly adventurous, you
can hike it as an 18-mile
round-trip. Whatever you
choose, don’t miss the opportunity to see this incredible corner of Dinosaurland.
Maps: Dutch John, Goslin
Mtn. (USGS 7.5 Minute
Quads)
Elevation: 5,600 feet
Difficulty: Easy to moderate
8. Jones Hole
Jones Hole, so named for
Major John Wesley Powell’s cartographer, Stephen
Vandiver Jones, who helped
with early mapping of the
area, descends from the
Jones Hole Fish Hatchery
through a deep canyon
beneath towering red-rock
cliffs along Jones Hole
Creek, culminating at the
confluence of Jones Hole
Creed and the Green River
in Dinosaur National Monucontinued on next page
Page 36
Discover Dinosaurland
Fall / Winter 2012
Dinosaurland is the gateway to the Uinta Mountains, which offer beautiful hiking opportunities. The range runs east-west across
most of the eastern part of Utah.
Continued from previous page
ment. The trail is a 4 miles
long, well-maintained and
relatively easy path that is
normally hiked as an 8-milelong round-trip hike. Watch
for American Indian petroglyphs, historical markers,
bighorn sheep, mule deer,
and occasional waterfalls.
The trail is frequented by
fishermen angling along the
renowned Jones Hole Creek,
and rafters on multi-day
trips down the Green River
through Split Mountain, but
is nevertheless very peaceful and quiet, and usually
empty on weekdays.
Maps: Jones Hole (USGS 7.5
Minute Quads)
Elevation: 5,000-5,600 feet
Difficulty: Easy to moderate
9. Sound of Silence
Trail
Dinosaur National Monument’s Sound of Silence
Trail lives up to its name,
offering solitude and peace
to the weary traveler. The
trail begins at a pull-out
about 2.5 miles from the
Quarry Entrance north of
Jensen. It meanders up Red
Wash, entering a cleft in the
ridge that encircles Split
Mountain, then continues
along Red Wash as far as
the hiker is willing to go.
The striking cliffs along
the wash muffle the surrounding sound, creating a
buffer between hikers and
the outside world. This high
desert hike is abundant with
mule deer and other wildlife
as well. Most hikers walk
only the first mile of the
trail, but the adventurous
can easily continue around
the loop, eventually ending
up over 10 miles later at
Rainbow Park. The trail is
well-maintained for the first
two miles, and is primitive
beyond that point.
Maps: Dinosaur Quarry
(USGS 7.5 Minute Quads)
Elevation: 4,800-5,800 feet
Difficulty: Easy to moderate
10. Hog Canyon and
Box Canyon
In the late 1800s and
early- to mid-1900s, a Wild
West woman named Josie
Bassett lived among the
slick-rock of northeast Utah,
cavorting with outlaws of
the Hole-in-the-Wall Gang,
making moonshine and
rustling cattle, eventually
building a home, a small
cabin, in what is now Dinosaur National Monument.
Just to the north of her
cabin is a short box canyon
named, appropriately, Box
Canyon, where Josie corralled her cattle and pigs,
using the steep-walled canyon as a natural pen. Just
to the east is another, even
more impressive, box canyon named Hog Canyon, due
to its use as another holding pen for Josie’s animals.
Both canyons offer solitude
and grandeur and are easy,
short hikes well worth the
effort. To reach Josie’s
Cabin, enter Dinosaur National Monument through
the Quarry Entrance and
follow the signs.
Maps: Split Mountain
(USGS 7.5 Minute Quads)
Elevation: 5,300 feet
Difficulty: Easy
11. Fantasy Canyon
Fantasy Canyon is less
a canyon as it is a series of
highly eroded gullies in the
hilly desert country south
of Vernal. What makes it
special is the fascinatingly
twisted and gnarled sandstone monuments adorning the entire area. From
delicate, seemingly sculpted
pieces of natural artwork,
to blunt little rows of
imaginary animals or trolls
marching along, the area
has earned its name as “nature’s china shop.” Legend
has it that demons from the
underworld once attempted
to escape at this spot but
were stopped by a Native
American medicine man
who rode to the rescue on
a mighty stallion. Fantasy
Canyon simply must be seen
to be believed. It is truly a
national treasure. To get
there, travel south on Highway 45 from Naples to Glen
Bench Road, then follow the
signs.
Maps: Red Wash SW (USGS
7.5 Minute Quads)
Elevation: 4,800 feet
Difficulty: Easy
Fall / Winter 2012
Discover Dinosaurland
Page 37
Up close and personal with wildlife
Wildlife viewing becomes
easier in winter as elk gather in winter herds and lone
bull moose stand out against
the stark white background.
Northeastern Utah is
where the stars of the animal world take the stage.
Bighorn sheep, elk,
moose, river otters and bald
eagles are all easily seen.
The more elusive cougar,
coyote, fox and bobcat are
seen in glimpses if at all, but
they are here.
While many animals
can be spotted along one of
our scenic drives, the best
way to get up close is to
ski or snowshoe one of the
many trails in Northeastern
Utah’s Dinosaurland.
BROWNS PARK
NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE
Browns Park is located
50 miles northeast of Vernal
situated on 13,455-acres and
lies along the Green River.
Over 200 species of birds
can be found on the refuge.
It is also home to deer, elk,
pronghorn antelope, river
otter, moose, and bighorn
sheep. A graveled, 11-mile
road with interpretive exhibits provides opportunities
to view and study wildlife
tain sheep, mule deer, and
many species of birds are
seen throughout Dinosaur
National Monument. www.
nps.gov/dino.
PARIETTE
WETLANDS
and wildlife habitat. www.
fws.gov/brownspark/
FLAMING GORGEUINTAS SCENIC BYWAY
This area is located along
US Hwy. 191 and UT 44
between Vernal and Manila,
UT. It offers drive-by viewing of pronghorn antelope,
elk, mule deer, moose, bighorn sheep and wild horses.
Nature trails and interpretive portals provide information and access. www.utah.
com/byways/flaming_gorge.
htm.
DINOSAUR
NATIONAL
MONUMENT
The monument offers
sightings of
Rocky Moun-
This area is a complex of
wetlands and marshes located near the Green River,
20 miles south of Fort Duchesne. The BLM’s largest
waterfowl management area
in Utah is home to more
than 105 species of birds
and mammals. Interpretive
information and viewing
facilities are located on site.
www.utah.com/playgrounds/
pariette_wetlands.htm.
OURAY NATIONAL
WILDLIFE REFUGE
This refuge is located 30
miles southwest of Vernal
and provides food and cover
for 14 species of nesting
ducks. Over 200 species of
birds have been documented
at the refuge. One can expect to see bald and golden
eagles, as well as several
species of hawks. Interpretive information and viewing facilities are located on
site. For more information
call 435.545.2522.
Discover Dinosaurland
Page 38
Fall / Winter 2012
Outlaw Trail interests
The civilized way to enjoy
the Great outdoors.
Flaming
FlamingGorge
Gorge
Country’s
Country’sPremier
Premier
Resort
Resort
435.889.3759
435.889.3759
Highway 44. Flaming Gorge Country - www.redcanyonlodge.com
Highway 44. Flaming
Country •with
www.redcanyonlodge.com
PartnersGorge
in recreation
Ashley National Forest
Partners in recreation with Ashley National Forest
Before the turn of the
century, Uintah County was
the scene of some of the Old
West’s most colorful history.
Frequented by fur trappers
and mountain men, the area
was also a hangout for some
of the West’s most notorious
outlaws, including Butch
Cassidy and the Wild Bunch,
Kid Curry, Matt Warner and
others. Several scenic sites
in the area were named after the famous outlaws, including Matt Warner Lake.
The John Jarvie Homestead,
settled in 1880, served as
a secret meeting place for
outlaws.
Today, many local sites
are accessible by vehicle or
within a short walking distance from main roads. For
more information, contact
the Dinosaurland Travel
Board at (800) 477-5558.
1. Brown’s Park:
A region that was never
an actual town, and historically serviced outlaws and
cattle rustlers.
2. Jarvie’s Ranch:
Includes several historical structures which
are more than 100 years
old. The ranch was a secret
meeting place for outlaws.
3. Jessie Ewing Canyon:
The narrow, winding
canyon is named after one of
the early settlers in the area
and was used frequently by
outlaws.
4. Josie Bassett Cabin:
The historical cabin
was home to Josie Morris Bassett, a progressive
woman who was married
and divorced several times,
and befriended and hosted
outlaws at her homestead.
5. Harper’s Corner:
This isolated viewpoint in
Dinosaur National Monument overlooks a vast area
of cliffs and canyons, which
were frequented by outlaws.
Fall / Winter 2012
Discover Dinosaurland
Page 39
More than just dinosaurs await you in
Northeastern Utah’s Dinosaurland.
Vernal is a great place
to see the dinosaurs that
once roamed the land. The
towns of Vernal, Roosevelt,
Duchesne and Dutch John
offer old west hospitality
with all of the conveniences
of modern life.
It’s all available from
luxury lodges to family motels and old fashioned diners
to fine dining. The area’s
towns are great places to begin your winter adventure.
And when you can’t feel
your toes anymore there will
always be a warm fire and a
hot meal waiting for you.
Western Heritage Museum
Featuring displays of
early settlers, Fremont and
Ute Indian artifacts, blacksmith display, barbershop,
country store, 1890s/1900s
ladies fashions, one room
schoolroom, Gilsonite
exhibit, old rifles, saddles,
tack and leather, and much
more. Picture galleries of
“Uintah County Sheriff’s” 1880s to present & “Women
of Courage” during the
early 1880s/1900s. Outdoor
museum of Horse-Drawn
equipment. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Monday – Friday, 10 a.m. - 2
pm Saturday. 435-789-7399.
Daughters of the Utah Pioneers Museum
6. Echo Park:
William Ashley and his
group were the first Europeans to enter Echo Park, with
Patrick Lynch, a hermit,
being the first to homestead the canyon in 1883.
In 1825, William H. Ashley
and his fur trappers were
the first Europeans to enter
Echo Park. In 1883, Patrick
Lynch, a hermit, was the
first to homestead in this
canyon.
Today, the state of Utah
thrives and the Uintah
Basin is home to established
communities. Civilization
has taken hold in what was
the wild west. It’s thanks
to the spirit of the rugged
pioneers.
That spirit is kept alive
in part through the memories held in the Daughters of
Utah Pioneers Museum, at
the corner of 500 West and
200 South in Vernal.
This year, the museum
celebrates its 50th anniversary of keeping the history
and the stories of those
early pioneers alive for the
present and future generations.
The museum, the focal
piece of which is the old rock
tithing house, is home to
thousands of artifacts, both
mundane and extraordinary,
that show just what life was
like in the Uintah Basin in
the latter parts of the 19th
century.
The museum is entirely
privately-funded, and stays
open thanks to donations,
said Phyllis Jones, with the
Daughters of Utah Pioneers.
“The thing that keeps
this going is people who donate their time and serve,”
Jones said.
Funding for the creation
of the museum also came
7. Swinging BridgeBrown’s Park:
The original sign on this
narrow suspension bridge
read “Load limit 200 sheep,
30 cattle or 3.5 ton gross.”
from the community.
“When it was built, it
was built on pot pies,” Jones
said. “Everybody in town
was making vegetable, beef
and chicken pot pies” and
selling them to raise money
for the museum.
There’s no pot pies at the
museum today, but there are
plenty of exhibits for everyone from the lifelong Basin
resident to newcomers to
explore.
The museum is open
from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays.
Lodging and Dining
The charming small
towns of Northeastern
Utah’s Dinosaurland offer a
range of lodging and dining
opportunities. If you just
want a simple place to crash
after a long day outdoors or
a luxury mountain experience we have it all. From
rustic to exquisite, you’ll
find excellent accommodations in the towns throughout Northeastern Utah’s
Dinosaurland. There are
a range of dining opportunities from comfortable
old-fashioned diners to
contemporary restaurants
along one of our main
streets. Scenic dining is
available year-round at the
mountain lodges of Flaming
Gorge. For a quick bite before
you get on your snowmobile there are plenty
of quick service and fast
food restaurants available
throughout the area. For
more visitor information call
800.477.5558.
K&K
SANITATION
HAULING AWAY
UNWANTED TRASH
SINCE 1977!
Transfer Station Open Monday-Friday
(Saturday April thru October)
3615 E. Highway 40 Roosevelt
For more information
Call Us at 435-722-1244
Page 40
Discover Dinosaurland
Fall / Winter 2012
Holly Days is a celebration of the people
Vernal’s Community
Holly Days, held the day
after Thanksgiving, is an
excuse for the people to get
out of the house, shop and
kick off the holiday season.
2012 will mark the ninth
year for the festival. It is set
for Nov. 23, 2012.
Holly Days is and effort
to get to know your neighbors, and have a good time,
“on the biggest shopping
day of the year,” Glade
Allred, one of the organizers
of the event said.
Events are free.
Some of the events scheduled so far are:
Professional Ice Sculpting - Cobble Rock Park,
11a.m., on display throughout event. Watch as a masterpiece takes shape from a
large block of ice. Children
also chip away at smaller ice
blocks to retrieve toys and
other items frozen inside.
Mini-Minute-Win-It New this year! Cobble Rock
Park, 12:30 p.m., 2:30 p.m.
and 4:30 p.m. Contestants
from the audience will test
their skill at a variety of
games and challenges with a
chance to win great prizes.
Camel Rides - near the
Gardens/County Library
on Main Street, 11 a.m. to
8 p.m. Yes, real camels in
Downtown Vernal providing rides for children and
adults.
Bubble Mania - Sponsored by Wheeler Machinery - County Building front
lawn, 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Lots of bubbles create a fun
area for kids to play!
Winter Tales Writing
Contest - Winners will
be announced at noon at
Cobble Rock Park. For information contact Connie with
the Literacy Commission at
435-781-0437 or email [email protected]
Turkey Drawings and
Prize Give-a-way - Sponsored by Vernal Chamber of
Commerce. Noon, 2, 4 and 6
p.m. at Cobble Rock Park.
Pony Rides - noon to
8 p.m. - in front of the
Gardens (next to County
Library). Youngsters enjoy a
ride on a real pony carousel.
Face Painting - Cobble
Rock Park Indoor Arena,
noon to 4 p.m.
Swimming, Rock Wall
and Obstacle Course - Uintah Community Center, 1
p.m. to 5 p.m.
TURBO Carts 100 East
50 North parking lot, noon
to 8:30 p.m. Pedal-powered
tilting carts designed for
youth and adults.
Children’s Police/Fire
Pedal Cars - Sponsored by
Uintah Fire District - 100
East 50 North in parking
lot, noon to 8:30 p.m.
Polar Express Children’s
Train Ride - Sponsored by
Mt. America Credit Union
- 100 East 50 North in parking lot, noon – 4:30 p.m. and
6:30 – 8:30 p.m. This attraction is designed for children
and provides rides in small
decorated wagons pulled by
a small utility vehicle.
Clowns/Balloon Twisters - Various locations - 100
East Main Street 1 – 8 p.m.
Watch closely, they will be
walking around the event
providing entertainment
and creating small balloon
animals/objects to give away.
Ice Skating - Sponsored
by Western Park - Ice Rink,
2 – 5 p.m. and 6 – 8:30 p.m.
Skates will be available on a
first come first served basis.
Bring your own skates if you
have them.
Movie Matinee - Sponsored by Vernal Theaters Showing Muppet Christmas
Carol. Downtown Vernal
Theatre. 1 p.m., second
Fall / Winter 2012
showing 3:30 p.m. Limited
to available seating in theater.
Ice Cube Scramble Sponsored by VTV Channel
6 - County Building front
lawn, 3 p.m. Children 12
and under are divided into
four age groups and scramble to gather ice cubes which
contain cold hard cash and
tokens to be redeemed for
prizes.
Anadarko Fun House Western Park Indoor Arena,
4 – 8 p.m. - Indoor family
carnival - Rides, slides and
fun! Free cotton candy
(while supplies last) and
more!
Face and Nail Painting Western Park Indoor Arena,
4 – 8 p.m.
Plasma Cars - Western
Park Upstairs, 4 – 8 p.m.,
small personal-powered
ride-on toys designed for
children.
Ground Force Go Carts
-Western Park Upstairs, 4 –
8 p.m. Children ride electric
carts and zoom around a
concrete track.
Cotton Candy and Popcorn (free) - Cobble Rock
Park, 4 - 8 p.m. (while supplies last)
Local Variety Talent
Show - Western Park. 4 – 8
p.m. Enjoy a varietry of
talent and entertainment on
stage in the indoor arena.
Clown Hopper Children’s
Ride, Wizzer Ride and Bell
Ringer - Vernal Avenue, 4 –
8 p.m. sponsored by Strata
Networks - Amusement
park style rides and attractions.
Vernal Chamber Parade
of Lights - Main Street
(700 W. to 300 E.) 5:30 p.m.
Parade entry registration
at Chamber office 134 West
Main. $600 in cash prizes to
winning entries.
Holly Trolley Shuttle Bus
– From 1 – 8:15 p.m. BTA
buses provide free transportation between venues and
attractions. Watch for signs.
Santa and Mrs. Claus Sponsored by 105.5 KLCY Cobble Rock Park, following
parade until 8 p.m. Children
visit Santa and receive a
Discover Dinosaurland
treat!
Handbell Choir - Kingsbury Community Church
(100 East 100 North) 6:30
– 7:30 p.m. Warm up inside
the church while you enjoy
the sounds of Christmas.
Horse Drawn Carriage
Rides -Sponsored by Ashley
Regional - Loads at 100 East
and Main Street, 6 – 8:15
p.m. Enjoy a classy ride
around the block taking in
the sights of the beautifully
decorated downtown area.
Incendiary Circus Fire
Dancers - County Building
Lawn East of Helicopter,
Various times: 6 – 8:30 p.m.
Professional fire dancers
light up the night as they
perform with real fire props
and holiday music.
Roasted Chestnuts Sponsored by Vernal Tree
Board - Cobble Rock park,
6 – 8:30 p.m. (or while supplies last). Enjoy a freshroasted holiday treat.
Hot Chocolate/Marshmallow Roast -Sponsored by
Davis Food & Drug- Cobble
Rock Park, 6 – 8 p.m. Enjoy
a free cup of hot chocolate
as you roast a mallow over
an open fire.
Christmas Karaoke Sponsored by 105.5 KLCY
- Cobble Rock Park, 6:30
– 8:30 p.m. Get in to the
holiday spirit by singing
your favorite holiday tunes.
Fireworks Display - Presented by Vernal City - Choreographed to Christmas
Music. View from County
Building front lawn area
at 100 East Main, 9 p.m.
Music will also be broadcast
on local FM radio stations
Channel X94 and 98.5 The
Fox.
Santa’s Workshop Craft
Fair - Middle School 100
South 850 West. Friday 10
a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Saturday
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Contact
Melissa at 435-766-4618
or [email protected]
yahoo.com
Trees For Charity Display - Western Park, noon
– 8 p.m. Contact Vernal
Area Chamber of Commerce
435-789-1352.
Food will be available for
Page 41
Warm holiday cheer eases the cold winter nights in Holly Days.
purchase at the Holly Days
Food Court (100 East Main)
and Downtown Restaurants.
All of the events, food
and giveaways at Vernal’s
Community Holly Days
would not be possible with-
out the many sponsors and
all of the community support, Allred said.
For more information
on Holly Days check out its
website at communityhollydays.com.
Discover Dinosaurland
• Silver/Native American Jewelery
• Minnetonka Shoes & Slippers • Leather Jackets
• Western & Native Art Work • Pottery
• T-Shirts • Painted Ponies
Pendelton Jackets, Vests and Blankets!
Ashley
Trading Post
236 East Main, Vernal • 435-789-8447
9:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. • Monday — Saturday
Discover Dinosaurland
Page 42
Fall / Winter 2012
Holiday events vary in Uintah County
The holidays come
alive with the snow covered western landscape as
a backdrop for our annual
holiday events. Moonlit
pines set in blankets of
snow will get the family in the holiday spirit
for Vernal’s Community
Holly Days and the lighting of the gardens.
Experience Christmas
as it was in the 1880’s
at the Jarvie Ranch
Winter Festival or warm
the heart with giving at
Vernal’s Trees for Charity auction. Northeastern
Utah’s Dinosaurland
brings the meaning of the
holidays to life with these
special annual events
that the entire family will
enjoy.
Jarvie Ranch Winter
Festival:
Jarvie Ranch in
Brown’s Park is a National Historic Site operated
by the Bureau of Land
Management and was
the site of a 19th century
trading post. Each December, the ranch takes
on a special charm as volunteers and staff decorate
the ranch and trading
post in great detail as a
historical recreation of
Christmas in the 1880s.
Tours, live entertainment, and refreshments.
435-885-3307 (Jarvie)
435-781-4400 (BLM)
Trees for Charity:
One of the premier
events of the winter
holiday season. Fully
decorated Christmas
trees, wreaths, quilts, and
specialty items auctioned
off for local charities are
on display at the Western
Park Convention Center.
Sponsored by the Vernal
Area Chamber of Commerce, this must-see
event is open Thanksgiving weekend that is free
to the public.
Enchanted Forest:
Roosevelt Crossroads
Senior Center is host
to this wonderful family event has become a
wintertime tradition.
Beautifully decorated
trees sponsored by
families and businesses
provide an atmosphere
of the true Christmas
Spirit. Santa is always on
hand to visit children and
update the wish list. Fun,
food and enchantment is
waiting for you. For more
information, contact the
Duchesne Chamber of
Commerce
435-722ITatALL
BEGAN WITH THE OPENING
4598.
OF OUR BEAUTIFUL
SUITE
FACILITY
Trees for charity
display.
RESPONSIVE
to our
COMMUNITY!
IN ROOSEVELT
TWO UINTAH BASIN LOCATIONS
NOW
OPEN
RESPONSIVE
TO SERVE YOU
IN BEAUTIFULLY!
to
Deluxe
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Suites with • vaulted ceilings
DUCHESNE
• over-sized roomsAND
• free internet • kitchens
COMMUNITY!
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screen TV’s • executive desks.
AND
ROOSEVELT
Now in Roosevelt...
IT ALL BEGAN WITH THE OPENING
King Deluxe
& Queen
King SuitesSuites
with...OF OUR BEAUTIFUL SUITE FACILITY
IN ROOSEVELT
• Deluxe
Now In Roosevelt
* Vaulted
• Oversize Rooms
• Ceilings
Kitchens
Opening
* Over-sized Rooms
• Free Internet *•FREE
Executive
Desks
wired and wireless internet
in
• 42 Inch Flat Screen
TV’sTV’s
* 42 inch Flatscreen
Duchesne in May
For reservations
or more information
Now
in435-725-1990
Roosevelt...
call
Deluxe King Suites with...
visit
* Vaulted Ceilingsus on-line at wintertonsuites.com
Proposed Roosevelt Expansions...
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37 Additional King Suites
Multi-Bedroom Suites
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Conference Center with Breakout Rooms
Fall / Winter 2012
Discover Dinosaurland
Page 43
What can I do in
Dinosaurland?
Vernal, Utah is the only place
in the world where you can
view and even touch over
1,500 dinosaur bones all in
their final resting place within
the newly reopened Quarry at
Dinosaur National Monument.
Dinosaurs are not all
Uintah County has to
offer... Camping, Fishing,
Rafting, Hiking, Biking,
Petroglyphs, Boating,
Cross Country Sking,
Snowshoeing, Snowmobiling,
Swimming, Museums,
Beautiful Scenary and so much
more are what makes
Dinosaurland loved by those
that live here and
vacation here.
World Famouse “Wall of Bones”
So pack your bags, and come
visit dinosaurland...you never
know, you might want to stay
forever...
The DINOSAURS did!!
www.visitdinosaurland.com
For more information Please contact Uintah County Travel & Tourism 800-477-5558
Page 44
Discover Dinosaurland
Fall / Winter 2012