The reception children have been celebrating this special time of year

We read a special big book in
class about Diwali.
Did you know?
Diwali was on the 28th
October this year
• Diwali
is
the
Hindu
festival which celebrates
the start of the New
Year.
• It is called the ‘festival of
lights.’
• Diwali lasts for five days
and is celebrated by
Hindus all around the
world.
• The fourth day of Diwali
is the actual Hindu New
Year.
• Lakshmi is the goddess of
prosperity and wealth. The
festival is held in honour
of her. People pray to her
in order that they will
have good luck in the New
Year.
• Little lamps called ‘divas’
are lit around the home.
Hindus put them out in
their gardens as well.
Sometimes little electric
lights are also used.
• Families give gifts to each
other. Sometimes they are
sweets. Fireworks are also
lit at this time.
The
reception children have
been celebrating this
special time of year
learning about festivals
and customs.
Seasonal
festivals and
customs.
The children have been
learning about special
festivals and customs.
The children drew patterns on
Miss Parson’s hands.
The children in Owl class drew
mendhi patterns.
They carefully used fine black
pens to draw patterns. The
children practised their fine
motor hand control using these
pens.
Beautiful mendhi patterns
Lots of
needed.
concentration
Reception Curriculum Information Sheets. Autumn/ Seasonal festivals and customs. Gusford Primary School. Jean Matson. 08
was
The children made
symmetrical patterns using
the pattern blocks.
Beautiful patterns were created
by the children in reception. The
children extended their creative
ideas.
The reception children drew ‘rangoli’ patterns outside their class.
Hindus decorate their homes They drew some by their back door. They used chalk outside.
and their temples by drawing
beautiful patterns on the The children also used paint, flour and water on the tables in class
ground
outside.
These to make prints.
Rangoli Patterns.
patterns are made up with a
mixture of flour and water. They also used coloured sand in trays to make ‘rangoli’ patterns.
Coloured powder such as sand They were all very beautiful.
is also used.
Rangoli patterns in yellow and
white.
The children drew rangoli
patterns in the spices. They
tried to make the patterns
symmetrical.
The children printed their
patterns onto black sugar
paper.
Reception Curriculum Information Sheets. Autumn/ Seasonal festivals and customs. Gusford Primary School. Jean Matson. 08
Turmeric was the smoothest
spice to draw in.
Flour and paint rangoli
prints.
Drawing patterns in spice.
Rice was a good medium to make
patterns in as well. The children
had to concentrate when making
patterns.
We had a lovely Diwali in Reception and learnt lots of new things and
we even learnt to say some words in Hindi. We learnt that ‘Namaste’
meant hello and goodbye!
Reception Curriculum Information Sheets. Autumn/ Seasonal festivals and customs. Gusford Primary School. Jean Matson. 08
Look at these amazing symmetrical patterns created independently by our 4 and 5
year old children.
The children used pattern blocks to make their own rangoli patterns.
Reception Curriculum Information Sheets. Autumn/ Seasonal festivals and customs. Gusford Primary School. Jean Matson. 08
The children’s interest in rangoli patterns developed further. They went to the
computer suite and drew symmetrical patterns on the ‘Colour Magic’ program.
They also took their play outside and used the nursery sand to draw patterns.
I am drawing
patterns in the
fine green
sand.
Reception Curriculum Information Sheets. Autumn/ Seasonal festivals and customs. Gusford Primary School. Jean Matson. 08
Did you know?
It is thought that our ancestors used The reception children made ‘Soul’ cakes on Thursday.
to celebrate New Year on November They tasted a little like Hot cross buns.
1st?
• They celebrated their New Year’s
Eve on October 31st. ‘Samhain’
marked the end of the season of
the sun (summer) and the beginning
of the season of cold and darkness
(winter).
•
Halloween comes from ‘All Hallow
Even,’ the eve before All Hallows
day. Halloween is thought to be the
eve of All Saints Day.
•
Halloween was sometimes called
‘Snap Apple Night,’ in England. A
game called Snap Apple was played
where apples were hung by string
and people had to try and bite them
without using their hands. We
sometimes play the game bobbing The children also had a go at apple bobbing. We
apples in water.
all got a little wet in class but had lots of fun.
•
Many places in England joined
Halloween with ‘Mischief Night’ (4th
November) when children played
tricks on their neighbours.
•
Another
tradition
was
called
‘souling.’ It was a Christian festival
where people would make calls at
houses begging for ‘soul cakes.’ It
was thought that even strangers
could help a soul’s journey to heaven
by saying prayers. They would
promise to pray in exchange for a
cake.
We had fun trying to catch the apples.
Reception Curriculum Information Sheets. Autumn/ Seasonal festivals and customs. Gusford Primary School. Jean Matson. 08
We got quite wet trying to catch
apples.
We got a little wet bobbing the apples.
Then we remembered we had to have
our photos taken so we dried off
quickly!
We looked at some of our autumn customs.
Reception Curriculum Information Sheets. Autumn/ Seasonal festivals and customs. Gusford Primary School. Jean Matson. 08
The children shared an old favourite book about ‘Meg and
Mog’ in the book corner. They dressed up to get in the
mood. A few strange characters came to listen to the
story.
•
Percy’s hut in the park had visitors
from a little witch and a wise old owl.
•
•
The children thought of lots of words beginning
with the phoneme ‘m’.
They sang a song about a monster on a Monday
morning.
They made up some magic spells and put things in a
cauldron that started with the phoneme ‘m’.
Did you know?
•
•
•
The children finished off their ‘Seasonal festivals’ by
In 1605 in the month of November looking into the history behind the 5th November.
it is said that the ‘gunpowder plot’
took place in London.
th
‘Remember,
remember
the
5
of
It is said that the Catholics were
November,
plotting to kill the King of England.
In 1605 it is said that a man called,
Gunpowder, treason and plot.
Guido Fawkes was put in charge of
We see no reason why gunpowder
the explosives to blow up the houses
treason
of Parliament and kill the protestant
King. He was not the leader but his
Should ever be forgot.’
name has been remembered to this
day. Catholics were not allowed to
Do you remember this old rhyme and wonder
practise their religion in public and
where it comes from?
the King would not change the law.
Reception Curriculum Information Sheets. Autumn/ Seasonal festivals and customs. Gusford Primary School. Jean Matson. 08
•
•
•
In celebration of his survival it is
said that James 1 ordered that
great bonfires would be lit on
November 5th.
In the 18th century the term ‘Guy’
was used to refer to a dummy which
would be paraded round the towns
and villages on the anniversary of
the plot. Children would ask for
money. ‘A penny for the guy’.
•
•
•
•
•
Traditional food on bonfire night is baked potatoes
wrapped in tinfoil.
Parkin cake, sausages and marsh mallows are
traditionally eaten.
Many towns and villages have large firework displays.
Did you go to Christchurch Park to see the fireworks
on Saturday 1st November?
In Ottery St. Mary, in Devon, people in the village
carry flaming tar barrels through the village. It is
quite a sight to see.
The first fireworks were made in China over 2,000
years ago.
Look at our amazing
firework pictures. We used
wet chalk to draw on black
sugar paper. We even went
outside to draw on the
pavement. Do you like the
indoor or outdoor pictures
the best?
The children used wet chalk to make the colours
brighter.
Reception Curriculum Information Sheets. Autumn/ Seasonal festivals and customs. Gusford Primary School. Jean Matson. 08
Beautiful firework
created in class.
pictures
were
The sparklers and Catherine wheels were a favourite.
The children used an amazing interactive firework program. They had to touch the
board as quick as they could to make the fireworks appear.
Reception Curriculum Information Sheets. Autumn/ Seasonal festivals and customs. Gusford Primary School. Jean Matson. 08
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