6 F S

Quilting Arts
handmade quilts with MAGAZINE®
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Make Handmade Quilts with Quilting Arts
6 Free Sewing Patterns for
Beautiful Homemade Gifts
1
2
3
5
6
4
1 A Festive Setting
Open House
2
Holiday
Advent Calendar
Jane Dávila
judy coates perez
3 Snow Play Table Runner
kathy mack
4
Short & Sweet
Candy Cane Napkin Holders
Pokey Bolton
5
6
Easy Wine Bottle Gift Bag
Elin Waterston
Quick Quilted Jewelry Wrap
laura west kong
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S
o you’re hosting a holiday
party and you want to
personalize your dining
room table—and quick! Look no
further. In this e-Book, we offer
you six festive quilting and sewing
projects to personalize your home
this holiday season. From colorful
napkin ring holders, quilted
placemats, and a wine bottle gift
bag to a cheerful advent calendar
to adorn your mantle, you’ll find
some nifty ideas from some of our
favorite artists in the pages ahead.
And to further impress your guests,
why not give them a party favor in
the form of a jewelry wrap?
s e w i n g pat t e r n s
Quilting Arts
MAGAZINE®
handma de quilts with
quilting arts:
6 Free Sewing Patterns
for Beautiful
Handmade Gifts
Editor-in-Chief
assistant editor
Pokey Bolton
Pippa Eccles
creative services
Larissa Davis
Photographer Larry Stein
Division Art Director
Projects and information are for inspiration and personal use only. Quilting Arts
Magazine is not responsible for any liability arising from errors, omissions, or
mistakes contained in this e-book, and
readers should proceed cautiously, especially with respect to technical information.
Interweave Press LLC grants permission to
photocopy any patterns published in this issue for personal use only.
Cheers to you this holiday season!
Pokey Bolton
Editor-in-Chief
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Adapted from
Quilting Arts Gifts
Holiday 2007/2008
M at e r i a l s
for the place mats
•Main fabric (you can get 3 fronts
from a 1⁄2 yard of fabric)
a festive
setting
•Accent band fabric (you can get 3
accent bands from 1⁄8 yard of fabric)
•Backing fabric (you can get 3 backs
from a 1⁄2 yard of fabric)
by J ane
D ávila
S
et the perfect table for any occasion by coordinating your
centerpiece display with place mats, napkins, and napkin
rings. Create a festive mood with color and pattern in fabric and
embellishments.
•Binding (1⁄4 yard will yield enough
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4. Slide
the batting between the
fabric layers, keeping it flat
and even. If it is too large to fit
comfortably, trim it slightly
until it fits.
5. Position
the accent band 2" from
the left edge of the main fabric
and fuse in place. Topstitch along
the long edges of the accent
band. Quilt the place mat as
desired using variegated thread
for interest. I chose a different
geometric pattern for each—
diagonal lines, straight lines,
zigzags, and curved lines.
6. Trim the top and bottom long
edges even. Pin a binding strip to
the top edge, right sides together,
centering the excess from left to
right. Sew the binding strip to the
top edge, through all layers, using
handmade quilts with Quilting Arts: 6 free sewing patterns for beautiful handmade gifts
a 1⁄2" seam allowance. A walking
foot on your sewing machine will
make this much easier. Press the
seam allowance away from the
place mat and toward the binding.
Turn over and press under 1⁄2" on
the remaining long edge of the
binding strip. Press the short ends
in to meet the finished edge of the
place mat. Press the long, folded
edge over the raw edges of the top
of the place mat and pin in place
over the stitching. Hand sew the
binding in place to the back of
the place mat. Repeat to bind the
bottom edge.
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tips
•Avoid beads and any lumpy
embellishments so that plates and
glasses sit well on your place mat.
•Try decorative stitching (by hand
or machine), stamping motifs, or
appliquéing.
•Make certain any paint you
use when stamping or painting
on your place mats is heat-set
or permanent so that they are
washable.
M at e r i a l s
for the napkin rings
•Main fabric
•Accent band fabric
•Lightweight to medium-weight
fusible interfacing
•Beads
•Beading needle
•Beading thread
stitches to consider are blanket stitch,
zigzag stitch, feather stitch, and
parallel rows of straight stitching.
4. Lay the other piece of the main fabric
over the stitched unit, right sides
together. With a 1⁄4" seam, sew both
long sides and 1 short side, leaving
the other short side open for turning.
Backstitch well to reinforce the
opening.
5. Clip the corners and turn
right-side out; press well. Turn
1
⁄4" to the inside of the short end
opening and press again.
6. Embellish with beads along the
accent band. I chose coordinating
beads and sewed them on in
geometric patterns. Consider adding
hand or machine embroidery to the
accent band as well as or instead of
beads.
7. Overlap the short ends about
N apkin
rings
1. Cut 2 pieces 2 ⁄2" × 8" from the
1" and hand stitch together to form
a ring.
s e w i n g pat t e r n s
Setting
the table
Position your centerpiece in the
middle of the table. Decorate with
candles or small vases with flowers,
if you’d like. Get out your beautiful
dishes and flatware and set your table!
Add a gift tag with a guest’s initials
or name to each napkin ring to show
them where to sit. They can take these
tags home with them to hang on a
tree or to keep as a memento. Sprinkle
sparkly sequins on the table for added
glitz.
To see more of Jane’s work,
visit janedavila.com.
Need fresh
i n s p i r at i o n ?
look inside
cloth paper
scissors®
M at e r i a l s
1
main fabric, 1 piece 11⁄4" × 8"
from the accent band fabric, and
1 piece 21⁄2" × 8" from the fusible
interfacing.
2. Fuse interfacing to the back of
1 of the main fabric pieces. Center
the accent band fabric, right-side
up, along the right side of this
main fabric piece and pin in place.
3. Using a matching or contrasting
thread and a decorative stitch on
your sewing machine, stitch the
2 long sides of the accent band
fabric to the main fabric. Some
for the napkins
•Fabric (1⁄2 yard for 1 napkin)
Napkins
1. Cut 2 squares 18" × 18".
2. With right sides together, sew around
the perimeter, leaving a 2" opening
along one side. Clip the corners and
turn right-side out. Press well.
3. Topstitch 1⁄8" from the finished
edge, closing the opening with this
stitching as well.
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clothpaperscissors.com
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Adapted from
Quilting Arts Gifts
Holiday 2007/2008
holiday open house
advent calendar
create a colorful countdown to christmas
by J udy
C oates P erez
While my technique and form are
contemporary, I try to root my work in
traditional themes and imagery. My
goal is to take the old and blend it with
the new in a way that keeps the past
alive and relevant.
So when I turned to the task of
designing an Advent calendar, it
seemed like the perfect opportunity
to experiment with a fresh take on a
traditional theme.
My Advent calendar takes on the
form of a row of houses. During the
holidays, we decorate our houses inside
and out in many festive ways, usually
following in the traditions our families
celebrated as we grew up. In symbolic
terms, the house represents the self. I
like this secondary meaning; it makes
the decorating of the houses and what
is hidden inside more of a personal
reflection of holiday traditions.
Directions
L
ife these days throws us so many chaotic distractions
that I’m often left asking, “What’s it all about? What is
meaningful and what is not?” It’s at times like these that I turn
to the past for guidance. The collective wisdom and traditions
of human history serve as a how-to book for me. They keep me
I mages
for windows
and doors
Any kind of imagery can be put behind
the door and window flaps. I used a
variety of images from family Christmas
photos, classic toys, vintage holiday
images, and details from some of my
quilts.
grounded, give my life substance, and inspire my work.
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1. After collecting a number of
images, size the photos on your
computer or a color copier to fit
in the various sizes of window
and door openings and print the
images on bond-weight paper.
2. Cut out the images and, using
a paintbrush and acrylic gel
medium, glue them to Lutradur.
Leave some space between the
photos. Gel medium dries clear,
so you can brush a coat over your
images to protect them, if you like.
3. After they dry, trim the photos,
6
M at e r i a l s
1
leaving a ⁄4" border of Lutradur
around each one.
C onstructing
the houses
Each house will be constructed
separately and then joined with fabric
hinges.
1. Cut out a single house from the
pattern on the following pages,
transfer the pattern to Peltex, and cut
out the house and window and door
openings with an X-acto knife. Save
the cutouts for later use.
2. Fuse a piece of fabric to the front of
the Peltex house shape; trim the sides
and roofline, leaving a 1⁄2" of fabric
at the bottom to wrap to the back
side of the house to create a clean,
finished edge.
3. Using the point of the scissors,
poke a hole in the center of the
fabric covering the window opening
and snip the fabric diagonally to
each corner. Pull the fabric over
the window edge to the back side
of the house and fuse to create a
clean, wrapped edge on the window
opening. Trim excess fabric as
needed.
For round openings, clip curves and
bring the fabric to the back, fusing it
in place.
4. Take each Peltex window and
door that was cut out and trim
approximately 1⁄4" from the side that
will have the hinge. Then trim a scant
1
⁄8" off the perpendicular side. This is
needed because the fabric wrapping
the window has decreased the size of
the opening.
handmade quilts with Quilting Arts: 6 free sewing patterns for beautiful handmade gifts
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Finished size: 9" x 12 1⁄2"
•1⁄2
yard extra-firm stabilizer
(I used Pellon® Peltex.)
•Fabric backed with fusible
web (I used 1 yard of
Frieda Anderson’s rainbow
hand-dyed fabric.)
•1 ⁄4 – 1⁄2 yard Lutradur®
•Golden® Acrylic Gel Medium
(semi-gloss)
•Paintbrush
•X-acto® knife
•Cutting mat
•Rotary cutter and fabric scissors,
straight and decorative edges
•Textile marker or permanent,
waterproof archival pen (Test for
bleeding; do not use a Sharpie® as
these will halo on fabric.)
•Images for behind the windows
•Bond-weight paper
Optional
•ArtEmboss™ lightweight, soft metal
sheets
•Kemper® Double Ball Stylus
Embossing Tool (A dried-up
ballpoint pen or knitting needle will
also work in a pinch.)
•Fabric trims, rickrack, buttons,
charms, beads
5. To wrap each Peltex window with
fabric, cut a fabric strip as follows.
For the strip length, measure the
width of the window, double it,
then add 11⁄2". For the strip width,
measure the height of the window.
Fold the strip in half and slide the
Peltex window inside so it abuts
the fold (the top and bottom of the
window should be aligned with
the raw edges of the strip). The
excess strip length will be used to
create the hinge.
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6. Fuse the fabric to the Peltex
window.
7. Stitch around the edge of the
window. I used a variety of
stitches on my windows: straight,
zigzag, and blanket stitching with
contrasting thread.
8. Fit the fabric-wrapped window
into the corresponding opening.
Place it firmly up to the right side
of the window opening with the
fabric hinge placed behind the left
side of the window to the back
side of the house. You may choose
to tack the hinge in place with a
bit of fusible web. The placement
Above: A view of the back side of one of the house panels. A piece of fusible web holds
each hinge in place.
Left: Three windows and the door have been covered with fabric strips; all have hinges on the
left side.
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10. When all doors and windows
have been filled and sewn in
place, cut a piece of fabric to
cover the back of the house. Fuse
it in place and trim the edges.
Repeat this process on the
remaining houses.
H inges
between houses
1. Cut five 6 1⁄2" x 3⁄4"-wide strips of
While carefully holding the image behind
the window in place, topstitching is added
from the front, 1⁄8" around the window.
of hinges on windows and doors
is completely optional—they
can open left or right or even
vertically.
9. Center the image behind the
window opening. Lift the fabric
Excess Lutradur is trimmed away.
fabric to create hinges between
the houses.
2. Lightly mark a line on each side
window flap to check the position
of the image. Close the flap and,
while holding the photo in place,
topstitch around the window 1⁄8"
away from the opening. Turn over
and trim the excess Lutradur 1⁄8"
away from the stitching.
of the house from roof to bottom
edge, 1⁄4" from the outer edge.
3. Place 2 houses side by side with
1
⁄4" space between them, lining
up the houses at the bottom edge.
Center the fabric strip over the
Enlarge Pattern 183%
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Above left: The ends of the front hinge are fused to the back, then the back hinge is fused in place.
Above right: Craft metal is prepared for the roofline. After cutting one edge with decorative scissors and embossing it, it’s scored twice
(measuring 3⁄8" and again 1⁄4" in from the straight edge).
houses, using the marked lines as
guides, and fuse the strip in place.
4. Cut the top of the strip 1⁄2" down
the center to fold over the roof
edge and fuse it to the back side of
the house. Wrap 1⁄2" at the bottom
to the back side of the house and
fuse it in place.
6. Center the strip of fabric on the
back between the 2 houses and
fuse. Topstitch the hinges on the
front of each house.
5. Cut
three 5 1⁄4" x 3⁄4" strips for
hinges on the back side of the
houses.
7. Line up the next house and repeat.
Enlarge Pattern 183%
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4. Score
the metal with the stylus,
running the stylus along the edge
of a ruler 3⁄8" from the straight
edge on the back side and again
1
⁄4" from the straight edge.
5. Cut
a notch at the center point
(3 5⁄8") on the other side of the
scored line. Fold the metal along
the scored lines. Bend at the
notches to shape the roofline
to match the top of the house.
6. Using a size-14 topstitching needle
on a home sewing machine, slowly
stitch the metal in place using a
long stitch length and heavyweight
cotton thread. Use this needle only
on metal from now on.
8. Wrap the remaining two 6 1⁄2"
fabric strips around the outside
edges on the first and last houses;
fuse and topstitch.
N umbering
the windows
I would suggest taking a blank paper
house pattern and filling in the
windows and doors with numbers to
decide how you want your numbering
to go. I did this a few times to make
sure I did not leave out a number or
write one in twice. Then follow your
chart carefully when you put the
numbers on your windows.
Try out the size and placement of the
numbers on the pattern pieces left
over from the paper house pattern.
Lightly draw the number with pencil
on the fabric window and then ink or
paint it in.
To number the doors and windows I
drew on numbers of my own design
with a black permanent marker. You
could also use a textile marker, fabric
paint, or numbers cut from fabric and
then fused in place.
R oof
To finish the top edge of the houses:
1. Cut a 7 1⁄4" x 3⁄4" strip of
lightweight craft metal.
2. Cut 1 long edge with decorative
scissors and clip a triangle shape
out at the halfway mark (3 5⁄8" from
the ends).
NOTE: I know many people will not
feel comfortable with the idea of sewing
metal on their sewing machine. As an
alternative, you can always glue the
metal trim on with a hot-glue gun.
Another option is to finish the tops
of the houses with rickrack or a strip
of fabric cut with a decorative rotary
cutter or scissors and fused in place.
D ecorate
Embellish your houses any way you
like. I fused bits of fabric to decorate
each with little Christmas motifs.
You could paint, glue on buttons, or
charms, and add bits of trim with a
glue gun. Personalize it to make your
own little holiday neighborhood.
To see more of Judy's work, visit
judyperez.blogspot.com.
3. Emboss
a simple design along the
decorative edge with a ball stylus.
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snow play
table
runner
M at e r i a l s
(to make a 13" × 40" table runner)
•1 fat quarter (FQ) lime green novelty
print (A). A fat quarter measures
approximately 18" × 20".
by
K athy M ack
Adapted from
Quilting Arts Gifts
Holiday 2008/2009
C
olorful holiday fabrics and easy construction combine to make
this festive table runner for holiday entertaining. Snowflake
templates backed with fusible web add to the fun.
Red-and-white striped binding fabric cut on the bias creates a
candy cane finish. Have fun playing in the snow!
•1 FQ solid red (B)
•1 FQ lime green dot print (C)
•1 FQ red-and-white novelty print (D)
•1 FQ solid lime (E)
•1 FQ white-on-white print (F)
•1 FQ red-and-pink novelty print (G)
•Solid pink scraps for snowflakes
•Fusible web
•Backing and quilt batting,
17" × 44" (Dimensions are 4" wider
and longer than finished size of
table runner.)
•Embroidery thread
• 1⁄2 yard red-and-white striped fabric
for binding
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Directions
using the dimensions provided
in the diagram below. Cut
directional prints lengthwise
across the fabric. Save leftover
solid fabrics for making
snowflakes.
2. Lay the strips on a worktable
in alphabetical order. Sew
them together using a ¼" seam
allowance. Press the seam
allowances open.
stitched each shape to make the
snowflakes more prominent.
I used a silver metallic thread
around the stars to make
them shine and then chose an
alternating stitch pattern for each
strip. For A, D, and G, I used
free-motion work inspired by
swirling snow; B and E were
stitched with uneven, closely
spaced straight lines; and C and F
were stitched with evenly spaced
straight lines finished with a wide
zigzag pattern.
4. Cut out the snowflakes, arrange
them in a random pattern on
top of the pieced strips, and fuse
them to the table runner.
5. Using your favorite method, layer
and baste the backing, batting,
and top to create your quilt
sandwich.
6. Secure the snowflakes by
stitching close to the edge of each
shape.
3. Use the snowflake templates on
the next page to make large and
8. Add additional interest by
hand embroidering around
A
B
C
D
Cut
5 ⁄2" x 13"
Cut
8" x 13"
Cut
3"
x 13"
Cut
10 ⁄2" x 13"
1
7. Machine quilt. I first echo
small patterns of each shape.
Trace the patterns onto fusible
web. Iron the fusible web to the
back of the leftover solid fabrics.
1. Cut strips from the fat quarters
s e w i n g pat t e r n s
1
E
Cut
5 ⁄2" x 13"
1
handmade quilts with Quilting Arts: 6 free sewing patterns for beautiful handmade gifts
F
G
Cut
3"
x 13"
Cut
8" x 13"
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s e w i n g pat t e r n s
For large snowflakes,
enlarge 200 percent.
For small snowflakes,
enlarge 140 percent.
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grants permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use.
and through the remaining
snowflakes with bright thread.
9. Bind the table runner as desired.
I cut my striped fabric on the
bias to look like a candy cane.
To see more of Kathy's work, visit
pinkchalkstudio.com.
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Adapted from
Quilting Arts Gifts
Holiday 2008/2009
M at e r i a l s
(to make 10 candy canes)
•Holiday-themed fabrics, 6–8 fat
quarters or large scraps (You will
need enough fabric to create 81
squares, roughly 2" each.)
•18" × 18" sheet of low-loft batting
or white craft felt
•18" × 18" piece of Mistyfuse™ or
other fusible web
•Iron
•Teflon® craft sheet or a piece of
parchment paper to protect your
iron
•Sewing machine and black machine
quilting thread
•Decorative ribbon, rickrack, or trim
for tying, 18" per candy cane
•Hand needle and thread
•Fabric scissors
•Marking pen or pencil
•Straight pins
Optional
•Needle-felting machine if you want
to give your candy canes a more
distressed and vintage appearance
Short & sweet
Candy Cane Napkin Holders
I
by
P okey B olton
f you want a low-calorie way to sweeten up your table
setting for the holidays, these candy cane napkin holders
will do the trick. They are very easy to make and, when
you’ve finished hosting a fine holiday repast, they can serve
double duty as ornaments on your tree.
handmade quilts with Quilting Arts: 6 free sewing patterns for beautiful handmade gifts
Directions
1. With your iron, fuse your fusible
web to one side of the batting.
Make sure to use a Teflon sheet or
parchment paper to protect your
iron from the fusible web.
2. Lay your batting fusible-side up
on your work surface. Cut your
fabrics into (roughly) 2" squares
(approximately 81 squares), and
place them on top of the batting.
Arrange the fabrics so that
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contrasting colors and patterns
juxtapose each other.
3. When the entire piece of
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batting is covered with
the fabric squares, iron
the fabrics in place. At
this stage, if you choose
to needle felt for a more
vintage appearance, take this
sheet of fabric-covered batting
to your needle-felting machine
and needle felt all over. When
needle felted, the fabrics will fray
and look rather weathered.
On the occasion of
International Quilt Festival’s 35th
anniversary, Quilting Arts and
International Quilt Festival capture the energy, beauty, and community of today’s quilt scene with
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4. Take this sheet of batting-backed
patchwork to your sewing
machine and, using black thread,
zigzag stitch around the perimeter
of every fabric square.
5. Trace and cut out the candy cane
pattern provided here and, with
a marking pen, trace the pattern
onto the top of the fabric.
Note: To get fronts and backs, you
need to trace the candy cane 10 times
one way, flip the pattern over, and trace
10 times the other way so that the
fronts and backs will match up.
6. Cut out the candy canes along the
traced lines and pair up the fronts
and backs. Pin each set together
so they stay aligned for sewing.
7. Zigzag stitch with black thread
around the perimeter of each
candy cane.
8. To add the tie, decide which side
will be the back of the candy
cane and make a small mark
approximately 11⁄2" down from
the top and centered on the long
side of each candy cane. Fold
your ribbon, decorative trim,
inside
you’ll find
• Stitched
projects to
make now
or rickrack in half to locate the
midpoint, and place it on top of
your pen mark for each cane.
9. With a hand needle and thread,
simply straight stitch your trim in
place. Be sure to stitch securely as
the tie will get a lot of use.
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Quilting Arts Magazine® and
she can be contacted at
[email protected]
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Quilting Arts
easy wine bottle
6
handmade quilts with MAGAZINE®
gift bag
by
s e w i n g pat t e r n s
Adapted from
Quilting Arts Gifts
Holiday 2008/2009
E lin W aterston
H
oliday time is often party time—family and neighborhood dinner
parties abound. And of course, you can’t show up to a dinner party
empty-handed. Since I’m the worst cook ever, I prefer not to take a
homemade food item. However, by presenting my hosts with
a bottle of wine in a homemade gift bag, I can still feel like
I’m making a personal contribution to the festivities.
These bags are a simple and
inexpensive way to wrap a wine
bottle and can serve as a table
decoration for future dinners as
well. Since they’re reversible, your
recipients can choose which side they
prefer to display. If you like,
you can also suggest to your
hosts that you’d be happy to
have them re-gift the bags the
next time they’re the guests at
a dinner party.
M at e r i a l s
(to make 1 wine bottle bag)
•1 fat quarter or 1⁄2 yard of 2 fabrics,
side A and side B (I’ve used batiks
here, but use your fabric of choice.)
•Fabric scraps for dove and reindeer
•Fusible web (such as
WonderUnder®)
•Stabilizer, such as Totally Stable™ or
Heat Away™
•Sewing machine with darning/
free-motion foot
•Coordinating thread
•Rotary cutter and mat
•Ruler
•Scissors
•Iron and ironing surface
•Hand-sewing needle
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handmade quilts with MAGAZINE®
6
s e w i n g pat t e r n s
7. Unfold the fabric and place
stabilizer under the appliqué dove,
on the back side of the fabric.
8. Using a darning foot and with the
feed dogs lowered, free-motion
stitch the dove in place and
remove the stabilizer.
9. Fold the rectangle with right
sides together (vertically).
10.With a 1⁄4" seam allowance,
machine stitch down the side, turn
the corner, and stitch across the
bottom.
11.Repeat steps 5–9 with the side
B fabric and reindeer appliqué.
(See next step for side B stitching
instructions.)
12.For the folded side B fabric, using
a 1⁄4" seam allowance, machine
stitch down the side to about
5" from the bottom edge and
backstitch to anchor the stitches.
13.Leave an opening about 21⁄2" long
and stitch the remaining side edge,
turn the corner, and stitch across
the bottom edge.
14.Miter the corners by pulling out
Directions
1. Measure the circumference and
height of the wine bottle.
2. Using a rotary cutter, cut a
rectangle 1" wider and 2" taller
than your wine bottle, one each
out of your 2 bag fabrics. (For
example, cut a rectangle 11" × 14"
for a bottle that is 10" around and
12" high.)
3. Trace the dove and reindeer
appliqué elements, or your own
original designs, onto the paper side
of fusible web.
4. Fuse the appliqué elements onto the
appropriate fabric and cut them out.
5. Fold the rectangle of the side A
fabric wrong sides together
(vertically).
6. Center the dove 4"–5" from the
bottom edge of the rectangle and
fuse in place.
Note: Be sure to do this with the fabric
folded for proper placement.
handmade quilts with Quilting Arts: 6 free sewing patterns for beautiful handmade gifts
the sides of the bag at one bottom
corner and folding so that the
bottom seam lines up with the
side seam (or side fold line).
15.Measure and mark 1" from the
point of the corner.
16.Mark a line across the folded
corner, perpendicular to the seam
line, and stitch across this line.
(See photos a and b.)
17. Repeat steps 14–16 for both
bottom corners on both side A and
side B fabrics.
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©Interweave Press LLC
Quilting Arts
handmade quilts with MAGAZINE®
18.Turn the side A bag right-side out
and slide it inside the side B bag
(so the right sides are together),
lining up the seam lines and the
top edges of both bags.
6
s e w i n g pat t e r n s
a
19.Pin and stitch the top edge closed,
with a 1⁄4" seam allowance.
20.Carefully pull side A through the
opening in the side B seam until
both sides are right-side out.
(See photos c and d.)
b
21.Hand stitch the side B side seam
closed.
22.Slide one side inside the other and
press the top seam.
23.Place the wine bottle inside the
c
bag and fold over the top edge to
form a cuff.
more design ideas
•Personalize your bags by
appliquéing the names or initials of
the recipient.
d
•Instead of appliquéing, paint,
embroider, or print a design
on the fabric.
•Wrap a cord or ribbon around the
top of the bag (under the cuff).
To see more of Elin's work, visit
elinwaterston.com.
Interweave Press LLC
grants permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use.
handmade quilts with Quilting Arts: 6 free sewing patterns for beautiful handmade gifts
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©Interweave Press LLC
Quilting Arts
quick quilted
handmade quilts with MAGAZINE®
6
s e w i n g pat t e r n s
Adapted from
Quilting Arts Gifts
Holiday 2008/2009
jewelry
wrap
S
tash a special treasure inside this quilted
jewelry wrap for traveling or gift giving.
M at e r i a l s
Finished size: 8" x 10"
•Cotton batik fabric for front of wrap,
9" x 11"
•Wool-rayon blend felt for lining,
9" x 11"
•Cotton batik fabric for button,
3" x 3"
•Lightweight woven fusible
1. Layer the front wrap fabric and
interfacing, 3" x 3"
•Cotton batting, 1 ⁄2" x 1 ⁄2"
•11⁄8" no-tools-required half ball
1
1
cover button
•Double-stick tape
•13 size E seed beads
•Nylon beading thread to match
beads
•30" narrow cording
•Decorative quilting thread
•All-purpose thread to match felt
•Clear-drying, all-purpose adhesive
(bonds metal and fabric)
•Hand-sewing needle
•Scissors
•Small pliers
•Iron
•Sewing machine
by
Directions
L aura W est K ong
lining with their right sides
facing. Sew around the edges with
a 1⁄2" seam allowance, starting
and ending with a backstitch and
leaving a 5" opening for turning.
2. Turn the wrap right-side out
through the opening. Fold in the
1
⁄2" seam allowance of the opening
and press, then slip stitch the
opening shut with matching
all-purpose thread.
3. Free motion quilt the wrap,
following the designs of the
batik across the surface and then
stitching close to the edges all the
way around.
4. Use small pliers to squeeze
shank and pull it off. Secure the
cotton batting to the top of the
button with double-stick tape.
Trim the batting so it is even with
the button’s edge.
5. Iron the interfacing to the reverse
side of the 3" x 3" piece of fabric.
Cut out a 2"-diameter circle from
this interfaced fabric using the
pattern from the button package.
Follow the package directions to
stretch the interfaced fabric over
the button top.
6. Stitch the size E seed beads around
the edge of the button fabric with
matching nylon beading thread,
then snap the button backplate
into the beaded button top.
together the sides of the button
handmade quilts with Quilting Arts: 6 free sewing patterns for beautiful handmade gifts
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©Interweave Press LLC
Quilting Arts
handmade quilts with MAGAZINE®
6
s e w i n g pat t e r n s
7. Lay the wrap with the cotton
side facing up and the 8" sides at
the top and bottom. Whipstitch
the cording to the wrap with
all-purpose thread, centering it
1" from the top edge. Leave
10" of cording above the
stitching and 20" below.
8. Use all-purpose adhesive to
attach the embellished button to
the wrap on top of the stitched
part of the cording, leaving 1⁄2"
of fabric between the button and
the top edge of the wrap. The
long end of the cording should
be facing down (toward the
bottom edge of the wrap) and
the short end facing up.
9. Trim the ends of the cording
to make a clean cut. Apply
adhesive sparingly onto the tips
of the cording to prevent fraying.
Let the adhesive dry.
10. To use, place the jewelry in the
center of the felt side of the
wrap. Fold in the sides, then the
bottom, and finally the top. Bring
the long piece of cording up and
around the back of the wrap and
tie the ends together in a bow
underneath the button.
To see more of Laura's work, visit
laurawestkong.com.
handmade quilts with Quilting Arts: 6 free sewing patterns for beautiful handmade gifts
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