D E S I G N G U... & P A T T E R N ...

DESIGN GUIDELINES
& PATTERN BOOKS
Design Guidelines and Pattern Books are essential tools for
ensuring a successful transition from project vision to built
reality. These regulatory documents vary with the needs of
the client, but the common goal is to educate, inspire and
guide the efforts of architects, builders and buyers during
the process of design and construction.
As planners and architects, Historical Concepts addresses
community patterns and public spaces, as well as the
intricacies of massing and building details. We have a
wide breadth of experience in creating Design Guidelines
and Pattern Books for projects ranging from Traditional
Neighborhood Developments to Resort Communities to
Historic Infill to Conservation Developments.
HISTORICAL CONCEPTS
architects, planners & place-makers
Excerpts from Design Guidelines
B AY SID E V ILLAG E at BAY CRE E K
"AYSIDE6ILLAGE
"AY#REEK
1
()34/29#(!2!#4%2
2
6
Identifying Features of the
Queen Anne Victorian Style
4
3TEEPLYPITCHEDROOFSOFIRREGULARSHAPEUSU
ALLYWITHADOMINANTFRONTFACINGGABLE
!SSYMETRICALMASSINGANDCONlGURATIONSOF
ELEMENTS
5SEOFDECORATIVEDETAILINGTYPICALLYOFCUT
WOOD
7
6ARIED USE OF EXTERIOR lNISHES OFTEN CLAP
BOARDSIDINGORBOARDANDBATTEN
3
!PERIODOFRAPIDINDUSTRIALIZATIONANDTHEPROLIFERATIONOFRAILROADSBETWEEN
ANDLEDTODRAMATICCHANGESIN!MERICANHOUSEDESIGNANDCONSTRUCTIONTECH
NIQUES4HENEWLYDEVELOPEDBALLOONFRAMEMADEUPOFLIGHTWOODFRAMINGFREED
HOUSESFROMTHEIRTRADITIONALBOXLIKESHAPE)NADDITIONPRODUCTSRESULTINGFROMIN
DUSTRIALIZATIONPERMITTEDMANYCOMPLEXHOUSECOMPONENTSTOBEMASSPRODUCEDAND
SHIPPEDTHROUGHOUTTHECOUNTRYATRELATIVELYLOWCOST
4HE6ICTORIAN3TYLEWHICHINCLUDES1UEEN!NNEAND3TICKBUILDSONTHETRADITIONS
EMBODIEDINASERIESOF0ATTERN"OOKSUSEDBYBUILDERSINTHESECONDHALFOFTHENINE
TEENTHCENTURY4HESEGREWOUTOFESSAYSOFANUMBEROFARCHITECTSFAVORINGNATURALISM
INARCHITECTUREANDLANDSCAPEDESIGN!STHESE0ATTERN"OOKSWEREMOREWIDELYUSED
THESTYLEWITHITSORNAMENTEDPORCHESANDROOmINESBECAMESOWIDELYADOPTEDASTO
SEEMTOBEATRUE!MERICANVERNACULARSTYLE
7INDOWS AND DOORS WITH VERTICAL PROPOR
TIONSANDORNATETRIM
5
4ALLCHIMNEYSUSUALLYOFBRICKWITHDECORA
TIVEFEATURESORCAPS
0ARTIAL OR FULLWIDTH ASYMMETRICAL PORCH
USUALLY ONE STORY HIGH AND EXTENDED ALONG
ONEORBOTHSIDEWALLS
THE QUEEN ANNE VICTORIAN STYLE
ARCHITECTURAL PATTERN BOOK
"AYSIDE6ILLAGE
"AY#REEK
.BTTJOH%JBHSBNT
Narrow Front
-ASSING#OMPOSITION
L-Shaped
L-Shaped
Hipped Roof
(IPPED2OOFWITH,OWER#ROSS'ABLES
4WO3TORY-INIMUM
4HISFORMACCOUNTSFORMORETHANHALFOFALL1UEEN
!NNE HOMES 4HE MAIN HIPPED MASS HAS A STEEP
PITCHOFAMINIMUMOFIN4HEREAREOFTENTWO
CROSSGABLESONEINFRONTANDONEONTHESIDETHAT
COMEOFFOFTHISMAINBODY7HENTHEYAREPRESENT
THEY ARE PLACED TO ONE SIDE OF THE RESPECTIVE FA½ADE
ANDNOTINTHEMIDDLE4HEHIPPEDROOFMAYHAVEA
RIDGEMAYBEPYRAMIDALANDMAYEVENHAVEASIMPLE
mATROOFDECKATTHEPEAK!TOWERISATYPICALACCENT
MASSTHATISOFTENPLACEDATONECORNEROFTHEFRONT
FA½ADE/NESTORYPORCHESTHATEMPHASIZETHEFRONT
ENTRYAREAMINIMUMREQUIREMENT
.ARROW&RONT'ABLE4WO3TORY-INIMUM
! NARROW FRONT HOME IS A FRONT GABLED RECTANGULAR
VOLUMEWITHAROOFPITCHRANGINGFROMINTO
IN FOR THE MAIN BODY 4HREE BAY COMPOSITIONS
ASYMMETRICALLY ARRANGED WITH FULLFRONT ONESTORY
PORCHES ARE MOST COMMON 7RAPAROUND PORCHES
WITHEMPHASISOVERTHEENTRYBAYAREENCOURAGED
,n3HAPED4WO3TORY-INIMUM
#ROSS GABLED VOLUME WITH A IN TO IN PITCHED ROOF FACING THE STREET 4HE WIDTH OF THE
GABLE FACING THE STREET IS TYPICALLY TWOlFTHS OF THAT
MAINBODY4HISMASSINGTYPICALLYACCOMMODATESA
ONE OR TWOSTORY CONTINUOUS PORCH WITH A SHED OR
HIPPEDROOFTHATDIESINTOTHESIDEOFTHEPROJECTING
WING!TOWERIFPRESENTWILLMOSTOFTENBELOCATED
AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE @, AND BE SQUARE ROUND
POLYGONAL
#OMBINATIONS
-ORE COMPLEX FORMS AND LARGER LIVING SPACES ARE
TO BE CREATED BY COMBINING SIDE WINGS ANDOR REAR
WINGSWITHTHEMAINBODY0RIMARYPORCHESAREAN
ADDITIONTOTHEMASSANDAREEITHERONEORTWOSTORIES
TALL 3ECONDARY PORCHES MAY BE SUBTRACTIVE FROM
THEMAJORORMINORMASSESANDUSUALLYOCCURONTHE
SECONDORTHIRDmOORS'ABLEDORARCHEDDORMERSMAY
BEADDEDTOINTRODUCELIGHTINTOHALFSTORYANDATTIC
SPACES 4HE ARCHITECTURAL CHARACTER OF THE ATTACHED
PARTSSHOULDMATCHTHATOFTHEMAINBODY"ECAUSE
OFTHEADVENTOFLIGHTWOODFRAMINGPROJECTIONSAND
RECESSESWEREUSEDWITHABANDONTOBREAKUPTHEmAT
SURFACES OF PAST ARCHITECTURAL STYLES 4OWERS FULL
HEIGHTBAYSCUTAWAYBAYSANDELABORATEOVERHANGS
EXPRESSEDTHISNEWFOUNDFREEDOM
&A½ADE#OMPOSITION
1UEEN !NNE FA½ADE COMPOSITION IS LIKE GOOD JAZZ
4HE NOTES MUST BE PLAYED RIGHT BUT THEY CAN BE
PLACEDINANYORDERTHATPRODUCESAmOW)TWASBASED
UPON THE LOCALIZED SYMMETRY OF INDIVIDUAL PARTS
COMINGTOGETHERINTOANASYMMETRICALWHOLE!LLOF
THEPARTSRELATEBUTARESTILLSUBORDINATETOTHEMAIN
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COMMON TYPE &RONT DOORS ARE GENERALLY LOCATED IN
THECORNEROFNARROWHOUSESANDATTHEJUNCTUREOF
MAJORANDMINORMASSESOFTHEWIDEHOUSES0AIRED
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DECORATIVE BRACKETRY THAT RELATED TO THE ORNAMENT
USEDONTHERESTOFTHEHOME
THE QUEEN ANNE VICTORIAN STYLE
ARCHITECTURAL PATTERN BOOK
HISTORICAL CONCEPTS
design guidelines / 2
Excerpts from Design Guidelines
B AY SID E V ILLAG E at BAY CRE E K
"AYSIDE6ILLAGE
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7INDOWS$OORS
3TANDARD7INDOWS
3TANDARD 7INDOWS ARE DOUBLE HUNG WITH SASHES AND
PANES OF VERTICAL PROPORTIONS 4HE PROMINENT SASH
PATTERNSINCLUDEOVEROVEROVER!VERY
COMMONANDENCOURAGEDSASHPATTERNISONELARGEPANE
SURROUNDED BY SMALL SQUARE PANES OF VARYING COLORS
OVERALARGESINGLEPANE4HECLASSICALBASEDSUBTYPES
OF1UEEN!NNEHOMESWILLEITHERHAVETHEOVEROR
OVERSASHES!CCENTWINDOWSAREOFTENlXEDAND
MAYBEROUNDOVALORPOLYGONALINSHAPEWITHAWIDE
VARIETY OF LIGHT PATTERNS ,EADED AND STAINED GLASS IS
ENCOURAGEDINACCENTWINDOWS
3TANDARD7INDOWS
3TANDARD$OORS
$OORSARECENTEREDINTHEIRBAYSANDAREEITHERPANELED
OR GLAZED $OORS CAN BE DOUBLE OR SINGLE AND OFTEN
INCLUDE SIDELIGHTS AND TRANSOMS ,EADED AND STAINED
GLASSISENCOURAGEDINTRANSOMSANDSIDELIGHTS
3PECIAL7INDOWS
!NGLED OR STRAIGHT BAY WINDOWS PAIRED OR TRIPLE
WINDOWS AND DORMER WINDOWS WITH A TRIANGULAR OR
SEGMENTEDPEDIMENTAREENCOURAGEDTOACCENTOVERALL
FORM "AY WINDOWS MUST EXTEND TO THE GROUND OR
BE VISUALLY SUPPORTED BY HEAVY SIMPLE OR ELABORATE
BRACKETS !T GABLE ENDS OR ABOVE ENTRANCES SMALL
SQUARE RECTANGULAR OR ROUNDTOP WINDOWS ARE TO BE
USEDASACCENTS
3TANDARD$OORS
4RIM
7INDOWANDDOORCASINGANDTRIMMUSTBEAMINIMUM
OFvWIDEvPREFERREDANDMUSTPROTRUDE
FROMTHEADJACENTWALLSURFACE7INDOWANDDOORSILLS
MUSTBEAMINIMUMOFINCHESTHICK
3PECIAL7INDOWS
THE QUEEN ANNE VICTORIAN STYLE
ARCHITECTURAL PATTERN BOOK
"AYSIDE6ILLAGE
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0ORCHES
4HEPORCHISTHEONEOFTHESTRONGESTARCHITECTURALELEMENTSONA1UEEN!NNEHOME4HEPORCHCANBE
PARTIALORFULLWIDTHUSUALLYONESTORYANDHASEMPHASISPLACEDONTHEBAYWHEREACCESSISGAINEDTOTHE
PORCH)NADDITION1UEEN!NNEPORCHESOFTENWRAPTHECORNEROFTHEHOMEINANACCENTEDWAY3ECOND
mOORPORCHESOFTENACCENTANELEMENTONTHEFA½ADEBELOWANDALSOCANBESEENASARECESSINTOTHEMASS
RATHERTHANANADDITIVEELEMENT4HESTYLEISALSODETERMINEDBYTHEPRESENCEOFDECORATIVEDETAILINGON
COLUMNSBALUSTERSSPANDRELSANDFRIEZES
Brackets
Porch Elevations
Columns
0ORCH2OOFS%AVES
4HE "AYSIDE 1UEEN !NNE HOME MAY HAVE ONE OR
TWOSTORYPORCHESWITHmATSHEDORSHALLOWHIPPED
ROOFS4HESHEDORHIPPORCHESRANGEINPITCHFROM
INTOINANDTHEEAVEATTHEENDOFAPORCH
MUSTDIEINTOAPROJECTINGMASSOFTHEHOUSE)TIS
UNACCEPTABLEFORANYPARTOFAPORCHEAVETOPROTRUDE
BEYONDTHECORNEROFTHEMAINBODYOFTHEHOUSE
0ORCH,OCATIONS
&ULLFRONTONEORTWOSTORYPORCHESAREENCOURAGED
ON "AYSIDE 1UEEN !NNE HOMES 4HE PORCHES CAN
BEUSEDTOWRAPTHECORNEROFTHEHOUSEORlLLINTHE
VOIDCREATEDBYAN,SHAPEDPLAN0ORCHBAYSSHOULD
BEVERTICALLYPROPORTIONED
#OLUMNS2AILINGS
#OLUMNS AT PORCHES INCLUDE APPROPRIATE CLASSICAL
COLUMNSOFTHELESSOPULENTORDERSTURNEDSPINDLES
WITHAvMINIMUMBASEANDSQUARECOLUMNSEITHER
BOXEDORSOLIDWITHTHECORNERSCHAMFERED
&RONT
DEPTHMINIMUM
RECOMMENDED
3IDE2EAR
DEPTHMINIMUM
RECOMMENDED
4URNEDORSQUAREBALUSTERSMUSTADHERETOTHELOCAL
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PERDESIGNAPPROVAL
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"RACKETS&RIEZES
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TO MORE ELABORATE TURNED WOOD OR JIGSAWCUT OPEN
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KEY ENTRY AND CORNER LOCATIONS ARCHWAY BRACKETING
MAYBEUSED4URNEDBALUSTERSMAYBEUSEDINBOTH
THEPORCHRAILINGSANDINFRIEZESSUSPENDEDFROMTHE
PORCHROOFSTRUCTURE
3ECOND&LOOR mOORTOCEILINGHEIGHTTOBEA MINIMUMOF
4HE0RIMARYPORCHDIMENSIONSAREASFOLLOWS
&IRST&LOOR
mOORTOCEILINGHEIGHTTOBE MINIMUMOF
3ECONDARY ACCENT PORCH DIMENSIONS WILL BE
DETERMINEDPERDESIGNBUTMUSTALLOWTHEUSAGEBY
ATLEASTONEHUMANSITTINGCOMFORTABLYINACHAIR
Porch Section
THE QUEEN ANNE VICTORIAN STYLE
ARCHITECTURAL PATTERN BOOK
HISTORICAL CONCEPTS
design guidelines / 3
Excerpts from Design Guidelines
B AY SID E V ILLAG E at BAY CRE E K
"AYSIDE6ILLAGE
"AY#REEK
#OLORS
-ATERIALS
4HISSTYLEEMBODIESARICHNESSOFDETAILANDCOMPLEXITYOFMASSINGNOTSEENBEFOREITBECAMETHEDOMINANTHOUSEFORMDURING
THEINDUSTRIALREVOLUTION4HEEXOTICANDEXPRESSIVENATUREOFTHISSTYLEISBESTCAPTUREDINAPALETTEOFRICHANDBOLDEARTHTONES
THATSTAYTRUETOTHEREGIONBUTCOMPLIMENTANDACCENTUATETHEDETAILINGOFTHISCREATIVEANDINVENTIVESTYLE
4HESE MATERIALS AND PATTERNS ARE STRONGLY ENCOURAGED AS THEY REmECT THE TRUE HISTORIC CHARACTER OF
THE#APE#HARLESVERNACULARALTHOUGHTHEYDONOTREmECTALLOFTHEPATTERNSANDMATERIALSALLOWED
!LTERNATIVEMATERIALSANDPATTERNSSHOULDREmECTASIMILARHISTORICCHARACTER!LLMATERIALSANDPATTERNS
WILLBEAPPROVEDONABYBUILDINGBASIS!PPROVALWILLCOMEONLYFROMTHE"AYSIDE6ILLAGE!2"
#OLORSHOULDBEUSEDTOEMPHASIZETHEMANYTEXTURESOFTHISHIGHLYORNATESTYLE&OREXAMPLEWOODSHINGLESCANANDSHOULD
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THE QUEEN ANNE VICTORIAN STYLE
ARCHITECTURAL PATTERN BOOK
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THE QUEEN ANNE VICTORIAN STYLE
ARCHITECTURAL PATTERN BOOK
HISTORICAL CONCEPTS
design guidelines / 4
Excerpts from Code of Development
W HI TE MARSH
Lot R e g u l at ing Pl a n
White Marsh - Code of Development
Page 16
R e sid e n t i a l - M u lt i - Fa m ily
R e sid e n t i a l - M u lt i - Fa m ily
pr e c e d e n t & p o s sibil i t ie s
pr e c e d e n t & p o s sibil i t ie s
K e y F e at u r e s of S a m pl e I m a g e s
Duplex residential units should be traditional in their architectural character or a contemporary interpretation
of historically traditional styles. They should be constructed of materials that have been been used in the
historic towns and villages of Fauquier County such as native stone, brick, stucco, cast stone and wood. If
shutters are used, they should be fitted with the appropriate hardware and proportioned to cover one-half the
width of the window. The roof should be pitched with overhanging eaves or flat with articulated parapets
or cornices. The use of porches fronting onto the primary street is strongly encouraged. All entrances shall
provide cover from the elements, such as an awning, recess or roof. Fencing, a low wall or landscaping may
be used to create a boundary at the edge of the sidewalk. Any awnings should leave a minimum vertical
clearance of 8’ from the sidewalk and shall break at any vertical divisions on the facade of the building.
This building type is strongly encouraged to be comparable in scale to the surrounding buildings, being one
to one-and-a-half stories in the MU-Residential areas and two stories when adjacent to MU-Core areas. Any
units that terminate a vista or street shall have a special architectural element such as a portico or pediment
to provide visual interest.
White Marsh - Code of Development
HISTORICAL CONCEPTS
K e y F e at u r e s of S a m pl e I m a g e s
Multi-family residential buildings should be traditional in their architectural character or a
contemporary interpretation of historically traditional styles. They should be constructed of materials
that have been used in the historic towns and villages of Fauquier County such as native stone, brick,
stucco, cast stone and wood. If shutters are used, they should be fitted with the appropriate hardware and
proportioned to cover one-half the width of the window. The roof should be pitched with overhanging
eaves or flat with articulated parapets or cornices. The use of porches fronting onto the primary street
is strongly encouraged. All entrances shall provide cover from the elements, such as an awning, recess
or roof. The use of special architectural elements such as towers, turrets, and chamfered corners are
encouraged at major street corners to to provide visual interest. All such elements shall be of a scale
compatible with the overall structure. Fencing, a low wall or landscaping may be used to create a
boundary at the edge of the sidewalk. This building type is strongly encouraged to be comparable
in scale to the surrounding buildings, being one to two stories closer to the MU-Residential areas and
two to four stories when adjacent to MU-Core areas. Any units that terminate a vista or street shall
have a special architectural element such as a portico or pediment to provide visual interest.
Page 29
White Marsh - Code of Development
Page 30
design guidelines / 5
Excerpts from Code of Development
W HI TE MARSH
R e sid e n t i a l - M u lt i - Fa m ily
Blo c k
R e sid e n t i a l - M u lt i - Fa m ily
A r c hi t e c t u r a l S ta nd a r d s
1. The building’s massing shall be developed such that there is a prominent
single roof line for at least 60% of the footprint.
A r c hi t e c t u r a l G u id e l ine s
2. The primary entry for the building shall face the primary street and shall
be articulated with a recessed entry, portico, lintel, stoop or other architectural feature that makes it easily identifiable as a point of entry; a second
point of entry shall clearly be articulated on the rear facade to address the
garage and alley.
1. The building’s massing should be developed such that there is a
nent single roof line for at least 75% of the footprint .
3. All façades of the building facing onto a street must be punctuated with
windows and/or doors in accordance with the massing requirements for
each architectural style.
3. The primary entry for the building shall face the primary street and shall
be articulated with a lintel, awning, portico or other architectural feature
that makes it easily identifiable as a point of entry. If parking is located
to the rear of the building, a second point of entry shall be provided and
architecturally articulated.
4. Building height for principal building varies from 2 - 3 stories. Outbuilding building heights vary from 1 - 2 stories.
4. All façades of the building facing onto a street must be punctuated with
windows.
Street Perspective View
Street Perspective View
Lot Cond i t ion s
2. Any curb cuts on the alley shall not exceed 22’.
40%
4. The primary mass of the building shall start within the Build-To Area as
identified on the Lot Layout.
2. Parking should be in the rear of each property, while the building
should maximize linear frontage along the primary street.
Minor Street
Lot Depth
3. All mechanical or electrical equipment shall be screened with a fence, garden wall, or plantings so that it is not visible from the street or any other
public right of way. Any roof-top units shall be screened by use of a parapet
or mansard roof.
15’
15’
R.O.W
25%
10’
10’
75%
4. On street parking and shared parking is strongly encouraged to minimize
the need for parking on site.
15’-20’
15’
P.L
Principal Building
Front: 15’ - 20’ Build-to Zone
Side: 15’ Setback
Alley
Lot Width
mass
3. At corner lots, curb-cuts should occur on side streets only. One-way curb
cuts should be no wider than 12’ with 10’ radius maximum. Two way curb
cuts should be no wider than 20’ with 10’ radius maximum.
60%
5. The Encroachment area is intended to encourage the use of garden entry
features, porches, breezeways, and outdoor seating areas; maximum area of
encroachment shall be 175 s.f.
Setbacks:
R.O.W
P.L
1. The primary mass of the building shall fall within the façade setback
zones.
Minor Street
Alley
Lot Width
10’
R.O.W
P.L
10’ 5’
1. The garage and any additional surface parking are to be placed in the rear
of the lot with no curb cut allowed on the primary street. Corner lots must
have either the outbuildings garage vehicular entrance or garage flat’s pedestrian entrance facing the minor street.
Lot Depth
Lot Cond i t ion s
promi-
2. All roof-top units shall be screened by the use of a parapet wall or mansard roof.
P.L
Major Street
Major Street
R.O.W
Lot Layout
Lot Layout
Outbuildings
Side: 15’ Setback
Rear: 5’ Setback
White Marsh - Code of Development
Page 26
White Marsh - Code of Development
Page 27
R e sid e n t i a l - M u lt i - Fa m ily
m a s sing d i a g r a m s
ESTATE:
Main Mass: Three to five bays wide with a single hip or flat roof; 2-2.5
stories in height.
Porches: Front porches may be one or two stories in height and 60%100% of the width of the main mass; rear and side porches may be added
if the lot allows; roofs may be shed or hip.
Dormers: Gable or hip dormers may be added on the front and rear of
the main mass.
Additions: Only one addition is permitted per façade, front and side additions shall have a maximum width of 40% of the width and 30% of the
depth of the main mass; maximum of 2 stories. Additions should have
gable or hip roofs.
BUNGALOW:
Main Mass: Two to four bays wide with a single gable roof; 1-1.5 stories
in height.
Porches: Front porches may be one story in height and 60%-100% of
the width of the main mass; rear and side porches may be added if the lot
allows; roofs may be gable, hip, or shed.
Dormers: Gable, hip or shed dormers may be added on either side of
the main mass.
Additions: Only one addition is permitted per façade, front and side additions shall have a maximum width of 40% of the width and 30% of the
depth of the main mass; maximum of 1.5 stories. Additions should have
gable or hip roofs.
BLOCK:
Main Mass: Three to five bays wide, rectangular form with a central hall; flat roof with parapet,
a gable or mansard roof; 2-3 stories. Broad or short side may front the major street.
Porches: Stoops and balconies are encouraged on all facades with street or courtyard frontage.
Additions: The basic rectangular form shall act as a building block, with the additions happening
in block or partial block intervals as illustrated. Bays and bump-outs should be added to emphasize entrances and add architectural interest.
1/3
1/3
1/3
40’-60’
1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4
36’-48’
1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4
36’-48’
1/3
1/3 1/3
1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4
1/3
1/3
40’-60’
1/3 1/3
1/3
20’-50’
1/3
1/3
40’-60’
48’-64’
36’-48’
1/3 1/3
1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4
1/3
1/3 1/3
80’-120’
48’-64’
36’-48’
1/3 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/3
60’-80’
White Marsh - Code of Development
HISTORICAL CONCEPTS
1/3 1/3
1/3 1/3 1/3
60’-80’
1/6 1/3
1/3
40’-60’
1/3
1/3
40’-60’
1/3
1/3
40’-60’
Page 28
design guidelines / 6
Excerpts from Pattern Book
SEN O IA G I N PROPE RTY
Gin Property - Senoia, Georgia
History of Site
Like many small towns, Senoia’s charm and character could easily
be lost to changes brought about by development. While Senoia
had retained a small town atmosphere, it’s proximity to Atlanta,
along with an abundance of undeveloped land represented a
new era of growth for the City. In 2005, the City Planner and
Downtown Development Authority took a proactive approach
to ensuring that the town would not be consumed by the
encroaching commercial development. Working together, City
officials and community stakeholders wanted to manage future
growth and provide for economic development opportunities
that would be compatible with Senoia’s historic character.
As a first step, Historical Concepts created Architectural
Guidelines for future infill development along Senoia’s Main
Street corridor. This project naturally led to other opportunities,
including the development of Main Street commercial buildings
and streetscapes, a land plan and architecture for a mixed-use
neighborhood adjacent to downtown Senoia called the Gin
Property.
Atlanta
Senoia
Georgia
Overview
Page 2
Gin Property - Senoia, Georgia
Vision
The Gin Property is a diverse extension of downtown
Senoia blending mixed-use retail establishments
with brownstones, live-work units and single family
homes. Building on Senoia’s heritage and history,
the Gin Property extends the sense of place found in
the businesses and homes that make up downtown
Senoia’s historic district.
Facing along the existing rail lines, lofts and a proposed
hotel overlook the green and downtown Senoia. Just a
short stroll away, residences down Baggarly Street and
Lower Creek Trail appeal to a broad range of citizens
contributing to a dynamic and diverse community.
Brownstones and live-work properties provide
flexible spaces for work or play while surrounded
by cozy courtyard environments or terrace views of
the historic town. Single family homes sit on well
groomed landscapes with quick access to several
nearby neighborhood parks. Pockets of green space
beautify the community and provide venues for
passive recreation.
While a new addition to the community, The Gin
Property not only complements Senoia’s historical
character, but helps preserve its small town charm.
Gin Street Perspective
Overview
Page 3
HISTORICAL CONCEPTS
design guidelines / 7
Excerpts from Pattern Book
SEN O IA G I N PROPE RTY
Gin Property - Senoia, Georgia
Lot Type Plan
E
C
B
F
A
B
Special Conditions:
The above marked lots have special considerations; the following is a description of the special conditions
that apply to the designated sites.
D
D
(A) This building is a terminus to a vista and should be appropriate in scale and formality of the position.
A two story column façade is recommended for this site with a 2 story guest quarter’s outbuilding
required on the opposite side of the alley.
(B) On the prominent intersection, this lot must hold the corner with a one story outbuilding and garden
wall at the pedestrian scale.
(C) Prospective hotel site. This site may have an encroaching gallery per the approval of the ARP. Parking
for any hotel will be in the basement level. Wrapping porches are preferred on the main façades of
this building.
(D) This site is in a prominent location and should be appropriate in scale and formality to its position
in the community. Wrap around porches and two story accessory buildings create bookends to the
adjacent open spaces.
(E) Key corner lot, this building should hold the corner and act as a gateway building to the
development.
(F) At the main entry to the neighborhood, this building should face Gin Street and Baggarly Way.
Neighborhood Patterns
Page 11
Gin Property - Senoia, Georgia
Brownstone Lot Types
Brownstone lots are typically 24-26’ wide and 70-90’ deep. They may vary in size from lot to
lot depending on location. These are attached units and the end units should have openings
according to the Architectural Patterns. Roof terrace stories are permissible in this type. All
utility boxes and meters should be placed in the designated bank per the Lot Regulating Plan.
Mid block:
Front Façade Zone: 15’-20’ from property line.
Front Garden Setback: 15’ from property line.
Side Yard Setback: Zero setback- buildings may be attached or detached.
Rear Yard Setback: Zero setback- may build to property line.
Corner:
Front Façade Zone: 15’-20’ from property line.
Front Garden Setback: 15’ from property line.
Side Yard Setback: Zero setback- build to property line.
Side Façade Zone: 5’ from property line. The main mass of the side façade and garage should
be in this zone.
Rear Yard Setback: Zero setback- may build to property line.
Parking: All parking must be accessed from the alley, and located in the rear 1/3 of the site.
Building Heights:
Main Building: 2-3 stories
Building Height shall be measured in number of stories, excluding a raised basement, roof
terrace story or inhabited attic. Each story shall not exceed 15ft clear, floor to ceiling and be no
less than 10ft. Maximum height shall be measured to the eave or roof deck. Where a single roof
terrace story is allowed it shall not be greater than 75% of the building footprint and setback
a minimum of 10’ from the front parapet wall. First floors and primary entry shall be raised a
minimum of 30” above the adjacent sidewalk.
Frontage Types Allowed: Terrace or Light Court
Utility Placement: Meters, condensers and other equipment must not be visible from the
sidewalk. Placement in the front façade or side façade zone is prohibited. Locate Equipment
off alleys or internal side yards when possible. Equipment may be used on flat roofs, but must
be accessible, located behind parapet, and not visible from the street. Meters may be placed in
groups on the alley or non pedestrian side elevation.
Neighborhood Patterns
Page 14
HISTORICAL CONCEPTS
design guidelines / 8
Excerpts from Design Guidelines
SEN O IA H I STORI C D I STRI CT
COMMERCIAL & MIXED-USE GUIDELINES
ARCHITECTURAL STANDARDS
Storefronts within the historic commercial district
should consist of large glass display windows with transoms above and
bulkheads below which provide areas to display merchandise. The
storefront follows the same tripartite division of the overall building
mass through the bulkhead/window base panels (base), display
windows and transoms (middle), and string course/cornice (top).
Transom
Display
The entrance may be recessed to provide cover from weather. However,
recessing the entire storefront from the face of the building is not
appropriate. The majority of the storefront must be on the zero-lotline.
Bulkhead
Typical Entry Door
The entrance door typically consists of a glass panel more than 1/2 the
area of the door with a panel below or one large glass panel. Transoms
must have an overall horizontal proportion and should be divided
into square or vertically proportioned lights.
Materials:
•
Metal, wood, or masonry columns are used to construct the
large openings in the storefront. Metal columns are typically
cast in wrought iron with a base, shaft, and capital. Steel post
columns with no detailing are not appropriate.
•
Wood or masonry is used to construct the bulkheads (panels
below the display windows). Typically the panels are divided
to match the width of the window.
Storefront turning corner
PAGE 13
Recessed Entry
HISTORIC DISTRICT DESIGN GUIDELINES
COMMERCIAL & MIXED-USE GUIDELINES
ARCHITECTURAL STANDARDS
The rhythm of the windows should reflect the
overall bay rhythm of the building and be repeated floor to
floor. Unrelieved expanses of wall must be avoided on street
facades, especially buildings that occupy a corner lot. False
windows and shutters are highly discouraged although they
may be employed along the side of a building. They may never
be used on the front façade.
Windows shall be of a vertical proportion of at least 2:1 height
to width. Generally, windows should be double hung and
should be operable. Transoms above the windows are not
appropriate except at storefronts.
Lintels and arches have a minimum height of 8” and must
extend beyond the masonry opening 4” on either side. Sills
have a minimum height of 2” and project from the wall surface
a minimum of 1”.
2:1 Window Proportion
with Brick Arch
Brick Hood Detail
Brick Arch
Window with Brick Hood
& Panel Below
Materials:
•
Wood or extruded aluminum frames with transparent
glass. Reflective and dark tinted glass is inappropriate.
•
Pre-cast stone, brick, or stucco sills.
•
Pre-cast stone, brick, or stucco lintels (or arches).
Window hoods constructed of pre-cast stone, brick or
stucco are appropriate.
HISTORIC DISTRICT DESIGN GUIDELINES
HISTORICAL CONCEPTS
PAGE 14
design guidelines / 9
Excerpts from Architectural Guidelines
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Main Mass: Three to five bays wide and 2 rooms deep; The front facade
should be 40’ - 60’ in width; should be 2-2.5 stories in height.
Main Roof Line: Single gable roof over the main mass; gable or hip for
additions and porches.
Porches: Front porch may be one or two stories in height and 60%-100%
of the width of the main mass; rear and side porches may be added if the
lot allows.
Dormers: Gable or hip dormers may be added on the front and rear of
the main mass.
Additions: Only one permitted per facade, front and side additions shall
have a maximum width of 40% of the width and 30% of the depth of the
main mass; maximum of 2 stories.
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Single family detached homes in the Village Residential area should be traditional in their
architectural character or a contemporary interpretation of historically traditional styles.
They should be constructed of materials that have been been used in the historic towns
and villages of Jasper County such as native stone, brick, stucco, cast stone and wood. If
shutters are used, they should be fitted with the appropriate hardware and proportioned
to cover one-half the width of the window. The roof should be pitched with overhanging
eaves or flat with articulated parapets or cornices. The use of porches fronting onto the
primary street is strongly encouraged. All entrances shall provide cover from the elements, such as an awning, recess or roof. The use of special architectural elements such
as towers, turrets, and wrapping porches are encouraged at major street corners and to
to provide visual interest. Any units that terminate a vista or street shall have a special
architectual element such as a portico or pediment to provide visual interest. All such
elements shall be of a scale compatible with the overall structure.
MANSION:
Main Mass: Five bays wide and 2 rooms deep; The front facade should
be 40’ - 60’ in width; should be 2-2.5 stories in height.
Main Roof Line: Single hip roof over the main mass; gable or hip for
additions with shed being used only on small masses and porches.
Porches: Front porch may be one or two stories in height and 60%-100%
of the width of the main mass; rear and side porches may be added if the
lot allows.
Dormers: Gable or hip dormers may be added on the front and rear of
the main mass.
Additions: Only one permitted per facade, front and side additions shall
have a maximum width of 40% of the width and 30% of the depth of the
main mass; maximum of 2 stories.
S ing l e Fa m ily De ta c he d
F r on t Loa d e d Cond i t ion s
GABLE:
Main Mass: Four bays wide and 2 rooms deep; The front facade should
be 36’ - 48’ in width; should be 2-2.5 stories in height.
Main Roof Line: Single gable roof over the main mass; gable preffered
for additions with shed being used on small bays and porches.
Porches: Front porch shall be one story in height and 60%-100% of the
width of the main mass; rear and side porches may be added if the lot
allows.
Dormers: Gable or hip dormers may be added on the front and rear of
the main mass.
Additions: Only one permitted per facade, front and side additions shall
have a maximum width of 40% of the width and 30% of the depth of the
main mass; maximum of 2 stories.
A r c hi t e c t u r a l G u id e l ine s
1. The building’s massing should be developed such that there is a
prominent single roof line for at least 75% of the footprint.
2. The primary entry for the building shall face the primary street
and shall be articulated with a lintel, awning, portico or other
architectural feature that makes it easily identifiable as a point of
entry. If parking is located to the rear of the building, a second
point of entry shall be provided and architecturally articulated.
3. All facades of the building facing onto a street must be punctuated
with windows.
1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5
1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5
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40’-60’
1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4
36’-48’
Street Perspective View
Lot Cond i t ion s
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1. The primary mass of the building shall fall within the façade set
back zones.
1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4
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R.O.W
1/3
66’-80’
1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5
40’-60’
1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5
1/4
1/4
1/5 1/5 1/5 2/5
5’ 5’
10’
4. A fence, garden wall, or similar feature shall be built to run along
the property lines that abut streets, only to be broken at pedestrian
or vehicular access points.
36’-48’
P.L
R.O.W
2/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 2/5
1/3 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5
Alley
70’-100’
P.L
2. Any curb cuts on the primary street should be no wider than
12’.
3. If the lot has alley access, garage and parking are to be placed in
the rear of the lot with no curb cuts on the primary street.
1/3 1/3 1/3 1/3
5. Any mechanical or electrical equipment shall be screened with
fence, garden wall, or plantings so that it is not visible from the
street.
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General Architectural Standards
Major Street
36’-48’
Lot Layout
54’-80’
,5
Architectural Guidelines
Architectural Guidelines
Page 8
Page 7
Architectural Guidelines
Page 5
A pply ing G e ne r a l
A r c hi t e c t u r a l
S ta nd a r d s
S e l e c t ing t he
Zoning Di s t r ic t
a nd A r e a
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A r c hi t e c t u r a l
S t y l e a nd M a s sing
A d d i t ion a l
S ta nd a r d s a nd
Lot Cond i t ion s
The purpose of the General
Architectural Standards is to codify
architectural “rules of thumb” that are
appropriate for Jasper County based
on existing historical precedent for
the county.
General Architectural Standards
cover a range of items that apply to
all buildings in all zoning districts
to include: height limits, glazing
requirements, fencing requirements,
building materials (roofing, siding,
decking, etc.) and architectural details
(cornices, dormers, porch columns,
etc.).
All of the requirements found in
the General Architectural Standards
are considered “rules of thumb”
because they are hallmarks of timetested construction techniques that
embody quality and transcend architectural style.
Additional architectural standards that further define specific
building types, architectural styles
and/or lot conditions are based on the
specific zoning district and/or the specific building use and are outlined in
the remainder of this document under
Specific Architectural Standards.
Once you have applied the
General Architectural Standards you
need to find your applicable zoning
district in the “Building Types by
Zoning District” table (page 15) and
determine which building types are
permitted for your zoning. Once you
have determined your building type
refer to the table of contents to find
the Specific Architectural Guidelines
relevant to that type.
In the Village Plan zoning district, the sub-area within the Village
Plan must also be identified prior to
determining which building types
are permitted. Refer to the Village
Plan diagram (page 16) for a general
overview and to the Area Descriptions
(page 17) for more specific information about the sub-areas.
The area boundaries are established as part of the Village Plan
Overlay approval. Also identified will
be Transitional Areas that allow for
development patterns to be modified
to accommodate future growth. As
a result, the County Zoning Commission reviews and approves which
area description and /or building
type best applies within an identified
Transitional Area.
Once you have selected your
approved building type, reference
the corresponding “Precedent and
Principles” page. The purpose of
this page is to illustrate appropriate
examples through photographs of
buildings found in Jasper County
and other vernacularly appropriate
communities. Other appropriate
architectural materials and elements
not featured in the photographs are
provided in the narrative.
Historic precedent is used as a
regulating criteria based on its proven
record of functionality, health,
safety, and aesthetics. The “Precedent and Principles” page is meant
to serve as a starting point to define
the appropriate historic precedent for
Jasper County. There may be other
equally appropriate precedents to
draw from that are not documented
herein. Alternatively, modern or
contemporary examples may also
be appropriate so long as they can
demonstrate similar attributes of scale
and proportion, safety, and aesthetics
(see “Methods of Compliance”).
The purpose of the architectural
massing diagrams is to define the
selected architectural style in terms
of scale and proportion. While each
architectural style has a vast array
of appropriate massings, the selections herein were considered most
appropriate based on the precedent
already found within Jasper County.
With that said, these standards still
contain several architectural styles
and corresponding massing diagrams
for each building type.
Once an architectural style is
selected, there are a variety of options
for arranging the massing. These
options are represented in blue over
the original massing, represented in
yellow. The dimensioned elevations
listed next to the massing diagrams
show appropriate proportional relationships and glazing patterns. The
text that accompanies the massing
diagrams provides alternate main
mass, glazing, porch, dormer, and
addition options to what is shown in
the diagrams.
The massing diagrams are intentionally basic, focusing primarily
on the critical relationships between
building, lot, and public realm. Exceptions are allowed but are subject
to County approval (refer to “Methods of Compliance”).
Based on the applicable zoning
district and selected building type,
there may be additional architectural
standards and lot conditions.
Specifically within the Village Plan
Zone there are different minimum and
maximum dimensions for lot widths
and depths, different set back criteria, different parking configurations,
and different street frontages/corner
conditions based on the building
type and sub-area within the Village
Plan zoning district. In this way, the
building types and lot types work in
conjunction with the street and alley
right of ways to determine the entry,
edge, and pedestrian conditions at the
property lines.
Closely review the lot types
associated with each building type
to determine the applicable setbacks,
easements, and allowable building
areas. Depending on the building
type, the buildable area may be subdivided for specific components of
the building (such as porches, portecocheres, etc.) and in some cases
the lot type may permit detached
outbuildings (such as garages and
carriage houses).
Historical Concepts
Jasper County Architectural Guidelines
Town Planning & Design
Page 6
One - S tory Of f ic e a nd Co m m e r c i a l
Pr e c e d e n t a nd pr inc ipl e s
Zone s : O - I , C - 1 , C - 2 , V- P C e n t r a l R e sid e n t i a l a nd S tor e f r on t
G e ne r a l Pr inc ipl e s f r o m Pr e c e d e n t B u il d ing s
One story commercial buildings shall be traditional in their architectural character or
a contemporary interpretation of historically traditional styles. They shall be constructed
of materials that have historically been used in the towns and villages of Jasper County
such as native stone, brick, stucco, cast stone and wood. Roofs shall be either pitched
with overhanging eaves or flat with articulated parapets or cornices. Any canopies shall be
constructed at a scale that is comfortable for pedestrians, with the ceiling being no higher
than 15' from the pavement. Lighting shall be recessed into the ceiling of the canopy so
that it is not visible from beyond the property lines of the establishment. Any awnings shall
leave a minimum vertical clearance of 8' from the sidewalk and shall break at any vertical
divisions on the façade of the building. The use of special architectural elements such as
towers, turrets, and chamfered corners are encouraged at major street corners to provide
visual interest. All such elements shall be of a scale compatible with the overall structure.
Historical Concepts
Town Planning & Design
HISTORICAL CONCEPTS
Jasper County Architectural Guidelines
Page 42
design guidelines / 10
Excerpts from Architectural Guidelines
J AS P ER CO U N T Y ZONI NG ORD I NANCE
One - S tory Of f ic e a nd Co m m e r c i a l
One - S tory Of f ic e a nd Co m m e r c i a l
De ta c he d Cond i t ion s
M a s sing R e q u ir e m e n ts
Zone s : O - I , C - 1 , C - 2 , V- P C e n t r a l R e sid e n t i a l
Zone s : O - I , C - 1 , C - 2 , V- P C e n t r a l R e sid e n t i a l a nd S tor e f r on t
A r c hi t e c t u r a l S ta nd a r d s
STOREFRONT ELEVATION
1. The building’s massing shall be developed such that there is a
prominent single roof line for at least 75% of the footprint.
1/3
120’ min.
100’ min.
80’ min.
40’ min.
16’-36’
R.O.W
1/3
10’
10’
10’
1/3
1/3
1/3
1/3
1/3
1/3
16’-24’
1/3
1/3
16’-24’
Minor Street
10’
140’ min.
10’
16’-24’
5’
5’
10’
P.L
R.O.W
Minor Collector
C1, C2, OI
Local Road
C1, OI
10’
20’
10’ 10’
10’ 20’
20’ 20’ 10’10’
20’ 10’
FIVE MODULES:
20’
5. The primary mass of the building shall start within the Build-To
Area as identified on the Lot Layout.
Massing: Each module should be expressed as a bay,
with the central bay being emphasized and occupied by
the entry door.
Glazing: All bays should be a minimum of 70% glazed.
Roof: Mansard or flat roof with parapet is appropriate
for an attached building; in addition, a hip or gable is
appropriate for a detached building.
Alley
10’
P.L
2. The Encroachment area is intended to encourage the use of entry
porches and outdoor seating areas; maximum area of encroachment shall be 300 s.f.
4. Minimum and maximum lot depths and widths shall as identified
on the Lot Layout.
1/3
THREE MODULES:
Perspective View
1. Any curb cuts on the primary street shall not exceed 20’.
Note: The following Lot Conditions are for V-P zoning districts only;
all other zoning districts are required to comply with Article IV,
Division C, Section 37 of the Zoning Ordinance.
1/3
16’-24’
4. The maximum building footprint shall be 60% of the buildable
area for V-P zoning districts; all other zoning districts are required
to comply with Article IV, Division C, Section 37 of the Jasper
County Zoning Ordinance.
3. All mechanical or electrical equipment shall be screened with a
fence, garden wall, or plantings so that it is not visible from the
street or any other public right of way.
CORNER
Massing: One to three bays, with one bay being occupied by the entry door.
Glazing: All bays should be a minimum of 70% glazed.
Roof: Mansard or flat roof with parapet is appropriate
for an attached building; in addition, a hip or gable is
appropriate for a detached building.
3. All façades of the building facing onto a street must be punctuated with windows and/or doors in accordance with the massing
requirements for each architectural style.
Lot Cond i t ion s
MIDBLOCK
ONE MODULE:
2. The primary entry for the building shall face the primary street and
shall be articulated with a porch, portico, awning, lintel, or other
architectural feature that makes it easily identifiable as a point of
entry.
Corner
Major Street
VP
Massing: Each module should be expressed as a bay,
with the end and central bays being emphasized to create a hierarchy; the entry door should occur in either
the central or end bays.
Glazing: All bays should be a minimum of 70% glazed.
Roof: Mansard or flat roof with parapet is appropriate
for an attached building; in addition, a hip or gable is
appropriate for a detached building.
Major Collector
C1, C2, OI
16’-24’
16’-24’
16’-24’
80’-120’
16’-24’
16’-24’
Arterial
C2, OI
Lot Layout
Historical Concepts
Town Planning & Design
Note: Buildings may not exceed 5 Bays in width without
review and approval by the Director of Planning.
Jasper County Architectural Guidelines
Page 45
Historical Concepts
Jasper County Architectural Guidelines
Town Planning & Design
Page 43
One - S tory Of f ic e a nd Co m m e r c i a l
T y pic a l S tor e f r on t De ta il s
Zone s : O - I , C - 1 , C - 2 , V- P C e n t r a l R e sid e n t i a l a nd S tor e f r on t
These typical storefront details are appropriate for buildings of
any commercial use and can be exchanged with the other storefront
details contained in this document. Note the large amount of glazing,
as well as the height of the glazing, awnings and signage which provide pedestrian interest and comfort along the street.
Historical Concepts
Town Planning & Design
HISTORICAL CONCEPTS
Jasper County Architectural Guidelines
Page 44
design guidelines / 11
Excerpts from Pattern Book
N ORTH HI LL
COMMUNITY PATTERNS
The estate homes are of somewhat larger size and massing,
and have more ample width to their lots. They may be
either one and one-half story or two-story in massing with
either full-width porches. Careful attention must be given
to hardscape and landscape of these sites, and picket fences
are of particular importance for the streetscape.
Larger lots at the main lawn at the end of the entrance require larger homes of stately
presence with two-story massing, as they will set the identity for the overall community.
All homes should face the lawn. The most prominent main home at the rear of the site
must have two-story porch with full-height columns. Homes at the corners must have
wrapping porches. Large-caliper oaks planted at the corners frame the lawn and add to
the significance of the site.
Old
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Cottage Lane contains smaller cottage homes of simple massing and design, to
appear as old dependants of the larger, adjacent homes. Careful consideration
must be given to the design of the porte-cocheres or parking structures.
Du
Pa rha
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Site Plan
Homes along the main entrance, while relatively small
in footprint, will frame the tree-lined main thoroughfare
leading to the park hill, creating a streetscape to slow the
traffic. These homes shall have 2-story massing, three
bays wide with full-width porches either single or doublegallery facing the street.
North Hill - Newnan, Georgia
COMMUNITY PATTERNS
Buffer Zone
*where required
Rear Setback
Outbuilding
Zone
*50% of Lot
Private Zone
Porch Zone
*1/3 of porch zone may
contain enclosed space
Front Setback
at
Outbuilding
Zone
Front Setback
*Porch stairs may encroach
S.S.B Outbuilding
Zone
S.S.B
Lot Size:
Mass: 1 to 1 ½ stories
Main Body:
Porch: 1 story, must occur on front set back
Front Yard Setback: The depth of the front yard is typically 10 feet
from property lines, unless noted otherwise in lot specific community
patterns.
Outbuilding: 1 to 1 ½ stories, must occur on side setback within rear
50% of lot; maybe connected with one story to main mass
Side Street Setbacks: Structures shall be set back a minimum of 5 feet
from the side property line unless otherwise noted in the lot specific
community patterns. Side street façades are defined by the side façade
of the main body of the house and any rear or side wings. Wrap-around
porches are encouraged on the main body. Houses on corner lots should
have an outbuilding placed on the rear and side street setback lines.
Side Setbacks: 5’; Architectural features may encroach a maximum of 24”
(chimney, eaves, cornices, sill, watertable, etc.)
Rear Yard Setbacks: All structures are to be 5 feet from rear buffer line if
one exists or 5 feet from rear property line.
Porch Zone: The depth of the porch zone is 10 feet. The front porch
may begin anywhere in this depth and the porch may be deeper than
10 feet. One-third of the porch may be enclosed.
Cottage Lots
HISTORICAL CONCEPTS
North Hill - Newnan, Georgia
design guidelines / 12
Excerpts from Pattern Book
N ORTH HI LL
ARCHITECTURAL PATTERNS
DOORS
Doors

Special care shall be given to take design and
detail of the front entry dorr, and it shall be
appropriate to the overall style of the home.

Exterior doors shall be made of wood.

Door muntins shall be traditionally profiled,
at exterior and interior faces, and no greater
than one inch (1”) in width.

Individual door lites shall be square or
vertically proportioned. Lites in doors and
windows of differing sizes shall be similarly
proportioned.

The use of side-lites and transoms are
encouraged.

Transom units shall be horizontally
proportioned with vertically proportioned
lites. Transoms must be a minimum of 18”
high.

Entry doors and gates may be stained. All
other doors must be primed and painted.

Prohibited: horizontally sliding doors, dark
tinted or reflective glass, and applied door
moldings.

Casing must be a minimum of 3 ½” wide in
a wood or a synthetic material.
North Hill - Newnan, Georgia
ARCHITECTURAL STYLES
HISTORY & CHARACTER
Identifying Features of
the Folk RevivalStyle
1
3
4
1
Porches with spindelwork detailing or flat, jigsaw cut
trim.
2
Symmetrical façade (except for the gable-front-and
wing example).
3
Cornice-line brackets are common.
4
Double hung windows with multi-pane glazing in one
or both sashes.
The Folk Revival Style is defined by the presence of Victorian or Classical decorative detailing
on simple folk house forms, which are generally much less elaborate than the pure Victorian and
Classical styles that they attempt to mimic. Details are usually of Italianate, Queen Anne, Classical
Revival or Greek Revival inspiration. The primary areas of application for this detailing are the
porch and cornice line.
This style was made possible by the dawn of the railroad. Large lumber yards sprang up all over
the country as the railroad provided easy transportation for bulky building materials. Although
new materials were available, the old folk building forms persisted; the most popular being the
front gable. Other forms include the gable-front-and-wing and the I-house. The Greek Revival
movement inspired the front gable shape, which echoed the pedimented façade of typical Greek
temples. Gable-front houses were particularly suited for narrow urban lots in rapidly expanding
cities. The gable-front-and wing house also descended from Greek Revival houses.
A porch typically filled in the L made by the two wings. The traditional I-house experienced
a surge in popularity after the birth of the railroads. Post-railroad I-houses were elaborated with
varying patterns of porches, chimneys and rearward extensions.
2
The Folk Revival Style
HISTORICAL CONCEPTS
North Hill - Newnan, Georgia
design guidelines / 13
Excerpts from Pattern Book
T HE RANCH
History
Introduction to The Ranch: “A Land Remembered”
The Ranch
Fort Drum
The Ranch, Fort Drum and General Vicinity
Among the first settlers in the area
was Henry Parker. In about 1878 he
moved to Fort Drum and opened a
store and trading post. Parker began
trading with the Seminole Indians,
who were living at the time scattered
along the St. Johns marsh. The
Seminoles brought their tanned deer
hides, alligator hides, and otter hides
as well as bird plumes to Parker’s store
Henry L. Parker
to trade for guns, ammunition, and
groceries. As cattlemen gradually
moved into the area and established their ranches, they also purchased
most of their supplies at Parker’s. Parker was also instrumental in
obtaining Fort Drum’s first post office, and in 1888 began his first term as
Fort Drum’s postmaster.
The area slowly grew and in 1914, the Florida East Coast Railroad completed
the Kissimmee Valley Extension of the railroad. They built a small depot in
Fort Drum, as well as one to the north, named Osawaw, and south, called
Hilolo. These depots became critical to the shipping of oranges, grapefruit,
and other produce that this fertile land was able to abundantly yield. The
train allowed the full potential of the land to be realized and citrus groves
became a dominant factor in the local economy.
Over the course of time, the actual town of Fort Drum shrank due to
economic and road changes, and is now little more than a name on a
map. The Ranch seeks to revive the heritage of Fort Drum by providing a
community of homes and ranches that honors the unique history of this
land and preserves its natural riches for this and future generations.
Henry Parker’s step-son, Henry Allen Holmes, settled at Fort Drum about
the same time as Parker and became active in the cattle business. Over
time, Holmes became one of the leading ranchers in the lower Kissimmee
River Valley. Holmes’ eldest son, Harley also operated a general
merchandise store and was appointed postmaster in 1907. Harley and his
brother Minor were instrumental in establishing Main Street Fort Drum
with Harley’s personal residence, his general store, and Minor’s barber
shop.
Work Crew at The Fort Drum Depot
Cattle on The Range
Main Street, Fort Drum - circa 1912
center of The Ranch is approximately seven miles north of Fort Drum, and shares
with it a common history and heritage. Originally, Fort Drum was a Seminole War fort built
in the 1840’s. The exact location was at the old crossroads of two military roads, one was
called the Old Wire Road and the other one came from Fort Basinger.
Following the close of the Civil War in 1865 pioneers began to view the area as a fine cattle
range. These early pioneers and would be cattleman were often referred to as “Crackers”.
In nearby southern Georgia the original term was “Corn Crackers” and referred to the
people of the backwoods who cracked their corn to make corn meal (a staple of their diet).
As these people (and others from nearby southern states) moved south and settled into
northern Florida, the term evolved and came to reference the sharp, loud crack of the
leather whips used to drive cattle, hence these early pioneers were called “Crackers”.
Page 6
Pattern Book
Plan
SiteSitePlan
Neighborhood Lot Layouts
Creekside Hammock
Equestrian Meadows
Farmstead Pastures
Lakeside Retreat
Polo Village
Polo Fields
Civic
Greenspace & Preserve
This conceptual master plan (“the plan”) has been prepared by Historical Concepts for The Ranch (“the developer”) for graphic presentation and as an aid to site location. Any property lines, tract dimensions and narrative descriptions are approximate. The plan is a planning
instrument which may be updated periodically as required to build the community. As such, it is subject to change and is not a commitment
of the developer to any parties. Persons desiring to determine actual restrictions and convenance applicable to the property may request
such documents for inspection.
Pattern Book
HISTORICAL CONCEPTS
Page 10
design guidelines / 14
Excerpts from Pattern Book
T HE RANCH
General Architectural Patterns
Architectural Typologies and the Evolution of the Compound
1830
1860
Historically the compound evolved from a single structure
designed in the early 19th century, a building typology often
referred to as the “Single Pen”. This structure provided only the
immediate needs of shelter and eventually a front porch and possibly
a rear porch were added to provide shade and refuge from the heat
of the Florida sun. It is likely that at the same time these porches
were being added, another pen would have been added to shelter
domestic animals. These two pens would share a common roof and
become the building typology known as the “Dog Trot”.
From the simple Single Pen and Dog Trot typologies sprung
many other more complex building forms that addressed different
environmental demands, agricultural uses, and family needs. The
house would have been added onto in layers. Starting first with a
separate kitchen structure attached by an open breezeway used to
keep the heat of open fire cooking out of the house. Over time as the
family grew, the addition of dormers would have made the attic into
usable bedrooms. In some instances, an entire second floor would
have been added, converting the house into two full stories. As even
more space was needed, side wings and pavilions were added for
additional bedrooms or living space.
The following generations, who had a desire for a grander style
of living and more available means by which to achieve it, would have
added rear wings and expanded the porches. In several cases the
main house was abandoned all together in favor of larger homes
with grander architectural styles and more “modern” conveniences.
Eventually, as electricity became available after the turn of the
century, a back room would have been converted to an-inhouse
kitchen, leaving the old kitchen as guest quarters or staff quarters.
Along the same time, porches were screened and small bedrooms
were converted into bathrooms as running water became available.
Later on, as central heat and air were added, porches would have
been glassed in for year-round use.
At the time the main house was expanding and evolving from its
Single Pen and Dog Trot beginnings, the shelter for domestic animals
and agrarian activities moved out of the main house and into separate
building typologies. The first of these “new” structures would have
been a simple shed or barn built near the main house. Perhaps a
smokehouse or small dairy building would have been built as well.
Later on larger sheds, barns and stables would have been built
farther from the main house and closer to the grazing pastures,
to accommodate growing herds. Other ancillary buildings like a
cane syrup boiling shed, hay barns, tractor sheds, and staff housing,
would have been added as the focus of the land and the family shifted
from livestock to citrus farming.
Much like the main house, over time outbuildings evolved to meet
the changing needs of the family. Old barns were converted into
garages, old sheds converted to guest quarters, and old smokehouses
and dairies were converted into exercise studios and entertainment
spaces. However, unlike the main house which would have been
more fastidiously maintained, the rugged and informal nature of
outbuildings allowed them to age naturally, developing a patina
that gracefully showed their age and original use. Consequently,
the compound evolved from a single cluster of small structures into
multiple clusters of buildings that expressed various layers of size,
style, purpose, and time.
The Architectural Patterns on the following pages are meant to act
as a tool for creating a compound that feels comfortable in its own
skin, possessing a timeless sense of beauty. By using a “generational
approach”, it is possible to have a home with all the modern
conveniences as well as an appearance of having evolved on the land
over the last 100-150 years. In this way, each home will be unique
but the overall built character will be harmonious; every compound
is a chapter waiting to be added to the story of The Ranch.
1890
2007 and Beyond
1920
Page 15
Neighborhood Patterns - Entry Lots
Main Building Zone
1/8
1/4
Guest House
Equestrian
or Garage Outbuilding Zone
1/8
Pasture/
Paddock
26’ Tr
20’ N ail Ease
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at
Creek ure Curtai t
n
20’ N
26’ Tr ature Cu
ail Ea rtain
semen
t
Equestrian Meadows
15’ Tr
ail Ea
semen
t
Meado
w / Pa
sture
Pattern Book
1/4
1/4
25’
25’
75’
175’
75’
200’
25’
10’ Landscape Zone
The Entry Lots are intended to set the rural tone of the Equestrian Meadows, serving as the transition from The Ranch
Equestrian Center to the Parkside Lots. The unique location of these lots create multiple “fronts” that face the Ranch Equestrian
Center, the main road and the lake beyond, and the neighborhood park.
The Main Building Zone is located in the western portion of the lot and the allowable building edge is setback 1/8th the
minimum depth of the lot in addition to the standard 15’ Landscape Zone. The main house, guest house, and garage are the only
structures permitted in the Main Building Zone of the Entry Lots. The main house is intended to be the dominant visual element
from the western “front” of the lot.
Since Entry Lots are approximately 6 acres, permanent equestrian structures are permissible within the Equestrian Outbuilding Zone. Other outbuildings such as additional guest homes and carriage houses are permitted only in the Outbuilding
Zones that flank either side of the Main Building Zone. The design intent of these three separate zones is to create specific architectural responses to multiple view axis; the Equestrian Outbuilding Zones frame the view axis of the Ranch Equestrian Center
while the southern Outbuilding Zone, align with the view axis of the neighborhood park.
Access drive locations for Entry Lots are restricted to one western front entry in order to preserve the integrity of the
streetscape. However, one additional access drive is allowed from each of the secondary roads at the north and south sides of the
lots. Additionally, there are 32’ Trail Easements at the north and south sides of the lots that are intended to serve as an entry for
the trail system that runs alongside the creek between the Equestrian Meadows and Creekside Hammock neighborhoods.
Fences are permitted along the inside edges of the front and side Landscape Zones as well as along the inside edge of the
trail easements. Fences are intended to be continuous in order to tie the streetscape of the neighborhood together. Fences at
pastures, paddocks and along the rear landscape zone are intended to be functional and can be sited as needed within the approved setbacks.
The “front” meadows of the Entry Lots are intended to be more aesthetic than functional and may only be subdivided for
access drives. The meadows to the rear of the lot (any area behind the eastern edge of the Main Building Zone) can be subdivided
into multiple paddocks. The Nature Curtain, Creek, and Trail Easements to the rear of the Entry Lot are intended to provide a lush
visual amenity; no bridges or vehicular access points other than those provided by The Ranch are permitted across the Creek or
the rear Trail Easement.
Pattern Book
HISTORICAL CONCEPTS
32’ Trail Easement
Existing Wetlands
(to include buffers)
Equestrian
Outbuildings
Pasture / Paddock
Creek
Existing
Wetlands
Trail
Main Building
Cluster
Page 63
design guidelines / 15
Excerpts from Pattern Book
T HE RANCH
Creekside Hammock
Architectural Patterns - Typical Massing for Main Buildings
DOGTROT TYPOLOGY
Main Mass: Three rooms wide and one room deep with a front facade width of 30’ to 45’ and a maximum
depth of 20’ (not including porches or additions); should be 1 to 1.5 stories in height; maximum footprint of 2,500 s.f. (to include porches and additions). Main Roof Line: Single gable or hip roof for main
mass; gable, hip, or shed roof for porches and attached additions. Dormers: Hip or shed dormers on
front and rear facade of main roof; shed dormers at attached central addition; central ganged dormers
are permitted on front facade and encouraged on rear facade and attached additions to create second
floor living space. Porches: Front porch is required and should be 1 story tall and the full width of main
mass (less 2’ to 4’ offset at each side); rear porch is permitted and should be 1 story tall and between
60%-100% width of main mass (less 2’ to 4’ offset at each side); rear porch may be screened or glass
enclosed; side porches are not permitted. Attached Additions: Permitted only on rear of main mass (either one central addition or two wing additions); central addition shall have a maximum width of 60%
of main mass (3 bays) and maximum projection of 40% main mass (2 bays); wing additions shall have
a maximum width of 40% of main mass (2 bays) and maximum projection of 40% main mass (2 bays);
all additions shall have maximum height of 1.5 stories; all additions shall be subordinate to main mass.
COTTAGE TYPOLOGY
Main Mass: Three bays wide and two rooms deep with a front facade width of 30’ minimum and 40’
maximum and a maximum depth of 32’ (not including porches); should be 1 to 1.5 stories in height;
maximum footprint of 3,400 s.f. (to include attached additions). Main Roof Line: Single gable roof
over main mass and/or front porch; gable, hip, or shed for porches and attached additions Dormers:
Gable, hip or shed dormers on front and rear facade; no dormers at attached additions. Porches:
Front porch is required and should be 1 story tall and the full width of the main mass (less a 2’ to 4’
offset at each side); rear and/or side porches are only required if facing public views; rear and side
porches may only be 1 story tall with a maximum projection of 40% of main mass (or 1.5 bays); rear
and side porches may connect as one wrapping porch, but may not project past the front of the main
massing; rear and side porches may be screened or glass enclosed. Attached Additions: Permitted
only on sides and rear of main mass; side additions shall have a maximum width of 50% of main mass
(1.75 bays), a maximum depth of 100% main mass (3 bays less a 2’ to 4’ offset on each side) and a
maximum height of 1 story; rear additions shall have a maximum width of 60% of main mass width
(2 bays), a maximum projection of 40% main mass (1.5 bays), and a maximum height of 1.5 stories.
1/5
1/5
1/5
1/5
1/5
1/3
30’ - 45’
1/3
1/5
1/3
1/5
1/5
1/5
1/5
1/5
1/5
1/7
1/7
40’ - 60’
30’ - 40’
FLORIDA PLANTATION TYPOLOGY
Main Mass: Five bays wide and two rooms deep with a front facade width of 40’ to 60’ and a maximum
depth of 32’ (not including porches); should be 1 to 1.5 stories in height; maximum footprint of 5,000
s.f. (to include porches and additions). Main Roof Line: Either single gable or hip roof over main mass
(with shed roof for porches and hip or gable roof for rear addition), OR single gable or hip roof over
main mass (including porches) with a shed break between 1/3 and 2/3 of the roof plane (gable roof
with shed breaks for rear addition). Dormers: Gable, hip or shed dormers on front of main mass; hip
or shed dormers on rear facade and attached additions (ganged dormers permitted). Porches: Front
porch is required and should be 1 to 1.5 stories tall and the full width of the main mass; rear and/or
side porches are only required if facing public views; rear and side porches should be 1 to 1.5 stories
tall (to match porch); may connect to front porch as one wrapping porch; rear and side porches may
be screened or glass enclosed. Attached Additions: Permitted only on sides and rear of main mass; side
additions shall have a maximum width of 40% main mass (2 bays), a maximum depth of 40% main mass
(2 bays) and height to match porches; rear additions shall have a maximum width of 60% of main mass
width (3 bays), a maximum projection of 60% main mass (3 bays), and a maximum height of 1.5 stories.
1/5
1/5
1/5
1/5
1/3
1/5
1/5
1/5
1/5
1/5
1/3
1/3
1/5
1/5
30’ - 40’
30’ - 45’
1/5
30’ - 45’
1/4
1/4
16’ - 18’
1/3
1/3
30’ - 40’
62’ - 76’
1/5
40’ - 60’
1/3
1/4
1/4
16’ - 18’
1/7
1/7
1/7
1/7
1/7
56’ - 84’
Page 38
Pattern Book
Creekside Hammock
Architectural Patterns - Key Features and Sample Images
Architectural Features:
Siding should be narrow clapboard, regular clapboard, bevel, or drop siding; pine or
cypress shingles also acceptable for appropriate styles
Foundation Material should be should be brick, stucco, coquina, or tabby with implied piers; brick lattice, wood louvered screen, or plank hog fencing between columns
Roof Material should be cypress or pine shake; corrugated, 5V, or standing seam
metal roofing also acceptable for appropriate styles
Cornice should be exposed rafters and/or decoratively shaped rafter tails; enclosed
rafters with chamfered profile trim also acceptable for appropriate styles
Architectural Details may include decorative brick and shingle patterns, shaped
rails and turned balusters, or chamfered cap and jigsaw cut balusters, louvered
shutters or batten shutters at doors and windows, entry doors with large sidelights
and transoms, chamfered or turned posts, and/or decorative spindle work at brackets, and spandrels
Architectural style should reflect either Cracker Vernacular (Florida Folk), Southern Tidewater Vernacular (Low Country), or Folk Victoria for inspiration.
Pattern Book
HISTORICAL CONCEPTS
Page 40
design guidelines / 16
HISTORICAL CONCEPTS
architects, planners & place-makers
4 3 0 Pr i m e Po i n t , Su i t e 1 0 3
P e a c h t r e e C i t y, G e o r g i a 3 0 2 6 9
(770) 487-8041
w w w. h i s t o r i c a l c o n c e p t s . c o m
2010-04-08