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SPRING | KLEIN EDITION
By Matt Stephens
As the 10th-fastest-growing
school district in the state, Klein
ISD has added nearly 7,000 students since 2008 and expects to
grow to more than 62,000 students by 2023. To accommodate
the incoming flood of students,
KISD is calling for a $498.1 million bond referendum May 9.
“[An estimated] 13,000 students are projected to join us in
the next 10 years, and they’re
coming
from
everywhere,”
Superintendent Jim Cain said.
The bond package would provide the district funding for three
new schools, in addition to renovation, technology and security
projects as well as buses.
Addressing growth
The largest piece of the proposed bond includes more than
$280 million for projects that will
accommodate future growth in
the district. The costliest line item
would provide $122 million for
the construction of High School
No. 5, which could open in fall
2017 if the bond is approved.
Without a fifth high school,
Klein Collins, Klein and Klein
Oak high schools are all anticipated to have their student
enrollments surpass 120 percent
of capacity by 2019, which is the
point when KISD looks to construct a new school to address
overcrowding.
“You’ve got to put those kids
somewhere,” Associate Superintendent for Facilities Robert
Robertson said.
The bond also includes
$47 million for Intermediate
School No. 10, set to open in
2018, and $26 million for Elementary School No. 33, set to
open in 2019, as well as a second
early childhood/Pre-K center,
gyms and classroom additions.
Spring ISD addresses
transcript irregularities
District helps affected students,
makes administration changes
By Ariel Carmona Jr.
In the wake of an internal investigation by
Spring ISD that revealed systematic districtwide irregularities with the transcripts of
about 600 high school students, the district is
moving forward with new administrators and
a thorough review of its data security systems.
Rather than dwell on mistakes made by
previous administrators, Superintendent Rodney Watson—who was appointed to the position in July—said he sees an opportunity to
improve the district.
“Anytime that you find gaps in the system, gaps in processes, I think they need to
be closed,” Watson said. “It provides us with
an opportunity to make sure what we say to
See Spring ISD | 24
In a 2013 study, Population and Survey Analysts projected Klein
ISD will add nearly 13,000 students between 2014 and 2023.
70,000
62,152
60,000
Students
Bond package would fund three new schools
PROJECTED STUDENT GROWTH
50,000
students
54,743
50,673
6 IMPACTS
Now Open, Coming Soon & more
9 TRANSPORTATION UPDATES
News, data on local road projects
students
students
10 BUSINESS
Copperfield’s Books
40,000
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
PROJECTED NEW HOMES
PASA’s 2013 study also projected that 1,500–2,700 homes would
be added annually within Klein ISD from 2014–23.
2,696
3,000
homes
2,399
homes
2,500
2,000
1,958
homes
Homes
KISD calls for $498.1M
bond referendum May 9
Volume 2, Issue 1 | April 9–May 13, 2015
11 DINING
Ba Mien Bistro
1,500
12 CHAMBER
1,000
Houston Northwest Chamber
Economic Outlook Forum
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
Source: Klein ISD, Population & Survey Analysts
Robertson said rising construction costs affected new
construction projects within the
bond as costs have risen 30 percent in the past two years in the
Greater Houston area. He said
projections from Houston-based
firm Kiley Advisors state construction costs could increase 20
percent in the next three years.
Despite rising construction
costs, the new schools within the
bond are necessary to address
the incoming students, said Lynn
Dozier, co-chair of the Citizens
for Klein Kids political action
committee.
“The potential for growth is
incredible,” Dozier said. “They’re
16 AT THE CAPITOL
House, Senate hear legislation
Spring, Klein legislator updates
20 PEOPLE
Jim Robertson
West Houston energy
companies hit the hardest
A comparison of the price of oil per gallon
today to oil prices from the 1980s.
By Marie Leonard and Liza Winkler
1980s Recession
See Oil prices | 27
Noise mitigation legislation
See Klein ISD bond | 22
Experts remain optimistic
amid falling oil prices
The drop in oil prices over the last nine
months has been welcome news for many
drivers at the gas pump. But in Houston,
which is considered the energy capital of the
world, the lower prices could also mean setbacks for the economy.
A significant amount of the Greater Houston area’s economy is tied to the oil and gas
industry—nearly 40 percent of all jobs—with
a number of companies located in Tomball,
The Woodlands, Spring and Cy-Fair, such
as Baker Hughes, ExxonMobil, Anadarko
Petroleum Corporation, National Oilwell
Varco and Southwestern Energy.
15 LEGISLATURE
NOW vs. THE 1980s
Oil peak
April 1980: $114.47
Oil low
July 1986: $24.83
Great Recession
Oil peak
June 2008: $143.71
Oil low
December 2008: $45.82
} -78%
} -68%
} -54%
change
change
Current downturn
Oil peak
June 2014: $104.48
Oil low
January 2015: $47.98
change
Source: Energy Information Administration
21 CLOSE-UP
St. Patrick’s Day Parade
19 CALENDAR
29 REAL ESTATE
Ponderosa Forest, 77090
31 COUPONS
2
Community Impact Newspaper • impactnews.com
TOUR ALL 10 MODEL HOMES
BETWEEN APRIL 19 - MAY 3
TO BE ELIGIBLE FOR A CHANCE
TO WIN ONE OF THREE
SUNDAY CONCERT SERIES
SUNDAYS
NOON-6PM
$500 AMERICAN EXPRESS
GIFT CARDS
Four acclaimed homebuilders – Coventry Homes, David Weekley
Homes, J. Kyle Homes and Palmetto Homes – have captured the
charm of simpler times with their neo-traditional home designs
in Liberty Branch in the Village of Creekside Park. The homes
range from townhomes, attached patio homes to large singlefamily homes, priced from the $300s - $1 million.
MODEL HOME HOURS:
Monday – Saturday, 10AM – 6PM Sunday: Noon – 6PM
SUNDAY CONCERT SERIES
APRIL 19 NOBODY’S FOOL
COUNTRY/VARIETY
APRIL 26 THE COPPERTONES
BLUES/VARIETY/ROCK & ROLL
COVENTRY HOMES
J KYLE HOMES
From the $580s
From the $430s
DAVID WEEKLEY HOMES
PALMETTO HOMES
MAY 3 GARY MICHAEL
DAHL BAND
BLUES/VARIETY/TOP 40
BANDS WILL PERFORM FROM 2-4PM
ENJOY YOUR PICNIC AT LIBERTY SQUARE PARK
IN THE VILLAGE OF CREEKSIDE PARK
while listening to some hometown music. A variety of food trucks
will be available to purchase meals.
From the $580s
From the $300s
LIBERTY SQUARE PARK: 66 Liberty Branch Blvd., The Woodlands, TX, 77389
DRIVING DIRECTIONS TO LIBERTY BRANCH: Take I-45 to Woodlands Parkway and
travel west to Kuykendahl Road. Turn left on Kuykendahl and travel south to Creekside Forest Drive. Turn left on Creekside Forest and travel east until you reach the
Liberty Branch entrance at Liberty Branch Blvd. Park on Creekside Forest Drive and
board a FREE RED, ROCK & BLUES SHUTTLE (Sundays only) to Liberty Square Park.
FREE RED, ROCK & BLUES SHUTTLE RIDES on Sundays from Creekside Forest Drive. Visit website for more information.
New homes from the $300s to $1 million • 281-719-6333 • TheWoodlands.com/LibertyBranch
TAKE I-45 TO WOODLANDS PARKWAY, GO WEST ON WOODLANDS PARKWAY TO THE INFORMATION CENTER.
A Division of The Howard Hughes Corporation ®
Homes within The Woodlands are constructed and sold by builders not affiliated with The Woodlands Development Company (TWDC) or any of its affiliates, companies or partnerships. Neither TWDC nor any of its
affiliated companies or partnerships guarantees or warrants the obligations of, or construction by, such builders. Prices and specifications subject to change. Membership fees may be required. * Receive your Home Tour
Card at any of the Liberty Branch models. The card may be returned at any of the models or at The Woodlands Information Center. All cards must be received by Monday, May 4, 2015 to be eligible for the drawings. 4/15
3
Spring | Klein Edition • April 2015
ST
Focus on your future
not student loans.
OP
BY
RSVP 832-230-5555
or send your name
& phone number
to [email protected]
OU
Bring your
transcripts
to see if you
meet automatic
acceptance criteria
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www.na.edu
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Community Impact Newspaper • impactnews.com
Commercial Real
Estate Leaders
LANDLORD & TENANT
REPRESENTATION
Featured Properties
Spring Hill Office/Warehouse
312 Spring Hill Dr., Spring
FOR LEASE
• 2,200-16,000 SF spaces available
• Private entry and private restroom
• Suites are individually metered.
• Excellent location, approximately
1 mile from Interstate 45, Hardy
Toll Road and the ExxonMobil
Corporate Campus
SITE ACQUISITION
SALES & LEASING
Woodforest Plaza
6334 FM 2920, Spring
FOR LEASE
• Located ½ mile west of Kuykendahl
at the lighted intersection of T.C. Jester
and FM 2920
• Available retail space consist of 1,340 SF
and would be ideal for an established
retail, medical or professional business
• Features include, great exposure and visibility
to FM 2920, monument signage, abundant
parking area and over-sized back dock
CONSULTING
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
Havenwood Office Park
25700 I-45, Spring
FOR LEASE
• 250,000 SF Class A office building,
expected 4th quarter delivery
• High-end finishes, designed to be LEED
Silver Certified
• Located in between The Woodlands
Town Center and Exxon Mobil campus
• On-site property management
and leasing
INSIGHT.
LEADERSHIP.
EXPERTISE.
FOR LEASE
10077 Grogan’s Mill Road | Suite 135
The Woodlands, Texas 77380
(281) 367-2220
www.jbeardcompany.com
“After going to Parkway ER,
I wouldn’t go anywhere else!”
Harmony Plaza
3535 Rayford Rd., Spring
• New construction – est. delivery
June 2015
• Located near intersection of Rayford Rd
@ Grand Parkway 99, East of I-45 North
• 10,000 SF retail center
• Adjacent to HEB Grocery Development
• Est. Completion Fall 2015
Jeff Beard, CCIM
President
“Thank you Parkway ER
for saving my life!”
“
“My daughter fell and hurt her shoulder.
We did not want to wait hours for her
to be seen. A friend had told me about
Parkway ER Creekside. When we
arrived, we were greeted by Dr. Davis at
the door. My daughter was taken
straight back to a room, medicated for
her pain, and x-rays were taken. She
had a broken shoulder and was placed
in a shoulder immobilizer. Dr. Davis set
up an appointment for the next day
with the orthopedist. It was a
wonderful experience with no wait.
After going to Parkway ER, I wouldn’t
go anywhere else!”
-Patient Testimonial from L.D.
“Who would have ever thought my
abdominal pain was a heart attack?
My family took me to a local hospital
emergency room where I was told it
would be a four hour wait. My
daughters told me about Parkway ER
at Creekside. As soon as we arrived, I
was immediately taken to the room. I
was evaluated and treated by Dr.
Kukkalli. I was actually having a heart
attack and was transferred to a local
hospital for an immediate cardiac
catheterization. Thank you Parkway
ER for saving my life!”
-Patient Testimonial from E.G.
CONTACT US FOR
OR MORE
MO
INFORMATION
832.761.7894 | parkwayER.com | [email protected] | 25450 Kuykendahl, Suite 300 | Tomball, TX 77375
Second location coming to HEB Harmony Shopping Complex Summer 2015
Best Emergency Room
IN-NETWORK, IN QUICK, OUT FAST.
2 minutes south
of HEB Creekside
between
Woodforest Bank
and Stripes
5
Spring | Klein Edition • April 2015
FROM THE GENERAL MANAGER
PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS
John and Jennifer Garrett
PUBLISHER - HOUSTON METRO
Jason Culpepper
GENERAL MANAGER
Patty McHugh, [email protected]
Editorial
Cathy Kincaid
Shannon Colletti
MANAGING EDITOR Emily Roberts
EDITOR Matt Stephens
REPORTER Ariel Carmona Jr.
COPY EDITOR Richard Guerrero
STAFF WRITERS Marie Leonard, Liza Winkler
CONTRIBUTING WRITER Carrie Taylor
FOUNDING EDITOR
EXECUTIVE EDITOR
Advertising
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE
Valerie Sanders
Desiree Bohls
ACCOUNT COORDINATOR
Design
It’s hard to believe we
launched the inaugural
issue of Community
Impact Newspaper’s
Spring/Klein edition in
April 2014. In the past
year we met many new
friends, told the stories of
business owners throughout the community and
have strived to bring you
the latest in relevant,
important news.
Although we are
pleased by the quality of the publication in its first year,
we are really just getting started.
In the months ahead, development and growth will
continue to be a major focus of our in-depth reporting. With the Grand Parkway projected to be completed near the end of 2015 and plans for a host of new
neighborhoods and commercial developments, it is an
exciting time for our community.
Klein ISD is at the center of much of that growth. One
of our lead stories this month delves into the upcoming
KISD bond referendum, which will be on the ballot May
9. The story provides bond package details, including
construction costs for three new schools, and how KISD
will accommodate new students as the 10th-fastestgrowing district in the state.
Check out our business profile this month showcasing Copperfield’s Books on Page 10. Thanks to the hard
work and collaboration of this passionate mother and
daughter duo, these new owners have renovated a long
frequented bookstore in the region, providing a warm,
welcoming atmosphere for fellow avid readers.
Enjoy this edition of Community Impact Newspaper,
and thank you—the readers and leaders of this community—for making this first year so spectacular.
Patty McHugh
GENERAL MANAGER
[email protected]
Derek Sullivan
GRAPHIC DESIGNER Michael Martinez,
STAFF DESIGNERS Evelia Gramajo
ART PRODUCTION MANAGER Jenny Tenbush
CREATIVE DIRECTOR
Business
Claire Love
Cody Leitholt
CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER
CIRCULATION SPECIALIST
About us
John and Jennifer Garrett began Community
Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pflugerville, Texas.
The company’s mission is to build communities of
informed citizens and thriving businesses through
the collaboration of a passionate team. Now, with 19
markets in the Austin, Houston and Dallas/Fort Worth
metro areas, the paper is distributed to over
1.4 million homes and businesses.
Contact us
8400 N. Sam Houston Parkway W., Ste. 220
Houston, TX 77064 • 281-469-6181
impactnews.com
[email protected]
ADVERTISING [email protected]
COMMENTS [email protected]
SUBSCRIPTIONS impactnews.com/subscriptions
PRESS RELEASES
COMMUNITY FEEDBACK
TAKE THE POLL
LAST MONTH’S POLL RESULTS
With an estimated 13,000 additional students set to enroll in
the district in the next few years, Klein ISD is preparing for the
growth with a $498.1 million bond referendum on the May 9
ballot. The bond features new construction projects as well as
renovations, technology, safety and security, and buses.
In our March issue, we reported on many of the parks and
pathway projects that have developed along Cypress Creek
in the past decade or could be on the horizon. Since 2004,
24 parks and 15 trail projects have been developed along
the creek.
Do you support Klein ISD’s
$498.1 million bond referendum?
What park and pathway projects are
you most likely to use?
Walking, jogging trails
Yes
No. I do not believe the projects justify the 10-cent tax
rate increase
No. The projected growth does not justify the need for these projects
Parks
25%
Bike trails and bike lanes
I’m still unsure
Take the poll online at impactnews.com/skl-poll.
25%
I am not likely to use any parks or pathway projects
Look for the results right here in next month’s print edition of
Community Impact Newspaper.
Turn on FOX 26 NEWS,
download the MyFoxHouston app,
log on to www.myfoxhouston.com
for more local news with IMPACT.
© 2015 COMMUNITY IMPACT LICENSING LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. NO REPRODUCTION OF ANY
PORTION OF THIS ISSUE IS ALLOWED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION FROM THE PUBLISHER.
33.33%
Yes, but I do not agree with all projects within the bond
16.67%
Ponds and lakes
0%
Results from an unscientific Web survey, collected 3/11/15–3/26/15
6
Community Impact Newspaper • impactnews.com
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TM; © 2015 COMMUNITY IMPACT LICENSING LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
Now Open
2 Chicago-based Gino’s East opened
in the Willowbrook area Feb. 26 at 17116
Hwy. 249, Houston. The restaurant offers
signature deep-dish pizza options along
with new Texas-inspired options, such as
the BBQ Brisket Za, and appetizers, such
as mozzarella sticks and deep-dish nachos.
Gino’s East also features a selection of
cocktails, wine and craft beer at the new
location. www.ginoseast.com
1 Brixology Crafted Cocktails opened
Feb. 16 at 110 Vintage Park Blvd., Ste. Q,
Houston. The upscale bar specializes in
crafted and old-fashioned cocktails and
makes syrups and freshly squeezed juices
in-house. Light appetizers are on the menu
as well. 281-374-6100.
www.brixologybar.com
HOUSTON
SAM
April 18, 2015 — 11 am to 6 pm
Map not to scale
3 Hacienda Isabel Mexican Grill
opened a second Houston-area location at
18955 Hwy. 249, Houston, on March 10.
In addition to traditional Mexican dishes,
such as tamales and chicken chalupas, the
restaurant also offers seafood, party packs
and a full cantina serving beer, wine and
margaritas. 832-688-5525.
www.facebook.com/pages/haciendaisabel-mexican-grill/278055682321119
FOOD
5 Chipotle Mexican Grill opened a new
Spring location Feb. 4 at 1600 Louetta
Road, Ste. A, Spring. The restaurant chain’s
menu includes burritos, tacos and a variety
of Tex-Mex favorites as well as beverages.
281-602-3500. www.chipotle.com
6 Impress for Less opened a location
March 19 in the Willowbrook area at 17335
Hwy. 249, Houston. The business offers
discounts on home decor and department
store brands for men, women and children.
The store also carries shoes and accessories
like handbags and jewelry. 281-469-1101.
www.impressforless.com
7 Luxury Warehousing opened its first
location in January at 4115 Kreinhop
Road, Spring. The business offers a 24-unit
warehouse condo for customers to store
valuables, such as vehicles, in climatecontrolled spaces. The warehouse offers
surveillance for security, access control
entry and a clubhouse. 800-280-5897.
www.luxurywarehousing.com
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4 Lush Fresh Handmade Cosmetics
opened its fifth Houston location April
10 within the Willowbrook Mall at 1596
Willowbrook Mall, Houston. The store is
stocked with the brand’s signature bath
bombs and fresh face masks as well as
other cosmetic products. Lush uses organic
fruit, vegetables and oils to create its
distinctive beauty products.
www.lushusa.com
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Huffsmith Rd.
ion Rd. IMPACTS
8 Bluejay Pharmacy opened Feb. 13 at
8344 Spring Cypress Road, Ste. A, Spring.
The compounding pharmacy offers
discontinued or backorder items as well
as alternatives to commercial products.
Bluejay also carries biogenic hormones.
A nutritionist is on staff to provide
nutritional counseling. The pharmacy also
sells herbal products. 281-251-0904.
www.bluejaypharmacy.com
9 A new Jason’s Deli location opened
March 30 at 22424 Hwy. 249, Houston.
The restaurant offers freshly made items
ranging from sandwiches to soups, salads
and wraps. The new location also features a
Crawfish, Corn, Potatoes
Sausage & Chicken Jambalaya
Boudin Balls
Local Beers & Wine
LIVE MUSIC
GAMES
Frank Martin Gilligan
1pm – 4pm
Cornhole / Bags Tournament
(winning team receives two seats
in a cooking class of their choice)
7
Spring | Klein Edition • April 2015
15 Cypress Station Car Wash & Lube will
open May 15 at 9305 Spring Cypress Road,
Spring. The business will be an express,
full-service car wash offering detailing, oil
changes and state inspections.
www.cypressstationcarwash.com
11 DentisTrust opened March 9 at 24225
Kuykendahl Road, Ste. 100, Tomball. Dr.
Fernando Perez’s practice offers general
dentistry services, including pediatric
dentistry, family comprehensive services
for all ages, oral surgery, periodontive
care and restorative services. The dental
practice uses state-of-the-art equipment
and advanced technology for X-rays and
diagnostics. 832-761-1667.
www.dentistrust.com
Coming Soon
12 Bombshells Restaurant and Bar
has a new location under construction
in the Willowbrook area at 17575 Hwy.
249, Houston. The first Greater Houstonarea Bombshells opened in Spring last
fall, offering a varied selection of mixed
drinks as well as wine, bottled beer and
beer on tap. Bombshells menu features
wings, burgers, pizza, pasta and appetizers.
www.4bombshells.com
13 Children’s Lighthouse Learning will
open its 11th Houston-area location in May
at 20004 Champion Forest Drive, Spring.
Serving children up to age 12, CLLs centers
offer classroom space, indoor and outdoor
play areas, and on-site kitchens serving
healthy meals for students. The business
offers child care during normal school
hours, after-school programs and summer
camps. 832-510-7125.
www.childrenslighthouse.com
14 Prospect Park Sports Bar will open
a second location this spring in the
Willowbrook area at 17776 Hwy. 249,
Houston. The business will offer a full
menu along with cocktails, specialty
Celebrate with a
COMPLIMENTARY
mimosa for mothers*
during our Special
Mother’s Day Brunch.
16 An ishine Express Car Wash location
will open by the end of July at 8414 Spring
Cypress Road, Spring. The car wash facility
will offer state-of-the-art tunnels and
three-minute automated washes. It will
also offer express details, free vacuums for
customers and focus on fully-automated
washes. VIP packages will also be offered
for a monthly fee, which entitles clients to
unlimited washes. 855-322-1111.
www.ishinecorp.com
Relocations
17 Catherine’s Plus Sizes celebrated the
grand opening Feb. 13 of its new location
at 7530 FM 1960, Houston. The store
relocated from its previous location on
Willow Chase Drive. The clothing shop
carries tops, dresses, other clothing items
and accessories for plus-sized women.
281-671-1630.
http://catherines.lanebryant.com
18 Klein Crossing Dental relocated to
its new location March 23 at 6531 FM
2920, Spring, from its previous site at
6078 FM 2920. The family and cosmetic
dentistry practice offers general, restorative
and cosmetic dental services, including
cleaning and exams, root canal therapy
and periodontal treatments. 832-717-0595.
www.kleincrossingdental.com
New Management
19 Little Angels Playhouse, at 24525
Gosling Road, Spring, is under the new
management of owner Jose Rodriguez
since Rodriguez took over the business
in late 2014. The bilingual child care
and learning center underwent major
renovations, including the playground,
Anniversaries
20 A Dog’s Life Pet Salon and Boutique
celebrated its 10th anniversary
March 19 at 7812 Louetta Road, Spring.
The pet grooming business provides
grooming services for most breeds of cats
and dogs. A Dog’s Life also showcases
a boutique featuring a wide array of pet
goods, such as food, treats, apparel, leashes,
collars, toys and hygiene products, as well
as a few apparel items for animal lovers.
281-370-3647.
www.adogslifepetsalon.com
21 3 Stitches celebrates its 20th year of
business April 14 at 7822 Louetta Road,
Spring. The specialty retail needlework
shop carries cross-stitch needlepoint,
books, fabrics, canvases and threads. The
shop also offers needlework classes and has
periodic special events and giveaways.
281-320-0133. www.3stitches.com
Luxury Warehousing opened its first location in
January at 4115 Kreinhop Road, Spring.
11
Dr. Ferdnando Perez opened DentisTrust on March
9 at 24225 Kuykendahl Road, Ste. 100, Tomball.
Expansions
22 The Kroger located at 8745 Spring
Cypress Road, Spring, is being expanded
by 29,000 square feet. The grocer is
revamping its layout for an improved
shopping experience, featuring a drivethru pharmacy kiosk as well as new
floral, produce, deli, bakery, meat and
seafood departments. The new-look
Kroger will offer kitchen accessories and
a small appliances section, a baby section,
sushi kiosk, salad bar, and cheese and
antipasta island. The grocery store is also
adding new checkout lanes, painting and
updating the interior decor to include
new graphics and shopping aisle markers,
and incorporating new product cases and
fixtures. The expansion is scheduled to be
completed in May. 832-717-4100.
www.kroger.com
for Mom
for Mom
Celebrate
Reserve Your
table with a complimentary mimosa for mothers*
for Mom
online at during our Special Mother’s Day Brunch.
opentable.com/
Sunday, May 10th
Sunday,
May
11th
11 a.m. - 5 p.m.
main-restaurant
Sunday, May 10th 11
7
11 a.m. – 5 p.m.
a.m. – 5 p.m.
*With the purchase of an entree. Limited quantities. Must be 21 or older.
Courtesy DentisTrust
10 Enstyle Nails & Spa opened Feb. 18 at
3416 FM 2920, Ste. 150, Spring. The salon
offers nail enhancements, pedicures and
manicures, and waxings. The business sells
a large variety of powder, gel and enamel
colors to choose from. 281-367-8953.
www.enstylenailsandspa.com
furniture and classroom redecorations. A
new curriculum features math, language
and arts for children ages 6 weeks through
pre-K. Fresh menu options are offered
daily for students. 832-815-9590
www.littleangelsplayhouse.com
20
Courtesy A Dog’s Life Pet Salon and Boutique
drinks and beer.
www.prospectparksportsbar.com
A Dog’s Life Pet Salon and Boutique celebrated
its 10th anniversary at 7812 Louetta Road, Spring.
22
Expansions at the Kroger at 8745 Spring Cypress
Road, Spring, are set to be completed in May.
News or questions about Spring or Klein?
Email [email protected]
Get inspired and come explore the one-stop
shopping destination for everything home!
On I-45 just North of FM1960
281.645.0182
MainStreetAmerica.com
Matt Stephens
drive-thru. 281-257-4725.
www.jasonsdeli.com
Courtesy Luxury Warehousing
Compiled by Ariel Carmona Jr.
8
Community Impact Newspaper • impactnews.com
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nted
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9
Spring | Klein Edition • April 2015
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Spring Stuebner Rd.
Falvel Rd.
Ho
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Project updates
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Jo nes Rd.
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Construction continues on three segments of
Houston’s third outer loop. The segments
stretch from Hwy. 290 to Hwy. 59 and feature
major overpasses and interchanges at Hwy.
290, Hwy. 249 and I-45. For more information
visit www.grandparkway99.com.
Mill
s Rd
Timeline:
Project is estimated to be complete
.
in December 2015.
Cost: $1 billion
Funding sources: Texas Department of
Transportation
nR
d.
HOUSTON
SAM
Ariel Carmona Jr.
E . Airtex Dr.
2 Hardy Toll Road widening
ers
1 The Grand Parkway F-1, F-2 and G
S c h ro e d e r R d .
5 Hufsmith-Kohrville Road
Segment 6
Map not to scale
1960
l R d.
Ell
Cy
o
sw
Timeline: Project development will each
take about 18–24 months for each segment.
Cost: $5.3 million (Segment 2), $10.9 million
(Segment 3), $6.9 million (Segment 4)
Funding sources: Harris County Precinct 4
d.
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Project spotlight
st
We
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Lane closures for the Grand Parkway construction
A Harris County Toll Road Authority project,
the Hardy Toll Road will be widened from
FM 1960 to the Grand
Parkway with a third
Spears Rd .
lane
added in each direction. Construction
began in January on the toll road’s partial
interchange with the Grand Parkway.
45
Maintenance work will begin on the roadway
in April, while construction on the expansion
will begin this summer.
Map not to scale
Timeline: Project is expected to be
completed by mid-2016.
Cost: $95 million
Funding sources: HCTRA
I-45 northbound Hardy Toll Road exit, I-45 northbound frontage road left lane and right shoulder from
Spring Stuebner Road entrance ramp to north of Exit No. 72 will be closed through the summer of 2015.
3 Hufsmith-Kohrville Road
Segment 1
I-45 northbound entrance ramp for Spring Stuebner Road will be closed beginning 8 p.m.
April 23 through May 31.
Contractor Menade Inc. began construction
Feb. 16 to widen Hufsmith-Kohrville Road
from a two-lane asphalt roadway to a fourlane concrete boulevard section in Tomball.
Segment 1 spans from just south of Spring
ine
d.
Bl v
ter
45
1960
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HAHORUDSYTON
SAM
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on
249
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Hollow Glen Ln.
3
Rhodes Rd.
irlin
m
Ezekiel Rd.
The second, third and fourth segments of
the Hufsmith-Kohrville Road widening are all
in the design phase. Harris County plans to
widen the roadway from a two-lane asphalt
roadway to a four-lane concrete boulevard.
The engineering design of the segments will
begin once the study phase is completed.
No construction timetable has been
identified for the projects. Segment 2
stretches from Hollow Glen Lane to 500
feet north of Ezekiel Road, while Segment 3
stretches from that point to 500 feet north of
Holderrieth Road and Segment 4 extends to
Willow Creek Estates Lane.
2
er A
Ch
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2920
.
Stu
Bo
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4 Hufsmith-Kohrville Road
segments 2-4
.
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Fu
4
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Willow Creek
Estates Lane
Rd.
6
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H u fs m it h - K
S. Cherry St.
Holderrieth
5
d.
Timeline: Construction is slated for
completion in February 15, 2016.
Cost: $6.59 million
Funding sources: Harris County Precinct 4
yk
Dr.
Ku
49
Cypress Road north to Hollow Glen Lane.
W. Mossy Oaks Rd.
Gosling Rd.
Kuyke
t h c re st
2978
Nor
Hu
Compiled by Matt Stephens and Liza Winkler
W
.R
ay
fo
Zion Rd. d.
rd
R
Major projects in the area
News or questions about these or
other local transportation projects?
Email us at [email protected]
TRANSPORTATION UPDATES
I-45 northbound entrance ramp for FM 2920 will be closed beginning 8 p.m. April 28 through May 31.
Hildebrandt Road at Kuykendahl Road will be closed continuously from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through June 30.
into
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HCTRA is constructing the six-lane
electronically monitored raised road above
Hwy. 249 feeder lanes. All major items of
work are complete on the three sections
spanning south of Spring Cypress Road
to north of FM 2920. Construction on a
northbound left-turn lane at the Northpointe
Boulevard intersection and southbound
entrance ramp widening is 95 percent
complete. Crews will soon begin to widen
the southbound frontage road to create a
right-turn lane onto Northpointe Boulevard.
Timeline Project is estimated to be
complete by April 12.
Cost: $170 million
Funding sources: HCTRA
HYUNDAI
1
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The sixth segment of the Hufsmith Kohrville
Road widening project, also planned to
widen the road to four lanes, runs from
Willow Creek Estates Lane to FM 2920.
Timeline: Project is expected to be bid in
the fourth quarter of 2015.
Cost: $7.7 million
Funding sources: Harris County Precinct 4
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10
Community Impact Newspaper • impactnews.com
BUSINESS
Copperfield’s Books
Mother, daughter team up to save business
A
Tiffany Smith (left) co-owns Copperfield’s Books, which is operated daily by her mother, Donna Maxwell.
Turning the page
Owner Tiffany
Smith first worked
at Copperfield’s
Books as a
teenager in the
summer of
The
bookshop
receives
150
used books
1994
per week
Copperfield’s
houses over
50,000
books
Copperfield’s reaches out to local teachers to
find out which books are required reading.
For the bibliophile
In addition to offering every book genre
imaginable, Copperfield’s offers a wide array
of gift items for book lovers, including:
•Bookmarks
•Gift baskets
•Gift cards
•Jewelry
•Tote bags
•Other novelty items
Copperfield’s Books
The shop’s owners renovated the store last year.
am
pio
n
Fo
t
res
.
Dr
the thousands of books on the shelves.
To bring the store into the new millennium, the owners use a software program
designed for small bookstores that manages the shop’s inventory as well as the
point-of-sale and customer credit system.
“Once we get all of the inventory done,
we’ll get all of the inventory online so
folks will be able to go to our website and
Facebook page and link directly to an
online store,” she said.
Taking over the business would not
have been possible without Maxwell,
the owner said. Smith and her husband,
Shawn, both still work full-time jobs and
have three children. Operating the shop
on a daily basis falls on the shoulders of
her retired mother.
“She has read every genre, so there’s
no better person to have working in a
bookstore,” Smith said.
Maxwell said the job has been a dream
come true, and she has enjoyed partnering with her daughter on the business.
She said emphasizing reading with her
daughter was important at a young age.
“You want your children to learn as
much as possible, and I grew up reading,”
Maxwell said. “I loved reading, and I
wanted to pass that love to her.”
Tiffany said the community has
embraced the new owners and business
continues to grow. Despite the store’s
initial success, Tiffany said there are still
many changes she hopes to implement,
including growing the store’s online customer base and offering more activities
for customers.
Smith said expansion is also an option
if space became available. The store
already has a small room in the back the
owners hope to use as meeting space for
community events.
“There are so many things we want
to do, but it just takes time,” she said.
“That’s been our biggest learning [curve]
is the time it takes to get things done.”
Ch
s a teenager working at Copperfield’s Books more than 20
years ago, Tiffany Smith often
dreamed with her mother, Donna Maxwell, of owning a shop like Copperfield’s
one day.
“My mom and I always just loved the
store from even back then,” Tiffany said.
“We would joke that if it ever went out of
business, we’d buy it.”
So when the bookstore posted a sign
notifying the community it was going
out of business in early 2014, Maxwell
brought the idea back to her daughter.
“At first I laughed and said, ‘Sure mom,
because with our jobs and three kids, this
is something [my husband and I] can just
take on,’” Tiffany said. “I mentioned it to
my husband really as more of a joke. …
But a few days later he sends me a text,
‘You know, I’ve been thinking about that
bookstore.’”
The Smiths met with owner Virginia
Schammerhorn, who originally opened
the shop with her husband in the late
’80s or early ’90s. After some research on
small bookstores, they bought the store
by the end of February 2014 and began
renovations before reopening the shop
April 5, 2014.
Longtime customers at Copperfield’s
may have noticed changes in the past
year. The desk next to the store’s entrance
that was once piled several feet high with
books as well as the dusty, packed shelves
have been replaced with an open,
welcoming atmosphere, a children’s area
at the entrance, new flooring and a reading area with chairs near the center.
“The place before was really maximized for space [to] cram in as many
shelves and books as possible,” Smith
said. “We really tried to optimize it more
now for the customer experience.”
Tiffany said one of the most significant
challenges the new owners faced was
developing a computerized inventory for
Photos by Matt Stephens
By Matt Stephens
The addition of a small seating area has allowed
the store to host book signings for local authors.
MEET OUR
PHARMACISTS
tta
e
ou
.
Dr
L
8220 Louetta Road, Ste. 106, Spring
832-761-5559
www.copperfieldsbooks.net
Hours: Mon.-Wed., Fri.-Sat. 10 a.m.6 p.m.; Thu. 10 a.m.-7 p.m.
NO
W
OP
EN
A Compounding Pharmacy
that is committed to serving physicians
and patients by finding creative
solutions to unique medical situations.
Nutritionist on site!
281.251.0904
Dr. Kendra McMullin and Dr. Tim Schroeder
8344 Spring Cypress Rd, Suite A, Spring
@ Champion Forest and Spring Cypress, next to The Hill Dental Group
www.bluejaypharmacy.com
11
Spring | Klein Edition • April 2015
Ma
get ke 20
rid 15 t
of y he
our year
pai you
n!
Klein
The bistro features a variety of appetizers, including crispy egg rolls and spring rolls.
• Serving the community since
1978 with a HANDS on approach
to reliving pain.
Chiropractic
Clinic,
• Let
us help you with
-Neck P.C.
Pain
Nathan
N. -Sciatica
Whitaker,-DegenerD.C.
• Back
Pain
ative Disc Disease -and MUCH
MORE!
Photos by Ariel Carmona Jr.
• Serving the community since 1978
with a HANDS ON approach to
relieving pain.
• Let us help you with: Headaches,
Neck Pain, Back Pain, Sciatica,
Degenerative Disc Disease and
MUCH MORE!
Ba Mien Bistro’s sandwiches, including the grilled beef sandwich, are served on crispy French bread.
DINING
Ba Mien Bistro
Sisters take over successful restaurant
Vermicelli bowls are on the menu, including pork,
chicken, beef and shrimp options.
By Ariel Carmona Jr.
V
The Khuc sisters, Ty (left) and Bee took ownership
of Ba Mien Bistro in January.
Popular menu items
•Noodle soups: The dishes are served with
rice, noodles, bean sprouts, cilantro, onion,
Thai basil, lime wedges and jalapeno slices.
(Prices vary)
•Pho combo: This dish consists of flank
steak served with brisket, meatballs and
traditional Vietnamese noodles. ($10)
•Vermicelli bowls: Served with rice noodles,
lettuce, cilantro, pickled carrots, daikon,
cucumbers, crushed peanuts, sautéed scallions and fish sauce ($7-$10)
•Grilled pork Banh Mi sandwich: Served
on a crispy baguette with garlic, butter, inhouse pate spread, cucumber slice, cilantro,
pickled carrots and daikon ($4)
Dr. Nathan Whitaker
Ba Mien Bistro
“Caring for you like family!”
te
Ve
sM
ran
1960
ha
m
ori
em
p
res
tD
r.
5102 FM 1960 W., Houston
281-781-8138
www.facebook.com/bamienbistro
Hours: Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.- 9 p.m.
Conveniently open 6 days a week
with same day appointments!
Call us today and relieve your PAIN!
.
Dr
Fo
al
ion
Mi sandwiches and vermicelli bowls.
Sandwiches are prepared with crispy
French bread and fresh ingredients.
Bee takes care of the operational side
of the business while her older sister
handles the cooking. They also get occasional help in the kitchen from relatives,
including nieces and nephews.
However, the sisters did not always
plan to operate a restaurant. Both sisters
earned chemistry degrees from Bridgewater State University in Boston in 2005.
Their mother, Thuy Nguyen, owns a
pharmacy in Vietnam and had hoped her
daughters would one day return home to
go into the family business.
“My mom worried about us,” Ty said.
“She encouraged us to go wherever we
liked, but first we had to get a degree.”
The Khuc sisters hoped to transfer to
pharmacy school, but said they found
the expense and the time required for
the career to be a major investment. The
sisters moved from Boston to Houston
to live near relatives in 2006 and worked
as chemical analysts for five years before
deciding to change careers.
The sisters decided against pursuing
a pharmaceutical career in favor of the
restaurant industry.
“We decided to just stop and go to
work [in the food industry],” Ty said. “I
said to her, ‘[Bee] why don’t we do what
we loved and always talked about?’ So
last September we started looking for
restaurants and that’s when this one
popped up.”
Now in a line of work they enjoy, the
Khucs said they see themselves running
the restaurant for many years to come.
“You never know where life will take
you,” Ty said. “You don’t pick your
career. Sometimes the career picks you.”
C
ietnamese sisters Huyen and
Tien Khuc moved to Houston
from Boston in 2006 after
graduating from college. The pair shared
a passion for food and a dream to own a
restaurant showcasing healthy food alternatives from their native culture.
Known today by their Americanized
names, Bee (Huyen) and Ty (Tien), the
sisters purchased Ba Mien Bistro in January and have kept the restaurant and its
menu intact. As restaurant owners, Bee
and Ty are living out a dream they have
had for years.
“I always had an idea to run a restaurant,” Ty said.
Living in the Spring area, the sisters
learned Ba Mien Bistro was for sale
after seeing an ad in a newspaper. The
previous owners, who had operated the
restaurant since 2012, wanted to sell the
restaurant to retire and spend more time
with their grandchildren.
In learning about the restaurant, Ty
said the eatery was tailor-made for her
aesthetic tastes and price range.
“I love this setup,” Ty said. “The food
that I wanted to sell is the same food that
[Ba Mien] already had. They [previous
owners] put their hearts and minds into
it, but they said they believed we could
make it better. That’s why when this
opportunity became available, I just
grabbed it.”
The young restaurateur said she did
not want to change anything about the
restaurant. Ty said she kept the same
recipes and menu so they could retain
the consistency their regulars had grown
to love.
Popular dishes on the menu include
a pho combo noodle soup consisting of
flank steak, brisket and meatballs, Banh
6518 Louetta Rd.
Spring, TX 77379
281.370.4251
www.kleinchiroclinic.com
12
Community Impact Newspaper • impactnews.com
CHAMBER
By Matt Stephens
Houston may be the fourth-largest city
in the country, but it is surrounded by
an unincorporated area that would itself
be the fourth-largest city in the country,
according to Jack Cagle, Harris County
Precinct 4 Commissioner.
“That’s mind-boggling when you see
that combination we have,” Cagle said.
Cagle was one of a dozen speakers
at the Houston Northwest Chamber of
Commerce’s Economic Outlook Forum
on March 27 at Lone Star College-University Park. The forum focused on growth
in the region and how different facets of
that growth are being addressed.
Mobility concerns
Mobility and the anticipated effects of
the Grand Parkway were a hot topic at the
forum. Although Segments F-1, F-2 and G
of the Grand Parkway are set to open by
the end of 2015, Harris County is already
preparing for rapid growth in the region
with other mobility projects, Cagle said.
The Tomball Tollway, a six-lane, electronically monitored tollway along
Hwy. 249, is set to open April 12, Cagle
said. The project was one of many that
county officials worked to fund years ago.
Officials—including Cagle and Judge Ed
Emmett—developed a plan on Christmas
Eve 2010 to accommodate the incoming growth through significant mobility
projects countywide.
“They were all put together as a
complete package with different financing from each group so we could move
forward now instead of doing [Hwy.] 290
10-15 years from now, [Hwy.] 249 never,
Hardy Toll Road five-10 years from now
and Grand Parkway sometime in 10-15
years,” he said. “All that is under construction [today].”
Transportation projects will be key
drivers to growth among school districts,
said Pat Guseman, president of Population & Survey Analysts, a demographics
firm that works with Houston-area school
districts, such as Klein ISD. Guseman said
PASA often targets large, undeveloped
parcels of land near new thoroughfares
or major roadway improvements when
projecting growth.
“These are parcels we target in Conroe,
Klein, Spring and Aldine [ISDs] we think
will have near-term impacts,” she said.
From 2014-24, PASA estimates 23,917
Matt Stephens
Leaders discuss growth in northwest
Harris County at economic forum
Noble Energy CEO David Stover discusses the company at the Economic Outlook Forum on March 27.
new housing units will be constructed
within Klein ISD, the 10th fastest growing
school district in the state. About
41 percent of the new housing units will
be multifamily developments.
“It’s because Klein is virtually builtout,” she said. “It’s a mature district, and
there’s still a demand for living in Klein.
It’s a coveted school district. So the new
housing simply becomes higher density.”
Growing businesses
The most important indicator of
growth, Guseman said, is job stability.
It is predicted that there will be 20,000–
30,000 new homes constructed in 2015
in the Greater Houston area, resulting in
a 1–34 percent downturn depending on
the area, she said. However, areas in high
demand with new offices related to the
energy sector may see no downturn in
new housing starts at all.
Job stability in the area has been a key
goal for the Lone Star College System’s
Small Business Development Center.
SBDC Senior Advisor Don Ball said
within the last five months, the SBDC has
helped start 29 new companies, helped
clients create 231 new jobs and helped
them obtain $46.3 million in capital.
“This is significant, because it shows the
strength of this community as a center of
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13
Spring | Klein Edition • April 2015
growth for the Northwest region,” he said.
He said the SBDC works with a number
of different industries, including manufacturing, energy, service, technology,
food, health care and commodities.
“It really is exciting to work with small
business owners and help them stabilize
their operations,” Ball said.
One of several companies that has
moved its headquarters to northwest Harris County in recent years, Noble Energy
continues work on its second office building at Hwy. 249 and Louetta Road.
Noble Energy CEO David Stover said
Noble Energy Center 1, which was built in
June 2013, houses more than 800 employees. With the completion of the adjacent
Noble Energy Center 2 in June, another
207 employees will be moving from the
Glenborough location in Houston and
another 100 positions will be added from
the company’s Ardmore, Oklahoma office.
“We’re excited to have everybody fully
located [in the headquarters],” Stover said.
“Our office here in Houston is our largest
office. It’s our corporate office. All of our
technical work [is] done here in Houston.”
Stover said 30 percent of the employees
live near the headquarters, a number he
expects will grow. The CEO said he felt
confident about the company’s future.
“We’re here to stay,” he said. “We’ve
formed a nucleus of our core operations
that has [grown], will grow in the future
and grow with this community.”
Houston Northwest Chamber of Commerce Economic Outlook Forum
Highest-growth school districts in Texas
Support for Grow Northwest
Nine of the top 10 districts with 20,000 or more
students that saw the most growth between
the 2013-14 and 2014-15 school years came
from within the Greater Houston area.
The Houston Northwest Chamber’s Grow Northwest initiative is working on an
improvement plan that hopes to improve security, economic development and
branding in unincorporated northwest Harris County. The initiative received support
at the economic outlook forum by members of Congress.
District
“Grow Northwest really sets out an ambitious and targeted
approach to growth in this region [by] better focusing on safer
communities, growing our local businesses [and] helping
our local businesses expand and create jobs in an economic
development initiative. Then just increasing the visibility, creating
an identity for the area that has a lot of unique identities, I think is
really a smart thing to do. People love living here, [and] they love
working here. This is where they want to raise families, but each
day is a constant competition with other communities in the area and with other
states in the country. The community has to step forward, has to set out that vision,
has to make it timely and achievable and [do] it in a way that brings the community
together. And I think Grow Northwest does exactly that. I’m really impressed with it
and am going to do all that I can to help it succeed.”
—Rep. Kevin Brady, R-The Woodlands
Student growth Percent growth
1. Frisco ISD
3,395
7.4%
2. Katy ISD
2,865
4.3%
3. Houston ISD
2,415
1.1%
4. Aldine ISD
2,135
3.2%
5. Cy-Fair ISD
1,684
1.5%
6. Conroe ISD
1,398
2.5%
7. Humble ISD
1,295
3.4%
8. Lamar CISD
1,276
4.7%
9. Fort Bend ISD
1,211
1.7%
10.Klein ISD
1,126
2.3%
2920
Small business growth
249
The area around Lone Star College-University
Park features thousands of small businesses,
or those with 500 or fewer employees.
3-mile radius
4,714 small businesses
5-mile radius
11,798 small businesses
10-mile radius
32,316 small businesses
s
es
pr
tt
ue
Lo
y
gC
rin
Sp
d.
aR
.
Rd
LSC-UP
1960
290
HOUSTON
SAM
Sources: Population & Survey Analysts,
Lone Star College Small Business
Development Center
“The Northwest area is [preparing]
for more and more people to come,
making sure the communities will
be safe, that the communities will
also have amenities for new housing
projects and also that there will be
opportunities for business—small
businesses and medium-sized
businesses—to grow and sell their products and employ
people in this area. The greatest thing about all that is
[Grow Northwest is] run by the community. People who
live here, work here, send their kids to school here, are
the ones who are planning this project, this initiative to
grow Northwest Harris County.”
—Rep. Ted Poe, R-Houston
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14
Community Impact Newspaper • impactnews.com
TEXAS HISTORY LESSON
#1003
Visit Texas Historical Sites near Houston
Spring and summer are upon us. A wonderful
time to take the family and visit historical sites
near Houston. These sites are a must for Texans or
Want-to-be Texans.
G
Washington on the Brazos State Park is a short
drive northwest. Take a picnic lunch and enjoy the
beautiful trees, wildflowers, and the Brazos River.
Located a few miles west of Navasota off Highway
105, just over the Brazos. It is operated by the
Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission. Visit the
Star of the Republic Museum, the Visitor’s Center;
take the guided tour of Independence Hall, where
on March 2, 1836, 59 brave men signed the Texas
Declaration of Independence. Go to the Gift Shop
where you will find books and gifts all about Texas.
Visit Barrington Living History Farm, the home
of Anson Jones, last president of the Republic of
Texas. See costumed interpreters perform and
explain the lifestyles of the mid 1800’s, and visit the
slave quarters. Enjoy your picnic in this beautiful
setting where the Republic of Texas was born.
B RI D
REEN
GE
NEEDHAM
COLLEGE PARK
S
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HF
G
O REST
THE WOODLANDS
GOLF CENTER
GO
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CRE
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LA
ND
SP
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MARKET
STREET
NORTH SHORE
PARK
LA
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FO
SIX PINES
RC
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PA
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ER
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S
ND
LA
O
WO
KE
LA
WOO
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SHADOWBEND
PARK
A
SE
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LAK
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TOWN
CENTER
THE
WOODLANDS
MALL
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THE
WOODLANDS
WATERWAY
TIMBERLOCH PL
AN DS PKWY
CYNTHIA
WOODS MITCHELL
PAVILION
CREEKWOOD
PARK
L
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SM
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OG
GR
SAWDUST
SPRING VALLEY
GOLF COURSE
The Battleship Texas is located in the park. The
U.S.S. Texas is the only U.S. Navy battleship to
survive both World War I and World War II. This
is a magnificent ship to tour. It was moved to the
park in 1948. The original funds to cover the cost
of the move were raised by donations of the school
children of Texas, who brought pennies, nickels and
dimes to local schools across Texas.
San Jacinto Day, April 21st – Every year on April
21st, the Sons of the Republic of Texas have a
ceremony on the north steps of the monument,
celebrating the battle that won independence for
the Republic of Texas. Master of Ceremonies will
be Ron Stone Jr. Awards will be given to students
for essays on Texas History. Keynote speaker
will be Larry Spasic, President of the San Jacinto
Museum of History. The public is welcome at
this event that begins at 11 am. At the end of the
ceremony there will be muskets and cannon fire.
Be early for a good seat.
Another great local Texas History Museum
is at the Steamboat House, also a fine Texas
steakhouse and restaurant. You will enjoy your
visit and your meal.
– Charlie Fogarty KSJ, proprietor
45
S.
GLEN LOCH
THE
WOODLANDS
EXPRESS
M ILLBEN
D
THE WOODLANDS RESORT
GOLF COURSE
GOSLING
L AKE ROBBIN
S
L
WO
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FR
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MOONEY
PARK
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San Jacinto Battleground State Historical Site
is about 18 miles east of Downtown Houston,
located just off the Houston Ship Channel. It was
at this site on April 21, 1836, that the Texas Army,
under the command of General Sam Houston,
defeated the Mexican Army under the command
of Dictator Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, and won
Texas Independence from Mexico. The Republic
of Texas was an independent nation for almost
10 years, until Texas joined the United States of
America on February 19, 1846, and became the
28th state. The park covers over 1,200 acres. In
1960 the battleground was designated a National
Historical Landmark by Congress. Visit the 570’
San Jacinto Monument, the San Jacinto Museum
of History within the monument, and the Jesse
Jones Theatre of Texas.
On Saturday, April 18, 2015, the San Jacinto
Festival and Battle re-enactment will be held,
beginning at 9 am until 6 pm. Booth spaces
around the west side of the monument will have
everything from educating on how to fire a cannon,
to the flags of Texas, food and entertainment.
At 3:30 pm is the annual re-enactment of the
battle. Cannons and muskets will be firing blanks.
Children and adults love watching the battle.
SAWM
ILL RD
SAWDUST
SIERRA PINES
N
W
THE
WOODLANDS
EXPRESS
HARDY
TOLL
E
EXXONMOBIL
CAMPUS
GE
THE
WOODLANDS
PK
WY
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SPRINGWOODS VI
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RECOGNIZED STEAKHOUSE
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8045 N. Sam Houston Pkwy W.
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832-912-1845 CALL FOR RESERVATIONS
www.steamboathousetx.com
15
Spring | Klein Edition • April 2015
LEGISLATURE
Legislation filed to better regulate
noise in unincorporated Harris County
By Marie Leonard and Matt Stephens
Law enforcement officials in Harris
County could have additional tools to
address noise pollution if a new law is
passed by the Legislature this session.
State Rep. Patricia Harless, R-Spring,
filed House Bill 153 in November after
hearing numerous complaints from
constituents about music and noise in
her district. In particular, noise from the
Something Wicked Festival at Sam Houston Race Park in late October generated
multiple concerns from nearby residents.
“The bass and the music was very loud,”
Harless said. “It was on a Saturday night
and Sunday night until 2 in the morning.
I was getting literally hundreds of calls
[from] as far as Huntwick [Forest].”
Unlike the city of Houston and other
municipalities, Harris County does
not have the power to pass ordinances.
Instead, county governments in Texas
can only enforce regulations that have
first been approved by the state Legislature. Therefore, the county can only rely
on the state’s noise ordinance to police
noisy disruptions.
“It’s not that you can’t have noise, it’s
that you can’t have noise above a certain
decibel level,” said Barbara Thomason,
president of the Houston Northwest
Chamber of Commerce. “It’s no different
than what the city of Houston has, and I
think it’s a good thing to have.”
Harless said she filed a much broader
nuisance bill in 2007 that included noise
and loud music. However, the bill was
unsuccessful.
“Our intention was
mainly just music
and loud noise when
neighbors are playing
[music] over 85
decibels.”
­–­­­State Rep. Patricia Harless, R-Spring
The new legislation designates noise
cannot be more than 85 decibels heard at
a distance from 50 feet or more outside
a property. HB 153 would affect counties
with 3.3 million people or more, which
only includes Harris County.
“In rural Texas where there’s fewer
people, you may have a concert out in
a pasture that nobody hears,” Harless
said. “You don’t want to give counties too
broad an authority for what you do on
your private property.”
Electricity and gas utility companies
are exempt from the legislation, even
though large generators often make noise
louder than 85 decibels. This exemption is
necessary because if a company is issued a
citation, turning off a generator could cut
electricity, power and other utilities.
However, Harless said she is considering the addition of other exemptions, such
as oil and gas companies.
Energy companies have already
expressed concerns about the legislation
since drilling a well for an oil or gas pipeline can also create loud noise.
“We’re working through [the exemption
process] and trying to see how the city of
Houston does it,” Harless said. “The last
thing we want to do is pull someone that
is providing a service to the population
into unintended consequences.”
The city of Houston’s noise ordinance
allows for 65 decibels during the day and
58 decibels at night, which Harless said
she believes is too low.
“We wanted [to prevent noise] that
would sustain damage [to the ears of
residents],” she said. “Our intention was
mainly just music and loud noise when
neighbors are playing [music] over 85
decibels. Then the police could issue a
citation.”
If passed the legislation would also
allow Harris County to issue permits for
certain residents or businesses to exceed
the decibel level, but Harless said she
could not comment on how the permits
might be implemented.
“That would be up to the county commissioners how they would do that,” she
said. “When we give them the authority
to do ordinances, from that point on it’s
their judgment call.”
Proposed MUD legislation
Harless filed another piece of
legislation this session that could have
significant effects on her constituents.
House Bill 2528, filed March 6, would
allow municipal utility districts in
unincorporated parts of counties with
populations greater than 4 million people
to fund economic development through
bills from water customers.
Thomason, a proponent of HB 2528, said
the bill could be a significant driver of
economic development in a region that
does not have many funding options at its
disposal.
“We don’t have the tools in our toolkit
to fund economic development, and
communities around us do,” Thomason
said. “We do not have the ability to have a
municipality, and we don’t have the ability
to put in a management district.”
Thomason said the legislation would
allow MUDs to feature a checkoff box
on water bills designating funding
to particular projects. There is a
precedent for checkoff boxes as a
funding mechanism, she said, and other
communities have shown interest in the
legislation to fund development.
“We don’t know what level of participation
we could get,” she said. “Anybody who
has issues with the community that needs
addressing would have a means to act.”
Should a management district be created
in the region that could provide funding
for economic development, Thomason
said the legislation would no longer
be necessary. However, the bill could
provide funding in the meantime.
“We can’t sit idly by and wait for other
areas around us to develop,” she said.
What’s that noise?
State Rep. Patricia Harless, R-Spring, filed a bill that
would allow county commissioners to regulate noise
in unincorporated parts of Harris County.
City of Houston ordinance: allows
for 65 decibels during the day and 58
decibels at night
Proposed Harris County ordinance:
would allow for 85 decibels at a
distance of no more than 50 feet from
a property
60 decibels
Normal conversation
from 3 feet
80 decibels
City traffic
90-95
95 decibels
Jackhammer
decibels
At 90-95 decibels, health professionals say
long-term or continuous exposure to such
noise may result in hearing loss.
Source: National Institute on Deafness & Communication
Disorders
115 decibels
loud concert
165 decibels
12-gauge shotgun blast
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16
Community Impact Newspaper • impactnews.com
News from the 84th Texas Legislature
During this legislative session, Community Impact Newspaper is reporting on bills and funding
for the state on budget, economy and small business, transportation, public education, higher
education, health care and more. All information on this page is as of March 31, 2015.
Full House, Senate begin hearing legislation
Texas lawmakers filed more than 6,300
bills for the 84th Legislature before the
March 13 bill-filing deadline, according to
the Legislative Reference Library of Texas.
That March 13 deadline represented
the first 60 calendar days of the session in
which the Senate and House could file any
number of bills but only take action on
HEALTH CARE
emergency items declared by Gov. Greg
Abbott. The governor made those declarations Feb. 17 on early education, higher
education, border security, transportation
and ethics.
With the 60-day deadline passed, the
full House and Senate may take action on
any bill.
TRANSPORTATION
By Amy Denney
On March 4 the Texas Senate approved SB 5 that would dedicate
the first $2.5 billion of motor vehicle sales tax revenue from that fiscal
year to the state’s general revenue fund and the second $2.5 billion
to the Texas Department of Transportation. On Feb. 25 the Senate
Committee on Transportation passed the bill, which is making its way
through the House of Representatives. Committee Chairman Sen.
Sen. Robert Nichols Robert Nichols, R-Jacksonville, said the purpose of the bill would
be to help bridge the annual shortfall in the State Highway Fund and
help TxDOT plan 10 years out.
“We need something to dedicate to transportation whether it be new or existing
revenue,” Nichols said. “What this does is it dedicates an existing, known, very predictable
revenue source. Not all of it. We’re trying to protect general revenue, too.”
Opponents of the bill—including Sen. Rodney Ellis, D-Houston, who was the lone “no”
vote in the Senate committee—are leery about constitutionally dedicating money that went
to support other purposes, such as education.
On March 26 the House approved HB 80 on final reading with a vote of 104-39 to
ban texting while driving statewide. Members approved several amendments, such as
exempting texting while driving when completely stopped and exempting law enforcement
during an emergency.
“The main thing is we need to say it is a safety issue in the state,” said Rep. Tom
Craddick, R-Midland, who authored the bill. “Driving is a privilege, not a right.”
PUBLIC EDUCATION
By Kelli Weldon
Kelli Weldon
Numerous education bills are being
considered, with subjects ranging from
school funding to e-cigarette bans.
A bill that directs the Texas Education
Agency commissioner to give schools
A-F performance ratings, SB 6, passed
the Senate on March 31. The Senate
Committee on Education chairman,
Larry Taylor, R-Friendswood, filed SB 6.
On March 26 the Senate committee
heard support for and opposition to bills The Senate Committee on Education meets March 26.
including school choice bill SB 276, which
Sen. Donna Campbell, R-New Braunfels, said would create a “taxpayer savings grant” to
cover some students’ private school costs.
The Senate passed SB 149, which would establish committees to determine if students
who pass classes but fail standardized tests can graduate, and it awaits a House Committee
on Public Education discussion. Also slated for consideration by the committee is HB 4, filed
by Rep. Dan Huberty, R-Houston, which outlines a “high-quality” statewide pre-K program.
HIGHER EDUCATION
By Jennifer Curington
WANT MORE TEXAS LEGISLATURE COVERAGE?
Follow us on Twitter @impactnews_skl and search for
#CITxLege or visit impactnews.com
CAMPUS CARRY RULES
• Concealed handguns would be
Campus safety and funding are two priorities for most
allowed on the grounds and in
university and college campuses in Texas for this session.
buildings owned by a college or
The Senate passed SB 11 to allow a person with a
university.
concealed handgun license to carry his firearm on university
• Rules can be established in
and college campuses throughout the state. Proponents
regard to storing the handguns
of the bill say it will increase safety on campuses, but
on grounds but cannot prevent
opponents say it could open the door for more violence.
licensed individuals from carryMany university and college administration members,
ing a concealed weapon.
including those at The University of Texas at Austin, have
voiced concern and asked the measure not be put into law.
The House version of the bill did not make it out of its assigned committees, and the
House will vote instead on the Senate version.
Different bills in the Senate and House pertaining to research funding are waiting to
be heard in front of the full floor of their respective chambers after making it through
the committee process. SB 44 would allow grants or gifted funding to be used for
undergraduate research and undergraduate financial aid instead of only graduate programs.
HB 495 continues a funding program that assists nursing research programs with grant
money until 2019.
By Lyndsey Taylor
The House of Representatives’ Public Health Committee met March 31 and passed
several bills to move on for the House’s consideration.
The committee, chaired by Rep. Myra Crownover, R-Denton, approved the
recommendation that HB 467 move to the House. The bill relates to sex education,
including education about AIDS, HIV infections and other health-related topics, in primary
and secondary curriculum. The committee first read the bill Feb. 12.
The Public Health Committee also approved HB 1219. The bill, authored by Rep. Richard
Raymond, D-Laredo, includes occupational regulations for funeral homes and directors. A
vote on HB 2171 was reconsidered but left the committee pending as of March 31. HB 2171
is related to the information maintained in the immunization registry with the consent of an
individual after the person becomes an adult.
Academic health care leaders spoke to the committee March 31 about ways to improve
public health in the state. Presenters included representatives from Texas higher education
institutions, such as Dr. Ray Greenberg, executive vice chancellor of health affairs at The
University of Texas System. Greenberg cited United Health Foundation national data about
Texas, including that the state ranks last in the nation in percentage of pregnant women
who receive early prenatal care and that Texas has the third-highest teen pregnancy rate in
the nation.
“We’re here today because we see a very different future, one in which we will work
together as partners for the good of the millions of Texans whom we serve,” Greenberg said.
In other health care news, Gov. Greg Abbott’s strike force—a group formed to take swift
action—against the Health and Human Services Commission report was publicly released
March 30. The report details the need for changes in the commission’s leadership structure
and includes information about the “procurement of fraud-detection services by HHSC’s
Office of Inspector General from an Austin-based company called 21CT.” To read the
report, visit http://gov.texas.gov.
BUDGET
By Leslee Bassman
As of March 31, SB 2, the Senate’s General Appropriations Bill, remained in the Senate
Finance Committee. The general appropriations bill was filed by Chairwoman Sen. Jane
Nelson, R-Flower Mound, on Jan. 27.
A Senate vote was taken March 31 on SB 20, a bill Nelson authored that institutes
reformative measures for state agency contracting practices. The bill analysis states that
its purpose is to increase transparency and ensure a competitive bid process. The vote
tally was not available as of press time.
On March 31, SB 761, authored by Sen. Brandon Creighton, R-Conroe, passed out
of the Senate by a 23-7 vote. The bill includes a proposal to fund the insurance funds of
volunteer fire departments from the proceeds of fireworks sales.
On April 1 the House of Representatives passed HB 1, the General Appropriations Act.
HB 1, filed Feb. 9 by Chairman Rep. John Otto, R-Dayton, was debated by the House for
18 hours March 31.
The bill, with more than 300 amendments and a two-year budget of $210 billion,
increases funding for border security, public schools and highway construction, Rep. Tan
Parker, R-Flower Mound, said in a news release. It provides funding for tax relief and holds
the state budget increase to less than 2 percent annually, he said.
“Our plan includes funding increases for top priorities for all Texans and maintains our
long-standing history of fiscal discipline,” Parker said.
ECONOMY AND SMALL BUSINESS
By Joe Olivieri
As of March 31 the House Committee on
Economic & Small Business Development has
met eight times to discuss proposed legislation.
A key topic so far this session has been
revising the Major Events Trust Fund, which
uses state and local taxes to pay for the cost
of hosting special events such as Super Bowls
and basketball championships.
Following testimony, HB 900—a bill that
would make ESPN, NASCAR and Ultimate
The House Committee on Economic & Small
Fighting Championship events eligible to
receive funding from the events fund—passed
Business Development meets March 26.
through the committee March 13. The bill was
discussed March 26 and tabled.
Three bills—HB 1318, HB 1440 and HB 2074—are pending in committee. The bills
would make presidential general election debates, the Elite Rodeo Association World
Championships and the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association final event eligible for
METF funds.
As of March 31 the Senate Committee on Business & Commerce has met five times to
discuss proposed legislation.
SB 641 would attach a civil penalty of up to $1,000 per violation to anyone who violates
a section of the Finance Code related to debit and stored-value card surcharges. Following
testimony, the bill passed through committee March 23 and awaits action by the full Senate.
The committee was slated to discuss three bills—SB 335, SB 336 and SB 337—related to
government entities’ ability to obtain information, documents and records.
Joe Olivieri
AT THE CAPITOL
17
Spring | Klein Edition • April 2015
AT THE CAPITOL
UPDATES FROM YOUR STATE LEGISLATORS FOR SPRING AND KLEIN
News from the 84th Texas Legislature
SEN. PAUL BETTENCOURT • DISTRICT 7
SEN. JOHN WHITMIRE • DISTRICT 15
Top bills filed:
R-Houston
Elected: 2014
512-463-0107
[email protected]
Tomball
Top bills filed:
• Coauthored SB 515 to increase the
residence homestead exemption to
$30,000 and reduce the limitation of taxes
imposed by a school district on elderly
or disabled people. The bill was referred
Feb. 11 to the Senate Finance Committee.
• Coauthored SB 11 to permit license
holders to carry concealed handguns
on higher education campuses and
provide criminal penalty for violations.
The bill was passed by the Senate and
sent to the House on March 20.
Conroe
45
10
610
D-Houston
Elected: 1982
512-463-0115
[email protected]
senate.state.tx.us
REP. PATRICIA HARLESS • DISTRICT 126
Top bills filed:
• Authored HB 152, which would allow
Harris County commissioners to regulate
the sale and use of fireworks.
• Authored HB 399 and HB 401, which
would increase the gasoline tax and
vehicle registration fees, respectively, for
transportation funding.
• Authored constitutional amendments
HJR 24 and HJR 48 to dedicate vehicle
sales taxes to the State Highway Fund
and limit SHF funds to nontolled roads.
Tomball
6
HOUSTON
SAM
Jersey
Village
Humble
• Authored SB
135, which
59
has passed
10
out of the
Senate. The bill
610
Pasadena
relates to the
organization of
a grand jury.
• Authored SB 308, which also passed
out of the Senate. The bill would place
private university police under the Open
Records Act.
• Authored SB 108, relating to the
prevention of truancy. The bill was
placed on the intent calendar on
March 31.
Follow us on Twitter—@impactnews_skl—for Spring and
Klein, and throughout the legislative session search for
#CITxLege for coverage that matters to you.
R-Cypress
Elected: 2008
512-463-0661
[email protected]
house.state.tx.us
Higher education
Public education
Health care
Budget
Transportation
Small business
and economy
More legislative coverage at #TxLege and communityimpact.com
REP. ALLEN FLETCHER • DISTRICT 130
R-Spring
Elected: 2006
512-463-0496
[email protected]
249
WANT MORE TEXAS
LEGISLATURE COVERAGE?
REP. DEBBIE RIDDLE • DISTRICT 150
Top bills filed:
Tomball
• Authored HB
937, which
290
expands gun
249
rights on
Waller
public college
6
campuses
to allow
concealed handgun license holders to
conceal carry inside campus buildings.
The bill is pending in the Homeland
Security and Public Safety Committee.
• Authored HB 121, which allows drivers
with warrants for unpaid traffic tickets
to pay fines via debit or credit without
going to jail. The bill is pending in the
Criminal Jurisprudence Committee.
R-Spring
Elected: 2002
512-463-0572
[email protected]
house.state.tx.us
S E N I O R
y
rd
45
ad
Ro
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wart
Rd.
resswood Dr.
Cyp
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2 03 0 5 H o l z wa r t h Ro ad
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Call 281-257-2299
L I V I N G
ASS I STE D L I VING & M EM ORY CAR E
Ha
Spr
Top bills filed:
45
• Authored
House Joint
Resolution 65 Tomball
to prohibit
government
249
interference
with speech
by religious leaders and students. The
resolution was referred to the House
State Affairs Committee on March 3.
• Coauthored House Bill 415 to permit
concealed handgun license holders to
openly carry a handgun and provide
violation penalties. The bill was referred to
the House Homeland Security and Public
Safety Committee on Feb. 16.
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18
Community Impact Newspaper • impactnews.com
Introducing
COMPASSIONATE, QUALITY CARE AND CONVENIENT LOCATIONS IN SPRING/KLEIN.
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Celebrating our 10th Anniversary Season!
19th Annual
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Monday, May 11, 2015
1:00 p.m. Shotgun Start
NW Houston’s Critically Acclaimed Professional Theatre
May 7 through
May 31
Augusta Pines Golf Club
18 Augusta Pines Dr.
Spring, TX 77389
The Odd
Couple
Register your team, sponsor the tournament,
and learn more online at
WWW.HoustonNWChamber.org
Foursome: $600
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Dinner Only: $30
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For More Information Contact Event Manager, Kate McKenna 281-440-4160,
[email protected] Houston Northwest Chamber of Commerce
3920 Cypress Creek Parkway, Suite 120 Houston, TX 77068
TexRepTheatre.org
Box Office
281.583.7573
14243 Stuebner Airline, Houston 77069
19
Spring | Klein Edition • April 2015
CALENDAR
Worth the TRIP
APR
09
through May 16
‘Painting in the Texas
Tradition: Contemporary Texas
Regionalism’
The Pearl Fincher Museum of Fine Arts
presents this exhibition courtesy of William
Reaves Fine Art. The museum showcases
28 works in various media, such as painting,
drawing and printmaking, in which the
artists provide a modern look at the Texas
landscape and traditions. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
(Mon.-Wed., Fri.-Sat.), 10 a.m.-8 p.m. (Thu.).
Free. Pearl Fincher Museum of Fine Arts,
6815 Cypresswood Drive, Spring.
281-376-6322. www.pearlmfa.org
09
through May 16
‘American Brilliant Cut and
Engraved Glass: An American Art Form’
Showcasing a private Houston collection, the
Pearl Fincher Museum of Fine Arts presents
an extensive array of cut glass pieces in
this exhibition. The works include large
punchbowls and vases to small engraved
stemware. Cut glass featured in the exhibition
shows the technical artistry of American
industry from more than 100 years ago and
aims to give viewers insight into the homes
of Americans in the late 19th and early 20th
centuries. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. (Mon.-Wed., Fri.Sat.), 10 a.m.-8 p.m. (Thu.), Free. Rebecca
Cole Gallery, Pearl Fincher Museum of Fine
Arts, 6815 Cypresswood Drive, Spring.
281-376-6322. www.pearlmfa.org
10
Attendees can purchase art from local, national
and international artists; sample food; and
listen to live music. The festival also features
interactive exhibits for attendees. 11 a.m.-6
p.m. (April 10), 10 a.m.-6 p.m. (April 11), 10
a.m.-5 p.m. (April 12). Free (children age 12 and
under), $10 (April 10 only), $12 (adults), $15
(weekend pass). Town Green Park, 2099 Lake
Robbins Drive, The Woodlands.
www.woodlandsartsfestival.com
281-353-4196.
www.shakespeareintheshade.org
10
and 15, 21
Precinct 4 Fun 4 Seniors trips
The Harris County Precinct 4 Seniors Adult
Program hosts trips for local seniors every
month. Trips in April include an excursion to
Shakespeare in the Shade on April 10 to see
“As You Like It” as well as trips to the Deep
in the Art Foundry in Bastrop on April 15 and
Chappell Hill Lavender Farm in Brenham on
April 21. The buses for the events meet at
the Barbara Bush Branch Library. 4:30-10:30
p.m. (April 10), 8 a.m.-5 p.m. (April 15),
8:45 a.m.-4:30 p.m. (April 21). $5 (April 10),
$10 (April 15), free (April 21). Barbara Bush
Branch Library, 6817 Cypresswood Drive,
Spring. 281-893-3726. www.hcp4.net
11
Texas Master
Chorale performance
Performed by the Texas Repertory Theatre
for the second time, the play was written
by William Nicholson. It portrays the life
of British author and scholar C.S. Lewis,
a Christian and Oxford professor who is
challenged by his friendship and romance
with outspoken American poet Joy Gresham.
7:30 p.m. (April 9), 8 p.m. (April 10-11), 3 p.m.
(April 12). $20–$38. Texas Repertory Theatre,
14243 Stuebner Airline Road, Houston.
281-583-7573. www.texreptheatre.org
The Texas Master Chorale presents its spring
concert featuring performances of Mozart’s
“Solemn Vespers” and Ola Gjeilo’s “Sunrise
Mass” at The Centrum. The same program
is performed at 4 p.m. July 24 at the Henry
Gonzalez Convention Center in San Antonio
for the community and university choruses
division of the Texas Choral Director
Association’s annual convention. 7:30 p.m.
$20. The Centrum, 6823 Cypresswood Drive,
Spring. 281-440-4850.
www.texasmasterchorale.org
10
11
‘Fly like an eagle’
09
through 12
‘Shadowlands’
through 11
Cypress Creek Art Show
Hosted by the Cypress Creek Christian
Church Art Ministry and showcasing more
than 25 local artists, the art show and sale
features work in media such as oils, acrylics,
watercolor and collage. 6-9 p.m. (April 10),
10 a.m.-5 p.m. (April 11). Free. The Forum
at Cypress Creek Christian Church and
Community Center, 6823 Cypresswood
Drive, Spring. www.cypresscreek.cc
10
and 11, 18
‘As You Like It’
Local theater company Shakespeare in the
Shade performs the comedy outdoors in
conjunction with Harris County Precinct
4. The play tells the story of Rosalind’s
banishment from town and her journey to
find a new life in the Forest of Arden while
disguised as a man. Seating is available
under the covered pavilion on a first-come,
first-served basis. Visitors can bring food and
non-alcoholic drinks. 7:30 p.m. (April 10-11,
18), 2:30 p.m. (April 18). Free. Burroughs
Park, 9738 Hufsmith Road, Tomball.
through 12
The Woodlands Waterway
Arts Festival
Artist and teacher Jennifer Kay
Hubbard shares Wilson Bickford’s oil painting
lesson in the Robin Bush Room at the
Barbara Bush Branch Library. In addition to
the oil painting lesson, Hubbard also presents
a show of a small selection of her own oil
and watercolor paintings. To see more of
Hubbard’s work, visit www.caribbeanartshop.
com. 1-2:30 p.m. Free. Barbara Bush Branch
Library, 6817 Cypresswood Drive, Spring.
281-893-3726. www.hcpl.net
18
Percussion One performance
The community-based percussion
ensemble and drumline performs at The
Centrum. The organization is composed of
high school percussionists from throughout
the Greater Houston area and has performed
throughout Texas at various events, including
on-stage performances with Keith Urban,
Shania Twain, STOMP and Blue Man Group.
6 p.m. $6 (students and children), $10
(seniors), $12 (adults). The Centrum, 6823
Cypresswood Drive, Spring. 281-440-4850.
www.cypresscreekface.org
24
through 26, and May 1-3
Texas Crawfish & Music Festival
The annual event features live music on both
the Bud Light and Zydeco stages as well as
the food and beverages from the variety of
vendors on-site. In addition to the existing
shops in Old Town Spring, attendees can
enjoy a carnival, midway games, alligator
wading pool, exotic birds and snakes, pony
rides and a petting zoo. Reserved parking
costs $10. 6 p.m.-midnight (April 24, May
1), Noon-midnight (April 25, May 2), 12:30-6
p.m. (April 26), Noon-midnight (May 3). $2
(April 24 and May 1), $10 (April 25-26 and
May 2-3). Old Town Spring, 403 Main St.,
Spring. www.texascrawfishfestival.com
Courtesy Ted Washington
April
Compiled by Matt Stephens
Allow us to teach you
how to climb HIGHER
and live INSPIRED
at Houston’s largest
climbing gym!
May
02
Relay for Life
02
Asleep at the Wheel
performance
The American Cancer Society’s
annual event invites communities around the
world to walk around a track or on a path
for up to 12 hours. The event raises money
and awareness to fight the disease and
celebrate those who are battling cancer or
lost their lives to the disease. The Northwest
Harris County event already features 307
participants among 43 teams and has raised
$53,000 for the ACS. An opening ceremony
is at 1 p.m. while a candlelight vigil is at 8:30
p.m. Activities are held throughout the day
as well as live music. Noon-midnight. $15
(T-shirt), costs to run vary. Klein Oak High
School, 22603 Northcrest Drive, Spring.
832-231-5195. www.relayforlife.org
The Western swing band performs at The
Centrum. A winner of nine Grammy Awards,
Asleep at the Wheel was founded by
members Ray Benson and Lucky Oceans in
1969 and has released more than 20 studio
albums. 8 p.m. $35-$65. The Centrum, 6823
Cypresswood Drive, Spring. 281-440-4850.
www.cypresscreekface.org
Services
• Rock Climbing up to 43’ high
• The Kidz Cave (Kid friendly climbing area)
• Yoga & Fitness
• Birthday Party Rooms
• R3 (Rock, Ropes & Rescue) Pro Shop
• Team Building Ropes Course
• Summer camps
• 25’ portable climbing walls
• The 5. ATE Café
and much more…
Online Calendar
Find more or submit Spring/Klein
events at impactnews.com/skl.
To have Spring/Klein events
considered for the print edition,
they must be submitted online by
the fourth Friday of the month.
403 E. Louetta Rd.
Spring, TX 77373
281.288.ROCK
inspirerock.com
Open to the public. No membership required.
20
Community Impact Newspaper • impactnews.com
PEOPLE
Jim Robertson
Cypress Creek Greenway Project chairman
By Matt Stephens
“I saw the opportunity
to have an impact in an
area where there wasn’t a
lot of focus.”
—Jim Robertson, chairman of the
Cypress Creek Greenway Project
Since January 2004, Robertson said
24 parks have been built along Cypress
Creek in addition to 15 pathway projects and 12 different land acquisitions.
Although many of the projects were built
or acquired independently of the organization, the Greenway Project has helped
coordinate many projects.
“We present a vision for the greenway,
and we work with utility districts, precincts and developers to share the concept of the greenway,” he said. “In that
role, we’ve been a catalyst for some parks
and trail development projects.”
Finding a home
An Ohio native, the 67-year-old
Robertson first came to northwest Harris County 26 years ago with his wife,
Ginny, for work as a geologist with Chevron. The region’s school districts, neighborhoods and forested areas attracted
the couple who found a home in the area
with their two daughters.
He retired about 10 years ago, roughly
the same time he began work with the
Greenway Project.
Robertson said he had little involvement in community service prior to the
organization’s founding. Growing up on
a farm in northeast Ohio, he has always
had an interest in the outdoors, which
drew him to the work.
“[My family has] certainly benefited
from living in this area,” he said. “It is
our home and will be our home, and we
made the choice to live in this area. I saw
the opportunity to have an impact in an
area where there wasn’t a lot of focus.”
Passion for the outdoors
Dick Smith, president of the Cypress
Creek Flood Control Coalition, said he
and Robertson have grown close over
their time working together and praised
Robertson’s passion for the region.
“Passion is what’s required to be successful for things like this because he’s
had to develop a rapport with organizations and community leaders,” Smith
said. “He’s intelligent and works hard.”
Smith said Robertson has worked closely with the CCFCC over the years and
was named a board director about nine
years ago. Smith said Robertson was also
Matt Stephens
Jim Robertson’s foray into the world of
parks and pathways along Cypress Creek
came in 2004. Robertson, who is now the
chairman of the Cypress Creek Greenway Project, discovered a tract of land
that had been bought by Harris County
Precinct 3 in the ’80s for a future park.
Robertson approached Precinct 3 and
began discussions with the county about
a potential park. Working with the Harris County Flood Control District and an
independent contractor for land acquisition, the county finally built and opened
Cypress Park in 2014.
It was the first of many park and pathway projects along the creek Robertson
was involved with in the past 11 years.
“I started looking along Cypress Creek
and realized it could be a wonderful
amenity because it is such a tremendous
corridor right in our backyard,” he said.
“[Cypress Creek was] really undeveloped
and unappreciated.”
That same year Robertson founded
the Cypress Creek Greenway Project, a
committee of the Cypress Creek Flood
Control Coalition that advocates for
trails and parks along the 40-plus miles
of Cypress Creek.
Jim Robertson formed the Cypress Creek Greenway Project in 2004 around the same time he retired.
a recipient of the Terry Hershey Bayou
Stewardship Award in 2014, an award
given out to those who work to preserve
and advocate for Houston’s waterways.
The two men teamed up years ago to
represent a group of concerned citizens
during the sale of hundreds of acres
of Hewlett-Packard land to KickerilloMischer for what is now The Vintage.
“We had concerns from a preservation
standpoint of bulldozers coming in and
knocking everything down,” Smith said.
“Jim made the necessary positive impressions on the people that counted. In the
end, Kickerillo-Mischer donated what
was worth more than $10 million in land
to [Harris County]. That came about as a
result of Jim’s dedication and passion.”
Robertson said the CCGP also helped
the Harris County Flood Control
District acquire 53 acres in 2009 along
Cypresswood Drive and worked with
Precinct 4 to connect Collins and Meyer
parks through the Gourley Nature Trail,
which opened in 2008.
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“You can see some of the results in
the number of parks and trails that have
developed,” CCFCC Secretary Jack Sakolosky said. “He’s been the key to getting
people interested in getting that done.”
Robertson served on the steering committee last year for Houston-Galveston
Area Council’s Livable Center Study
along FM 1960 in Spring and serves on
the executive committee for the Bayou
Preservation Association. He said he
works closely with the Houston Northwest and Cy-Fair chambers of commerce.
The Robertsons are also involved with
Lakewood United Methodist Church,
and have done mission work in Kenya.
Despite the many projects Robertson
has had a hand in, he said he is proudest
of the progress made on the Greenway,
where more than seven miles of trails
have been constructed.
“The proudest thing is seeing the progress we’re making on the Cypress Creek
Greenway,” he said. “We’ve seen tremendous support for the concept.”
For More Information
281-757-9946
281-330-2096
Community IMPACT 1/4 page 2.375 x 12.25”
21
[email protected]
Spring | Klein Edition • April 2015
CLOSE-UP
1960 St. Patrick’s Day Parade
APRIL
22
37th annual event attracts thousands of spectators, participants
Wednesday
By Ariel Carmona Jr.
Peking Acrobats
A
n annual event that brings
together the Spring and Klein
communities, the 37th annual
1960 St. Patrick’s Day Parade on March 15
drew as many as 100,000 residents to FM
1960, according to parade officials.
More than 120 floats made their way
through the 3.5-mile route from Champion Forest Drive to the Concert Pub
North at FM 1960 and Kuykendahl Road.
“There were as many people or more
than I have ever seen,” Parade Committee
Chairman Jeff Doran said.
Doran said what started as a group of
neighbors cruising FM 1960 in their convertibles decades ago has grown over the
years in both participants and spectators,
with 81 parade entries this year.
“Outside of the people that enter it,
there are family members who have been
watching it for years,” he said.
Barbara Thomason, president of the
Houston Northwest Chamber of Commerce, said the chamber had a large representation of members in the parade.
“It’s great that we have one of the largest
[St. Patrick’s Day parades] in the country,”
Thomason said. “I think it’s primarily an
opportunity for the community to come
out and rally and have fun.”
The St. Patrick’s Day Parade Committee raised more than $20,000 through
the parade for scholarships, said Doran,
who is also the president-elect for Cypress
Creek Emergency Medical Services, said
“The money goes to help individuals
that are already EMTs or want to take a
paramedic class,” he said. “It helps with
expenses like uniforms and textbooks.”
APRIL 22
Houston Symphony
Robert Franz, conductor
8 p.m. / Doors: 6:30 p.m.
$20 orchestra seating
FREE mezzanine and lawn
seating courtesy of Anadarko
Petroleum Corporation
Hats Off to
Reading
in the House
of Blues Tent
6 - 7:30 p.m. / VIP Doors: 6 p.m.
1
FREE event
Photos by Ariel Carmona Jr. and Michael Martinez
www.woodlandscenter.org
3
1
3
2
1 Participants from Crazy Frogs Bar and Grill
enjoy the festivities. The restaurant featured two
separate floats in the event and has been a longtime
participant of the parade.
2 A large crowd of families and spectators lined
the streets of FM 1960—which was shut down for
four hours for the parade—in anticipation of the
floats.
3 Snacks, drinks and live music were available
for attendees prior the start of the parade, and the
event provided a number of other activities along
FM 1960.
2
4 The annual event attracted between an estimated 75,000 and 100,000 attendees this year and
had 120 floats among the 81 participating entities,
according to parade officials.
Tickets can be purchased at
The Pavilion Box Office, all Ticketmaster
outlets, by calling 800-745-3000 or
online at www.ticketmaster.com.
GROWTH 57%
RENOVATIONS 27%
TECHNOLOGY 10%
SECURITY 4%
BUSES 2%
Renovations, technology
The proposed bond referendum would provide more than $100 million in renovation projects. Robertson said renovations were narrowed
down to those given a priority level of 1 or 2, or projects that keep students warm, safe and dry.
“If you’ve got a roof leaking, that’s a Priority 1 [project],” he said.
“There’s also in there, major mechanical, electrical [and] plumbing equipment that’s reached the end of it’s useful life and needs to be replaced to
avoid future expense or avoid that unplanned breakdown.”
Renovations also includes the installation of more energy efficient systems that will save the district money in the long run, said Judy Rimato,
associate superintendent for communications and planning. Energy
efficiency was a significant factor in the district’s ability to save about
$58 million in tax dollars in the last five years.
“When you can save those dollars and turn around and use them productively with staffing and salary and benefits and other things to meet
your needs, that’s a huge win-win,” Cain said.
projecting adding 1,600 students a year moving
to the district. That’s two elementary schools. That’s an intermediate school. That’s a high school in three years.”
Dozier taught English for almost 30 years at Klein Forest High School,
where all four of her children graduated, and participated in the bond
steering committee meetings last year. She said the PAC supports the
bond because the district brings significant value to the community.
“Having good schools in the neighborhood is the best way to enhance
your property values,” she said. “That’s why my husband and I moved to
Klein—because of the schools.”
Continued from | 1
Klein ISD Bond
$498.1M
Bond total
To accommodate for an estimated 13,000 students expected to enroll in
Klein ISD in the next 10 years, the district hopes to pass a
$498.1 million bond authorization May 9 that would fund a slew of
updates and additions, including three new schools.
FUTURE
BUILDING FOR THE
$0.10
Taxable value
$100,000 home
$155,866 home*
$200,000 home
$300,000 home
$400,000 home
* Average Klein ISD home value
Projected tax
rate increase
$0.10
$0.10
$0.10
$0.10
Added cost
per month
$8.33
$12.99
$16.67
$25
$33.33
Per year
$100
$155.87
$200
$300
$400
If approved by voters May 9, the $498.1 million bond referendum would
raise the property tax rate by a maximum of 10 cents per $100 valuation in
the next eight years. That would cost the average KISD homeowner $156
more per year or $12.99 per month.
TAX RATE INCREASE EFFECTS
1:1 Computer-to-student ratio program: $23.0 million
Instructional and classroom equipment: $16.0 million
IT infrastructure: $7 million
Other expenses: $5.3 million
“When [KISD Chief Financial Officer Thomas Petrek] projects what
the tax rate is going to be, we always do that very conservatively,” Rimato
said. “We suspect the same thing could hold true for this bond election.”
Cain said the tax rate increase will not affect senior citizens over the age
of 65 who have applied for a homestead exemption.
The superintendent emphasized the district lowered the property tax
rate five cents in the last two years but said passing the bond referendum
without a property tax increase would be impossible.
“It would be great if we could, but given the scope of the projects and the
•
•
•
•
10%
Priority 1 and 2 projects, life cycle renovations: $103.4 million
Facility capital projects: $33.1 million
- Klein Instruction Center renovations
- Baseball field lighting at three high schools
- Elementary school bus and car canopy at four schools
- Musical instrument replacement
- Elementary sound reinforcement at 25 schools
TECHNOLOGY: $51.3M
•
•
RENOVATIONS: $136.5M 27%
2%
1.70
1.58
1.26
1.31
1.75
1.63
1.28
1.30
2005-06
2022-23
2021-22
2020-21
2019-20
2018-19
2017-18
1.45
–––
–––
–––
1.49
1.46
–––
–––
1.48
2016-17
–––
–––
1.43
2015-16
2014-15
2013-14
1.49
1.44
1.43
1.39
1.46
1.46
–––
–––
1.43
1.46
2011-12
1.49
1.49
1.41
1.42
2010-11
2012-13
1.36
1.35
2009-10
2008-09
2007-08
2006-07
1.70
1.70
ACTUAL
2004-05
PROJECTED
Although the property tax rate is expected to rise by 10 cents per $100
valuation if the bond is approved May 9, the actual property tax increase has typically been less than the projected tax increase following
the passage of the 2004 and 2008 bonds.
TAX RATE PROJECTIONS
• Replacement buses: $5.1 million
• Buses for growth: $2.8 million
SCHOOL BUSES: $7.9M
Elementary school entry improvements: $6.1 million
Digital radio communication system: $5.1 million
Classroom doors: $3.4 million
Other expenses: $4.1 million
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
High School No. 5: $121.9 million
Intermediate School No. 10: $47.1 million
Elementary School No. 33: $26.2 million
Early Childhood/Pre-K Center North: $14.1 million
High school gymnasiums (Klein Forest, Klein Oak, Klein Collins): $15.6 million
Klein Forest Career & Technical Educational Building: $13.7 million
Land for future school sites: $12.3 million
Classroom additions (Wunderlich, Northampton, Haude): $9.5 million
Klein Oak auditorium renovation: $7.1 million
Intermediate school gymnasiums: $5.2 million
Small learning community remodel (Klein Oak and Klein Collins): $5.1 million
New north agriculture facility: $3.6 million
Other expenses: $2.2 million
SAFETY & SECURITY: $18.7M 4%
GROWTH: $283.6M 57%
Source: Klein ISD, DeJong Richter and Jacobs Engineering
• Klein ISD Central Office
7200 Spring Cypress Road, Klein
• Klein Multipurpose Center
7500 FM 2920, Klein
• Klein Instructional Center
4411 Louetta Road, Spring
• Klein Collins High School
20811 Ella Blvd., Spring
• Klein Oak High School
22603 Northcrest Drive, Spring
• Klein Forest High School
11400 Misty Valley Drive, Houston
• Klein High School
16715 Stuebner Airline Road, Klein
0916, 0690, 1030, 0114
Metzler Elementary School, 8500 W. Rayford Road, Spring
Frank Elementary School, 9225 Crescent Clover Drive, Klein
0880
T
T
Benignus Elementary School, 7225 Alvin A. Klein Drive, Klein
Epps Island Elementary School, 7403 Smiling Wood Lane, Houston
0876, 0263
0868,0496, 0511, 0597,
0841, 0873, 0884
S
R
Nitsch Elementary School, 4702 West Mt. Houston Road, Houston
0855, 0109, 0467, 0977
0723, 0628, 0859, 0861, 0870 Eiland Elementary School, 6700 North Klein Circle Drive, Houston
O
Q
Mueller Elementary School, 7074 FM 2920, Klein
0672, 0552, 0575
N
Kuehnle Elementary School, 5510 Winding Ridge Drive, Klein
Theiss Elementary School, 17510 Theiss Mail Route Road, Klein
0648, 0624, 0631, 0783
M
0853, 0477
Haude Elementary School, 3111 Louetta Road, Spring
0633, 0246
L
P
Doerre Intermediate School, 19218 Theiss Mail Road, Spring
0601, 0082
K
Kaiser Elementary School, 13430 Bammel North Houston Road, Houston
0592, 0113, 0468, 0614
Klenk Elementary School, 6111 Bourgeois Road, Houston
0516
H
• Harris County
Administration Building
1001 Preston, 4th floor, Houston
J
Brill Elementary School, 9102 Herts Road, Spring
0515, 0484, 0513, 0623
G
EARLY VOTING POLLING LOCATIONS
Hassler Elementary School, 9325 Lochlea Ridge Drive, Spring
Strack Intermediate School, 18027 S. Kuykendahl Road, Spring
0514, 0464, 0874
F
May 9: Election day from 7 a.m.–7 p.m.
0551, 0998
Lemm Elementary School, 19034 Joanleigh Drive, Spring
0500
E
May 2: Early voting from 8 a.m.–noon
I
Roth Elementary School, 21623 Castlemont Lane, Spring
0482, 0851
from 8 a.m.–4 p.m.
April 27–May 1, May 4–5: Early voting
D
Kohrville Elementary School, 11600 Woodland Shore Drive, Tomball
Krahn Elementary School, 9502 Eday Drive, Klein
Zwink Elementary School, 22200 Frassati Way, Spring
0245
0112, 0668, 1025, 1026
Location and Address
Do you support Klein ISD’s $498.1 million
bond referendum?
0452, 0735
B
A
Pct. Harris Co. Pct. No. ELECTION DAY LOCATIONS
Take the poll online at impactnews.com/skl-poll
Planning for the future
Cain said the timeline and projects within the bond are not set in stone.
The previous bond in 2008 was set to be a four-year bond, but following the
economic recession, the funds were stretched over a longer period of time
and some projects were delayed or changed.
“When a bond is approved, that’s simply giving the school district the
authorization to move forward when the time is right,” Cain said. “If the
time isn’t right, we just step back.”
If residents vote against the bond, Cain said the district can call another
bond as soon as November. In the meantime, KISD could take other measures to address enrollment growth, particularly with the use of temporary
buildings at overcrowded campuses. Should voters not pass a bond for an
extended period of time, KISD would have to consider more serious measures, such as more lunch periods or longer school days.
KISD Board President Steven Smith said he urges residents who are not
parents, staff or faculty to get out and vote for the bond.
“Whether you have kids or not, you ought to care about the fabric of our
community, and if you don’t educate our young kids, then they’re not going
to be the responsible adults you want them to be,” Smith said.
fact that we’re setting aside $284 million alone for growth in terms of new
campuses, we simply have to increase the taxes in order to address that
kind of a situation,” Cain said.
C
March 10–April 30: Apply for a mail ballot
IMPORTANT ELECTION DATES
ELECTION
INFORMATION
Tax increase
If approved by voters, KISD estimates the property tax rate for residents of the district will increase no more than 10 cents per $100 valuation in the next eight years. The average homeowner in the district
would pay $156 more per year in property taxes to the district at the
height of the proposed tax increase.
Spring Tea Party founder Fred Blanton said he would like to see the
district set up a reserve fund to replace certain life cycle and maintenance items, but he still supports the bond referendum. He said he participated in the steering committee process and helped the committee
cut the initial recommendations from $725 million to $498.1 million.
“We’ve cut the guts out of this thing,” Blanton said. “We’ve cut the
frills out of it. We’ve gotten it down for the basic needs.”
Technology costs within the bond make up about 10 percent of the
costs. The largest piece is $23 million to help the district continue a
1-to-1 computer-to-student ratio at various campuses, Rimato said.
“We’re getting classroom sets of computers, labs of mobile computers that the classrooms share,” Rimato said. “We’re putting more and
more technology into the hands of the students to do their work.”
The district has also begun a Bring Your Own Device pilot program
at Ulrich Intermediate School this semester, which would allow students to bring their own electronic devices and requires wireless infrastructure costs within the bond, Robertson said.
“School districts want to use technology tools increasingly as part of
the standard classroom instruction,” Cain said.
CULTIVATING CAMPUSES
Year built
Bond costs
106%
84%
111%
82%
105%
85%
86%
84%
125%
117%
95%
119%
119%
149%
93%
80%
79%
139%
71%
129%
$5.27M107%
$2.54M85%
$6.22M 105%
$3.30M92%
$3.10M96%
$2.25M85%
$4.29M68%
$1.37M90%
$1.41M85%
$3.47M82%
$1.32M85%
$1.65M95%
$3.51M95%
$459,00088%
$2.25M104%
$8.38M 100%
$1.69M82%
$1.84M97%
$2.64M83%
$452,00089%
$9.86M 108%
$24.05M 101%
$37.09M90%
$32.06M 110%
Exceeding 120% of capacity by 2019
High school campuses
Klein High
2014
Klein Collins 2001
Klein Forest 1979
Klein Oak
1982
125%
120%
99%
142%
102%
131%
104%
118%
136%
127%
95%
122%
112%
88%
99%
101%
116%
90%
63%
116%
104%
71%
88%
$2.74M78%
$1.83M117%
$459,000 67%
$459,000 89%
$2.47M 86%
$3.24M85%
$1.27M99%
$5.96M99%
$524,00070%
---------------
2014-15 2019-20 est.
enrollment enrollment
percentage percentage
of capacity of capacity
Intermediate school campuses
Doerre
1984
$8.35M97%
Hildebrandt 1973
$10.55M 83%
Kleb
1993
$5.78M111%
Klein Int.
1984
$4.27M104%
Krimmel
2007
$4.93M 103%
Schindewolf 2002
$3.65M 119%
Strack
1977
$2.99M88%
Ulrich
2010
$435,000 88%
Wunderlich 1975
$10.10M108%
Benfer 1977
Benignus
2006
Bernshausen 2013
Blackshear 2011
Brill 1978
Ehrhardt
1979
Eiland
1993
Epps Island 1973
Frank
2007
*French** 2015
Greenwood
Forest
1971
*Hassler
1999
Haude
1971
Kaiser
1978
Klenk
1992
Kohrville
2002
Krahn
1983
Kreinhop
2004
*Kuehnle
1989
Lemm
1980
McDougle 2004
*Metzler
2005
Mittelstadt 1991
*Mueller
2009
Nitsch
1980
*Northampton1971
Roth
1984
*Schultz
1994
Theiss
1974
*Zwink
2012
Elementary school campuses
Campus
**French Elementary will open in the fall.
*Most recent data since French Elementary
rezoning includes transfer students
Several of Klein ISD’s campuses are expected to see their enrollment grow
to more than 120 percent of capacity by 2019. If the bond is passed, all 42
campuses will receive some funding for renovations and improvements,
and new schools will relieve overcrowding on many campuses.
Spring | Klein Edition • April 2015
23
SPRING ISD
24
Community Impact Newspaper • impactnews.com
TRANSCRIPT
TR A N SG R ESSIONS
2003
2011
Rodney E. Watson takes
over as Superintendent
of SISD
2013
2014
SISD signs a five-year contract with
Houston-based vendor Sungard to
provide a management platform for
all district records—eSchool
New indicator is put in
place by the TEA looking
at discrepancies between
end-of-course completion
data and exit exam data
February 16, 2015
SISD begins internal
investigation of all high
school transcripts and
finds poor transcript
management practices
Community meeting held
at Dekaney High School
advising graduating seniors,
parents and the public
about internal investigation
TEA provides school
districts data validation
reports that could indicate
student data anomalies
Dekaney High School that serious issues
were identified exposing improper course
scheduling and poor transcript management
practices. He said the district found negligent mismanagement of records at Dekaney,
including missing test results and legal and
personal documents found sprawled on the
floor of administrative offices.
The irregularities found by the district,
which serves nearly 37,000 students, affect
students across all three comprehensive
high schools and have resulted in the resignation or termination of 11 SISD administrators since the investigation began.
The Feb. 16 meeting advised graduating seniors and their parents that alternative scheduling might be needed to ensure
Spring ISD
Continued from | 1
parents, what we say to kids, we’re actually
able to follow through with that and do that.”
Genesis of investigation
Through its internal investigation, which
began in January, SISD discovered some
data on transcripts was incorrect. District
officials said in a few cases, some courses
were placed on students transcripts twice. In
other cases, transcripts were not completed
or course information was overlooked.
Watson told parents and students gathered at a Feb. 16 community meeting at
March 4, 2015
January 2015
2015
December 2014
2013
December 2011
Spring ISD has revealed findings of an investigation that discovered
transcript errors and poor data management practices. SISD is helping
students, replacing staff and addressing data management system issues.
July 1, 2014
The Texas Education Agency
develops a system to improve
student performance and obtain
data from school districts
2003
Sources: Spring ISD and Texas Education Agency
District announces
the hiring of new
staff, including chief
financial officer and
Westfield High School
principal
2016
March 10, 2015
February 22, 2015
Board of trustees
approve proposal
to retain consulting
company iSphere to
assess district’s student
information system
SISD board of trustees holds
a special meeting to begin
termination process of key
administrators and staff;
several staff members resign
prior to meeting
students meet all state graduation requirements. Similar informational meetings were
held for juniors, sophomores and freshmen.
The district’s investigation began in
response to a report the Texas Education
Agency issued in December.
“[The TEA report] wasn’t anything that
was specifically pinpointed to Spring [ISD],”
Watson said. “It’s a data validation report
that provides us an opportunity to see
[which] kids actually took tests based upon
how many could have taken the tests. It’s our
opportunity to look at those numbers and
find out what red flags we needed to look at.”
TEA information specialist DeEtta Culbertson said preliminary data validation
reports were provided in December to
March 23, 2015
District begins
printing transcripts
and GPA rankings for
affected seniors
districts that reported information that
could indicate anomalies in their student
assessment data, based on indicators in TEA’s
Student Assessment Data Validation system.
The SADV system is designed to improve
student performance and program effectiveness, according to the TEA. The integrity of
a district’s data is critical to the system.
Culbertson said a new indicator in the
2013 SADV—which looks at discrepancies
between end-of-course completion data and
exit exam data—triggered potential issues
with data received from SISD.
“Because there is an open investigation
pertaining to Spring ISD, we can’t provide
additional information on Spring ISD,” TEA
information specialist Lauren Callahan said.
Saturday, May 2nd
Noon-Midnight
Klein Oak High School
• Organized community fundraising walk
• Members of each team take turns walking
around the track
• Food, games and activities provide
entertainment and build camaraderie
• Family-friendly environment for the entire
community
At Relay For Life, our community
comes together to honor cancer
survivors, remember loved
ones lost, and fight back against
a disease that has already taken
too much.
For more information
or to sign up now
visit
www.relayforlife.org/
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25
Spring | Klein Edition • April 2015
BY THE BOOK
37,000students
served by Spring ISD
3 district staff
members
have had contracts
terminated
8 administrators
have resigned
600
high school
students
affected by
transcript and data
mismanagement
Needs have been met for graduating
students with the exception of
60 students
who were not on track to graduate
prior to the investigation
District response
Although Watson said the district could
have kept the transcript issues quiet and
fixed the problem behind the scenes, he said
that option would have been out of line with
his philosophy as superintendent.
“That’s not being honest, that’s not being
transparent, and when I came to the district
I promised our board as well [as] our community that we would be transparent based
upon best practices,” Watson said.
Watson said he could not go into detail
about the district’s internal investigation
on the transcript issue or how the district
looked at personnel problems as a whole
because the investigation is ongoing. However, the district has already begun taking
actions to address the issues.
During a special meeting of the SISD
board of trustees on Feb. 22, the board
unanimously voted to initiate the termination process for Adrian Johnson, director of
special projects; Royal Hammond, student
success specialist for Westfield High School;
and Thad Gittens, associate principal for
Wunsche High School.
Chief Financial Officer Christine Porter announced her resignation the morning prior to the special meeting, while
seven other SISD administrators have also
resigned since the investigation began.
To fill the vacant positions, the district has
hired staffers in key roles, including CFO,
Westfield High School principal, assistant
superintendent for research, accountability
and testing, and director of transportation.
In addition to making administrative
changes, SISD is looking into concerns
raised by parents during community meetings regarding accessibility to counselors
and improving communication.
“I’ve heard from countless parents regarding their inability to communicate with
district administration but probably more
so campus administration,” Watson said.
Moving forward
At its March 10 meeting, the board of
trustees approved a proposal to retain the
consulting services of iSphere, a Houstonbased firm providing IT services and staffing experts to assess the district’s handling
of its student information system, eSchool.
iSphere Consulting Services Director
Kemp Fuller said his company was hired by
the district to assess the student grade system
and look into transcripts and coursework.
However, because of the ongoing investigation and a nondisclosure agreement, Fuller
was unable to provide specifics about findings with regards to grades and transcripts.
It could cost the district up to $130,000 to
hire iSphere for six to eight weeks, said Sheleah Reed, executive director of communications for SISD.
changes to get them back on track toward
completing their graduation requirements.
Virtual classes, credit by examination and
summer school were options offered by the
district to effected students.
“We were able to meet the needs of all our
kids, except for a little under 60 kids,” Watson said. “It’s important to understand that
for those 60 kids, several of them were not
on track to graduate. This issue was not an
issue that caused them not to graduate.”
Rhonda Faust, president of the SISD
board of trustees, said the board expects
“When I came to the district I promised our board
as well [as] our community that we would be
transparent based upon best practices.”
—Spring ISD Superintendent, Rodney Watson
“[The consultants] will sit over the shoulders of district employees to see how they
input and pull information and to try and
determine if the gaps were in the technology
or created by humans,” Reed said.
Reed said SISD reached out to Katy ISD,
which also uses eSchool, to see how it was
using its data management system. KISD
recommended the use of iSphere, which
KISD has also used for consulting purposes.
While SISD is working to prevent future
transcript issues in the long term, the district is trying to help affected students in the
short term. SISD has worked with the hundreds of students affected by the transcript
to receive an update on the progress of the
investigation and the administration’s discussions with the TEA at board meetings in
April. Faust said the administration has the
board’s support.
“The internal investigation has progressed
in an efficient and appropriate manner,” she
said. “Our concern remains first and foremost ensuring resolution of any outstanding
issues that exist for our students.”
Find related stories at impactnews.com. Keyword Search
Spring ISD, Texas Education Agency, transcripts
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Spring | Klein Edition • April 2015
CRUDE AWAKENING
Oil prices
THE COST AND
THE ECONOMY OF OIL
Continued from | 1
“You won’t do a sophisticated drilling job
anywhere in the world without contacting a
Houston company,” said Bill Gilmer, director of the Institute for Regional Forecasting
in the Bauer College of Business at the University of Houston. “When drilling declines
elsewhere around the world, that makes a
difference here in Houston in terms of the
amount of workers you’ll need.”
Although local economists do not believe
the 2014-15 downturn will be as severe as
the oil bust of the mid-1980s, layoffs in the
oil and gas industry began in January and are
expected to continue this year, said Patrick
Jankowski, senior vice president of research
for the Greater Houston Partnership.
“It will cause some pain for Houston,
but it won’t be a repeat of the 1980s,”
Jankowski said. “We learned our lessons
then; growth will slow down, but the
economy isn’t going to implode.”
Drop in prices
Oil prices began dropping in July due to a
combination of factors, most notably overproduction of oil and less demand for oil
from the developing world, Jankowski said.
“In 2008, we were only producing 5 million barrels a day, and now we are producing 9.2 million a day,” he said. “We’ve almost
doubled our production, and normally that
would be a good thing but demand in the
rest of the world hasn’t grown as fast.”
The price for one barrel of oil dropped
from $104.48 in June 2014 to $47.98 in January. In recent years, the U.S has increased
its output of oil significantly due in part to
horizontal drilling, or fracking.
“The demand for oil is growing in developing countries but not fast enough to sop
up the new oil we’ve discovered,” Jankowski
said. “That’s what has been driving [the
price of oil] down.”
It is impossible to predict the price of oil,
Jankowski said, but looking at the trends in
drilling and production, once the oil surplus begins to shrink late this year, there
should be an improvement in prices. Until
then, layoffs in the oil industry are expected
to continue in Houston.
“If you’re in the oil and gas business, you
By the end of January 2015, the price of oil per
gallon had reached its lowest point since the Great
Recession of the early to mid-2000s. Experts say
increased production and global economics are
among the reasons for the lower price.
THE PRICE OF OIL
Houston’s first energy crisis occurred in the 1980s when the price of oil dropped below
$30 per barrel.
$150
$88.03 (May)
1982
$70.74 (March)
1986
$49.16 (January)
$24.83 (July)
1990
$63.15 (October)
$30.48 (June)
1994
$31.09 (July)
$23.38 (March)
1998
$24.26 (January)
$16.15 (December)
$102.88
$100
$97.84
$85.79 (July)
$68.48 (October)
2010
$95.36 (December)
$79.45 (May)
0
$20
$40
$60
Price per barrel
$100.86
$104.48
$102.06
$96.59
$96.76
$89.89
$79.64
Yearly peak
Yearly low
$65.54
$53.45
$38.48 (September)
2002
$26.06 (January)
2006
$99.07
$47.98
$50
$80
$100
$0
Jan. Feb. March April May June July Aug. Sep.
2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014
Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan.
2014 2014 2014 2015
Source: Energy Information Administration
will have less money from the oil you’re producing,” Jankowski said. “With less revenue,
it makes it more difficult to meet payroll,
service any debt and continue to drill for oil.”
Chain reaction
The first jobs cut due to the falling oil
prices typically start in the oil field and
move down the line to the manufacturing
plant, Jankowski said.
“Eventually you don’t need people in the
office supervising the office workers,” he said.
“We’ve seen layoffs announced by oil field
service companies, but we haven’t seen the
domino effect running backwards just yet.”
Manufacturing layoffs have already
hit Spring and Tomball as Baker Hughes
announced plans in January to cut 7,000
jobs from a total workforce of 62,000. Melanie Kania, enterprise media relations specialist for Baker Hughes, said the company’s
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decision to reduce workforce numbers and
spending was a difficult but important move
that will help the company remain competitive. Kania declined to comment on any location-specific layoff numbers.
“Oil and gas market conditions have
become increasingly challenging,” Kania said.
“All impacted employees will be eligible for
severance benefits.”
Workers with more specialized job skills,
such as reservoir engineers or geologists,
will not be as vulnerable, Gilmer said.
“When the [1980s] bust came, we downsized and the baby boomers became the
American oil industry,” he said. “We’ll
probably see those jobs protected.”
The oil and gas industry is divided into
upstream and downstream industries.
Upstream companies focus on exploration, field development and production
operations, while downstream companies
“Gratzi is at the top of our list
when we consider going out for
fine dining. ”
–Nathan, Spring.
manufacture and refine oil and gas.
“Anyone who is associated with
upstream companies will be the most
directly impacted,” said Adam Perdue,
economist with the University of Houston’s Bauer Institute for Regional Forecasting. “In the U.S. and worldwide, those
companies are concentrated in Houston.”
At the other end of the spectrum, lower
oil prices are good for the petrochemical
and refining industries in east Houston.
“The main job losses will be white-collar
jobs, and it will be the west side of Houston that gets hurt from that,” Gilmer said.
“We’ll probably create 40,000 new jobs in
Houston this year, but it won’t feel good on
the west side. And it will feel like a boom
town on the east side of Houston.”
For more information visit impactnews.com
281-376-4800
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29
Spring | Klein Edition • April 2015
REAL ESTATE
FEATURED NEIGHBORHOOD
Ponderosa Forest is located north of FM 1960
between Kuykendahl Road and Ella Boulevard.
The neighborhood, which began in the ’60s
and ’70s, contains more than 1,300 homes
and offers a variety of amenities. Residents
can enjoy Woerner Park and attend civic
association events.
Ponderosa Forest, 77090
Recent listings
Build-out year: 1972
1514 Ash Meadow Drive
$169,400
17403 Anvil Court
$179,900
Square footage: 2,100–5,000+
4 Bedroom / 2.5 Bath
2,963 sq. ft.
Agent: Obiajulu Smith
RE/MAX The Woodlands & Spring 281-682-1345
4 Bedroom / 2.5 Bath
Agent: Jason Binder
Keller Williams Realty
3,218 sq. ft.
832-429-7136
1402 Roanwood Drive
$209,999
17302 Sandy Cliffs Drive
$319,900
4 Bedroom / 2.5 Bath
Agent: Larry Gozan
Boncler Realty
2,633 sq. ft.
The neighborhood is located just a few
miles1488
west of I-45 and the Hardy Toll Road
as well as several miles east of Hwy. 249.
Nearby attractions include Old Town Spring,
Willowbrook Mall and MainStreet America.
The Woodlands
Home values: $108,000–$173,000
HOA dues (estimated): $400–$600 annually
77389
2920
Amenities: Pool, park, new walking trail park,
playground
77373
77388
77379
45
249
77068
77070
77090
77069
77066
Uu
Oo
STsON
M HH
to
SSaAm
1960
n
Spring ISD
Harris County
Harris County WCID No. 91
Harris County Hospital District North Harris-Montgomery College District
Harris County EMSD No. 28
Harris County EMSD No. 11
Harris County Flood Control District
Port of Houston Authority
Harris County Department of Education
1.5700
0.4146
0.3600
0.1700
0.1160
0.1000
0.0475
0.0283
0.0172
0.0064
Total (per $100 value)
2.8300
Neighborhood data provided by
Veronica Barefield, CEO/Team Leader
KW Professionals
281-444-3900
www.professionalskw.com
6
Median
home value
Median price
per square foot
$134,754
Median annual
property taxes
$51.45
$3,814
5 Bedroom / 3 Full & 2 Half Bath
Agent: Steve Lockling
Champions Real Estate Group
713-505-2600
Homes on
the market*
Homes under
contract*
30
5,029 sq. ft.
713-659-6666
Average days
on the market*
8
54
Data does not include builders not listed in MLS listings *As of 04/1/15
10
Although
every effort has been made to ensure the timeliness and accuracy of this real estate data, Community Impact Newspaper assumes no liability for errors or omissions. Contact the property’s agent or seller for the most current information.
Market Data
On the market (March 2015)
Price
Number of homes for sale/ Average days on the market
for last six months
77066
77068
77069
77070
77090
77373
March 2015
77379
77388
77389
$500,000
Price Range
77066
77068
77069
77070
77090
77373
77379
77388
77389
$149,999 or under
82/24
17/24
24/28
71/15
55/27
301/24
75/15
79/18
38/15
$150,000–$199,999
70/33
24/35
55/36
102/20
55/35
151/31
135/25
133/28
26/16
$200,000–$299,999
69
17/34
18/44
29/32
71/25
13/34
76/48
242/28
122/31
106/37
$300,000–$399,999
1/12
5/43
10/66
6/18
3/47
12/55
137/43
34/32
89/36
$400,000–$499,999
—
5/46
10/66
9/24
2/33
—
86/49
17/32
63/36
$500,000–$599,999
ugar Land
$600,000–$799,999
6
—
2/83
7/26
—
1/89
—
12/26
4/28
49/44
$150,000
—
5/53
4/61
5/50
—
—
22/41
5/59
72/53
$100,000
$800,000–$999,999
—
—
1/41
2/98
—
—
9/73
1/50
21/59
$50,000
$1 million +
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Missouri City
March 2014 vs.
Median price of homes sold
$450,000
$400,000
$350,000
$300,000
$250,000
$200,000
KW Professionals
is excited to announce
WE ARE MOVING THIS SUMMER!
8344 Spring Cypress Road, Spring, TX 77379
Just East of Gleannloch Farms!
Buy, Sell, or Invest with us!
CALL 281.444.3900 OR VISIT US ONLINE AT WWW.PROFESSIONALSKW.COM
Ready to partner with
KW PROFESSIONALS?
Visit
www.redcareers.com/professionals
Or call today for
your business
consultation with
VERONICA BAREFIELD
CEO
281.444.3900
CUST
170
114
26
30
Southlake
289
77
Grapevine
Community Impact Newspaper • impactnews.com
114
635
26
97
121
Colleyville
360
Look for the Conroe/Montgomery
edition coming April 16, 2015
Montgomery
105
105
Conroe
336
149
1485
1314
1488
Magnolia
45
The Houston editions of
Community Impact Newspaper
deliver to
249
The Woodlands
Tomball
99
Spring / Klein
1960
290
642,768
45
Cypress
99
Jersey Village
69
529
6
90
610
10
Katy
homes and businesses.
10
225
610
69
99
90
Sugar Land
6
59
45
518
Pearland
521
Missouri City
Friendswood
288
35
6
75
75
121
289
121
289
FRONTIER PKWY.
FRONTIER PKWY.
McKinney
380
McKinney
380
380
5
CUSTER RD.
CUSTER RD.
Frisco
Frisco
380
5
With over 1.4 million in distribution
STACY RD.
289
STACY RD.
289
121
121
Plano
121
PRESIDENT G
E
BUSH TURN P I K
Plano
E
CUSTER RD.
E
EO
RG
BUSH TURN P I K
CUSTER RD.
EO
RG
E
COIT RD.
COIT RD.
121
170
PRESIDENT G
170
Community Impact Newspaper is in more homes than any other publication in Texas.
114
114
26
Southlake
Southlake
114
Colleyville
Grapevine
289
635
360
Colleyville
97
121
360
Montgomery
Montgomery
105
183
35
149
1488
Magnolia
130
TOLL
Hutto
Cedar Park
620
Tomball
99
TOLL
Pflugerville
1
183
TOLL
Northwest Austin
620
Northwest Austin
620
Lake Travis
71
290
Westlake
290
45
99
360
130
529
121
FRONTIER PKWY.
McKinney
642,768
45
Jersey69Village
380
Frisco
5
69
529
130
TOLL
75
289
99
Jersey Village
360
213,751
1960
Cypress
35
Central Austin
290
Spring / Klein
1960
290
Cypress
35
Lake Travis
Central Austin
Westlake
Spring / Klein
TOLL
Houston Metro
99
CUSTER RD.
71
Pflugerville
1
183
DFW Metro
Tomball
45
TOLL
The Woodlands
79
Round Rock
Hutto
45
1314
45
249
The Woodlands
79
TOLL
Round Rock
620
1485
1488
45
Magnolia
249
TOLL
183A
TOLL
Cedar Park
1485
1314
29
130
Leander
183A
105
Conroe
336
149
Georgetown
29
Leander
Conroe
336
183
Georgetown
555,607
105
105
35
Austin Metro
289
77
114
635
26
97
121
26
77
Grapevine
26
STACY RD.
289
TOLL
121
290
6
71
MoPac
10
35
183
6
183
Katy
90
610
90
610
10
10
Katy
10
225
Buda
Buda
90
21
69
San Marcos
26
114
Pearland
521
45
Friendswood
Pearland
521
Missouri City
288
26
45
518
6
288
35
6
35
289
77
Grapevine
635
518
59
Missouri City
San Marcos
Plano
E
114
Sugar Land
6
BUSH TURN P I K
170
69
99
90
Sugar Land
59
E
PRESIDENT G
610
Southlake
Kyle
21
121
225
610
99
Kyle
COIT RD.
35
CUSTER RD.
Southwest71Austin
MoPac
EO
RG
Southwest Austin
290
Colleyville
Friendswood
97
121
360
35
6
35
Montgomery
105
105
35
Conroe
336
183
149
1485
Georgetown
1314
29
1488
Magnolia
130
45
249
TOLL
Leander
183A
TOLL
The Woodlands
79
Round Rock
Hutto
Cedar Park
Tomball
620
45
TOLL
99
Pflugerville
1
183
Spring / Klein
TOLL
Northwest Austin
1960
290
620
Lake Travis
Central Austin
Westlake
45
Cypress
35
71
290
99
Jersey Village
360
69
529
130
TOLL
To advertise or to submit story ideas: (281) 469-6181 | impactnews.com
Southwest Austin
6
71
290
90
610
MoPac
35
10
183
Katy
10
225
Buda
610
69
99
Kyle
90
21
Sugar Land
59
6
518
45
380
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