FOOTPRINTS

FOOTPRINT S
APRIL 2015
A N INFORM ATION A L NE WSLE T TER FOR PATIEN T S OF A PM A MEMBER PODI ATRIS T S
SPRING EDITION
PLAY IT SAFE WITH TODAY’S PODIATRIST
PLAYING SPORTS IS A GREAT WAY TO EXERCISE,
SPEND TIME WITH FRIENDS AND FAMILY, AND
DEVELOP TEAM-BUILDING SKILLS. BUT DID YOU
KNOW THAT ANKLE SPRAINS AND BREAKS ARE
AMONG THE MOST COMMON SPORTS INJURIES
FOR BOTH ADULTS AND CHILDREN * ?
“For many of us, sports are an integral part of our lives. To get the most out of your
workout or from playing a favorite sport, it’s important to choose the right footwear for the
type of exercise you’ll engage in,” says Phillip Ward, DPM, a podiatrist and president of the
American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA). “People should be aware that sports, which
require a substantial amount of running, turning, and contact, can translate to injuries.
If you or someone you know sustains a foot or ankle-related injury while playing sports,
it’s important to see a podiatrist right away.”
SPORT S STAT S
Unfortunately, there are many myths surrounding foot and ankle injuries, which may
cause a patient to delay seeking treatment. Learn more about some of these common
myths on page 2.
Taken from http://www.safekids.org/we-work-prevent-sports-injuries and http://www.webmd.com/men/features/seven-most-common-sports-injuries
*
OVER 21 MILLION YOU TH
BE T WEEN THE AGES OF 6 AND
17 PL AY T E A M SPOR T S ON A
R EGUL AR BA SIS, ACCORDING
T O THE SPOR T S & FITNESS
INDUSTRY A SSOCIATION.
A 2014 ESPN POLL SHOWED
THAT 88 PERCEN T OF PAR EN T S
HAVE CONCERNS ABOU T
THEIR CHILDR EN’S RISK
OF INJURY WHIL E PL AYING
YOU TH SPOR T S.
A 2014 APM A SURVE Y
SHOWED THAT 1 IN 4 ADULT S
FEEL S UNABL E T O E XERCISE
DUE T O FOO T PAIN, AND 39
PERCEN T OF ADULT S SAID
THE Y WOULD E XERCISE MOR E
IF THEIR FEE T DIDN’T HUR T.
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ME MBE R
HERE ARE THE
TOP FIVE MY THS
TO STOP
BELIEVING NOW:
1
“ IT CAN’T BE BROKEN BECAUSE I CAN MOVE IT.”
False. You can walk with certain kinds of fractures.
Common examples include breaks in the smaller, outer
bone of the lower leg, small chip fractures of the foot or
ankle bones, and the often-neglected fracture of the toe.
2
“ IF YOU BREAK A TOE, IMMEDIATE CARE ISN’T
NECESSARY.”
False. A toe fracture needs prompt attention. X-rays will
reveal if it is a simple, displaced fracture or an angulated
break. Your podiatrist can develop the right treatment
plan once he or she has identified the type of break.
3
“ IF YOU HAVE A FOOT OR ANKLE INJURY, SOAK IT IN
HOT WATER IMMEDIATELY.”
F alse. Heat promotes blood flow and can cause greater
swelling, which can lead to more pain. An ice bag
wrapped in a towel is the ideal temporary treatment
before you see your podiatrist.
4
“ APPLYING AN ELASTIC BANDAGE TO A SEVERELY
SPRAINED ANKLE IS ADEQUATE TREATMENT.”
False. Ankle sprains often mean torn or severely
overstretched ligaments, and they should receive
immediate care.
5
“ THE TERMS ‘FRACTURE,’ ‘BREAK,’ AND ‘CRACK’ ARE
ALL DIFFERENT.”
False. All of those words are appropriate for describing
a broken bone.
R
EMEMBER, A DELAY IN TREATMENT CAN
CAUSE TOE DEFORMITIES AND OTHER
PODIATRIC PROBLEMS.
DOES THE
SHOE
FIT THE
SPORT?
It’s important to choose the right
footwear for your activity. Sneakers made for
tennis players will provide different support and traction
than cleats made for football players.
WHAT DO I LOOK FOR?
BASKETBALL, TENNIS, VOLLEYBALL: A thick, stiff sole that gives
support while running and landing jumps. Basketball players should
look for high ankle construction that supports the ankle during quick
changes in direction. Volleyball players should look for a lighter shoe,
with less midsole support for quick starts and stops.
FOOTBALL AND LACROSSE: A good amount of high ankle support
is especially important for lineman and other players who make
frequent sideways movements during play. Football and lacrosse
players should have shoes with proper traction on a grassy field, in
both wet and dry conditions. Shoes with proper traction can help
prevent injury.
SOCCER: Soccer shoes should have a good-quality footbed, which
can help provide proper arch support. Make sure they feature the stud
type for the ground that will be played on most often: soft, hard, firm,
or turf. Also, use molded rubber cleats rather than the screw-on variety.
BASEBALL AND SOFTBALL: Shoes should offer plenty of arch
support. If you experience arch pain, try using customized shoe
inserts called orthotics. Baseball and softball shoes should have no
more than a half inch of space between the big toe and the end of the
shoe. Metal baseball spikes should not be used by athletes younger
than 13.
RUNNING: A good running shoe should provide maximum shock
absorption to help avoid injury. It is also important to match your shoe
to your foot’s arch type (high, medium, low). Replace your running
shoes after 300-500 miles.
PRO TIP: DO NOT USE HAND-ME-DOWN SHOES; ILL-FITTING
FOOTWEAR INCREASES THE DANGER OF ANKLE INJURIES.
D O C T O R S O F P O D I AT R I C M E D I C I N E A R E P O D I AT R I C P H Y S I C I A N S A N D S U R G E O N S , A L S O K N O W N A S P O D I AT R I S T S , Q U A L I F I E D B Y T H E I R E D U C AT I O N ,
T R A I N I N G , A N D E X P E R I E N C E T O D I A G N O S E A N D T R E AT C O N D I T I O N S A F F E C T I N G T H E F O O T, A N K L E , A N D R E L AT E D S T R U C T U R E S O F T H E L E G .
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• W W W. A PM A .OR G •
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