MASTERY IS IN THE REACHING, noT THe ArrIVInG

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ HOUSTON, TEXAS | THE OFFICIAL ANNUAL CONFERENCE NEWSPAPER | www.ascd.org/conferencedaily ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★
CONFERENCE DAY 2
SUNDAY,
March 22,
2015
INSIDE
MASTERY
IS IN THE
REACHING,
NOT THE ARRIVING
3
Equity in the

Classroom
14
Engaging

Latino Families
15
Mobilize Me!

SARAH MCKIBBEN
SCHEDULE
CHANGES
Near wins teach us to
persist through even the
most challenging setbacks.
Sarah Lewis’s defining moment came after
a fateful day when her closest friend passed
away while trying to save a younger cousin
from drowning. This friend had an incredible
zeal for life and “wanted to get to the marrow of every idea,” Lewis recalled. During
a period of unimaginable grief, Lewis was
compelled to understand how we become
our fullest selves, to explore how failure is an
inexplicable part of growth, and to get to the
heart of mastery.
She shared her profound journey with attendees during the packed First General Session,
sponsored by SAFARI Montage. An art curator and Du Bois Fellow at Harvard University,
Read These Stories and
MORE ONLINE

F ive Keys to Connected
Leadership
 A Flipped Approach
to
Engaging Every Student
Visit www.ascd.org/conferencedaily
for more in-depth conference coverage.
Lewis spent time unearthing the life stories
of nearly 150 famous artists, musicians,
educators, and entrepreneurs for her book
The Rise: Creativity, the Gift of Failure, and
the Search for Mastery. She dug past their
successes to reveal stunning examples of grit
and persistence. While attending seminary,
Martin Luther King Jr. received Cs in public
speaking. How did he rise from a setback
of such magnitude to become one of the
nation’s greatest orators, Lewis wondered?
On welfare and unable to support herself,
J. K. Rowling went on to pen the wildly popular Harry Potter series. Harvard’s Dean of
College Admissions was expelled from high
school for truancy and now looks for grit in
applicants above other characteristics.
Lewis discovered that some of the greatest
artists and innovators in history possessed
three common traits: they could distinguish
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between success and mastery; they cultivated a private domain for themselves; and
they were gritty but knew when to surrender,
when to avoid unravelling into “dysfunctional persistence.”
“Mastery is not about the arriving or
achievement alone, it is about the reach,”
Lewis emphasized. Success is a fleeting
moment, but “mastery is a curved-line pursuit that requires endurance.” The drive for
mastery helped Columbia University archers,
whom Lewis observed through three hours
of grueling practice, send arrows flying 150
miles per hour, 75 yards away, over and over
and over again. They derived their energy
from “an attentiveness to that near win,” confirmed Lewis, “to the gap between where they
are and where they want to go—and where
they can go.”
CONTINUED on page 14
Access conference information on your
mobile device with the ASCD 2015 app.
Go to www.ascd.org/acapp on your iPhone,
iPad, Android, or Internet-enabled device, or
search “ASCD” in your app store.
Conference information is also available on
our main Annual Conference website (www
.ascd.org/annualconference), and speaker,
session, and exhibitor listings on Map Your
Show (www.ascd.org/mapyourshow).
  
sunday
New Session
2290: “Empowering
Emergent Bilingualism
through the Arts,” with
presenter Laura Fattal:
1:00–1:45 p.m., Level 3,
Room 350C. Please see www
.ascd.org/schedulechanges
for the session description.
CORRECTIONs
ASCD Center: The ASCD
workshop on FIT Teaching™
Strategies originally
scheduled for 1:45 p.m. has
been changed to 11:30 a.m.
in the ASCD Center Theater
(booth 484). This workshop
will also be held at 2:30 p.m.
2113: The ASCD Forum,
“Forum on Accountability,”
has moved to Level 3,
Room 352B.
2186: “ASCD Education
Policy Update” has moved
to Saturday, March 21,
8:00–8:45 a.m., Level 3,
Room 330B.
2269: “How to Engage All
Layers of the Whole Child”
has moved to 3:00–4:00
p.m., Level 3, Room 350A.
More schedule changes
on page 15   
ASCD ON SOCIAL MEDIA: #ASCD15 |  @ascd |  @officialascd |  facebook.com/ascd.org |  pinterest.com/officialascd |  youtube.com/officialascd
www.ascd.org/conferencedaily ★ CONFERENCE DAILY ★ 3
Equity in the Classroom
through Culturally Conscious Instruction
Everyone needs a pair of shoes, but each person needs a pair that fits them properly.
Because of this, not all shoes are going to be the same. Equity in the classroom is just
this. It isn’t synonymous with fairness, but rather, according to Edwin Javius, CEO of
EDEquity Inc., it consists of “applying additional or different resources (human, fiscal,
and intellectual) to ensure all students receive what they need to exceed common
core, or rigorous, standards.”
To foster equity in the classroom, educators must
be culturally conscious. To accomplish this, Javius
explained in his Saturday session, “Equity and
Culturally Conscious Teaching: Meeting Rigorous
Standards,” they must be purposeful, intentional, and
deliberate with students. Understanding where students come from and focusing on building relationships with them is crucial to being able to give them
what they need to succeed.
Growing up, Javius experienced very little cultural
synchronization between school and home. He
described himself as an ESL student because he didn’t
speak using academic language, but preferred to
speak in the black dialect he was accustomed to. He
wasn’t taught to speak with a quiet voice, wait his turn
to speak, or sit still for long periods of time. He was,
however, able to hold meaningful conversations with
adults at the mere age of four. Rather than recognizing
this as one of many core attributes he possessed, his
teacher only saw a student who couldn’t sit still during
circle time. The problem in many classrooms, Javius
stated, is that teachers aren’t always dissecting what
students are bringing to the table.
Laura Checkley
learn. Some minority or low-income students are
caught between trying to succeed in an AP class and
still maintaining relationships with their friends who
aren’t excelling in school. Some of these students may
also feel as if they can’t answer incorrectly in class,
or it will be attributed to the color of their skin. “To
understand the impact of race and culture on student
achievement, [teachers] need to be willing to abandon
the belief that colorblindness is a possible solution,”
according to Javius, because equity itself is based on
color consciousness.
In the last few minutes of his session, Javius left educators with three “culturally conscious instructional
strategies” to support students in transferring their
learning into the common core realm. The first was
the use of structured oral language practice, which
consists of strategically pairing students and having
them discuss topics as the teacher models academic
language use and assists them when needed. The
second strategy involves transferring the use of
academic language to what the students are expected
to master cognitively. Finally, Javius recommended
employing positive and descriptive feedback in the
classroom. He emphasized the importance of commending students on their efforts, not on whether
their answers are correct.
Equity, he argued, is 75 percent mind-set and 25
percent strategies. Mind-set comprises not only our
cultural awareness and attitude, but also our ability
to analyze our own biases and to recognize how racial
identification and development affect how students
According to Javius, “there are no pedagogical barriers to teaching and learning when willing people are
prepared and made available to children.” The knowledge and skills needed to educate all children equitably already exist; it is the will to do it that is needed. 
Opening
the Doors to
Opportunity
By providing rigorous instruction, meaningful
assessment, and access to opportunity — both
inside and outside the classroom — the College Board
is committed to ensuring that students are ready for
college and careers. AP Potential helps schools grow
their AP programs by identifying students likely
to succeed in AP courses and on AP Exams.
TM
®
Learn more at appotential.collegeboard.org
© 2015 The College Board.
15b_10308_ASCA_HalfpageAd_2_23.indd 1
2/23/15 2:35 PM
Hello, Superkids.
Zaner-Bloser is pleased to announce that we
have acquired Superkids Reading Program
from Rowland Reading Foundation.
Superkids joins Zaner-Bloser’s exciting portfolio of language arts
programs to offer educators and students a passport to literacy.
Get free coffee—on us! Let’s talk about language arts and
reading. Saturday and Sunday only, pick up your passport in either of our booths
and find out how to get your language arts and reading stamps to earn a free
coffee gift card. Quantities are limited.
Zaner-Bloser booth #308 • Superkids booth #629
www.zaner-bloser.com • 800.421.3018
E1257A2
E1257A2_ASCD_newspaper_SK_Full_FNLART.indd 1
2/12/15 2:52 PM
www.ascd.org/conferencedaily ★ CONFERENCE DAILY ★ 5
The ASCD Whole
Child Symposium
Event encourages debate, turns attention to poverty
Last year, ASCD launched the Whole Child Symposium (WCS) to elicit various
viewpoints and suggest actions that each of us, regardless of our areas of influence,
can take to improve education systems, processes, and outcomes. The event also
seeks to put educators back in front of the education debate.
Our Discussions to Date
A Focus on Poverty
Since launching the WCS, ASCD has hosted two significant events. The ­inaugural event in May 2014 centered on the theme “Choosing Your Tomorrow Today.”
We chose this theme because the decisions we make
today—for our systems, schools, and classrooms—will
affect what our tomorrows will become. We are, either
purposefully or inadvertently, determining our future,
our economy, and our society at each step.
This spring, the symposium turns its attention to the
“elephant in the ­education room”: poverty.
This past fall, ASCD hosted the second WCS, which
focused on “The What, Why, and How of Teacher
Leadership.” Although widespread agreement exists
about the great value of teacher leaders and the
importance of recognizing and even cultivating this
role, progress can be hampered by the myriad definitions and examples of what a teacher leader is.
The concept of teacher leader has different meanings
and goes by a variety of names, including specialist, instructional coach, mentor, peer colleague, and
team leader. In addition, many who view themselves
as teacher leaders feel that they are on their own in
terms of preparation, support, and development. Such
teacher leaders are seeking guidance about the definition and parameters of their role.
Socioeconomic status has been touted as one of the
greatest determinants of academic achievement and
student success. The most recent reports from the
Program for International Student Assessment
(www.schoolfunding.info/news/policy/2011-01PISA.
php3) reveal that although poverty influences educational outcomes, it still needs to be tackled and
discussed in earnest.
This year, the Southern Education Foundation
reported that more than half of America’s public
school children come from low-income families and
live in poverty. Ironically, this statistic comes 50 years
after Lyndon B. Johnson’s War on Poverty legislation.
To view video archives from the past events and learn
details about this year’s WCS, visit www.ascd.org
/wcsymposium. 
Community
Involvement
Family
Engagement
Employee
Wellness
CO
Moving Ahead with
the WSCC Model
Y
N IT
MU
M
CO
What became clear throughout this discussion was
the need to establish the role of teacher leader as
separate from the role of administrator or principal.
Teacher leaders not only provide instructional leadership, but also develop effective climate and culture
across the school setting.
With all attention and funding provided to education
reform and school improvement efforts over the past
decade, shouldn’t we have witnessed greater gains in
student achievement and graduation rates? Is there
something else that we have either inadvertently or
deliberately ignored that needs to be discussed?
MM
UN
Last year in Los Angeles, ASCD joined with the U.S. Centers for Disease
Control to launch the Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child
(WSCC) Model. This model, which is the next evolution of the coordinated
school approach, “responds to the call for greater alignment, integration,
and collaboration between health and education to improve each child’s
cognitive, physical, social, and emotional development,” as outlined in the WSCC backgrounder released in 2014.
IT
Y
Since its launch, the model has been adopted at the state level by Alaska and Mississippi and in numerous large
districts, including Orange County Schools in California; Denver Public Schools in Colorado; Laurel School District in
Delaware; Buffalo Public Schools in New York; Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools in North Carolina; and Pasadena and
Fort Worth Independent School Districts in Texas.
“It is time to truly align the sectors and place the child at the center,” said Wayne H. Giles, director, Division of
Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. “Both public health and
education serve the same students, often in the same settings. We must do more to work together and collaborate.”
Throughout 2015, ASCD will be looking to states to adopt and use the model as a way to integrate learning and health
into the curriculum. We have already begun to assist a handful of states—including Kentucky, Nebraska, Ohio, Oregon,
and Rhode Island—with this initiative and are looking for others to learn from their approaches.
For more information, visit www.ascd.org/learningandhealth. 
LEGISLATIV
E
AGENDA 20
15
I
t is time for federa
l education policie
s to address
and educators.
and support
Rather than contin
the needs of
today’s studen
uing to rely on
law (or a tempo
ts
an antiquated,
rary set of waiver
turn-of-the-c
s), it is neces
entury educa
long-term congre
sary to push
tion
ssional reauth
for a complete,
orization to establ
immediate, and
and the suppo
ish the goals
rts to meet them.
for our public
Obviously, ensuri
education system
opportunities
ng equity and
must remain
access to high-q
a paramount
uality educational
federal conce
priority for all
rn and fundin
students should
g
imperative. But
be broader and
and citizenship
the national
more ambitious
readiness to
and move beyon
the successful
d college, career
education system
development
,
of the whole
.
child at every
level of the
ASCD calls on
Congress and
the Obama admin
recommenda
istration to adopt
tions to promo
the following
te the succe
ss of studen
communities
ts, educators,
, and the nation
schools,
.
1
2
3
4
5
Reauthorize
ESEA Now
Establish a Multim
Reduce the Relianc
Promote a Whole
Honor and Suppor
etric Accoun
e on Standa
Child Educat
t the Educat
tability System
rdized Testing
ion
ion Profession
ASCD
Unveils 2015
Legislative
Priorities
continued on
back
In January, ASCD released its 2015 Legislative
Agenda at the Leadership Institute for Legislative
Advocacy in Washington, D.C. The agenda was
established by ASCD’s legislative committee and
delineates the five key legislative priorities for the
association and its members. Chief among the
priorities is the reauthorization of the Elementary
and Secondary School Act (ESEA). ASCD strongly
urges the 114th Congress to act with urgency to
reauthorize ESEA.
“The act is long overdue for an update, and all
states and districts deserve stable, transparent,
and uniform policies that can only come from
reauthorization,” said David Griffith, ASCD director
of public policy.
In addition to pushing for ESEA reauthorization,
ASCD is calling on Congress and the Obama
administration to adopt the following
recommendations that will promote the success
of students, educators, schools, communities,
and the nation.
• Establish a multimetric accountability
system—A new comprehensive accountability
model must use multiple measures of
performance, incorporate all subjects, include
nonacademic factors, promote continuous
improvement and support, and report communitylevel data to highlight shared responsibility for
student success.
• Reduced the reliance on standardized
testing—Standardized tests alone should never
be used for high-stakes purposes, and neither
students nor educators nor schools should
be ranked or rated based on test scores. State
test scores provide an incomplete appraisal
of student achievement and by themselves
often offer a misleading depiction of student
performance and school quality.
• Promote a whole child education—A whole
child approach to education can best prepare
students to be college, career, and citizenship
ready. Elements of such an approach include
comprehensive opportunities in all academic
subjects, promotion of social and emotional
learning, and access to in-school health and
counseling services.
• Honor and support the education
profession—A robust federal investment in time
and resources is necessary to provide ongoing
professional development for teachers and
school leaders and successfully recruit, train, and
induct them. All educators should receive a stairstepped induction into the profession, time to
reflect and refine their practice, and personalized
professional development that recognizes their
strengths and allows them to grow.
The complete 2015 ASCD Legislative Agenda can be
found at www.ascd.org/legislativeagenda. 
6 ★ CONFERENCE DAILY ★ www.ascd.org/conferencedaily
Exhibitor
Directory
#DontLetThemDrop......................873
A
Achievement Loop.........................543
ACT Inc...........................................1018
ActivEd Inc......................................661
Adobe................................................401
Advanced Learning
Concepts LLC............................ 943
Air Watch By Vmware..................418
Algebra Readiness
Educators LLC........................... 860
Amazon Education.........................955
American Reading Company......617
American School............................842
Amplify.............................................601
Apex Learning............................... 642
Apperson Datalink........................216
Arizona State University
Online...........................................937
Art in Action.................................. 659
Ascend Education..........................752
Atlanta CVB.................................. 1029
Audio Enhancement Inc.............. 444
Ayn Rand Institute........................438
B
Backpack Gear Inc.........................339
Benchmark Education.................. 101
Big Ideas Learning LLC................927
Blended Schools Network and
Urban Planet Mobile.................247
Booksource......................................919
Borenson and Associates Inc......839
Box Cars & One Eyed Jacks........533
Brainchild.........................................242
brass\Money Side of Life
­STUDENT Program............... 1024
BrightBytes..................................... 439
Buck Institute for Education...... 664
Build Your Own Curriculum.......835
C
C.A.R.E Core Augmented Reality
Education....................................658
Cambridge Educational
Services....................................... 670
Cambridge International
Examinations..............................457
Capstone/MyON............................723
Center for School
Transformation......................... 654
Claire Lynn Designs..................... 546
CompuScholar Inc........................ 864
Conscious Discipline................... 665
Corwin............................................. 509
Cover One........................................ 581
Crayola LLC.....................................923
Curriculum Associates LLC..... 1005
D
E
Education Week............................ 924
Edulastic...........................................443
EduTect.............................................679
Engineer Your World from the
University of Texas.................. 960
Engineering Is Elementary........ 940
ESR.....................................................823
Examview By Turning
Technologies..............................657
Excel Math...................................... 646
Exemplars........................................454
Exibi...................................................344
Explore Learning............................228
EZ - Robot Inc.................................870
F
G
EAI Education.................................347
Edisonlearning................................363
Edlio...................................................238
Edmentum........................................523
Edmodo............................................ 300
EDTRAININGCENTER................958
Gilder Lehrman Institute of
American History......................634
Glogster EC Inc..............................570
Great American
Opportunities Inc......................747
Great Expectations
Foundation..................................542
GT Ignite..........................................861
H
Handwriting Without Tears........827
Harvard Education Press............ 209
Harvard Graduate School of
Education................................... 462
Heinemann......................................301
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.........534
Houston Independent School
District....................................... 1011
I
I Think School................................ 656
Insight Public Sector................. 1026
Institute For Excellence in
Writing.........................................575
International Baccalaureate....... 680
IPEVO............................................... 909
IRIS Connect.................................. 465
Istation..............................................563
itslearning Inc.................................324
Jensen Learning Corporation... 205
Jones International
University....................................572
Just ASK Publications &
Professional Development...... 517
K
Mackin Educational
Resources....................................767
Mark Elliott Designs.....................677
Marshall Cavendish
Education....................................538
Marzano Research.........................327
Mastery Ed...................................... 766
MasteryConnect............................ 944
MathFest Inc....................................574
Math Teachers Press Inc............1033
MathLine at Howbrite
Solutions......................................638
McREL International.....................778
Measured Progress........................227
Measurement Incorporated........422
Media-X Systems Inc....................874
Membean, Inc................................. 880
Memorial Healthworks! Kids
Museum.......................................841
Mentoring Minds, LP................... 926
Microsoft Corporation.................529
Mindrocket Media Group............379
MTGTS SMARTBoard
Training.......................................878
My Learning Plan Inc....................447
N
Naiku.................................................338
National Council of Teachers of
Mathematics.............................. 640
National Library of Medicine.... 405
Neufeld Learning Systems
Inc................................................. 208
Neuhaus Education Center.........554
Nextlesson...................................... 459
Nightlock Lockdown..................... 471
Northwest Evaluation
Association................................. 318
Norwood House Press..................441
Nudging the Imagination........... 644
Nystrom Education.......................219
O
Q
Lamar University.......................... 880
R
PALS Marketplace........................ 409
Pearson.............................................701
Penguin Random House.............. 424
Pitsco Education......................... 1008
Positive Action...............................922
Qualtrics........................................ 1020
Questar III Boces...........................475
Read Naturally Inc.........................326
Reading Horizons......................... 220
Real OT Solutions Inc...................453
Realityworks Inc............................. 771
Really Great Reading....................776
Renaissance Learning.................. 400
Responsive Classroom................ 446
Revolve Robotics......................... 1059
Rezilient Kidz................................1021
Richer Picture/Ideas
Consulting...................................552
Routledge Eye on Education.......740
Rowman & Littlefield
Education....................................843
Royal Fireworks Publishing....... 908
Royal Roads University................245
Rubicon International...................653
Russian Blue Diamond...............1027
S
Saint Joseph’s College................. 340
Sanford Education Center at National University....................... 760
Sanford Harmony Program........ 939
Scantron........................................... 717
Scholastic Inc................................. 900
School Datebooks......................... 564
School Improvement
Network.......................................501
School Innovations &
Achievement..............................735
School Mate.....................................762
School Technology Resources
Inc..................................................232
Schoology.........................................535
Schoolwide Inc...............................641
Scribesense.................................... 1017
Seacliff Educational Solutions....859
Second Step/Committee for
Children.......................................855
Sesame..............................................765
Seton Hall University..................1022
Shader Productions.......................754
Shout! Media...................................359
Sibme.................................................674
Silver Strong & Associates..........578
Singapore Math Inc.......................547
Skyward Inc..................................... 541
SMARTTraining NOW.................545
Smith System..................................652
Snooty Hooty Too, LLC.................779
Solution Tree.................................. 429
Spirit Lala.......................................1053
Springboard.................................... 440
STAAR Master/Testsmart Common
Core/Novel Units Inc...............810
Staff Development for
Educators.....................................252
Stenhouse Publishers....................553
Stop Summer Learning Loss!......437
Studies Weekly............................... 417
Sumblox Group LLC......................758
Superkids by Zaner Bloser......... 629
Sweet Treats.................................... 671
Swivl..................................................342
T
observe4success............................562
Observer Tab.................................. 809
Oneida Indian Nation.................. 244
ORIGO Education..........................623
OSC World.......................................225
Otto Trading Inc............................224
Overdrive.........................................819
P
Kaeden Books..................................635
Kagan Publishing & Professional
Development..............................845
Knopf Doubleday........................... 341
Knovation........................................ 808
Knowledge Delivery Systems..... 741
KnowRe............................................. 561
L
Language Magazine......................559
Lead Your School.......................... 947
Learning A Z....................................681
Learning Bird..................................557
Learning List.................................. 540
Learning Sciences
International...............................753
Learning Sciences
International...............................852
Learning Theater...........................372
Learning Theater.......................... 360
Learning Focused Solutions........222
Learning.Com................................. 662
LEGO Education............................ 866
Lexia, A Rosetta Stone
Company..................................... 609
Library of Congress...................... 962
Lightspeed Technologies Inc..... 246
Lions Quest.....................................556
Listen Current................................ 945
Little Caesars Pizza Kits............. 560
Lone Star Learning........................558
lynda.com........................................ 426
M
FAST - The Formative Assessment
System For Teachers ...............478
Findaway......................................... 956
Florida Institute of
Technology.................................577
Follett................................................729
Foot Pain DBA Happy Feet..........255
Forde Ferrier LLC.......................... 862
Free Spirit Publishing...................433
Frog Publications.......................... 942
FSP Cool Lockers...........................461
J
Danielson Group............................678
Diamond Council of America.....544
Digitalis Education Solutions
Inc................................................. 309
Dinah-Might Adventures, LP..... 846
District Administration
Magazine.....................................337
Drawp for School............................825
DreamBox Learning..................... 709
 In addition to being exhibitors, some companies are also sponsors. Their names appear in color.
The School Planner
Company......................................226
The Virtual High School............. 660
Thinking Maps Inc....................... 648
Thomas Edison State College.....863
Tiggly................................................672
Tobii Dynavox/Boardmaker.......479
Touchstones Discussion
Project..........................................458
Townsend Press..............................763
Treetop Publishing/Bare
Books............................................ 761
Tutto/Mascot Metropolitan
Inc................................................. 954
U
V
W
Z
Universal Publishing.....................354
University of Houston Victoria,
School of Education and Human
Development..............................345
University of Nebraska High
School...........................................941
University of Pennsylvania, Mid
Career Doctoral Program........857
University of Texas at San
Antonio........................................463
University of West Georgia.........236
Vantage Learning...........................243
Variquest Visual Learning
Tools.............................................355
Velazquez Press............................. 840
Vocabulary Spellingcity.Com..... 319
Vocabulary.Com.............................455
VS America......................................423
W A Y Widening Advancements
for Youth......................................918
Walden University.........................343
WestEd..............................................325
WIDA Consortium........................ 436
Wiley.................................................201
Wilson Language Training
Corporation................................237
World of Wicked............................775
World Savvy–Global Competence
Certificate..................................1023
WRiTE BRAiN BOOKS.................978
Writerkey.Com...............................732
WriteSteps.......................................336
Zaner Bloser................................... 308
zSpace...............................................756
Tardy Calculator............................473
TeacherMatch................................ 676
Teacher's Discovery...................... 781
Teachers College Press................322
Teaching Channel..........................210
Teaching Tolerance.......................323
Teachscape......................................223
TestDividers....................................579
Textbook Warehouse................... 480
The Arts & College Prep
Academy..................................... 663
The Cooper Institute.................... 936
The DBQ Project............................746
The Great Books Foundation..... 647
The Learning Connection
TLC................................................733
The Markerboard People.............834
The Master Teacher.......................445
The New Book Press LLC...........1055
The New York Times.....................925
Have a
Treat
On Us!
Cupcakes a la Houston will
be served in Exhibit Hall C,
Booth 671, 3:00–5:00 p.m.
www.ascd.org/conferencedaily ★ CONFERENCE DAILY ★ 7
Today’s Exhibitor Workshops
All exhibitor workshops will take place in the Learning Theater in the Exhibit Hall, Halls C & D. Room 1 is Booth 360; Room 2 is Booth 372.
9:00–10:00 a.m.
12:00–1:00 p.m.
1:30–2:30 p.m.
3:00–4:00 p.m.
Using Foldables for Formative
Assessment in Student Notebooks
WRiTE BRAiN Books
in Your Classroom
Need More Science?
We’ve Got Solutions!
Make an Impact with Visible
Learning
Discover how to use interactive
formative assessment techniques by
implementing brain-compatible and
research-supported Foldables® within
student notebooks. When students create their own products, their effort and
commitment increases. Create handson, minds-on graphic organizers to use
immediately with your students or staff.
WRiTE BRAiN books are richly
­illustrated, textless books igniting selfexpression and inventive storytelling
while developing 21st century skills.
Students can upload their stories onto
the WRiTE BRAiN website and receive
a fully self-authored published book.
Find out how this project-based learning, English language arts curriculum
complements your school community.
At ProjecTeach, science is our focus.
Captivating from first glimpse to last
assessment, our lessons have been
designed based on the Texas TEKS
and the Common Core State Standards. Our songs, lessons, videos,
and stories will have teachers and
students excited to learn. Leave
with a ready-to-go lesson.
The Visible Learning(plus) framework,
based on the research of John Hattie,
was developed to help educators leverage the powerful research on what
works—and what doesn’t—in raising
student achievement. Learn about
these practices and how to start the
journey towards becoming a Visible
Learning school.
Hilary Kostichka, ProjecTeach, Keller, TX
Kristin Anderson, Corwin, Thousand Oaks, CA
Fisher and Frey’s Close and
Critical Reading PD Resource
Center
Bring Student Voice to
Life with Digital Surveys
211EW | Room 1, Booth 360
Debi Krampen, Dinah-Might Adventures,
San Antonio, TX
Next Generation Assessments:
Finding a Balance
212EW | Room 2, Booth 372
Next Generation Assessments have
the potential to help students cultivate
higher-order thinking skills, yet they
can also reduce high-stakes testing
by connecting formative and summative assessments. With better vendor
and district pilot pro­grams, smoother,
affordable d
­ istrictwide imple­
mentation is achievable.
Leslie Tyler, Edulastic, Fremont, CA
221EW | Room 1, Booth 360
231EW | Room 1, Booth 360
241EW | Room 1, Booth 360
Julia Gabor, WRiTE BRAiN BOOKS, Los Angeles, CA
CARE4D: Revolutionary Augmented Reality and Virtual Labs
222EW | Room 2, Booth 372
232EW | Room 2, Booth 372
242EW | Room 2, Booth 372
C.A.R.E. has developed a product line
that changes the way we educate our
children in classrooms and at home by
infusing the Common Core curriculum
with augmented reality technology to
create a unique learning experience.
C.A.R.E.’s product suite includes lessons, assessments, and 4D virtual labs.
Learn more about Fisher and Frey’s
PD Resource Center: a low-cost, highgains alternative to your current PD
plan. This one-of-a-kind, web-based
platform provides all the resources
and expert guidance you need to
direct a yearlong initiative focused
on close and critical reading.
In partnership with Russell Quaglia,
Corwin offers a collection of surveys
that ask students, staff, and parents
for their opinions on school-related
topics. Educators can improve student
academic motivation by asking
students, staff, and parents about
school experiences, analyzing their
responses, and acting on them.
Meredith Walkiewicz, C.A.R.E Core Augmented
Reality Education, North Brunswick, NJ
Douglas Fisher, Nancy Frey, and Lisa Luedeke,
Corwin, Thousand Oaks, CA
Sarah Downing and Lisa Lysne, Corwin,
Thousand Oaks, CA
The Power of Potential
At Microsoft, we believe limitless potential lives within every student, every educator,
every school. Together we can unlock this potential by providing technology that not only
fits the needs of different learning environments, but also expands the power of education.
To learn more, visit Microsoft.com/Education.
www.ascd.org/conferencedaily ★ CONFERENCE DAILY ★ 9
Because of ASCD...
What are your favorite ASCD
resources, publications, solutions, or events, and why?
We’re always looking for new ways to
insert ASCD voices into our conversations. With this in mind, we’ve asked
a set of questions to ASCD members,
who come from all walks of life and
are happy to share their stories.
Did you know that academic
credit is available for attending
ASCD’s Annual Conference?
The L2L (Leader to Leader) Conference
is my favorite. I love this little
conference that could—and does!
It is great to see the mix of affiliate
leaders, emerging leaders, and
national staff come together to share
the vision and mission of ASCD. I try
to figure out a way to go every
year—2014 was my third consecutive
L2L Conference.
Meet Jason Ellingson, ASCD
Member and Emerging Leader
Complete this sentence:
“Because of ASCD. . .”
I am a more empowered educator who
is better able to challenge the status
quo, advocate for the whole child, and
lead whenever I can.
Speak with Kim Nielsen in the registration
area (Level 1, Hall E) for information
on credit with the Institute of Graduate
Studies or visit www.ascd.org
/academiccredit for information
on credit with other schools.
ASCD members have until April 15,
2015, to cast a ballot in the 2015 General
Membership Election to elect two
members of the ASCD Board of Directors.
Meet the candidates:
There is great work to do in education,
both to enrich the lives of every student
and to improve the system in which
they learn and grow. ASCD gives me the
tools, the expertise, the support, and
the network to build my capacity to help
others reach their potential.
My favorite ASCD moment is the 2013
Annual Conference keynote by Dr.
Maya Angelou. She challenged us all
to be rainbows in others’ clouds, and I
was amazed at the stillness of a room
of 10,000 people listening to every
word Dr. Angelou said. It was the most
powerful professional—and personal—
development I had experienced.
 S
unday, March 22
| 3:00–4:00 p.m.
George R. Brown Convention Center
Level 3, Room 342C
All Annual Conference attendees are
invited to attend ASCD’s Annual Meeting,
which will provide an opportunity to hear
from ASCD’s leaders about the state of the
association and to raise important issues.
Participate in the conversation and help
shape the association’s future.
ASCD Election—Vote Now!
Why are you an ASCD
member?
What is your favorite ASCD
moment?
ASCD Annual
Meeting
Get
Credit!
Leslie Grant
Assistant Professor, The
College of William and Mary,
Williamsburg, VA
Read more stories on Inservice at
http://inservice.ascd.org. Explore
ASCD membership at www.ascd.org
/learnmore.
Tom Hoerr
Head of the New City School, St.
Louis, MO
Peter Lancia
Director of Teaching and
Learning, Westbrook School
Department, Westbrook, ME
Benjamin
Shuldiner
Distinguished Lecturer of
Education Leadership, Hunter College-City
University of New York, NY
Go to www.ascd.org/votenow to
read full bios for each candidate
and then vote.
Win an iPad
Visit the EduTect team
at booth 679 for your
chance to win an
iPad
®
The EduTect Unit Planner offers a whole-school, web-based,
comprehensive and integrated curriculum planning and
reporting tool for educators.
Unit Planner is accessible at anytime, anywhere
through an elegant web-based or native iPad app.
Unit Planner supports the Understanding by Design®
framework based on the work of Jay McTighe and
Grant Wiggins to encourage a common language and
consistent curriculum format.
The intuitive nature and flexibility of Unit Planner
encourages teacher collaboration and sharing, within
and across schools.
©
The curriculum mapping function enables horizontal
and vertical curriculum alignment.
ENROLL FOR A 14 DAY FREE TRIAL
www.edutectinc.com/ASCDMarch2015
1-844-338-8328
www.edutectinc.com
10 ★ CONFERENCE DAILY ★ www.ascd.org/conferencedaily
EXPLORE THE ASCD CENTER
Enter and Win
Win a new Apple iPad!
Come by the Member Services desk in the ASCD Center
and enter a drawing to win an Apple iPad. The drawing
will be held at 3:45 p.m.
Open today from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. in Booth 484 in the Exhibit Show.
Ready, Set, Selfie!
Engage in Author Talks
and Book Signings
Meet some of your favorite ASCD authors who
are featured at the conference. The ASCD Theater
features popular authors sharing personal insights.
In the ASCD Bookstore, get your ASCD books signed
by select authors. Detailed schedules are available at
the bookstore.
Author Talks
12:00–12:45 p.m. | ASCD Theater
Book Signings
9:00 a.m.–3:30 p.m. | ASCD Bookstore
Share Feedback and Insight
Visit the ASCD Research Row to share your insight
and feedback with our research experts through a
brief, interactive survey. All participants will receive
a free gift while supplies last.
Saturday’s raffle winner was Anthony B. Harper, Dallas,
Tex. Congratulations! Come to the Member Services desk
to claim your prize.
Grab a friend and stop by the selfie booth in the ASCD
Center to take a photo with fun ASCD-themed props.
 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
Participate in Educator
Workshops and
Demonstrations
The ASCD Center is offering these free
user workshops in the ASCD Theater.
Classroom Formative Assessment:
The Key to Student Understanding
10:30 a.m. and 2:00 p.m.
Increasing Teacher Effectiveness
with the FIT TeachingTM Strategies
11:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m.
ASCD Principal Leadership Development:
Meeting Needs and Making a Difference
9:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m.
Personal demonstrations are available on request
in the ASCD Professional Learning Zone. See how
ASCD’s video library, for example, brings successful
teaching practices to life through the PD In Focus®
on-demand system.
Attend a Film Screening
of The Whole Child
Join the film’s producers in the ASCD Theater for a
screening of the film The Whole Child (30 minutes)
­followed by an audience Q&A.
Speakers: Sally Nelson Barrett and Brittany Mascio
1:00–2:00 p.m.
Benefit from Your
Membership
In appreciation of your membership with ASCD and
your attendance at this year’s Annual Conference, we
invite you to take part in the many activities we have
planned for you. Visit us at the Member Services desk to
• Learn about valuable ASCD member benefits.
• Collect your Membership Ribbon.
• Learn about special renewal offers.
Improve Outcomes with
Social-Emotional Learning
Seton Hall University
graduates enjoy successful
careers as Superintendents,
Central Office and Building
Leaders in 30 states
and 7 countries.
Attend Monday’s session #3212!
Michael I. Cohen, Ed.D. ’12
Manager in Assessment, Research &
Evaluation; Denver Public Schools
Schools that explicitly teach social-emotional learning (SEL) see
an average 11% increase in standardized test scores.
DISCOVER
AN INNOVATIVE
ED.D. PROGRAM
THAT PUTS YOU
ON THE PATH
TO SUCCESS.
Our Executive Ed.D. degree offers
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• Extensive networking and professional
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new and established superintendents
• Intensive 2-year program; weekends
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• Engaging full-time faculty who mentor
as well as teach
National leaders share the research case for SEL, innovative
strategies for implementation and sustainability, effect of SEL on
Austin ISD schools, and lessons learned.
• National Reputation
Social-Emotional Learning:
Systemic Innovation for Improved Outcomes
Presenter: Roger Weissberg, CASEL
10–11:30 a.m., Level 3, Room 340A
• Dissertation research that forwards
leadership vision and practice
cfchildren.org
Skills for Social and Academic Success • Early Learning Through Grade 8
• Cohort community supporting advancement during and after the program
400 South Orange Avenue
South Orange, NJ 07079
To learn more, visit us at
www.shu.edu/go/execedd
or call 1-800-313-9833.
www.ascd.org/conferencedaily ★ CONFERENCE DAILY ★ 11
1
HIGHLIGHTS from
DAY ONE
1. The Exhibit Show is buzzing at the
70th ASCD Annual Conference and
Exhibit Show.
2. ASCD President Nancy Gibson,
Executive Director Judy Seltz, and
Immediate Past President Becky Berg
open the Exhibit Show with a ribboncutting ceremony.
3. The Whole Child Network of Schools
holds its annual meeting.
2
4. ASCD Student Chapter members gather
before touring David Anthony Middle
School in Cypress-Fairbanks ISD.
4
5. Attendees line dance, Texas-style,
during the Welcome Reception.
6. A drumline from Jersey Village High
School performs during the ribbon
cutting ceremony.
3
5
7. Art Cars, a Houston tradition,
and Randy Blair add flair to the
Welcome Reception.
6
7
Join over 48.9 million
teachers and students
on the world’s leading
K-12 platform
Visit Edmodo at booth 300 and discover
how you can safely and securely:
Create free online Groups for your classrooms
Connect and collaborate with fellow teachers
Discover resources and learning communities
Available online and for mobile, Edmodo is everything you
need for learning. All in one place.
edmodo.com
www.ascd.org/conferencedaily ★ CONFERENCE DAILY ★ 13
How Principals
Can Ensure New
Teacher Success
Kelsey Hodges
In his Saturday morning session, “Help New Teachers Be
Effective Now: Practical Tips for K-8 Principals,” Otis Kriegel,
a teacher educator from New York City, discussed valuable
knowledge principals should share with their new teachers.
He expanded on his tips with creative examples and
humorous stories of his experiences teaching grades 1–8.
First, Kriegel shared his top five tips for
new teachers:
1. Keep a spare set of clothes at school
for the days you end up covered in glue,
paint, or puke. Kriegel learned the value
of this tip firsthand when one of his 1st
graders peed on him; the extra set of
clothing allowed him to continue the
day normally.
2. Always have extra supplies on hand
so that you’ll be prepared for a new
student at any time of the year. Kriegel
recommended creating a new-student
packet to help students acclimate
more easily.
3. Review class rules with students; get
their input on what to add or change.
Teachers should enforce classroom
speed limits and handle discipline.
“Management and rules should be
consistent for the entire school year or
redone with the entire class,” Kriegel
added. Classroom chaos could occur
if a teacher goes from “20 mph to 80
mph" and the students can't keep up
with changes. Kriegel also suggested
that new teachers “steal” from veteran
teachers by observing other classrooms
to learn more about what works for their
colleagues.
4. Never go home without writing your
schedule for the following day. It's
important that all classroom members—
students and teachers alike—know the
day's schedule so that kids know what
they're doing and teachers can keep
themselves and their students on task.
5. Share one classroom breakthrough
with your principal each week; it’ll
make his or her day. Teachers can keep
principals better involved by sharing
positive classroom experiences.
Along with these practical tips, Kriegel shared other ideas that principals
can use to help a teacher's first year
run smoothly. For example, principals
should ensure that teachers know how
to make classroom traffic flow so that
students have room to move around.
And if there are specific lesson plans
principals want their teachers to use,
they should be sure to supply them.
“Principals need to update teachers.
That is the key to creating a successful
classroom,” Kriegel recommended.
ASCD Launches Principal Leadership
Development Framework
Cate Nielan
Visionary. Instructional Leader. Influencer.
Learner and Collaborator. If these words
describe the four key roles that you play, wish
to play, or encourage your team members to
play in your work as district or school leaders,
check out ASCD’s new Principal Leadership
Development Framework.
Developed to align with the new ISLCC Standards, as well as
other relevant leadership standards and rubrics, the framework steps into the gap between changing expectations and
the current needs and practices district and school leaders
are facing. As schools work to become dynamic centers of
learning that are fueled by student curiosity and engagement, the roles of district and school leaders in this new
landscape must evolve accordingly. Yet, current leadership
development options on both system and individual levels
are also evolving. To support this evolution, the framework
offers two arms of support: one to help districts create sustainable leadership development programs and structures
for school systems, and another to help school teams and
individuals identify, learn about, and use leadership best
practices and resources in their day-to-day work.
As an offering from ASCD Professional Learning Services,
the framework provides products and services—including a
wealth of expertise from ASCD’s Leadership Faculty—that
districts and schools can use “to develop leadership development programs from the ground up, or to integrate into
their existing leadership development plans and structures,”
notes Ann Cunningham-Morris, ASCD’s director of professional learning . In addition, the framework offers specific
descriptors of effective practice as well as a reflection tool to
help leaders identify their areas of need and progress within
each of the four key roles
Designed for use by groups or individuals at any stage in their
careers, the framework also provides a way for districts and
schools to talk about principal leadership, what it means, and
how to implement best practices in leadership so that they are
consistent and sustainable.
As a supporting resource for the framework, ASCD recently
added the Principal Leadership channel to its PD In Focus®
digital product, which provides online, on-demand professional
learning. Specifically, the new channel helps principals and
­aspiring principals develop skills and capabilities in the four
key leadership roles: visionary, instructional leader, influencer,
and learner and collaborator. ASCD also has PD Online®
courses and extensive library of books and e-books on the
topic of leadership to support your work. 
He also suggested that teachers should
have a place where they can safely lock
their things; they're less stressed if they
don't have to worry about their belongings. New teachers should always be
well-informed on school protocol, such
as absences, fire drills, and hall traffic—
and that the first rule for field trips is to
always know where the bathrooms are.
Kriegel concluded by reminding participants that they as leaders can be intimidating. Principals can demystify their
position by giving teachers a system
for when they can ask questions and to
whom questions should be directed—as
well as providing an infrastructure for
giving and receiving feedback. Teachers
who are confident in their environment
become effective more quickly, and
effective teachers are more likely to
stay in the profession. 
Leadership
Matters
Building Principals’ Capacity with
the ASCD Principal Leadership
Development Framework
Pete Hall, Deborah Childs-Bowen, Phyllis Pajardo,
and Ann Cunningham-Morris
Learn More About
the Framework
Attend one of our workshops in the
ASCD Center to learn more about
the framework:
ASCD Principal Leadership
Development: Meeting Your
Needs and Making a Difference
 S
unday | 9:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m.
Monday | 9:30 a.m.
Pick up the latest ASCD white paper,
“Leadership Matters—Building
Principals’ Capacity with the ASCD
Principal Leadership Development
Framework,” available in the ASCD
Center and for download at www
.ascd.org/plpaper.
14 ★ CONFERENCE DAILY ★ www.ascd.org/conferencedaily
MASTERY IS IN THE REACHING... continued from page 1
Near wins can have a dramatic effect on our
psyche: “The near win offers a kind of propulsion that catapults us into terrain we have not
before seen,” Lewis noted. Great artists thrive
on this constant pursuit: Paul Cezanne signed
only 10 percent of his paintings, considering
most of his pieces unfinished. After publishing The Sound and the Fury, William Faulkner
rewrote entire sections of the book five times.
Michelangelo summed up this pursuit best, said
Lewis, when he pleaded, “Lord, grant that I may
always desire more than I can accomplish.”
So how can educators encourage students to
pursue their goals with similar persistence?
Give students a “private domain”—a safe space
to play and explore. “Make no question foolish,”
implored Lewis, and always integrate time for
innovation, creativity, and play. “Play is what
allows us to maintain a sense of wonder [and]
sustain the journey required for mastery.”
Cultivating grit and teaching students how
to rise from their failures commands a shared
vision, according to Lewis. “It takes companionship to better see what the true nature
of triumph will require. It takes turning our
classrooms into temporary laboratories,” to
allow students to work in ambiguity on their
near wins.
Students of the future will be “walking on terrain that will look radically different from what
we’re walking on today,” Lewis observed. We
must equip them with the adequate tools to
“adjust their arrows” when they go off course.
As Lewis reminded the captivated audience, “The
path to excellence is never a straight line.” 
Anytime, Anywhere:
PD Online®
Courses
PD Online courses from ASCD enable
school administrators, teachers, and
other faculty to choose specific topics
to meet specific classroom, district,
or university needs. The courses
leverage user-friendly technology
and instructional applications that
make it easy and practical to learn
anytime and anywhere.
The courses cover timely topics that help build educators’ skills, knowledge, and capacity. Here are some of
the newest PD Online courses:
• A
ssessment and Student Success in a
Differentiated Classroom
• T
he Next Generation Science Standards:
An Introduction
• Common Core Literacy: Grades 3–5
• Where Great Teaching Begins
All PD Online courses create an engaging learning ­experience through a blend of videos, readings,
­assessments, and real-world activities. Their flexible
design fits the needs of almost any type and size of
Reaching
Out to
Latino
Families
In Latino families, education begins at home in everyday
activities such as chores and play. School education is
deemed to be out of the parents’ expertise and not their
responsibility, so parents view involving themselves with
teachers as extra work and unnecessary.
“One of the conversations that Rocio and I regularly
have . . . is basically trying to break the paradigm that
many of us have that ‘Oh, what is wrong with them?
Why don’t they want to come to school?’” said Campos.
learning group—from individual learners to entire
districts and university programs. And because the
courses are mobile- and tablet-friendly, you can take
them with you wherever you go.
With the PD Online series, teachers and leaders can
improve their classroom practice, advance their professional development, and earn academic or career
credit. Districts and schools can use integrated tools
to target and monitor professional learning for individuals and groups. PD Online’s self-paced, intuitive
design lets teachers complete professional learning
on their own schedule. Teacher leaders use the PD
­Online format as a catalyst for an ongoing, collaborative professional learning community engaged in
virtual or face-to-face learning.
State, district, and school administrators use PD
Online courses to tailor and target professional
­development for groups or individual teachers, and
staff development coordinators use the PD Online platform to bolster school-based or districtwide programs
with research-based content from ASCD authors.
Visit www.ascd.org/pdonline to view a complete
course catalog, check out a sample course, or learn
about course features. 
rather than viewing it as intentionally
rude or disruptive.
Jocelyn Quintanilla
In English, education means schooling, whereas
educación in Spanish means being taught manners and
other practicalities. David Campos of the University of
Incarnate Word and Rocio Delgado of Trinity University
addressed this difference and the difficulties it can cause
in their Saturday sessions based on their ASCD book
Reaching Out to Latino Families of English Language
Learners. (The session was our first bilingual session,
presented back-to-back in English then Spanish.) In
heterogeneous Latino culture, there is no clear-cut way
to approach how to engage families in their children’s
education.
With the PD Online series,
teachers and leaders can
improve their classroom
practice, advance their
professional development,
and earn academic or
career credit.
Campos raised these questions to get people to
start thinking of assets that the parents can bring
and to start seeing them as key stakeholders in their
children’s education. All children have crucial learning
experiences in their homes that they bring to their
school, such as time-management skills they've
learned in tasks like cooking or gardening. Campos
recalled how his uncle received a broken 18-wheeler
trailer and turned it into a porch without consulting
any manual. This shows how all cultures have some
knowledge or specialty that they use in everyday life
and help establish in their children.
Knowing that the primary discourse of children’s speech
communities may differ from the one in school is
helpful in understanding children’s literacy and speech
practices. For example, a group of Latino children may
hold side conversations during class, and it is helpful if
the teacher understands that this is part of their social
upbringing and has influenced their speech usage,
After their brief discussion on Latino
children’s family backgrounds,
Campos and Delgado divided the
audience into three groups to begin
a group activity based on the article
"Seeing Past the Fences: Finding
Funds of Knowledge for Ethnical
Teaching" by Sarah Sugarman,
which follows her methodology in
conducting a neighborhood walk,
parent interview, and home visits
to understand 2nd grader Ricky
Eugenio’s difficulties and find his
assets. The audience shared their
findings in each of Sugarman’s
approaches to assessing Ricky’s social setting and
found that Sugarman thought she knew what Ricky’s
neighborhood was like—until she saw it through
his eyes.
After discussing Sugarman’s and the audiences’ own
practices, participants agreed that Latino families do
care about their children’s educations but need more
resources in accessing them. Erica Bernal, district social
studies coordinator from Southwest Independent
School District in Bexar County, Tex., said that at her
school they have Noche de Familia (Family Night) to get
Latino families involved in a comfortable setting.
Building trust with parents, becoming familiar with
the culture, using Spanish-language media, soliciting
information from parents, and communicating with
them will help educators reach out to Latino families
and involve them in their children’s educations. 
www.ascd.org/conferencedaily ★ CONFERENCE DAILY ★ 15
Digital-Age
Revolution
BULLETIN
BOARD
Kelsey Hodges
No Standing
Room Only
in Education
Tim Clark, director of learning innovation for
SAFARI Montage and educator of 25 years,
addressed the importance of digital learning in his
afternoon session, “Mobilize Me! Engaging DigitalAge Learners.” Clark used personal experiences
and statistics to provide insight into the BYOT (bring
your own technology) education revolution he has
influenced in Forsyth County, Ga.
The BYOT movement started in 2007, and by 2008 there were
7 schools and 40 teachers on board in the small county outside of
Atlanta. Today, all 35 schools have joined. Clark led the movement
and walked the teachers and parents through the initial fears associated with technology in the classroom. “We set kids up for failure
when you expect failure,” Clark explained.
You show up at a session and find it already filled beyond the
room’s capacity. You’re uncomfortable but willing to stand for an
hour to hear this speaker. Only a moment later, someone wearing
a volunteer badge asks you to leave the room. What’s up with that,
you wonder. Sound familiar?
What’s up is the regulation in most public venues that gives the
fire marshal the authority to close down sessions that are filled
beyond designated room capacity. ASCD staff members work to
ensure that sessions are in appropriately sized rooms, but we’re
sometimes taken by surprise. If that happens, please be kind to
the volunteer and understand that safety must come first. We offer
many concurrent sessions, and none of the sessions are ticketed,
so please choose another. We apologize for the inconvenience.
A Word About Wi-Fi
When the movement started, most elementary students did not
possess smartphones, so they worked with the most popular form
of technology for kids their age at the time—the Nintendo DSI.
Because the Nintendo DSIs were Wi-Fi enabled, students were able
to use the device’s PictoChat ability to connect to other DSIs and
use apps like Twitter to collaborate on note-taking. As technology
and the movement progressed, parents and instructors expressed
concerns that allowing students to bring smartphones, iPads, laptops, and other devices would cause them to veer off task or end up
creating a technology overload.
AC15 SSID: ascd15 | No password required
To support the goal of providing a positive experience for all
participants, we ask that you make good choices when using
shared resources at the conference. With this in mind, we ask all
participants to
Clark, however, disproved these concerns with real-life examples of the
benefits of the BYOT movement for students. He explained that allowing students to use their own technology in class encourages them to
stay on task and teaches them how to properly use technology to learn.
He also added that theft decreased in the schools that implemented
the movement because the presence of smartphones and other devices
became normalized.
In addition, Clark stressed that teachers are harder to get on board
than parents because they have to transform the way they teach.
“Things are different now that kids can fact-check everything that
you say,” Clark explained.
To calm the fears of parents and teachers associated with the movement, Clark and Forsyth County created a set of guidelines, referred
to as TRUST, to ensure students use technology properly:
Think about privacy before posting.
Recognize learning with technology.
Unleash learning with technology.
Stand up to inappropriate use.
Treat myself and others with respect.
Overall, implementation of the BYOT movement led to an increase in
students’ academic success by allowing them to experience authentic
and personalized learning that connects to the real world.
To read more about Clark’s innovative BYOT initiative, go to his blog
at www.byotnetwork.com or follow him on Twitter @byotnetwork. 
Share Your ASCD Story
Stop by the ASCD Center, Room 1, to tell us how your ASCD
membership has shaped your career. Get your picture taken,
too. You may appear in an ad campaign!
Sunday, 1:00–2:30 p.m.
CONFERENCE
• Avoid using a Mi-Fi device or mobile hotspot.
Conference Daily is dedicated to
providing ASCD Annual Conference
and Exhibit Show attendees with
the latest news and information to
enrich their conference experience.
ASCD Staff
Judy Seltz,
Executive Director
• Use the established wireless network SSID for this conference
(ascd15).
Gary Bloom,
Senior Director, Creative Services
• Be mindful of the parameters of shared bandwidth.
Mary Beth Nielsen,
Managing Editor
• When possible or in areas with high network traffic, use only
one device at a time to access the web.
Reece Quinones,
Art Director
• Avoid downloading large files on-site; please download items
overnight at your hotel or before you arrive on-site. Presentation
materials are available to download for four weeks after the
conference either through the AC App or at
www.ascd.org/mydownloads.
SCHEDULE CHANGES from Page 1
sunday
Presenter Changes
2112: “ Design Thinking:
Cultivating Tomorrow’s Innovative
Leaders Today”: Eric Gomez will
replace Diane Godines.
2168: “Tools for Teaching
Writing: Strategies for Students
in Grades 3–8”: Kathleen Fad will
not be presenting.
2204: “ Powerful Practice Teams:
Disrupting the Conversation
about Professional Practice”: Mike
Thomas will not be presenting.
2239: “Making Sense of Student
Work: A Protocol for Teacher
Collaboration”: Jennifer JordanKaszuba will replace Staceylyn
Machi, Kathy Hunkosky, and
Shawn Schlueter.
2242: “Top 10 Tips for Publishing
a Book with ASCD” will be
presented by Douglas Fisher,
Nancy Frey, Genny Ostertag, and
Susan Hills.
2247: “How’d They Do That?
Whole Child Implementation
in Elementary Schools”: Julie
Babcock will replace Pam Delly.
Andrea Wilson,
Senior Production Specialist
Katie Freeman,
Senior Associate Editor
Donald Ely,
Senior Graphic Designer
Sarah McKibben,
Staff Writer
Chris Richards,
Advertising Manager
Additional Editorial Staff
Amber Medin
Cate Nielan
Megan Barnett
2271: “Making Grades
Meaningful: Standards-Based
Approaches in a Traditional
Grading System”: Katie Borton
will not be presenting.
Photography
Kyle Steichen
Kevin Davis
Anne Marie D’Arcy
Monday
Reporter Interns
Laura Checkley
Kelsey Hodges
Jocelyn Quintanilla
3311: “Low-Tech Disruptions in
an Age of High Tech” has moved
to Level 3, Room 362BC.
Contributing Editor
Carole Hayward, Clear Message
Media
Corrections
3340: “Unleashing Student
Superpowers “ has moved to
8:00–9:00 a.m., Level 3, Room
330B.
Presenter Change
3212: “Social Emotional
Learning: Systemic Innovation for
Improved Outcomes”: Paul Cruz is
an additional presenter.
1703 N. Beauregard Street
Alexandria, VA 22311-1714
1-800-933-2723 or
1-703-578-9600
www.ascd.org
© 2015 by ASCD.
All rights reserved.
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