Document 86011

The FNRI
Executive Order No. 94, dated July 1,1947 created the Food and Nutrition Research Institute
(FNRI) as the first clearinghouse of data and information on food and nutrition. Over the years, it
has evolved as the lead government agency for food and nutrition research in the country. From
its humble beginnings of only eight (8) pioneers, the FNRI now has in its fold 186 trained and
committed personnel.
Mandate
Executive Order No. 128, dated January 30, 1987, mandates the FNRI to:
1. undertake research that defines the citizenry’s nutritional status with reference particularly to
the malnutrition problem, its causes and effects and identify alternative solutions to them;
2. develop and recommend policy options, strategies, programs, and projects which address
the malnutrition problem for implementation by the appropriate agencies, and;
3. disseminate research findings and recommendations to the relevant end-users.
In 1996, Executive Order No. 352 designated the FNRI’s National Nutrition Surveys and
Regional Updating of the Nutritional Status of Filipino Children among the statistical activities
that generate critical data for decision-making of the government and private sector.
In carrying out these mandates, the Institute is guided by its vision of optimum nutrition for all
Filipinos, socially and economically empowered through scientifically sound, environmentfriendly and globally competitive technologies.
The FNRI affirms that nutrition is a human right.
Table of Contents
Page
The FNRI Mandate
Secretary’s Message ……………………………………………………………………….
Director’s Message …………………………………………………………………………
Highlights of Accomplishments ……………………………………………………………
I. Diffusion of Knowledge and Technologies ……………………………………………
- Commercialized Technologies in Support of SETUP …………………………….
- Diffused Technologies ………………………………………………………………..
- TECHNICOM …………………………………………………………………………..
- Technical Trainings on Food and Nutrition …………………………………………
II. Generation of New Knowledge ………………………………………………………..
- Research and Development on Food and Nutrition (F&N) ……………………..
1. Basic and Applied Researches on Food and Nutrition ………………………..
A. Food Fortification Program to Combat Micronutrient Deficiencies ……….
B. Nutritional and Functional Food Product Development Program
as Alternative Solution/Remedy to Alleviate Other Nutritional Problems..
C. Programs for Development of Tools and Standards Used for Nutritional
Assessment and Technical Services ………………………………………
D. Program to Address the Increasing Incidence of Food-Borne Diseases
and Demand for Quality and Safe Food, Food Product and Water ……
E. Strategic Programs Addressing Normal, Under-and Over-Nourished
Individuals …………………………………………………………………….
2. Nutritional Assessment and Monitoring ………………………………………..
A. Nutrition Surveys …………………………………………………………….
B. In-depth and Correlation Studies ………………………………………….
- Contract Research on Food and Nutrition ………………………………………..
- Patent and Publications …………………………………………………………….
III. Provision of Quality Science and Technology Services …………………………..
- Technical Services on Food and Nutrition ……………………………………….
1. Laboratory and Testing Services ……………………………………………..
2. Consultancy Services …………………………………………………………
- Science and Technology Promotion Services …………………………………….
1. Food and Nutrition Promotion and Networking ………………………………
2. Other Promotional Activities ……………………………………………………
- Information and Communication Technology (ICT) ……………………………..
IV. S&T Capacity Building Services on Food and Nutrition ……………………………
- Scientific Linkages and International Cooperation ………………………………
- Awards ………………………………………………………………………………..
V. FNRI Internal Audit Services ………………………………………………………….
VI. Financial and Human Resources Management …………………………………….
- Financial Resources Management …………………………………………………
- Human Resources Management …………………………………………………..
Committing to Future Directions …………………………………………………………..
FNRI Executive Officials …………………………………………………………………..
Organizational Structure ……………………………………………………………………
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Secretary’s Message
The year 2006 was equally challenging and rewarding for the Food and Nutrition Research
Institute (FNRI). Its efforts to contribute in the advancement of Science and Technology (S & T)
through accurate data, correct information and innovative technologies in the fields of food and
nutrition proved its dedication and commitment to help eradicate the formidable problem of
malnutrition in the country.
Foremost of its accomplishments is the launching of the e-Nutrition, an interactive web-based
information system. It provides accurate and accessible food and nutrition data and analyses for
planning of poverty alleviation programs aligned with the attainment of the Millennium
Development Goal (MDG) of eradicating extreme poverty and hunger among the population. In
recognition of the Institute’s untiring commitment towards service and excellence, the eNutrition was awarded the grand prize for Information and Communication Technology (ICT)
Best Practice in e-Governance by the Asia-Pacific Economic Conference Digital Opportunity
Center (ADOC).
In continuing to fulfill its mandate of defining the citizenry’s nutritional status, the dissemination
forum on the results of the 2005 Updating of the Nutritional Status of Filipino Children and
Selected Population Groups proved to be another significant accomplishment of the Institute.
The nutrition survey results are essential inputs for planning strategic programs among the
regions and provinces of the country aimed at improving the nutritional status of children and
selected population groups.
To deliver one of DOST’s major final outputs (MFOs) which is the generation of new knowledge
and technologies, the FNRI continued with its efforts to develop nutritional and functional
products as an answer to the emerging lifestyle and nutrition-related diseases.
I would like to congratulate the FNRI for its unrelenting efforts to improve the nutritional status of
Filipinos through various activities described in this report.
I acknowledge that the battle against malnutrition is far from over. The task to alleviate the nutritional
status of our people is made even more difficult with the increasing trend of overnutrition, obesity and the
accompanying lifestyle diseases such as hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus. I
believe, though, that with the able leadership of FNRI officials and with the persevering, dedicated efforts
of its staff, the fight against malnutrition can be won.
To the men and women of the Food and Nutrition Research Institute, again, my congratulations for a
fruitful year!
Director’s Message
In behalf of the Food and Nutrition Research Institute (FNRI) family, it is with great pride and
sense of fulfillment that I present the major accomplishments of the Institute for the year 2006.
As the country’s lead agency in food and nutrition research and development, the FNRI, through
the years, continues its relentless efforts to find ways and measures to help alleviate the
formidable problem of malnutrition affecting the general population. In fulfillment of its mandate,
the Institute consistently takes the lead in defining the citizenry’s nutritional status.
The last quarter of 2006 paved the way for the results of the survey on “Updating of Nutritional
Status of Filipino Children and Selected Population Groups” done in 2005 to be disseminated to
the public. These results are essential inputs for policy and program recommendations, both for
long and short term solutions to nutrition and health problems prevalent at the national, regional
and/or provincial levels. The information also serves as basis for monitoring and tracking the
nutrition situation in the country, in line with the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).
Hand in hand with fulfilling its mandates, the FNRI geared its efforts at completing a total of 31
R & D and S & T projects and activities to deliver the Department of Science and Technology’s
Major Final Outputs (MFOs) in support to the Medium-Term Philippine Development Plan for
2004-2010. The MFOs are aimed towards ensuring that the country’s science and technology
efforts are translated to socio-economic benefits for the Filipino people.
Diffusion of knowledge and technologies was primarily achieved by the Institute through the
conduct of two strategic programs which are: the FNRI Technology Transfer Program and the S
& T Promotion Program.
Under the FNRI Technology Transfer Program, six (6) entrepreneurs signed technology transfer
agreements for several fortified food products developed by the Institute in response to the
problem, particularly of micronutrient deficiencies prevalent in the country and in support to RA
8976 or the Food Fortification Act 2000.
The FNRI also diffused 13 food and nutrition technologies to 600 clients. Under the Food
Processing Center, the Technology Business Incubator (TBI) has provided support to five (5)
Small and Medium Scale Enterprises (SMEs) who adopted FNRI-developed food technologies.
The FNRI’s third mandate to disseminate research findings and recommendations is realized
with the conduct of its S & T Promotion Program. A notable accomplishment under this program
was the launching among media and relevant s t a k e h o l d e r s
o f t h e
e - Nutrition. This Information and Communication Technology Project
(ICT) was established by the Institute to improve the nutritional status of the population by
providing electronically accessible information on food consumption, nutrition and health status
and other essential indicators that would be useful in policy-making, planning and development
of nutrition-related programs. The e-Nutrition was awarded the grand prize as the 2006 ICT Best
Practice in e-Governance by the Asia-Pacific Economic Conference Digital Opportunity Center
(ADOC).
Still another significant accomplishment under the S & T Promotion Program is the strong
partnership the FNRI has forged with tri-media institutions, contributing to its remaining as one
of the most active DOST agency in terms of media promotion and exposure. In 2006, the
Institute generated a tri-media mileage value of Php 21 million, about Php 2.5 million more than
that of 2005. Notable among the partnerships formed is that with The Coca Cola Export
Corporation (TCCEC) and 11 publishers who made possible the publication of the Healthy and
Active Lifestyle (HAL) page in various newspapers.
The Institute’s commitment to provide accurate data and correct information on food and
nutrition has not gone unnoticed. This year, the FNRI celebrated still another important event as
it received an award from the ABS-CBN Foundation and DZMM, in appreciation of its continuing
support and effort in its campaign to disseminate and promote science and technology,
particularly in the area of food and nutrition.
While the FNRI is hard-put to generate new knowledge and technologies, the Institute also
gives time to contribute towards the development of human resources for S & T through the
conduct of training courses for its clients.
The battle against malnutrition is far from over with the current developments in the health and
nutrition situation of our population. In response, the FNRI continuously equips itself with new
knowledge and improved skills in food and nutrition and related fields. Energized with renewed
vigor and commitment and armed with the support of DOST, our mother agency, and that of our
partners, we will continue to accomplish the mission we have set to do in order to achieve our
vision of optimum nutrition for all Filipinos, socially and economically empowered through
scientifically sound, environment friendly and globally competitive technologies.
Highlights of Accomplishments
President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo stated in her 2006 state-of-the-nation address that in
today’s economy, knowledge is the greatest creator of wealth. As a response to this, the Food
and Nutrition Research Institute of the Department of Science and Technology completed 31
research and development (R&D) and science and technology (S&T) projects in 2006. These
projects generated, diffused and disseminated knowledge geared towards the improvement of
the nutritional status of Filipinos.
Diffusion of Knowledge and Technologies
Winning the war against poverty through diffusion and transfer of technologies and technical
trainings
The FNRI developed-technologies, namely, iodine-rich drinking water, iron-fortified chocolate
crinkles, squash supplemented bakery products, lumpia wrapper and ready-to-serve lumpia
sauce, and fortified soy sauce, were transferred to six (6) small and medium-scale enterprises
(SMEs).
Likewise, 13 food and nutrition technologies were diffused for possible livelihood opportunities
to 600 clients composed of entrepreneurs, government and non-government employees,
students, and homemakers.
The Institute conducted a pilot scale production of corn-based food bar that can be used for
food assistance during disasters. This is a ready-to-eat food item that is appealing, nutritious,
convenient, easy-to-carry and a possible vehicle for future macro/ micro nutrient enhancement.
The Institute also held several trainings to increase the capability of its staff and its various
stakeholders particularly mess officers, health workers, mothers, teachers, students and
entrepreneurs. It successfully undertook three (3) batches of training on Food Handling and
Meal Management among the Bureau of Jail Management and Penology personnel. A series
of training on nutrition labeling component analysis was conducted with support from the
Philippine Council for Industry and Energy Research and Development (PCIERD-DOST).
Moreover, it also undertook a series of training on statistical methodologies and report writing to
build capability among FNRI staff and selected partner agency representatives.
Generation of New Knowledge
Combating micronutrient deficiencies and other nutritional problems
A total of six (6) projects on food fortification to combat micronutrient deficiencies were
undertaken. Among these are the determination of the efficacy of multi-micronutrient milk and
biscuits and technology generation and evaluation of the effects of fortified health drinks in the
nutritional status of school-aged children. The multi-micronutrient milk and biscuits, and the
fortified health drinks were found efficacious in improving the nutritional status of the children,
and thus, were recommended to be
used in mass supplementary feeding projects. The fortification of chocolate crinkles with iron,
on the other hand, were found to be technically feasible and stable under simulated market
conditions.
The production and quality assurance of iodized salt, and evaluation of iodine in cooked food
were also done as a review and in support of the National Salt Iodization Program or ASIN Law
passed in 2000.
Development of functional foods as alternative solution to alleviate other nutrition problems
With the appalling rise of lifestyle and diet-related diseases, the FNRI responded by developing
functional food products like the meatless sausage and the scale-up production of high-fiber
sausage.
Advancing nutritional assessment with new tools and standards for nutritional assessment
A compilation of 50 recipes utilizing eggs was developed by the Institute in partnership with the
National Nutrition Council (NNC). The project was in line with NNC’s promotion of nutritious and
affordable recipes, and encourages families to raise livestock as sources of additional food and
income.
The FNRI also produced the 2007 FNRI Menu Guide Calendar in partnership with UNILEVER
Philippines. The Calendar consisted of 12-monthly seven-day cycle menus and 12 standardized
recipes with their nutrient contributions per serving portion.
A total of 15 sets of easy-to-use Manual of Operations of frequently used equipment and
machineries of FNRI were prepared. The manuals will be used in the production activities of the
FNRI Pilot Plant and in the operation of similar equipment and machineries in the regions which
are used by adoptors of FNRI-developed food technologies.
Assuring quality and safe foods for health and well-being
To address the increasing incidence of food-borne diseases and demand for quality and safe
food, the Institute undertook the nutritional, physico-chemical and sensory evaluation of the
Philippine native chicken strain “Darag”. The study on Darag chicken addressed the gaps in
enhancing its production and utilization in the Philippines.
Promoting optimum nutrition and cutting down under- and overnutrition
In 2006, four (4) projects were completed addressing the issues of normal, under- and overnourished individuals, particularly their food habits, eating patterns and lifestyles which
contribute to the development of chronic illnesses.
An evaluation on the effectiveness of an intervention program by means of nutrition education
and physical activity among Grades 1-3 children in St. Scholastica’s College was done.
Monitoring of the implementation of the School Nutrition Program (SNP) among schoolchildren
in Camarines Sur was also undertaken. The monitoring showed that all issues and gaps were
properly addressed which resulted to the successful completion and effective execution of the
program.
In line with the promotion of locally-produced vegetables and related products, the National
Nutrition Council (NNC) tapped the FNRI to conduct a qualitative study on vegetable
consumption. Results showed that vegetables were generally perceived as available and
affordable, and were considered “good” for their nutritional and health benefits.
Overweight and obesity does not only affect the health status of individuals but also their mental
attitude, happiness and wellness, especially women. Thus, a study on the body image
satisfaction of urban Filipino women was done and showed that waist-hip ratio has a significant
contribution on body image satisfaction.
Ensuring well-nourished Filipinos
To further define the country’s nutritional status, the FNRI conducted four (4) studies using
data from the 2003 National Nutrition Survey.
One study focused on the folate status of Filipino pregnant women in a nationwide scale and
zinc status of young children. Findings from these studies suggested that public health
campaigns are needed to promote consumption of folate and zinc-rich foods and folic
supplements among women of reproductive age.
A study on the riboflavin intake of pregnant women recommended that attention be given to
increased intake of dietary riboflavin or riboflavin supplement of pregnant women especially
those in their second and third trimesters.
Furthermore, the Institute also undertook a baseline nutrition and food security assessment in
Mindanao. Results revealed that food insecurity was manifested by skipping or missing meals
among mothers/caregivers and children.
Exploring the malnutrition problem in a deeper perspective
The Institute continued to examine the factors that affect the malnutrition problems of the
country. This was done to implement proper intervention programs and target population groups
who are most in need.
The first study provided data on breastmilk and plasma retinol of Filipino lactating women and
vitamin A status of breastfed infants. The findings of the study can serve as vital input in
promoting exclusive breastfeeding.
A study on the prevalence of multiple micronutrient deficiencies among Filipino pregnant women
indicated the strong need for women to enter pregnancy with sufficient stores of essential
nutrients to minimize the risk of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes.
With the controversies arising from the use of coconut oil and the development of noncommunicable diseases, a study was done to examine the association of dietary factors
particularly coconut oil on the lipid profile of some Filipino adults. The study
showed that coconut oil was not positively associated with the different risk factors and chronic
diseases such as hypertension, dyslipidemia and obesity and diabetes.
Two studies on harmonizing methodologies for estimating food security, hunger and food
poverty were also done. Data generated from these studies will be used for the improvement of
the country’s poverty estimation methodology. Other studies focused on disparities in nutritional
status, food intake and nutrient adequacy across income and selected population groups. The
results of these studies can help policy makers and program implementers enhance and fine
tune programs to achieve increased equity in nutrition.
Two studies focused on the development of cost-effective, sustainable nutrition intervention
programs and models. The first study was an in-depth analysis of the 2003 National Nutrition
Survey (NNS) data, with one-time plasma retinol (PR) measurements from 6-71 month-old
children. The findings of this study can be used as important inputs in nutrition program
planning, particularly on vitamin A capsule distribution in the country. The second study
provided data on the vitamin A and iron intake with and without fortification of processed foods
and fortified staple.
Provision of quality S&T services
Several projects undertaken in 2006 were in support to DOST’s fourth major final output (MFO),
the provision of quality S&T services. These included nutrition surveys, technical services on
food and nutrition, laboratory and testing services, consultancy services, information and
communication technology (ICT), and S&T promotion initiatives.
As part of FNRI’s commitment to render quality S&T services to its various clientele, its Food
Analytical Service Laboratory (FASL) served 198 clients for microbiological, nutrient, and
aflatoxin analyses. The FASL generated an income of Php 1,146,630.00. Consultancy services
provided by FNRI experts benefited about 370 stakeholders.
Promoting and popularizing food and nutrition
The FNRI also continued its promotion initiatives through tri-media partnerships, local media
networking, participation in S&T fairs and DOST Media Core activities and publication and
distribution of IEC materials.
To improve the public’s awareness on food and nutrition, the Institute conducted its Annual
Seminar Series. It was attended by 552 participants from government agencies, nongovernment organizations (NGOs), academe, food industry and others.
The Institute regularly disseminates its research findings and recommendations through media
releases and broadcast and personal interviews. For 2006, the FNRI was able to gain a trimedia mileage of Php 21 million, attesting to its strong partnership with media. It also continued
to develop and produce IEC materials, of which seven (7) were developed, and 8,107 copies
were disseminated to FNRI’s various stakeholders.
As for its information and communication networks, the FNRI revived and strengthened its
linkages in 2006. The Nutrition Communication Network (NUTRICOMNET) held three (3) media
fora in Regions 10, 11 and CARAGA. This signaled the reconstitution of members and
revitalization of promotion-sharing activities of the Network. The Nutrition Research Information
Network (NUTRINET), on the other hand, coordinated several information activities like the
NUTRINET fair. The dissemination forum on the results of the 2005 Updating of Nutritional
Status of Children and Selected Population Groups was also conducted from November to
December 2007 in Mindanao areas.
The Institute’s information and communication technology (ICT) capabilities were strengthened
to better serve the increasing demands of research, communication and networking. Three (3)
ICT projects were successfully implemented in 2006. These were the Establishment of the
Philippine Knowledge Center on Food and Nutrition or e-Nutrition, Test Analyses and
Calibration Information System (TACIS) and the Philippine e-lib project. The e-Nutrition was
launched last October 2006 and was awarded the grand prize as the 2006 ICT Best Practice in
e-Governance by the Asia-Pacific Economic Conference Digital Opportunity Center (ADOC) in
Taiwan. The FNRI website (http://www.fnri.dost.gov.ph) was also regularly updated to include
the latest food and nutrition data generated by the Institute.
S&T Capacity Building on Food and Nutrition
Affirming old and new alliances for a worthy cause
The Institute strengthened and forged partnerships with international and local agencies,
organizations and institutions in conducting its R&D and S&T programs and projects. Likewise,
the Institute maintained its linkages with several government agencies, international
organizations, professional organizations and the food industry with the 22 contract researches
it has engaged in. Among the agencies and organizations included the Coca-Cola Export
Corporation (TCCEC), Moonbake, Inc., United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), International
Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Tulane University, Philippine Council for Industry and Energy
Research and Development (PCIERD-DOST), National Nutrition Council (NNC), Philippine
Association for the Study of Overweight and Obesity (PASOO), and Philippine Pediatric Society
(PPS).
Maintaining Resource Generation and Development of Human Resources for the S&T Sector
Committing resources to cost-effective R&D and S&T programs
The FNRI’s total budget in 2006 was Php 65,783,000 under the General Fund. Of this, 81.03
percent was used for personal services, 18.50 percent for maintenance and other operating
expenses, and 0.47 percent for capital outlay. By S&T activity, 53.26 percent was spent for
R&D, 10.20 percent for science & technology services, 3.26 percent for technology delivery,
0.73 percent for science & technology education & training and 32.55 percent for general
administrative and support services. Under the DOST Grants-in-Aid and international & local
funds, a total fund of Php 39,839,262 was granted to FNRI.
Building and upgrading staff capabilities
A total of 21 trainings on food and nutrition were undertaken by the FNRI. These were attended
by 370 participants from different government, non-government and private offices.
Majority of the 186 FNRI personnel are female (143), while 43 are male. By educational
attainment, 7 have Ph.D. degrees, 45 have Master’s degrees,
110 have Bachelor degrees,
24 are below Bachelor degree. Formal training is on-going for Doctoral and Master’s degree in
nutrition, food science, public health, chemistry, communication, microbiology, statistics, applied
science, economics and public administration. By S&T activity, 39.7 percent of FNRI personnel
are engaged in R&D activities, 12.0 percent in technical services, 6.4 percent in science
promotion, 4.8 percent in information services, 3.9 percent in technology services, and 33.3
percent in general administration and support services.
The FNRI personnel attended in-house trainings, non-formal local and international trainings,
seminars, workshops, conferences and symposia, as part of their continuing education. Formal
training is on-going, six (6) employees are currently pursuing their doctorate degrees and 22 are
presently continuing their master’s studies.
Prospects and Policy Directions
Making S& T in food and nutrition available and accessible to all Filipinos
With the compelling vision for “optimum nutrition for all Filipinos, socially and economically
empowered through scientifically sound, environment-friendly and globally competitive
technologies”, the FNRI management will be guided by its Investment Portfolio. The focus of its
R&D programs will be in addressing prevalent nutritional problems. Food quality and safety and
development of tools and standards will continue to be undertaken. The S&T programs will
gear towards technological assistance to SMEs through technology transfer and
commercialization.
Promoting and popularizing S&T, in general, and food and nutrition, in particular, will also be a
continuing undertaking of FNRI. Traditional, non-traditional, and the latest communication
modes will be used in all promotion initiatives. This will include tri-media and online
partnerships, development and distribution of IEC packages, networking and training, among
others. ICT will be fully harnessed through FNRI’s e-Nutrition, e-Library and TACIS projects.
Lastly, delivery of quality technical services will be ensured. The FASL, food processing center
and biochemical service laboratory, to mention a few, will continue to service the FNRI’s various
clients.
As the FNRI enters its 60th year of dedicated service to the country, it reaffirms its commitment
to the Filipino people by “fighting malnutrition with accurate data, correct information and
innovative technologies”
I . Diffusion of Knowledge and Technologies
To diffuse and transfer knowledge and technologies, the FNRI continued to implement specific
projects and activities that directly increase the level of knowledge, skills and productivity of
relevant stakeholders. This is done to generate the much needed livelihood and income to
ultimately help improve the nutritional status of the marginalized sectors and the socio-economic
well-being of the population in general.
Commercialized Technologies in support of SETUP
The Small Enterprises Technology Upgrading Program (SET-UP) is DOST’s nationwide
strategy designed to benefit small- and medium- scale enterprises (SMEs) through the infusion
of technological innovations and support services like acquisition/upgrading of technologies;
provision of quality S&T services, packaging and labeling assistance; database management;
and skills upgrading/training.
For 2006, a total of six (6) FNRI food technologies were transferred and agreements for
technology commercialization were signed.
Technology Transfer Beneficiaries
Beneficiary
Registered Name
of Enterprise
St. Martin Pharmaceutical
Laboratory, Incorporation
Address
of Enterprise
St. Martin Bldg., 17-A
West Point St., Cubao,
Quezon City
Name/Tel. No./
E-mail of Contact
Person
Mr. Jose Israel S. Bravo
President
9122409
Title / Description
of Technology/ies
Transferred
Period
of Engagement
Name/E-mail
of Responsible
Agency Staff
Start
End
Iodine-Rich Drinking Water
2006
ongoing
Joyce R. Tobias
[email protected]
Moonbake, Inc.
FTI Complex, Taguig City Rufino R. Manrique, Jr.
President
Iron Fortification of
Chocolate Crinkles
2006
ongoing
Joyce R. Tobias
[email protected]
E.J. Baker
# 33 National Road,
Matain, Subic,
Zambales
Ernesto C. Lim
Owner
Squash Supplemented
Bakery Products
2006
ongoing
Joyce R. Tobias
[email protected]
Auden Enterprises
230 Samson Road
Caloocan City
Auden C. Pilar
Owner
Lumpia Wrapper and
Ready-to-Serve Lumpia
Sauce
2006
ongoing
Joyce R. Tobias
[email protected]
South East Asia Food
Inc. (SAFI)
12 F Centerpoint
Condominium
Garnet Road
Cr. Julia Vargas Ave.,
Ortigas Center, Pasig
City 1600
Ms. Bambi M. Centino
Group Product Manager
Fortified Soy Sauce
2006
ongoing
Marcela C. Saises
[email protected]
ph
Town Holdings Corporation
(THC)
# 23 Berospe St. BF
Homes, Parañaque City
Mr. Oscar S. Torralba
Chairman
Soy Gel
2006
ongoing
Benjamin T. Molano
[email protected]
ph
Technology Business Incubator (TBI) Tenants
Beneficiary
Registered Name
of Enterprise
Address
of Enterprise
Name/Tel. No./
E-mail of Contact
Person
Title / Description of
Technology/ies
Transferred
Period
of Engagement
Start
End
ongoing
Auden Enterprises
230 Samson Road
Caloocan City
Auden C. Pilar
Owner
Lumpia Wrapper and
Ready-to-Serve Lumpia
Sauce
2006
Town Holdings Corporation
(THC)
# 23 Berospe St. BF
Homes, Parañaque City
Mr. Oscar S. Torralba
Chairman
Soy Gel
2006
ongoing
Name/E-mail
of Responsible
Agency Staff
Joyce R. Tobias
[email protected]
Benjamin T. Molano
[email protected]
ph
Licensing Agreements
Title/Registry No. of Patents
Name of Licensee
Date Signed
Squash Supplemented Bakery
Products: Pan-de-sal, Buns & Loaf
Bread
Mr. Ernesto C. Lim
#33 National Road, Matain,
Subic, Zambales
December 6, 2006
Canton Noodles with Squash
Mrs. Anita B. Cervas Ipil Market Vendor
Multipurpose Cooperative
(IMAVEMPCO)
August 7, 2006
Diffused Technologies
The FNRI also diffused 13 food and nutrition technologies such as tocino, skinless pork
longganisa, beef tapa, maki-mi recipes, squash kutsinta, chocolate molding, shrimp kroepeck,
fish cracker, choco coated pili nuts , rice-mongo crunchies to 600 prospective technology
adoptors composed of entrepreneurs, members of non-government organizations (NGOs),
government employees, students, and homemakers through product demonstration.
TECHNICOM
In support to the DOST’s TECHNICOM, the FNRI conducted pilot-scale production of cornbased food bar. This is a ready-to-eat food item that is appealing, nutritious, convenient,
easy-to-carry and a possible vehicle for future macro/micro nutrient enhancement.
A prototype food bar was prepared from admixture of
flavor enhancers and syrup. Sensory evaluation was
acceptability of its sensory attributes such as color,
general acceptability. The shelf-life of the food bar
proximate analysis, fatty acid profile, mineral
corn, nuts, high-protein flours, binders,
conducted to determine the degree of
taste, texture, appearance, flavor and
as well as its physico-characteristics,
contents, aflatoxin content, and microbial load counts were determined. The production of the
prototype food bar was also scaled-up at pilot plant level.
Results of the study showed that an acceptable prototype corn-based food bar made of
admixture of high protein flours and nuts can be produced with acceptable sensory attributes.
The microbial load counts were within the limits set by the Bureau of Food and Drugs (BFAD).
No aflatoxin (B1 and B2) was detected. Packaging design should be developed for its image
enhancement in the market place.
The production of this food bar can be a potential entrepreneurial activity for employment and
income generation.
Technical Training
The FNRI conducted 22 technical trainings which benefited 520 participants, particularly mess
officers, health workers, mothers, teachers, and entreprenuers.
The FNRI’s Nutrition Information Promotion and Training Section (NIPTS) successfully
conducted three batches of training on Food Handling and Meal Management for Bureau of Jail
Management and Penology (BJMP) personnel. This is in response to the request of the BJMP
to improve food preparation and meal management skills of mess officers in order to prepare
and serve nutritious, safe, clean and affordable foods for the inmates. The first batch of trainees
consisted of 11 Taguig personnel, the second batch comprised of 34 BJMP wardens and the
third batch had 18 participants from BJMP-NCR.
Another successful activity conducted by the FNRI was the Statistical Training Program for its
staff and other stakeholders held from February 6-June 15, 2006. A total of 14 trainings were
conducted, comprising 14 modules with each training covering a different module. It was
spearheaded by the Nutritional Assessment and Monitoring Division (NAMD).
Technical Training Courses Conducted
Title of Training
Training on Production of Food Bar
Training Venue/Location
No. of
Participants
Inclusive Dates
Conducted
Funding
Scheme
FNRI Food Laboratory
2
January 13-20, 2006
FNRI
FNRI Training Room
61
February 6-10 , 2006
e-Nutrition
Project Fund
Module 3: Designs and Operations of Surveys
FNRI Training Room
14
February 27March 3, 2006
-do-
Module 4: Statistics for Project Monitoring and
Evaluation
FNRI Training Room
19
March 6-10, 2006
-do-
Module 6: Small Area Estimation
FNRI Meeting Room
9
March 6-10, 2006
-do-
Module 2: Statistical Methods for Researches
FNRI Training Room
20
March 13-17, 2006
-do-
Module 8: Nonparametric Statistics and Data
Analysis
FNRI Training Room
30
Module 5: Statistical Projection and Forecasting
Techniques
FNRI Training Room
9
April 3-7, 2006
-do-
Module 9: Multivariate Categorical Data Analyses
for Food and Nutrition Researches
FNRI Training Room
16
April 17-21, 2006
-do-
Module 11: Effective Use of Microsoft Excel and
Powerpoint Statistical Report and
Presentation
FNRI Meeting Room
22
May 8-12, 2006
-do-
Module 12: Webpage Development for
Dissemination of FNRI Statistical Data
FNRI Training Room
11
May 8-12, 2006
-do-
FNRI Training Room
15
May 15-19, 2006
-do-
FNRI Training Room
12
May 15-19, 2006
-do-
Statistical Training Program
Module 1: Refresher Course on Descriptive
Statistics, Inferential Statistics and Data Analysis
Module 13: Database System and Data Mining
Module 10: Statistical Report Writing for FNRI
Researchers
March 20-24, 2006
-do-
T itle o f Tra in in g
Tra in in g
Ven u e /L o ca tio n
N o . o f P articip a n ts
M od ule 7: Sp atia l Statistics and D ata ba se
M ana ge m ent
F NRI Tra ining Roo m
Tra ino rs' Tra ining on S a lt Io dization
S a n Jo se M ind oro
20
F NRI Tra ining Roo m
15
C a ga yan de Oro C ity
25
M od ule 14 : Respo nse S urfa ce M e thod olo gy
Tra ining o n How to K e ep Stree tfo od s S afe and
C urre nt Go od M a nufacturing P ractices
Tra ining o n Nutrition L ab elling C o m po nent
A nalysis
M od ule 1 - P ro xim a te A na lyses of F oo ds
(M oisture, F at, pro te in a nd A sh)
F oo d A na lytica l S ervice
L ab orato ry Ro om s
9
In clu s ive D a te s
C o n d u c ted
M ay 22 -26 , 2 00 6
M ay 22 -26 , 2 00 6
June 8-15 , 20 06
July 25 -27 , 2 006
United Na tio ns C hild ren's
F und (UNIC E F )
e -nutritio n P roject F und
D OS T Re gion 1 0 a nd F NRI
A ug ust 28 S ep tem b er
1 , 20 06
P hilipp ine C ouncil fo r
Industry a nd E nerg y
Resea rch D eve lo pm ent
(P C IE RD )
B urea u o f Ja il M anag em ent
a nd P e no log y (B JM P )
F NRI M e eting Roo m
11
A ug ust 29 -30 ,
2 00 6
Tra ining o n Nutrition L ab elling C o m po nent
A nalysis
M od ule 2 - Tra ining o n M inera l A na lysis o f
F oo ds (Iron, C a lcium , S odium ,
P otassium , Iod ine )
F oo d A na lytica l S ervice
L ab orato ry Ro om
10
S ep tem b er 4 -8 ,
2 00 6
Tra ining o n F oo d Handling and M ea l
M ana ge m ent (B atch 2 )
F NRI M e eting Roo m
30
Octo be r 1 6-1 7,
2 00 6
Tra ining o n Nutrition L ab elling C o m po nent
A nalysis
M od ule 5- V ita m in A , B -ca ro tene a nd V itam in C
A na lyses
F oo d A na lytica l S ervice
L ab orato ry Ro om s
10
Octo be r 2 3-2 7,
2 00 6
International W o rkship on La bo ratory Quality
Standards To wa rd Glo ba l C o m pe titiveness
C ity Gard en S uite s
E rm ita , M anila
1 52
D ecem be r 1 &
4 -7, 20 06
F NRI-D OS T
e -nutritio n
P ro ject F und
10
Tra ining o n F oo d Handling and M ea l
M ana ge m ent (B atch 1 )
On-the-Job Training
M s. Jackie B . A stille ro
M s. A be ryn M . P a drique
B a chelo r o f S cie nce in F o od Te chnolo gy
F u n d in g S c h e m e *
2
P hilipp ine C ouncil fo r
Industry a nd E nerg y
Resea rch and D e velopm e nt
(P C IE RD )
B urea u o f Ja il M anag em ent
a nd P e no log y (B JM P )
P hilipp ine C ouncil fo r
Industry a nd E nerg y
Resea rch and D e velopm e nt
(P C IE RD )
A ustra lla n A ge ncy fo r
Inte rna tio na l D e ve lop m ent P ub lic S e cto r L inkag es
P ro gra m (A usA ID -P S L P )
A pril 4-M a y 1 5,
2 00 6
2 40 ho urs
B icol University
On-the-Job Training
M s. Que nnie T. B eca ro
M s. Honeylet S . Ochangco
B a chelo r o f S cie nce in F o od Te chnolo gy
F NRI-D OS T
2
A pril 4-M a y 1 5,
2 00 6
2 40 ho urs
University of Sto . Tom as
On-the-Job Training
M r. A lex M . P a lom o
B a chelo r o f S cie nce in F o od Te chnolo gy
F NRI-D OS T
1
A pril 4-M a y 1 5,
2 00 6
2 40 ho urs
P olyte chnic Unive rsity o f the
P hilipp ines
F NRI-D OS T
2
A pril 4-M a y 3 1,
2 00 6
University of the P hilip pine ,
D ilim a n
On-the-Job Training
M s. Janee n L. D e la C ruz
B a chelo r o f S cie nce in F o od Te chnolo gy
F NRI-D OS T
1
M ay 8 - July 1 4,
2 00 6
Rizal Techno log y University
On-the-Job Training
M s. Jennylyn M . M atienzo
B a chelo r o f S cie nce in F o od Te chnolo gy
F NRI-D OS T
1
M ay 2 - June 8 ,
2 00 6
University of the P hilip pine s
L os B a ño s
F NRI-D OS T
6
A pril 19 - M ay
2 4, 2 00 6
University of the P hilip pine s
L os B a ño s
F NRI-D OS T
2
A pril 19 - M ay 31 ,
2 00 6
University of the P hilip pine s
L os B a ño s
F NRI-D OS T
1
A pril 24 -June 7,
2 00 6
2 40 ho urs
University of the P hilip pine s
L os B a ño s
On-the-Job Training
M s. M ary Grace S ap nu
M s. E rsan A . Resurreccio n
B a chelo r o f S cie nce in F o od Te chnolo gy
On-the-Job Training
M s. K ristina O. Ta bla nte
M s. Ivy M . F ernande z
M s. A nd rea Ja ne B . B a ba res
M r. E dm yr L . D esab elle
M r. A llan N. M a na lo
M s. Nerisa B . M a rtinez
B a chelo r o f S cie nce in Sta tistics
On-the-Job Training
M s. Joyce Gra jo
M s. M a. Ve ronica M ancilla
B a chelo r o f S cie nce in F o od Te chnolo gy
On-the-Job Training
M r. A lexander B . Ja rdinero
B a chelo r o f S cie nce in C o m p uter S cience
II. Generation of New Knowledge
Research and Development on Food and Nutrition (F&N)
The Institute’s R&D programs focused on responding to basic needs of the poor and vulnerable
groups for improving their health and nutritional status. These included programs on food
fortification, food quality and safety, nutritional and functional foods. Strategic programs
addressing normal, under- and over-nourished individuals were also conducted. Nutrition tools
and standards for nutritional assessment were developed.
1.
Basic and Applied Researches on Food and Nutrition
A. Food Fortification Program to Combat Micronutrient Deficiencies
One way of addressing the problem of micronutrient deficiencies is fortifying foods given in
feeding programs.The Institute carried out a study on the efficacy of multi-micronutrient –
fortified milk and biscuits in improving the nutritional status and school performance of
schoolchildren.
This study determined the effects of fortified milk and biscuits on the
nutritional status and school performance of school children. Results of the study showed that
there was a reduction from 42.6 percent to 25.0 percent on the prevalence of underweight
among 6-9 year old children given fortified milk and biscuits and for those given non-fortified
food, a reduction from 37.2 percent to 22.8 percent was noted. Among the 10-12 year old
children given fortified milk and biscuits, the prevalence was reduced from 43.8 percent to 35.8
percent. The study also revealed that there was a significant increase in the linear growth
among the children given the fortified foods compared to the children given non-fortified foods
as well as the control group of children.
Prevalence of anemia among children 6-9 years old under the “underweight anemic” and
“anemic alone” classifications showed a reduction from 100 percent to 73.1 percent and 40.8
percent, respectively, upon consumption of fortified milk and biscuits. Among “underweight
anemic” children given the non-fortified foods, the prevalence was from 100 percent to 69.2
percent. Among the “anemic alone” given non-fortified foods, the prevalence was also reduced
from 100 percent to 46.7 percent.
The study also revealed a reduction in the prevalence of anemia among “underweight anemic”
children aged 10-12 years given the fortified foods, from 100 percent to 6.7 percent. Among the
children fed with non-fortified foods, there was reduction from 100 percent to 27.3 percent.
Among the “anemic alone” group fed with non-fortified foods, the reduction was from 100
percent to 37.5 percent. The group fed with non-fortified foods was from 100 percent to 50
percent.
One way of reducing the prevalence of anemia and underweight among school children is
through fortified milk and biscuits. However, if this strategy is to be used for improving school
achievement test, other interventions should likewise be administered.
The Institute conducted a study to determine the effects of a newly-developed noncarbonated fortified health drink in improving the nutritional and iron status of
schoolchildren. The participants of the supervised center-based feeding activity consisted of
four groups: 100 anemic, 100 underweight, 50 normal weight-non-anemic, and 27 underweightanemic children. The groups of anemic and underweight children were each further divided into
two. One group was given fortified beverage while the other group was given non-fortified
beverage. On the other hand, the groups of normal weight non-anemic children and the
underweight-anemic children were given fortified beverage. Weight, height, hemoglobin, plasma
ferritin, and plasma zinc of the subjects were collected at baseline and after a 100-day feeding
period.
Results showed that basal weight and height significantly increased between baseline and
endline among all children under study. Hemoglobin plasma ferritin and plasma zinc
concentrations of the children that were given fortified beverage significantly increased from
baseline to endline.
The study recommends that mass supplementary feeding using the fortified beverage be
conducted because it demonstrated significant reduction in the prevalence of anemia among
children. It also showed that the fortified beverage maintained the nutritional and iron status of
normal children thereby preventing the deterioration of their nutritional status.
The lack of scientific data on the stability of iodized salt at the production level prompted the
United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) to tap the FNRI in conducting the study among
selected salt farms in Pangasinan and Occidental Mindoro.
Iodized salt was produced using the existing method, formulation, and equipment of salt
manufacturers at the study areas. Three production trials were conducted, (a) using fresh salt,
(b) salt stored for one month, and (c) salt stored for two months. The iodized salt were packed in
woven sacks with and without low density polyethylene lining (LDPE) and stored in warehouses
of Alaminos and Infanta in Pangasinan and San Jose and Magsaysay in Occidental Mindoro.
Moisture and iodine content, as well as purity, contaminants such as lead, arsenic, mercury and
cadmium, and microbial content analyses were determined.
The study showed that the loss of iodine was dependent upon the moisture content, packaging
materials and storage conditions. The loss of iodine was higher in woven sacks without linings
than in woven sacks with linings. The study recommends that quality assurance be put in place
for iodization particularly with regard to the moisture content to maintain the stability of the
iodized salt and to ensure correct level of iodine in the final product.
The results of this study can be used as basis to revisit some provisions of the Implementing
Rules and Regulations (IRR) of the ASIN Law.
The high retention of iodine in selected cooked foods seasoned with iodized salt and the
variability of iodine results in food products prompted the FNRI to conduct the study on the
retention of iodine in selected cooked food seasoned with iodized salt. It was a
confirmatory study aimed to determine the iodine content of uncooked and cooked food
seasoned with iodized salt using Technicon Auto Analyzer II Industrial Method (AAII) and Gas
Chromatographic Method (GC). The study also aimed to determine the percent iodine retention
in cooked food.
Fresh fish, rice, and meat samples were seasoned with iodized salt and were cooked by boiling,
frying, steaming, grilling and oven/baking. Salt was analyzed for its iodine content using the
titration method before adding to food and cooking. Uncooked and cooked samples were then
freeze-dried, ground, homogenized and sampled using quartering method. Moisture was
analyzed before and after cooking and after freeze-drying.
The research concluded that significant amounts of iodine were retained in raw and cooked food
previously seasoned with iodized salt using both analytical methods. Retention of iodine,
however, is dependent upon the different food matrices. The iodine content of
selected raw and cooked food samples using Gas Chromatography was relatively lower than
those from food samples obtained using Technicon Auto Analyzer II Industrial Method.
The study recommends that iodine content of other foods commonly consumed by Filipinos
using other cooking methods be analyzed to provide a database on the iodine content of cooked
foods. Other methods for determining iodine in foods may be explored to measure accurately
the iodine level in food samples and to confirm the retention of cooked food seasoned with
iodized salt.
In the Philippines, chocolate crinkles are popular snack items among children. These are
delicious chocolate cookies coated with confectioner’s sugar. Because of the popularity of the
product among children, the FNRI saw its high potential for iron fortification.
Moonbake Incorporated, a company that manufactures and distributes bakery products in the
Philippines entered into an agreement with the Institute to fortify chocolate crinkles with iron.
This led to the fortification of chocolate crinkles with iron through a public-private partnership
agreement.
The product was fortified with iron to increase the level initially present in the fortified flour to
meet 1/3 of the RENI for 7-12 year old children. Changes in the physico-chemical,
microbiological and sensory properties of the fortified chocolate crinkles during storage were
also determined.
Results of the study showed that the fortified chocolate crinkles with iron were stable for three
weeks when stored under simulated market conditions. Iron was substantially retained in the
product after processing and storage. The product was found acceptable to the taste panelists
in terms of color, odor, flavor, texture and general acceptability.
The iron-fortified chocolate crinkles are now distributed in supermarkets, public and private
schools, and industry and government feeding programs. The product carries the Sangkap
Pinoy Seal of the Bureau of Food and Drug of the Department of Health as required under the
Philippine Food Fortification Law of 2000.
This public-private collaboration between FNRI and Moonbake Inc. will enhance the
current market-driven approach to food fortification in the Philippines.
The Institute plays an important role in technology generation and commercialization of fortified
products in partnership with the food industry. The project embarking on priority R&D and
S&T activities through joint programs with industry and other stakeholders was
undertaken in 2006. Through the project, nutritious bakery products made of indigenous
ingredients like squash, kamote, mongo and sesame were developed, formulated and packed.
The nutrient content and sensory qualities, shelf-life and physico-chemical characteristics of
these products were determined for commercial and financial viability. Technology transfer and
commercialization was done to small and medium scale bakeries like E.J.Baker in Olongapo,
Zambales.
To increase public awareness on various food and nutrition information, press releases on
nutritious bakery products were developed and disseminated. Capacity-building activities were
also conducted to prospective stakeholders as communication support in popularizing and
promoting the developed nutritious bakery products.
B.
Nutritional and Functional Food Product Development as Alternative Solution
to Alleviate other Nutrition Problems
The alarming increase of lifestyle and diet-related diseases led to a study on development of
functional food product, meatless sausage. This sausage was made from soybean products.
Several research studies have revealed that bioactive chemical components of plant foods such
as isoflavones from soybeans can play a role in the prevention of cancer and heart diseases.
A 100 gram serving of FNRI meatless sausage contained 1.5 percent dietary fiber, 17.3 percent
protein and 262 kilocalories. The results of the study showed that the product remained stable
and acceptable for 12 months of storage in a freezer when packed in polyethylene bags.
The study recommends that pilot scale production of this product be conducted coupled with
clinical and efficacy studies to substantiate any health claims.
The increasing popularity of sausage products as viand or snack among children and adults
prompted the Institute to develop and standardize a high-fiber sausage production. The study
on scale-up production of high-fiber sausage was conducted to determine its commercial
viability; sensory, chemical, and microbiological properties; estimate production and product
cost.
Coconut meat residue or sapal was processed at the FNRI pilot plant to produce coconut flour,
the source of fiber in the formulation.
Results of the study revealed that the product was rated between “like moderately” and “like
very much” by the taste panelists. The product contains 12.8 percent protein, 236 kilocalories of
energy, 16.5 percent fat, 9.2 percent carbohydrates and 4.0 percent dietary fiber. The fat,
cholesterol, and sodium contents of the sausage are lower than that of the commercial pork and
Chinese sausages but higher in dietary fiber. The pilot scale production of this high-fiber
sausage is commercially viable. It has a short payback period and a high return of investment.
The use of coconut waste product into a valuable ingredient of the sausage could address some
of the health problems related to low intake of dietary fiber. It will also lead to the diversification
of the uses of coconut in providing additional income to coconut farmers and processors and in
reducing diet-related diseases among at-risk population groups.
C.
Programs for the Development of Tools and Standards Used for Nutritional
Assessment and Technical Services
The Institute in partnership with the NNC conducted a study on the standardization of eggbased recipes. It developed a compilation of recipes using eggs. The nine-point Hedonic
Rating Scale was used in determining the most desirable appearance, odor, texture and
consistency, taste and flavor of the recipes.
A total of 50 recipes were organized, translated to Filipino, standardized and subjected to
sensory evaluation. These recipes came from the NNC’s nationwide search for nutritious and
affordable recipes.
Based on the study, all recipes from all regions except Region 2 passed the acceptability test.
No single recipe per serving portion met all the RENI for 4-6 year old children. Most of the
vitamin A contribution exceeded the 100 percent mark. The percentage nutrient contribution per
recipe varied but the least met was the energy. Majority of the recipes’ cost per serving portion
ranged from 10-15 pesos. All the recipes were simplified to make them user-friendly and can
be prepared as breakfast, snack or as main dish. The standardized egg-based recipes are
nutritious, easy-to-prepare and affordable.
The FNRI in cooperation with UNILEVER Philippines, developed and printed the 2007 FNRI
Menu Guide Calendar focusing on food fortification. The project was undertaken to promote
utilization and immediate application of researches and technologies both in the home and the
community, particularly the use of fortified food products.
The Calendar included 12-monthly seven-day cycle menus and 12 standardized recipes. The
featured recipes were tested, standardized and evaluated for nutrient contribution. The recipes
were evaluated using the nine-point Hedonic Rating Scale and featured the nutrient contribution
per serving size in terms of energy and nutrients like protein, calcium, iron, vitamin A, thiamin,
riboflavin, niacin and vitamin C.
Health and nutrition tips, food fortification facts, facts about iodized salt, the Daily Nutritional
Guide Pyramids for various age groups and the Philippine Recommended Energy and Nutrient
Intakes (RENI) were also included in the calendar. The calendar is an effective way of reaching
intended users and beneficiaries.
A total of 15 sets of easy-to-use Manual of Operations of frequently used equipment and
machineries of FNRI were prepared. The manuals will increase production, lessen
maintenance cost and downtime as well as facilitate more effective personnel training. These
consisted of the forced draft tray dryer, vacuum packaging machine, spike mixer, shrink wrap
machine, plastic sealer, pasta forming machine, octagonal mixer, moisture meter, Hobart mixer,
rice/corn grinder, flour mill, extruder/cooker, colloid mill, LPG tray dryer, and noodle machine.
The 15 sets of Manual of Operations prepared were copied in 20 CDs.
The manuals will be used in the production activities of the FNRI Pilot Plant and in the operation
of similar equipment and machineries in the regions which are used by adoptors of FNRIdeveloped food technologies.The development of the manuals is also in support to DOST’s
SET-UP.
D.
Program to Address the Increasing Incidence of Food-Borne Diseases and
Demand for Quality and Safe Food, Food Product and Water
To address the increasing incidence of food-borne diseases, the Institute undertook the
chemical, physico-chemical and sensory qualities of meat from the Philippine native
chicken (Darag) strain. The study on Darag chicken addressed the gaps in enhancing its
production and utilization in the Philippines.
The chicken samples were analyzed for proximate, calcium, potassium, cholesterol and fatty
acid contents. The chicken was cooked as tinola and roasted. A total of 50 consumer-type
panelists participated in evaluating the sensory qualities of the meat based on a seven-point
Hedonic Rating Scale.
Results showed that the Darag chicken is an excellent source of protein and has low fat content.
A 100-gram cooked sample contained 67.8 grams moisture, 4.2 grams fat, 27.1 grams protein,
147 kilocalories, 15 milligrams calcium, 229 milligrams potassium and 141 milligrams
cholesterol. The fat content of the chicken consisted of more unsaturated than saturated fatty
acid. When the chicken samples were cooked as tinola, flavor was significantly higher in freshly
dressed Darag chicken meat while freshly dressed commercial broiler chicken was more
tender, as rated by consumer-type panelists. Flavor, juiciness, tenderness and general
acceptability were significantly higher in roasted freshly dressed commercial broiler chicken. Offflavor was detected significantly more in commercial broiler chickens.
The study recommends that a similar study be conducted on the different edible parts of male
and female Darag chicken meat.
E. Strategic Programs Addressing Normal, Under- and Over-Nourished Individuals
Food habits and lifestyles of individuals contribute to the development of chronic illnesses or
lifestyle diseases as shown by many studies. These include hypertension, coronary heart
diseases, cancer and obesity. Though these diseases mostly affect adults, there is now an
increasing trend of such ailments among the younger population. Results of the 6th National
Nutrition Survey of the FNRI showed an increase of 0.8 percent in the prevalence of overweight
among primary school children.
The “Whiz Kids for Fitness” Program of the Philippine Association for the Study of Overweight
and Obesity (PASOO) is an intervention aimed at reducing the number of overweight children
through nutrition education and physical activity.
The FNRI evaluated the Effectiveness of the “Whiz Kids through Fitness Program” among
Grades 1-3 Pupils in St. Scholastica’s College, Manila.
About 150 of the children were randomly selected for the study. The pupils’ weight, age and
physical activities were evaluated at the start and end of school years 2004-2005 and 20052006. The same was also done for knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of the children and
their parents. Results showed that there was generally a small but non--significant decline in the
percentage of children with above normal weight-for-age. Physical activity scores decreased
and the percentage of inactive children increased.
This study recommended a review, revalidation or modification of the instruments used in the
assessment of the physical activity and KAP components. The module should likewise consider
ways of reinforcing knowledge learned from school into the home and outside environment.
The Institute undertook a monitoring of the implementation of the School Nutrition
Program (SNP) among schoolchildren in Camarines Sur, the province with one of the
highest rates of undernutrition in the Bicol region, according to the FNRI’s 5th National Nutrition
Survey in 1998.
The SNP’s manpower linkages, networking and coordination, supervision, field visits in schools,
data and report collection, documentation and feedbacking were conducted in the study area as
an intensive surveillance of the SNP’s implementation.
There was a total of 162,072 beneficiaries from the SNP. They included pre-elementary to
grade six pupils, their teachers, other school staff and volunteer parents who are members of
the Parent-Teacher Community Association (PTCA) in the 406 schools in Camarines Sur and
Iriga City.
Based on the monitoring, the implementation incurred less losses and damages. Moreover, all
issues and gaps were properly addressed which resulted to the successful completion of the
program. This contributed to the effective execution of the SNP and has empowered the
teachers, school staff and parents to properly manage and carry out the program with broad
sense of responsibilities.
In line with the National Strategic Plan on Vegetables, 2005-2010, the Formative Research on
Vegetable Consumption was undertaken to provide a qualitative information base for
designing a promotional and educational campaign.
The study was conducted in rural and urban barangays of Metro Cebu (Danao, Toledo and
Cebu Cities) and Metro Davao (Davao and Panabo Cities and Sta. Cruz) and in Metro Manila
(Manila, Parañaque and Marikina Cities). Focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted
among mothers (pregnant and lactating) with preschoolers and schoolchildren. Key informant
interviews (KIIs) were used among frontline workers and sellers to obtain data on the current
situation of the local vegetable industry.
Results showed that all groups of respondents generally perceived vegetables as available and
affordable. According to sellers, vegetables, either leafy or fruit vegetables, were bought at less
than a kilo daily, with sales highest on weekends.
Mothers and schoolchildren generally considered vegetables as “good” for their nutritional and
health benefits. Among vegetables, squash, stringbeans, and eggplant were commonly liked
while ampalaya and okra were generally disliked by both groups in all areas. Reasons given for
eating vegetables were mainly their nutritional value and because these are cheap, easy to
cook, and available. The reasons cited for not eating vegetables included: not used to eating
vegetables and the bad smell, taste, texture and appearance of the vegetable. What seemed to
stand out though as reason for not eating vegetables was the influence of a family member,
usually the father or the mother, who did not eat vegetable.
Varied strategies and client-preferred channels including the use of interpersonal means of
communication (seminars, meetings, cooking demos), print (poster, magazines and books) and
broadcast media (radio and television) were suggested by all groups for the design of a
communication campaign to promote the increased consumption of vegetables. Frontline
workers, moreover, recommended that the campaign address the community and the school.
The study recommends the use of audience segmentation, area-specific strategies and
communication channels (preferably interpersonal), inclusion of sellers among the primary
audiences, and nutrition education focused on the various age groups in the family to help
dispel the many false beliefs about vegetables.
The increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity as reported by the results of the 6th
National Nutrition Survey is alarming. Correlates of body image satisfaction among
economically depressed urban Filipino women was conducted to assess the relationship of
body image satisfaction with dietary intake, hemoglobin levels, obesity indices and sociodemographic factors of economically-depressed urban Filipino women.
Results indicated that body image satisfaction is greatly affected by nutrient intake - the higher
the nutrient intake, the greater the body image satisfaction. On the other hand, younger women
with higher income, and higher body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist-hip ratio and
hemoglobin levels were not satisfied with their body image.
The study also showed that waist-hip ratio was found to have a significant contribution to body
image satisfaction. As the body image satisfaction increases, there was a corresponding
decrease in the waist-hip ratio of the respondents.
2. Nutritional Assessment and Monitoring
A. Nutrition Surveys
Considering folate deficiency as an important risk factor for neural tube defects (NTD),
spontaneous abortion, intrauterine growth retardation and preterm birth, and may result to
macrolytic type of anemia, the FNRI investigated the folate status of Filipino pregnant
women in a nationwide scale. A total of 584 pregnant women with complete folate parameters
from the 6th National Nutrition Survey were included in the study. Blood samples were collected
in a non-fasted state. Red blood cell, serum folate, and hemoglobin levels were analyzed.
Interviews were also conducted to gather gynecological related data like age, gravida, parity,
and other health related information such as history of miscarriages, alcohol consumption,
cigarette use, and taking of oral contraceptive pills with folate. The results of the study are
presented below.
Prevalences of Anemia and Folate Deficiency by Stages of Pregnancy
Parameter*
Hemoglobin (g/dL)
% below normal
95% CI
Serum folate (ng/ml)**
% below normal
95% CI
Red cell folate (ng/mL)
% below normal
95% CI
Trimester 1
(n=91)
Trimester 2
(n=246)
Trimester 3
(n=247)
All subjects
(n=584)
11.8 + 0.16a
11.1 + 0.8b
10.6 + 0.10c
11.0 + 0.07
22.3a
(13.2-30.7)
39.5b
(32.8-46.1)
57.2c
(50.2-64.2)
44.3
(39.5-49.0)
3.90 + 1.08a
3.01 + 1.05b
3.26 + 1.06b
3.23 + 1.04
39.9a
(29.8-49.8)
54.3b
(47.2-61.4)
53.6b
(46.5-61.2)
51.7
(46.9-56.7)
218.6 + 13.4
273.8 + 14.9
254.2 + 11.3
256.7 + 8.06
47.7a
(36.4-58.8)
36.3b
(29.9-42.6)
35.0b
(28.1-42.0)
37.5
(33.2-41.8)
a
b
b
- value of different letters within the same row are significantly different. (p<0.05)
** geometric mean + 2 SE
* all values (means and prevalences are weighted)
abc
The findings strongly suggest that public health campaign is needed to promote consumption of
folate rich food and folic supplements among all women of reproductive age.
Plasma zinc levels among pre-school children 6 months to 5 years was also assessed
using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) from 1,879 preschool children aged 6
months to 5 years old. Data was interpreted using International Zinc Nutrition Consultative
Group (IZiNCG) guidelines.
Results showed that the mean zinc level was 102.6 + 0.9 g/dL and the prevalence of
deficiency based on the cut-off values of 65 g/dL was 9.8 percent. Disaggregating into single
age groups showed that prevalence of the deficiency tended to be higher among males than
females except among children less than 1 year old and the 4-years old.
Mean Plasma Zinc and Percent Deficiency by Age
and Sex Among Six Months to Five Year old Children
Age group/sex
No. of
subjects
Plasma zinc
X + SE ug/dL
% deficient
6-11 months
Male
Female
92
69
105.1 + 3.9
104.9 + 5.9
8.7
9.7
1y-<2 y
Male
Female
134
134
107.7 + 3.3
99.0 + 3.0
11.1
8.4
2y-<3y
Male
Female
176
125
105.0 + 2.6
101.9 + 3.3
8.6
7.8
3y-<4 y
Male
Female
188
181
101.8 + 2.6
100.4 + 2.6
11.3
6.9
4y-<5 y
Male
Female
196
169
102.7 + 3.1
99.9 + 2.9
13.4
13.9
5y-<6 y
Male
Female
205
208
103.1 + 2.4
102.2 + 2.1
9.3
7.9
Total 6 mos -<6 y
Male
Female
991
886
104.0 + 1.2
100.9 + 1.1
10.6
9.1
1879
102.6 + 0.9
9.8
All Children
Results of the study warrants further studies on zinc assessment including determination of zinc
intakes of population groups and association of zinc deficiency to growth.
Riboflavin deficiency is a prevalent nutritional problem among Filipino pregnant women. The
1993 National Nutrition Survey (NNS) showed that 22.6 percent of pregnant women were
deficient in riboflavin.
Hence, the Institute looked into the riboflavin intake of pregnant women with normal erythrocyte
glutathione reductase –activity coefficient (EGR-AC) in comparison to the 2002 Recommended
Nutrient Intake (RNI). EGR-AC is a test used to study the riboflavin nutriture of pregnant women
and is considered to represent a specific and functional test of nutritional adequacy of riboflavin.
It assessed the prevalence of riboflavin deficiency among Filipino pregnant women covered by
the 6th NNS done in 2003.
Using the EGR-AC assay, results showed that the recommended riboflavin intake of the
mothers studied is adequate to satisfy the needs of Filipino pregnant women in this
physiological stage. Therefore, riboflavin supplement is a must during pregnancy especially in
countries with low intakes of dietary riboflavin. Factors like age, parity, and educational
attainment of subjects were found to affect the riboflavin status of pregnant women.
Riboflavin Status and Intake by Stages of Pregnancy
Stages of Pregnancy
Parameter
1st
Trimester
EGR-AC:
Mean + SE
95% CI
Riboflavin deficiency (%)
95% CI
Riboflavin intake (mg/d)
Mean + SE
95% CI
% RENI
1.29 + 0.02
1.24 - 1.33
37.4
27.2 - 47.6
0.88 + 0.12
0.63 - 1.13
51.9
2nd
Trimester
1.30 + 0.01
1.27 - 1.32
44.0
37.6 - 50.4
0.83 + 0.04
0.75 - 0.91
48.8
3rd
Trimester
1.38 + 0.02
1.35 - 1.41
58.6
52.5 - 65.2
0.78 + 0.03
0.71 - 0.85
45.7
All
Subjects
1.33 + 0.01
1.31 - 1.35
49.1
45.1 - 53.4
0.82 + 0.03
0.76 - 0.88
48.0
The study recommends that attention be given to increased intake of dietary riboflavin or
riboflavin supplement of pregnant women especially those in their second and third trimesters of
pregnancy. Emphasis on proper nutrition education and information dissemination on the
importance of adequate amounts of riboflavin during pregnancy is also urged.
For three decades, Mindanao has suffered from serious nutritional problems and food security
which can be attributed to human conflict. In order to assess the nutrition and food security of
the area, the Institute was commissioned by the United Nations World Food Program (UN WFP)
and UNICEF to conduct a baseline nutrition and food security assessment in Mindanao.
The study was done in 5 selected provinces, namely: Lanao del Norte, Lanao del Sur,
Maguindanao, Sultan Kudarat and North Cotabato. It measured the prevalence of malnutrition
among 0-59 month old children, anemia among 0-59 month old children, pregnant and lactating
women and night blindness among 6-59 month old children, pregnant and lactating women. It
also verified households using iodized salt as well as describe and assess the current food
security of the area in terms of food access and utilization. The study also established the extent
of vaccination coverage among 0-59 month old children.
Results of the study showed that undernutrition and stunting among 0-59 year old children were
still a public health concern in the area. Moreover, among the 5 provinces selected,
Maguindanao appeared to have the most number of malnourished children compared to others.
Majority of the households experienced anxiety that food would run out before they could get
money to buy it.
Percentage of mothers/caregivers who experienced food insecurity
(knowledge of self) in the last 3 months by province: Mindanao, 2006
Percentage of Food Insecurity
Food Security Items
Lanao del Norte
Lanao del Sur
Maguindanao
Sultan Kudarat
Once
More
than
once
Never
Once
More
than
once
Never
Once
More
than
once
Never
Once
More
than
once
Never
Once
More
than
once
Never
1. Did you skip eating or miss
meals/food, because there
was no food or no money to
buy food?
11.0
21.3
67.7
19.4
30.9
49.7
11.6
41.4
47.0
19.4
25.9
54.6
14.0
12.1
73.9
2. Did you not ever eat for a
whole day, because there
was no food or no money to
buy food?
4.1
3.9
92.0
9.8
6.5
83.7
13.4
14.5
72.1
17.8
11.1
71.1
4.1
2.8
93.1
3. Were you ever hungry but
did not eat, because there
was no food or money to
buy food?
12.9
22.7
64.4
20.8
34.8
44.4
14.8
38.2
47.0
24.4
20.0
55.6
16.8
11.3
71.9
A. Knowledge of self in the
last three months
North Cotabato
Malnutrition among children, pregnant and breastfeeding mothers in all the WFP provinces still
exist and continue to be a public health problem. The survey findings emphasized the need for
a comprehensive program geared at combating malnutrition among children, pregnant and
breastfeeding mothers in the WFP provinces.
B. In-depth and Correlation Studies
In the 2003 National Nutrition Survey (NNS), the prevalence rate of vitamin A deficiency (VAD)
among lactating mothers was 20.1 percent or 20 in every 100. This rate was higher than in 1998
which was 16.5 percent or 16 in every 100 lactating mothers.
Vitamin A level in breastmilk has been recommended for monitoring vitamin A status of lactating
women and their infants. A study was done to examine the breastmilk and plasma retinol of
Filipino lactating women and vitamin A status of breastfed infants.
This study used data of lactating women from the 2003 National Nutrition Survey (NNS).
Maternal plasma retinol levels, maternal age, duration of lactation, body mass index (BMI),
parity and vitamin A intake of lactating women were determined. Breastmilk and blood samples
were also collected. Breastmilk and plasma retinol concentrations were determined by highpressure liquid chromatography (HPLC).
B re a st-m ilk retin o l co n c en tra tio n s (u g /g fat) in re latio n
to d u ratio n to la c ta tio n
Bre a st-m ilk a nd pla sm a re tinol conce ntra tions (um ol/L) in re la tion to
dura tion of la cta tion
Retinol concentration (umol/L)
1.2
1
0.8
breas tmilk retinol (umol/L)
Plas ma retinol (umol/L)
0.6
0.4
0.2
Breast-milk retinol concentration (ug/g fat)
10
1.4
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
0-3
4- 6
7-9
10-11
Du r atio n o f lact atio n (m o s )
0
0-3
4-6
7-9
10-11
Du r atio n o f L actatio n (m o s )
Breast-milk and plasma retinol concentrations (umol/L) in
relation to duration to lactation
The result showed that lactating women with vitamin A intakes above the recommended level
had higher breastmilk retinol concentrations expressed in milk volume and gram milk fat than
those lactating women with inadequate intakes of vitamin A. Infants whose mothers had
breastmilk retinol levels of more than or equal to 8 micrograms per gram had significantly higher
plasma retinol levels than those whose mothers had breastmilk retinol levels of less than 8
micrograms per gram. Infants whose mothers have normal plasma retinol levels showed higher
plasma retinol concentration compared to those whose mothers had low plasma retinol levels.
The average amount of vitamin A in mature milk of Filipino lactating women can provide
sufficient vitamin A during the first trimester of lactation (223 microgram Retinol Equivalent per
day) to prevent clinical deficiency.
Exclusive breastfeeding from birth to six months, and then, giving appropriate foods while
continuing breastfeeding should be emphasized in nutrition education classes.
The study on the determinants of underweight, stunting and wasting among Filipino
children 0-5 years of age aimed to correlate the children’s nutritional status (such as
underweight, stunting and wasting) with the child’s characteristics, as well as maternal, paternal
and household characteristics. Other variables were also tested such as child’s anthropometry
and household food consumption. Based on the study, underweight, stunting and wasting were
found to be associated with the following child’s characteristics such as: age, total energy and
nutrient intake together with other variables such as household characteristics like household
head’s education, some socio-economic variables, number of household members andnumber
of nutrition programs participated in by the household and child (e.g. Garantisadong Pambata,
Operasyon Timbang, Nutrition Education and Food Production lectures).
According to the study, underweight among children was predicted by variables like child’s food
insecurity and child’s total carbohydrates and protein intake. Moreover, variables such as
household per capita income and number of appliances can also predict underweight among
the study group. Also identified in the study are the five contributory factors to stunting among
children. These included (a) household head’s education, (b) household per capita income, (c)
child’s food insecurity (d) child’s total protein intake, and (e) number and types of appliances
owned by the household. The child’s total carbohydrate intake, household head and
household’s ownership of a water-sealed toilet found in the study group were significant as
predictors of wasting.
Through this study, intervention programs on proper program management and targeting of
population most in need must be implemented.
Proper nutritional status of women before, during and after pregnancy is an important element
of reproductive health. The benefits of good reproductive health helps reduce the risk of
adverse pregnancy outcome, birth defects and chronic disease in children in postnatal life. The
high demands for quality nutrients during pregnancy makes pregnant women vulnerable to
multiple micronutrient deficiencies.
The FNRI conducted a study on the prevalence of multiple micronutrient deficiencies among
Filipino pregnant women. It showed that single and multiple micronutrient deficiencies were
common among pregnant women. Single micronutrient deficiency was highest for folate and
riboflavin at 11.9 and 11.5 percents, respectively.
The following concurrent prevalence of micronutrient deficiency among pregnant women were
also obtained:
Distributions of Pregnant Women by Type of Micronutrient Deficiency and Indicator with
Single Micronutrient Deficiency
M icronutrient
Num ber
%
TOTAL
32
16
10
61
64
183
5.6
3.4
1.8
11.9
11.5
34.2
Two (2) M icronutrient Deficiencies
Fe rritin + V itam in A
+ Zinc
+ Fo late
+ Rib o flavin
V itam in A + Fo late
+ Rib o flav in
+ Zinc
Fo late
+ Rib o flavin
+ Zinc
Rib o flav in + Zinc
TOTAL
9
5
17
56
11
14
1
42
10
4
169
2.1
0.8
3.3
10.2
2.0
2.7
0.3
7.8
1.0
0.8
31
Three (3) M icronutrient Deficiencies
Fe rritin + V itam in A + Fo late
+ Rib o flavin
+ Zinc
Fe rritin + Rib o flav in + Zinc
+ Fo late + Rib o flavin
+ Fo late + Zinc
V itam in A + Fo late + Rib o flavin
+ Fo late + Zinc
+ Rib o flav in + Zinc
Fo late + Rib o flav in + Zinc
TOTAL
2
7
1
2
35
2
10
3
4
2
68
0.3
1.5
1.3
6.0
0.3
1.9
0.6
0.7
0.3
12.9
Four (4) and m ore M icronutrient Deficiency
Fe rritin + V itam in A + Fo late + Rib o lfav in
+ Fo late + Rib o flavin + Zinc
+ V itam in A + Rib o flav in + Zinc
+ V itam in A + Fo late + Zinc
V itam in A + Fo late + Rib o flavin + Zinc
Fe rritin + V it. A + Fo late + Rib o + Zinc
TOTAL
2
1
2
0
3
3
11
0.8
0.4
0.3
0.0
1.0
0.3
2.8
S ingle Deficiency
Fe rritin
V itam in A
Zinc
Fo late
Rib o flav in
The existence of 2 or more micronutrient deficiencies indicates that women should enter
pregnancy with sufficient stores of these essential nutrients in order to reduce the risk of
adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. The study recommends that multiple micronutrient
supplementation can be very helpful not only during pregnancy but also during pre-pregnancy.
Non-communicable diseases such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular diseases
among Filipinos are becoming significant public health problems. The prevalence of these
diseases increases with age according to 2003-2004 National Nutrition Health Survey (NNHeS).
Age factor cannot be altered or changed. However, others factors like diet, smoking, alcohol
consumption and physical activity that contribute to the emergence of non-communicable
diseases are mostly modifiable.
Coconut oil is a saturated fat under the category of medium-chain fatty acid. It is considered as
the chief source of fats and oils in the diet of Filipinos. This oil has been the subject of several
controversies regarding its effect on blood lipid levels, diabetes mellitus, metabolism, obesity
and other chronic diseases.
A study was done to examine the association of dietary factors, particularly coconut oil on
the lipid profile of some Filipino adults. It also assessed the diet composition of Filipino
adults especially their fat and oil intake, correlating it with the prevalence of obesity,
hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes.
This study used the standardized Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) of the 2003 NNHeS.
Other foods not found in the list but are usually taken were added provided that the food item is
a potential source of fat, cholesterol, sodium and fiber.
Results showed that the prevalence of obesity, diabetes, high low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol
(LDL-c) and high total cholesterol were higher among females than males. The prevalence of
hypertension, high triglyceride and low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c) were higher
among males than females.
Bicol Region had the highest proportion of coconut (gata) consumption at 88.8 percent, followed
by CARAGA at 78 percent, and the Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) at 76.3
percent.
The consumption of coconut gata is inversely related with the level of education. As
consumption increases, the level of education decreases. Educational attainment by gender,
on the other hand, seemed to have protective effect against developing high cholesterol, high
triglyceride and high LDL-c among males. Females with at least tertiary education were more
likely to have low HDL-c and be at risk of having hypertension than their male counterparts.
In terms of income, having a higher income increased the risk of developing high cholesterol,
high triglyceride, hypertension and diabetes mellitus among males while there was an increased
risk of having high LDL-c for both sexes.
The research concluded that the consumption of coconut oil was not positively associated with
the different risk factors and chronic diseases studied. Age, educational attainment and income
level were some of the factors that must be looked into.
The results of this study may be used in promoting consumption of coconut oil in the
Philippines.
The FNRI validated food insecurity responses vis-a-vis Nutritrional Status and Adequacy
of food intake from the 6th National Nutrition Survey (NNS). The study aimed to contribute
to the on-going efforts toward establishing an official methodology for measuring food insecurity
and hunger and to assess the progress of the programs to address them.
This validated the Food Insecurity Measure Tool using the 2003 food consumption survey data.
It described levels of food insecurity with their dietary, socio-demographic and nutritional
characteristics. It also assessed validity and reliability measures of food insecurity and hunger.
It used data from interviews of 3,568 mothers/ caregivers of 0-10 year old children from 786
enumeration areas. The data set included household demographics, nutritional status and
household food security. Food insecurity was checked using the 10 items concerning economic
fears and experiences related to sufficient food supply during the past 6 months adapted from
Radimer/ Cornell measures. Cronbach’s alpha was used to measure internal consistency and
criterion-related validity was checked using the nutrient intake variables.
Results revealed that the Food Insecurity Tool used in the 2003 NNS was valid based on the
Cronbach’s alpha. Discrepancies in the nutrient intake and adequacy suggest that the tool is
valid based on the criterion-related validity measure.
This study demonstrated the procedure for determining the reliability of summated scales. It
emphasized that reliability tests are especially important when derivative variables were
intended to be used for subsequent predictive analyses.
Cronbach’s Alpha by Food Insecurity Level
Food Insecurity
Level
Cronbach's Alpha
Mother/caregiver
0.81
Child
0.84
Household
0.89
All
0.89
Prevalence of Undernutrition by Food Security Status of Households
Nutritional Status
Food Secure (%)
Food Insecure (%)
Underweight
12.66
27.66
Stunted
15.44
30.10
Wasted
3.45
6.29
The study recommended that a good method of screening for efficient items is to run an
exploratory factor analysis on all the items to weed out those variables that failed to show high
correlation.
Methodological issues in computing provincial poverty statistics prompted the NSCB to tap
FNRI to conduct a study to address these issues. These issues include the large variability of
provincial food thresholds within the regions, higher food thresholds for some provinces
compared to that of the National Capital Region, and non-comparability across space of poverty
estimates, among others.
The study aimed to develop a menu-based approach for the formulation of provincial
menus that will become the basis in coming up with food threshold estimates that have less
variability within regions and are comparable across space.
A national reference menu was formulated that served as basis in the formulation of provincial
menus consisting of foods deemed acceptable and cheapest in the province. After validation
and subjecting the menus to tests of revealed preferences, the cost of menus were then used to
estimate provincial food thresholds that are comparable across provinces. These food
thresholds can then be used for the improvement of the country’s poverty estimation
methodology.
National Reference Menu
Reference Menu
Breakfast
Scrambled egg
Coffee with milk
Food Item
Itlog, manok, buo
Indicative Weight
(in grams)1
Instant Coffee
Gatas, pulbos, filled, instant
48
(weight of 1 medium-sized egg)
1
5
Munggo, buto, berde, tuyo
Malunggay
Dried Dilis
Latundan/Lakatan
35
25-35
20-30
65
Boiled rice/corn
Lunch
Boiled/sauteed/ginataang munggo with malunggay
and dried dilis
Banana
Boiled Rice
Supper
Fried (fish)/boiled pork
Vegetable dish
(weight of 1 medium-sized lakatan)
Bangus/galunggong/tulingan/
matambaka/tilapia/sapsap/
tambakol/flying fish/aloy/
Baboy, liempo
(Kangkong/kamote tops/saluyot/
alugbati/pechay/sayote leaves)
50-55
(weight of a medium-sized fish)
50
85-100
(weight of 1-1 1/4 household cup
of all other vegetable, raw weight)
Boiled rice
Snack
Bread or boiled
saba/ rootcrop
Pan de sal or cassava/kamote/
saba
Bigas, puti
Mais, durog, puti
Langis, niyog
Asukal, pula
Kakang gata
Asin, magaspang
Bawang
Sibuyas
Luya
30 (medium-sized pan de sal)/
120-190 (kamote/cassava)/
150-200 (saba)
360 (raw weight)
210
15
10
5
7
2
5
5
Results of the 6th National Nutrition Survey in 2003 showed that there is inadequate food
consumption and nutrient intake in Filipino households specially among low-income households.
The Institute conducted the study on the disparities in household food and nutrient intake
across income and occupational groups to determine the differences in food and nutrient
intake of Filipino households by income quartile and occupational groups.
The results showed that households belonging to the lowest income quartile have the least
mean per capita food intake (731 g/day) wherein 50 percent was contributed by cereals and
cereal products. While those households that are in the highest income quartile have the
largest mean per capita food intake (1,033 g/day) of which 33 percent was contributed by
cereals and cereal products.
Cereals, 346g (33.5 % )
Cereals, 365g (50.0 % )
Starchy Roots
& tubers, 30g (4.1 % )
Sugars, 19g (2.6 % )
Dried beans,
8g (1.2 % )
Miscellaneous,
20g (2.8% )
Starchy Roots
& tubers, 17g (1.6 % )
Dried beans,
13g (1.3 % )
Sugars, 26g
(2.5 % )
731g
Miscellaneous,
57g (5.5% )
Vegetables,
114g (11.0 % )
1,032 g
Fats 28g (2.8 % )
Fats 9g (1.2% )
Eggs, 6g (0.9% )
Eggs, 19g (1.8 % )
Fruits, 76g (7.3 % )
Meat & Poultry
24g (3.2 % )
Fish, 86g (11.8 % )
Fruits, 34g (4.7% )
Milk
products, 16g (2.2 % )
Vegetables,
113g (15.4 % )
Food consumption pattern of Filipino households in the 1st
income quartile
Milk
products, 89g (8.6 % )
Meat & Poultry
132g (12.8 % )
Fish, 118g (11.4 % )
Food consumption pattern of Filipino households in the
4th income quartile
By occupational groups, households whose heads are professionals, technicians, associate
professionals and clerks have the highest mean per capita food intake while households whose
heads are trades and related workers have the least intake.
The study concluded that mean per capita food and nutrient intake differs across income and
occupational groups with the poorest having the lowest intake. The inverse relationship
observed between the intake of cereal and cereal products and income suggests a coping
action/strategy among the poor income groups.
Based on the results of the study, it is recommended that there should be vigorous and
sustained socio-economic and development programs/projects including jobs and incomegenerating activities. Special attention should focus on the socially-disadvantaged groups where
inequities in energy and nutrient intakes were more pronounced.
Widespread undernutrition and micronutrient deficiencies still persist in the Philippines.
Inequalities in nutritional status particularly across income groups and regions are very high.
The study examined disparities in nutritional status among Filipino children across
income and occupational groups. The data used were from the 2003 National Nutrition
Survey. Energy and nutrient adequacies were assessed using the Philippine Food Composition
Tables and Recommended Energy and Nutrient Intakes.
Percentage of malnourished 6 to 10 years-old children by poverty
status
50
45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
47 .87
36 .6 4
poor
non-poor
26 .75
17 .88
0 .06
2.2
Underweight
Underheight
Overweight
Figure 2. P ercentage of malnourished 6 to 10 year-old childre n by
poverty status
The study revealed that there were more underweight, stunted, vitamin A deficient, anemic, and
iodine deficient preschool- and school-age children in households in the poorest income quartile
than in the highest income quartile. These gaps are reflections of dietary inequities and
disparities in energy and nutrient intakes between children from the rich and poor households.
The occupational group of farmers, forestry workers, and fishermen had the highest prevalence
of undernutrition while overnutrition was highest among technicians, associate professionals
and clerks. Prevalence of vitamin A deficiency (VAD) and iodine deficiency disorder (IDD) were
also high among farmers, forestry workers, and fishermen. Laborers and unskilled workers had
the highest incidence of anemia.
The results of the study will help policy makers and program implementers enhance and fine
tune programs to achieve increased equity in nutrition.
Data extracted from the 6th National Nutrition Survey (NNS) of the FNRI and the 2003 Family
Income and Expenditure Survey (FIES) of the National Statistics Office (NSO) were used for a
study to determine the disparities in infant feeding practices and complementary feeding
across income and educational attainment of household heads. The trends and
relationships of current infant feeding practice and the household’s income and educational
attainment of the household head were analyzed.
There were 1,200 subjects in the study. The results showed that current infant feeding
practices at the time of the survey had a significant relationship with household income. On the
average, breastfed infants from higher income households were given water, complementary
foods and commercial milk earlier at about two to three months of age. Infants from lower
income groups were given complementary feeding at five to seven months of age.
Percentage distribution of 0-23 month-old infants by current feeding
practice in poor and non-poor households: Philippines, 2003
Current Feeding Practice
Breastfeeding
Nonpoor
Poor
43.41
Total
67.40
t
52.48
Exclusive Breastfeeding
4.76
10.49
6.93
Breastmilk + Water
3.06
3.21
3.12
Breastmilk + Other Milk
3.91
2.92
3.53
31.68
50.78
38.91
Breastmilk + Complementary Food
Non-Breastfeeding
Other milk + other food
Not breastfeeding nor
bottle (milk) feeding (regular diet)
Total
56.59
32.60
P-value
8.49
0.000
47.52
50.38
18.32
38.25
12.7
0.000
6.21
14.29
9.27
-4.67
0.000
100.00
100.00
100.00
As educational attainment of the household head became higher, the proportion of infants being
breastfed decreased. The negative correlation between breastfeeding and educational
attainment was only seen among 6-11 and 12-23 month-old infants.
The findings of the study showed that there should be an emphasis on educating not only the
mothers of the children, but also the household heads about the advantages of exclusive
breastfeeding for the first six months, and that of continuous breastfeeding until two years of
age.
Along increasing prevalence of vitamin A deficiency among children, an in-depth analysis of
the 2003 National Nutrition Survey (NNS) data, with one-time plasma retinol (PR)
measurements from 6-71 month-old children assessed changes in plasma retinol level
related to a national six-monthly high-dose vitamin A supplementation program.
Plasma retinol (PR) measurements from 2,537 children aged 12 to 59 months, were collected
using a stratified multi-stage sampling design that covered all regions of the country. The
sample was in turn culled from the bigger sample of 6-71 month-old children of the 2003
National Nutrition Survey (NNS). Blood samples were collected by fingerprick in heparinized
capillary tubes. Serum was separated from red cells by centrifugation. Plasma retinol (PR) was
determined by high pressure liquid chromotography (HPLC).
The study revealed that Mindanao had the highest VAD among 12-59 month-old children, with
50.5 percent moderate to severe deficiency (PR <20 micrograms/deciliter) and 19.4 percent
severe deficiency (PR <10 micrograms/deciliter). These findings confirm the results of the 1998
NNS that significant PR changes do not persist through six months after supplementation. It is
plausible that the effect of the capsules occurs in the two-three month post-dosing period when
PR rises, but does not persist through six months.
Figure 3. Pre vale nce of V AD ( SR<20ug/dL) am ong 12-59
m ont h old children according t o rece ipt of VAC, is land
groups and m onths afte r V AC
60
% SR <20ug/dL
50
40
Luzon
V isayas
30
Mindanao
20
10
0
No V AC
V AC 1-2
V AC 3-4
V AC 5-6
M onths afte r V AC
Prevalence of VAD (SR<20ug/dL) among 1259 month old children according to receipt of
VAC, island groups and months after VAC
Luzon = 40.2 (constant) – 12.0 (VAC 1-2)* + 3.8 (VAC 3-4) + 0.1 (VAC 5-6) *significant, p=0.004
Visayas = 22.6 (constant) – 13.1 (VAC 1-2)* + 0.9 (VAC 3-4) + 8.4 (VAC 5-6) *significant, p=0.020
Mindanao = 55.6 (constant) – 6.7 (VAC 1-2) – 22.3 (VAC 3-4) – 0.6 (VAC 5-6)
The findings can be used as important inputs in nutrition program planning particularly
vitamin A capsule distribution in the country.
on
A study on the vitamin A and iron intake with and without fortification of processed foods
and fortified staples was undertaken by the FNRI. The study examined the possible effect of
the Philippine Food Fortification Program on the vitamin A and iron intake of Fiipino households
and preschool children.
The study aimed to compare the current vitamin A and iron intake from actual household food
consumption data with that of a simulated intake. The simulated intake among households and
preschool children consisted of the substitution of fortified food items of the same amount and
type with those that are not fortified. The study sample was taken from the 6th National Nutrition
Survey. The study compared the current vitamin A and iron intake from the actual household
food consumption with that of a simulated intake of staples, namely rice, sugar and cooking oil.
This simulated intake substituted rice, sugar and cooking oil intakes with the same amount of
the fortified varieties. It also re-computed vitamin A intake of households, preschool children,
pregnant and lactating women using the 12:1 carotene: retinol conversion factor.
Results showed a decrease of 90.86 microgram retinol equivalent (ugRE) in vitamin A and 0.35
milligrams (mg) in iron when fortified foods were substituted with non-fortified foods of the same
type. There was also a significant increase in the intake of vitamin A and iron specifically coming
from rice, cooking oil and sugar when these staple foods were substituted with the fortified
variety of staples.
The study recommended that RA 8976 be fully implemented since the study showed that with
food fortification, intakes of vitamin A and iron increased. Moreover, a consistent monitoring and
evaluation of the Food Fortification program is encouraged.
Contract Research on Food and Nutrition
A total of 27 contract researches were entered into by FNRI and several government agencies,
international institutions, professional organizations and the food industry. A total of
P39,839,262.00 was generated by FNRI from the 27 contract researches.
Client
Name of
Business/Organization
Project Duration
Name / Tel. No. /
E-mail of Contact
Person
Title/Description of
Research
Start
End
Name/E-mail
of
Responsible
Agency Staff
Project
Costs
A. Private Industry
Dr. Mario V.
Capanzana
[email protected]
Marcela C.
Saises
[email protected]
1,600,000.00
December
2006
Dr. Imelda A.
Agdeppa
imelda_
[email protected]
yahoo.com
1,077,622.00
July 2004
June
2007
Celeste C.
Tanchoco
[email protected]
gov.ph
P1,264,000.00
April
2006
December
2006
Joyce R. Tobias
[email protected]
gov.ph
P 121,521.00
October
2006
on-going
Joyce R. Tobias
[email protected]
gov.ph
Marcela C.
Saises
[email protected]
dostgov.ph
P282,432.00
Production and Quality
Assurance of Iodized Salt
April
2005
December
2006
Dr. Mario V.
Capanzana
[email protected]
dost.gov.ph
P354,000.00
A Study on the Energy
Expenditure, Body
Composition and Nutritional
Status among Filipino Elderly
2004
2007
Gemma P.
Yuchingtat
[email protected]
dost.gov.ph
P627,551.00
Mr. Edward Otico
901-01-23
Updating of the Nutritional
Status of Filipino Children
May
2005
June
2007
Corazon M.
Cerdeña
[email protected]
dost.gov.ph
P1,971,958.00
(UNICEF)
P2,276,274.00
(DA-BAR)
PP68,000.00
(DOST)
Mahadevan
Ramachandran
[email protected]
com
mahadevan.
[email protected]
Baseline Nutrition and Food
Safety Assessment in
Mindanao
May 2006
August
2006
Corazon M.
Cerdeña
[email protected]
dost.gov.ph
P1,712,540.00
Dr. John B. Mason
[email protected]
hotmail.com
[email protected]
Turning the Corner in the
Prevalence of Vitamin A
Deficiecy in Highly Affected
Areas in the Philippines
August
5, 2005
The Coca-Cola Export
Corporation
(TCCEC)
Ms. Cindy Lim
Fax: 849-859
[email protected]
Technology Generation for the
Production of the Health
Drink Beverages
July
2005
March
2007
The Coca-Cola Export
Corporation
(TCCEC)
Ms. Cindy Lim
Fax: 849-859
[email protected]
The Efficacy of Fortified
Health Drink in Improving the
Nutritional Status of
Schoolchildren
July
2005
The Coca-Cola Export
Corporation
(TCCEC)
Ms. Cindy Lim
Fax: 849-859
[email protected]
Kineti-Kids a Fitness
Program for Children
Moonbake Incorporated
Mr. Rufino R. Manrique
FTI Complex, Taguig City
Pinoy Incorporated
Mr. Joshua Garlon Y.
Icasas
Development and Shelf-life
Study of Vitamin A and
Energy-Rich, Frozen Readyto-Fry Saba Banana Turon
United Nations Children's
Fund (UNICEF)
Dr. Nicholas K. Alipui
Mr. Edward Otico
International Atomic Energy
Agency (IAEA)
Dr. Najat Mokhtar
Technology Generation for the
Production of the Chocolate
Crinkles Fortified with Iron
B. International Funding
Agency
United Nations Children's
Fund (UNICEF)
Department of Science and
Technology
United Nation Childrens'
Fund (UNICEF)
United Nations - World Food
Program (UN-WFP)
Tulane University
September Ma. Anna Rita
30, 2007
M. Ramirez
maria_anna_
[email protected]
com
P2,318,127.00
Client
Name of
Business/Organization
Project Duration
Name / Tel. No. /
E-mail of Contact
Person
Title/Description of
Research
Start
End
January
2005
January
2007
Name/E-mail
of
Responsible
Agency Staff
Project
Costs
C. DOST Agency
Dr. Mario V.
Capanzana
[email protected]
dost.gov.ph
P727,558.00
PCIERD
June
2006
Ma. Elena G.
Fernandez
[email protected]
gov.ph
P670,337.00
November
2006
October
2007
Dr. Rosario H.
Arim
[email protected]
gov.ph
November
2006
November
2007
Dr. Mario V.
Capanzana
[email protected]
P2,200,212.00
April
2006
December
2007
Dr. Imelda A.
Agdeppa
imelda_
[email protected]
yahoo.com
P1,900,000.00
February
2006
January
2007
Teresita R.
Portugal
[email protected]
gov.ph
P5,460,556.00
Project 2-Provision of
Reference Materials (RM)
and Subsequent of
Proficiency Testing (PT)
Program
May
2006
April
2007
Teresita R.
Portugal
[email protected]
gov.ph
P3,357,807.00
Philippine Council for Industry
and Energy Research and
Development (PCIERD)
Ms. Rina C. Resureccion
Tel. No. 837-61-71
Loc. 2121 or 2120
Development of Functional
Food Products from Coconut
Flour
Philippine Council for
Agriculture, Forestry and
Natural Resources Research
and Development (PCARRD)
Ms. Maritess M. Ramil
[email protected]
Nutritional, Physico-Chemical
and Sensory Evaluation of
Meat of Philippine Native
Chicken Strain "Darag"
April
2005
Department of Science
and Technology (DOST)
Ms. Grace Estrillore
[email protected]
Study on the Level of Nitrate
and Nitrite in Foods
Commonly Consumed by
Filipinos
Department of Science
and Technology (DOST)
Ms. Grace Estrillore
[email protected]
Strengthening Public and
Private Partnership in Food
and Nutriton through R&D
and S&T Activities
Department of Science
and Technology (DOST)
Ms. Mary Jeanne
Berroya
837-20-71 loc.2111
Supplementary Feeding
among School Aged Children
Utilizing FNRI- Developed
Food Products
Establishment,
Implementation and
Maintenance of Management
System in all RDI's Regional
Offices
Project 1-Establishment,
Implementation and
Maintenance of Laboratory
Accredition in all DOST
Laboratories in accordance
with ISO/IEC 17025
P3,889,672.00
Philippine Council for Industry
and Energy Research
and Development (PCIERD)
Ms. Grace Estrillore
[email protected]
Department of Science
and Technology (DOST)
Ms. Grace Estrillore
[email protected]
Philippine Council for Industry
and Energy Research
and Development (PCIERD)
Ms. Grace Estrillore
[email protected]
Establishment of Shelf Life
Testing Facilities and
Upgrading of Nutrition
Analysis Capability for DOST
IV, VII, X
June
2006
December
2007
Teresita R.
Portugal
[email protected]
gov.ph
P277,265.00
Department of Science
and Technology (DOST)
Ms. Ma. Theresa de
Guzman 837-2071
loc. 2031
Preparation of Manual of
Operation for Frequently used
Equipment and Machineries
of FNRI
March
2006
May
2006
Benjamin T.
Molano
[email protected]
gov.ph
P152,580.00
Department of Science
and Technology (DOST)
Ms. Ma. Theresa de
Guzman 837-2071
loc. 2031
Technology Transfer and
Commercialization of
Nutritious Food Products
January
2006
December
2006
Joyce R. Tobias
[email protected]
gov.ph
P189,510.00
Client
Name of
Business/Organization
Project Duration
Name / Tel. No. /
E-mail of Contact
Person
Title/Description of
Research
Start
End
Name/E-mail
of
Responsible
Agency Staff
Project
Costs
D. Other Government
Agency
National Nutrition Council
(NNC)-DOH
National Nutrition Council
(NNC)-DOH
Ms. Bernardita T. Flores
Director National
Nutrition Council
(NNC)
843-58-38
Formative Research on
Vegetable Consumption
February
2006
May
2006
Ms. Bernardita T. Flores
Director National
Nutrition Council
(NNC) 843-58-38
Development and
Standardization of EggBased Recipes
March
2006
September
2006
Dr. Rodolfo F. Florentino
rfflorentino.mydestiny.net
Effectiveness of the Whiz
Kids Through Fitness
Program: Phase 1.
Process of the Physical
Activity Component
2004
Dr. May Lian Guno
[email protected]
Zinc Status of Filipino PreSchool Children
January
2006
Dr. Zenaida V.
Narciso
[email protected]
gov.ph
P300,000.00
Marietta M.
Bumanglag
[email protected]
gov.ph
P149,068.00
2007
Celeste C.
Tanchoco
[email protected]
gov.ph
P50,000.00
December
2006
Leah A. Perlas
[email protected]
gov.ph
P1,613,700.00
June
2006
Dr. Imelda A.
Agdeppa
[email protected]
yahoo.com
P488,147.00
April
2006
Dr. Imelda A.
Agdeppa
[email protected]
yahoo.com
P2,938,825.00
March
2007
Wilma L. Molano
[email protected]
gov.ph
P1,800,000.00
E. Non-Government
Organization (NGO)
Philippine Association for the
Study of Overweight and
Obesity (PASOO)
Philippine Pediatric Society
(PPS)
The Efficacy of MultiMicronutrient Fortified Milk
and Biscuits in Improving the
Nutritional Status and School
Performance of School-aged
Children
July
2005
Land O' Lakes Phil, Inc.
and FNRF
Mr. Allan S. Racoma
[email protected]
com.ph
Land O' Lakes Phil, Inc. and
FNRF
Mr. Allan S. Racoma
[email protected]
com.ph
Monitoring The
Implementation of School
Nutrition Program on Schoolaged Children in Camarines
Sur
January
2005
Southeast Asian Association
of Glutamate Sciences
(SEAGS) and FNRF
Dr. Akarat Suksomcheep
Scientific Affairs Group
Ajinimoto Company
Bangkok, Thailand
Regional Pilot Study on Free
Glutamate
January
2005
Patent and Publications
Patent/Utility Model
Intellectual Property Rights
Title/Registry No./Description of
Intellectual Property
1. e-Nutrition Logo
Trademark is a small leter "e" which represents the electronic
dissemination of information. This letter is enclosed in a circle
that represents one of the four circles in the DOST Logo, with
green background and a leaf on top that represents FNRI (the
agency mandated to define the nutritional status of Filipinos).
Intellectual Property Type1
Researcher/Inventor
Status and Date2
design
Food and Nutrition Research Institute Department of Science and Technology
(FNRI-DOST)
For approval
October 13, 2006
04-2006-011276
design
Food and Nutrition Research Institute Department of Science and Technology
(FNRI-DOST
For approval
October 13, 2006
04-2006-011276
Utility Model
Mario V. Capanzana, Ph.D.
Joyce R. Tobias
Wenefrida N. Lainez
Kristine A. Beganos
Lydia M. Marero, Ph.D.
For approval
Application
No. 22006000457
October 25, 2006
4. Thermally Processed Pinakbet Sinigang Vegetable
Mix
This is value added products using indigenous food materials.
This is thermally processed, ready-to-eat and convenient to
prepare.
Utility Model
Mario V. Capanzana, Ph.D.
Joyce R. Tobias
Wenefrida N. Lainez
Kristine A. Beganos
Lydia M. Marero, Ph.D.
For approval
Application
No. 22006000458
October 25, 2006
5. Thermally Processed Putsero Vegetable Mix
This are value added products using indigenous food materials.
This is thermally processed, ready-to-eat and convenient to
prepare.
Utility Model
Mario V. Capanzana, Ph.D.
Joyce R. Tobias
Wenefrida N. Lainez
Kristine A. Beganos
Lydia M. Marero, Ph.D.
For approval
Application
No. 22006000459
October 25, 2006
6. Thermally Processed Pinakbet Vegetable Mix
This are value added products using indigenous food materials.
This is thermally processed, ready-to-eat and convenient to
prepare.
Utility Model
Mario V. Capanzana, Ph.D.
Joyce R. Tobias
Wenefrida N. Lainez
Kristine A. Beganos
Lydia M. Marero, Ph.D.
For approval
Application
No. 22006000460
October 25, 2006
2. E-Nutrition Information Trade Name
Website Logo plus a word "nutrition" written in green cursive
and bold small caps.
3. Thermally Processed Kare-kare Vegetable Mix
This is value added product using indigenous food materials.
This is thermally processed, ready-to-eat and convenient to
prepare.
Publications
Scientific Papers Published
III. Provision of Quality Science and Technology Services
The Institute provided various S&T services in 2006. These included nutrition surveys, in-depth
and correlation studies of the Sixth National Nutrition Survey (NNS), technical services on food
and nutrition, laboratory and testing services, consultancy services, information and
communication technology (ICT) services, and S&T promotion initiatives.
Technical Services on Food and Nutrition
1.
Laboratory and Testing Services
Through its laboratory and testing services, the FNRI was able to serve 198 clients for 2006.
These services generated a total income of P1,146,630.00 for the Institute.
Name of Service*
Microbiological services/
Nutrient Analysis/
Aflatoxin/Physico-chemical
Analysis
2.
No. of Clientele
Served
445 samples/ 198 clients
Income Generated
P1,146,630.00
Consultancy Services
The Institute’s consultancy services, i.e. regular counseling of clients (oral or written) regarding
food and nutrition matters is a continuing activity of the Institute.
Beneficiaries of Consultancy Programs
Beneficiary
Name of
Enterprise/
Organization
Address
Title of Consultancy
Services Rendered
Name/Tel. No. E-mail
of Contact Person
DOST-Davao
Davao City
Ms. Ma. Delia MoranMorados
Ella Ballon
Parañaque
Lalaine Abonal
Coconut Republic Manila
Gina Alejandro
65 Gen. Luna St., Ampid
San Mateo, Rizal
Arsenio S.
Santos III
Ifugao St., La Vista Subd.,
Bgy. Pansol, Quezon City
Eunice Villanueva
Parañaque
0917-8929973
Trina Guanzon
Parañaque
787-1982
FT Manlapaz
Quezon City
637-2163
Leticia Araullo
Quezon City
371-9202
Marvin Tibig
Mandaluyong
Marvin Tibig
Cel
DOST-ITDI
A.B. Garcia
MSH East Service Road
Parañaque
Joana
Grace Manuel
Furumoto
Jayson T. Alamo
205 Bukandala, Imus,
Cavite
Lenie S.
Ronald Garcia
Ronnie Robino
Inclusive Dates
of
Engagement
Name/E-mail of
Field Staff
TNA on squash noodles processing
plant
Aoril 4-7, 2006
Joyce R. Tobias
[email protected]
Ella Ballon
Fruit Juices
April 11, 2006
-do-
894-4420
Coco-based products
April 26, 2006
-do-
Kimchi
April 28, 2006
-do-
Sources of Glycoprotein, etc.
May 4, 2006
-do-
Water
May 5, 2006
-do-
Noodles, juices
May 10, 2006
-do-
Food Preservation
May 18, 2006
-do-
Food Preservation
May 18, 2006
-do-
Food Preservation
May 18, 2006
-do-
Salt Iodization
May 18, 2006
-do-
821-3643
Food Preservation
May 24, 2006
-do-
Occidental Mindoro
0919-2755981
Noodle Marketing
May 30, 2006
-do-
Roxas, Isabela
0927-5886489
Noodles, juices
June 16, 2006
-do-
515-2143
Food Processing
June 19, 2006
-do-
Parañaque
0917-8534600
Food Processing
June 23, 2006
-do-
Parañaque
824-0868
Food Processing
June 23, 2006
-do-
RUPT
Ronnie Robino
Feasibility Study
June 28, 2006
-do-
Mary Grace
Evangelista
RUPT
Mary Grace
Evangelista
Feasibility Study
June 28, 2006
-do-
Lyndo Villacorta
DOST-CARAGA
(85)3425345
JRT & MCS are resource persons for
Technology Forum on July 26 to
discuss FNRI food Tech
JRT &MCS to conduct TNA of
MARJECK FOODS & TAGINDECO
on July 24-25 re tech transfer of Vit.A
Fortified Cooking Oil & Squash
Canton Noodles
July 11, 2006
-do-
Dr. Angelito
Alolod
DOST-X
(88)8583933
Breakdown of extruder cooker for ricemongo curls product in Cagayan de
Oro
July 11, 2006
-do-
Engr. Zinnia
Teruel
DOST-VI
(33)3200907
JRT as resource person on ricebased technology developed by FNRI
July 11, 2006
-do-
Dr. Carol Yorobe
TAPI
8372938
JRT & MCS as resource persons for
Technology Forum on Food
Processing in Butuan on July 26 for
STEVPP
July 11, 2006
-do-
Jenifer Acabado
Muntinlupa City
Jenifer Acabado
Feasibility Study
July 13, 2006
-do-
Ronnie B. Rabido
Taguig City
0910-2597943
Feasibility Study
July 13, 2006
-do-
0916-7825591
660-9464
837-20-71 loc.2270
Beneficiary
Name of
Enterprise/
Organization
Medical doctor taking up PhD
Nutrition
Rose Yamsuan
Marjeck Food
TAGINDECO
Name/Tel. No. Email
of Contact Person
Address
Title of Consultancy
Services Rendered
Inclusive Dates of
Engagement
UP Diliman, Quezon
City
Dr. Leila de Llana
Poverty estimation
July 14, 2006
Biñan
049-8390030
Feasibility Study
July 18, 2006
Surigao del Sur
Pimentel St. Tago,
Surigao
del Sur
Mrs. Estrella Uy
Eng. Vidallusa
Technology Needs
Assessment (TNA) on
Squash Canton Noodles
Set-up
Techology Needs
Assessment (TNA) on
Vitamin A Fortified Cooking
Oil
July 24, 2006
Name/E-mail of
Field Staff
Ma. Anna Rita M. Ramirez
[email protected]
hotmail.com
-doJoyce R. Tobias
[email protected]
Marcela C. Saises
[email protected]
July 25, 2006
-do-
Albert Joseph, Jr.
Parañaque City
0917-8546474
Food Processing
July 25, 2006
-do-
Michael Soriano
Delifrance Philippines
6420021
Food Labelling Claim
July 27, 2006
-do-
Melton Mannag
FEU
4396530
Feasibility Study
August 1, 2006
-do-
JC Lazaro
FEU
3628730
Feasibility Study
August 1, 2006
-do-
Dina Masa
PCA
-
Pandesal with coco flour
August 8, 2006
-do-
Ester Lampa
Bacoor, Cavite
046-9701826
Food Processing
August 7, 2006
-do-
O. Agpaoa
Lucena City
042-7104799
Food Processing
August 11, 2006
-do-
Amarylis Abcede
Medical Action Group
439-1376
Food Processing
August 17, 2006
-do-do-
Ruth Yanga
Malabon
4471152
Powdered Products
September
5, 2006
Mr. Wilfred Teves
Davao
(082) 2971188
Amount of instant noodles
and other concerns re SFP
in Subic
September
5, 2006
-do-
Benjamin Ong
Manila
0922-4449146
Fruit Processing
September
11, 2006
-do-
Johnson Maigue
San Francisco,
Quezon
0920-8122321
Taho, Bean Sprouts
September
13, 2006
-do-
Rene Taal
Imus, Cavite
9707136
Preservatives
September
21, 2006
-do-
Romy Tagbian
DOST-III
Romy Tagbian
Product Info on Canton
Noodles
September
27, 2006
-do-
Provincial Health
Office (PHO)
Provincial Health
Office Compound
Balanga, Bataan
Mr. Enrique Garcia
PCARRD
Los Baños, Laguna
Dr. Ester Lopez
Fin Atienza
[email protected]
DOST 3
Dr. Conrado Oliveros
Dr. Conrado Oliveros
Technology Needs
Assessment (TNA) on
Iodine- Rich water
S&T Consultant to package
a Profitability Analysis of the
Backyard "Bahay Kubo"
production (technology)
Resource Person to
conduct Training on
Preparation of Squash
Products
October 8, 2006
-do-
October 12 to
present
Ma. Anna Rita M. Ramirez
[email protected]
hotmail.com
October 13, 2006
Joyce R. Tobias
[email protected]
Beneficiary
Name of
Enterprise/
Organization
Address
Name/Tel. No. E-mail
of Contact Person
Title of
Consultancy
Services
Rendered
Inclusive Dates
of
Engagement
Name/E-mail of
Field Staff
Trece Martirez
Cavite
Mr. Raul Castaneda
Shelf-life of Tahong
November 2,
2006
Joyce R. Tobias
[email protected]
PSTC Business
Center
Tarlac City
Mr. Romy Tadiar
Squash Canton
and Canton
Noodles with
Saluyot
November 2,
2006
-do-
Nep Bagnes
Glacier Ref
Services Corp.
8980083
Shelf-life
November 10,
2006
-do-
Aleli Narvaez
Cofre Fuerte
Manufacturing,
Corp.
5208926
Shelf-life
November 10,
2006
-do-
Elisha Hidalgo
HB Biotech
8350163
Shelf-life
November 13,
2006
-do-
N/A
Valenzuela
Helen Marcelino
(Tel. No. 279-9179)
Vegemeat
preparation
December 12,
2006
Chona M. Fernandez
[email protected]
com
World Vision
Quezon City
Grace Alviar
Food during
disasters
(computation of
energy and nutrient
composition of
rice, munggo
guisado and dried
fish)
December 13,
2006
Dr. Imelda A. Agdeppa
[email protected]
com
Written request for
IEC materials
January 2006 December 2006
Dr. Zenaida V. Narciso
[email protected]
Phone-in requests
for IEC materials,
course
offerings/trainings,
food and nutrition
literatures, nutrition
surveys
January 2006 December 2006
Dr. Zenaida V. Narciso
[email protected]
Benefits on
Coconut Oil
Request of IEC
materials and FNRI
publications
2006
-do-
2006
-do-
PSTC-Capitol Comp.
Corporate service manager,
schools, NNC, health & lifestyle
magazine, Fonterra Brands Phil,
GMA-7, Medical Observer, Asia
Food News
GMA-7 Emergency, ERDA Tech,
Zamboanga del Sur, food
companies, students/teachers for
secondary and tertiary
Ms. Sheila Garcia, Publisher
Students (CEU, UST, UPLB,
UPDil, PUP, FEU, PLM, St.
Scholastica's College, Alaska
Technical Staff, researchers from
government and private
companies)
Student (Immaculate Heart of
Mary College)
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Request for IEC
materials
Food and Nutrition
literature and
surveys
Nutritive Content of
Filled Milk
Information and
Communication
Technology
Chona M. Fernandez
[email protected]
com
2006
Milflor S. Gonzales
[email protected]
Science and Technology Promotion Services
1.
Food and Nutrition Promotion and Networking
The FNRI provides accurate data, correct information and innovative technologies to fight
malnutrition. In line with this mission, the Institute’s food and nutrition promotion efforts play an
important role as catalyst in improving knowledge and attitude and ultimately in changing
behavior towards food and nutrition. This is done through regular dissemination of R & D
findings and recommendations among the Institute’s various stakeholders. Several activities
like the Annual FNRI Seminar Series, tri-media exposures, IEC materials, exhibits, the Nutrition
Communication Network (NUTRICOMNET), the Nutrition Research Information Network
(NUTRINET) and others are regularly conducted.
The year 2006 was a fruitful year in terms of the Institute’s tri-media partnership. The FNRIDOST was able to achieve a media mileage of Php 21 million. Over the years, the Institute’s
media mileage has been constantly increasing. This can be attributed to FNRI’s strong trimedia partnership.
The Institute produced 119 media releases, arranged 65 broadcast and personal interviews,
participated in three (3) S & T and F & N related exhibits and two (2) Media Core activities. The
Institute also continued to develop and revise seven (7) IEC materials, distribute and sell 8,107
copies of IEC materials.
A total of nine (9) feedback conferences in Country Programme for Children (CPC) VI Focus
Areas (Mindanao) were conducted from November 23 to December 12, 2006. The aim of the
conference was to report back the results of the 2005 Updating of the Nutritional Status of
Children and Selected Population Groups.
In November 2006, three (3) media fora on the Current Nutritional Status of Filipinos for
NUTRICOMNET CARAGA, Region 10 and Region 11 were successively held. The
NUTRICOMNET plays a vital role in imparting food and nutrition information where it is needed
most, and where the Institute being a national agency, cannot reach local areas through
conventional promotion strategies.
For 32 years now, the FNRI Seminar Series continues to be an important venue for presenting
findings of completed researches and food and nutrition technologies. The 2006 Seminar
Series’ theme Nutrisyon ng Pamayanan, Yaman ng Buong Bayan emphasized the importance
of health and nutrition as a building-block in shaping the country’s development and productivity.
The activity was participated in by 552 nutritionists, dietitians, health workers, public health
practitioners, college students, members of the academe and research organizations, nutrition
allies in the medical field and media practitioners.
The Institute’s library provided information services to 2,390 clients coming from various
government agencies, private firms, Nutrition Research Information Network (NUTRINET)
member agencies, food industry, universities and colleges.
The NUTRINET continued to promote food and nutrition information by regularly conducting
meetings and promotion activities as well as developing food and nutrition databases. These
databases, such as the collection and computerization of bibliographic data and F&N abstracts;
profile of member institutes and union list updates were used to improve the flow of F&N
information system in the country.
Another venue of promoting F&N information was the conduct of the NUTRINET Fair held last
September 25-27, 2006 at the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD). The
event included seminar on food processing, bookfair and food demonstrations. In 2006, the
network also continued to publish and distribute its newsletter.
2.
Other Promotional Activities
FNRI technical staff served as resource persons, speakers, lecturers, presentors, facilitators
and trainors in numerous conferences, conventions, seminars, and trainings organized by
private institutions, other government agencies and non-government organizations (NGOs).
Subject areas included results of the Sixth National Nutrition Survey (NNS), dietary fiber, food
fortification, food safety, laboratory techniques and safety, meal planning for children, teenagers
& elderly, healthy lifestyle, and nutrition education & communication, among others.
Type of Service Rendered
by FNRI Staff
Resource Person
Speaker
Lecturer
Presentor
Trainor
Demonstrator
Critic
Science Review Committee/Technical
Working Group Member
OJT Supervisor
Judge
Facilitator/Moderator/Emcee
Number
80
16
41
25
17
6
2
10
1
8
2
2006 Tri-media Mileage
P u b lic a tio n
M a n i la
B u lle t i n
P h p
5 7 9 ,5 9 5 .9 1
B u s in e s s
M irro r
5 2 1 ,9 5 0 .2 5
P h i li p p i n e
S ta r
3 2 2 ,1 8 3 .7 1
P h i li p p i n e
D a i l y In q u i r e r
3 1 8 ,4 3 9 .7 5
B a b y M a g a z in e
3 1 2 ,0 0 0 .0 0
B u s in e s s
1 2 2 ,3 5 2 .0 0
M a n i la
W o r ld
S ta n d a rd
9 0 ,1 6 1 .2 5
P e o p le 's
J o u rn a l
6 1 ,0 0 3 .8 8
S ta n d a rd
E xp re s s
5 7 ,0 0 5 .1 0
In q u i r e r L i b r e
5 5 ,5 5 0 .2 3
S u n d a y T im e s
5 4 ,2 0 7 .9 0
M a la y a
4 1 ,0 5 5 .8 2
P e o p le 's
T a li b a
3 4 ,7 6 2 .5 9
P e o p le 's
To n ig h t
3 2 ,8 8 0 .0 0
M a n i la
T im e s
6 ,2 1 0 .3 9
Te m p o
2 ,0 3 4 .4 0
S u b -to ta l
2 ,6 1 1 ,3 9 3 .1 8
T e le v is io n
A B S -C B N
4 ,5 1 9 ,9 2 7 .0 0
A B C
5
5 3 8 ,0 0 0 .0 0
G M A
7
4 ,1 8 9 ,6 9 7 .3 3
1 1
1 ,6 4 1 ,6 6 6 .6 7
Q T V
IB C
N E T
1 3
6 0 0 ,0 0 0 .0 0
2 5
U N T V
3 ,6 0 0 ,0 0 0 .0 0
3 2
9 8 0 ,0 0 0 .0 0
S u b -to ta l
1 6 ,0 6 9 ,2 9 1 .0 0
R a d io
D Y D W
3 9 ,0 0 0 .0 0
D Z A R
4 0 ,0 0 0 .0 0
D Z A S
4 0 ,0 0 0 .0 0
D Z B B
4 5 ,0 0 0 .0 0
D Z E C
2 8 8 ,0 0 0 .0 0
D Z E M
2 8 8 ,0 0 0 .0 0
D Z M M
1 ,1 9 8 ,0 8 0 .0 0
D Z R B
6 9 ,0 0 0 .0 0
D Z R M
1 0 4 ,8 0 0 .0 0
D Z X L -R M N
M o m 's
2 0 ,0 0 0 .0 0
R a d io
2 0 ,3 3 3 .3 3
S u b -to ta l
P h p
2 ,1 1 3 ,2 1 3 .3 3
G R A N D
P h p
2 0 ,7 9 3 ,8 9 7 .5 1
T O T A L
Monitoring based on FNRI’s limited access to newspapers and magazines.
Publication cost for the Manila Newsweek, F&B World, Ang Diaryo Natin at Birit where FNRI media releases were also published cannot be computed
due to unavailable rates.
3 Monitoring based on FNRI and STII-DOST data.
4 Monitoring based on FNRI’s limited access to broadcast exposure and fluctuationg costs of airtime.
1
2
Information and Communication Technology (ICT)
In keeping abreast of the latest innovations in information and communication technology (ICT)
and to better serve FNRI’s research and development, communication and networking needs,
three (3) ICT projects were successfully implemented in 2006. These were part of the
Information System Strategic Plan (ISSP) of the Institute for 2005-2008.
The Establishment of the Philippines’ Knowledge Center on Food and Nutrition or e-Nutrition
was launched in October 18, 2006. It is an interactive web-based nutrition information system
which provides electronically accessible information on food consumption, nutrition and health
status, and other essential indicators that would be used for policy-making, monitoring,
evaluation, planning, development of nutrition-related programs. The e-Nutrition was funded by
the Commission on Information and Communications Technology (CICT) in support of the
country’s e-Government program.
The TACIS (Test, Analyses and Calibration Information System) Project, on the other hand, is
an interactive information system that will facilitate the processing of tests, analyses and
calibration services of FNRI-DOST. This is a collaborative project of seven (7) DOST R&D
institutes and 15 regional offices.
The FNRI is also a contributor to the Philippine e-Lib project. The Philippine e-Lib aims to give
the Filipino people access to the wealth of information available not only in the Philippine
libraries but in the world. It has a collection of more than 800,000 bibliographic records. A total
of 1,790 bibliographic records were taken from FNRI.
The FNRI website (http://www.fnri.gov.ph) is regularly updated to include the latest food and nutrition data
generated by the Institute. In 2006, FNRI website had a total of 62,048 hits.
IV. S&T Capacity Building Services on Food and Nutrition
Scientific Linkages and International Cooperation
The FNRI continued to establish, forge and strengthen partnerships with both foreign and local
agencies/institutions and individuals in its food and nutrition projects and activities.
The following linkages with various institutions were developed in the implementation of the
Institute’s food and nutrition projects.
International Scientific Linkages and Networks
Scientific Institution
Name of Institution
Name/E-mail/Position
of Contact Person
Dates of Engagement
Nature/Description of
Scientific Linkages
Start
End
January
2006
December
2006
ASEANFOODS Project
Coordinator
Co-Project Team,
Australian Agency for
International Development Public Sector Linkages
Program
(AusAID-PSLP) Project on
Preparation of Reference
Materials and Conduct of in the
Australasian Region
January 2006
December
2006
Julia Kantasubrata
Chair, Indonesian
Food Analysis Network
[email protected]
Co-Project Team,
Australian Agency for
International Development Public Sector Linkages
Program
(AusAID-PSLP) Project on
Preparation of Reference
Materials and Conduct of in the
Australasian Region
January 2006
December
2006
International Atomic Energy
Agency (IAEA)
Dr. Lena Davidson
Collaborative Project on
Regional Project on Preventing
Osteoporosis
1970
present
International Life Science
Institute (ILSI)
Ms. Leong Boon Yee
Consultancy on Functional
Foods
1990
present
Institute of Food Research
(Norwich Englang)
Dr. Susan Fairweather-Tait
Training Center on
Bioavailability
1985
present
National Instrument
Institute,Department of Industry,
Tourism and Resources
Australian Resources Research
Center
Stewart Jones
Laboratory Services Manager
[email protected]
measurement.goo.air
Project Coordinator,
Australian Agency for
International Development Public Sector Linkages
Program
(AusAID-PSLP) Project
Preparation of Food Reference
Materials in the Australasian
Region
Institute of Nutrition
Mahidol University
Bangkok, Thailand
Prapassi Puwastein
Professor ASEANFOODS
Coordinator
Bangkok, Thailand,
[email protected], ac.th
Research Center for Chemistry,
LIPI, Indonesia
Scientific Institution
Name of Institution
Name/E-mail/Position
of Contact Person
Dates of Engagement
Nature/Description of
Scientific Linkages
Start
End
University of Toronto
Dr. Lilia U. Tompson
Consultancy on In Vitro Mineral
Availability/Functional Foods
1980
present
Institute of Food Science and
Nutrition, ETH Zurich
Dr. Richard Hurrell
Consultancy on Bioavailability of
Iron
1995
present
Consultancy on the Asia-Pacific
Regional Project on In Vitro
Mineral Availability/Calcium
1995
present
2002
present
October
2005
February
2006
Institute of Nutriton - Mahidol
University
Dr. Emorn Wasantwisort
Taiyo Kagaku
Dr. Lekh Kuneja
Funding Agency
(Collorative Project)
World Health Organization
(WHO)
Dr. Tommaso Cavalli-Storza
Funding
University of Toronto
Dr. Thomas Wolever
Consultancy on Glycemic Index
of Foods
2002
present
University of Surrey (UK)
Dr. Warren TK Lee
Consultant (Lead Country
Project Coordinator)
2003
present
United Nations Children's Fund
(UNICEF)
United Nations - World Food
Program (UN-WFP)
Mahadevan Ramachandran
[email protected]
[email protected]
wfp.org
Baseline Nutrition and Food
Safety Assessment in
Mindandao
May
2006
August
2006
Tulane University
Dr. John B. Mason
[email protected]
[email protected]
Turning the Corner in the
Prevalence of Vitamin A
Deficiency in Highly Affected
Areas in the Philippines
August
2005
present
International Workshops on Laboratory Quality Standards Toward Global Competitiveness held at the City
Garden Suites in Ermita, Manila last December 1 and 4-7, 2006 sponsored by the Australian Agency for
International Development’s Public Sector Linkages Program (AusAID-PSLP). The workshop was in
collaboration with the Institute of Nutrition of the Mahidol University in Bangkok, Thailand, the Research
Institute for Chemistry, LIPI, Indonesia, and the Australian National Measurement Institute. Shown in left
photo above, from left to right are: Dr. Mario V. Capanzana (FNRI Director), Dr. Estrella F. Alabastro (DOST
Secretary) and Stewart Jones. Shown in right photo above, from left to right are: Ms. Teresita R. Portugal,
OIC and Supervising Science Research Specialist of the Food Science and Technology Division of the FNRI,
Dr. Aida R. Aguinaldo, FNRI Consultant and Former FNRI OIC and Deputy Director, Stewart Jones, Dr.
Local Linkages and Networks
S cientific Institution
N ame of Institution
N ame/E -mail/Position
of C ontact P erson
N ature/D escription of
S cientific Linkages
D ates of Engagement
Start
End
Unilever P hilippines
Ms. Jika MendozaD alupan
[email protected]
unilever.com
D evelopment and
printing of the quarterly
FNRI D igest and the
2007 Menu C alendar
January
2006
D ecember
2006
Nestle P hilppines
Ms. C orazon V. S ager
[email protected]
nestle.com
898-0001 loc. 6730
W riteshop for the FNRI
W riters' P ool and the
D OST Media C ore
April
2006
November
2006
The C oca-C ola E xport
C orporation
Ms. Maria C indy C hingLim
C ommunity Relation
Manager
[email protected]
849-8155
Health and Active
Lifestyle (HAL) Page
September
25, 2006
November
8, 2006
The C oca-C ola E xport
C orporation
Ms. Maria C indy C hingLim
C ommunity Relation
Manager
[email protected]
849-8155
Mr. Rufino R. Manrique
FTI C omplex, Taguig C ity
Nutri Fair and Seminar
on Health, Food and
Nutrition:
C hallenges and
Opportunities
September
25, 2006
S eptember
27, 2006
Land O'Lakes
Foundation,
P hilippines
Mr. Allan S. Racoma
[email protected]
Efficacy of Multi-Nutrient
Fortified Milk and
Biscuits in Improving the
Iron Status and S chool
Performance of Schoolaged C hildren
July 2005
May 2006
P hilippine Pediatric
S ociety
(PPS )
D r. May Lian Guno
ma[email protected]
Zinc Status of Filipino
PreSchool C hildren
January
2006
D ecember
2006
P hilippine Association
for the Study of
Overweight and Obesity
(PA SOO)
D r. Rodolfo F. Florentino
rfflorentino.mydestiny.net
Effectiveness of the Whiz
Kids Through Fitness
Program:
Phase 1. Process of the
Physical Activity
C omponent
2004
2007
P hilippine C oconut
A uthority
Ms. Rina Masa
Research and
D evelopment Manager
[email protected]
com
D evelopment of
Functional Food
Products from C oconut
Flour
2006
present
UP C ollege of Home
E conomics
Mr. C hristian E.C iron
UP -C HE Assistant
Professor
[email protected]
ph
D evelopment of
Functional Food
Products from C oconut
Flour
June
2006
January
2007
Moonbake Incorporated
Awards
The Establishment of the Philippines’ Knowledge Center on Food and Nutrition (eNutrition) won the international grand prize for Information and Communication Technology
(ICT) Best Practice for e-Government. The award was given by the Asia-Pacific Economic
Conference (APEC) Digital Opportunity Center (ADOC) last June 30, 2006 in Taiwan. The eNutrition is a collaborative project of the FNRI and the Advanced Science and Technology
Institute (ASTI).
The ABS-CBN Foundation also awarded FNRI a plaque of appreciation last August 7, 2006 in
recognition of the Institute’s continuing support in their campaign of disseminating and
promoting science and technology (S & T).
Lastly, the Philippine Council for Industry and Energy Research and Technology (PCIERD)
awarded a certificate of recognition to FNRI’s Technology Generation and Commercialization of
Iron Premix Rice using Extrusion Technology as qualifier in the Regional Competition of the 6th
S & T Fora and Competitions in the Industry and Energy Research and Development Category
last February 27, 2006.
e-Nutrition wins grand prize in
APEC Digital Opportunity Center
Award
A plaque of appreciation given by the
ABS-CBN Foundation to FNRI-DOST in
recognition of the continuing support of
disseminating and promoting science and
technology (S&T)
V. FNRI Internal Audit Services
The FNRI’s internal audit unit prepared and accomplished the following:
Coordinated with the Accounting Section regarding management comments as per Audit
Observation Memorandum issued by the Commission on Audit (COA).
Pre-audited all kinds of disbursement vouchers, namely 767 purchase orders, 92 working
orders, 219 liquidation and 1,589 other vouchers for payment.
Audited time cards against the leave cards of FNRI employees.
Audited accumulated vacation/sick leaves of personnel who transferred, retired or resigned
prior to computation of terminal leave.
Financial Resource Management
Budget Trends
(2001-2006)
(In millions P)
70
65
60
55
50
2001
2002
2003
2004
(Year)
2005
2006
Total Budget in 2006 = P65,783,000.00
Human Resource Management
The Institute’s human resource development program continued to further develop its staff
through local and international formal trainings. For 2006, a total of 22 technical staff are
undergoing formal trainings.
A.
Formal Training Programs, Local and International
MS/PhD. Scholars Supported
Name/Address/
E-mail of Scholar
Level (MS or PhD)/
Field of Study
Name of Educational Institution
Status
(On-going or graduate)
Ruby J. Apilado
PhD in Food Science
University of the Philippines
Diliman
On-going
Marie T. Bugas
PhD in Human Nutrition
University of the Philippines
Los Baños
On-going
Julieta B. Dorado
PhD in Sociology
University of the Philippines
Diliman
On-going
Jocelyn A. Juguan
PhD in Human Nutrition
University of the Philippines
Los Baños
On-going
Celeste C. Tanchoco
Doctor in Public Health
University of the Philippines
Manila
On-going
Marina B. Vargas
PhD in Nutrition
University of the Philippines
Manila
On-going
Rowena E. Velasco
MS in Nutrition and Dietetics
Philippine Women's University
Graduate
Marilen M. Espinosa
MS Programme Environment
and Resource Management
Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam,
the Netherlands
On-going
International
Catherine C. Lumba
MS of Science in Community
Nutrition
University of Putra Malaysia
On-going
International
Ma. Julia T. Golloso
MS in Nutrition and Health
Wageningen University
On-going
International
Divorah V. Aguila
MS in Public Health
University of the Philippines
Manila
On-going
Marlon SA. Aguinaldo
MS in Microbiology
University of Santo Tomas
On-going
Jocelyn R. Badillo
MS in Human Management
University of Santo Tomas
On-going
Regina C. Beleno
MA Health Policy Studies
University of the Phippines
Manila
On-going
Alfee N. Bustamante
MS in Food Science
University of the Philippines
on-going
Chona M. Fernandez
Master of Public Health
University of the Philippines
Manila (Open University)
on-going
Allan A.Gulles
MS Statistics
University of the Philippines
Diliman
on-going
Aida C. Mallillin
MS in Chemistry
Adamson University
on-going
Czarina Teresita S. Martinez
MS Applied Nutrition
University of the Philippines
Los Baños
on-going
Name/Address/
E-mail of Scholar
Level (MS or PhD)/
Field of Study
Name of Educational Institution
Status
(On-going or graduate)
Alexis M. Ortiz
Master's in Public
Administration
Polytechnic Universtiy of the Philippines
on-going
Ivy Marie P. Palma
MMT Management Technology
De la Salle University Lipa
on-going
Rey Alfred G. Rañola
MS in Chemistry
University of Santo Tomas
on-going
Marietta P. Rodriquez
MS in Microbiology
University of Santo Tomas
on-going
Michael E. Serafico
MS in Chemistry
De la Salle University
on-going
Salvador R. Serrano
MS in Development
Communication
University of the Philippines
Los Baños
on-going
Rodolfo E. Sumayao, Jr.
MS in Chemistry
University of the Philippines
Diliman
on-going
Trinidad E. Trinidad II
MS in Chemistry
University of Santo Tomas
on-going
Phoebe Z. Trio
MS in Chemistry
University of the Philippines
Diliman
on-going
B.
Non-Formal International Training Programs Attended by the FNRI Staff
Title
Participant/s
Date
Place
Organizer
International Atomic Energy
Agency (IAEA) Training on
Calcium Bioavailability and
Bone Minimal Density
Measurements
Aida C. Mallillin
February
20-24, 2006
Hongkong
International Atomic Energy
Agency (IAEA)
Bioavailability 2006
Aida C. Mallillin
March 7-10,
2006
Chiang Mai,
Thailand
Institute of Nutrition
Mahidol University
AusAID International Workshop
on Laboratory Quality Standards
Towards Global Competition
Teresita R. Portugal
Julita G Ardeña
Rosemarie J. Dumag
May 13-17,
2006
Bandung,
Indonesia
Indonesian Research
Center for Chemistry, LIPI
with Australian Agency for
International Dev- Public
Sector Linkages Program
(AusAID-PSLP) funding
The 4th Asian Congress of
Dietetics (ACD)
Celeste C. Tanchoco
Arsenia J. Cruz
Milagros F. Villadolid
Mildegarde C. Capistrano
Mina Grace C. Aquino
Ulpiano A. Florida
Ermelita N. Bautista
Mildred T. Aquino
Evelyn Dela Cruz
Merlyn G. Tajan
Michael Angelo G. Lijauco
Gemma P. Yuchingtat
Consuelo L. Orense
Ellen E. Cea
Marilou L. Madrid
Charina A. Javier
Marie T. Bugas
Zenaida V. Narciso
April 23-26,
2006
Philippine
International
Convention
Center,
Pasay City
Nutritionist-Dietitians'
Association of the
Philippines
Title
Participant/s
Date
Place
Organizer
The 4th Asian Congress of
Dietetics (ACD)
Crisanta M. delos Reyes
Carol R. Pine
Mildred O. Guirindola
Ma. Belina Nueva España
Cristina J. Garcia
Magelene B. Casio
Rhea B. de Leon
Dulce S. Concepcion
Ma. Erlinda R Tarrayo
April 23-26,
2006
Philippine
International
Convention
Center,
Pasay City
Nutritionist-Dietitians'
Association of the
Philippines
36th Southeast Asian
Association of Glutamate
Sciences Annual Meeting and
SEA Collaborative Research
Meeting
Dr. Mario V. Capanzana
May 18-19,
2006
Pattaya,
Thailand
Southeast Asian
Association of Glutamate
Sciences (SEAAGS)
AusAID International WS on
Laboratory Quality Standards
Towards Global Competition
Teresita R. Portugal
Dr. Rosario H. Arim
Ennata M. Aveña
Marlon SA Aguinaldo
July 17-21,
2006
Bangkok,
Thailand
Thailand Institute of
Nutrition, Mahidol Univrsity
with Australian Agency for
International Dev-Public
Sector Linkages Program
(AusAID-PSLP) funding
27th International Horticulture
Congress
Korea Joint Workshop on Fruits
and Vegetables for Health:
Enhancing Production and
Consumption of Safe and High
Quality Fruits and Vegetables
Dr. Mario V. Capanzana
August 13-19,
2006
Seoul, Korea
Food and Agriculture
Organization (FAO) Ministry
of Agriculture
Palm Oil Awareness Seminar
and International Palm Oil Trade
Fair
Dr. Mario V. Capanzana
November
21-24, 2006
Kuala Lumpur,
Malaysia
Malaysian Palm Oil Council
AusAID International WS on
Laboratory Quality Standards
Towards Global Competition
Leah A. Perlas
Josefina Desnacido
December
1-7, 2006
Manila,
Philippines
Food and Nutrition
Research Institute,
Department of Science and
Technology with Australian
Agency for International
Dev-Public Sector
Linkages Program
(AusAID-PSLP) funding
C.
Non-Formal Local Training Programs Attended by the FNRI Staff
Number of
Conventions/
Conferences
Training/Seminars/
Workshops Attended
Number of FNRI
Staff who
Attended
Nutrition, Dietetics and Health
28
75
Chemistry and Microbiology
3
5
Statistics and Data Analysis
6
39
Food Processing, Food Safety, Food Labeling, and Quality
Assurance
4
7
Laboratory Standards and Measurement Techniques
8
16
Communications and Information Technology
6
23
Policy and Development Planning
4
3
Administrative matters (e.g. government procurement, briefing on
charter change)
2
2
Topic
D.
In-house Trainings of FNRI Staff
Title
Sponsor
Date
Venue
Number of
Participants
Lecture and Critiquing of Research
Proposal & Seminar
of the Use of Stable Isotopes
NSTD Continuing
Education
January
20, 2006
FNRI Training
Room
11
Writing the Research Report
RUMD
January 27, 2006
FNRI Library
37
Tips on the printing of IEC
materials and demonstration of
the risograph machine
RUMD
March 7, 2006
FNRI Library
23
Seminar on Stress Management
RUMD
April 11, 2006
FNRI Library
24
Dietary Fiber Food Fortification in the
Philippines Functional Foods and New
Products for the Obese, and Echo
Presentations on Sampling Theory and
Sampling and Safe handling of Hazardous
Wastes
FSTD
May 10, 2006
FNRI Pilot Plant
35
Probiotics and Prebiotics
Fructooligosaccharides New Food Products
for Children and Experimental Design in
Food Product Development, and Good
Manufacturing Practices
FSTD
May 18, 2006
FNRI Pilot Plant
33
Creating High Performance Teams
FSTD
May 26, 2006
FNRI Training Room
23
Effective and efficient nutrition tools that
work
RUMD
May 31, 2006
FNRI Library
25
Seminar-Workshop on Presentation,
Interview and Hosting/Emceeing/Moderating
Skills
RUMD
June 1-2, 2006
FNRI Training
Room
35
32nd FNRI Seminar Series*
FNRI-DOST
July 6-7, 2006
FNRI Auditorium
502
FNRI Webmail Training
MISU, FNRI
August 2006
FNRI MISU Room
101
Seminar on formative research on
vegetable consumption
RUMD
August 9, 2006
FNRI Library
21
Seminar on understanding
knowledge management
RUMD
August 23, 2006
FNRI Library
23
Seminar on understanding the human
dynamics as a knowledge
manager/worker
RUMD
September 5,
2006
FNRI Library
21
Seminar on conflict management
in the workplace
RUMD
September 8,
2006
FNRI Library
19
Lifestyle Modification Through
S.E.X.
NAMD
September 27,
2006
FNRI Meeting
Room
24
Wellness Orientation Seminar
NSTD
October 16,
2006
FNRI Meeting
Room
88
Lecture on Wellness
NSTD
October 26-27,
2006
FNRI Training
Room
45
Measurement of Body
Composition and Energy
Expenditures
NSTD
November 9,
2006
FNRI Training
Room
15
Procurement Training (RA 9184 and its IRR)
FNRI
November 23-24,
2006
FNRI Meeting
Room
27
E.
Awards and Recognition
The FNRI’s Program Awards and Incentives for Service Excellence (PRAISE) Committee
conducted its annual search for model employees for each division and two model employees
for the Institute. This activity is done to recognize the commitment, dedication and excellence of
the Institute’s employees in their work.
The FNRI Model Employee Awards (Agency Level) were granted to:
Redemptor C. Pagador – FNRI Model Employee, Level I (Non-Technical)
Wilma L. Molano
– FNRI Model Employee, Level II (Technical)
The Model Employee Awards (Division Level) were given to the following:
Nutrition Standards and Management
Division
Ruben M. Matanguihan – Level I
Teresita R. Portugal – Level II
Bio-Medical Nutrition Division
Paz S. Lara – Level I
Ermelita N. Bautista – Level II
Nutrition Intervention Modelling
and Assessment Division
Edgardo C. Merambil – Level I
Wilma L. Molano – Level II
Communication Dissemination
Services Division
Redemptor C. Pagador – Level I
Ma. Idelia G. Glorioso – Level II
Administrative and Finance Division
Sofia B. Banta – Level I
For 2006, the FNRI PRAISE Committee
granted other awards for its employees.
The following awards were given:
Exemplary Attendance and Punctuality Award
Reynaldo G. Baldovino
Arsenia J. Cruz
Lolito G. Lugay
Ulpiano A. Florida
Bandila Award
Paz S. Lara
Most Prolific Writer Award
Ma. Idelia G. Glorioso – Popular Writer Award (print media)
The Institute’s Chess Team also won the
DOST Sportsfest 2006, Inter-Agency
Chess Tournament Championship The members
are the following:
Team Captain: Renato P. Leobrera
Members:
Gil D. Artuz
Romeo R. Artuz
Fernando G. Gregorio
Carlito J. Magno
Hilarion D. Sanchez, Jr
Committing to Future Directions
The year 2007 unfolds another milestone of worthy achievements for the FNRI as it celebrates
60 years of dedicated research and development work in food and nutrition.
Likewise, the year 2007 brings with it another opportunity for the Institute to continue with its
mission to fight malnutrition with accurate data, correct information and innovative technologies.
With its vision for the future – “optimum nutrition for all Filipinos, socially and economically
empowered through scientifically sound, environment-friendly, and globally competitive
technologies”, the FNRI, boosted with renewed vigor and commitment will continue to fulfill its
mandates.
In 2007, the FNRI’s research agenda and investment portfolio will include various projects and
activities under its major R&D programs on food and nutrition. The investment portfolio for each
program, a new development in the Institute’s R&D undertaking will include the enlisted projects
and activities with corresponding estimated budget and personnel requirements for the period
2007 to 2011.
The following projects and activities which are formulated bearing in mind the Medium-Term
Philippine Development Plan (MPDP) 2004-2010 and the DOST’s Eight-Point Agenda (EPA)
and Major Final Outputs (MFOs) will be undertaken in 2007:
Programs Addressing Normal Nutrition, Macro- and Micronutrient Deficiencies and NutritionRelated Problems
Assessment studies to define the nutritional status of various population groups
In-depth analyses and correlation studies on the dynamics and determinants of nutritional
status based on the nutrition survey results
Effectiveness of wellness/fitness programs and nutrition intervention programs for
schoolchildren
Alternative communication strategies and innovative methodologies on nutrition education
Capability building of local manpower and updating of survey to ensure effective and
efficient conduct of the nutrition survey
Complementary, nutritional and functional foods as alternative solutions to the malnutrition
problem and emerging lifestyle-related diseases
Efficacy and effectiveness of micronutrient-fortified food products to address priority health
and nutrition problems among at-risk population groups
Review and evaluation of the effectiveness of various fortification programs in support of the
Health Sector Reform Agenda (HSRA)
Animal and human studies on health claims and safety of functional foods
Program for Food Quality and Safety
Updating of the Food Composition Tables (FCT) as a continuing response to the MediumTerm Philippine Plan of Action for Nutrition (MTPPAN)
Enhanced efforts to sustain laboratory accreditation to comply with international standards
and continuously provide quality service and procedures
Assistance in the implementation and maintenance of laboratory accreditation in the field of
chemical and microbiology testing
Additives and exposure studies; evaluation of foods on trade-related components and
establishment of laboratory methods for filth analysis to ensure quality and safety of foods
Program for Development of Tools and Standards for Nutritional Assessment
Generation of new knowledge towards development of recommendations for the
improvement of the nutritional status of various population groups through the development,
updating and evaluation of guides and handbooks; development and validation of standards,
methods and protocols; updating of the E-cal and FCT + Menu Eval softwares; and
preparation of communication and library tools.
S & T Programs
Provision and transfer of knowledge and technological innovations to SMEs in support of
the SET-UP Program of DOST
Development and commercialization of nutritional food products and technologies to help
improve the nutritional status of the marginalized sectors and the socioeconomic well-being
of the Filipinos in general
Promotion and popularization of S & T with the continuous development, updating,
production and distribution of nutrition information packages; participation in food and
nutrition exhibits; dissemination of research findings and recommendations through various
media channels; rebuilding and monitoring of established information and communication
networks such as NUTRICOMNET and NUTRINET; and enhancing food and nutrition
training capability
Continuous harnessing of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) programs
through the conduct of the e-Nutrition, TACIS, e-library and e-NGAS projects
Program for S & T Services
Initial preparation for the conduct of the 7th National Nutrition Survey
Technological assistance to SMEs in terms of laboratory and analytical services
Upgrading of library collections and computerization in support of the R & D and related
activities
The above projects and activities constitute the R&D agenda of the Institute in its sustained
effort to contribute to the health and nutritional development of the country’s most valuable
resource - the Filipino citizenry - for a more social and economic empowered Philippines, both
at the local and global arena.
Organizational Chart
(as per E. O. 128)