Document 85544

Living
Grimes
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magazine
Family
2.0
TECHNOLOGY AND
TODAY’S FAMILY
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Grimes Living
SEPTEMBER | 2012
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Grimes Living
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welcome
By Shane Goodman, [email protected]
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expanded website, iowalivingmagazines.com.
Y
We have been providing full and free access to our magazines in a
digital format, complete with the news and advertising that you see in
print each month. This was a helpful tool for those who wanted to share
specific articles with friends and family living outside the community. It was
“scrapbook journalism,” you might say. In addition, we developed formats
so users could view the magazines on tablets and smart phones.
That was all fine and dandy, but we heard your requests loud and clear.
You told us how you enjoyed receiving your magazine each month, but
you also wanted access to stories from nearby communities for free, too.
You wanted information like obituaries for free. You wanted an expanded
community calendar for free. You wanted to be able to view photos from
events the next day, and you wanted an easier way to submit your own
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news and information with access to free Web exclusives. And you wanted
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You got it.
We are pleased to unveil the all new iowalivingmagazines.com, and we
look forward to continuing to serve you for free in print, online, on your
phones/tablets and in ways still yet unimaginable.
Regardless of how you view this magazine, I appreciate you taking the
time to do it. So, as always, thanks for reading. Q
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515-953-4822 ext. 304
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Grimes Living
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On the cover: Colin, Callie, Mikayla and Anita Schroeder. Photo by Todd Rullestad.
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Shane Goodman
Darren Tromblay
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ADDRESS: 414 61st Street Des Moines, Iowa 50312
PHONE: 515.953.4822
EDITORIAL: ext.304
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CONTRIBUTORS:
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DISTRIBUTION:
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Lindsey Woody
Circulation and readership
audited by
Grimes Living magazine is a monthly publication of Big Green Umbrella Media, Inc., an Iowa corporation. Nothing may be reprinted in whole or in
part without permission of the publisher. Grimes Living magazine is mailed free of charge to every household and business in the 50111 zip code.
Others may subscribe for $18 annually. Copies of past issues, as available, may be purchased for $3 each (plus shipping if required). Grimes Living
is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters and photos received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print
letters in condensed form.
Submit story ideas to [email protected]
Photo by Todd Rullestad
feature
Family 2.0
Anita and Darrin Schroeder and their
kids — Colin, 17, Callie, 13, and
Mikayla, 19 — are self-proclaimed TV
buffs. Sometimes technology can be
used in their family as designated
family time when they all catch on
their favorite shows together.
TECHNOLOGY AND TODAY’S FAMILY
By Ashley Rullestad
F
rom cell phone to iPods, technology isn’t
just here to stay — it’s an integral part of
most people’s everyday lives.
While some argue that technology has
afforded us an improved lifestyle, others say
it’s taken away from family life and is ruining
people’s ability to communicate and socialize
without handheld gadgets. For kids growing
up in the information age, speedy technological updates are all they’ve ever known —
something older generations might struggle
with. Read on to see how Grimes families use
technology and how they feel it’s had an affect
on their lives, for better or for worse.
Staying safe
This year Dallas Center-Grimes students will
get an up-close-and-personal experience with
technology, as each eighth-grade student at
the middle school will be assigned a laptop to
use throughout the year. Principal Lori Phillips
says she hears the same two questions from
parents regarding the new program: How
is my student going to take care of a laptop
when she loses her cell phone almost daily?
How can I keep my student safe online?
Anita Schroeder is mom to three kids.
Callie is in eighth grade, Colin is a senior, and
Mikayla is a sophomore in college. She says
while she knows that safety is an important
issue, they’ve taken steps to keep their kids
safe online. They never open an email unless
they know who it’s from. They only are able
to friend people on Facebook who they have
relationships with already.
“There is too much out there, and no one
needs to know everything about you unless
you already know them,” Scroeder says. “I
realized not too long ago that they had their
profiles public, and I had them all change them
to private.”
If there’s a news story pertaining to
online safety, Schroeder uses it as a teaching
moment to show her kids that the threat is
real. But, overall, she hasn’t been too worried
because they know their limits and stick to
them.
Sue Bravard also is mom to three —
eighth-grader Jared, junior Emma, and college
sophomore Celia — and she says she ultimately trusts her kids to be making the right
decisions.
When they first got their computer at
home, they kept it in a public, high-traffic
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/grimes
SEPTEMBER | 2012
Grimes Living
5
Submit story ideas to [email protected]
location in the house. Now she says the girls
have their own email and other accounts, and
she only checks on things periodically because
they’ve already set the expectation that things
will be used appropriately.
“We haven’t had to really limit things
because our kids know they have to use them
appropriately,” Bravard says. “When they
were little, we didn’t really limit TV either,
because then it didn’t become something big
or important. It wasn’t how we did life. It was
there, but it wasn’t the biggest thing in their
lives.”
Marsha Bender says her kids got a firsthand lesson in Internet safety when someone
they knew was involved in a police sting. Her
kids — eighth-grader Allie and junior Madeline
— learned that Internet dangers were real.
“It was a good teaching moment for our
children,” she says. “When you’re on a computer, you’re not always talking to who you
think it is. We work hard at not trying to be
too restrictive.
“They have Facebook accounts, and they
don’t friend anyone other than their real
friends or family. It has to be people you
know.”
Photo by Todd Rullestad
feature
Sue Bravard and her
husband, Matt, with
their kids Emma, 16,
Celia, 18,
and Jared, 13, say one
way they limit
technology is having
designated “unplugged”
time during family
dinners.
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Grimes Living
SEPTEMBER | 2012
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Submit story ideas to [email protected]
Photo by Todd Rullestad
feature
Marsha Boender and
daughters Madeline, 16,
and Allie, 13, embrace
technology, but it hasn’t
taken over their lives.
Too much tech?
Though we’ve heard the stories of teenage girls, particularly,
sending thousands of text messages or sitting and texting a
friend who is sitting right next
to them, the families we talked
to said it hasn’t been like that
for them. While their families
have embraced technology, from
Kindles to laptops and iPads and
more, they aren’t on them constantly either.
“They see it as a tool, and we
Looking for more
do, too, but it’s not like the only
thing that exists,” Bravard says.
“My daughters are big Pinterest
people, but they’re not on there
an enormous amount of time.
Jared has an itouch and plays
games, but they’ve done a good
job with being able to understand
it’s a tool. It’s not how we do
life.”
Bravard said their oldest
received a cell phone in later
middle school, and Jared ended
up getting one a bit before that
Living?
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More of everything you are looking for from your community and beyond.
You enjoy receiving your local Iowa Living magazine in your mailbox each month. Now you can access news
and information from all of our 23 Iowa Living magazines at one convenient site. You will find community
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SEPTEMBER | 2012
Grimes Living
7
feature
Submit story ideas to [email protected]
since their contract was coming due. They find
it convenient to be able to easily stay in touch,
but the kids don’t live on their phones either.
Schroeder says they’ve had to place some
limits on her son’s video game playing when he
first started, but now they’re less concerned
about it so long as he’s still getting his work
done. In some ways, Schroeder says it’s a bit
of a plus having him home playing games where
she knows where he is and what he’s doing.
“My son thinks the X-box gives him
good hand-eye coordination and helps him in
sports,” laughs Schroeder.
All the families also agreed that it was
important to set aside some non-tech time,
or at least some time when the family could
hang out together. It can be a challenge even
for the parents — with a smart phone, it’s
tempting to take a quick second to see who
the latest email is from.
“I’m bad about it, too,” admits Schroeder.
“I will keep up on my emails on my phone
because then I don’t have to sit behind the
computer for a long period of time, and it
drives my husband nuts. In fact the other night
we were going out to dinner, and I forgot my
phone, and he said, ‘Oh, so I might get your
full attention tonight.’ ”
Bravard says their family has always had
a “no phones at the dinner table” rule. This
applies to their land line and also now to
everyone’s cell phones.
“We make an attempt to eat dinner
together every night, so we use our phones as
a way to keep in touch during the day but not
as a substitute for face-to-face interaction,”
she says. “It helps with logistics, but we don’t
center out life around those things. It’s just
the way we’ve always done it, so the kids just
integrate the new tech in with that.”
For the Schroeders, sometimes technology can be used as a bonding tool as well.
Each member of the family is a big TV buff,
and they have certain shows that they all sit
down and watch together. It’s really hard
for them all to be together at the same time
for dinner with different sports and activities
schedules, but they do try to set aside some
time later in the evening to hang out.
Boender says her girls are also busy —
one with music and other activities and the
other with sports — and those things keep
them active and off their devices.
Walking the line
When it comes to technology, most every-
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Grimes Living SEPTEMBER | 2012
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/grimes
one agreed that it’s mostly good and that
it’s definitely here to stay. So setting limits
and figuring out what works for your family
is the best way to approach things. Only you
can determine what you’re comfortable with,
what your kids are ready for, and what you’ll
ultimately allow.
For Boender, the biggest thing is just being
involved. Know what your kids are doing.
Make sure no one is camped out in his or her
room for hours and hours at a time. Keep
electronics in a public area, and for handheld
devices, check them out every once in a while.
“I tell all parents they don’t have privacy
anymore,” says Phillips. “You have to know
their passwords and be checking.”
Bravard says ultimately you have to trust
your kids — and figure out what you will do
if they do abuse their privileges.
“I don’t even go online and check on
them often because I expect them to tell
me things,” she says. “We don’t sneak up on
them. We set expectations up front. If they’d
go against that, there would be a consequence
and they know that. If you take the hard way,
then we will take away a privilege that is very
important to you. Luckily we haven’t had an
issue.” Q
chiropractic Q&A
Q: Does scoliosis mean surgery?
A: Your child receives a diagnosis of scoliosis after a routine exam.
Naturally you’re concerned — what parent wouldn’t be? But does a
scoliosis diagnosis always mean spinal fusion surgery is the only option?
The initial treatment of scoliosis usually focuses on preventing the
curve from becoming worse. At this stage, bracing is often the first-line
of traditional treatment. If the scoliosis has already progressed beyond a
45° - 50° curve in the spine, a medical doctor will generally recommend
spinal fusion. This surgery involves the placement of steel rods, hooks
and screws to mechanically straighten the spine; these are then covered
with bone fragments that fuse together with the spine.
This surgery has risks and complications. They include bowel problems,
infection, neurological complications, collapsed lung, back pain and broken
rods. These are sometimes handled with medication or still more surgeries.
In recent years, chiropractic research studies have shown great
promise with scoliosis, particularly in children. Post-chiropractic X-rays,
when compared to pre-chiropractic X-rays, often demonstrate a reduction in the degree of curvature after 12 weeks of chiropractic care, so
surgery is no longer appropriate.
Many adults and children are becoming increasingly aware of alternatives to the traditional medical treatment of this condition and for good
reason… the risks often do not outweigh the benefits.
If you or a loved one is concerned about scoliosis, or needs to be
examined to determine whether scoliosis is present, please speak to us
at your next visit. Q
Information provided by Zortman & Kleckner Chiropractic, 250 S.W. First St.,
Suite D, 986-2233.
Q: Can chiropractic treatments
help control fibromyaglia pain?
A: Fibromyalgia is a common condition characterized by widespread pain
in joints, muscles, tendons and other soft tissues. Some other problems
commonly linked with fibromyalgia include fatigue, morning stiffness,
sleep problems, headaches, numbness in hands and feet, depression and
anxiety. Fibromyalgia can develop on its own or secondary to other musculoskeletal conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus.
Diagnosis of fibromyalgia requires a history of at least 11 of 18 tenderpoint sites. These tender-point sites include fibrous tissue or muscles
of the neck, shoulders, chest, rib cage, lower back, thighs, knees, arms
(elbows) and buttocks. The overwhelming characteristic of fibromyalgia is
long-standing, body-wide pain with defined tender points. Tender points
are distinct from trigger points seen in other pain syndromes. (Unlike
tender points, trigger points can occur in isolation and represent a source
of radiating pain, even in the absence of direct pressure.) Fibromyalgia
pain can mimic the pain experienced by people with various types of
arthritis. The soft-tissue pain of fibromyalgia is described as deep-aching,
radiating, gnawing, shooting or burning and ranges from mild to severe.
Fibromyalgia sufferers tend to waken with body aches and stiffness.
Symptoms include multiple tender areas, sleep disturbances, reduced
exercise tolerance, fatigue, body aches and chronic muscle pain or aching.
Research and experience have found that chiropractic adjustments,
exercise, dietary changes, nutritional enhancement, postural changes,
physical therapies (heat, ice, light massage) and stress management can
improve symptoms. This makes a doctor of chiropractic an excellent
choice for the management of fibromyalgia. Q
Information provided by Williamson Chiropractic, 206 S. Main St., 986-9189.
ZORTMAN & KLECKNER
CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC
Headache
Neck Pain
Numbness & Tingling
Joint Pain
Family Wellness Care
Sports & Exercise Injuries
Work & Auto Injuries
Hours:
M – F 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.
240 S.W. First St.
Grimes, IA 50111
Across the street from
Grimes Library
515-986-2233
www.zkchiro.com
Dr. Jerome J.
Dr. Ethan J.
Zortman
Kleckner
Creating Healthier Lives
WILLIAMSON
FAMILY CHIROPRACTIC
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www.iowalivingmagazines.com/grimes
SEPTEMBER | 2012
Grimes Living
9
health Q&A
Q: What is hay fever, and how Q: Who should get influenza
is it treated?
vaccine?
A: Hay fever is caused by pollen, a common
allergen. Allergens are chemicals that cause
your body to respond with an allergic reaction.
When you are exposed to something you are
allergic to, your body releases chemicals. One
type of chemical that is released is histamine.
The release of histamine causes swelling, itching, sneezing, watering eyes and nose — all the
symptoms of hay fever.
Dr. Dennis Bussey, D.O.
If your symptoms interfere with your life,
consider seeing your family doctor. Your doctor will probably do a physical exam and ask you questions about your
symptoms. Keeping a record of your symptoms over a period of time
can help your doctor determine what triggers your allergies.
Antihistamines help reduce the sneezing, runny nose and itchiness of
allergies. They’re more useful if you use them before you’re exposed to
allergens. Some antihistamines come in pill form and some are nasal sprays.
Decongestants, such as pseudoephedrine and phenylephrine, help
temporarily relieve the stuffy nose of allergies. They are best used only
for a short time.
Nasal steroid sprays reduce the reaction of the nasal tissues to
inhaled allergens. Q
A: It is recommended that all people aged 6
months and older receive the flu vaccination for
the 2012 - 2013 influenza season. It is important
to remember that you must receive either the
flu shot or nasal mist every year in order to be
protected.
This year there is also a third way to be
vaccinated. The FDA has approved an intradermal injection to administer the vaccine. This
Lena Mullins, Pharm. D.
extremely short needle delivers the vaccine just
under the upper layer of the skin, so there is
little to no pain associated with the injection. This option is available to
people aged 18 to 64 years for the 2012 - 13 season.
Some tips to remember going into the influenza season include:
avoid close contact with people who are sick with influenza, stay home
and away from others when you are sick, cover your mouth or nose
with a tissue when you sneeze or sneeze into your elbow, wash your
hands frequently and get your yearly influenza vaccination.
Influenza vaccines are now available, so make sure to visit you physician or Hy-Vee Drugstore to get yours today. Q
Information provided by Grimes Family Physicians, 101 S.E. Destination Drive,
986-4524.
Grimes Medical Campus
Answer provided by Hy-Vee Drugstore, 1541 S.E. Third St., Suite 100, 986-4527.
Grimes Medical Campus
Convenient
DriveThru FLU
SHOTS
GRIMES FAMILY PHYSICIANS
now
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Grimes Family Physicians is excited to
announce that we have expanded to meet
the needs of our growing community.
Dennis L. Bussey, D.O.
We invite you to visit our new location,
conveniently located on the corner of
Highway 44 and Destination Drive.
Meet our Hy-Vee Drugstore team!
Our physicians and staff look forward
to providing you the same, great
individualized care you expect from
us, now with more convenience.
Carin A. Bejarno, A.R.N.P.
Accepting New Patients
If you would like to learn more about
any aspect of our personalized care,
please call 515-986-4524.
Grimes Family Physicians
Seth R. Quam, D.O.
101 SE Destination Drive | Grimes, IA 50111
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Grimes Living
SEPTEMBER | 2012
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/grimes
ALICIA
Celebrating our 20th year serving the Grimes community!
health Q&A
Q: What can I do to reduce
the risk of tooth decay?
Q: Do you recommend a static
or dynamic stretching routine?
A:There are several ways to reduce the risk
of tooth decay. First, you should limit the
consumption of sugary foods and drinks. If you
choose to consume sugary foods or drinks, try
to do so with a meal. Your saliva production
increases during meals and helps to neutralize
acid production. Saliva also helps to rinse food
particles from the mouth.
Another way to reduce the risk of decay
is to limit snacking in between meals. If you Matthew Platt, D.D.S., P.C.
do decide to have a snack during the day try
to choose a nutritious food and try chewing sugarless gum afterwards.
Chewing sugarless gum will increase your saliva production which will
help wash away the food particles and decay-producing acid. Drinking
more water throughout the day can help prevent tooth decay because
of the fluoride content. If you drink bottled water, look at the label to
check for fluoride content.
Finally, brushing twice a day and flossing daily can decrease the risk
of tooth decay. It’s also very important to visit your dental care provider
twice a year for an examination and prophylaxis. Plus, it always fun to
visit the dentist. Q
A: First, we should define both static and dynamic stretching. Static stretching is defined as applying tension to a muscle to theoretically add length to
it. An example would be bending over and touching your toes while holding
the stretch for a set period of time. Dynamic stretching is defined as a type
of sports fitness routine where momentum and active muscular involvement
are used to stretch and the end position is not held like walking lunges.
While your parents and their parents before them may have been
instructed to always sit and stretch before activity, recent research has
shown that dynamic stretching is actually a more effective way to warm
up prior to activity. Static stretching will indeed increase muscle length
over time, but it can also augment joint stability, increasing your chances
of injury during activity. There have also been research statistics stating
that static stretching can result in as much as a 9 percent decrease in
explosiveness and make the muscle weaker in the hour following the
bout of stretching. Dynamic stretching has been shown to increase
your flexibility more effectively prior to activity without the concerns
for loss of explosiveness, muscle weakness or augmenting joint stability.
Performed correctly, dynamic stretching has been shown to drastically
reduce injury rates due to muscle strain/tear.
Please call the Grimes Accelerated Rehabilitation Centers Clinic at
515-986-5190 to schedule a complimentary injury screen to learn what
specific stretches are appropriate for you and your lifestyle. Q
Information provided by Grove & Platt Dental Associates, PLC, 1541 S. Third
St., Suite 300, 986-4001 and American Dental Association.
Grimes Medical Campus
Information provided by Jerod Torey, Accelerated Rehabilitation Centers, 1451
Gateway Circle, Suite 500, 986-5190.
Grimes Medical Campus
Jennifer Grove, D.D.S., P.C.
Mark W. Platt, D.D.S., P.C.
Mathew Platt, D.D.S.
Rachel Reis, D.D.S.
1541 SE 3rd Street, Suite 300
515-986-4001
Fax: 515-986-4037
www.gpdentalassociates.com
(/523-ON4UEAMPMs7EDAMPMs4HU&RIAMPM
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/grimes
SEPTEMBER | 2012
Grimes Living
11
banking
By Wade Lawrence
Don’t miss
Dividends
these home
loan rates! can help fight
15 Year
30 Year
inflation
2.75
3.375
% Rate
% APR
3.08
180 payments of $6.79 per month per thousand
borrowed (does not include taxes or insurance so
paymenys may be greater). APR based on loan
amount of $100,000. Credit qualifications apply.
5% down payment may be required.
RATES & TERMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE
3.56
% Rate
% APR
360 payments of $4.42 per month per thousand
borrowed (does not include taxes or insurance so
paymenys may be greater). APR based on loan
amount of $100,000. Credit qualifications apply.
5% down payment may be required.
RATES & TERMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE
Steve Davis
Chrissy Draper
100 NE Jacob Street
Grimes
515-986-BANK
Member
FDIC
12
www.citystatebank.com
Grimes Living
SEPTEMBER | 2012
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/grimes
Stock risk is lower over time
By Wade Lawrence, City State Bank
s an investor, you may ask
if an allocation to dividend
stocks in your retirement
portfolio will help keep up with
inflation.
Examining stock returns during periods of high inflation may
answer this question. Dividendpaying stocks may offer benefits
such as stability through income
return and inflation protection.
While stock prices tend to be
volatile, dividends may serve as a
stable component of total return
and may provide better inflation
protection compared with bonds,
especially in today’s low interest
rate environment. Between 1974
and 1980 (high inflation period),
the average rate of inflation was
9.3 percent, much higher than
the historical rate of 3 percent.
During this time, bonds yielded 7.9
percent from income, but prices
declined by 2.7 percent, resulting
in a total return of 5.6 percent —
way short of inflation. On the contrary, stocks returned a total of 10
percent: 5.0 percent from dividend
income and 4.8 percent from price
return, outpacing inflation for this
time period. With the risk of rates
staying lower for a longer period,
this can help boost your yield and
A
over all return. This could also
help battle inflationary risks.
Stocks do have risks, but that
risk is lower over time. So if your
time frame allows, then adding
some less volatile dividend stocks
could provide for some needed
income to your current low yielding income portfolio. If I can help
you determine if this would be
suitable for your situation, please
come see me at City State Bank or
call me at (515) 986-2265 to set up
a meeting.
Not FDIC insured, not a bank
deposit or product, not guaranteed by
bank, may lose value and is subject to
investment risk including possible loss
of principal. Q
Information provided by Wade Lawrence, City State Bank, 100 N.E. Jacob St.,
Grimes, 986-2265.
education
Submit story ideas to [email protected]
Meet Jill Pickell
Instructor finds what
goes around, comes
around
news brief
Submit briefs to | [email protected]
Sipp’n™ Sweet Corn launches in Grimes
Sipp’n, a new producer of alcohol specialty spirits in Grimes, is launching its first product; Sipp’n Sweet Corn™. Sipp’n is owned and operated
by Chris and Janet McAninch. Sipp’n Sweet Corn™ is handcrafted and
bottled at the company’s headquarters located at 303 S.E. Second St. in
Grimes. Q
By Maxine Grove
fter working at three different central Iowa school
districts, Jill Pickell knew
where she wanted to plant her
roots.
Pickell grew up in central Iowa and graduated from
Madrid Community High School.
She earned a bachelor’s degree
in elementary education with a
reading endorsement from Iowa
State University in 1989 and
began teaching second grade at
Woodward-Granger Community
Schools. After subbing at W-G,
Perry and Dallas Center-Grimes
for a year, she decided she really
liked the DC-G Schools.
“I worked really hard to get
into DC-G,” she says — 22 years
later at Dallas Center Elementary.
“Fifth grade is my ‘niche.’ I’ve
been teaching this grade since
1991,” Pickell says. “The kids are
just learning what they can do, and
they are not afraid to do it yet.”
Over the years there have
been a lot of changes, a lot of
recurrences.
“Teaching is cyclical; what
goes around comes back around,”
Pickell says. “Technology today
has certainly changed the way
we do things. A major change in
teaching is that it is much more
research based. We spend more
time analyzing data, instruction
strategies. We must be accountable for what’s happening in the
classroom.”
Her favorite subject to teach
was language arts in the beginning,
but her likings have expanded over
time.
“Over the years I’ve grown
to love all subjects,” Pickell says.
“It would be really hard for me to
give up any of the six subjects. It’s
like tying everything together, like
weaving this great big tapestry.”
A
Jill Pickell teaches fifth grade at Dallas
Center Elementary.
Pickell has always had live animals in her classroom.
“I used to have ferrets for
many years,” she says. “I have a
tarantula now, and we are reading
books about them. I believe having
animals here teaches responsibility
— not all kids have pets at home.”
Pickell says she loves to read.
Her day doesn’t start until she’s
read the entire morning newspaper and doesn’t end until she has
worked the New York Times crossword puzzle.
“I like reading aloud to the
class,” she says.” I can use different
voices and try to bring the story
to life. When school is out in the
summer I like reading something
not class related.”
After 22 years at DC-G, Pickell
says she is very satisfied here.
“If I wasn’t having fun here, I
wouldn’t stay,” she says. “We have
an outstanding district. I wanted
to work here because we are on
the cutting edge. After subbing at
some of the other schools I could
see that.”
Now she is receiving graduation invitations from some of her
former students.
“I’m now starting to have the
children of former students. It’s
kind of neat, when it comes full
circle that way,” Pickell says.
When she isn’t teaching,
Pickell enjoys her three grandchildren, plus her Labrador retriever
and four cats.
“They pretty much run the
house,” she says. Q
Suggest
a teacher
for a Grimes Living
education column!
Call Darren Tromblay
at 953-4822, ext 304
or email
[email protected]
Johnston Community School District
The JCSD has the following employment opportunities
Bus Drivers
$16.74/hr., pre-employment drug screen required.
Substitute Bus Drivers
Pre-employment drug screen required.
Visit our web site at www.johnston.k12.ia.us
Click on Human Services – Current Vacancies
5608 Merle Hay Road s 278-0470
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/grimes
SEPTEMBER | 2012
EEOC
Employer
Grimes Living
13
City of Grimes, Iowa
September 2012
Visit Us on the Web
www.grimesiowa.gov
STORMWATER UTILITY
QUESTIONS & ANSWERS
986-3036
CITY OF
How much Revenue will the Proposed Fee Generate?
The proposed fee will generate approximately $320,000 per year for the first
year. The proposed plan includes an inflation adjustment of 5% each year for up
to 5-years. Note that the projected revenue will only fund half of the City’s actual
needs. Portions of the program would not be funded, projects could be delayed, or
the city could incur additional debt
*Public Information Meetings will be held on Sept. 17, 2012 at
6 pm and Sept 18, 2012 at 7:30 am at the Grimes Community
Complex, 410 SE Main Street. A Public Hearing will be held during
the City of Grimes Council Meeting on Sept. 25, 2012 5:30 pm, City
Hall, 101 NE Harvey Street*
Who pays the Stormwater Utility Fees?
Why is a Stormwater Utility Fee Necessary?
New Regulations - In 2005 Federal laws (Clean Drinking Water Act) regulating
stormwater runoff required the City of Grimes to evaluate stormwater management
and develop and implement a comprehensive stormwater quality program to protect
property and improve water quality. Grimes is a Phase 2 city since the storm water
discharges into a metropolitan area (Des Moines) that is required to be permitted
under the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Municipal
Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4). In order to comply with NPDES MS4 Permit
requirements, the City must develop water quality regulations, stormwater quality
monitoring with outfall inspection and sampling, stormwater programs, ordinances,
master planning, watershed management, education, and public outreach.
The City is responsible for providing stormwater management facilities and
services, including installation and maintenance of storm drains, intakes, drainage
channels, as well as ensuring that state programs such as erosion and sediment
control are provided on construction sites and existing sites to protect our waterways.
The City has a desire to minimize localized flooding and improve water quality in
the community. Funding for stormwater management is not provided by federal
or state government for these services. There is NO existing utility fund specifically
for stormwater. The City of Grimes is in debt over $700,000 in related stormwater
management funds since 2005. A Stormwater utility will help pay this existing
debt and provide a consistent funding revenue stream for the Grimes Stormwater
Management Program.
What is the City’s Projected
Stormwater Management Expenses?
In order to repair and maintain existing utilities, expand and improve with new
stormwater projects, enforce regulations, and comply with NPDES MS4 Permit
requirements, the City of Grimes will need approximately $620,000 per year in
today’s dollars. The following is the projected Annual Stormwater Expense Summary:
Floodplain Management
$15,000
EPA Permit Administration
$75,000
Inspection & Maintenance
$80,000
Channel Improvements
$100,000
Capital Improvements
$350,000
Annual Total
$620,000
14
Grimes Living
SEPTEMBER | 2012
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/grimes
Owners of all developed land in the City of Grimes pay Stormwater Utility Fees. This
includes residential properties, commercial properties, industrial properties, schools,
churches, and other non-profit organizations. Undeveloped land (no structures),
agriculture, and vacant properties are not charged stormwater utility fees. Stormwater
Utility Fees are billed monthly currently with water and sewer utility bills.
How is a Stormwater Utility Fee Different that a Tax?
Currently city taxes are used to fund the Stormwater Management Program.
Relying on taxes for stormwater management is not always effective for the
following reasons:
t Assessed property values are not relative to stormwater utility use.
t Tax exempt properties don’t contribute to the program.
t Taxes are variable and can result in underfunding of the program.
t General Fund is shared and stormwater projects may become lower priority.
t State Law does not allow tax increases exclusively for stormwater needs.
A stormwater utility fee is a user fee, similar to a water and sanitary sewer utility
service fee. Users of these services are charged for the demand they place on the
system. A stormwater utility fee has been found to be the most effective tool for
stormwater management funding. Iowa Code Section 384.84 allows for the creation
of a stormwater utility fee for a community.
What if the Stormwater Fee isn’t implemented?
The City of Grimes only existing option for funding stormwater at this time is through
property taxes. As the constraint on City’s budgets becomes tighter and tighter the
question could then become, “What services will be reduced or eliminated in order
to fund the stormwater mandates? As stated before, currently the City’s Storm Water
Fund is $700.000 in debt. This is money that has been borrowed from the General Fund
to temporarily pay for these expenses over the last seven years until another revenue
source can be determined. If indeed the General Fund is required to pay off this debt, as
well as fund this program going forward, the City Council could have to find $420,000
of services to cut back or eliminate annually using the current estimate of obtaining
$320,000 as the existing proposal anticipates plus an additional $100,000 over seven
years to pay off the debt. This would be equivalent to eliminating almost the entire
Fire and Rescue’s budget, or the entire Park’s budget. Eliminating the Library’s budget
wouldn’t even cover these expenses. In the end, if additional revenue sources aren’t
found, existing services will have to be reduced or eliminated.
What other options did the City investigate?
FLAT FEE: The Flat Fee option is a simple fee structure where all properties in the
community pay the same rate for stormwater utilities. No matter the use or size of
the property, all users pay the same monthly fee. A flat fee of $13.84 would generate
$620,000 per year. A flat fee ignores the size of the lot in relation to stormwater
runoff and substantially increases the stormwater fee for residential properties.
BUILDING PERMITS: The City of Grimes has issued 650 building permits for single
family homes over the last 5-yrs for an average of 130 permits per year. In order to
achieve $320,000 in storm water revenue the building permits would have to be
increased by $2,460. This would not be a stable method of revenue. The increase
building permits could burden new construction and slow growth.
LOBBY STATE AGENCIES: The IDNR along with the EPA has required the City
of Grimes to evaluate stormwater management and develop and implement a
comprehensive stormwater quality program to protect property and improve water
quality. The City is lobbying state agencies to change the unfunded mandate and
require the IDNR to take over some or all of these responsibilities over for the city.
These efforts could reduce the City’s stormwater management yearly costs.
What are the Annual Stormwater Expenses?
Stormwater management is essential for minimizing flood damage in the
community and preventing pollution of nearby streams and lakes. The City of Grimes
is continually making efforts with stormwater quality and quantity management by
providing systems for collection, conveyance, detention, treatment, and release of
stormwater. The following activities and annual expenses are necessary to maintain
an adequate stormwater management utility and program for the City.
Floodplain Management ($15,000/year)
The City maintains records for FEMA Flood Insurance Studies (FIS), Flood Insurance Rate
Maps (FIRM), and subsequent map revision data. Recently, more collaboration with
FEMA has been necessary as updated digital floodplain maps are being created for the
State of Iowa. The City also has the responsibility of investigating flooding issues and
addressing public questions and concerns. In addition, the City makes decisions about
floodplain management and enforces requirements for floodplain development.
EPA Permit Administration, ($75,000/year)
The City of Grimes operates a regulated Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System
(MS4) and is required to have a National Pollution Discharge Elimination System
(NPDES) Phase II Permit. The City is also required to develop and implement a
stormwater management program, set measurable goals, and evaluate effectiveness
of stormwater quality improvement efforts. The six minimum control measures of the
program include public education and outreach, public involvement, illicit discharge
detection and elimination, construction site runoff control, post-construction runoff
control, and pollution prevention and good housekeeping.
The City has already developed several important stormwater ordinances to
address water quality and continues to expand the stormwater management
program. There are also ongoing efforts for stormwater masterplanning, watershed
management and protection, City staff training, and public education and outreach.
Each year, there is need for storm outfall inspections, illicit discharge detection, and
stormwater sampling. Inspections at construction sites, monitoring Stormwater
Pollution Prevention Plan practices, and enforcement of City ordinances are also a
necessity. Events for public participation and programs including Adopt a Stream
and Pesticide/Fertilizer Management are other elements that will be implemented
in the near future. Each year, the stormwater management program will require
more effort as it develops. A comprehensive report is submitted annually to the EPA
to show participation and progress with the program.
Inspection & Maintenance ($80,000/year)
The City stormwater system includes storm sewers, culverts, inlets, manholes,
swales, ditches, channels, detention ponds, and other stormwater facilities. Periodic
inspections by the City are necessary to identify locations and types of problems that
may inhibit the proper function of the system. Routine maintenance performed by
the City may include mowing vegetated waterways, removing sediment and debris,
repairing erosion problems, and cleaning or repairing storm sewer structures. The
City also owns a street sweeper that is used to remove dirt and other pollutants from
roadways. The street sweeper is expensive equipment that has annual maintenance
costs and will likely be replaced every 5 years on average.
Channel Improvements ($100,000/year)
The stormwater system in Grimes includes more than 11 miles of urban channels and
streams that collect and convey stormwater away from the City. A recent channel
evaluation study shows that many of these channels are in need of cleaning, repair,
and improvement. Costs for channel repair vary greatly depending on existing site
conditions and severity of problems within the channels. A relatively inexpensive
project at Little Beaver Creek Tributary included repair for 1 mile of channel at a cost
of $250,000. It is estimated that many more channels will need repairs in the future
with total cost exceeding $2.5 M. A 25-year channel improvements plan would
require at least $100,000 per year to fund channel projects.
Capital Improvements ($350,000/year)
Capital improvement projects are necessary for replacement of old or damaged
stormwater infrastructure or expansion of the existing stormwater system. In
general, the capital improvements include new storm sewers, culverts, bridges,
detention ponds, and other stormwater facilities.
Floodplain Management
EPA Permit Administration
Inspection & Maintenance
Channel Improvements
Capital Improvements
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/grimes
$15,000
$75,000
$80,000
$100,000
$350,000
SEPTEMBER | 2012
Grimes Living
15
out & about
Submit photos to [email protected]
2
201
Scott Gustafson and Kar Gustafson at B.I.G. at AmericInn Lodge and Suites on Aug. 23.
SAMPLE THE METRO’S
FINEST MARTINIS
OCT. 5, 2012 5-9 PM
WEST GLEN TOWN CENTER
NEW THIS YEAR!
Ken Wheeler and BobbiJo Wolfe at B.I.G. at AmericInn Lodge and Suites on Aug. 23.
SUMMIT BEER GARDEN
LIVE MUSIC BURNIN’ SENSATIONS 7-11 PM
$
PERSON $
IN ADVANCE
15 PER
20 PER PERSON
DAY OF EVENT
ORDER YOUR TICKETS
ONLINE NOW AT
WWW.DMCITYVIEW.COM
Clint Dudley, Steve Ogden and Adam Nederhoff at B.I.G. at AmericInn Lodge and
Suites on Aug. 23.
SPONSORED BY:
Chris Kenner,owner of Food
Depot, provided the appetizers for
B.I.G. at AmericInn on Aug. 23.
16
Grimes Living
SEPTEMBER | 2012
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/grimes
out & about
Submit photos to [email protected]
Grimes Chamber hosted a ribbon cutting for Meadows Elementary on Sept. 7.
library news
By Grimes Public Library
Create a puppet
Craft day celebrates Jim Henson’s birthday
By library staff
elebrate the late, great puppet master Jim Henson’s
birthday on Saturday, Sept.
22 by making some of your own
homemade puppets — sack puppets, shadow puppets, and sock
puppets.
No registration required is
required. The event starts at 1 p.m.
All ages are welcome. (Caregivers,
please accompany children younger than 5 years old)
Meadows Elementary students at the ribbon cutting for Meadows Elementary School
C
on Sept. 7.
Early Out Adventures
Wednesday, Sept. 26, 1:30pm
School-age kids are invited to
come to the library after school on
early dismissal days for fun activities. No registration is required.
Join us for bingo today.
Youth Book Club
Thursday, Oct. 4, 4:30 p.m.
Students in grades 5 and up are
welcome to come and discuss
what they’re currently reading.
Grimes Chamber of Commerce hosted a ribbon cutting for Verizon
Wireless on Aug. 21.
Tail Waggin’ Readers
Saturday, Oct. 6, 9 - 11 a.m.
Improve your reading skills and
make a new friend by reading
aloud to a therapy dog. Students
in grades 2 - 4 may sign up for a
20-minute time slot to read to a
therapy dog partner. Please call
the library to register, 986-3551.
Craft Day - Painting Pumpkins
Saturday, Oct. 6, 1 p.m.
Join us to paint ceramic pumpkins.
All ages welcome. (Caregivers
please, accompany children younger than 5 years old.) No registraJanelle Schlosser presented Jerry Marckres, owner of Verizon Wireless ,with a plaque
tion is required.
from the Chamber of Commence on Aug. 21.
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/grimes
Bookclub
Monday, Oct. 8, 7 p.m.
Pick up a copy of this month’s
book at the circulation desk and
join us at 7 p.m.
Grimes Public Library
200 N. James St.
986-3551
Hours:
Mon. - Thur. 9 a.m. - 9 p.m.
Fri. 9 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Sat. 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Sun. 1 - 4 p.m.
Early Out Adventures
Wednesday, Oct. 10, 1:30 p.m.
School-age kids are invited to
come to the library after school on
early dismissal days for fun activities. No registration is required.
Youth Writing Club
Thursday, Oct. 11, 4:30 p.m.
Decorate a journal to keep your
work in and bring any past work you
want to share for grades 5 and up.
Bingo for adults
Thursday, Oct. 18, 2 p.m.
Come for the game, meet new
friends, and have some fun. Every
third Thursday of the month.
Ongoing events
Toddler Time
Tuesday, Wednesdays, 9:30 a.m.
Toddlers 18 months to 3 years old
and a caregiver are invited to join
us as we introduce literacy and a
love of books through storytelling, rhymes, songs and crafts. No
registration required.
SEPTEMBER | 2012
Grimes Living
17
calendar
Submit event information to [email protected]
Friday, Sept. 21
Sunday, Sept. 23
Q Friday Story Time, Grimes Public
Library, 10 a.m.
Q Bridge Program, Grimes
Community Complex, 12- 3 p.m.
Q Dallas Center Farmers’ Market,
Mound Park, 4- 7 p.m.
Q DCG Homecoming parade and
coronation, 2 p.m.
Q 9/V football vs. Knoxville,
Homecoming game, 4:45/ 7:30 p.m.
Q Family Open Gym, Grimes
Community Complex Gym, 12- 3 p.m.
Q Grimes Park and Rec Volleyball
Camp, North Ridge Elementary,
1- 4 p.m.
404 S.E. Second St., 9- 11 a.m.
Q Toddler Time, Grimes Public
Library, 9:30 a.m.
Q Preschool Story Time, Grimes
Public Library, 10/10:45 a.m.
Q Early Out Adventures, Grimes
Public Library, 1:30 p.m.
Q V Volleyball at Nevada, 8:30 a.m.
Q Family Open Gym, Grimes
Community Complex Gym, 12- 3 p.m.
Q Homemade Puppets Craft Day,
Grimes Public Library, 1- 2 p.m.
Q Homecoming Dance, 8- 11 p.m.
Q Family Open Gym, Grimes
Community Complex Gym, 12- 3 p.m.
Q Grimes Park and Rec Volleyball
Camp, North Ridge Elementary Gym,
1- 4 p.m.
Monday, Sept. 24
Monday, Oct. 1
Q Card and Board Games, Grimes
Public Library, 4:30- 6 p.m.
Q V XC Invitational at Nevada, 5 p.m.
Q JV Football at Knoxville, 6 p.m.
Q 9/JV Volleyball vs. Ankeny, 5:30 p.m.
Q JV Football vs. Newton, 6 p.m.
Q DNR Hunter Education Class,
Grimes Community Complex, $5,
6-9 p.m.
Q Zumba Fitness Class, Oct. 1st
and 8th, $60 for twice a week or
$7 drop-in fee per class, Grimes
Community Complex Gym, Register
online, 6- 7 p.m.
Q FOFA Meeting, HS Vocal Room,
7 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 25
Saturday, Sept. 22
Sunday, Sept. 30
Q Toddler Time, Grimes Public
Library, 9:30 a.m.
Q Preschool Story Time, Grimes
Public Library, 10 a.m.
Q Baby Lapsit, Grimes Public
Library, 11 a.m.
Q Video Gaming, grades 5 and up,
Grimes Public Library, 4:30 - 6:15 p.m.
Q Grimes Christian Mens Group,
Grimes Community Center, 6:30 8:30 p.m.
Q 9/JV Volleyball at Bondurant,
5:30 p.m.
Q V Volleyball at Bondurant, 7 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 27
Q Bricks for Kidz, Grimes
Community Complex Meeting Room,
4:30- 5:30 p.m.
Q V XC Invitational at Perry, 5 p.m.
Q 9/JV Volleyball vs. Perry, 5:30 p.m.
Q Evening Story Time, Grimes
Public Library, 6:30- 7 p.m.
Q V Volleyball vs. Perry, 7 p.m.
Friday, Sept. 28
Wednesday, Sept.26
Q DCG Schools Dismiss 1 p.m.
Q Coffee, Cookies & Conversation,
Grimes Volunteer Support Services,
Q HS Recognition Rally, 9:40 a.m.
Q Friday Story Time, Grimes Public
Library, 10 a.m.
Q Bridge Program, Grimes
Community Complex, 12- 3 p.m.
Q Dallas Center Farmers’ Market,
Mound Park, 4- 7 p.m.
Q 9 Football at Newton, 4:45 p.m.
Q V Football at Newton, 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 2
Q
Q
9/JV Volleyball vs. Adel, 5:30 p.m.
V Volleyball vs. Adel, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 3
Saturday, Sept. 29
Q Urbandale Marching Band
Q V Volleyball tournament at
Urbandale, 8:30 a.m.
Q Family Open Gym, Grimes
Community Complex Gym, 12- 3 p.m.
18
Grimes Living
SEPTEMBER | 2012
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/grimes
Q Coffee, Cookies & Conversation,
Grimes Volunteer Support Services,
404 S.E. Second St., 9- 11 a.m.
Q DNR Hunter Education Class,
Grimes Community Complex, $5,
6 - 9 p.m.
calendar
Submit event information to [email protected]
Thursday, Oct. 4
Q V XC Inviataional at Atlantic,
4:30 p.m.
Q 9/JV Volleyball at Norwalk,
5:30 p.m.
Q V Volleyball at Norwalk, 7 p.m.
Q 9 Football at Waukee, 7:15 p.m.
Community Complex Gym, 12- 3 p.m.
Q Painting Pumpkins Craft Day,
Grimes Public Library, 1- 2 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 7
Q Family Open Gym, Grimes
Community Complex Gym, 12- 3 p.m.
Q Grimes Park and Rec Volleyball
Camp
Friday, Oct. 12
Monday, Oct. 15
Q Grimes Chamber Lunch and
Learn ft. Suku Radia.
Q Bridge Program, Grimes
Community Complex, 12- 3 p.m.
Q Dallas Center Farmers’ Market,
Mound Park, 4- 7 p.m.
Q Band Night at HS Football Game
Q 9 Football vs. Ballard, 4:45 p.m.
Q V Football vs. Ballard, 7:30 p.m.
Q
Q
Q
Monday, Oct. 8
9/JV Volleyball at Ballard, 5:30 p.m.
JV Football at Ballard, 6 p.m.
V Volleyball at Ballard, 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 16
Q
Q
9/JV Volleyball vs. Carlisle, 5:30 p.m.
V Volleyball vs. Carlisle, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 17
Q Zumba Fitness Class, Oct. 1 and
8, $60 for twice a week or $7 dropin fee per class, Grimes Community
Complex Gym, Register online,
6 - 7 p.m.
Q V XC RRC Meet at Adel, 4:30 p.m.
Q PSAT Test
Q Coffee, Cookies & Conversation,
Grimes Volunteer Support Services,
404 S.E. Second St., 9- 11 a.m.
Thursday, Oct. 18
Tuesday, Oct. 9
Friday, Oct. 5
Q Bridge Program, Grimes
Community Complex, noon - 3 p.m.
Q Dallas Center Farmers’ Market,
Mound Park, 4- 7 p.m.
Q 9 Football at Saydel, 4:45 p.m.
Q V Football at Saydel, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 6
Q Valleyfest Marching Band
Competition
Q Family Open Gym, Grimes
Q
Q Grimes Park and Rec Volleyball
Camp, North Ridge Elementary Gym,
5:30- 7 p.m.
Q V Girls Swimming at Summit
Middle School, 5:30 p.m.
Q 9/JV Volleyball vs. Winterset,
5:30 p.m.
Q V Volleyball vs. Winterset, 7 p.m.
V XC Regional Meet, 4 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 13 Friday, Oct. 19
Q State Marching Band Contest
Q Family Open Gym, Grimes
Community Complex Gym, 12- 3 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 14
Wednesday, Oct. 10
Q Coffee, Cookies & Conversation,
Grimes Volunteer Support Services,
404 S.E. Second St., 9- 11 a.m.
Q DCG Schools dismiss 1 p.m.
Q Family Open Gym, Grimes
Community Complex Gym, 12- 3 p.m
Q Grimes Park and Rec Volleyball
Camp, North Ridge Elementary Gym,
1- 4 p.m..
Q No School DCG- Teacher Workday
Q Bridge Program, Grimes
Community Complex, 12- 3 p.m.
Q Dallas Center Farmers’ Market,
Mound Park, 4- 7 p.m.
Q 9/V Football at Boone, 4:45/ 7 p.m.
It’s free!
Submit calendar items for
your school, church, business,
organization or family to
[email protected]
Wellness WORKSHOP
Join me every month to discuss different health topics.
Natural Solutions to ADD/ADHD
Wednesday, Sept. 19th
6:30 p.m.
FREE - Reserve a seat today!
(515) 986-9091
(Next to Talking Heads Salon on Hwy. 141)
www.backtohealthchirogrimes.com
Holly Davis, D.C.
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/grimes
SEPTEMBER | 2012
Grimes Living
19
recipe
Dr. Tracy’s
Counseling
Services
20 years of experience
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USFBUNFOUJOPSEFSUPIFMQUIFNDPNCBUUIFBEEJDUJPO
Specializing in the treatment of:
Anxiety and Depression ~ Addictions
5SBVNBand(SJFG_(FOFSBM$PQJOH*TTVFT
4UBUFBQQSPWFEUPQSPWJEF08*BTTFTTNFOUT
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'BNJMZ*OUFSWFOUJPOT_$PVQMF$PVOTFMJOH
8PNFOT*TTVFT_8PSLQMBDF4USFTT
Most insurance accepted.
215 SE Main Street t(SJNFT
515-490-1921
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20
Grimes Living
SEPTEMBER | 2012
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/grimes
Submit ideas to [email protected]
Nutella cookies
Recipe was entered in Iowa State Fair
By Beth McDonald
he Iowa State Fair just
wrapped up, and I hoped
to be sharing with you a
blue ribbon cookie recipe, but
unfortunately my recipe did not
win this year.
I am going to share my recipe
anyway because my family and
everyone else who tried these
cookies before I submitted them
to the fair loved them.
If you have not entered anything into the state fair or any food contest, it is nerve wracking. I spent
six months trying to perfect my cookie recipe, making several different
versions of it. One of the biggest challenges was reviewing the classes
and reviewing all the rules for the food contests. What should have
been the easiest thing to prep for the contest was the most challenging
— finding white small plastic plates to display the cookies. I had to go
several places before I found white plastic plates. Once at the fair, turning in the cookies is a little scary, too. There were several people ahead
of me in line turning in their canned items, and they all seemed to know
each other and exactly what to do.
The last thing I wanted to do was upset a potential judge. Once it
was my turn, I got a couple of “Oh, those look good,” and I left thinking
those are winners. Oh well, there is always next year. I hope you enjoy
these cookies and consider entering something into the fair next year. Q
T
Nutella cookies
Ingredients
1 c. lard
1 c. packed brown sugar
1 c. granulated sugar
3/4 c. Nutella
2 eggs, beaten
2 ½ c. all-purpose flour
1 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. amaretto
Directions
1. Cream together lard and sugars.
Add Nutella and eggs.
2. Sift together flour, baking soda
and salt. Add to creamed mixture;
stir in amaretto.
3. Form into balls and roll in sugar.
Place on ungreased baking sheets.
4. Bake in 350º oven 12 to 15
minutes.
Beth McDonald is a wife and mother and works full time in Des Moines.
legal briefs
By Joseph Wallace
CELEBRATING
Full disclosure
Seller must tell buyer about home’s problems
By Joseph Wallace, attorney, Abendroth and Russell Law Firm
ost residential real estate
sales are accomplished
smoothly.
However,
sometimes the closing of the transaction is the beginning of problems.
The leading cause of postsale disputes and litigation is
alleged non-disclosure of defects.
No house is perfect, but when a
new buyer finds water damage, a
cracked foundation or a leaking
basement, the first instinct is often
to blame the seller.
Any agreement for the sale
of real estate must be in writing. The statute of limitations for
suits brought for the breach of a
written contract is 10 years. This
means that the seller has a decade
of potential liability for failing to
disclose defects when selling property. Thankfully, most disputes can
be avoided if proper disclosures
are made.
Iowa Code Chapter 558A
requires the seller of real estate to
complete a written disclosure statement. This is true even if the seller
is attempting to sell the property in
“as-is” condition or if the seller may
not be familiar with the house (such
as a sale from an estate).
The seller has an obligation
to disclose known material facts
about defects or other adverse
conditions. A material fact is anything that could affect the sale
price or influence a buyer’s decision to purchase a home. This is
a very subjective standard that is
weighted in favor of the buyer.
The seller also has an obligation to conduct a reasonable
investigation when completing the
disclosure statement. In the event
of litigation, sellers will be held
responsible for defects that they
M
25
YEARS
EXPERIENCED
ATTORNEYS
SINCE 1987
knew about and didn’t disclose
or which they should have known
about if they had conducted a
reasonable investigation. Take the
time to inspect the property.
Homebuyers are becoming
increasingly concerned about environmental hazards and toxic materials in houses, especially in older
homes. Common toxic substances
include lead paint, asbestos, formaldehyde insulation and glues, carbon monoxide and radon gases.
More buyers are requesting tests
and may expect the seller to correct the problem or offer a lower
price to cover the cost of removing toxic substances.
Full disclosure of a home’s history is always the right thing to do.
A fact that is material to one buyer
may not concern another. If you
are wondering whether something
should be disclosed, consult your
realtor or a real estate attorney.
Ask yourself if you would want to
have the information if you were
the buyer. If the answer is “yes,”
then disclose. Q
Information provided by Joseph Wallace, attorney for Abendroth and Russell
Law Firm, 2560 73rd St., Urbandale, 278-0623, www.ARPCLaw.com.
Top Row:
Joe Wallace, Thomas Sherzan
Bottom Row:
Mark Abendroth, Dave Russell, Ross Barnett, Chris Low
Wills and Trusts
Estate Planning
Probate
Powers of Attorney
Real Estate Transactions
Small Business
Representation
Abendroth
and Russell
Law Firm
2560 - 73rd Street Des Moines
515.278.0623
www.ARPCLaw.com
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/grimes
SEPTEMBER | 2012
Grimes Living
21
what’s in your garage?
– Matt Hidlebaugh, Owner –
We also restore classic cars!
32 YEARS
EXPERIENCE
Senior Citizen and
Student discounts!
Jared McLaren mows his lawn in 15 minutes with his dad’s old John Deere.
We will bring back years to your car
or just get it back to the place it was meant to be!
1001 N. Main Street 3UITE$s'RIMES
515-986-3174 Fax: 515-986-2031
We work with all insurance companies!
Mon. - Fri. 8am to 6pm s Sat. 8am to Noons Other hours by appointment
What’s In
Your
Garage?
To suggest a garage, call Darren Tromblay
at 953-4822, ext 304
or email [email protected]
22
Grimes Living
SEPTEMBER | 2012
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/grimes
Overkill
McLaren tackles small lawn with big John Deere
By Dave Mable
ared McLaren grew up on his
family’s farm in the small southwest Iowa town of Farragut.
Driving tractors was part of daily
life for him and his family, who
farm a large number of acres of
corn and soybeans.
After landing a job as a computer security engineer at Wellmark,
McLaren now measures his land
in square feet, not acres. In 2003,
he moved into a modern Grimes
home with 10,000 square feet of
land, less than a quarter of an acre.
About the same time, his dad
purchased a new tractor to tend
the yard at the farm and found that
the old tractor, a 1993 John Deere
425, was worth less on the tradein market than he wanted to let it
go for, so he offered it to his son
with the new house.
“I call it ‘Overkill,’ ” says
McLaren. “The first time I took it
out, the neighbors were peering
out their windows at me, wondering what I needed such a big lawn
mower for with such a small yard.”
The John Deere 425 is a 25
horsepower tractor with a 54-inch
J
hydraulic mowing deck, much
more than a 10,000-square-foot
yard needs. Most neighbors mow
with a small push mower, according to McLaren. His family is used
to owning and operating large
equipment. After the floods that
ravaged southwest Iowa in 1998,
his family bought an excavator
to repair the levys along the East
Nishnabotna River themselves.
“I feel like a bit of a fool with
such a large mower,” McLaren
says. “But I’m done in 15 minutes.
I didn’t know many families in my
neighborhood, but as I began to
meet them, they would describe
me as ‘the guy with the lawn
mower.’ ”
Far from lazy, McLaren participates in triathlons and bike races
and is currently preparing for a fall
marathon in Germany.
“A friend who lives a block
away once told me ‘For years, we
thought you were some lazy guy,
but then discovered that you finish
your lawn in 15 minutes and go
out for a 75-mile bike ride,’ ” he
says. Q
Contact Darren at 953-4822 ext. 304 or [email protected] to recommend someone for an upcoming issue of “What’s In Your Garage?”
faith
Submit story ideas to [email protected]
FREE HAIRCUTS
to single moms, widows, spouses
of deployed military personnel and
unemployed persons/families!
Sunday, Sept. 0 ‡ 9am-pm
59 2st St. ‡ Urbandale
Children learn about their faith at local Sunday school classes.
You MUST call 515-276-6089
for an appointment for a haircut
by Wednesday, September 26th at noon.
Without shame timberline church
Area churches offer Sunday school and more
By Dave Mable
eptember marks the beginning of the Sunday school
and youth programs at many
churches. We’ve listed a sampling
of Grimes area churches and a
brief description of youth programs
offered during the school year.
Maranatha Baptist Church,
877 S.E. 19th St. Sunday school is
offered at 9:30 a.m. prior to the
regular 10:45 a.m. Sunday worship
service. Maranatha offers familyfriendly Biblically-based education
for every age group, from newborn to adult. ANAWA (Approved
Workmen Are Not Ashamed) is a
weekly Bible club for school-aged
children that meets on Wednesday
evenings from 6:45 - 8:15 p.m.
Information can be found at www.
maranathabaptist.org or by calling
515-986-9202.
First Presbyterian Church
of Grimes, 410 S. Third St. offers
Sunday school for school-aged children during the 9:15 a.m. worship
service. A nursery is available at
that time as well. Adult Sunday
school follows a post-service fellowship and begins at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday school programs do not
meet on the first Sunday of the
month when Communion is served
at the worship service. For information on Sunday school and
monthly youth group programs,
call 515-986-3720 or view the
latest monthly bulletin at www.
S
grimesfirstprebyterianchurch.org.
St. Peter Lutheran Church,
1001 S. James St. On Sundays, the
3-year-old through second grade
children meet for music from 9:15
to 9:30 a.m. in the church sanctuary, then have lessons in individual
classrooms. The older elementary
children meet in classrooms first,
from 9:15 to 10 a.m. followed by
music in the sanctuary until 10:15.
Elementary students will be following the Spark program. Lessons,
taken from both the Old and New
Testament are taught through art,
music, games and science, which
helps accommodate the different
ways that children learn.
WORSHIP TIMES Sundays – 8:15am & 10:15am
Children & Student Ministries Sundays – 8:35am &10:35am
59 2st st ‡ urbandale ‡ 276.6089
Corner of Meredith and
121st St in western Urbandale
Visit our web site for more info!
www.timberlineonline.org
Spread the Word
Have an upcoming event or
church news you would like to
announce? Send information to
[email protected]
A youth group for junior and
senior high students meets weekly
throughout the school year. Fall
activities for youth include the
Fall Outreach in October, which
is a free labor of love and service to Grimes residents who
need some help, such as raking
leaves or cleaning windows. For
information, call the church at
515-986-3077 or click on www.
stpeterofgrimes.org. Q
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/grimes
SEPTEMBER | 2012
Grimes Living
23
chamber news
THE
POWER
TO ACHIEVE ENERGY
EFFICIENCY AT HOME
Grimes Chamber, 986-5770
I dare you
to teach me
You don’t know what you don’t know
By Clint Dudley, GCED Boad president
MidAmerican Energy Company puts the power of energy
efficiency to work for our residential customers. Through our
EnergyAdvantage® programs, the cost of becoming energy
efficient is more affordable. MidAmerican Energy provides
rebates on approved residential equipment such as furnaces,
air conditioners and water heaters. MidAmerican Energy can
help you save some green through greater energy efficiency.
Contact us to learn more about EnergyAdvantage programs.
800-894-9599
www.MIDAMERICANENERGY.com
Thanks
to all of our sponsors and golfers
for making our Grimes Chamber Golf Outing
a huge success!
A BIG “THANK YOU”
TO OUR TITLE SPONSOR:
and
for hosting our
Golf Outing!
e all know someone
who practically wears
that on a T-shirt. The
guy who has it all figured out and
doesn’t need it explained.
If you don’t know someone
like this, I’m sorry… it means you
are probably that person. These
people simply don’t want to hear
what you have to say. However,
let’s not confuse expressing opinions with education. Opinions are
like belly buttons. Education is
more like a box of tools. Anyway,
that’s just what I think…
You don’t know what you
don’t know. I see this in every
“Ladies Night Out” class we teach
at Shade Tree Auto. People who
have been getting their vehicles
serviced for years, or have been
through an accident, or think that
they understand their insurance.
By the end of the night, everyone
walks away with valuable information. The tricky part is convincing
people that the class is worth
their time. Offering free wine and
food from Görtz Haus Gallery and
Bistro usually helps.
“The only true wisdom is in
knowing you know nothing.” Yes,
I just quoted Socrates, but in the
spirit of the article, I didn’t realize
he was the original author. During
the last few months I have been
the attendee at meetings, classes
W
and events I normally wouldn’t
have been involved in, had it not
been for the Grimes Chamber
and Economic Development. Most
of these events had changed my
opinion on certain topics; all of
them left me with a better sense
of understanding and an opportunity to meet other people who
are passionate about what they
do. In the near future, there will
be opportunities to become more
informed on expansion projects,
changes in federal policies that
affect the community and new
businesses that improve our local
options. Feel free to learn more
about these topics on your own,
but if it helps, I can dare you. Q
Opinions are like belly buttons.
Check out our Facebook
page for the full listing
of sponsors
Education is more like a box of tools.
www.grimesiowa.com
24
Grimes Living
SEPTEMBER | 2012
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/grimes
out & about
Submit your photos and captions to [email protected]
Brett Barber and Kim Staker at the ribbon cutting
for Meadows Elementary School on Sept. 7.
Dini Anderlik and Tom Wengert at the ribbon
cutting forMeadows Elementary School on Sept. 7.
Janell Schlosser and Cara Gregory at the ribbon
cutting for Meadows Elementary School on Sept. 7.
Scott Grimes addresses the crowd at the ribbon
cutting for Meadows Elementary School on Sept. 7.
Nick Cretors shares his thoughts about the new
Meadows Elementary School on Sept. 7.
Sydney Rants shares her thoughts about the new
Meadows Elementary school on Sept. 7.
Principal Lori Phillips addresses the crowd at the
ribbon cutting for Meadows Elementary on Sept. 7.
Mayor Tom Armstrong addresses the crowd at the
ribbon cutting for Meadows Elementary on Sept. 7.
Clint Dudley addresses the crowd at the ribbon
cutting for Meadows Elementary on Sept. 7.
Janell Schlosser and Ryan Rivera at the ribbon
cutting for Meadows Elementary School on Sept 7.
Janine Seibert and Jill Altringer at B.I.G. at
AmericInn Lodge and Suites on Aug. 23.
Brian Buethe and Jay Brewer at B.I.G. at AmericInn
Lodge and Suites on Aug. 23.
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/grimes
SEPTEMBER | 2012
Grimes Living
25
classifieds
To place an ad, call 515-953-4822, ext. 302
REACH
2
MILLION
HOUSEHOLDS! Do you have a
product, service, or business that
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you to reach these potential customers quickly and inexpensively. For
more information concerning a creative classified ad call this publication
or Midwest Free Community Papers
at 800-248-4061 or get information
online at www.mcn-ads.com
SEARCH THOUSANDS OF
CLASSIFIED ADS FROM AROUND
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WANT TO ADVERTISE TO THE
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in the Midwest Classified Network
anytime online at www.midwestfreeclassifieds.com
TO
INVESTIGATE
OTHER
ADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIES Call
PaperChain at 931-922-0484 or e-mail
[email protected]
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MANTIS DELUXE TILLER. NEW!
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Grimes Living
SEPTEMBER | 2012
s new & replacement of
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Call Pete at
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www.iowalivingmagazines.com/grimes
chure www.PlayAtOsakisMN.com,
1-800-422-0785, “Explore Minnesota”
WE BUY used manufactured homes,
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RV, SPORT, REC & GUN
CONSIGNMENT SALE, SAT., OCT.
6, 2012 at 9:00 A.M. Consign early by
Sept. 17, 2012 for complete advertising. Gilbert’s Sale Yard, LLC, 641-3982218. 2 Mi. N. of Floyd, IA On Hwy.
218. Tractor House Internet Bidding
Available. www.gilbertsaleyard.com
HELP WANTED!!! Make up to
$1000 a week mailing brochures from
home! Helping Home-Workers since
2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately!
www.themailinghub.com
HOROSCOPES, RECIPES, Stock
prices, Sudoku puzzles. All this and
more at WWW.MW-ADS.COM
WORK ON JET ENGINES - Train
for hands on Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified - Housing
available CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance 866-231-7177.
“YOU GOT THE DRIVE, WE HAVE
THE DIRECTION” OTR Drivers, APU
Equipped Pre-Pass EZ-pass, passenger
policy, Newer equipment. 100% NO
touch. 1-800-528-7825
HIGH PRESCRIPTION COSTS?
Low Income? No Insurance? We
Can Help! Call SCBN Prescription
Advocacy at 1-888-331-1002
HELP WANTED: KERRY, A
WORLD LEADER IN INGREDIENTS
& FLAVOURS SEEKS PLC CONTROLS
TECHNICIAN. The primary responsibility for this position is the maintenance, repair, and continuous improvement of the Company’s packaging and
process systems, including site auxiliary equipment, in a safe and efficient
manner. The right candidate should
have a strong working knowledge of
governing Electrical Code and Safety
requirements. Of prime importance is
the elimination of breakdowns at the
manufacturing site. Starting pay: $21$24/hour depending on experience.
We offer a full benefit package. Kerry
requires pre-employment background,
physical and drug screen. We are an
Equal Opportunity Employer. Please
apply at the plant: 341 South Jefferson
Ave, Fredericksburg, IA.
HIGHSPEED
INTERNET
EVERYWHERE By Satellite! Speeds up
to 12mbps! (200x faster than dial-up.)
Starting at $49.95/mo. CALL NOW &
GO FAST! 1-877-789-9086
FOR SALE:
Several motorized
wheelchairs in good to excellent condition. Assorted sizes, priced $200$500. Contact Camp Courageous of
Iowa 319-465-5916 Ext. 2130.
ROTARY
INTERNATIONAL
builds peace and understanding
through education. For more information visit www.rotary.org. This message provided by PaperChain and your
local community free paper.
AUTOS WANTED: CASH FOR
CARS: All Cars/Trucks Wanted.
Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We
Come To You! Any Make/Model. Call
For Instant Offer: 1-888-417-1382
MISC AUTOS: CASH FOR CARS:
Any Make, Model or Year. We Pay
MORE! Running or Not Sell your Car
or Truck TODAY Free Towing! Instant
Offer: 1-888-420-3805
LOVING COUPLE LOOKING To
Adopt A Baby. We Look Forward
To Making Our Family Grow. All
Information Confidential, All Medical
Expenses Paid. Please Call Us Anytime.
Gloria and Joe 888-229-9383
BE YOUR OWN BOSS! Earn
$1,000’s Weekly! Work From
Home! Easy Work! Act Now: www.
MotorClubProfits.com
REVEALED! How Ordinary People
Are Making Good Money With Simple
Postcards. FREE Recorded message
Reveals How. Call Toll-Free, 1-888335-9694 24/7
$8000+
FOR
ENVELOPES!
Receive $6-$8 for every envelope
stuffed with our sales brochures:
Guaranteed! Postage, supplies furnished. 1-800-538-7420
TRUCK DRIVERS WANTED Best Pay and Home Time! Apply
Online Today over 750 Companies!
One Application, Hundreds of Offers!
www.HammerLaneJobs.com
PREGNANT? CONSIDERING
ADOPTION? Call Us First! Living
expenses, Housing, Medical and continued support afterwards. Choose
Adoptive Family of Your Choice. Call
24/7. ADOPT CONNECT 1-866743-9212
A UNIQUE ADOPTIONS, LET
US HELP! Personalized Adoption
Plans. Financial Assistance, Housing,
Relocation and More. Giving the Gift
of Life? You Deserve the Best. Call Us
First! 1-888-637-8200. 24HR Hotline.
TRAILER SALE: 83” x 14’ 14,000lb
Dump Trailer $6299.00, 500gallon
Tank Trailer $3599.00, CLOSE-OUT
on all Motorcycle pull-behind Cargo &
Camper Trailers! 30 - 5’ x 8’ to 82” x
12’ Utility Trailers (steel & aluminum),
NEW 6’ x 12’ Enclosed Cargo just
$2232.00. 7’ x 16” H&H XL $3999.00,
2004 Grand Cherokee SE, 75,000
miles, Moon roof, 10 disc changer, Blue,
All wheel drive $10,500.00. 515-9724554 www.fortdodgetrailerworld.com
CENTRAL*
Comprehensive
Mercy Central Pediatric Clinic
-BVSFM4USFFUt%FT.PJOFT
(515) 643-8611
EAST
*Extended hours available by appointment
Pediatric Care
Mercy’s pediatric clinics are ready to care for the health care needs of
your family. Our physicians and staff provide well child exams, sports
and school physicals, immunizations and care for unplanned illnesses.
Our clinics are conveniently located throughout Des Moines and its
surrounding communities, and our central location offers extended
hours on evenings and weekends for patients*.
Mercy East Pediatric Clinic
&6OJWFSTJUZ"WFOVFt1MFBTBOU)JMM
(515) 643-2600
JOHNSTON
My Child Need To Get The
Q Does
Flu Vaccine?
A
NORTH
Mercy Johnston Pediatric Clinic
/8UI4USFFUt+PIOTUPO
(515) 643-6090
Mercy Pediatric Clinics are here to keep your family healthy during
the upcoming flu season. Schedule an appointment to receive the
flu vaccination and protect your child today!
WEST
Mercy North Pediatric Clinic
&'JSTU4USFFUt"OLFOZ
(515) 643-9000
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends
that everyone age 6 months and older receive the seasonal flu
vaccine. Each year, thousands of children are hospitalized due to
complications from influenza. According to the CDC, the single
best way to protect against seasonal flu and its potential severe
complications in children is to get a seasonal influenza vaccine
each year. Vaccination is especially important for children ages
6 months to 5 years.
Mercy West Pediatric Clinic
/8UI4USFFUt$MJWF
(515) 222-7337
www.mercyclinicsdesmoines.org
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/grimes
Grimes Living
SEPTEMBER | 2012
Your Home Buying Checklist
Buy into the Circle of Grimes Businesses
Choose
a bank
Steve Davis
515-986-BANK
100 NE Jacob St.
Grimes
Choose
a realtor
FOR SALE
[email protected]
Ryan
Rivera
554-5870
Clean out
your ducts
Choose
a builder
BUILDING
DREAMS
AIR FREE 986-3424
One Home
at a Time!
s
DUCT CLEANING
Custom
Home Builder
and
Remodeler
Patrick Kearney
Choose
a mover
4015 SE Grimes Blvd. Q Grimes
515-986- 2020 Q [email protected]
Choose your
insurance
5PN)BSSJTt
SEPTEMBER | 2012
Grimes Living
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/grimes