FORM A CHAIN TO SAFEGUARD CHILDREN

FORM A CHAIN TO SAFEGUARD
CHILDREN
Successful multi-agency working to safeguard children: a
European guide and blended training among law
enforcement officers & key agencies
REPORT RESEARCH VISIT
Madrid, Spain
th
26 – 29th of January 2015
Participants
Name
Authority
Function
E-mail
Dries Wyckmans
Province of
Project
[email protected]
Limburg – Police
coordinator
& Security
Sabrina Reggers
Province of
Assistant- project
Limburg – Equal
coordinator
[email protected]
Opportunities
Ingrid
Confidential
Delameillieure
Centre for Child
Child psychologist
[email protected]
g.be
Abuse & Neglect
Anke Van
Thomas More
Vossole
University
Senior researcher
[email protected]
.be
College
Johan Neijens
Center for
Relief point
General Welfare
domestic violence
[email protected]
Limburg
Andy Veltjen
University
Reseacher-
College Leuven-
designer
[email protected]
Limburg
Pascale Franck
Dries Palmaers
Province of
Expert domestic
[email protected]
Antwerp
violence approach
nt.be
University
Reseacher-
[email protected]
College Leuven-
designer
Limburg
Name
Authority
Function
E-mail
Sotiris
CARDET
Assistant Director
[email protected]
Themistokleous
Name
Authority
Function
E-mail
Marta
Nobody's Children
Expert
[email protected]
Skierkowska
Foundation
Maria Keller-
Nobody's Children
Vice-president
[email protected]
Hamela
Foundation
Name
Authority
Function
E-mail
Gábor Veisz
Victim Support
Head of unit
[email protected]
Trainer
[email protected]
Service
Katalin Stáhly
Victim Support
Service
v.hu
Name
Authority
Function
E-mail
Astrid Diez
Spanish National
Inspector
[email protected]
Suarez
Police Corps
Federico Millan
Spanish National
Expert
[email protected]
Maricalva
Police Corps
Name
Authority
Function
E-mail
Remco de Jong
Keten&Co
Chain advisor
[email protected]
Name
Authority
Function
E-mail
Giovanna Allegri
Ministry of Justice -
Expert
[email protected]
Trainer
[email protected]
Juvenile Justice
Department
Francesca
Ministry of Justice -
Merlini
Juvenile Justice
Department
Name
Authority
Function
E-mail
Agnese
Center Against
Expert
[email protected]
Sladzevska
Abuse “Dardedze”
Laila Balode
Center Against
ardedze.lv
Expert
Abuse “Dardedze”
[email protected]
e.lv
Name
Authority
Function
E-mail
Ieva Daniūnaitė
Children support
Expert
[email protected]
Expert
[email protected]
centre
Ausra Kuriene
Children support
centre
Agenda
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Form A Chain To Safeguard Children (FACTSC)
Coordination Meeting Madrid
January 26-29, 2015
Dries Wyckmans & Sabrina Reggers – project coordinators - Province of Limburg
With the financial support of the Prevention of and Fight against Crime Programme
European Commission - Directorate-General Home Affairs
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Tuesday, January 27
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Programme
•
09.15: Welcome, introduction & state of affairs concerning the
project deliverables (by Dries Wyckmans)
•
10.00: Blended Learning Module 1 – Day 1 – A general picture of child
abuse: ‘train the trainer’ session (part 1) (by Sabrina Reggers &
Andy Veltjen)
•
10.45: Coffee break
•
11.15: Blended Learning Module 1 – Day 1 – A general picture of child
abuse: ‘train the trainer’ session (part 2) (by Sabrina Reggers)
•
12.30: Lunch
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Programme
•
14.00: Blended Learning Module 1 – Day 2 – Specific manifestations of
child abuse: explore the content by yourself
•
15.00: Work shop: technical guidance, training opportunity and
questions concerning the blended learning modules (by Andy
Veltjen & Dries Palmaers)
•
16.00: Free time
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Wednesday, January 28
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Programme
•
•
•
•
•
•
09.15: Blended Learning Module 2 – Day 1 – Collaborating in a chain:
‘train the trainer’ session (part 1) (by Remco de Jong)
10.45: Coffee break
11.15: Blended Learning Module 2 – Day 1 – Collaborating in a chain:
‘train the trainer’ session (part 2) (by Remco de Jong)
12.30: Lunch
14.00: Blended Learning Module 2 – Day 1 – Collaborating in a chain:
‘train the trainer’ session (part 3) (by Remco de Jong)
15.30: Final conclusions (by Dries Wyckmans)
• 16.00: Free time
Welcome word & introduction European project & goals research visit
Summary
A European project on domestic violence and the safeguarding of children …

In 2004 an innovative project on the subject domestic violence was initiated in the Belgian
province of Limburg. Through this project, an inter- and multidisciplinary cooperation between
police, justice and assistance has been developed.

In 2007 the project won the Belgian Security and Crime Prevention Award and was a
successful entry at the European Crime Prevention Award that year in Lisbon.

In 2008 the Belgian Home Affairs Ministry decided to extend the project on the European level.
To this end, contacts were made with European key partners through the European Crime
Prevention Network (EUCPN).

In 2009 the project ‘Form a chain, break the circle’ was awarded a grant by the Commission
(ISEC-programme) and initiated by the Province of Limburg. This project – that was carried
out between July 2010 and September 2012 - aimed primarily at developing, promoting and
implementing a European scenario and training programme, according to the optimization of
the inter- and multidisciplinary approach to domestic violence in different European Member
States. The project was successfully completed with a final seminar in Hasselt (BE) in
September 2012.

Later that year, after an intensive project preparation period, the Belgian Home Affairs Ministry
introduced a second project proposal to the European Commission, Directorate-General
Justice, Freedom and Security, within the Programme “Prevention of and Fight against
Crime”. This project concerned the safeguarding of children, among others through multiagency collaboration.

In spring 2013 this project was awarded a grant and in June 2013 the European project ‘Form
A Chain To Safeguard Children’ was launched by the Province of Limburg.
Form A Chain To Safeguard Children

The present European project aims primarily to support a more effective European joint
approach to safeguard children, by law enforcement officers and other agencies. The project
focusses on the following 3 objectives:
o
To offer guidance on how to collaborate effectively to safeguard children, also on
international level, by providing a conceptual framework for multi-agency collaboration
and by translating that framework into practical information (based on literature study
and findings from empirical research).
o
To offer training that will equip law enforcement officers with the knowledge and skills
to work more effectively with those from other professions. The training also wants to
equip them with a higher level of expertise about the various types of violence,
exploitation and abuse.
o
To offer an online environment as a platform of practice and for information sharing
and case management, in order to describe the results concerning the content and
process and to enrich fragmented information.

This project will make recommendations and offer guidance, in the form of an online guide, on
how to form a successful professional (multi-agency) chain for children exposed to different
forms of violence, exploitation and abuse. In such a chain it must be very clear for all relevant
agencies and organizations how signaling, registration, screening, help and support,
coordination and follow-up is regulated.

This project wants to improve the joint response by turning that guide into a blended multiagency training for operational and managerial staff of law enforcement and other key
agencies. The purpose is to achieve better outcomes by fostering: a higher understanding of
child abuse (different forms, consequences, risk and protective factors,…), a shared
understanding of the tasks, processes, principles, roles and responsibilities, more effective
and integrated services at both the strategic and individual case level, improved
communication and information sharing, effective working relationships, sound assessments
and decision-making and learning from serious case reviews. The training program will offer a
‘stepping stone’ pathway, from an introductory training on a basic level to a fuller
understanding on an advanced with concrete guidance to developing a successful multiagency approach.

The training will be translated to the context and language of the 8 participating
countries/regions, trainers will be trained and multi-agency training sessions will be organized,
evaluated and analyzed. In addition, this project makes use of its own social media. During the
training, participants will build and maintain an online European platform of practice (open
source). With a chain computerization system (open source), collaborative processes can be
mapped, joint operational casuistry can be handled and working arrangements can be
secured. The system will help to facilitate cooperation by creating an overview of the work to
be performed. Furthermore, all users will have access to the information of specific interest to
them.

At the same time a process chain to safeguard children will be designed and tested in a pilot
region in the province of Limburg. The design of that chain approach will be based on the
guide, while the participating agencies will receive the multi-agency training. That way the
findings and training will be translated into practice, tested in the pilot and evaluated and
analyzed afterwards.
A first coordination meeting in Warsaw

General conclusions
o
There was a consensus between the partners that the original texts firstly will be
translated in English and then send to the partners for revision. After this revision, a
final version will be drawn up by the authors of the different texts. Every country will
then provide their own translators for the translation of the final texts of the book and
the training to their own language.
o
There is consensus between the partners that the main target group for the book and
the training should be law enforcement. The partners are aware that the term ‘law
enforcement’ is a very general and broad concept, but the ICT-structure of the
blended learning module offers an answer to the concern that it might be a too
general and broad concept.

Conclusions about the European guide
o
Module 1

There is consensus between the partners that there should be a lot of
examples and case studies to clarify the theory in this module, which should
be universal and recognizable for the readers from all the different countries.
The module has to be written in such a manner that everyone can understand
what the author is trying to explain (not a highbrow text).
o
Module 2

There is consensus between the partners that the author of module 2 is using
CO3 Antwerp and LINK Limburg as examples to clarify some aspects of the
theory of multi-agency collaboration, seeing that it is not his intention to be
normative or to idealize these multi-agency collaborations. Also this module
has to be written in such a manner that everyone can understand what the
author is trying to explain (not a highbrow text).
o
Module 3

The project coordinators showed an overview of the answers on the
questionnaire that was send to all the project partners in September. The
project coordinator told the project partners that the answers on this
questionnaire could be used for the article every project partner has to write
for the book and they promised the project partners to send them a guiding
framework for the writing of their article for module 3.

Conclusions about the blended learning training
o
There is consensus between the partners about the ICT-structure and the concept of
the blended learning modules. The overall suggestions for the training were:

Make sure that there are enough examples and case studies in the training.

Keep the main target group of the project in mind while writing the training and
use examples and case studies they can relate with.


Keep it simple!
The meeting took place in the premises of the Nobody’s Children Foundation (Walecznych 59,
03- 926 Warsaw).
A second coordination meeting in Rome

The most important conclusions of the second coordination meeting in Rome were:
o
Every country thinks child abuse is a very serious problem. Every country has its
own legislation and training program about this topic, even though this training
isn’t always mandatory or it’s not always being evaluated.
o
In every country there are multi-agency collaborations, ranging from very loose
cooperation to very intense forms of collaboration.
o
Every country also has its own challenges and we hope to give some answers to
those challenges with this project.
o
There was consensus about the content of the book and the blended learning
modules. The partners gave the project coordinators and the authors of the texts
valuable tips and remarks that were taken into account when finalizing the texts
for the book and the blended learning modules.

The meeting took place in the premises of the hotel ‘Meliá Roma Aurelia Antica’ (Via
Aldobrandeschi, 223, 00163 Roma, Italië). All the project partners were also staying in this
hotel during the coordination meeting.
A third coordination meeting in Madrid
The coordination meeting

When developing a European training programme on an inter- and multidisciplinary approach
of domestic violence & the safeguarding of children, setting up an intensive exchange of
information and work practices with an important number of European key actors is absolutely
essential. It is also absolutely necessary to have an intensive exchange of information with an
important number of the European key actors in order to come to an overall consensus about
the content of the online guide and the blended learning modules.

Within the framework of the actual European project, partnerships have been concluded with
Hungary, The Netherlands, Spain, Poland, Italy, Lithuania, Latvia and Cyprus. All these
partners were represented at the coordination meeting in Warsaw, except the partners from
The Netherlands.

The main goal of this coordination meeting was to show the European partners the developed
blended learning modules and to guide them in how to use the blended learning modules as a
trainer, a trainee or as a local administrator. For this purpose an extra person from every
partner organization was invited, who will be acting as the trainer during the training days that
will be hosted by all the European partners (except the Cypriot partner).

The meeting took place in the premises of the hotel ‘INNSIDE Madrid Suecia’ (Marqués de
Casa Riera 4, Madrid 28014, Spain). All the project partners were also staying in this hotel
during the coordination meeting.
The city of Madrid

Madrid is the capital and largest city of Spain. The population of the city is almost 3,2 million
and that of the Madrid metropolitan area, around 6,3 million. It is the third-largest city and its
metropolitan area is the third-largest in the European Union. The city spans a total of 604,3
km².

Madrid is one of Europe’s most vibrant cities. Life in Madrid is lived in the crowded streets and
in the noisy cafés, where talking, toasting, and tapa-tasting last long into the night. Madrid’s
other chief attraction is its unsurpassed collection of paintings by some of the world’s great
artists, among them Goya, El Greco, Velázquez, Picasso, and Dalí. Nowhere else will you find
such a concentration of masterpieces as in the three museums—the Prado, the Reina Sofía,
and the Thyssen-Bornemisza—that make up Madrid’s so-called Golden Triangle of Art.
Presentation on the project’s objectives, deliverables and timing, but also on the role and
tasks of the project partners– by Dries Wyckmans (Province of Limburg)
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Welcome / Introduction
State of affairs
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Project partners
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
BE - Ingrid Delameillieure, child psychologist , Confidential Centre for Child Abuse
& Neglect
BE - Pascale Franck, expert, Province of Antwerp
BE - Dries Palmaers, reseacher, Research Group Education & ICT, University
College Leuven Limburg
BE - Sabrina Reggers, assistant project coordinator, Province of Limburg
BE - Anke Van Vossole, researcher, Research Group Prevention Of And Dealing
With Violence, Thomas More University College
BE - Andy Veltjen, reseacher-designer, Research Group Education & ICT, University
College Leuven Limburg
BE - Johan Neijens, cluster coordinator, Center for General Welfare Limburg
BE - Dries Wyckmans, project coordinator, Province of Limburg
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Project partners
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CY ES ES HU HU IT IT NL PL PL LT LT LV LV -
Sotiris Themistokleous, assistant director, CARDET
Astrid Diez Suárez, expert, National Police
Federico Millan Maricalva, expert, National Police
Gabor Veisz, head of unit, Victim Support Unit - Office of Public Administration & Justice
Katalin Stáhly-Zsideg, trainer
Giovanna Allegri, expert, Ministry of Justice - Juvenile Justice Department
Francesca Merlini, trainer
Remco de Jong, chain advisor, Keten&Co
Maria Keller-Hamela, director, Nobody's Children Foundation
Marta Skierkowska, psychologist, Nobody's Children Foundation
Ieva Daniunaite, psychologist, Children Support Centre
Ausra Kuriene, trainer
Laila Balode, expert, Centre Dardedze
Agnese Sladzevska, trainer
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Project Objectives
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Why this project?
•
Families, and especially children and young people are more likely to be safeguarded if
professionals are structurally and regularly trained in:
o having a better understanding of the violence & abuse
o recognizing key signs
o knowing how to respond
o knowing how to successfully collaborate
•
BUT:
“Whilst the need for training for all relevant professionals on VAW, VAC and SOV, and
on victim rights in general, is recognized in most Member States, the results of this
study suggest that this is not installed on a regular basis nor ensured for all who need it,
but tends to be sporadic or offered on a voluntary basis” (EU study, 2011)
o While there is lip service paid to the importance of collaboration, there seems to be little
guidance and few training opportunities to make these complicated processes work
o
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Objectives
•
General objective: to support a more effective European joint
approach to safeguard families and especially children by law
enforcement officers and other agencies
o To
o To
offer guidance on how to collaborate effectively to safeguard children
offer training that will equip law enforcement officers and other agencies with
the necessary knowledge and skills in order for them to better know how to
respond and to collaborate more effectively with those from other professions
o To offer an online environment as a platform of practice and for information
sharing and case management, in order to enrich fragmented information
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Target groups / Professionals
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Target groups / professionals
•
Priority = law enforcement !!!
o Police officers/investigators
o Prosecutors
o Judges
 “Judges
and prosecutors are the least likely to receive training. It is a matter of
concern that qualifications and expertise are weakest among the professional actors
with the greatest powers” (EU study, 2011)
 The ISEC programme – prevention of and fight against crime - mainly (but not
exclusively) focuses on law enforcement officers as a target group
 Because of the ICT-structure it is possible to customize the blended training to the
needs of the specific law enforcement group in a specific country. Partners can do
this by adding extra content in their national ‘added local content’, for instance on
legislation, interventions, protocols, …
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Target groups / professionals
•
But also:
o (Child protection) social workers
o (Child) psychologists
o Healthcare professionals
o Nursery workers and school teachers
o Public officials
o Professionals on a policy and strategic
level
 Training on violence & abuse on a basic or advanced level


Understanding of the perspective and approach of other professionals
Training on how to successfully collaborate
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Deliverables
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Deliverables
1 – Blended training: European blended training for law officers & other key agencies about successful multiagency working to safeguard children (tested in 8 Member States, translated in 11 languages EN, FR, DE, NL,
ES, HU, IT, PL, GR, LT, LV)
2 – Book: European guide with conceptual and practical information, a step-by-step plan and examples of good
practice about successful multi-agency working to safeguard children (in11 languages)
3 – Recommendations: European recommendations specific to multi-agency working on safeguarding children
4 – Module: User-friendly module for online information sharing (open source)
5 – Platform: European online platform of practice (open source)
6 – Website: Interactive project website
7 – Training report: Evaluation report of the training sessions
8 – Pilot report: Evaluation report of the Limburg pilot
9 – Campaign: European promotional campaign
10 – Status reports: Reports of the coordination meeting and closing seminar
11 – Final report: Final project report with a summary (in 11 languages)
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Timing
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Phases
 Phase
1. Preparation and gathering of information: June 2013 – November 2013
 Phase
2. Writing and building: December 2013 – June 2014
 Phase
3. Translation and delivery: July 2014 – December 2014
 Phase
4. Training, evaluation and dissemination: January 2015 – July 2015
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Phase 1. Preparation and gathering of information
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Phase 2. Writing and building
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Phase 3. Translation and delivery
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Phase 4. Training, evaluation and dissemination
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Role & tasks EU-partners in phase 4
•
Coordinating and giving the training, by using the blended learning module: a
2,5-day training will have to be given to a local or regional multi-agency group
of maximum 15 people -> between March & middle of April 2015
•
Assessing the training: the local or regional training will have to be evaluated > evaluation module available -> between March & middle of April 2015
•
Participating with a delegation of 3 people in a 3-day European seminar in
Hasselt, Belgium (27-29 May 2015); each delegation will give a short
presentation about their approach of child abuse, ambitions in working
together, what added value have they derived from this project…
-> please inform us asap on the names of your 3 delegates!
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Programme final seminar
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Wednesday, May 27
•
Noon/afternoon:
Arrival
•
18.00:
Welcome reception & brief introduction at the
residence of Governor Herman Reynders
•
19.45:
Dinner (at the Holiday Inn or Raddison Blu Hotel)
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Thursday, May 28
•
09.00: Registration
•
09.30: Welcome by the Limburg governor Herman Reynders
•
09.40: Opening remarks on the importance of collaboration in tackling
child abuse and domestic violence
by Jan Jambon, Belgian minister of Home Affairs
•
09.50: Presentation concerning child abuse
by Prof. Dr. Peter Adriaenssens, child psychiatrist at the clinic for
child psychiatry in UZ Gasthuisberg, director of the
Confidentiality Centre Flemish Brabant
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Thursday, May 28
•
09.00: Presentation concerning a multi-agency approach in tackling
domestic violence and child abuse
by Pascale Franck, project manager CO3 Antwerp & Matthieu
Goedhart, director of the Mutsaers Foundation
•
10.40: Presentation of the project deliverables & launch of the project
website
by Dries Wyckmans, coordinator of the ‘Form a Chain to
Safeguard children’ project
•
11.00: Coffee break
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Thursday, May 28
•
11.30: Workshop
Workshop 1: Blended learning module ‘Samenwerken in een keten’
(NL)
door Remco de Jong, Pascale Franck & Dries Wyckmans
or
• Workshop 2: Blended learning module ‘Kindermishandeling / child
abuse’ (NL & EN)
door/by Sabrina Reggers, Ingrid Delameillieure, Anke Van Vossole,
Isabelle Dirikx & Johan Neijens
•
•
12.15: Lunch
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Thursday, May 28
•
13.30: Workshop
Workshop 1: Blended learning module ‘Collaborating in a chain’ (EN)
door Remco de Jong, Pascale Franck & Dries Wyckmans
or
• Workshop 2: Blended learning module ‘Kindermishandeling’ (NL)
door Sabrina Reggers, Ingrid Delameillieure, Anke Van Vossole,
Isabelle Dirikx & Johan Neijens
•
•
14.15: Coffee break
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Thursday, May 28
•
14.30: 6 EU-partners: approach of child abuse, ambitions in working
together, what added value have they derived from this project…
by ES, HU, IT, LT, LV, PL
•
15.30: Highlights & recommendations
by Limburg representatives Frank Smeets & Ludwig Vandenhove
•
15.45: Closing
by Philip Willekens, Director General - Directorate General for
Security and Prevention, Federal Public Service Home Affairs
•
Evening programme
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Supporting documents
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Supporting documents
•
Concerning content:
o an article of 3 to 5 A4 pages for the project book (writing and
building phase)
o an evaluation of the 2,5 day training, using the evaluation format in
the blended training
•
Concerning travel: the boarding passes of all flights
•
Concerning other expenses: a copy of the invoices/receipts
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Supporting documents
•
Concerning staff costs:
o
o
o
o
o
o
•
a copy of the employment contract for the project staff member indicating duties, working hours, employment
status and salary
timesheets for the project staff member, indicating working hours and activity/tasks performed for the ISEC
project, signed and dated by employee and employer; a template of this timesheet will be delivered by the
project coordination
a copy of the salary slips or payrolls of each project staff member for each month worked on the ISEC project
a copy of the documents proving amounts of employers' tax and social contributions paid in addition to the
gross salary of each project staff member
a proof of payment through a bank account of the salaries, the tax and social contributions paid for each
project staff member
a copy of the letter of assignment stating the name, function, daily rate, working hours and tasks of the
permanent employee seconded to the ISEC project, as well as the name and function of the person newly
employed to replace the seconded person for his/her regular duties
These supporting documents must be submitted before June 15, 2015
-> Sabrina will contact you during or after this coordination meeting
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The book / guide
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The book / guide
• Feedback?
• Translated versions in (end of) February
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Blended learning modules
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Blended learning modules
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Blended learning modules
•
Choose a combination of building blocks to create the perfect training for
your local users!
•
For example:
o Police officers on operational level = A + E or A + C + E
o Child protection social workers on operational level = B + C + E
o Child protection social workers on tactical level = B + D + E
o Policy makers on strategic level = A + D + E
Remarks and questions:

Agreement on the reimbursement of the receipts of the coordination meeting:
o The project coordinators asked the partners to keep all their receipts together and to
send them in, together with the boarding passes, after the Madrid meeting. It was
more practical for the project coordinators to reimburse the partners the full amount
by bank transfer, than to reimburse an amount by cash and after the meeting an
amount by bank transfer.

There was a question about the 750 euros the partners can spend for the training in their
own country:
o How can we spend the 750 euros?

Answer from the project coordinators: Every partner can use the 750 euro for
the practical arrangement of the training they will host in their country. They
can use it for catering, to print out some documents, to pay for the
transportation of the trainer, etc. The project coordinators emphasized that
the money can only be used to pay for organizing the training, but not to
pay the teacher!

There were a few remarks/questions about the book:
o Can we still send in our remarks about the book?

Answer from the project coordinators: Off course it is possible to send in
remarks about the book. The project coordinators will review these remarks
and discuss them with the authors. It is not possible to change whole
sections of the book, but off course it is still possible to make some changes.
The project coordinators ask the project partners to send the
remarks/question in before the end of February.
o At the moment most of the names in the book and the blended learning modules are
universal names. Is it possible to change them, to make them sound more natural to
the readers/trainees? For instance, Polish names for the Polish version, Spanish
names for the Spanish version,…

Answer from the project coordinators: Every partner has to do the
proofreading of the translated texts of the book and of the training. If the
partner thinks that it would be advisable to change the names to more
natural sounding names in his/her language, then he/she can do so.
o At the moment there are some quotes in the book. There is a concern that the
readers of the book will find these quotes a bit too ‘Belgian’.
 Conclusion: The project coordinators will send the translated texts of the book and the
training to the partners and ask them to do the proofreading and/or make some changes in
their own language before a certain deadline (final deadline will be communicated by e-mail).
After this the texts of the book will get their final lay-out, so that the document are ready to
get printed. The project coordinators will be responsible for the final lay-out of the different
language versions of the book. The project coordinators repeated to the partners that the
book will not be printed in every language, but the partners can choose to print the book
themselves (on their own budget).
Presentation on the concept of blended learning and the blended learning modules – by Andy
Veltjen (University College Leuven - Limburg)
The goal of this presentation was to revise the concept of blended learning and the technical
structure of the modules. It was also important that this presentation showed the partners how to
log-in to the modules. To make sure everything ran smoothly, the project coordinators asked Andy
Veltjen and Dries Palmaers to already register the partners as trainees before the coordination
meeting. As a result, the partners received a document stating their usernames and passwords (see
annex 1: ‘Users Madrid Workshop 2015 Trainee’), which they had to use to log-in.
Train-the-trainer-session – Module 1 : Child Abuse – by Sabrina Reggers (Province of Limburg)
There were several goals for this train-the-trainer-session. The project coordinators wanted to show
the partners the developed content of the module on child abuse and the variety of exercises that
were developed. It was also important for the project coordinators that the partners experienced
what it’s like for trainees of the blended learning modules, but also what the possibilities are for the
trainer when working with the modules.
The train-the-trainer-session was organized as follows:

Different roles
o Sabrina Reggers acted as the trainer for this session
o Andy Veltjen and Dries Palmaers were available for technical support
o All the partners acted as trainees

Content
o Difference between ‘M1: A general picture of child abuse – Course Day 1’ and ‘M2:
Specific manifestations of child abuse – Course Day 2’
o How to navigate the modules
o Content of Course day 1

Introduction: Is this child abuse – Video Clip 1 and 2
 The trainer asked the trainees to watch the video clip and then to
answer the question ‘Indicate the extent to which you consider child
abuse to be involved’, ranging from 1 (very little) to 5 (a lot).
Figure 1: Screenshot of the exercise (Is this child abuse - video clip 1)
 The trainer waited until the trainees answered the question and then
showed the results, plus the option of locking or unlocking the
results for the group.
Figure 2: Screenshot of the results of the exercise (Is this child abuse - video clip 1)
 The trainer then showed the trainees that there is a read-me section
for the trainer, which holds extra information/extra questions which
the trainer can use for his/her group discussions.
Figure 3: Screenshot of the ‘Read me’-section of the exercise (Is this child abuse - video clip 1)

Physical child abuse: visibility task
 The trainer asked the trainees to look at the pictures and then to
answer the question ‘Indicate whether you can tell straight away if
physical child abuse was involved or not.’
Figure 4: Screenshot of the exercise (Visibility – task)
 The trainer then showed the results and told (+showed) the trainees
the theory that was behind this exercise.
Figure 5: Screenshot of the theory (Visibily - theory)

Emotional child abuse: Children exposed to intimate partner violence - Forms
of exposure
 The trainer first explained what is meant with ‘Children exposed to
intimate partner violence’. She then told the trainees that when you
ask someone for an example of being exposed, most of the time you
get the answer: “The child saw the violence”. This exercise wants to
make the trainees aware that there are multiple forms of being
exposed to intimate partner violence by making them link the
different parts of the table.
Figure 6: Screenshot of possible answers (Emotional abuse – Children exposed to intimate partner violence - Forms of
exposure)
 The trainer showed the trainees the results they could get from this
exercise.
Figure 7: Screenshot of the results (Emotional abuse – Children exposed to intimate partner violence - Forms of
exposure)
 The trainer also showed the trainees that the trainer could use the
‘Read me’-section to check the right answers and that there are also
examples given of every form of exposure.
Figure 8: Screenshot of the 'Read me'- section (Emotional abuse – Children exposed to intimate partner violence - Forms
of exposure)

Neglect: 4.1 Physical neglect – Definition – Theory – Task
 The trainer told the partners that when they are the trainer they can
start by asking the trainees to give their definition of the term
‘physical neglect’ and to give examples of this form of abuse. To
speed things up, the trainer explained that she would not ask the
trainees these question during this train-the-trainer-session and that
she would only show the corresponding slides.
Figure 9: Screenshot of the slide on the definition of physical neglect
Figure 10: Screenshot of the slide on the different types of physical neglect
 The trainer explained that it’s important to talk about the definition
and the different forms of physical neglect, because the trainees will
need this information for the exercise that can be found on the slide
4.1.2 Types – Task.
Figure 11: Screenshot of the exercise on the different types of physical neglect
 The trainer again showed that the trainer can find possible solutions
for the exercise in the ‘Read me’-section of the Results-page.
Figure 12: Screenshot of the 'Read me'-section of the exercise on the different types of physical neglect

Sexual abuse : definition task + characteristics task/theory
 The trainer told the trainees that there were also a lot of case studies
included in the blended learning modules. She showed the trainees
the case study on child sexual abuse and the accompanying exercise,
but explained that they wouldn’t be doing this exercise in the trainthe-trainer-session.
Figure 13: Screenshot of an example of a case study in the blended learning modules (5.2 Characteristics - task (part 1))
Figure 14: Screenshot of an example of the accompanying exercise for a case study (5.2 Characteristics - task (part 1))

In my job – Handling child abuse
 The trainer emphasized that the this is one of the most important
exercises of the whole blended learning module on child abuse. This
exercise uses case studies to ask the trainees to share their
(professional) experiences on child abuse and for them to formulate
tips on how to deal with those types of situations.
 The trainer emphasizes that in perfect circumstances, you have a
multidisciplinary group of trainees (police, justice department and
social services) and that you mix up the trainees so that they form
little multidisciplinary groups. This way they can explain their
procedures to each other and they get an insight to the way the
other organizations deal with situation of child abuse, which is very
valuable information for every professional!
 The trainer asked the trainees to match up in groups of 3 and then
assigned each group a case study. She told them that after reading
the case study, they should discuss how their organization would
handle such a case and then they should formulate some tips for
other professionals to deal with such cases of child abuse.
Figure 15: Screenshot of one of the case studies (6.2 Handling child abuse - case 4)
Figure 16: Screenshot of tips that the trainees formulated (6.2 Handling child abuse - case 4)

Test yourself
 The trainer explained that this part of the blended learning modules
could be used as a final exercise, so that the trainees of course day 1
can test their knowledge on the content of day 1. She also explained
that these exercise are also included in day 2 of the blended learning
module on child abuse, but there it will be used as an introductory
exercise.
Figure 17: Screenshot of the statements of the 'Test Yourself'-part of course day 1
 The trainer waited until the trainees answered the statements and
then showed the results, plus the option of locking or unlocking the
results for group.
Figure 18: Screenshot of the results of the statements of the 'Test Yourself'-part of course day 1
o Content of Course Day 2

The project coordinators decided to let the partners browse through the
module: ‘M2: Specific manifestations of child abuse – Course day 2’
themselves. The project coordinators, Dries Palmaers and Andy Veltjen were
available the whole time to answer the questions one of the partners might
have had.
 There was question about subtitling the videos of the training, which
was addressed in the ‘Technical Guidance’- train-the-trainer-session.
Train-the-trainer-session – Technical Guidance – by Dries Palmaers and Andy Veltjen
(University College Leuven - Limburg)
The goal of this presentation was to show the partners how to use the blended learning modules as a
trainee, trainer or local administrator. Dries Palmaers and Andy Veltjen decided to do so by using the
manuals they wrote (annex 2: ‘User Manual Form a Chain to Safeguard Children’ and annex 3:
‘Administrator manual Form a Chain to Safeguard Children’).
They made sure that the following topics were covered:

Using the blended learning modules as a trainer or trainee
o How to create a new account
o How to sign in and out with your account
o The “My Profile” section (update personal details, change password)
o The “My Groups” section (creating/deleting a group, assigning to and leaving a
group)
o The “My Course” section (navigating through the modules and slides, how to use the
result slide, how to download the results of the exercises, how to open and close the
‘Read me’-section)

Using the blended learning modules as a local administrator
o How to sign in and out with the local administrator account
o The “My Profile” section (update personal details, change password)
o The “Manage Users” section (how to approve users of my organisation)

There were some remarks about the fact that a new user has to be approved
before he or she can enter the blended learning modules. The general idea
was that it would be better if a new user is immediately approved. That way
the local administrator doesn’t always have to check whether someone new
registerred and the new user could immediately explore the modules.
 The project coordinators and Dries Palmaers and Andy Veltjen agreed
with this remark. As a result they made sure that a newly registerred
user is immediately approved to enter the blended learning
modules, but they left the option open for the local administrator to
approve/disapprove someones account at any time.
o The “Course Editor” section (how to add, edit or remove modules/chapters/slides,
how to add new media/questions to a slide, how to save a slide, how to add notes
for the teacher in the ‘Read me’-section)

How to add subtitles to the videos that are being used?
o Dries Palmaers and Andy Veltjen explained that the partners will have to subtitle
the videos themselves, because it’s not possible for them or the project
coordinators to do so. The subtitles will have to be directly uploaded into the
YouTube- channel (https://www.youtube.com/user/FACTSC).
o Dries Palmaers and Andy Veltjen showed the partners how to add subtitles, by
actually adding some ‘test’-subtitles to one of the videos.
Figure 19: Screenshot of how to add subtitles to a YouTube-video
The partners can find more information about adding subtitles to a YouTube-video on
https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/2734796?hl=en-GB. They can also always
contact the project coordinators or Dries Palmaers or Andy Veltjen about it.
Train-the-trainer-session – Module 2 : Multi-agency collaboration – by Remco de Jong
(Keten & Co)
There were several goals for this train-the-trainer-session. The project coordinators wanted to show
the partners the developed content of the module on child abuse and the variety of exercises that
were developed. It was also important for the project coordinators that the partners experienced
what it’s like for trainees of this module of the blended learning, but also what the possibilities are
for the trainer when working with this module.
The train-the-trainer-session was organized as follows:

Different roles
o Remco de Jong acted as the trainer for this session
o Andy Veltjen and Dries Palmaers were available for technical support
o All the partners acted as trainees

Content
o Difference between ‘M3: Collaborating in a chain – Course Day 1’ and ‘M4:
Implementing a chain approach – Course Day 2’
o Content of Course day 1

First session: How do we collaborate – 1.1 Collaboration
 The trainer asked the trainees to watch the video clips and then to
answer the question ‘Indicate the extent to which video clip involves
collaboration’, ranging from 1 (very little) to 5 (a lot).
Figure 20: Screenshot of the exercise (Task 1.1 Collaboration)
 The trainer waited until the trainees rated every video clip and then
showed the results, plus the option of locking or unlocking the
results for the group. He also discussed the answers for every video
and asked participants to comment on their answers (for instance,
“What score did you give this video clip and why did you choose for
this score?”).
Figure 21: Screenshot of the results of the exercise (Task 1.1 Collaboration)
 The trainer then showed the trainees that there is a read-me section
for the trainer, which holds the objectives of this exercise. He told
the trainees that the trainer has to make sure these goals are
achieved after the video clips are discussed.
Figure 22: Screenshot of the 'Read me'- section (Task 1.1 Collaboration)

First session: How do we collaborate – 1.2 My organisation
 The trainer asked the trainees to fill in the first two questions of ‘Task
1.2 – My organisation’ and then to draw their picture of the
collaboration their organisation conducts with other organisations
in its approach to domestic violence and child abuse. He told the
trainees that their drawing should illustrate all the organisations
that are involved, the file managing process adopted by and
between the organisations involved and the results achieved by
the collaboration.
Figure 23: Screenshot of the exercise (Task 1.2 My organisation)

The trainer showed the trainees the results of the first two questions and
briefly discussed their answers. He then asked the trainees to come and
present their drawings.
Figure 24: Drawings of exercise '1.2 My organisation'

Second session: What is chain collaboration? – 1.5 Basic principles of chain
collaboration
 The trainer asked the trainees to watch the video clip about the basic
principles of chain collaboration before they filled in the exercise
below. In this exercise the trainees have to indicate per topic
which of the two images they believe to best correspond to optimal
chain collaboration.
 The trainer waited until the trainees completed the exercise and then
showed the results, plus the option of locking or unlocking the
results for the group. He discussed the answers for every topic and
asked participants to comment on their answers (for instance, “Did
you choose picture A or B and why did you choose for this picture?”).
Figure 25: Screenshot of the results (Task 1.5 Basic principles of chain collaboration)
 The trainer showed the trainees that the trainer could find the
answers to this exercise in the ‘Read me’-section of the results.
Figure 26: Screenshot of the 'Read me'-section (Task 1.5 Basic principles of chain collaboration)

Second session: What is chain collaboration? – 1.6 File management
according to a chain approach
 The trainer asked the trainees to watch the video clip about file
management according to a chain approach and then to fill in this
exercise in group. Every group consisted of 3 trainees.
Figure 27: Screenshot of the exercise (Task 1.6 File management according to a chain approach)
 The trainer waited until the trainees completed the exercise and then
asked the trainees whether they found it a difficult exercise. He then
showed the ‘correctly completed’ chain template.
Figure 28: ‘Correctly completed’ chain template
 While discussing the different elements of the chain template, the
trainer asked Dries Wyckmans and Pascale Franck to give examples
from both their chain approaches in Belgium to help clarify the chain
template. For instance, they gave examples of how they deal with
the sharing of information between different organisations and the
professional secrecy, the actions that case directors sometimes have
to take,… Pascale Franck also showed the video she and her
colleagues made for a DAPHNE-project about their Family Justice
Center in Antwerp and gave extra information on their chain
approach.
o Content of Course day 2

First session: Launching a pilot project – Task 2.2 Implementation approaches
 The trainer asked the trainees to watch the video clips and then to
indicate which implementation approach was shown in the video
clips.
Figure 29: Screenshot of the exercise (Task 2.2 Implementation approaches)
 The trainer waited until the trainees selected their answers and then
showed the results, plus the option of locking or unlocking the
results for the group. He also discussed the answers for every video
and asked participants to comment on their answers (for instance,
“Why did you choose for this approach?”).
Figure 30: Screenshot of the results (Task 2.2 Implementation approaches)
 The trainer then showed the trainees that there is a read-me section
for the trainer, which holds the correct answers to this exercise.
Figure 31: Screenshot of the 'Read me'-section (Task 2.2 Implementation approaches)
o Content of Course Day 2

The trainer decided to let the partners browse through the module: ‘M4:
Implementing a chain approach – Course day 2’ themselves. The trainer, the
project coordinators, Dries Palmaers and Andy Veltjen were available the
whole time to answer the questions one of the partners might have had.
Presentation on a possible follow-up project – by Dries Wyckmans (Province of Limburg)
lokalebesturen.limburg.be
Follow-up project
lokalebesturen.limburg.be
Form A Chain To End Family Violence
European
Project Proposal
2015 – 2016
lokalebesturen.limburg.be
3 complementary EU projects
I. First EU project ‘Form a chain, break the circle’ (July 2010 – September 2012)
•
Theoretical framework for multi-agency & multi-disciplinary chain collaboration on
Child abuse & Domestic violence
•
Status: delivered September 2012
II. Second EU project ‘Form a chain to safeguard children’ (June 2013 – May 2015)
•
Practical framework for multi-agency & multi-disciplinary chain collaboration on Child
abuse & Domestic violence
•
Status: expected delivery in May 2015
III. Third EU project ‘Form a chain to end family violence’ (October 2015 – December 2016)
•
Sustainable implementation & education of multi-agency & multi-disciplinary chain
collaboration on Child abuse & Domestic violence
•
Status: proposal in February 2015
.
lokalebesturen.limburg.be
Project objectives & deliverables
I.
II.
Designing and implementing optimal multi-agency & multi-disciplinary chain collaboration (between
the fields of care, safety, enforcement and administration) on Family Violence in different EU contexts.
Guarantee sustainable collaboration & education by developing:
a pilot project plan on implementing chain collaboration,
a blended training (e-learning& face-to-face) on chain direction roles in chain collaboration,
a blended training (e-learning & face-to-face) on case management roles in chain collaboration,
for each EU context.
•
•
•
III.
Evaluate the status of the chain collaboration & blended training and develop common and context
specific sustainability factors for each EU context.
lokalebesturen.limburg.be
Project planning
I.
Preparation phase (October – December 2015)
II. Design phase (January – April 2016)
III. Implementation phase (May – October 2016)
VI. Evaluation phase (November – December 2016)
Project timing: 15 months in total
lokalebesturen.limburg.be
Project planning
Former
EU
projects:
first
FACBTC
project
&
second
FACTSC
project
Phase I
Phase II
Phase III
Phase VI
Preparation
phase
Design
phase
Implementation
phase
Evaluation
phase
Kick-off
meeting
October
2015
December
2015
Conf.
meeting
February
2016
April
2016
June
2016
Final
meeting
August
2016
October
2016
December
2016
Sustainable
EU
chain
collaboration
on
child
abuse
&
domestic
violence
lokalebesturen.limburg.be
I. Preparation phase
I.
Objectives
EU partners: to start the project & to make all own preparations for participation
Coordinators: to make all preparations for the project & project coordination
•
•
II.
Process & deliverables
Developing all project documents & safeguarding all project conditions
A.
B.
C.
Making conceptual frameworks for the chain collaboration pilot project plans (of the design phase
(Phase II))
Organising kick-off meeting with all EU partner participants (December 2015):
To introduce the project
To prepare the participants for the design phase (Phase II)
To commonly execute the first design activities and visioning of the chain collaboration pilot
project plan for each EU context
•
•
•
lokalebesturen.limburg.be
II. Design phase
I.
Objectives
EU partners: to design a chain collaboration on child abuse & domestic violence for each EU
context
•
Coordinators: to enable all EU partners to execute this phase with quality & dedication
•
II.
Process & deliverables
Designing a chain collaboration pilot project plan by each EU context using the conceptual
framework, including: chain mission statement, chain target groups, chain roles, chain processes
and activities, chain deliverables, chain tools, chain ethics, planning & resources
A.
B.
Delegating chain participants by each EU context, including: project steering and chain direction
roles, case management roles, mandating and delegating professionals
C.
Make preparations for the implementation phase (Phase III) by each EU context
lokalebesturen.limburg.be
III. Implementation phase
I.
Objectives
EU partners:
•
to implement & execute a chain collaboration on child abuse & domestic violence in each
EU context
•
to guarantee sustainable chain collaboration in each EU context
•
to implement & execute their own chain direction and case management roles in each EU
context
•
to guarantee sustainable chain education in each EU context
•
•
Coordinators:
to develop a blended training (e-learning& face-to-face) on chain direction and case
management roles in chain collaboration, including teacher manuals
•
to enable all EU partners to execute this phase with quality & dedication
•
lokalebesturen.limburg.be
III. Implementation phase
II.
Process & deliverables
Organising a conference meeting with all EU partner participants (May 2016):
•
Presenting the designed chain collaboration pilot project plan by each EU context
•
Execute the blended training (e-learning& face-to-face) on chain direction roles in chain
collaboration via train the trainer sessions
•
Execute the blended training (e-learning & face-to-face) on case management roles in chain
collaboration via train the trainer sessions
A.
B.
Implementing and executing the designed chain collaboration on child abuse & domestic violence
in each EU context
•
According to the designed chain collaboration pilot project plan
•
Supported by the educated chain directors and case managers
C.
Make preparations for the evaluation phase (Phase VI) by each EU context, including making a
status report of the chain implementation & evaluating the blended training
lokalebesturen.limburg.be
IV. Evaluation phase
I.
Objectives
EU partners: to evaluate and end the project,
Coordinators: to enable all EU partners to execute this phase with quality & dedication
•
•
II.
Process & deliverables
Making conceptual frameworks for the evaluation of the chain collaboration & blended training
A.
B.
Organising final meeting with all EU partner participants (November 2016):
to present the implementation results and status of chain collaboration pilot project plan by
each EU context
•
to present the blended learning results by the coordinators
•
to formulate sustainability factors for each EU context.
•
to end the project
•
C.
Developing all final project documents & safeguarding all project evaluations
lokalebesturen.limburg.be
Project tools: already developed
•
Manual: how to implement chain collaboration on child abuse & domestic violence
lokalebesturen.limburg.be
Project tools: already developed
•
Blended learning tool: sustainable education on child abuse, domestic violence & chain collaboration
(www.formachain.eu)
lokalebesturen.limburg.be
Project partners & project conditions
Want to join?
•
Participation – Support and participate project planning, deliverables and meetings
•
Number of partners – Minimum of 4 and maximum of 8 EU contexts (local or regional)
•
Contribution – 80% project means versus 20% individual means
•
Coordination – Province of Limburg, Belgium
Remark: All the present project partners showed interest in the possible follow-up project. The
project coordinators will send an e-mail about it and the partners will have until the deadline to let
the project coordinators know whether they want to sign up or not for the possible follow-up
project.
Annex 1: ‘Users Madrid Workshop 2015 Trainee’
Annex 2: ‘User Manual Form a Chain to Safeguard Children’
Annex 3: ‘Administrator manual Form a Chain to Safeguard
Children’