The Sheridan Press E-edition April 7, 2015

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Could this year be
the busiest tourist
season yet? A3
SCSD2 continues to plan for alternative school
BY ALISA BRANTZ
[email protected]
SHERIDAN — The Alternative
School Planning Study that
Sheridan County School District 2
compiled for the Wyoming School
Facilities Commission has been
completed and approved, recommending that the district explore
building a collaborative alternative
high school on or near the Sheridan
College campus.
Recently the district received
funds from the SFC to evaluate and
determine the needs of the district’s alternative schools.
Previously, Fort Mackenzie High
School and the Wright Place Junior
High School have not been on any
of the state’s priority lists for
capacity or needs because they
were housed on the junior high
campus and included in the junior
high numbers. The district has
been requesting they be prioritized
for the past several years and this
year the state recognized it as a
viable need and funded the study.
SEE ALTERNATIVE , PAGE 2
District estimates of future enrollment for
Sheridan High School show the site would
not allow for an alternative school to be
housed within the current facilities.
COURTESY GRAPHIC |
Ticket to ride
Counterfeit
Sheridan man
charged with
making $100 bills
City passes
Holloway
Avenue
agreement
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — A Sheridan
man is scheduled to appear
before a federal court
Wednesday after being indicted for making counterfeit $100
bills.
Wyatt T. McMahon is scheduled for an arraignment in the
U.S. District Court in Casper.
He made an initial appearance
Friday where the charge
against him — conspiracy to
commit counterfeiting and
forging obligations or securities of the U.S. — and its possible penalties were
explained.
The indictment alleges that
McMahon made the fake
money in July 2013.
If found guilty, McMahon
may face up to 20 years
imprisonment, a $250,000 fine,
three years of supervised
release and a $100 special
assessment.
McMahon’s codefendant
Amanda R. Buell has also
been charged with uttering
counterfeit obligations and
securities for allegedly using
one of the fake $100 bills at
Wahoo Likkers in Buffalo. If
found guilty, she faces the
same potential penalty as
McMahon.
Buell is scheduled to make
an initial appearance today in
Casper.
Additional details regarding
the crimes were included in
the court documents.
BY TRAVIS PEARSON
[email protected]
determination by the buildings’ insurer
could take another year but that process
shouldn’t hold up reconstruction, Phillips
said.
The gaping hole there now is an improvement, said local resident Ellen Jungck.
“It’s good because when the buildings were
there it was kind of like, ‘Oh, it’s depressing,’” Jungck said. “There’s a piece of history now that’s gone, so it’s kind of sad. At the
same time, I’m glad because we can move forward.”
SHERIDAN — The
Sheridan City Council
took a cooperative agreement off the table and
approved the plan
Monday evening that
lays out work on
Holloway Avenue.
The joint city-county
project calls for $1 million in improvements to
bring the gravel road to
urban street standards
from 11th to 15th street,
including curb and gutter and sidewalk.
The deal mandates the
city take ownership of
13th through 15th street
— currently a county
road with unincorporated residences along it —
upon construction completion, a stipulation
that caused concern for
some councilors and led
to the group tabling the
matter at the March 17
meeting.
Councilor Jesus Rios
was one such voice but
said Monday he felt comfortable with the agreement after talking to
Mayor John Heath and
City Public Works
Director Nic Bateson
and checking out the
area.
“I was concerned, really, what is that cost-burden to city residents?”
Rios said. “I’m pleased to
know it’s going to be
minuscule when you
think about the life of
the two blocks in particular within the county’s
area.”
He later added the city
would need to provide a
chip seal on the reconstructed road in a few
years, but that $8,000
expenditure would be
the only expense over
the next 20 to 25 years.
SEE REBUILD, PAGE 8
SEE CITY, PAGE 2
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
South Dakota resident Jacob Kammerer preps his ride in the chute during the bareback/saddle bronc riding school Saturday at
the Sheridan College AgriPark north of Sheridan. The school was offered to individuals with high school rodeo cards wanting to
learn more about rodeo.
Devastated by winter fire, Wyoming town looks to rebuild
CHEYENNE (AP) — A western Wyoming
town knocked back by a fire that destroyed a
large portion of its downtown last winter is
dusting off for tourist season and could begin
rebuilding as soon as this summer.
A demolition crew razed two burned buildings in Dubois last week. The integrity of a
third is being assessed as the property owner
begins to consult with architects and contractors on how to replace the structures.
A fourth building burned has been deemed
salvageable.
Dubois, population 1,000, is a fly-fishing and
hunting destination between the Absaroka
and Wind River ranges about 50 miles east of
Grand Teton National Park. The new storefronts will retain the town’s Western flavor,
said Reg Phillips, manager of the Wind River
Land and Building Co. properties.
“The boardwalks survived the fire just
fine,” Phillips said. “No matter what happens, they will still be there.”
The eight businesses destroyed in Dubois
included an accounting firm, gallery, fly shop
and a flea market called The Mart where
dozens of people rented space to sell antiques
and other items.
Investigators theorize the fire began in
dried-out building material next to a stove
chimney in the attic of The Mart. An official
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The Sheridan Press
144 Grinnell Ave. Sheridan, WY 82801
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www.DestinationSheridan.com
Today’s edition is published for:
John Vickrey
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BUSINESS
OPINION
PEOPLE
PAGE SIX
3
4
5
6
ALMANAC
SPORTS
COMICS
CLASSIFIEDS
9
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THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
ALTERNATIVE: Partnership with college
committee reviewing the
need for alternative schools
With the study, there are
in each of the Sheridan
some key elements requirCounty school districts and
ing review including an
the Johnson County School
enrollment projection num- District has been meeting
ber, a look at the capacities
recently as well. Carroll
of other secondary schools
said they have been examinin the district and a review
ing things like vision, misof viable solutions.
sion, values, goals, instrucUsing the cohort formula
tional models, student supprovided by the SFC, SCSD2 port systems and student
facilities director Julie
outcomes trying to deterCarroll determined that a
mine how to capture more
grade 6-12 alternative
students who don’t do as
school in SCSD2 would
well in a mainstream educahouse 156 students; theretion system. However, steerfore neither the high school ing committee meetings
nor the junior high have the have yet to be open to the
capacity to house a school
public and requests for
within a school.
information regarding their
Viable solutions the disdiscussions and progress
trict explored for housing
have resulted in limited
the new alternative school
feedback.
included the old Highland
“It’s kind of coincidental
Park Elementary School
that the board had put this
site, the old Woodland Park committee together about a
Elementary School back
year ago,” Carroll said.
acreage and a co-located site “But basically it has flowed
within Sheridan College.
handily right in with this
A collaborative steering
(SFC) report, so a lot of the
information had already
been gathered.”
The SCSD2 board of
trustees unanimously
approved the SFC report as
presented by Carroll and
will move forward pursuing
FROM 1
(ISSN 1074-682X)
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EXECUTIVE STAFF
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Mark Blumenshine
Sheridan Junior High projected growth
a site on or near the
Sheridan College campus.
During the regular meeting of the Northern
Wyoming Community
College District board of
trustees Thursday at
Sheridan College, a recommendation will be voted
upon authorizing the college administration to enter
into a long-term ground
lease with SCSD2 for the
purpose of building an
alternative high school on
property owned by
Sheridan College.
The school will also be
included in the district’s
five-year facilities plan
update.
Other funding requests
included in the facilities
plan will include funds for
the transportation department, funds for Sagebrush
Elementary School, component level funding and additional necessary repairs to
Sheridan High School.
In other business:
• a Gollings Endowment
Fund will be established
after unanimous approval
by the board, using
$1,237,500 of the $3,237,500
TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2015
COURTESY GRAPHIC |
District estimates of future enrollment for Sheridan Junior High School show the site would not
allow for an alternative school to be housed within the current facilities.
paid to them in the sale of
the 10 Gollings paintings
previously owned by the
district. The board will
determine at a later date
how the interest on the fund
will be distributed, but the
principal allocated to the
fund shall remain intact
and not distributed unless
required by law.
• a ground breaking ceremony will be held at
Sheridan High School for
the new sports facility project on Thursday at 5:30 p.m.
Students and several of the
major donors will provide
an overview of the project,
a shovel ceremony and a
celebration. All members of
the community are invited
to attend the event.
Organizers of the project
are hoping to wrap up the
locker sales portion of project fundraising at
Thursday’s event.
Currently, 257 of the 400
lockers have been sold.
WYOMING BRIEFS |
Environmentalists sue over
Grand Teton grizzly take limit
CHEYENNE (AP) —Environmentalists are suing
over how many grizzly bears would need to be killed
by elk hunters before Grand Teton National Park
officials would have to reassess their rules for elk
hunting in the park.
The Sierra Club and Western Watersheds Project
filed suit Friday in federal court in Washington,
D.C.
The lawsuit against the National Park Service and
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says planning for elk
hunters to kill as many as four grizzlies over the
next seven years fails to account for cumulative
threats to grizzlies across the region.
Grand Teton is among the few national parks that
allow hunting.
Hunters regularly kill grizzly bears in self-defense
in western Wyoming. That’s only happened once in
Grand Teton, when two elk hunters killed a grizzly
in self-defense in 2012.
Office Manager
Production Manager
Cheyenne getting veterans
mental health care facility
CHEYENNE (AP) — The Veterans Affairs
Department is building an extended-stay mental
health facility in Cheyenne so Wyoming veterans
can get care closer to home.
The Wyoming Tribune Eagle reported Tuesday
work on the 10-bed, $6.75 million facility is underway and is expected to be finished by the spring of
2016.
The veterans hospital in Cheyenne currently provides outpatient mental health care and outreach
services. Patients who need more intensive, longterm care have to go to Denver or elsewhere.
The new facility will offer that care in Cheyenne,
closer to veterans’ families.
VA officials expect to hire at least 26 additional
staff members for the facility, but the number of
employees hasn’t been determined yet.
The facility will have private rooms, communal
living areas, a kitchen and a laundry area.
COURTESY PHOTO |
In honor of John Patton
Rehabilitation Enterprises of North Eastern Wyoming participant Doug
Williams lowers the flag at the RENEW Service Center in honor of Rep.
John Patton, who died Sunday.
CITY: City, County to be responsible for project costs
FROM 1
Councilor Alex Lee, however, still opposed the agreement. Lee insisted he supports working with the county on
the construction portion of the project, but disagreed with
ultimately taking ownership of a street with homes on
both sides that are not annexed into city limits. Right now,
only 11th through 13th street are in city limits.
“The city [would be] taking on an expense in an area
where we’re not being compensated to cover that expense,”
he explained.
Other councilors felt the road acted as a city street.
Numerous city residents travel the heavily trafficked
Holloway Avenue each day to get to work, Councilor
Thayer Shafer said.
Sheridan County Commission Chairman Tom Ringley
spoke in support of city-county cooperation for the
Holloway Avenue agreement and also moving forward.
“I’m really optimistic, and so is the Council, on the ability of Sheridan County and the city of Sheridan to act as
one,” he said.
The measure eventually passed by 5-1 vote with only Lee
dissenting.
Under terms of the joint agreement, the county will
administer all construction. The city and county will each
be responsible for 100 percent of project costs on their
respective sections of Holloway Avenue, and the parties
will split engineering services 50-50.
The Sheridan County commissioners and Sheridan City
Council each previously passed a memorandum of understanding on how to proceed with road annexations.
Holloway Avenue will be the first construction project to
use the conditions laid out in the MOU.
In other business:
• Approval in the consent agenda finalized the contract
between the city and IAFF Local 276 for fire protection.
Firefighter union leaders and City Council members spent
previous meetings negotiating the finer points of the
agreement and reached a preliminary deal on March 17.
The last steps were union and subsequent council ratification.
• The Council held a public hearing and then approved
the first reading of an annexation of roughly 25,000 square
feet on Independent Lane. The land will be zoned R-1 residential.
Sheridan initiated the annexation to rectify an awkward
split in the municipal boundary caused when a parcel
north of Independent Lane was annexed several years ago,
leaving the small area to the south unincorporated.
A staff report found the city could provide solid waste
collection and also police protection. The property already
has access to central water and sewer, and the city would
honor its franchise agreement with existing electrical utilities.
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BUSINESS
TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A3
Will 2015 be the busiest tourism season to date?
BY MIKE DUNN
[email protected]
SHERIDAN — Tourism is a moving target, Sheridan
Travel and Tourism Executive Director Shawn Buckley
said.
It changes annually — they never know how much of
their audience they will retain from last year or what new
tourists they will draw in for the coming year.
There are too many variables to definitively predict a
boom or bust tourism season in Sheridan. But if everything falls into place, this year could be the most successful on record.
Last year was the most successful tourism season for the
state of Wyoming. Approximately 10.1 million people visited the state, increasing 11 percent from the previous year.
This created an 11 percent increase in the tourism-based
industries over the past 10 years and added an 85 percent
increase for tax revenues from tourism and hospitality
industries.
Locally, 2015 is looking very positive for Sheridan County
tourism. There has already been a 16 percent increase in
lodging tax revenues from this time last year.
“It’s really a strong indication of what is to come,”
Buckley said.
The peak season for tourism is typically between
Memorial Day and Labor Day.
But the successes of a handful of events taking place
this summer are what could send Sheridan toward record
breaking numbers as well.
“The more we have to advertise about all that we have to
offer and what is going on in the community only adds to
the momentum we already have and reinforces our communications through our marketing mediums,” Buckley
said.
Rob Green, at Trails End Concert Park, is absolutely
floored with the success of Big Horn Country USA ticket
sales thus far. Since sales for this year’s concert began,
people have purchased tickets from all corners of the
nation including California, New England, the Midwest
and Canada.
“Eighty-five percent of our buys are out of county,”
Green said. “This isn’t our money being spent here, this is
new money coming in … I can’t believe we’ve been able to
do that.”
The concert venue expanded its capacity from last year
and it has paid dividends thus far. With 3,300 tickets sold,
organizers said they are about halfway to their goal of a
record 8,500 concert attendants.
Between the area hotels and restaurants, Green expects
the concert goers to bring millions in revenues to the local
tourism industry.
“Toby Keith plays 35 cities, it’s not like he’s just playing
in Sheridan,” Green said. “People can see him anywhere,
but they are deciding to come to Sheridan.”
Likewise, the Sheridan WYO Rodeo breaks attendance
records almost every year, and this year is no exception.
Jeff Wells, a member of the Sheridan WYO Rodeo board
and its ticket committee, said tickets are selling at a brisk
pace compared to 2014, nearly one-third more tickets than
they sold at this time last year.
“If that continues, obviously we are going to blow last
year’s tickets and attendance numbers out of the water,”
Wells said.
The Sheridan WYO Rodeo is expected to draw 22,000 people, both regionally and nationally, to Sheridan this July.
Buckley said other large events, such the reopening of
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
While area economic and tourism leaders say events like the Sheridan WYO Rodeo and Big Horn Country USA will draw visitors from
out of town for events, others say the area’s tourism season could depend largely on weather. If the spring and summer months are
too rainy, it deters campers. If it is too dry, fire restrictions could also deter camping.
the Sheridan Inn and The Brinton Museum, are bound to
bring people into Sheridan as well.
For recreationists utilizing the Bighorn National Forest,
this year’s projections are hard to pin down. Public Affairs
Specialist Susie Douglas said weather will have a lot to do
with the success of the recreation season — too much rain
during the spring and summer will keep campers away,
not enough will cause fire restrictions which often hamper
campsite usage.
The bulk of the traffic that comes through Sheridan
County includes travelers coming to and from the Black
Hills and Yellowstone National Park. But dwindling gas
prices may not have as much of an impact on Sheridan’s
tourism as some may anticipate. Many traveling to those
destinations have made travel arrangements and reservations many months in advance and typically continue
their vacation regardless of gas prices.
“Even when gas prices are high, we haven’t seen much of
a decline,” Douglas said. “We get a lot of people from the
region … people coming from places like New Jersey have
been planning those trips for a while and gas prices won’t
keep them from going to Sheridan.”
Buckley said it’s challenging to determine exactly what
type of impact gas prices will have on the Sheridan
tourism industry, but in theory, getting to Sheridan will be
much easier for travelers.
Even if many things go right for the tourism industry
this summer, detriments still exist. The biggest of which is
the recent news of Sheridan County Airport losing its
commercial air service, which Buckley said will hurt
Sheridan from becoming a destination rather than a stop
along the way.
“We do geographically fall between (Yellowstone and
Mount Rushmore) and that is both a strength and a weakness,” Buckley said. “It’s a strength because there is an
audience passing through that we can capture, but it’s a
weakness in that it does position Sheridan as a secondary
destination. That, coupled with the lack of air service,
makes it extremely challenging to identify Sheridan as a
singular-point destination.”
Landon’s to host raised bed and bug workshops Saturday
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Landon’s Greenhouse and
Nursery will host two workshops Saturday
focused on gardening in small areas and on
pest management.
In “Growing in Small Spaces: Building
Raised Beds,” Pete Veinbergs will demon-
strate how to design and build a raised garden bed, which can help a garden fit into a
small space. Raised beds can be in fixed
locations or mobile.
Veinbergs will also have materials on
hand for participants to purchase a raised
garden kit.
The workshop will take place at 11 a.m.
Saturday.
In “Bugs Buggin’ Ya?,” Donald Legerski
will teach participants how to deal with
garden pests by being knowledgeable about
the pests themselves. Learn how to scout
plants for bugs and the best methods to
treat plants and eliminate the threat of
bugs.
The workshop will be held at 1 p.m.
Saturday.
Landon’s will also host its weekly farmers market from 9-11 a.m. Saturday.
A prize drawing will be held directly
after the workshops for those who called
and preregistered. For more information
or to register, call 672-8340 or stop by the
greenhouse.
Landon’s Greenhouse and Nursery is
located at 505 College Meadows Drive.
A4
OPINION
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Patton recalled;
Wollenman game
S
heridan’s City Council proclaimed
today as Vietnam Veteran’s
Remembrance Day.
It’s most certainly a gesture that’s felt
throughout the community.
••••••
God bless John Patton.
When he passed away
Sunday afternoon after a
long battle with pulmonary issues, the community’s shoulders
PUBLISHER’S seemed to slump a little.
He was always an advocate
NOTEBOOK
for Sheridan in the
|
Legislature; his passion
was education for
Stephen Woody
Wyoming children.
Governmental transparency was paramount.
Most of all, I remember his grace. His frequent trips into my office lifted my day. It
was far more than keeping in touch, or further explaining a vote or a point of view. He
was always saying something encouraging,
positive about the Press and its staff. Often
with humor. He was typically a source for
background on complex education legislation. Wyoming is emptier today.
LETTER |
‘Do the right thing,’
leadership, transparency
Re: Remembering John Patton
Sheridan and Wyoming has lost a rare
public servant in John Patton.
As a Wyoming journalist, I have had
more than my share of time to observe
those elected to represent us in this grand
experiment called “democracy.” The
service is difficult and challenges those
who attempt it. Most officials strive to
put aside their personal biases and agendas and not give in to the myriad pressures the job brings. But Rep. John
Patton stood above the crowd.
I remember the first time I met Patton
TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2015
when I interviewed him as a young
reporter for The Sheridan Press when he
was “retiring” from his first stint in the
Wyoming Legislature. It did not take me
long to learn that Patton was not afraid to
let people know what was on his mind,
but it was not about ego. He clearly saw
himself as a servant of the people, not
the other way around. He valued debate
and opportunity to share views with
those who disagreed.
As an advocate of public access to government, I greatly admired his efforts to
have committee chairs in the Legislature
announce their meetings and agendas
ahead of time so people could attend
those crucial meetings where a bill’s fate
may be largely determined. Some of his
••••••
A highly partisan Congress; a sitting president. A rancorous, even bitter debate over a
treaty negotiation with a foreign country.
Sound familiar?
Consider this item from the David S.
Heidler and Jeanne T. Heidler book,
“Washington’s Circle.”
In 1795, secretary of state John Jay had
negotiated a treaty with Great Britain. It
was increasingly unpopular and had been
settled by a close vote to resolve simmering
tensions left over from the Revolutionary
War.
In February 1796, there was a House resolution to extend “best wishes” for his 64th
birthday. In other words: “Happy Birthday,
Mister President.” It failed, 52-38.
••••••
Quotable
“Procrastination is the art of keeping up
with yesterday.”
— Don Marquis, humorist, The Boston
Globe
THE SHERIDAN
Press
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Office Manager
Mark
Blumenshine
Production
Manager
Letters must be signed and include an
address and telephone number – which
will not be published – for verification
purposes. Unsigned letters will not be
published, nor form letters, or letters that
we deem libelous, obscene or in bad taste.
Email delivery of letters into the Press
works best and have the best chance of
being published.
EDITOR’S NOTE: An attorney, Moats has represented the Press in legal
matters. He was a reporter for the Press in the 1980s.
FROM STAFF REPORTS
“John Patton was a wonderful
Wyoming man and a thoughtful, hard-working legislator
who set a positive example for
his colleagues. He loved
Wyoming and it showed in his
service. I was not at all surprised to find him still working
during a recent visit at the hospital. We are sorry to lose a
friend and great public servant.
Carol and I send our condolences to Virginia and his
entire family.”
— Gov. Matt Mead on the
death of Rep. John Patton, RSheridan.
“I was privileged to have
some time as superintendent to
listen and learn from Chairman
Patton. He led impactful change
in Wyoming education and
brought great perspective to the
Legislature. I, and the state of
Wyoming, have lost a great
mentor. I will miss him as a
friend and colleague.”
— Superintendent of
Public Instruction Jillian
Balow on Patton’s death.
B
The Iran 'Agreement' Charade
y abandoning virtually all its
demands for serious restrictions on
Iran's nuclear bomb program, the
Obama administration has apparently achieved the semblance of a preliminary
introduction to the beginning of a tentative
framework for a possible hope of an eventual agreement with Iran.
But even this hazy "achievement" may
vanish like a mirage. It takes two to agree
— and Iran has already publicly disputed
and even mocked what President Obama
says is the nature of that
framework.
Had Iran wholeheartedly agreed with everything the Obama administration said, that
agreement would still
have been worthless,
since Iran has already
blocked international
THOMAS
inspectors from its
nuclear facilities at
SOWELL
unpredictable times. The
|
appearance of international control is more
dangerous than a frank admission that
we don't really know what they are doing.
Why then all these negotiations?
Because these charades protect Barack
Obama politically, no matter how much
danger they create for America and the
world. The latest public opinion polls
show Obama's approval rating rising. In
political terms — the only terms that
matter to him — his foreign policy has
been a success.
If you look back through history, you
will be hard pressed to find a leader of
any democratic nation so universally popular — hailed enthusiastically by opposi-
DROP US A LINE |
The Sheridan Press welcomes letters to
the editor. The decision to print any submission is completely at the discretion of
the managing editor and publisher.
Bruce T. Moats
Cheyenne
QUOTABLE |
••••••
Big Horn’s Colby Wollenman had a solid
game for Michigan State in its 81-61 loss to
Duke Saturday in the national semi-finals.
While watching it, there was a sense that
most of the eyeballs tuned to the game hereabouts were watching him, as much as the
game. Wollenman is a junior reserve on
coach Tom Izzo’s team, a walk-on who
through skill and grit made the varsity and
found himself in a Final Four with his
Spartan teammates. Sheridan Press sports
editor Michael Pruden profiled the former
Big Horn and Sheridan all-stater (basketball, soccer) in Saturday’s edition.
Wollenman’s story was the number one
trending story on the Press’ website,
www.thesheridanpress.com.
Wollenman’s numbers: 10 minutes, two
points, three rebounds, one blocked shot.
During one rebound battle against Duke’s
All-American, Jahlil Okafor, he caught the
eye of the game announcers who praised
him for neutralizing Duke’s big man, an athlete who will likely be a first-round NBA
choice.
Best of all, he was recognized before the
game as the recipient of the Elite 89
Award, indicative of the student-athlete
with the highest cumulative grade-pointaverage, 3.98, at the Final Four.
The two-time winner of Michigan State’s
Scholar Athlete Award is a pre-med major.
colleagues were not too happy when he
began publicizing his committee meetings, as the public can sometimes be seen
as an impediment to getting “good”
things done. Of course, his actions put
pressure on other chairs to do the same.
Now, the rules require advance notice of
committee meetings.
John, you shared with us your wisdom,
humor, humility and a firm resolve to “do
the right thing.” You have left this world
better for your time among us.
tion parties as well as his own — as was
British Prime Minister Neville
Chamberlain when he returned from
Munich in 1938, waving an agreement
with Hitler's signature on it, and proclaiming "Peace for our time."
Who cared that he had thrown a small
country to the Nazi wolves, in order to get
a worthless agreement with Hitler? It
looked great at the time because it had
apparently avoided war.
Now Barack Obama seems ready to
repeat that political triumph by throwing
another small country — Israel this time
— to the wolves, for the sake of another
worthless agreement.
Back in 1938, Winston Churchill was
one of the very few critics who tried to
warn Chamberlain and the British public. Churchill said: "The idea that safety
can be purchased by throwing a small
State to the wolves is a fatal delusion."
After the ruinous agreement was made
with Hitler, he said: "You were given the
choice between war and dishonor. You
chose dishonor and you will have war."
Chamberlain's "Peace for our time" lasted
just under a year.
Comparing Obama to Chamberlain is
unfair -- to Chamberlain. There is no
question that the British prime minister
loved his country and pursued its best
interests as he saw it. He was not a "citizen of the world," or worse. Chamberlain
was building up his country's military
forces, not tearing them down, as Barack
Obama has been doing with American
military forces.
Secretary of State John Kerry, and
other members of the Obama administration, are saying that the alternative to an
agreement with Iran is war. But when
Israel bombed Iraq's nuclear reactors,
back in 1981, Iraq did not declare war on
Israel. It would have been suicidal to do
so, since Israel already had nuclear
bombs.
There was a time when either Israel or
the United States could have destroyed
Iran's nuclear facilities, with far less risk
of war than there will be after Iran
already has its own stockpile of nuclear
bombs. Indeed, the choice then will no
longer be between a nuclear Iran and war.
The choice may be between surrender to
Iran and nuclear devastation.
Barack Obama dismissed the thought of
America being vulnerable to "a small
country" like Iran. Iran is in fact larger
than Japan was when it attacked Pearl
Harbor, and Iran has a larger population.
If Japan had nuclear bombs, World War II
could have turned out very differently.
If anyone examines the hard, cold facts
about the Obama administration's actions
and inactions in the Middle East from the
beginning, it is far more difficult to reconcile those actions and inactions with a
belief that Obama was trying to stop Iran
from getting nuclear weapons than it is to
reconcile those facts with his trying to
stop Israel from stopping Iran from getting nuclear weapons.
This latest "agreement" with Iran —
with which Iran has publicly and loudly
disagreed — is only the latest episode in
that political charade.
THOMAS SOWELL is an American economist, social theorist and Senior
Fellow on Public Policy at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. He is
a syndicated columnist for Creators Syndicate and has authored more
than 30 books.
IN WASHINGTON |
Letters should not exceed 400 words. The
best-read letters are those that stay on a
single topic and are brief.
Letters can be edited for length, taste,
clarity. We reserve the right to limit frequent letter writers.
Write: Letters to the Editor
The Sheridan Press
P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyo. 82801
Email: [email protected]
President Barack Obama Rep. Cynthia Lummis
The White
1004
House
Longworth
1600
HOB
Pennsylvania
Washington,
Ave.
DC 20515
Washington,
DC 20500
Phone: 202-225-2311
Phone: 202-456-1111
Toll free: 888-879-3599
Fax: 202-456-1414
Fax: 202-225-3057
Sen. Mike Enzi
Sen. John Barrasso
Senate
307 Dirksen
Russell
Senate
Building 379A
Office Building
Washington,
Washington,
DC 20510
DC 20510
Phone: 202-224-3424
Toll free: 888-250-1879
Fax: 202-228-0359
Phone: 202-224-6441
Fax: 202-224-1724
The 1st Amendment: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the
freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.
A05 People 0407.qxp_A Section Template 4/7/15 10:00 AM Page 1
PEOPLE
TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
SC Adventure Club
to host annual
spring gear swap
Saturday
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan College
Outdoor Adventure Club will host its
annual spring gear swap on Saturday
from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Whitney
Academic Center atrium.
“The Sheridan College Outdoor
Adventure Club’s gear swap is one way
we reach out to the community,” SC student and club President Adam Haile said.
“I am a huge proponent of putting the
community back in community college.”
The club hosts two gear swaps per year,
and this is the sixth year for the event
that serves as the main source of
fundraising for the club.
“It’s an excellent way to find equipment
at a discounted price and an opportunity
to clean out the gear you no longer use,”
Haile said.
Admission to the event is free and open
to the community.
To sell used equipment, there will be a
drop-off period Friday from 4-8 p.m.
Community members may bring their
gear to the Whitney atrium, pay the $2
entry fee per item and set a sale price for
each item. If unsure how much an item
should be priced, event volunteers will
Sheridan Jaycees honored at national convention
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The U.S.
Junior Chamber recently
recognized members of the
Sheridan Jaycees among
the best in the country for
2014 during the organization’s national convention
in Nashville, Tennessee,
March 26-28.
Jamie Ostermyer, 2014
individual development
vice president, received the
JCI USA Heidi Juttner
Memorial Outstanding
Local Vice President
award. This award is given
based on leadership, motivation and inspiration to
members; community
impact; impact on the local
organization; participation
in state events; and exemplification of USJC values.
Presidential Medallions
were awarded to Billie
Chapman and Brianna
Straub for exemplary
efforts within the organization.
Molly Boyer, Michelle
Edwards and Cathy
Rosenthal were also
acknowledged for their outstanding support and service during the Nothing But
Nets BZZZ Tour 2.0.
The Sheridan Jaycees
were recognized for reaching 90 percent efficiency
within the Civic
Leadership Certification.
The chapter’s Christmas
Shopping Tour was also
voted in the top four for
Best Long-Term Local
Community Program and
for Project of the Year.
Representing the
Sheridan chapter at the
national convention were
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A5
help set a price.
Ten percent of each sale will go to the
club.
Community members can pick up
unsold gear following the event on
Saturday, between 3-5 p.m.
Alternate arrangements can be made
for item pick-up and drop-off. Donations
of equipment will be graciously accepted.
For more information, call 461-9285, email [email protected] or
visit
facebook.com/OutdoorAdventureClubSh
eridanCollege.
WGFD to hold aquatic
invasive species training
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The
Wyoming Game and Fish
Department will be offering watercraft and equipment inspection and
decontamination training
for aquatic invasive
species during April,
May and June at various
locations around the
state.
The trainings are open
to anyone interested in
learning more about
aquatic invasive species
and becoming certified in
watercraft inspections.
The trainings will provide the skills necessary
for boaters to inspect
their own watercraft
and will include training on basic mussel
biology, distribution,
transport vectors and
impacts. The focus is on
how to inspect watercraft that may be transporting zebra or quagga
mussels.
Training will include
classroom instruction,
a question and answer
session and a hands-on
watercraft inspection
exercise.
The training in
Sheridan will be held
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
April 14 at the Sheridan
Game and Fish Regional
Office, located at 700
Valley View Drive.
The training is free but
registration is requested
one week prior to the
class. Class size is limited
to 20 people.
For more information
or to register, contact
Game and Fish AIS coordinator Beth Bear at 7455180, ext. 256, or email
beth.bear[email protected]
Penrose Place Apartments
COURTESY PHOTO |
Sheridan Jaycees members, from left, Lacey Johnsen, Michelle Edwards and Billie Chapman represented the Sheridan chapter at the U.S. Junior Chamber national convention in Nashville,
Tennessee, in March. Several Sheridan Jaycees members were recognized for their service at the
convention.
Chapman, Edwards and
Lacey Johnsen.
Edwards and Rosenthal
also serve as project man-
agers on the national
board.
For more information
about the Sheridan
Jaycees, email [email protected] or visit
the chapter’s website at
sheridanjaycees.org.
Story Historical Society to feature program on early Banner
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Story Historical
Society will meet at 1:30 p.m. Sunday
at the Story Woman’s Club.
SHS bands
to perform
pre-festival
concert April 14
The program will feature Banner
resident Bea Hutson who will speak
on the history of Banner.
Coffee and cookies will be served,
and the event is free and open to the
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan High
School band department will hold a
pre-festival band concert at 7 p.m.
April 14 in the Sue Henry
Auditorium at Sheridan High School.
The Symphonic Band and the Wind
Ensemble will be performing the
songs they are taking to the
Northeast District Music Festival to
be held at Campbell County High
School in Gillette on April 30. These
public.
Story Woman’s Club is located at 28
N. Piney Road in Story.
For more information, call Patty
Hoover at 683-2452.
songs include "Foundry" by John
Macky, "American Riversongs" by
Pierre La Plante, "Shepherd's Hey"
by Percy Grainger and "Symphonic
Dance No. 3" by Clifton Williams.
Diane Knutson directs the SHS
bands.
The concert is free and open to the
public.
For more information, call SHS at
672-2495.
Sheridan High School is located at
1056 Long Drive.
MARRIAGES AND DIVORCES |
Divorces granted in March in 4th Judicial District
Court (plaintiff v. defendant):
• Mandy Jo Warren v. Eric Thaine Warren, March 31
• April Garcia Pedraza v. Bernardo Garcia Pedraza,
March 10
• Tawnie Dobson v. Gerald Scott Dobson, March 20
• Valerie Thomas v. Joel Enos, March 4
• Sarah Paisley v. Joshua Paisley, March 4
• Cindy Stellpflug v. Steven Stellpflug, March 18
• Leyla Peterson v. Beau Tyrel Peterson, March 4
• Deborah Louise Trentacosti v. Kenneth Allen
Trentacosti, March 31
• Shanna Cladwell v. Rick Knuckles, March 4
• Gerald Sue Clutter v. Darcy Scott Taylor, March 19
Marriage licenses issued and recorded by the
Sheridan County clerk’s office in March:
• Ulian Riel Hogen, 19, Gillette, and Jasmin Maria
Romero, 18, Gillette, March 20
• James Coleman Cullen, 46, Cameron, North Carolina,
and Shannon Elizabeth Eaton, 32, Cameron, North
Carolina, March 18
• Chad Sterling Chase, 32, Sheridan, and Ashley RobertaAnn Telford, 31, Sheridan, March 18
• Nicole Renee Gales, 27, Gillette, and Serena Kay
Jeffress, 36, Gillette, March 13
• Rebecca Ann Kauffman, 59, Sheridan, and Larry Allen
Fisher, 60, Sheridan, March 5
Great News for Seniors 62 yrs of Age or Older
Comfortable & Affordable Apartments
Accepting Applications for Seniors
CALL 763-4690 • TTY (800) 877-9965
• Rent Based on Income,
HUD 202 PRAC Program
• On-Site Community Administrator
• Off Street Parking
• Mailboxes on Premises
• Laundry Facility
• Electric, Gas, Water, Sewer & Trash
Pickup Paid by Penrose Place
• Community Room Available for
Social Gatherings and Meetings
For More Information or Application:
667 East 6th St. • Sheridan, WY 82801 • 307-763-4690
A6
PAGE SIX
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2015
TODAY IN HISTORY |
10 things to
know today
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Your daily look at latebreaking news, upcoming
events and the stories that
will be talked about today:
1. WHO’S MAKING CASE
FOR DEAL WITH TEHRAN
Obama defends an
emerging agreement by
noting Iran would be kept
a year away from obtaining a nuclear weapon for
more than a decade.
2. WHOSE CAREER IS
BLEMISHED BY ROLLING
STONE STORY
The article about an
apparently fictional gang
rape at the University of
Virginia is a rare demerit
for freelance journalist
Sabrina Rubin Erdely.
3. RAND PAUL READY TO
JOIN 2016 PRESIDENTIAL
CAMPAIGN
The tea party favorite
will begin his White
House campaign today,
kicking off the run with a
rally in downtown
Louisville.
4. MASS GRAVE EXHUMED
IN IRAQ
Forensic teams in the
liberated city of Tikrit
exhume at least 12 bodies
from the burial site
believed to contain hundreds of soldiers killed by
Islamic State militants last
year.
5. HOW OBAMA PRESENTS
CLIMATE CHANGE
The president is asking
Americans to think of
global warming as a threat
not just to the environment, but also to their
health.
6. MAN, KIDS DIE FROM
CARBON MONOXIDE
POISONING
The deceased, who were
identified as an adult and
seven young people ages 6
to the teens, were using a
generator after the power
company cut off electricity in their Maryland
home.
7. CALIFORNIA PRESSURED
TO STEP UP TO SLASH
WATER USE
The State Water
Resources Control Board
will start discussing how
to enforce the reduction,
which will likely include
cutback targets for cities.
8. CLOSING ARGUMENTS
SET IN HERNANDEZ TRIAL
Both sides have 90 minutes today to make their
case to the jury. The
lawyer of the former New
England Patriots star tight
end will go first, followed
by the prosecution.
9. DON MCLEAN’S
‘AMERICAN PIE’ COULD
BRING $1.5M AT AUCTION
Christie’s says the
singer-songwriter is selling 16 pages that include
the original working manuscript and typed drafts of
the song.
10. DUKE TOPS
WISCONSIN 68-63 FOR
NATIONAL TITLE
Led by Tyus Jones and
Jahlil Okafor, the Blue
Devils play like veterans
down the stretch, outscoring the Badgers by 14
points over the final 13
minutes.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Learning about the journey
Clearmont Community Church members pause for a prayer before an erected cross during the Journey to the Cross on Saturday
morning at the 7-Up Ranch near Clearmont. Church members traveled by foot to the cross at the 7-Up Ranch to pray and
reflect on the journey Jesus Christ took leading to his crucifixion.
LOCAL BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Science lecture to focus on
citizen science
SHERIDAN — The next installment of the
spring 2015 lecture series at the Sheridan College
Science Museum will be held at 7 p.m. Wednesday
at the Science Museum/Mohns Center at Sheridan
College.
The program, “WyoBio: A New Citizen Science
Web Portal for Wyoming Naturalists and
Researchers,” will focus on citizen science and be
led by University of Wyoming Biodiversity
Institute Project Coordinator Brenna Marsicek
and Associate Director Dorothy Tuthill.
The lecture is free and open to the public.
For additional information, call 674-6446, ext.
3500.
The Sheridan College Science Museum/Mohn’s
Center is located at 3059 Coffeen Ave.
Brinton Museum to offer lecture,
workshop with ceramic artist
BIG HORN — The Brinton Museum, in partnership with Sheridan College, will host ceramic
artist Kim Dickey for an evening lecture and workshop demonstration on Thursday and Friday.
Dickey is an art professor at the University of
Colorado at Boulder. She is known for her largescale, sculptural pieces.
Dickey received her master’s of fine arts in
ceramics from New York State College of
Ceramics at Alfred University. She has exhibited
her work extensively throughout the United States
and in group exhibitions in Canada, Germany,
Australia, Japan and Taiwan. She has received
numerous awards and fellowships.
Dickey was also represented in The Brinton
Museum’s 2014 summer show “Flora and Fauna.”
The lecture will be held at 7 p.m. Thursday in
The Brinton Museum’s Reception Gallery.
A one-day workshop will be held on Friday from
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the fine arts ceramics studio at
the Sheridan College Art Department.
Both events are free and open to the public.
Dickey’s lecture and workshop are funded by a
grant from the Homer A. and Mildred S. Scott
Foundation.
The Brinton Museum is located at 239 Brinton
Road in Big Horn. Sheridan College is located at
3059 Coffeen Ave. in Sheridan.
For more information, call The Brinton Museum
at 672-3173 or visit thebrintonmuseum.org.
City, county land use plan open
house set for Thursday
SHERIDAN — Are you curious about where and
how Sheridan might grow in the future? Do you
have an opinion about what kind of land use you’d
like to see surrounding city limits? Do you want
to see pathways extended from the city limits into
the county?
Make your opinions heard at an open house
regarding the future development of Sheridan and
the land surrounding Sheridan.
The open house, open to all members of the public, will be held from 4-6 p.m. Thursday at the
Sheridan County Chamber of Commerce, located
at 171 N. Main St.
The city of Sheridan, Sheridan County and planning consultants are updating the Joint Planning
Area Land Use Plan, and the city is also completing its new land use plan. The open house is a public outreach effort to obtain citizen input about the
direction and design of future land use.
A map of the proposed future land uses in
Sheridan will also be available for public review
and comments.
For more information, call city Planning and
Development Director Robert Briggs at 675-4225 or
County Planner Mark Reid at 675-2420.
Storyteller Dave Sage to present
at Story Library Friday
SHERIDAN — Storyteller Dave Sage, author of
“The Heirs of the Medallion,” will be at the Story
Branch Library from 1:30-2:30 p.m. Friday.
The program is geared toward adults but children in junior high and older will also enjoy
Sage’s storytelling.
For more information, call the Story Branch
Library at 683-2922.
The Story Branch Library is located at 20 N.
Piney Road in Story.
WEDNESDAY EVENTS |
• 10 a.m., Casual Conversations in History, Sheridan Senior Center, 211 Smith St.
• 11:30 a.m., Chamber of Commerce monthly luncheon, Best Western Sheridan Center, 612 N. Main St.,
$15 for lunch
• 7 p.m., “WyoBio: A new citizen science Web portal for Wyoming naturalists and researchers,” Mohns
Center/Science Museum, Sheridan College, 3059 Coffeen Ave.
TIPPED OVER |
Labor leader Victor Gotbaum dies;
helped NYC in 1970s crisis
NEW YORK (AP) — Victor Gotbaum, an influential New York labor leader who both fought City
Hall and helped it survive its 1970s fiscal crisis,
has died, his son said Monday. He was 93.
Gotbaum died Sunday at his Manhattan home,
Noah Gotbaum said. He said the cause of his
father’s death hasn’t been determined.
As the leader of the American Federation of
State, County and Municipal Employees’ District
Council 37 in New York, Gotbaum was the voice of
the nation’s biggest municipal union when the city
faced the threat of bankruptcy in the mid-1970s.
“Victor Gotbaum was a true New York City warrior — a man of action who dedicated his life to
organizing workers and improving their lives” but
also understood the importance of compromise,
Mayor Bill de Blasio said in a statement.
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On April 7, 1945, during
World War II, American
planes intercepted and effectively destroyed a Japanese
fleet, which included the battleship Yamato, that was headed to Okinawa on a suicide
mission.
On this date:
In 1788, an expedition led
by Gen. Rufus Putnam established a settlement at presentday Marietta, Ohio.
In 1862, Union forces led by
Gen. Ulysses S. Grant defeated
the Confederates at the Battle
of Shiloh in Tennessee.
In 1915, jazz singer-songwriter Billie Holiday, also
known as “Lady Day,” was
born in Philadelphia.
In 1927, the image and
voice of Commerce Secretary
Herbert Hoover were transmitted live from Washington
to New York in the first successful long-distance demonstration of television.
In 1939, Italy invaded
Albania, which was annexed
less than a week later.
In 1949, the Rodgers and
Hammerstein musical “South
Pacific” opened on Broadway.
In 1953, the U.N. General
Assembly ratified Dag
Hammarskjold of Sweden as
the new secretary-general,
succeeding Trygve Lie of
Norway.
In 1955, movie actress
Theda Bara died in Los
Angeles at age 69.
In 1966, the U.S. Navy
recovered a hydrogen bomb
that the U.S. Air Force had
lost in the Mediterranean Sea
off Spain following a B-52
crash.
In 1978, President Jimmy
Carter announced he was
deferring development of the
neutron bomb, a high-radiation weapon.
In 1985, British pop sensation Wham! (George Michael
and Andrew Ridgeley) performed at a packed Beijing
stadium in Communist
China’s first big-name rock
concert.
In 1990, a display of Robert
Mapplethorpe photographs
opened at Cincinnati’s
Contemporary Arts Center,
the same day the center and
its director were indicted on
obscenity charges (both were
acquitted). An arson fire
aboard a ferry en route from
Norway to Denmark killed 158
people.
Ten years ago: The blockbuster painkiller Bextra was
taken off the market, and the
FDA said all similar prescription drugs should strongly
warn about possible risk of
heart attacks and strokes.
Ibrahim al-Jaafari, a Shiite,
was named Iraq’s interim
prime minister; Kurdish
leader Jalal Talabani was
sworn in as interim president.
Historic bus service began
between the two parts of
Kashmir, one controlled by
India, the other by Pakistan.
Five years ago: North
Korea said it had convicted
and sentenced an American
man to eight years in a labor
prison for entering the country illegally and unspecified
hostile acts. (Aijalon Mahli
Gomes was freed in August
2010 after former U.S.
President Jimmy Carter
secured his release.). Space
shuttle Discovery docked at
the International Space
Station, its astronauts overcoming a rare antenna breakdown that had knocked out
radar tracking.
One year ago: Pro-Russian
activists barricaded inside
government buildings in eastern Ukraine proclaimed their
regions to be independent and
called for a referendum on
seceding from Ukraine, an
echo of events that had led to
Russia’s annexation of
Crimea.
Thought for Today: “Verba
movent, exempla trahunt.”
(Words move people, examples
compel them.) — Latin
proverb.
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TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2015
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REBUILD: Pitching in to help the victims
FROM 1
As firefighters toiled in 20-below cold the
night of Dec. 30, townspeople gathered at a
bar across the street to watch the spectacle
of fire and ice from the water sprayed.
‘I think we’ll be ready for the tourists
when they come this summer, and we’ll
have plenty of businesses that will serve
them.’
Mary Ellen Honsaker
St. Thomas Episcopal Church parish administrator
Since then, they’ve pitched in to help the
victims. As of early April, a local organization, Needs of Dubois, had raised almost
$89,000 and disbursed around $72,000 toward
the bills of affected business owners.
“We basically cover daily survival needs,”
said Jungck, president of the nonprofit. “As
people lost their income, we’re covering
food, gas, medical expenses, utilities, rent.”
St. Thomas Episcopal Church has raised
almost $78,000, more than a quarter of that
from a Valentine’s Day fundraiser, to help
business owners recoup lost inventory,
parish administrator Mary Ellen Honsaker
said.
“They, of course, were expecting nothing,
because they didn’t have insurance,” she
said Monday. “We’ve had an awful lot of
thanks and tears, so that’s been good.”
Nobody was hurt in the fire.
Traffic over Togwotee Pass northwest of
town will begin picking up once Grand
Teton and Yellowstone open for their summer seasons next month. The fly shop
destroyed is preparing to reopen elsewhere
in town and a new Mexican restaurant also
will be opening up, Mayor Twila Blakeman
said.
“I think we’ll be ready for the tourists
when they come this summer, and we’ll have
plenty of businesses that will serve them,”
she said.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A7
US job openings surge,
yet employers slow to hire
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. job openings surged in February to a 14-year
high, yet employers filled fewer of
those jobs than in the previous month.
On a brighter note, the Labor
Department also says that layoffs fell
sharply. Taken together, the figures
suggest that signs of a stumbling economy have prompted U.S. businesses to
pull back on hiring. But they weren’t
spooked enough to cut more jobs.
The number of available jobs rose 3.4
percent in February to 5.1 million, the
government says, the most since
January 2001. That indicates companies want to add staff. Yet total hiring
slipped 1.6 percent to 4.9 million.
Layoffs, meanwhile, plummeted 7.6
percent to 1.6 million, the lowest level
in 16 months. That points to a high
degree of job security for those
Americans who are employed.
Subscriptions as low as $108 a year!
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THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A9
SERVICE NOTICES |
Sending
out a
prayer
John Patton
John Patton, 84, of Sheridan passed away Sunday, April 5,
2015 at Sheridan Memorial Hospital. A Memorial Service will
be held at 2:00 pm Saturday, April 11, 2015 at St. Peter’s
Episcopal Church, 1 S. Tschirgi. Arrangements have been
entrusted with Champion Funeral Home.
DEATH NOTICES |
Ray Edward Race
Ray Edward Race, 72, of Dayton, passed away on Monday,
April 6, 2015, at his residence.
A Visitation will be held from 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday,
April 8, 2015, at Kane Funeral Home. A Celebration of Life will
be held at 2:00 p.m. on Friday, April 10, 2015, at the Dayton
Community Church.
Online condolences may be written at www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
Clearmont Community
Church member Barbara
Hoyt nails a note to a wooden cross on the hill during
the Journey to the Cross
Saturday morning at the 7Up Ranch near Clearmont.
The notes were made by the
members to list prayers,
needs, sins or burdens they
wished to surrender.
OBITUARIES |
Carol S. Norcross
December 17, 1949 - March 27, 2015
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
AGENDA |
Northern Wyoming Community
College District board of trustees
meeting
6 p.m. Thursday
W132, Sheridan College
3059 Coffeen Ave.
1. Regular meeting minutes
from March 10
• President’s report
• Gillette College Advisory Board
report
• Johnson County Advisory Board
report
• Organization reports
1. Classified staff council
2. SC Student Senate
• Call to order and roll call
• Agenda additions and deletions
• Consent agenda
• Public comments
• New business
1. Introduction of SC
Foundation Student Partners
2. Ag project presentation
3. Preliminary budget
4. Long-term ground lease
agreement for alternative school
5. Early retirement request
for Rose Hendrickson
6. Decision on ACCT presentation
7. WACCT Executive Director
search
8. HLC annual conference
report
• Adjourn
• Executive session to discuss personnel matters
REPORTS |
SHERIDAN
FIRE-RESCUE
Monday
• Rocky Mountain
Ambulance assist, 100
block Coffeen Avenue, 12:51
p.m.
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
AMBULANCE
Monday
• Trauma, 400 block
North Jefferson Street, 6:10
a.m.
• Medical, 200 block Kurtz
Drive, 8:54 a.m.
• Medical, 2200 block
Coffeen Avenue, 9:33 a.m.
• Medical, 100 block River
Road, 9:58 a.m.
• Medical, 100 block
Coffeen Avenue, 12:50 p.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
Fifth Street, 3 p.m.
• Medical, 100 block
Darlington Road, 7:36 p.m.
• Medical, 900 block West
Brundage Lane, 11:08 p.m.
SHERIDAN
MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL
Monday
• No admissions reported.
• Dismissals — Bronwyn
C. Barnes, Sheridan;
Lincoln Robert Barnes,
Sheridan
SHERIDAN POLICE
DEPARTMENT
Information in the police
reports is taken from the
SPD website.
Monday
• Theft (cold), West Fifth
Street, 7:19 a.m.
• Criminal entry,
Meridian Street, 8:40 a.m.
• Dog at large, De Smet
Avenue, 9:23 a.m.
• Theft (cold), West
Loucks Street, 9:26 a.m.
• Dog at large, North
Main Street, 9:49 a.m.
• Removal of subject,
Sugarland Drive, 10:04 a.m.
• Civil dispute, Broadway
Street, 10:37 a.m.
• Dog at large, North
Main Street, 11:16 a.m.
• Civil dispute, Shoshone
Street, noon
• Accident with injuries,
Coffeen Avenue, 12:15 p.m.
• Parking complaint, First
Street, 12:31 p.m.
• Found property, North
Main Street, 12:56 p.m.
• Vehicle identification
number inspection, West
12th Street, 12:56 p.m.
• Accident, Long Drive,
1:03 p.m.
• Welfare check, West 16th
Street, 1:12 p.m.
• Lost property, Sheridan
area, 1:22 p.m.
• Lost property, Sheridan
area, 3 p.m.
• Agency assist, Strahan
Parkway, 3:26 p.m.
• Burglar alarm, Olympus
Drive, 4:17 p.m.
• Parking complaint,
Gould Street, 5:12 p.m.
• Harassment, Parker
Avenue, 6:09 p.m.
• Suspicious circumstances, West Fifth Street,
6:30 p.m.
• Burglar alarm, West
Fifth Street, 8:38 p.m.
• Domestic, North Main
Street, 9:08 p.m.
• Removal of subject,
Shoshone Street, 9:24 p.m.
• Bar check, North Main
Street, 10:40 p.m.
• Bar check, North Main
Street, 10:40 p.m.
• Bar check, North Main
WEDNESDAY
SHERIDAN COUNTY
SHERIFF’S OFFICE
Monday
• Assist agency, Decker
Road, mile marker 1, 9:15
a.m.
• Warrant service, West
13th Street, 9:27 a.m.
• Medical, River Road,
Dayton, 9:54 a.m.
• DUI (citizen report),
Highway 331, mile marker
2, 11:23 p.m.
ARRESTS
Names of individuals
arrested for domestic violence or sexual assault will
not be released until those
individuals have appeared
in court.
Monday
• Alexander James Higby,
21, Sheridan, probation violation/revocation, out of
county court, arrested by
SPD
• William Franklin
Lowery, 37, Sheridan, driving without interlock
device, circuit court,
arrested by SPD
JAIL
Today
Daily inmate count: 61
Female inmate count: 14
Inmates at treatment
facilities (not counted in
daily inmate count): 0
Inmates housed at other
facilities (not counted in
daily inmate count): 5
Number of book-ins for
the previous day: 1
Number of releases for
the previous day: 8
FRIDAY
THURSDAY
33
Cloudy, brief
showers; cooler
44
27
Decreasing
clouds and
warmer
Mostly cloudy
Mild with sun,
then clouds
52
58
67
Almanac
Temperature
High/low .........................................................53/33
Normal high/low ............................................55/28
Record high .............................................78 in 1969
Record low ...............................................13 in 1997
Precipitation (in inches)
Monday........................................................... 0.00"
Month to date................................................. 0.00"
Normal month to date .................................... 0.23"
Year to date .................................................... 2.13"
Normal year to date ....................................... 2.31"
27
31
36
The Sun
Rise
Set
Today
Wednesday
Thursday
6:39 a.m.
6:37 a.m.
6:35 a.m.
7:42 p.m.
7:44 p.m.
7:45 p.m.
The Moon
Rise
Set
Today
Wednesday
Thursday
11:06 p.m.
none
12:04 a.m.
8:28 a.m.
9:08 a.m.
9:54 a.m.
Last
New
First
9a 10a 11a Noon 1p
2p
3p
4p
5p
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection. Shown is the highest
value for the day.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High;
11+ Extreme
Cody
31/45
Apr 11
Apr 18
Apr 25
May 3
Next Cowboy Draw
drawing: April 9
Call The Sheridan
Press TODAY!!
Shown is Wednesday's weather.
Temperatures are tonight's lows
and Wednesday's highs.
Ranchester
33/45
SHERIDAN
33/44
For more detailed weather
information on the Internet, go to:
www.thesheridanpress.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2015
Clearmont
36/46
Story
31/42
Gillette
35/47
Buffalo
35/44
Worland
32/50
Wright
36/52
Kaycee
34/47
Regional Cities
City
Billings
Casper
Cheyenne
Cody
Evanston
Gillette
Green River
Jackson
Wed.
Hi/Lo/W
49/31/sh
55/27/sh
59/31/sh
45/28/sh
40/27/sh
47/29/sh
47/28/sh
42/21/sh
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
58/35/pc
49/29/sn
46/27/r
51/34/pc
48/28/c
48/26/sn
50/26/sh
44/26/sh
Lawrence Blake 77, of Sheridan, passed
early Easter morning, April 5, 2015, surrounded by his beloved wife of 45 years
Margaret Mary (Peggy) and his four sons
Sean, Andrew, Brendan and Daniel. Larry
as he was affectionately known was the secLawrence
ond of the four sons of William Blake and
Blake
Marion Coleman-Blake and born in
Flushing, NY on January 20, 1938.
Larry was always inquisitive and had an affinity for languages and taught himself German while living in Vienna after
his deployment in the Army. He was a lifelong student and a
voracious reader. He attended several universities including
Ole Miss, The University of Vienna, NYU and Pace University.
Larry had an extensive and successful career in which he wore
many hats. He was an entrepreneur, a bank director and an
adjunct professor at his alma mater Pace University.
Larry fell in love with Wyoming as a young sportsman working in Jackson Hole and at Yellowstone Park and decided to
retire in Sheridan to enjoy the beauty of the Big Horns. Larry
is survived by his beloved Peggy and his four sons and grand
children Dylan and Julianna and extended family.
A Rosary will be held at 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday, April 8, 2015,
at Kane Funeral Home. Mass of the Christian Burial will be
held at 10:00 a.m. on Thursday, April 9, 2015, at Holy Name
Church with Father Jim Heiser officiating. A Reception will
follow in the Parish Hall. Interment will be held at the Family
Homestead with Military Honors.
Online condolences may be written at www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
– 672-2431 –
National Weather for Wednesday, April 8
Big Horn
34/53
Basin
34/53
January 20, 1938 - April 5, 2015
Delivery as low
as $108 a year!
Hardin
37/49
Parkman
33/45
Dayton
34/46
Lovell
33/49
Lawrence Blake
Estimated jackpot:
$475,000
Thermopolis
32/46
Weather on the Web
UV Index tomorrow
Winning numbers:
23-24-30-32-44;
Full
Big Horn Mountain Precipitation
24 hours through noon Monday ..................... 0.00"
Here are the results
of Monday’s
Cowboy Draw
lottery drawing:
Broadus
37/47
Sun and Moon
Sheridan County Airport through Monday
Quarter
Pounder
SATURDAY
Billings
36/49
Clouds and
spotty showers
2146 Coffeen Ave. • 673-1100
2590 N. Main • 672-5900
Regional Weather
5-Day Forecast for Sheridan
TONIGHT
Street, 10:41 p.m.
Carol S. Norcross, 65, of Sheridan, passed away on Friday,
March 27, 2015, at the Sheridan Memorial Hospital.
Carol was born on December 17, 1949, in Great Lakes, IL, to
parents Harry K. and Gladys (Lockman) Norcross.
Carol enjoyed taking long walks and animals, especially her
little dogs. She was very artistic and enjoyed both painting and
sculpting. She will be greatly missed.
Carol is survived by her brother, Frank Norcross of Florence,
OR.
Services will be held at 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, April 8, 2015,
at the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah Witness with Mike Turley officiating.
Memorials to honor Carol may be made to the Kelly
Schreibeis Memorial Foundation at P.O. Box 6786, Sheridan,
WY, 82801, Sheridan Dog and Cat Shelter at 84 East Ridge Road,
Sheridan, WY, 82801, or to the Hospice of the Big Horns at 1401
West 5th St., Sheridan, WY, 82801.
Online condolences may be written at www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
Fri.
Hi/Lo/W
62/42/s
58/30/pc
57/31/pc
56/34/pc
53/31/pc
57/34/s
55/26/c
46/24/c
City
Laramie
Newcastle
Rawlins
Riverton
Rock Springs
Scottsbluff
Sundance
Yellowstone
Wed.
Hi/Lo/W
54/24/sh
49/29/sh
51/25/sh
46/30/sh
45/26/sh
63/30/sh
47/28/sh
39/8/sh
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
45/25/sn
44/24/sn
46/28/sh
49/30/sh
48/29/c
53/25/c
42/26/sn
40/14/sh
Fri.
Hi/Lo/W
54/26/c
55/30/pc
53/29/pc
56/31/c
52/29/c
64/29/pc
53/33/pc
40/18/c
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Shown are
Wednesday's
noon positions of
weather systems
and precipitation.
Temperature
bands are highs
for the day.
A10 Open 0407.qxp_A Section Template 4/7/15 10:05 AM Page 1
A10
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2015
Obama says Iran could cut nuke
time to near zero in 13 years
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Riding companion
A student greets a puppy held by rodeo instructor JR Vezain during the bareback/saddle bronc riding
school Saturday at the Sheridan College AgriPark north of Sheridan.
Postal Service
issuing
stamp to
honor late
poet Maya
Angelou
WASHINGTON (AP) —
The U.S. Postal Service is
issuing a new limited edition “Forever” stamp
honoring the late poet,
author and civil rights
champion Maya Angelou.
Angelou rose from
poverty, segregation and
violence to become a
force on stage, screen and
the printed page. She
died last May at her
Winston-Salem, North
Carolina, home at 86.
The stamp for dedication at a Washington ceremony Tuesday showcases Atlanta artist Ross
Rossin’s 2013 portrait of
Angelou, an oil painting
in the Smithsonian’s
National Portrait Gallery
collection
The postal service says
Ethel Kessler of
Bethesda, Maryland,
designed the stamp based
on Rossin’s portrait. It
includes the quotation:
“A bird doesn’t sing
because it has an answer,
it sings because it has a
song.”
Angelou was a longtime
professor of American
studies at Wake Forest
University.
WASHINGTON (AP) — Defending an
emerging nuclear deal, President Barack
Obama said Iran would be kept a year
away from obtaining a nuclear weapon
for more than a decade, but conceded
Tuesday that the buffer period could
shrink to almost nothing after 13 or more
years.
Obama, whose top priority at the
moment is to sell the framework deal to
critics, was pushing back on the charge
that the deal fails to eliminate the risk
because it allows Iran to keep enriching
uranium. He told NPR News that Iran
will be capped for a decade at 300 kilograms — not enough to convert to a
stockpile of weapons-grade material.
“What is a more relevant fear would be
that in Year 13, 14, 15, they have advanced
centrifuges that enrich uranium fairly
rapidly, and at that point, the breakout
times would have shrunk almost down to
zero,” Obama said.
Breakout time refers to how long it
would take to build a bomb if Iran decided to pursue one full-bore — in other
words, how long the rest of the world
would have to stop it. The framework deal
expands Iran’s breakout time — currently two to three months — to at least a
year. But that constraint would stay in
place only for 10 years, at which point
some restrictions would start phasing
out.
Although Obama acknowledged that
Iran’s breakout time could shrink, he
said at least the world would have better
insight into Iran’s capabilities because of
extensive inspections in the earlier years.
“The option of a future president to
take action if in fact they try to obtain a
nuclear weapon is undiminished,”
Obama said.
The stark admission came as the president seeks to quiet a growing chorus
questioning whether the deal he and
world leaders have negotiated merely
delays the certainty of a nuclear-armed
Iran. Obama has insisted confidently that
Iran will not get a nuclear weapon on his
watch, which ends in roughly 20 months,
but has made no similar assurances
about his successors.
Tehran has always maintained it
doesn’t want a nuclear bomb, but the
international community has been skeptical, and America’s close ally Israel considers a nuclear Iran an existential
threat. U.S. lawmakers and foreign policy
hawks have questioned how Obama can
strike a diplomatic deal with a country
that continues to threaten Israel and tops
the U.S. list of state sponsors of terror.
Obama, who is also working to restore
ties to longtime U.S. foe Cuba, has suggested cautiously in the past that a
nuclear agreement could be a precursor
to Iran pursuing a more amicable relationship with the world community. But
in the days since the framework deal was
announced in Switzerland, his administration has sought to emphasize that the
deal relies on inspections, not trust, and
is worthwhile even if the Iranian regime
remains venomously anti-American.
“I think there are hard-liners inside of
Iran that think it is the right thing to do
to oppose us, to seek to destroy Israel, to
cause havoc in places like Syria or Yemen
or Lebanon,” Obama said. “If they don’t
change at all, we’re still better off having
the deal.”
Obama presents climate change as hazard to your health
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack
Obama will ask Americans to think of climate change as a threat not just to the
environment, but also to their health.
Obama on Tuesday was to announce a
series of steps that private entities like
Google and Microsoft are taking to better
prepare the nation’s health systems for the
inevitable effects of a warmer, more erratic climate. He was to be joined at Howard
University Medical School by Surgeon
General Vivek Murthy and the head of the
Environmental Protection Agency, Gina
McCarthy.
Warning of the perils to the planet has
gotten the president only so far; polls consistently show the public is skeptical that
the steps Obama has taken to curb pollution are worth the cost to the economy. So
Obama is aiming to put a spotlight on
ways that climate change will have real
impacts on the body, like more asthma
attacks, allergic reactions and injuries
from extreme weather.
Microsoft’s research arm will develop a
prototype for drones that can collect large
quantities of mosquitoes, then digitally
analyze their genes and pathogens. The
goal is to create a system that could pro-
vide early warnings about infectious diseases that could break out if climate
change worsens.
Google has promised to donate 10 million hours of advanced computing time on
new tools, including risk maps and early
warnings for things like wildfires and oil
flares using the Google Earth Engine platform, the White House said. Google’s camera cars that gather photos for its “Street
View” function will start measuring
methane emissions and natural gas leaks
in some cities this year.
The Obama administration was also to
announce a series of modest steps it will
take to boost preparedness, such as
expanding access to data to predict and
minimize the health effects from climate
change.
Obama’s effort to link climate change to
health comes as he works to build support
for steps he’s taken to curb U.S. emissions
that are opposed by business and industry,
including strict limits on vehicles and
power plants. The president is relying on
those emissions cuts to make up the U.S.
contribution to a global climate treaty that
he and other world leaders expect to finalize in December.
Consumer groups say YouTube Kids app is deceiving
WASHINGTON (AP) — The new YouTube
Kids mobile app targets young children
with unfair and deceptive advertising and
should be investigated, a group of consumer advocates told the Federal Trade
Commission in a letter Tuesday.
Google introduced the app in February as
a “safer” place for kids to explore videos
because it was restricted to “family-focused
content.”
But the consumer activists say the app is
so stuffed with advertisements and product
placements that it’s hard to tell the difference between entertainment and commercials. One example is a 7-minute video of
Disney’s “Frozen” characters who appear
as dolls inside a toy McDonald’s, eating ice
cream and drinking Sprite.
The activists say digital media should be
subject to the same rules as television,
which limits commercial content on kids’
programming.
“As a consumer, you should have the right
to know who is trying to persuade you,”
said Angela Campbell with the Institute for
Public Representation at Georgetown Law,
who provided legal counsel to the coalition.
In young children especially, “it takes
unfair advantage of their trusting nature
and lack of experience,” she added.
YouTube released a statement Monday
saying: “When developing YouTube Kids,
we consulted with numerous partners and
child advocacy and privacy groups. We are
always open to feedback on ways to
improve the app.”
Since its inception in 2005, YouTube has
become the world’s most popular online
video site, with more than 1 billion users.
For parents, it’s become an easy way to
find Elmo song clips or full episodes of
“Barney & Friends.” But when searching
for Elmo or Barney, it’s easy to pull up
other user-generated content aimed at
adults, such as the two puppets cursing or
waving guns.
“Now, parents can rest a little easier
knowing that videos in the YouTube Kids
app are narrowed down to content appropriate for kids,” wrote Shimrit Ben-Yair,
the app’s product manager, in a February
blog post.
According to the consumer groups’ letter,
the videos mingle commercial and entertainment content in ways that wouldn’t be
allowed on television. Search for “My Little
Pony,” for example, and the first several
options are lengthy advertisements for My
Little Pony Play-Doh and toy kitchen sets,
including one Play-Doh segment stretching
19 minutes.
“The fact that children are viewing the
videos on a tablet or smartphone screen
instead on a television screen does not
make it any less unfair and deceptive,” the
letter states.
Groups that signed the letter were the
Center for Digital Democracy, the
Campaign for a Commercial-Free
Childhood, American Academy of Child
and Adolescent Psychiatry, Center for
Science in the Public Interest, Children
Now, Consumer Federation of America,
Consumer Watchdog, Consumers Union,
Corporate Accountability International
and Public Citizen.
B01 Sports 0407.qxp_A Section Template 4/7/15 9:49 AM Page B1
SPORTS
TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
DUKE
WINS
Duke, Krzyzewski
heading home to
celebrate NCAA
championship
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) —
Mike Krzyzewski stood
beside the gleaming national championship trophy, posing for the traditional, confetti-soaked photos after
winning a fifth title.
But when a photographer
asked Krzyzewski to hold up
five fingers, Duke’s Hall of
Fame coach declined.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Kendrick,
Rockies
trounce
Brewers
in opener
Athletes
OF THE WEEK
Athletes of the Week are selected by The Sheridan Press sports reporters.
Peyton Bomar
Dontae Crow
SHS - Track and Field
SHS - Soccer
Bomar
• Bomar finished first in 300-meter
hurdles.
• She finished first in long jump.
• She finished first in triple jump.
• She finished second in 100-meter
dash.
• Crow scored two goals against
Gillette.
• He helped Sheridan secure a 3-0
win over the Camels.
MILWAUKEE (AP) — Kyle
Kendrick pitched seven
sharp innings and also got
two hits Monday as the
Colorado Rockies trounced
the Milwaukee Brewers 10-0
on opening day.
Corey Dickerson and
Nolan Arenado each homered and drove in four runs.
Troy Tulowitzki doubled
twice, singled and scored
three times.
There were eight extrabase hits in the game, all by
Colorado. Kendrick,
Dickerson and Carlos
Gonzalez contributed doubles.
Kendrick (1-0), who left
Philadelphia after last season, excelled in his first
opening day start. He gave
up seven singles, walked
none and struck out six.
After former commissioner Bud Selig lobbed in the
ceremonial first ball, the
Rockies teed off against
Kyle Lohse (0-1).
Gonzalez, Tulowitzki and
Arenado doubled in the first
inning and Dickerson hit a
two-run homer for a 4-0 lead.
Arenado hit a two-run
shot into the bleachers off
Lohse in the third.
Crow
‘I haven’t loved a
team any more than I’ve
loved this team. We have
eight guys, and four of
them are freshmen. For
them to win 35 games and
win the national title is
incredible.’
Mike Krzyzewski
Duke basketball coach
“No,” Krzyzewski said,
pointing at the crystal basketball sitting atop the trophy. “This is one win.”
It made sense. Krzyzewski
has talked all season about
not letting his players feel
burdened by either his program’s past successes or
failures. Live in the
moment, he told them. And
in the end, it explained why
he was more focused on
winning his first title with
this team than becoming the
second coach to win five
NCAA titles with Monday
night’s 68-63 win against
Wisconsin.
“All of them are great,”
Krzyzewski said. “The one
you’re in this moment with
is always the most current,
you can feel it the best. I
haven’t loved a team any
more than I’ve loved this
team. We have eight guys,
and four of them are freshmen. For them to win 35
games and win the national
title is incredible.”
The Blue Devils (35-4)
were scheduled to return to
their campus in Durham,
North Carolina, on Tuesday
afternoon for a welcomehome ceremony at their
famed Cameron Indoor
Stadium. That will cap a
season in which the Blue
Devils started as the preseason Atlantic Coast
Conference favorite and a
Final Four favorite, stumbled a bit through a bumpy
few weeks in January, then
surged down the stretch en
route to a third NCAA
championship won in
Indianapolis.
Duke has now won NCAA
titles in 1991, 1992, 2001, 2010
and now, 2015.
“It’s hard to put it into
words,” said freshman point
guard Tyus Jones, who was
named the most outstanding
player at the Final Four.
“This is just such a special
group. The best team I’ve
ever been a part of. We’ve
worked hard all year. This
has been our one goal that
we were working for.”
SEE TITLE, PAGE B2
B1
SEE ROCKIES, PAGE B2
Closing arguments begin in trial of ex-NFLer Aaron Hernandez
FALL RIVER, Mass. (AP) — A lawyer for former New England
Patriots star tight end Aaron Hernandez told jurors on Tuesday that
there is only one possible and lawful verdict in his client’s murder
trial: not guilty.
Defense attorney James Sultan began his closing arguments Tuesday
morning in the trial, which has lasted more than two months.
Hernandez is accused in the June 17, 2013, killing of Odin Lloyd, who
was dating the sister of Hernandez’s fiancee. Lloyd was shot six times
and died in an industrial park less than a mile from Hernandez’s
home. At the time, Hernandez had a $40 million contract with the
Patriots.
Both sides have 90 minutes on Tuesday to make their case to the jury.
The defense goes first. Jurors are expected to get the case later in the
day.
Sultan spent several minutes asking jurors to forget what they have
heard about Hernandez in the media and outside the courtroom.
He pointed out that prosecutors never presented a clear motive for
why Hernandez would kill Lloyd, saying they were friends and future
brothers-in-law and that there was no evidence he would have wanted
Lloyd dead.
SEE TRIAL, PAGE B2
Tiger arrives, and the guessing
game begins at Masters
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Spring drills
Quinton Suska returns the ball during a spring practice drill Monday at Sheridan
High School.
AUGUSTA, Ga. (AP) — Tiger
Woods arrived later than usual
Monday for a Masters that is different from all the others he has
played.
No one was sure what to expect
from him.
Woods offered a quick glimpse
that it could be just about anything. He hooked his tee shot so
far left that it nearly went into
the ninth fairway. And then he
hit a shot to about 6 feet and
rolled in the putt for birdie.
“I felt like I had to get my game
into a spot where I felt I could
compete to win a golf tournament and it’s finally there,”
Woods said after playing 11
holes. He played the front nine
with Mark O’Meara, then the
10th and 18th holes before darkness.
More relevant than any of his
shots — including his chipping,
which looked fine — was the
atmosphere.
The first official day of practice at Augusta National was
filled with warmth and optimism
for the first major of the year.
Rory McIlroy, No. 1 in the world
and going for a career Grand
Slam, played 18 holes with
British Amateur champion
Bradley Neil. Steve Stricker is
playing for the first time all year.
Jason Day took four hours on the
back nine alone, letting groups
through so he could chip and
putt, the key to winning a green
jacket.
And then Woods arrived.
Fans ran to the side of the
practice area when his cart
pulled up, with one man holding
a digital camera high above his
head for a picture. Fittingly,
Woods headed straight for the
chipping area and went through
two bags of balls before heading
to the first tee with O’Meara.
Woods is playing for the first
time since Feb. 5. He was off
nearly five months when he
returned at the Masters in 2010
following the scandal in his personal life, but he was No. 1 in the
world back then. His last competition was a victory in the
Australian Masters.
Now he is No. 111. In his last
tournament this year, he walked
off the course at Torrey Pines
after 11 holes.
SEE MASTERS, PAGE B2
B2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Recreation District now taking
signups for 2015 Webb Wright
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan
Recreation District is currently taking
signups for the 2015 Webb Wright baseball league.
Webb Wright baseball is available in
three different leagues ranging from
first grade to sixth. The pee-wee league
is for first- and second-graders and costs
$35 per player. The intermediate league
costs $40 and is available for third- and
fourth-graders. The minor league is
open to all fifth- and sixth-graders and
costs $45.
Signups will remain open until April
22. You can sign up online at
SheridanRecreation.com, at the
Recreation District office — located in
Thorne-Rider Park — or by calling 6746421.
The Recreation District would also
like to invite any and all baseball
friends and families to the Sixth Street
baseball fields this Saturday for voluntary field maintenance. Volunteers will
help rebuild mounds, install bases, rake
up debris and install fence guards.
The work day will begin at 10 a.m. and
free pizza will be provided to volunteers.
TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2015
TITLE: Unclear on NBA prospects
FROM B1
Duke ended the year with 18 wins in 19
games, the only loss coming to Notre Dame
in the ACC Tournament semifinals in an
off performance that Krzyzewski described
as “an out-of-body experience.” The Blue
Devils responded by looking sharp
throughout a six-game run through the
NCAAs, most notably with a defense that
held every opponent to 63 points or less.
They did that with a roster of eight scholarship players, half being freshmen. And
one of those, reserve Grayson Allen,
turned in an unexpectedly huge performance that sparked Duke’s rally from nine
down midway through the second half
against the Badgers.
“It was all about the team,” senior Quinn
Cook said of the freshmen. “All of them
worked. All of them looked to the upperclassmen for advice. They didn’t think they
knew it all and things like that. They
worked. I mean, they worked hard. It paid
off tonight.”
It’s unclear if Jones, big man Jahlil
Okafor and fellow freshman Justise
Winslow will follow Cook out the door as
one-and-done NBA prospects, and none of
the three were ready to talk about their
futures after Monday’s game.
Regardless, the 68-year-old Krzyzewski
has another milestone — and moment — in
a career full of them.
“They’ve been a joy,” Krzyzewski said.
“They’ve been an incredible joy. When
you’re already happy, and you get happier,
it’s pretty damn good. It’s pretty good.”
TRIAL:
1 alternate
FROM B1
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Spring stretches for tennis team
Sheridan's Turner Martini stretches for a forehand Monday at the tennis courts at Sheridan High School.
ROCKIES: Lyles to make first start since he broke his hand June 4
FROM B1
The right-hander gave up eight
runs on 10 hits before Gonzalez
ended Lohse’s third career opening day start with an RBI single
in the fourth.
Rockies relievers Rafael
Betancourt and Christian
Friedrich each pitched scoreless
innings.
The Brewers’ best scoring
chance came in the second when
with one out they loaded the
bases on two singles and a hit batter.
Kendrick got Jean Segura to
ground into a double play.
Brewers star Ryan Braun, who
had offseason surgery on his
right thumb, went 0 for 2 and left
after the fifth inning. Adam Lind
had three singles in his
Milwaukee debut.
The Rockies had to be happy
with how their two key veterans
played, especially after last season.
Gonzalez had multiple injuries,
each requiring surgery, and ended
the season on the 60-day disabled
list.
Tulowitzki injured his hip the
second game after the All-Star
break and missed the remainder
of the season.
TRAINER’S ROOM
Rockies: LHP Jorge De La Rosa,
last year’s opening day starter for
Colorado, was limited in spring
training with a groin injury.
Placed on the disabled list
Sunday, he is scheduled to make a
rehab start for Triple-A
Albuquerque on Thursday and is
limited to 65-70 pitches.
Brewers: Commenting on the
pitching staff, general manager
Doug Melvin said, “We were very
healthy during the spring. That’s
a positive to open up the season
with all our guys healthy.”
UP NEXT
Rockies: RHP Jordan Lyles
makes his first start since June 4
when he broke his left hand covering home on a wild pitch. He
landed on the disabled list June 5
and missed 54 games before being
activated off the 60-day DL on
Aug. 6.
Brewers: RHP Matt Garza, who
starts Tuesday, has beaten the
Rockies his last two starts.
“You didn’t hear because
it doesn’t exist,” Sultan
said. “Does the prosecution
expect you to fill in that
gaping hole in its case with
guesswork, speculation?”
He also said investigators
unfairly fixated on his
client, presuming his guilt
and finding what they could
to support that theory.
“The investigation done
in this case was incomplete,
biased and inept. That was
not fair to Odin Lloyd, that
was not fair to Aaron
Hernandez, and it was not
fair to you,” he said. “All
that effort and this is all
they could come up with.
What does that tell you?”
The trial featured hundreds of pieces of evidence
and testimony from 135 witnesses — 132 of them called
by the prosecution.
Prosecutors said
Hernandez and two friends
drove to Boston to pick up
Lloyd at his home, then
drove him to the industrial
park in North Attleborough
and killed him.
Surveillance video along
the way showed Hernandez
driving a rented silver
Nissan Altima shortly
before Lloyd’s sister saw
him get into a silver car.
Soon after, a toll booth camera caught the Nissan leaving Boston. Lloyd’s phone
pinged several cell towers
before stopping in North
Attleborough for good.
Surveillance video at
Hernandez’s home minutes
after the shooting showed
him holding a black item
that appeared to be a gun. A
joint found near Lloyd’s
body had Hernandez’s and
Lloyd’s DNA on it.
After closing arguments,
the judge will give the 15
members of the jury
instructions. Three of the
jurors will then be randomly selected as alternates.
The 12-person jury will then
be sent to deliberate.
MASTERS: First hole packed when Woods, O’Meara teed off in late afternoon
ed home after a long day at Augusta. The
first hole was packed when Woods and
Before that, he shot 82 and missed the
O’Meara teed off at 4:20 p.m., and more
cut in the Phoenix Open. In both events, he than 2,000 kept following him. Dozens of
played 47 holes and hit chips that either
fans raced over from the second fairway to
didn’t reach the green from 5 yards away
the fourth tee to get a good spot.
or went some 25 yards over the green.
Remember, you’re not supposed to run at
That’s when he stepped away, saying his
Augusta National.
game was not acceptable and he would not
“I hope he’s happy. I hope he’s fine,” U.S.
return until it was.
Open champion Martin Kaymer said. “I
After his opening birdie, Woods tossed
hope he will play well this week. But what
two balls short of the green to work on his would bother me a lot is all the speculachipping. He hit 14 chips — two balls each tion. You don’t have a choice. You will read
from various hollows around the green to
about it somewhere. You will hear about it
different pin positions. Most looked reabecause you socialize with people. So mensonable. Some looked good.
tally, it must be quite exhausting, and we
“Chipping was fine,” Woods said. “I
know how important the mental part is in
wanted to test out some wedges out here.
golf.”
That’s why I was chipping a little bit more
“So it’s difficult, and some things I don’t
— a couple different bounce settings,
find very fair,” he said. “You should just let
because it’s a little bit different than
him be. Let him play golf, what he likes to
Florida. We figured the right one out.”
do.”
The real test comes Thursday, when the
The last image of Woods was the best
shots count. What he showed Monday cerplayer of his generation at his worst, espetainly looked acceptable, and it was a treat cially with the chipping. That led to ramfor the fans who normally would be headpant speculation — some coaches, includFROM B1
ing former swing coach Hank Haney, said
he had the yips. He was said to be practicing hard at home in Florida. When he
showed up at Augusta National last week
to practice, one report said he shot 74.
Another said he was playing better than
ever at home.
The fans who stuck around the Masters
got to see for themselves, at least in practice. The real show starts Thursday, and
everyone is curious.
“We’re all waiting with baited breath
what Tiger is bringing,” three-time champion Nick Faldo said. “He’s got to believe
he’s got a bit more game than that. This is
not the place. These are the toughest chipping areas, but off perfect lies, anywhere
in the world. ... It’s all nerve. That’s what
the Masters is. It’s nerve. It’s the most
nerve-wracking golf course.”
Woods looked relatively calms on the golf
course. He reached the par-5 second hole
with ease on his second shot. He smashed
a drive down the short par-4 third and hit
a flip wedge that trickled a few inches by
the hole, making a tough shot look easy.
O’Meara hit a good tee shot on the par-3
fourth. Woods hit it inside that.
“I felt good,” Woods said. “It was nice to
get out here and play it. It’s a little bit
faster than what we played last week. It’s
great.”
Woods played twice last week, the last
time on Friday just before ending speculation by saying he would play in the
Masters.
Gary Player was among those — and a
few thousand fans in the late afternoon
would agree — that it was good to see him
back inside the ropes.
“Golf internationally needs Tiger
Woods. He does make a difference,” threetime Masters champion Player said.
“People say — I hear this all the time —
‘Well, they won’t miss Tiger Woods.
There’s so many young guys that will take
his place.’ There is nobody in the world
today that can play like Tiger Woods at his
best. Nobody yet. I’m not saying in time to
come, a Rory, Jordan Spieth, Jason Day.
“As of today, there’s nobody playing like
Tiger at his best.”
TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B3
SCOREBOARD |
PRO RODEO LEADERS |
Pro Rodeo Leaders
By The Associated Press
Through April 5
All-around
1. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas $45,937
2. Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb. $20,032
3. Clint Robinson, Spanish Fork, Utah $18,144
4. Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. $17,001
5. Clayton Hass, Terrell, Texas $15,208
6. JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas $14,878
7. Morgan Grant, Granton, Ontario $13,593
8. Eli Lord, Sturgis, S.D. $12,757
9. Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas $12,309
10. Wesley Brunson, Terry, Miss. $11,485
11. Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, Utah $11,258
12. Trenten Montero, Winnemucca, Nev. $8,051
Bareback Riding
1. Kaycee Feild, Spanish Fork, Utah $34,432
2. Austin Foss, Terrebonne, Ore. $32,303
3. Bobby Mote, Stephenville, Texas $31,521
4. Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa $29,570
5. Evan Jayne, Marseille, France $29,401
6. Seth Hardwick, Laramie, Wyo. $29,317
7. Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah $24,544
8. David Peebles, Redmond, Ore. $23,856
9. Luke Creasy, Lovington, N.M. $23,043
10. Ryan Gray, Cheney, Wash. $21,708
11. Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, Minn. $20,670
12. Tyler Nelson, Victor, Idaho $18,563
13. Clint Laye, Cadogan, Alberta $17,226
14. Clint Cannon, Waller, Texas $16,833
15. Will Lowe, Canyon, Texas $15,721
16. Winn Ratliff, Leesville, La. $14,529
17. Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb. $13,319
18. Kash Wilson, Gooding, Idaho $12,706
19. George Gillespie IV, Hamilton, Mont. $12,530
20. Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba $12,442
Steer Wrestling
1. Seth Brockman, Wheatland, Wyo. $31,039
2. Hunter Cure, Holliday, Texas $26,304
3. Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $23,920
4. Olin Hannum, Malad, Idaho $23,006
5. Luke Branquinho, Los Alamos, Calif. $22,554
6. Casey Martin, Sulphur, La. $22,372
7. Beau Clark, Belgrade, Mont. $18,972
8. K.C. Jones, Decatur, Texas $18,797
9. Adam Strahan, McKinney, Texas $18,658
10. Dirk Tavenner, Rigby, Idaho $18,460
11. Tyler Pearson, Louisville, Miss. $17,945
12. Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis. $17,783
13. Cody Cabral, Hilo, Hawaii $17,468
14. Baylor Roche, Tremonton, Utah $16,978
15. Kyle Irwin, Robertsdale, Ala. $16,579
16. Matthew Mousseau, Hensall, Ontario $14,484
17. Darrell Petry, Cheek, Texas $12,008
18. Blake Knowles, Heppner, Ore. $11,790
19. Jason Thomas, Benton, Ark. $11,148
20. Wade Sumpter, Fowler, Colo. $10,829
Team Roping (header)
1. Clay Tryan, Billings, Mont. $38,481
2. Derrick Begay, Seba Dalkai, Ariz. $33,740
3. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas $24,914
4. Tyler Wade, Terrell, Texas $21,718
5. Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga. $21,034
6. Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz. $19,842
7. Charly Crawford, Prineville, Ore. $18,891
8. Nick Sartain, Dover, Okla. $18,331
9. Jesse Stipes, Salina, Okla. $16,866
10. Jake Barnes, Scottsdale, Ariz. $15,573
11. Bubba Buckaloo, Caddo, Okla. $15,567
12. Riley Minor, Ellensburg, Wash. $15,534
13. Jake Cooper, Monument, N.M. $14,506
14. Doyle Hoskins, Chualar, Calif. $13,637
15. Chad Masters, Cedar Hill, Tenn. $13,341
16. Levi Simpson, Ponoka, Alberta $12,754
17. Jake Orman, Prairie, Miss. $12,615
18. Matt Sherwood, Pima, Ariz. $12,510
19. Coleman Proctor, Pryor, Okla. $12,105
20. Cale Markham, Vinita, Okla. $11,536
Team Roping (heeler)
1. Jade Corkill, Fallon, Nev. $38,436
2. Clay O’Brien Cooper, Gardnerville, Nev. $35,820
3. Travis Woodard, Stockton, Calif. $26,605
4. Patrick Smith, Lipan, Texas $24,914
5. Kinney Harrell, Marshall, Texas $22,838
6. Cory Petska, Marana, Ariz. $21,736
7. Shay Carroll, La Junta, Colo. $18,891
8. Rich Skelton, Llano, Texas $18,331
9. Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore. $16,379
10. Buddy Hawkins II, Columbus, Kan. $15,838
11. Junior Nogueira, Scottsdale, Ariz. $15,573
12. Brady Minor, Ellensburg, Wash. $15,534
13. Billie Jack Saebens, Nowata, Okla. $15,340
14. Matt Kasner, Cody, Neb. $14,313
15. Jeremy Buhler, Abbotsford, British Columbia
$12,754
16. Quinn Kesler, Holden, Utah $12,510
17. Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan. $12,105
18. Tyler Domingue, Dekalb, Texas $11,383
19. J.W. Borrego, Weston, Colo. $11,259
20. Martin Lucero, Stephenville, Texas $10,421
Saddle Bronc Riding
1. Cody DeMoss, Heflin, La. $56,276
2. Spencer Wright, Milford, Utah $45,279
3. Rusty Wright, Milford, Utah $32,081
4. Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M. $26,285
5. Joe Lufkin, Sallisaw, Okla. $23,948
6. Chuck Schmidt, Keldron, S.D. $20,794
7. Wade Sundell, Colman, Okla. $20,786
8. Wade Sundell, Coleman, Okla. $20,786
9. Jake Wright, Milford, Utah $18,737
10. Bradley Harter, Loranger, La. $17,031
11. Chad Ferley, Oelrichs, S.D. $15,955
12. Allen Boore, Axtell, Utah $14,354
13. Sterling Crawley, Stephenville, Texas $13,502
14. Cort Scheer, Elsmere, Neb. $13,342
15. Jesse Wright, Milford, Utah $12,245
16. Zeke Thurston, Big Valley, Alberta $11,990
17. Sam Spreadborough, Snyder, Texas $11,215
18. Tyler Corrington, Hastings, Minn. $10,874
19. Tyrel Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba $10,680
20. Layton Green, Meeting Creek, Alberta $10,624
Tie-down Roping
1. Cory Solomon, Prairie View, Texas $39,482
2. Monty Lewis, Hereford, Texas $33,305
3. Timber Moore, Aubrey, Texas $30,260
4. Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas $23,639
5. Hunter Herrin, Apache, Okla. $23,363
6. Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas $21,074
7. Chase Williams, Stephenville, Texas $20,731
8. Sterling Smith, Stephenville, Texas $20,174
9. Randall Carlisle, Athens, La. $19,062
10. Blair Burk, Hermiston, Ore. $19,054
11. Adam Gray, Seymour, Texas $18,678
PICKLES
NON SEQUITUR
12. Bart Brunson, Terry, Miss. $16,469
13. Clint Robinson, Spanish Fork, Utah $14,582
14. Ace Slone, Cuero, Texas $14,428
15. Jordan Ketscher, Squaw Valley, Calif. $13,522
16. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas $13,072
17. Dane Kissack, Spearfish, S.D. $12,444
18. J.C. Malone, Roy, Utah $12,352
19. Cody McCartney, Ottawa Lake, Mich. $11,550
20. Michael Otero, Lowndesboro, Ala. $11,003
Steer Roping
1. Neal Wood, Needville, Texas $34,785
2. Mike Chase, McAlester, Okla. $28,473
3. Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas $26,027
4. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas $21,423
5. Cody Lee, Gatesville, Texas $19,357
6. Jess Tierney, Hermosa, S.D. $17,044
7. Shay Good, Midland, Texas $16,567
8. Jarrett Blessing, Paradise, Texas $14,742
9. Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas $14,305
10. Troy Tillard, Douglas, Wyo. $12,222
11. Rocky Patterson, Pratt, Kan. $12,072
12. Ralph Williams, Skiatook, Okla. $9,889
13. Landon McClaugherty, Tilden, Texas $9,713
14. Lawson Plemons, Axtell, Texas $8,835
15. Brady Garten, Claremore, Okla. $7,735
16. Jason Evans, Huntsville, Texas $7,301
17. Chet Herren, Pawhuska, Okla. $7,177
18. JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas $6,983
19. J.P. Wickett, Sallisaw, Okla. $6,858
20. Chance Kelton, Mayer, Ariz. $6,846
Bull Riding
1. Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla. $45,537
2. Tanner Learmont, Cleburne, Texas $33,403
3. Chandler Bownds, Lubbock, Texas $32,654
4. Wesley Silcox, Santaquin, Utah $30,547
5. Reid Barker, Comfort, Texas $28,734
6. Parker Breding, Edgar, Mont. $28,078
7. Brennon Eldred, Sulphur, Okla. $27,923
8. Joe Frost, Randlett, Utah $27,339
9. Cody Teel, Kountze, Texas $24,172
10. Trevor Kastner, Ardmore, Okla. $20,998
11. Brett Stall, Detroit Lakes, Minn. $20,773
12. Caleb Sanderson, Kissimmee, Fla. $20,410
13. Zeb Lanham, Sweet, Idaho $16,975
14. Ardie Maier, Timber Lake, S.D. $16,609
15. Zack Oakes, Tonasket, Wash. $16,419
16. Steve Woolsey, Payson, Utah $16,225
17. Nile Lebaron, Weatherford, Texas $14,872
18. Dylan Vick, Escalon, Calif. $14,676
19. Dalton Votaw, Porter, Texas $14,176
20. Bobby Welsh, Gillette, Wyo. $14,034
Barrel Racing
1. Nancy Hunter, Neola, Utah $55,900
2. Sarah Rose McDonald, Brunswick, Ga. $53,374
3. Lisa Lockhart, Oelrichs, S.D. $44,211
4. Alexa Lake, Richmond, Texas $40,518
5. Sherry Cervi, Marana, Ariz. $39,210
6. Callie Duperier, Boerne, Texas $39,074
7. Fallon Taylor, Collinsville, Texas $36,961
8. Meghan Johnson, Deming, N.M. $27,239
9. Victoria Williams, Kiln, Miss. $26,484
10. Layna Kight, Ocala, Fla. $24,529
11. Cassidy Kruse, Gillette, Texas $23,787
12. Jana Bean, Fort Hancock, Texas $23,748
13. Kelly Tovar, Rockdale, Texas $23,331
14. Kaley Bass, Kissimmee, Fla. $23,055
15. Shelly Anzick, Livingston, Texas $21,013
16. Kenna Squires, Fredonia, Texas $19,612
17. Britany Diaz, Solen, N.D. $18,199
18. Michele McLeod, Whitesboro, Texas $17,835
19. Shelby Janssen, Coleman, Okla. $17,341
20. Megan Swint, Lithia, Texas $16,344
NHL |
National Hockey League
By The Associated Press
All Times EDT
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP
W
L
x-Montreal
80
48
22
x-Tampa Bay 80
48
24
Boston
79
41
25
Detroit
79
41
25
Ottawa
79
40
26
Florida
80
36
29
Toronto
80
30
43
Buffalo
80
23
49
Metropolitan Division
GP
W
L
y-N.Y. Rangers 79
51
21
x-Washington 80
44
25
N.Y. Islanders 79
46
27
Pittsburgh
79
42
26
79
39
35
Columbus
Philadelphia
79
32
29
New Jersey
79
32
34
Carolina
79
29
39
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP
W
L
x-St. Louis
79
49
23
x-Nashville
79
47
22
x-Chicago
79
48
25
Minnesota
79
44
27
Winnipeg
79
41
26
Dallas
80
39
31
Colorado
79
36
31
Pacific Division
GP
W
L
y-Anaheim
80
50
23
Vancouver
80
46
29
Calgary
79
43
29
Los Angeles 79
39
25
San Jose
80
39
32
Edmonton
79
23
43
Arizona
79
24
47
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point
loss.
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Monday’s Games
Vancouver 2, Los Angeles 1, SO
Buffalo 4, Carolina 3
N.Y. Rangers 4, Columbus 3, OT
Winnipeg 2, Minnesota 0
Dallas 5, San Jose 1
Tuesday’s Games
N.Y. Rangers at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Winnipeg at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Nashville at Colorado, 9 p.m.
OT
10
8
13
13
13
15
7
8
Pts
106
104
95
95
93
87
67
54
OT
7
11
6
11
5
18
13
11
Pts
109
99
98
95
83
82
77
69
OT
7
10
6
8
12
10
12
Pts
105
104
102
96
94
88
84
OT Pts
7 107
5 97
7 93
15 93
9 87
13 59
8 56
for overtime
New York
1
0
Miami
0
1
Philadelphia
0
1
Washington
0
1
Central Division
W
L
Cincinnati
1
0
St. Louis
1
0
Chicago
0
1
Milwaukee
0
1
Pittsburgh
0
1
West Division
W
L
Colorado
1
0
Los Angeles
1
0
San Francisco 1
0
Arizona
0
1
San Diego
0
1
___
Sunday’s Games
St. Louis 3, Chicago Cubs
Monday’s Games
Colorado 10, Milwaukee 0
Arizona at Calgary, 9 p.m.
Los Angeles at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Toronto at Columbus, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Washington, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Anaheim, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
Ottawa at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Winnipeg at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Los Angeles at Calgary, 9 p.m.
San Jose at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Arizona at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
MLB |
American League
1.000
.000
.000
.000
—
1
1
1
Pct
1.000
1.000
.000
.000
.000
GB
—
—
1
1
1
Pct
1.000
1.000
1.000
.000
.000
GB
—
—
—
1
1
0
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W
L
Pct
x-Houston
53
24
.688
x-Memphis
52
25
.675
x-San Antonio 51
26
.662
Dallas
46
31
.597
New Orleans 41
35
.539
Northwest Division
W
L
Pct
y-Portland
50
27
.649
Oklahoma City 42
35
.545
Utah
35
42
.455
Denver
28
49
.364
Minnesota
16
60
.211
Pacific Division
W
L
Pct
z-Golden State 63
14
.818
x-L.A. Clippers 52
26
.667
Phoenix
39
38
.506
Sacramento
26
50
.342
L.A. Lakers
20
56
.263
x-clinched playoff spot
GB
—
1
2
7
11½
GB
—
8
15
22
33½
GB
—
11½
24
36½
42½
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Cooling off
Garrett Vezain strips a horse after a ride during the bareback/saddle bronc riding school Saturday at the Sheridan College
AgriPark north of Sheridan. The school was offered to individuals with high school rodeo cards wanting to learn.
By The Associated Press
East Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Baltimore
1
0 1.000
—
Boston
1
0 1.000
—
Toronto
1
0 1.000
—
New York
0
1
.000
1
Tampa Bay
0
1
.000
1
Central Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Detroit
1
0 1.000
—
Kansas City
1
0 1.000
—
Chicago
0
1
.000
1
Cleveland
0
1
.000
1
Minnesota
0
1
.000
1
West Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Houston
1
0 1.000
—
Oakland
1
0 1.000
—
Seattle
1
0 1.000
—
Los Angeles
0
1
.000
1
Texas
0
1
.000
1
___
Monday’s Games
Toronto 6, N.Y. Yankees 1
Detroit 4, Minnesota 0
Boston 8, Philadelphia 0
Baltimore 6, Tampa Bay 2
Kansas City 10, Chicago White Sox 1
Seattle 4, L.A. Angels 1
Houston 2, Cleveland 0
Oakland 8, Texas 0
Tuesday’s Games
Baltimore (Chen 0-0) at Tampa Bay (Karns 0-0),
7:10 p.m.
Texas (Lewis 0-0) at Oakland (Hahn 0-0), 10:05
p.m.
L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 0-0) at Seattle (Paxton 0-0),
10:10 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Minnesota (Nolasco 0-0) at Detroit (Sanchez 0-0),
1:08 p.m.
Boston (Porcello 0-0) at Philadelphia (Harang 0-0),
7:05 p.m.
Toronto (Dickey 0-0) at N.Y. Yankees (Pineda 0-0),
7:05 p.m.
Baltimore (M.Gonzalez 0-0) at Tampa Bay (Odorizzi
0-0), 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Quintana 0-0) at Kansas City
(D.Duffy 0-0), 8:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Carrasco 0-0) at Houston (Feldman 00), 8:10 p.m.
Texas (Detwiler 0-0) at Oakland (Kazmir 0-0), 10:05
p.m.
L.A. Angels (Shoemaker 0-0) at Seattle (Iwakuma
0-0), 10:10 p.m.
National League
By The Associated Press
East Division
W
L
Pct
Atlanta
1
0 1.000
GB
—
Boston 8, Philadelphia 0
N.Y. Mets 3, Washington 1
Atlanta 2, Miami 1
Cincinnati 5, Pittsburgh 2
L.A. Dodgers 6, San Diego 3
San Francisco 5, Arizona 4
Tuesday’s Games
Atlanta (Wood 0-0) at Miami (Latos 0-0), 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Lynn 0-0) at Chicago Cubs (Arrieta 0-0),
8:05 p.m.
Colorado (Lyles 0-0) at Milwaukee (Garza 0-0),
8:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Vogelsong 0-0) at Arizona (De La
Rosa 0-0), 9:40 p.m.
San Diego (T.Ross 0-0) at L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 00), 10:10 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
St. Louis (Lackey 0-0) at Chicago Cubs (Hammel 00), 2:20 p.m.
Boston (Porcello 0-0) at Philadelphia (Harang 0-0),
7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (deGrom 0-0) at Washington
(Zimmermann 0-0), 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta (S.Miller 0-0) at Miami (Koehler 0-0), 7:10
p.m.
Pittsburgh (Cole 0-0) at Cincinnati (Leake 0-0), 7:10
p.m.
Colorado (E.Butler 0-0) at Milwaukee (W.Peralta 00), 8:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Undecided) at Arizona (Hellickson
0-0), 9:40 p.m.
San Diego (Cashner 0-0) at L.A. Dodgers
(McCarthy 0-0), 10:10 p.m.
NBA |
National Basketball Association
By The Associated Press
All Times EDT
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
L
Pct
y-Toronto
45
32
.584
Brooklyn
36
41
.468
Boston
35
42
.455
Philadelphia
18
60
.231
New York
15
62
.195
Southeast Division
W
L
Pct
z-Atlanta
57
19
.750
x-Washington 44
33
.571
Miami
34
43
.442
Charlotte
33
43
.434
Orlando
24
53
.312
Central Division
W
L
Pct
x-Cleveland
50
27
.649
x-Chicago
46
31
.597
Milwaukee
38
39
.494
Indiana
34
43
.442
Detroit
30
47
.390
GB
—
9
10
27½
30
GB
—
13½
23½
24
33½
GB
—
4
12
16
20
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference
___
Sunday’s Games
Houston 115, Oklahoma City 112
Cleveland 99, Chicago 94
Indiana 112, Miami 89
San Antonio 107, Golden State 92
New York 101, Philadelphia 91
Utah 101, Sacramento 95
L.A. Clippers 106, L.A. Lakers 78
Monday’s Games
Brooklyn 106, Portland 96
Tuesday’s Games
Phoenix at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Golden State at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Washington at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Boston at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at New York, 7:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Houston at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Denver, 9 p.m.
Sacramento at Utah, 9 p.m.
Phoenix at Dallas, 9:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Portland, 10 p.m.
0407 TUESDAY_A Section Template 4/6/15 3:47 PM Page 1
B4
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BABY BLUES® by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman
COMICS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2015
DRS. OZ & ROIZEN
Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen
MARY WORTH by Karen Moy and Joe Giella
BORN LOSER® by Art and Chip Sansom
While the usual suspects
Kentucky, Duke, Wisconsin
and Villanova universities
landed the top seeds in this
year's March Madness, smart
oddsmakers kept an eye out
for a Gonzaga-type emer-
gence of an unexpected seed.
And you should do the same!
The top unexpected seeds
that deliver a slam dunk for
your ongoing health and help
you achieve a younger
RealAge? Chia, flax and sunflower.
Chia seeds: Chia seeds are
packed with omega-3
linolenic acid (heart-, skinand romance-friendly!), more
calcium (ounce for ounce)
than milk, plus phytonutrients, vitamins and minerals.
For the most benefit, choose
ground whole chia seeds.
They can boost blood levels of
omega-3 alpha-linolenic acid
by 58.4 percent and eicosapentaenoic acid by 38.6 percent, compared with eating
the whole seed. Sprinkle
them over salads and add to
soups and casseroles.
Flaxseeds: Flaxseeds deliver protein, fiber, phytonutrients, phytoestrogens and
omega-3 fatty acids. Health
Canada has verified the
claim that ground whole
flaxseed helps lower total
and, specifically, lousy LDL
cholesterol. They say 2 tablespoons a day supplies 40 percent of what's needed to
bring it all down court! Bake
into 100 percent whole-wheat
bread and add to soups and
smoothies.
Sunflower seeds: They're
the third seed, because
although they deliver healthy
fats, protein, fiber, phenolic
acids and lots of phytosterols, which block absorption of cholesterol in the
intestines, they also contain
choline, and we don't want
you getting too much of that!
These you can snack on
whole.
Call it a slam dunk or
swish -- bet on these seeds,
and you're moving up in your
bracket!
DEAR ABBY
Pauline Phillips and Jeanne Phillips
GARFIELD by Jim Davis
FRANK & ERNEST® by Bob Thaves
REX MORGAN, M.D. by Woody Wilson and Tony DiPreta
ZITS® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
DILBERT by S. Adams
ALLEY OOP® by Dave Graue and Jack Bender
MAN WHO DOESN'T
WANT KIDS SHOULD LOOK
FOR ANOTHER WOMAN
DEAR ABBY: When I
turned 25, after considering
it for years, I went to my doctor and told him I wanted to
become sterile. I got a vasectomy two months later. I
haven't had any regrets, and
now at 27, I'm still firmly convinced that I don't want children -- ever.
I started dating a woman a
year ago, "Anita," who told
me that if she never had
kids, she could live with it. I
felt lucky to have found someone who would be OK with
no kids.
I have had a few issues with
Anita. When she gets upset
from time to time, she says
that if she stays with me, she
will never have kids. I know
she cares for me deeply, but I
also believe she feels conflicted about giving up the chance
to be a mother.
Do you think it's fair for me
to pursue this relationship
and hope that eventually
she'll come to terms with not
having children with me? Or
should I end the relationship
so she can find someone who
shares her desire to become a
parent? I worry that if I end
it, it may take years before I
find someone who shares my
wish to never be a parent. -NO KIDS IN COLORADO
DEAR NO KIDS: You have
been upfront with Anita. She
understands that you do not
want children, and that you
have taken steps to ensure it
won't happen. She's correct
that if she stays with you,
she will never have any.
For both your sakes, the
two of you need to talk this
through once and for all,
because if Anita is ambivalent about forgoing motherhood, she does need to find
another life partner. And you
need to let her do that.
DEAR ABBY: It happened
to me again yesterday. After I
had been waiting patiently at
the counter of a large department store, another woman
came up and stood beside me.
The clerk walked over and
immediately began to ring
up the other woman's purchase. I said, "I was here
first!" Both the clerk and the
woman apologized, but
because the sale had already
begun, the salesclerk completed it and I was left waitI
am angry about it. I feel
stores should have a queue
where you get in line in
order, or clerks should be
instructed to ask, "Who was
here first?" I don't want to
believe I was passed over
because the other woman
looked more prosperous than
I do, but she was buying a
very expensive handbag,
while I was purchasing socks
that were on clearance. How
should that be handled in the
future? -- SHOPPER IN KENTUCKY
DEAR SHOPPER: If you
have a complaint about service, it should be addressed to
the store manager. A welltrained retail salesperson
would have asked which of
you was there first. The
amount you were spending
should have made no difference.
DEAR ABBY: My wife and I
travel with another couple. I
furnish the vehicle and do all
the driving. How should we
share the expenses? -- EASY
RIDER IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA
DEAR EASY RIDER:
The other couple should pay
for half the gas and their
own meals and lodging.
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips.
Contact Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
For an excellent guide to
becoming a better conversationalist and a more sociable
person, order "How to Be
Popular." Send your name
and mailing address, plus
check or money order for $7
(U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby,
Popularity Booklet, P.O. Box
447, Mount Morris, IL 610540447. (Shipping and handling
are included in the price.)
Classifieds 0407_Layout 1 4/7/15 8:40 AM Page 1
CLASSIFIEDS
Phone: (307) 672-2431
TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2015
Fax: (307) 672-7950
www.thesheridanpress.com
TO PLACE YOUR AD
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
DEADLINES
B5
RATES & POLICIES
Deadline
Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 days . . . . . . . .6 days . . . . . . . . . . . .26 days
Monday ........................................................................Friday 2:30 PM
2 lines (minimum) . . . . . . .$10.75 . . . . . . .$16.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$40.00
Tuesday.................................................................... Monday 2:30 PM
Each additional line . . . . . .$4.75 . . . . . . . . $7.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$17.50
Email : [email protected]
Wednesday ............................................................Tuesday 2:30 PM
Visit : 144 Grinnell Street, Downtown Sheridan
Thursday........................................................... Wednesday 2:30 PM
Mail : P.O. Box 2006, Sheridan, WY, 82801
Friday...................................................................... Thursday 2:30 PM
Include name, address, phone, dates to run and payment
Saturday ...................................................................... Friday 2:30 PM
We reserve the right to reject, edit or reclassify any advertisement accepted by us for publication. When placing an ad in person or on the phone, we will read all ads back to you for
your approval. If we fail to do so, please tell us at that time. If you find an error in your
classified ad, please call us before 9 a.m. to have it corrected for the next day’s paper. The
Press cannot be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Claims cannot be considered unless made within three days of the date of publication. No allowances can be
made when errors do not materially affect the value of the advertisement.
Phone: (307) 672-2431 Fax: (307) 672-7950
Monday – Friday, 8am – 5pm
Run Day
All classified ads run for free at www.thesheridanpress.com!
All classified ads running in Monday’s Press also run in the weekly PressPlus at no additional charge!
Miscellaneous for Sale
MARY KAY products
for sale. Call for
details.
307-660-4966.
Musical Instruments
BASIC
TECHNIQUES of
Singing. AMAZE
Your Friends at
Karaoke! SHINE in
Your Church Choir!
ROCK Your Metal
Band! Call Kristi at
307-763-3412.
For Lease
Mobile Homes for Rent
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted, Office
HEIDI'S MOBILE
HOME CT. #60. 2 BR/1
Ba. $600/mo incl.
W/S/G & lot rent. 1st &
last req. No smk. 1 Pet
w/ dep. 763-0675.
CASINO PARTY
Dealers. Fun, social,
energetic, dependable
people needed to deal
our various casino
games. No need to
know how to deal, but
must know how to play
the games with
knowledge & skill. This
is the most fun part-time
job you will ever have.
[email protected]
wyomingcasinoparties.c
om. Complete
information will be sent
to you about this
position. 10-15
positions.
Now Hiring
ELIASON FINANCIAL
ASSOCIATES
is currently searching
for an Administrative
Assistant to join our
team. Successful
candidates must have
exceptional customer
service skills.
Applicants must have
strong computer, data
entry and
communication skills.
Chosen
applicants will perform
administrative duties
and general office
support. Please email
your resume and
cover letter to
[email protected]
eliasonfa.com.
WATER PRODUCTS,
INC.
is actively seeking an
energetic & dynamic
person with excellent
skills in customer
service & multitasking
for FT position of
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT.
Knowledge of QB
preferred but will train
the right person. Must
be able to lift 50 lbs.
Pre-employment drug
testing & background
check required.
Pick up application @
Water Products, Inc.,
1831 S. Sheridan Ave.
Mobile Hm. Space for
Rent
RV SPACE, Big Horn.
By day, month or year.
674-7718.
Office Space for Rent
CORNER SUITE w/
MTN VIEWS. 1,000 sq.
ft. 2 private offices,
conference & reception
areas. Utilities included.
672-8700.
Storage Space
BUILDINGS
FOR LEASE
Rail Road Land
& Cattle Co.
Has Shop Space,
Warehouse Space,
Retail Space,
Office Space and
much more
for lease!
673-5555
Roommate Wanted
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED. $500/mo.
307-461-0767.
Furnished Apts for Rent
1BR. NO smk/pets.
$575 + elec + dep.
Coin-Op W/D.
307-674-5838.
STAGE STOP MOTEL
CLEAN. Weekly &
Monthly rates. Internet,
cable & utilities incl.
307-672-2477.
WKLY FR $240.
America's Best Value
Inn. 672-9757.
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
2
B
R
.
WASHER/DRYER.
$700 + Dep + Elec. No
smkg/pets. Lease. Call
for appt. 752-4735.
Broadway Apts.
2 bdrm, 1 bath
townhouse
Available in
Dayton, WY.
Rent based on
income.
Please call
307-751-1752 or
1-888-387-7368
Toll-Free for application
Equal Housing
Opportunity
EXTRA LG. 2 BR. Low
utils. $650/mo. + $500
dep. 1 yr. lease. Ref's
req'd. 751-2445.
1 BR. 242 S.
Thurmond. No
pets/smk. 600 sq. ft.
$485/mo. Call 307-6202167
BIG 3 BR. Porch. Gar.
Laundry. New tub. Sun
room. Creek. $1200
incl. H/W/S, No
smk/pets. Close to park
& downtown. 752-4066
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
NICE 1 BR cottage.
$850/mo + util & dep.
No pets. 674-7258
INTERSTATE
STORAGE. Multiple
Sizes avail. No
deposit req'd. 7526111.
CALL BAYHORSE
STORAGE 1005 4th
Ave. E. 752-9114.
KENNEDY
LANDSCAPING
Now doing commercial
sweeping, spring and
fall clean up, complete
landscape
maintenance and
installation . 751-6723
Help Wanted
BARTENDER.
FLEXIBLE Schedule.
Apply at Sutton's
Tavern, 1402 N. Main
St., Sheridan, WY
NWCCD
Job OPENINGS
Sheridan College
• Facilities Coordinator
• User Services
Coordinator
• Server Administrator
• Computer Science
Instructor
• Director of Business
Education
• Asst. Coach
Women’s Volleyball
(PT)
Gillette College
• Computer Science
Instructor
• Director of Business
Education
• Nursing Instructor
• Diesel Technology
Instructor
• Community Edu.
Instructors (PT)
Great facilities and
locations with
outstanding FT
benefits.
On-line postings and
application at: https://
jobs.sheridan.edu
EOE.
*Wage DOE
Apply in person at the
Front Desk.
NOW HIRING
housekeepers.
Apply at
Candlewood Suites
1709 Sugarland Dr.
WOODLANDPARK
STORAGE.COM
5211 Coffeen
Call 674-7355
New Spaces
Available!
Work Wanted
Maintenance
1809 SUGARLAND DRIVE
SHERIDAN, WY
ELDORADO
STORAGE Helping you
conquer space. 3856
Coffeen. 672-7297.
CIELO STORAGE
752-3904
Overnight
Security
FULL TIME C.N.As
WANTED!!
If you are looking for
a position in a NO
LIFT work
environment- come
see us at Emeritus at
Sugarland Ridge. Our
full time team
members enjoy
employment which
offers access to
medical, dental, vision
insurance, paid time
off, flexible
scheduling,
computerized
continuing education
system, opportunities
for growth and
advancement, as well
as a warm, family-like
atmosphere. We
currently have
vacancies for NIGHT
SHIFT (10p-6a)
certified nursing
assistants. If you are
energetic, caring and
enjoy giving excellent
care to seniors, then
we want you to join
our family. Apply in
person at 1551
Sugarland Ridge.
Looking for a LONG
HAUL LIVESTOCK
RELOCATOR. Class
A CDL required.
$1600+ per week. Will
train. New fancy
equipment.
307-752-5420.
SEEKING HVAC
INSTALLER,
Experience Preferred
but will Train the Right
Person.
Apply in Person @
Kosma Heating & AC,
529 N Main Street
ELM LOCATING &
UTILITY SERVICES
Locate Technician
Sheridan, WY area
*On the job training
*$13-$18/hr DOE
*Company vehicle
provided
*Must have a valid
driver’s license with a
good driving record
and be able to pass a
pre-employment drug
screen
*For complete job
description go to
www.elmllc.com
Fax resume to: 406327-6877 or email
[email protected]
cating.com
EEO
Go online today!
www.thesheridanpress.com
PERKINS IS
currently accepting
applications for
SUMMER
EMPLOYMENT:
Kitchen Manager,
Dining Room Manager,
& all other positions.
AM & PM shifts avail.
Apply in person at 1373
Coffeen Ave
or online at www.
pleaseapplyonline.com/
sugarlandenterprises.
EOE
Help Wanted, Medical
FT CASHIER needed.
$10/ hr. Must be 21.
Opportunity for growth.
Send reply to box 228,
c/o The Sheridan Press,
PO Box 2006,
Sheridan, WY 82801.
QDOBA now HIRING
COOKS, up to $11/hr
DOE, & LINE
SERVERS, up to $10/hr
DOE. Apply in person
@
2112 Coffeen Ave.
ROOFING LABORERS
NEEDED
Call 307-278-0314
**LPN
PROFESSIONALS**
Join a team that
supports you –
professionally and
personally
Correctional
Healthcare
Companies is
currently seeking topnotch Healthcare
professionals to join
our team at our
Sheridan County
Detention Facility in
Sheridan, WY
Healthcare
Opportunities Include:
Licensed Practical
Nurse – Full Time
We invite you to take
a look at our career
opportunities and the
benefits of working at
CHC.
Please apply online at
www.correctcaresoluti
ons.com Careers/
current openings/
Correctional
Healthcare openings
(CHC)
or Contact [email protected]
correctcaresolutions.
com. CHC is an EEO
Employer
Delivery as low as $108 a year!
Call TODAY!!
– 672-2431 –
Help Wanted,
Professional
SHERIDAN COUNTY
School District #1 is
accepting applications
for the following
positions:
·Elementary Music
Teacher (Tongue
River)
·Kindergarten
Teacher (Tongue
River)
·Secondary Physical
Education Teacher
(Tongue River)
The candidate must
be eligible for a
Wyoming Teaching
certificate. Possible
coaching or student
activities may be
available. If interested,
contact Brandi Miller,
[email protected]
sheridan.k12.wy.us or
visit district website,
www.sheridan.k12.wy.
us for more
information and
application.
Position open until
filled. E.O.E.
LOST PET?
Call 672-2431
These Animals are Available
at the Dog & Cat Shelter
84 East Ridge Road
Dogs
Cats
“Gwert”, 1 yr. old, NM, blue & black, Hound mix
“New B”, 10 yr. old, NM, brown, Lab mix
“Jasper”, 2 yr. old, NM, black, Lab/Blue Heeler mix
“Brut”, 2 yr. old, NM, black & brown, Presa Canario
“Dudley”, 3 yr. old, NM, brown & white, Pointer Mix
“Luke”, 2 yr. old, NM, tan, Rhodesian Ridgeback Mix
“Jojo”, 2 yr. old, SF, black, Retriever/Heeler mix
“Harry”, 3 yr. old, NM, black & white Australian Cattle Dog
“Bethany”, 1 yr. old, SF, black, Lab mix
“Leticia”, 3 yr. old, SF, black DSH
“Annie”, 3 yr. old, SF, black & white DMH
“Leo”, 2 yr. old, NM, black & brown, DSH
“Kennedy”, 1 yr. old, SF, black & white, DSH
“Dora”, 2 yr. old, SF, Gray Russian Blue mix, DSH
“Cupid”, 2 yr. old, SF, gray & orange Calico mix
“Freya”, 3 yr. old, SF, cream & gray, DSH
“Boozer””, 12 yr. old, NM, cream & black Ragdoll
“Nicco”, 4 yr. old, NM, black, DSH
DSH = domestic short hair DMH = domestic medium hair DLH = domestic long hair
NM = neutered male • SF= spayed female
We have 37 cats, 1 kitten, 13 dogs & 1puppy up for adoption!!
Come up and see what we have for you!
Please bring your aluminum cans either to our Can Hut just inside the Shelter
gates or to our can trailer at Scotty’s Skate Castle. Recycling proceeds are
used to care for the animals.Thanks for your support.
Classifieds 0407_Layout 1 4/7/15 8:40 AM Page 2
CLASSIFIEDS
B6 THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
PRE-OWNED VEHICLES
TRUCKS AND SUV’S
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
‘15 CHEVY SILVERADO 250 HD
‘14 CHEVY SILVERADO 2500 LTZ
‘12 CHEVY TAHOE
‘14 CHEVY SUBURBAN LT
‘11 CHEVY FORD F-350 SD
‘14 CHEVY TRAVERSE
‘08 DODGE RAM 3500
‘11 FORD F-150 SD
‘11 CHEVY SILVERADO LTZ
‘12 CHEVY 1500 CREW LT
‘11 CHEVY SILVERADO 3500 HD
‘14 FORD EDGE
‘12 CHEVY SILVERADO
‘11 CHEVY SILVERADO
‘09 CHEVY SILVERADO
54,995
49,995
42,495
42,495
42,295
38,495
35,495
31,995
31,995
29,995
29,995
29,995
28,495
27,995
27,495
26,995
26,995
24,995
23,495
21,995
21,495
20,995
17,495
14,995
12,995
11,995
$ 8,995
$ 7,995
$ 7,995
$ 7,995
CARS
CARS
‘15 BUICK LACROSSE
‘14 CHEVY IMPALA
‘12 INFINITY G25X
‘09 CADILLAC CTS
‘14 TOYOTA COROLLA S
‘14 TOYOTA COROLLA LE
‘10 VOLKSWAGON JETTA
‘13 NISSAN SENTRA
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
‘12 FORD F-150
‘12 CHEVY TRAVERSE
‘12 CHEVY COLORADO
‘06 CHEVY 2500
‘07 CHEVY SILVERADO
‘11 HONDA CRV
‘14 JEEP COMPASS
‘14 CHEVY CAPTIVA
‘05 DODGE RAM 1500
‘04 CHEVY SILVERADO
‘05 FORD F-150
‘05 HONDA PILOT
‘03 CHEVY SUBURBAN
‘04 SUZUKI XL-7
‘06 BUICK RAINIER
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
28,495
23,495
22,995
20,495
18,995
17,495
15,495
14,995
$
$
$
$
$
14,495
13,995
13,995
12,995
11,495
$ 9,995
$ 8,995
‘12 FORD FUSION SE
‘13 CHEVY SONIC
‘13 CHEVY CRUZE
‘09 TOYOTA CAMRY
‘11 TOYOTA COROLLA
‘11 NISSAN VERSA
‘07 CHEVY IMPALA
Forars!
78 ye
TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2015
Help Wanted,
Professional
SHERIDAN COUNTY
SCHOOL DISTRICT
#1
is
accepting
applications for the
following positions:
· Secondary Physical
Education Teacher
(TRMS)
· Secondary Science
Teacher (Physical,
Physics, Chemistry
– TRHS)
· Guidance
Counselor
(TRHS)
The candidate must
be eligible for a
Wyoming Teaching
certificate. Possible
coaching or student
activities may be
available. If
interested, contact
Brandi Miller,
[email protected]
wy.us or visit district
website, www.
sheridan.k12.wy.us
for more information
and application.
Position open until
filled. E.O.E.
Schools & Instructions
Professional Trades
PIANO LESSONS.
I provide piano lessons
in my home in
Sheridan. Over 30
years experience
teaching all levels.
$25/lesson. Call Ruby
307-751-1866 for
further information.
PROTECT YOUR
pine trees from
Mountain Pine Beetle
devestation. Proven
methods &
experience. Licensed
& insured. Call for
more info
307-683-7787.
Autos-Accessories
Motorcycles
2002 CHEVY IMPALA.
Runs Great. 35 MPG.
Cruise. A/C. OnStar.
Remote Entry. $3995.
Call 752-3325
PRIME RATE
MOTORS is buying
clean, preowned
vehicles of all ages.
We also install B&W
GN hitches, 5th Wheel
Hitches, Pickup
Flatbeds, Krogman
Bale Beds. Stop by
2305 Coffeen Ave. or
call 674-6677.
Delivery
problems?
Call The Press at
672-2431
2011 SOFTTAIL
DELUXE
5,800 Miles
Two-Tone Brown
$12,500
307-752-7131
Campers, Trailers
ALASKAN CAMPER
insert w/ homemade
trailer. Snug, Cozy &
clean. Stove, icebox
& storage. Great for
fishing trip. $850.
970-209-8448
Content matters.
Po lice blo tter,
repo rts every is s u e.
107 E. ALGER
307.674.6419
OPEN SATURDAYS UNTIL 4PM
38,495
23,495
$
$
Sheridan’s only full service dealership
2014 Chevy Traverse
2014 Chevy Impala
on facebook at www.facebook.com/hammerchevy
www.hammerchevy.com
Hints from Heloise
Heloise Bridge
Tag -- You're Arrested?
Dear Heloise: We all joke
about the TAGS ON OUR MATTRESSES that say they cannot
be removed under "penalty of
law." What is the real story
with the warnings on these
tags? -- J.W., via email
Oh my! What the heck does
this mean? You can take off
those tags and you won't be
taken to jail! Can you see the
police report? "Arrested for cutting tags off of mattress." The
tag is there to let you know that
a new mattress is made with all
new materials. If you cut off the
tag, it may void a warranty, but
that, too, is a big stretch. I do
tear (or cut) them off, and slip
the tags between the mattress
and box spring. -- Heloise
QUICK FIX
Dear Heloise: Ever put on a
favorite top or pants to discover that a button is about to
fall off or you have a small rip
that needs mending? Save time
by keeping three or four needles already threaded in commonly used colors, such as
black, white, cream and navy. I
keep the needles on a thin piece
of cardboard at the top of my
sewing basket,
and they are easily accessed. I can
quickly mend the
item and be on
my way! -- Carmon H., Trenton,
Ohio
You said it -- a stitch in time
saves nine. Fix the small tear
now, and it won't get bigger
later! -- Heloise
REMOVING LABELS
Dear Heloise: I discovered an
easy way to remove prescription labels from bottles. While
traveling, I had a number of
empty bottles that I did not
want to take home and had no
tool to scrape off the labels. On
a whim, I filled a sink with
warm water and soaked them
all for a little while.
I was surprised to see how
easily the labels came off the
bottles. -- Dale Smith in California
Yes, that hint is an oldie but
still a goodie. Also, it's a reminder to NOT throw empty
prescription bottles (or sales receipts) in the hotel trash can.
Play it smart and be safe. -Heloise
BEVERAGE CARRIER
Dear Heloise: My co-workers
and I often bring lunches to
work. We always are searching
for the perfect containers and
totes for storing and transporting food and beverages.
I usually bring in a thermos
mug of hot coffee, a water bottle
and another beverage bottle. I
recently have come up with a
handy and efficient solution.
I've found that the free tote
bags in the grocery-store wine
section make the perfect tote
for transporting beverages.
These totes have six separated
compartments made to fit six
wine bottles, and easily can be
converted to carry all my daily
beverages, plus extra items
that fit into the slots. -- Carol
D., Spring, Texas
NO SLIP
Dear Heloise: To keep your
platform rocker/swivel recliner from slipping backward
on your carpet, take a piece of
waffle plastic shelf liner, cut a
square of approximately 12
inches and place it under the
platform. No more slipping. -- A
Reader, via email
Phillip Alder
CAREFULLY COUNT
LOSERS AND WINNERS
W. Somerset Maugham
said, "Common sense
and nature will do a lot
to make the pilgrimage
of life not too difficult."
Common sense and
card sense will do a lot
to make the pilgrimage
of a bridge deal not too
difficult. What would a
declarer with those
characteristics do on
this deal? He is in four
hearts, and West leads
the spade jack, which is
covered by dummy's
queen and East's king.
South's three-heart
rebid shows at least a
six-card suit and gameinvitational values; typically, he will have 15-17
high-card points. Yes,
this hand is a maximum,
but if partner has an unhelpful holding, game
will probably fail. North,
of course, is happy to
raise to four hearts.
When you are in a suit
contract and have more
trumps than the
dummy, count the losers
in your hand. Here,
South has four: one
spade, two diamonds
and one club.
Then declarer should
count winners. Interestingly, he has 10: one
spade, six hearts,
one diamond and
two clubs. So he
can make his contract as long as the
defenders do not
get their four
tricks first.
There is only
one way for South
to eliminate a
loser: discard it on
the third round of
diamonds. Also,
because dummy is
so short of entries,
there isn't a moment to lose. Declarer must win
the first trick (or
East might shift to
a trump) and lead
a diamond. A de-
Omarr’s Daily Astrological
Forecast
BIRTHDAY GAL: Actress
Emma Caulfield was born
in San Diego, Calif., on this
date in 1973. This birthday
gal is recognized by TV fans
for her roles as Anya on
"Buffy the Vampire Slayer"
and Susan Keats on "Beverly Hills 90210." More recently, she's appeared on
episodes of "Royal Pains,"
"Once Upon A Time" and
"Leverage." Caulfield's big
screen work includes "Back
in the Day," "Timer" and
"Darkness Falls."
ARIES (March 21-April
19): You possess a lion's
share of originality and creative energy. Hold off on
making major purchases or
investments right now,
however, as you may be
blind to pitfalls. Financial
affairs could be put in jeopardy by unforeseen misun-
derstandings.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): If you yield to an itchy
finger on the trigger you
could stir up trouble. Don't
dive into action without adequate thought and planning. Give yourself plenty
of travel time to arrive at
your destination and avoid
the evening rush.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Run a tight ship. Treat your
neighbors and family with
the same care and respect
you'd give to a job or employer. A loved one might
want to discuss an impossible dream, so be prepared to
let him or her down gently.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Remain sensitive to
someone's competitive nature. Your efforts to be amiable will help you to
achieve goals, especially
where career or business is
concerned. Don't be oblivious to the threat you may
seem to pose to others.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You may be invincible, but
don't be naive. Knowledge is
power and power puts you
in the driver's seat. Even so,
it's what you don't know
that can hurt you. It might
pay off to be a bit more
humble and less aggressive.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Open your eyes to the latest
technology. Online banking
might be just what you need
to keep finances in order, so
investigate your options. A
new group or a new friend
could offer ideas about future investments.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Build up your strength and
stamina. Take a walk, do
some pushups or sit-ups, or
fender may win, cash a
spade trick, and play a
trump, but South wins
with dummy's 10 and
leads another diamond.
Then, when back in the
dummy with the heart
ace, he pitches his club
two on the diamond
queen.
Jeraldine Saunders
work on your yoga positions. Your leadership abilities and health will improve
if you exercise your mind
and body in equal measure.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Move ahead step by step
rather than by leaps and
bounds. Your business aspirations may seem like a
game you can't lose, but the
stakes may be higher than
you think. An error of judgment could be very costly.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Your sensitive nature shrinks from
arguments. People who are
more demanding and arrogant than you may get all
the attention. The squeaky
wheel gets the oil. Your beliefs might be founded on
false premises.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Ambition may be so
strong you can taste it.
What you think is a great
business strategy, however,
may have some serious
strings attached. Don't invest your money or time in
something illusionary.
Check the details.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): A smile makes a great
umbrella. Avoid a downpour of doubts. You could
receive helpful tips or gratuities, or have an opportunity to make some new
friends. Be forgiving if family members are hard to
deal with and abrasive.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Keep your piggy bank
under lock and key. Don't
give in to your whims or an
attempt to speed up a situation. It's much better to wait
a few days before you make
an important decision or
launch a project.
IF APRIL 8 IS YOUR
BIRTHDAY: If you've always had a secret wish,
reach for it between now
and the end of June. You're
ready to spread your wings
and become more independent, and will see our popularity soar. In June, a
golden opportunity for beneficial change should arise,
and you can successfully
put your wildest dreams
into motion. During the
summer, learn your craft,
be patient with loved ones,
and refuse to jump headfirst
into new environments.
Wait for October, when
you're shrewd and wise, to
make a crucial business or
investment change. That's a
great time period to strive
for business and financial
goals.
040715Legals_Layout 1 4/6/15 3:48 PM Page 1
YOUR ELECTED
OFFICIALS |
CITY
John Heath
Mayor
307-675-4223
Public Notices
TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
WHY PUBLIC NOTICES ARE IMPORTANT |
Kristin Kelly
Councilor
307-673-4751
Shelleen
Smith
Councilor
307-461-7082
Thayer
Shafer
Councilor
307-674-4118
Alex Lee
Councilor
307-752-8804
Jesus Rios
Councilor
307-461-9565
Kelly Gooch
Councilor
307-752-7137
COUNTY
Pete Carroll
Treasurer
307-674-2520
Eda
Thompson
Clerk
307-674-2500
Nickie Arney
Clerk of District
Court
307-674-2960
John Fenn
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
William
Edelman
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
Shelley
Cundiff
Sheridan
County Circut
Court Judge
307-674-2940
P.J. Kane
Coroner
307-673-5837
Terry
Cram
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Tom
Ringley
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Mike
Nickel
Chairman
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Steve
Maier
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Dave
Hofmeier
Sheriff
307-672-3455
Bob
Rolston
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Paul
Fall
Assessor
307-674-2535
Matt
Redle
County
Attorney
307-674-2580
STATE
Matt
Mead
Governor
307-777-7434
Mark
Jennings
Representative
House Dist. 30
307-461-0697
Mike
Madden
Representative
House Dist. 40
307-684-9356
Bruce
Burns
Senator
Senate Dist. 21
307-672-6491
Rosie
Berger
Representative
House Dist. 51
307-672-7600
Dave
Kinskey
Senator
Senate Dist. 22
307-461-4297
307-278-6030
Public notices allow citizens to monitor their government and make sure that it is
working in their best interest. Independent newspapers assist in this cause by
carrying out their partnership with the people’s right to know through public
notices. By offering an independent and archived record of public notices,
newspapers foster a more trusting relationship between government and its
citizens.
Newspapers have the experience and expertise in publishing public notices and
have done so since the Revolutionary War. Today, they remain an established,
trustworthy and neutral source that ably transfers information between
government and the people.
Public notices are the lasting record of how the public’s resources are used and are
presented in the most efficient and effective means possible.
NOTICE OF REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE
BY ADVERTISEMENT AND SALE
On February 2, 2010, Pamela A. See, as
Attorney for Keith F. Ware, made, executed, and
delivered a Mortgage to First Federal Savings Bank in
Sheridan, Wyoming, as Mortgagee. The Mortgage was
dated February 2, 2010, was duly recorded on February
8, 2010, in Book 762 of Mortgages, at Page 0341, in the
office of the County Clerk and Ex-Officio Register of
Deeds of Sheridan County, Wyoming, and is made a part
hereof and incorporated herein by reference The
Mortgage covers the following described real property
located in Sheridan County, Wyoming, to-wit::
Township 55 North. Range 83 West.
6th P.M.
Section 19: S1/2NE1/4
Section 19: A tract located in the
N1/2SE1/4 described as follows:
Beginning at a point located South
89°30' West 819.7 feet from the
East quarter comer of said Section
19; thence South 89°30' West
484.7 feet; thence South 41°54'
East 257.2 feet; thence North
59°06' East 364.6 feet to the point
of beginning
ALSO INCLUDING an easement for
ingress and egress to the tract of
land hereinabove conveyed, said
easement being 50 feet in width,
the center line of said access road
being described as follows:
Beginning at a point on the
Southerly right-of-way line of the
main Hidden Hills Development
Company access road, said point
being N 70° 02' West 1508.8 feet
from the Southeast Comer of
Section 18, Township 55 North,
Range 83 West of the 6th P.M.,
Sheridan County, Wyoming; thence
South 4°29' East 197.9 feet to a
point; thence South 18°19' East
272.5 feet to a point; thence South
50°35' East 309.8 feet to a point;
thence South 28°30' East 255.5
feet to a point; thence South 21°19'
West 277.2 feet to a point; thence
South 0°27' East 378.1 feet to a
point; thence South 23°37' East
345.7 feet to a point on the North
boundary of the above described
tract.
ALSO
A tract of land in the S1/2NE1/4 of Section
19, T55N, R83W of the 6th P.M., Sheridan County,
Wyoming, 50 feet in width, the centerline of which is
described as follows:
Beginning at a point located on the
North boundary of said
S1/2NE1/4 of Section 19, T55N,
R83W of the 6th P.M., said point
being located South 34°50' West,
1602 feet from the northeast
corner of said Section 19; thence
South 23°37' East 331.9 feet;
thence South 7°32' East, 452.3
feet; thence South 21°10' West,
575.4 feet; thence South 20°01'
East, 148 feet..
The Mortgage was given to secure the
payment of a Promissory Note dated February 2, 2010,
in the principal sum of $225,000.00, that Pamela A.
See, as Attorney for Keith F. Ware, made, executed, and
delivered to the Mortgagee. The Mortgagor has failed to
pay the principal and interest on the Note and Mortgage
when the same became due and payable, and in this
regard, and otherwise, has defaulted in performance
under the terms and conditions of the Note and
Mortgage.
Because the Mortgagor has defaulted under
the terms and conditions of the Note and Mortgage, the
Mortgagee has elected and declared, and does hereby
elect and declare, to accelerate and to make the entire
debt secured by the Mortgage due and payable without
further demand, and to exercise the power to foreclose
the Mortgage by advertisement and sale as provided in
the Mortgage. No suit or proceeding has been instituted
at law or otherwise to recover the debt secured by the
Mortgage or any part thereof.
TAKE NOTICE THAT, pursuant to the power
of sale by advertisement contained in the Mortgage,
and pursuant to Wyoming law, the Mortgage will be
foreclosed and the above-described real property will
be sold by the Sheriff or Deputy Sheriff of Sheridan
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B7
GLOSSARY OF TERMS |
Default: Failure to fulfill an obligation, especially the obligation to
make payments when due to a lender.
Encumbrance: A right attached to the property of another that may
lessen its value, such as a lien, mortgage, or easement.
Foreclosure: The legal process of terminating an owner’s interest in
property, usually as the result of a default under a mortgage.
Foreclosure may be accomplished by order of a court or by the
statutory process known as foreclosure by advertisement (also
known as a power of sale foreclosure).
Lien: A legal claim asserted against the property of another, usually
as security for a debt or obligation.
Mortgage: A lien granted by the owner of property to provide
security for a debt or obligation.
County, Wyoming, to the highest bidder, for cash, at
public vendue, at the Burkitt Street front door of the
Sheridan County Courthouse, Sheridan, Wyoming, at
10:05 o'clock a.m. on the 24th day of April, 2015. The
proceeds of the sale shall be applied first to the amount
claimed to be due on the note and mortgage which, as
of February 3, 2015, was equal to unpaid principal and
accrued interest in the sum of $218,975.74, plus interest
which has continued to accrue at the rate of 6.5% per
annum thereafter, late charges, escrow adjustments,
attorney fees, costs, and expenses of this foreclosure.
Any remaining proceeds will thereafter be distributed in
accordance with Wyoming law.
The property being foreclosed upon may be
subject to other liens and encumbrances that will not
be extinguished at the sale and any prospective
purchaser should research the status of title before
submitting a bid.
Dated this 18th day of March, 2015.
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK
c/o Lonabaugh and Riggs, LLP
Attorneys at Law
P. O. Box 5059
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
(307) 672-7444
Publish: March 31, April 7, 14, 21, 2015.
NOTICE OF REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE
BY ADVERTISEMENT AND SALE
On September February 13, 2007, John R.
Johnson made, executed, and delivered a Mortgage to
First Federal Savings Bank in Sheridan, Wyoming, as
Mortgagee. The Mortgage was dated February 13, 2007,
was duly recorded on February 13, 2007, in Book 658 of
Mortgages, at Page 0574, in the office of the County
Clerk and Ex-Officio Register of Deeds of Sheridan
County, Wyoming, and is made a part hereof and
incorporated herein by reference The Mortgage covers
the following described real property located in
Sheridan County, Wyoming, to-wit:
ALL OF LOTS 1 AND 2, AND
THE N1/2 OF LOT 3, BLOCK 2 OF
THE TOWN OF RANCHESTER, IN
SHERIDAN COUNTY, STATE OF
WYOMING, EXCEPTING THAT
PORTION CONVEYED TO THE TOWN
OF RANCHESTER, A WYOMING
MUNICIPAL CORPORATION BY QUITCLAIM DEED DATED DECEMBER
23,1982 AND RECORDED DECEMBER
30, 1982, IN BOOK 272 OF DEEDS,
PAGE 50.
The Mortgage was given to secure the
payment of a Promissory Note dated February 13, 2007,
in the principal sum of $56,800.00, that John R.
Johnson made, executed, and delivered to the
Mortgagee. The Mortgagor has failed to pay the
principal and interest on the Note and Mortgage when
the same became due and payable, and in this regard,
and otherwise, has defaulted in performance under the
terms and conditions of the Note and Mortgage.
Because the Mortgagor has defaulted under
the terms and conditions of the Note and Mortgage, the
Mortgagee has elected and declared, and does hereby
elect and declare, to accelerate and to make the entire
debt secured by the Mortgage due and payable without
further demand, and to exercise the power to foreclose
the Mortgage by advertisement and sale as provided in
the Mortgage. No suit or proceeding has been instituted
at law or otherwise to recover the debt secured by the
Mortgage or any part thereof.
TAKE NOTICE THAT, pursuant to the power
of sale by advertisement contained in the Mortgage,
and pursuant to Wyoming law, the Mortgage will be
foreclosed and the above-described real property will
be sold by the Sheriff or Deputy Sheriff of Sheridan
County, Wyoming, to the highest bidder, for cash, at
public vendue, at the Burkitt Street front door of the
Sheridan County Courthouse, Sheridan, Wyoming, at
10:00 o'clock a.m. on the 24th day of April, 2015. The
proceeds of the sale shall be applied first to the amount
claimed to be due on the note and mortgage which, as
of February 3, 2015, was equal to unpaid principal and
accrued interest in the sum of $45,203.77, plus interest
which has continued to accrue at the rate of 3.625% per
annum thereafter, late charges, escrow adjustments,
attorney fees, costs, and expenses of this foreclosure.
Any remaining proceeds will thereafter be distributed in
accordance with Wyoming law.
The property being foreclosed upon may be
subject to other liens and encumbrances that will not
be extinguished at the sale and any prospective
purchaser should research the status of title before
submitting a bid.
Power of Sale: A clause commonly written into a mortgage
authorizing the mortgagee to advertise and sell the property in the
event of default. The process is governed by statute, but is not
supervised by any court.
Probate: The court procedure in which a decedent’s liabilities are
settled and her assets are distributed to her heirs.
Public Notice: Notice given to the public or persons affected
regarding certain types of legal proceedings, usually by publishing
in a newspaper of general circulation. This notice is usually
required in matters that concern the public.
Disclaimer: The foregoing terms and definitions are provided merely as a guide to the
reader and are not offered as authoritative definitions of legal terms.
Dated this 18th day of March, 2015.
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK
c/o Lonabaugh and Riggs, LLP
Attorneys at Law
P. O. Box 5059
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
(307) 672-7444
Publish: March 31, April 7, April 14, April 21, 2015.
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Wyarno Station Barn Roof Replacement Project
Notice is hereby given that the Trustees of the
University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming hereafter
referred to as the “Owner” will receive sealed bids in
Conference Room of Dale Buckingham Architects, LLC,
45 East Loucks, Suite 301, Sheridan, WY 82801, up to
but no later than April 21, 2015 at 2:30 pm (Mountain
Standard Time) for possible award of the contract for
construction for the Wyarno Station Barn Roof
Replacement Project.
Bids will be received by Owner and will be publicly read
aloud at the stated time. Each bid must conform and be
responsive to all pertinent Contract Documents. The
Owner invites bids as follows and as hereinafter
described:
A Lump sum bid for providing all
labor, materials, equipment and services necessary to perform all work
to complete the project as shown
on the Drawings and as outlined in
the Specifications. The work includes: Selective demolition and replacement of the existing asphalt
shingle roof system, underlayment,
and related appurtenances.
Each base bid over $150,000 must be accompanied by a
Bid Bond, executed by the Bidder, as Principle, and a
satisfactory surety company, executed in favor of the
Owner in the amount of 5% of the maximum amount
of the bid. Bid Bond shall be accompanied by a certified
copy of Power of Attorney, and be signed or
countersigned by an agent of the bonding company. No
other form of Bid surety will be accepted.
Preference shall be given to Wyoming contractors,
subcontractors, laborers and suppliers as required by
Chapter Six, “Public Property”, of the Wyoming Statutes
(W.S. Section 16-6-101 et. seq.). Attention is called to
the provisions of W.S. Section 16-6-103 with respect to
subcontracting by a successful resident bidder.
Attention is also called to the provisions of W.S. Section
16-6-203 requiring resident labor in the project. Bids
must anticipate compliance with the Wyoming
Prevailing Wage Act of 1967 (W.S. Section 27-4-401, et.
seq.) and the prevailing wage rates in effect at bid date.
The Owner reserves the privilege of rejecting any or all
bids, or waiving any irregularities or informalities in any
bid or in the bidding.
The Owner will have the right to retain the bid security
of Bidders until (a) the Contract has been executed and
bonds, as required, have been furnished; or (b) the
specified time has elapsed so that Bids may be
withdrawn; or (c) all Bids have been rejected. The work
shall commence upon receipt of a written “Notice to
Proceed.” Work Shall Be Substantially Complete by
August 13, 2015.
A mandatory pre-bid meeting will be April 8, 2015, 1:15,
pm local time at the main office of the Wyarno Station,
663 Wyarno Road.
Copies of Contract Documents may be obtained from
Heather Earl, Facilities Engineering Office, Room 112,
Service Building, University of Wyoming, 1000 E.
University Ave. Dept. 3227, Laramie, WY 82071,
[email protected], at no cost for contractors and a one
hundred ($100) non-refundable deposit for others.
DATED: March 30, 2015.
THE TRUSTEES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF
WYOMING
William Mai
Vice President for Administration
Deputy Treasurer, Board of Trustees
Publish: April 4, April 7, and April 14, 2015.
IN THE DISTRICT COURT, FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT,
COUNTY OF SHERIDAN, STATE OF WYOMING
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
DUANE M. ANDERSON,
Deceased.
Probate No. PR 2015-39
NOTICE OF PROBATE
TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN SAID
ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that on the 10th day
of March, 2015, the Last Will and Testament of Duane
M. Anderson was admitted to probate by the above
named Court, and that Susan M. Malott was appointed
the Personal Representative thereof. Any action to set
aside the Will shall be filed in the Court within three (3)
months from the date of the first publication of this
notice, or thereafter be forever barred.
Notice is further given that all persons
indebted to the decedent or to his estate are requested
to make immediate payment to the undersigned at P. O.
Box 1031, La Junta, CO 81050.
Creditors having claims against the
decedent or the estate are required to file them in
duplicate with the necessary vouchers, in the office of
the Clerk of said Court, on or before three (3) months
after the date of the first publication of this notice, and
if such claims are not so filed, unless otherwise allowed
or paid, they will be forever barred.
DATED this 18th day of March,
2015.
/s/Susan M. Malott,
Personal Representative
Timothy S. Tarver
Attorney at Law
P. O. Box 6284
200 West Loucks
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
Publish: March 24, 31, April 7, 2015.
LEGAL NOTICE POLICY
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THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2015