the newspaper

Ad Populos, Non Aditus, Pervenimus
OUR 125th YEAR – ISSUE NO. 14-2015
USPS 680020
Periodical – Postage Paid at Rahway, N.J.
Thursday, April 2, 2015
(908) 232-4407
[email protected]
Published Every Thursday Since September 3, 1890
www.goleader.com
SEVENTY FIVE CENTS
Walnut Street Residents Thwart
Historic District Designation
By DELL SIMEONE
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
WESTFIELD – The attempt by the
Historical Preservation Commission to
designate Walnut Street between Elm
Street and Mountain Avenue as a historic district appears to have been
thwarted by 20 percent of the residents
who have signed a petition, which was
given to Town Administrator Jim
Gildea, saying they did not want to
participate in such a plan.
In November, at a public hearing
held during commission meeting, testimony was presented by Margaret
Hagan, of Connolly and Hickey Historic Architects of Cranford, outlining
the rational for Walnut Street, between
Elm and Mountain, to be named a
historic district.An ordinance was about
to be introduced to the town council
which would amend an existing ordinance on the designation of a historic
district.
The homes on the street are Queen
Anne Victorians and Dutch Colonials,
and were built around 1890. Most are
two-and-a-half stories high, have gables
and wrap-around porches. Also to be
included in the district were the Park
Edge Condos, which were built in 1949
and border Bicentennial Park (formerly
called Triangle Park).
At that meeting, Kelly Kessler, commission chairman, said the process for
the designation had begun a year ago,
and the ordinance would have to go to
the planning board and then to the
council for adoption. In the designated
area there are 26 residents’ homes including the condos, which were called
by Ms. Hagan harmonizing but non-
Brian Trusdell for The Westfield Leader
ADDRESSING PLANNING BOARD… Richard Kozel, the attorney for Millen
Industries and the Schulman family, owners of the Garwood Paperboard plant,
speaks to the Garwood Planning Board on March 25.
Paperboard Plant Declared
Area In Need of Redevelopment
contributing. Ms. Kessler said a majority (75 percent) of the homeowners
wanted the historic designation.
While approximately 10 or 12
homeowners attended the meeting, R.
Thomas White, who with his brother,
James White, owns 225 Walnut Avenue, said not all of the residents got the
packet sent to homeowners.
Many were not sure of what would
happen and had many questions for the
commission. While all were in favor of
maintaining the character of a historic
district, they were not happy to have to
get approval for any changes they may
wish to make to their homes. Many said
they wanted to opt out and did not want
to be included in the historic district
designation. When a clarification of
whether the amended ordinance provided for this was asked for, Town
Attorney Russ Finestein said that point
was not clear. The meeting was then
adjourned.
These same homeowners, who were
balking about being included in the
proposed historic district, two years
ago were opposed to a builder who
wanted to build on a lot where a house
had been razed. They were concerned
about maintaining the character of the
neighborhood. Changes were made to
the design of the new house and no
further action was necessary.
The information that was originally
sent to the residents contained the following paragraph: “You should also be
aware that a protest petition against a
proposed historic district, signed by 20
percent or more of the owners of either
lots or land, included in the proposed
designated area or of the lots and land
extending 200 feet in all directions
there from, inclusive of street space
may be filed with the town clerk. In
such event, the proposed designation
shall become effective only by a favorable vote of two-thirds of the members
of the town council.” The information
CONTINUED ON PAGE 10
By BRIAN TRUSDELL
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
GARWOOD – The planning board
has declared the Garwood Paperboard
plant property on North Avenue an
“area in need of redevelopment” and
has forwarded its recommendation
to the borough council for further
action.
The decision on March 25 was the
first step in possibly transforming the
4.54-acre plot on the east edge of the
borough, a largely vacant, hulking,
four-story, 115-year-old structure
with smaller buildings, into another
use, such as an over-55 housing unit
and/or nursing home.
If the borough agrees with the determination, it can develop a plan for
the property and work with the owner
to implement it.
Zoning Code Official Victor
Vinegra, who works for the planning
board’s designated engineering firm
Harbor Consultants of Cranford, explained how his firm determined that
the property met three of the state’s
eight criteria for declaring it “in need
of redevelopment.” Only one is required for the declaration.
Highlighting Harbor Consultants’
77-page report, Mr. Vinegra noted
how the buildings are largely empty
and contain broken windows with tin
or wood covering them. Moreover,
much of the underdeveloped areas of
the property has overgrown vegetation.
While the building is not crumbling, he said, those conditions met
criteria “B” of a “discontinuance of
use” that made it in “so great a state of
disrepair as to be untenable.”
Additionally, Mr. Vinegra explained, the property met criteria “D”
that the age of the buildings’ obsolescent design and state of dilapidation
made them “detrimental to the safety,
health, morals, or welfare of the community.”
And finally, the parcel was “consistent with smart growth planning
principles” – criteria “H” – due to its
location along the NJ Transit Raritan
Valley Rail Line and Garwood being
“more or less a transit village,” Mr.
Vinegra said.
Richard Kozel, the attorney representing the property’s owner, Millen
Industries Inc., and its principal, Ken
Schulman, did not dispute the report,
CONTINUED ON PAGE 10
Paul Lachenauer for The Westfield Leader
TALENTED YOUNGSTERS… Young gymnasts from Surgents Elite Gymnastics put on a show during the JCC of Central New Jersey in Scotch Plains
“Family Fun Fest” on Sunday afternoon.
Paul Lachenauer for The Westfield Leader
EASTER BUNNY AND PANCAKES… TheCranford Jaycees held their annual Pancake Breakfast with the Easter Bunny
Sunday morning at the Cranford VFW hall on South Avenue. The event raised money for the Cranford First Aid Squad.
Pictured are the Easter Bunny greeting Mia and Amy Andre.
Candidates File For State, County,
Municipal Elected Offices
By PAUL J. PEYTON
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
REGION — The fall campaign
officially began Monday with nominating petitions filed by candidates
for state assembly, Union County clerk
and freeholder, Westfield town council, Cranford township committee,
Fanwood mayor and borough council, and Garwood borough council.
At the county level, incumbent
Democratic Freeholders Al Mirabella
of Fanwood, Mohamed Jalloh of
Union, the current board chairman,
Rahway, Clark Residents
Object to Park Turf Field
By PAUL J. PEYTON
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
COUNTY — Opponents of a lighted
turf field at Rahway River Park showed
up to voice their displeasure of the
project at the Union County Freeholder
Board meeting last Thursday night.
Objectors raised issues ranging from
seating capacity and noise to the impact on the environment.
As previously reported, plans call
for the replacement of an existing field
at the park with a turf field, track and
lights paid for by the county. Bleachers, team pavilions, a public address
system, scoreboard, restroom facilities
and concession stand, and a press box
would be paid for by Rahway. The
county portion in preliminary plans
was $2.6 million with Rahway paying
$2.3 million.
County Manager Al Faella, who
spoke prior to members of the public,
said the field would have bleachers for
1,200 persons, not the 5,000 that had
been sought by Rahway.
“This is an upgrade of an existing
field, not a new stadium-type facility,”
Mr. Faella said. He also said the new
field would be constructed according
to New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) regulations,
saying it would not “destroy the open
nature” of the park as noted at
change.org, the website for the Coalition to Save Historic Rahway River
Park, which is opposed to the project.
He said comments on the website
and by some who spoke at the meeting
are incorrect in stating that the park is
historic. He said the park is not listed on
the state or federal registers of historic
places.
Due to the condition of the playing
field after rain, a turf field is being
constructed, “so that more county residents can partake in a valuable county
resource that is in very short supply in
our densely populated area,” Mr. Faella
said.
Rahway Business Administrator
Cherron Rountree, a former Union
County employee, said Rahway
“strongly supports this project.” She
said “after careful consideration and
concerns from residents” the city agreed
to a seating capacity of 1,200. She said
the field would be used for Rahway
High School home football games of
five to seven games a year. She said the
games attract “a couple hundred” spectators. She said the additional seating
would be used in anticipation of attracting county-wide track meets, “and
that would be maybe once a year.”
She said the field would be used by
other towns and individuals when
Rahway is not using the facility.
“I think when everyone understands
what is laid out there and the importance, this will be a really great project,”
Ms. Rountree said.
Bob Carson of Rahway called the
park a “gem that is rare in Union
County.” He said he obtained “contracts” through the Open Public Records
Act (OPRA) that showed the proposed
facility “will change the character of
Rahway River Park immensely.”
A soccer coach for 20 years, he said
turf fields can reach a temperature of
160 degrees in the summer.
Freeholder Chairman Mohamed
Jalloh said there are no contracts for the
project as the freeholders have not
passed any resolutions to date.
Kelly Tropeano of Clark called the
project a “costly and unnecessary upgrade to the facility.” A member of the
Coalition to Save Historic Rahway
River Park, she also raised health concerns regarding turf fields. She said
2,700 persons have signed an online
CONTINUED ON PAGE 10
and Bruce Bergen of Springfield, are
being challenged in the June Primary
by Diana Escobar, Eric Kulick and
Fabiola Rios, all of Elizabeth, running under the slogan “Real Democrats for Change,” and Henry McNair
of Union and Jack Freudenheim of
Plainfield, running under the banner
Union County Progressive Democratic Organization.
The winners will face Republican
challengers, Richard Fortunato of
Scotch Plains, chairman of the board
of The Catastrophe Risk Exchange,
Inc., which provides transaction software for reinsurance brokers, managing agents and syndicates, and reinsurers; Mountainside Councilman
Rene Dierkes, a financial advisor for
Morgan Stanley in Westfield and who
was born in Naples, Italy, and Joel
Bonilla of Union, a police dispatcher
in North Plainfield.
County Clerk Joanne Rajoppi is
seeking re-election against Republican Joseph Aubourg, an educator at
Monmouth University, in the General
Election.
In Westfield, Republican incumbents Frank Arena, first ward; JoAnn
Neylan, second ward, and Mark
LoGrippo, third ward, all filed for reelection, and Doug Stokes, fourth
ward, replaces James Foerst, who is
not seeking re-election. Mr. Stokes is
president of the Westfield Memorial
Library Board of Trustees. The GOP
ticket will face Democrats Daniel
Ortolani, first ward, a senior vicepresident of Worldwide Customer
Services at Information Builders, a
software technology firm; Martin
Rothfelder, third ward, an attorney,
and Kimberly Palmieri-Mouded,
fourth ward, in November, who most
recently was associate dean for student life at St. John’s University. No
Democrat filed in the second ward.
In Fanwood, Mayor Colleen Mahr,
who heads the Union County Division of Strategic Planning and Intergovernmental Relations, is seeking a
fourth term. She is joined on the
Democratic ticket by Councilman
Jack Molenaar, director of transportation services with Rutgers University, and council candidate Erin
McElroy Barker, who is replacing
Councilman Daniel Levine, who is
not seeking re-election. No Republicans filed for mayor or council seats.
Garwood Borough Council members William Nierstedt, director of planning for Plainfield, and Ann Palmer
Tarantino, a project manager with
AT&T, are seeking re-election. They
face a Republican challenge in November from Ileen Bocchino Cuccaro,
a realtor with Coldwell Banker, and
Joseph R. Sarno III, a senior accountant with SS&C GlobeOP in Cranford.
CONTINUED ON PAGE 10
Paul Lachenauer for The Westfield Leader
ARENDELLE IN SCOTCH PLAINS…Olaf delighted children at the JCC of
Central New Jersey in Scotch Plains “Family Fun Fest” on Sunday afternoon.
Dressed as Olaf is Westfield Leader Editor Lauren S. Barr.
PAGE INDEX
Regional ........
Editorial ........
Police ............
Community ...
Obituary ........
2-3, 20
4-5, 20
9
6-8, 20
8
Education ......
Sports ............
Real Estate ....
Classifieds .....
A&E ..............
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Page 10
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, April 2, 2015
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Garwood Council Hires
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By BRIAN TRUSDELL
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
Paul Lachenauer for The Westfield Leader
HUG THE EASTER BUNNY… Kids enjoy the Cranford Junior Woman’s
Club’s “Breakfast with the Easter Bunny” event Saturday morning at the
Cranford Community Center.
Fanwood Board Okays
Resolution for K-9 Resorts
By CHRISTINA M. HINKE
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
FANWOOD — The planning
board on Wednesday at its regular
meeting had no applications to be
heard. The board approved the resolution for applicant K-9 Resorts
LLC, located at 57 South Avenue.
The application to subdivide the lot
was approved unanimously last
month.
K-9 Resorts’ plan is to create a
new doggie day care facility on the
adjacent lot it is leasing. Co-owners Steven and Jason Parker held a
groundbreaking ceremony last
Thursday.
There is a grand opening planned
for Sunday, June 14, from noon
until 4 p.m. Steven Parker told The
Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times Friday that he is expecting 400 to 500
people at the event, which will include kids’ activities with a bouncy
house, and catered food and beverages. During the grand opening,
people will be able to tour the facility.
The new doggie daycare facility
will have about double the space
and will include a new daycare area
for smaller dogs. “We will have one
room for dogs 30 pounds and up
and one room for 30 pounds and
smaller,” Mr. Parker told The Times.
Dog owners can choose from
three boarding options: luxury
suites, executive rooms, and traditional boarding rooms.
“We are going to have Rodeo
www.goleader.com
Drive luxury suites that are styled
after a Beverly Hills streetscape,”
said Mr. Parker, and which will include working lampposts modeled
after those found in the famed shopping mecca.
Another new feature is a 5,000square-foot private, outdoor dog
park made of a special artificial
turf, and the area will have benches,
lampposts and murals painted on
the fence. The building will be fully
sprinklered and have a generator in
the event of a power outage.
Both Steven Parker and his
brother, Jason, live in Fanwood less
than a mile from the facility, as
does the general manager of K-9.
K-9 was rated number three in the
country by Ilovedogs.com, and is
rated number one in New Jersey by
New Jersey Monthly magazine and
the Courier News as best doggie
daycare facility.
Zoning Officer Raymond
Sullivan said he anticipates three
new applications — an addition, a
generator and a pergola — at the
board’s next regular meeting on
Wednesday, April 22.
Planning Board member Jack
Molenaar, who also serves on the
borough council, said he talked to
the council Wednesday night and it
is hoping to introduce at the next
council meeting an ordinance that
will rezone part of South Avenue.
The ordinance would then be reviewed by the planning board, with
a second reading by the borough
council in May.
After it was questioned at a recent planning board meeting, Board
Secretary Pat Hoynes said the board
does not need a liaison to the historic preservation committee.
“It was a past practice, but it is
not a bylaw,” Mr. Molenaar said.
Mr. Molenaar said the board would
keep the lines of communication
open when a project comes up in
which the historic preservation committee may have an interest.
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GARWOOD – The borough council
on March 24 decided to accept the bid
of Equipment Rental Services to replace the Houston-headquartered Waste
Management as the borough’s recycling collector, choosing the company
after a debate which sparked a heated
discussion and concerns of corruption.
Councilman Jim Mathieu was the
lone opponent to Equipment Rental, of
Staten Island, N.Y., which Borough
Administrator/Borough Clerk Christina Ariemma disclosed was owned by
the son of the borough’s former recycling collector, Great Northern.
Mr. Mathieu said he was unequivocally against the return to any company
affiliated with Great Northern, recalling how he and other council members
in 2011 received the specifications for
renewing at “the 11th hour” and “were
put under a lot of pressure internally” to
extend the contract with the company
without going for bid.
“What I’m trying to say is there were
shenanigans,” Mr. Mathieu said. “I’m
just saying there are some advocates
within this administration for Great
Northern...”
“He means me,” interjected Ms.
Ariemma, who earlier in the discussion
said she had received numerous more
complaints about Waste Management
than with Great Northern. “I don’t know
what you’re implying, councilman, but
I’m telling you the truth, the facts.
There’s no improprieties.”
Mr. Mathieu and Ms. Ariemma disputed the details of the 2011 contract,
with Mr. Mathieu saying Waste
Management’s bid saved the borough
money and Ms. Ariemma saying the
bids were “pennies” apart.
The conflict arose out of the council’s
desire to match the borough’s recycling contract with the calendar year
for producing a collection schedule
and budgeting. The current contract
expires Wednesday, July 1. Waste Management, which originally insisted on
renewing only on a yearly basis, according to Ms. Ariemma, submitted a
bid of $28,578 to complete the year,
while Equipment Rental offered to
Freeholders
charge only $16,900.
When Councilman Lou Petruzzelli
questioned that, with a difference of
$11,678, why there was any question
as to which bid to accept, Mr. Mathieu
shot back.
“Because we’re worried about corruption here, that’s why. Because we’re
worried about corruption,” he said. “I’m
trying to protect the borough from corruption.”
That spurred Mayor Charles
Lombardo to gavel the meeting back
into order.
In another budgetary contract matter, Mr. Mathieu, the buildings and
grounds committee chairman, said the
Garwood school board had agreed to
extend the shared-services agreement
at a 2-percent increase with regard to
custodial maintenance.
The issue of adding the Garwood
Sports and Recreation Complex field
house to the agreement was still a matter of some discussion with the school
board. The exact level of service and
cost was to be determined as the month
of April progressed, Mr. Mathieu said.
That drew a tone of concern from
Councilwoman Sara Todisco, who felt
the building would not require a lot of
work and asked for an update before
the council’s next meeting on Tuesday,
April 14.
The council met in an executive session for about 30 minutes to hear an
update from its attorney with regard to
contract negotiations before a mediator with the police officers’ union. No
details were revealed after the closeddoor session.
Councilwoman and Parking Committee ChairwomanAnn Tarantino told
the council that she had received a
commitment from the manager of the
Burger King restaurant on North Avenue about increasing the number of
commuter parking spots from the current 15. The exact number was still a
matter of discussion with higher management at Burger King.
In another parking issue, Mayor
Lombardo said he had discussed residents’ concerns about traffic and cars
around Lincoln School with Schools
Superintendent Teresa Quigley, who
agreed to send reminders to parents
about drop-off and pick-up regulations.
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
petition opposing the project.
She said the coalition is opposed to
the project based on “safety, quality of
life, projected costs, impact to the environment and habitat to the park.” She
said the park is suited for soccer, not
football.
Ms. Tropeano said adding lights and
extending playing time will “change
the dawn-to-dusk nature of the park.”
Jeff Freeman of Rahway said the
field would “drastically reduce our
property values.” He said residents will
be faced with noise from large crowds
and the loudspeakers as well bright
lights in the evening.
“Ninety percent of the people are
against this development,” Mr. Freeman said. He called the project “just
totally inappropriate.”
James Coyle of Rahway commented,
“This is wrong...I didn’t purchase my
house to be within two blocks of the
sports complex.” He questioned why
fixing Veterans Field, the current home
to Rahway High School football, has
not been discussed.
“I don’t want to sit in my living room
and hear, ‘first and 10, ball on the 20yard line.’ It’s unfair,” Mr. Coyle said.
Former Clark councilwoman Maria
Soyka said the athletic facility “will
ruin the whole footprint of that park.”
During freeholder comments, Freeholder Angel Estrada said, “This is a
very moving issue and we’ll see what
happens.”
Freeholder Chris Hudak added, “I
think people should hold judgment until
there are actual plans in place that
people can scrutinize and make comments on....We’re not talking about Met
Life Stadium in the middle of Rahway
River Park.”
Freeholder Jalloh said he wants to
hold a public forum with Rahway officials in the city once plans are set.
In other topics raised during public
comments, representatives of Communications Workers of America (CWA)
Local 1080 spoke of negotiations with
the county on a new contract for social
services employees. Jeff Robinson said
the union has not been treated fairly.
Local 1080’s contract expired in June
of 2013.
Summit Council President Robert
Rubino said he was “hoping for a better
proposed (county) budget” after the
sale of Runnells Specialized Hospital.
He said he would “enjoy seeing” a flat
tax levy or even a tax cut, urging the
freeholders to cut the budget more. Mr.
Rubino said the Summit city budget
has gone down to 21 percent of the
Summit tax bill with the county portion
at 29 percent.
Walnut St.
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
was signed by Ms. Kessler.
Subsequently, the December and
January meetings of the commission
had been cancelled. Meanwhile the
amended ordinance, which did not contain an opt-out provision, had been
introduced before council for first reading.
The commission met again on February 23. That meeting, however, was
not a continuation of the public hearing
on the designation. At that meeting, the
White brothers and 10 of their neighbors showed up only because one of
them saw on the town’s website that a
commission meeting was being held
that evening. The concern of the meeting that evening was to approve additions to be made to a house in a historic
district. The Walnut Street owners
waited a hour-and-a-half for that portion of the meeting to be over and then
presented their objections to the commission. Most of their concerns were
about having to get approval to make
changes to the homes many of them
had grown up in.
Ms. Kessler told the residents that
ordinance would be before the council
again and that 75 percent of the residents would have signed to agree to the
designation before it could be passed.
She assured the residents that no one
was trying to “shove anything down
their throats.”
However, the amended ordinance
did not contain an opt-out provision to
provide for those may not want to be
part of district.
In any case, R. Thomas White said,
later, the opposing residents got together with other residents, had more
discussion, and the 20 percent needed
signed the petition opposing the historic designation. The historic designation appears to have been scrapped.
In the aftermath, it appears that communication to residents as to the process of historic designation and what it
entails and could mean to them (the
residents) was not clear.
Tom Jardim, a former town mayor
and a resident of Walnut Street, told
The Westfield Leader he is disappointed.
“I’ll keep talking to my neighbors, I
won’t give up,” he said. “We have to do
something to stop the razing of historic
houses in this town,” he added.
The Monday night meeting of the
commission was cancelled. The next
commission meeting will be on Monday, April 27, at 7:30 p.m. at the municipal building, 425 East Broad Street.
MARCH FOR MEALS...Pictured left to right, Meals on Wheels volunteers
Maureen O’Rourke of Chatham and Christine Melendez of Summit, and New
Jersey State Senate Minority Leader Tom Kean, Jr. (R-21st, Westfield), deliver
meals to older adults in Summit on Tuesday. Senator Kean participated in the
Meals on Wheels America’s “March For Meals” campaign, which is coordinated
by SAGE Eldercare in Summit. During the entire month, a total of 24 dignitaries
delivered meals with SAGE volunteers. On a daily basis, SAGE volunteers deliver
meals and check in on approximately 120 older residents in parts of Union, Essex,
and Morris Counties. For more information on the program, call (908) 273-5554
or visit sageeldercare.org.
Garwood Paperboard
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
but he would not state whether he
agreed with its conclusion that the
paperboard plant was in need of redevelopment.
Board Attorney Donald Fraser
pressed Mr. Kozel four times if he
agreed or disagreed with Harbor’s
determination. But Mr. Kozel deferred each time, acknowledging on
one occasion with a laugh that he was
not directly answering the question.
Instead, he said only that such a determination would make transitioning
the property to another use easier.
Mr. Kozel also said the plant has
environmental contamination contained within the perimeter of the
plant walls that likely would cost
between $800,000 and $1 million to
correct. Until the exact level of contamination is specified, he could not
offer an opinion on the determination.
He bristled at the use of the word
“blight” although two residents, including former planning board member Al Del Conte, described the property as “blighty” and “an eyesore.”
Planning Board Chairman Steve
Greet referred to it as “blightful.”
Mr. Kozel told the board how the
plant is operating at a minimal level,
with five people for recycling various types of paper. At its peak, he
said, the plant, which was built to
produce musical organs, had more
than 105 employees spread out over
three shifts as it operated 24 hours a
day.
But about 10 years ago, he said, the
price of recycled paper plummeted to
one sixth of its previous value, about
$20 a ton, with countries such as
China and India dominating the market.
The Schulmans, who purchased
the property in the 1970s, investigated redeveloping the property, but
with the price of recycled paper rebounding in recent years, the family
also is considering amping up production again.
Mr. Kozel said Millen looked into
a mixed-use of retail and housing,
but rejected the idea when it could
not find many interested developers.
The most promising proposal was
some combination of elderly housing, such as an age 55-and-up community, assisted living facility, nursing home or a mixture of all three.
“It’s something very, very interesting,” he said. “We intend to look in
that direction, but I don’t want the
board to think we’ve foreclosed the
idea of reopening the plant.”
Except for the abstentions of Mayor
Charles Lombardo and Borough
Council President Bill Nierstedt, the
board voted unanimously to declare
the site in need of redevelopment.
In other action, the board sent its
recommendations to the borough
council regarding its still yet to be
introduced ordinance on temporary
sidewalk signs.
The board spent more than half an
hour before deciding to ask the council to: consider prohibiting lighted
temporary signs, allow a “T sign” in
addition to A-frame and easel types,
restrict the signs being permitted to
only during hours of operation, mandate that they must be stored inside
when not in use and that they be no
wider than two feet and greater than
eight square feet.
It rejected a suggestion from Mr.
Nierstedt that plastic be banned as
the signs’ composition. Although
North and South Avenues are replete
with the signs already, borough ordinances do not permit them.
Candidates
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
Cranford Township Committeeman Thomas H. Hannen, Jr., the lone
Democrat on the five-member committee, is being challenged in his bid
for a second term by Republican
Michael A. Petrucci, who serves as an
alternate member on the Cranford
Planning Board. Mr. Hannen was
mayor in 2013.
In Mountainside, Republican
Mayor Paul N. Mirabelli is seeking
another term along with GOP borough council incumbent Robert
Messler and newcomer Wendy FechCaccamo, who replaces Councilman
William Lance, who did not seek reelection. No Democrats filed for council seats.
There is no municipal election in
Scotch Plains this year.
At the state level, candidates filed
for the General Assembly. The State
Senate will face re-election in 2016.
In the 21st legislative district, Republican incumbents, Assemblyman
Jon Bramnick of Westfield and Assemblywoman Nancy Munoz of Summit, face a fall challenge from Democrats Jill Anne Lazare of Summit, an
attorney who ran for the Assembly in
2013, and David Barnett of Springfield, a member of the Springfield
Township Committee currently serving as mayor. Mr. Barnett owns an
information technology company.
In the 22nd legislative district, Assemblyman Jerry Green of Plainfield)
is joined on the Democratic ticket by
his new running mate, former Rahway
mayor James Kennedy, who replaces
Assemblywoman Linda Stender og
Scotch Plains, who is not seeking reelection following a scandal involving her husband’s shore home.
They will face Republicans, former
Scotch Plains councilman William
Vastine, a finance manager with the
Plainfield YMCA, and William
Michelson, an attorney and land use
planner from Plainfield.
Horace R. Corbin for The Westfield Leader
FUTURE REPORTERS...Cub Scouts from School One in Scotch Plains got a
tour of the offices of The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
last week.
Serving the community since 1959
OUR 56th YEAR – ISSUE NO. 14-2015
USPS 485200
Periodical – Postage Paid at Rahway, N.J.
Thursday, April 2, 2015
(908) 232-4407
[email protected]
Published Every Thursday Since 1959
www.timesnj.com
SEVENTY FIVE CENTS
Scotch Plains-Fanwood BOE
Celebrates Student Artists
By THOMAS VAN DUYNE
Specially Written for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
SCOTCH PLAINS — At Thursday night’s Scotch Plains-Fanwood
Board of Education (BOE) meeting,
students were formally recognized
for their artistic achievements with
the PTA Reflections project. Every
year students from all around New
Jersey submit original pieces around
a common theme. This year’s theme
was, “The world would be a better
place if…” The work entered must be
in one of six categories: Dance/Choreography, Musical Composition,
Photography, Film, Literature, and
Visual Arts.
Thirteen students from the Scotch
Plains-Fanwood school district, out
of the hundreds of entries all across
the state, received awards and were
recognized for their accomplishments.
For Dance, third grader Billie Rose
Sherratt received an Outstanding Interpretation award for her piece, entitled “Heroes.” Seton Dill, a fourth
grader, received an Honorable Mention for her piece, “Be Who You Are.”
Additionally, sixth grader Mae Merkle
won an Award of Merit for “The
Ripple Effect of Contagious Love.”
In the category of Musical Composition, third grader Kayla Fiore won
Courtesy of Tom Kranz
VISIT FROM CANCUN…The Fanwood Fire Department and Rescue Squad
received a visit this past weekend from the fire chief of the Mexican tourist resort
of Cancun. Cancun Fire Department Director General Tom Hurtado, third from
right, is shown here with his New Jersey hosts from the Fanwood Fire Department, Little Hearts Big World CPR/First Aid Instruction and the Region 4 Rescue
Team of the American Power Boat Assocation during Chief Hurtado's tour of the
Fanwood Fire Department and Rescue Squad.
Candidates File For State,
County, Municipal Offices
By PAUL J. PEYTON
Specially Written for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
REGION — The fall campaign
officially began Monday with nominating petitions filed by candidates
for state assembly, Union County clerk
and freeholder, Westfield town council, Cranford township committee,
Fanwood mayor and borough council, and Garwood borough council.
At the county level, incumbent
Democratic Freeholders Al Mirabella
of Fanwood, Mohamed Jalloh of
Union, the current board chairman,
and Bruce Bergen of Springfield, are
being challenged in the June Primary
by Diana Escobar, Eric Kulick and
Fabiola Rios, all of Elizabeth, running under the slogan “Real Democrats for Change,” and Henry McNair
of Union and Jack Freudenheim of
Plainfield, running under the banner
Union County Progressive Democratic Organization.
The winners will face Republican
challengers, Richard Fortunato of
Scotch Plains, chairman of the board
of The Catastrophe Risk Exchange,
Inc., which provides transaction soft-
ware for reinsurance brokers, managing agents and syndicates, and reinsurers; Mountainside Councilman
Rene Dierkes, a financial advisor for
Morgan Stanley in Westfield and who
was born in Naples, Italy, and Joel
Bonilla of Union, a police dispatcher
in North Plainfield.
County Clerk Joanne Rajoppi is
seeking re-election against Republican Joseph Aubourg, an educator at
Monmouth University, in the General
Election.
In Westfield, Republican incumbents Frank Arena, first ward; JoAnn
Neylan, second ward, and Mark
LoGrippo, third ward, all filed for reelection, and Doug Stokes, fourth
ward, replaces James Foerst, who is
not seeking re-election. Mr. Stokes is
president of the Westfield Memorial
Library Board of Trustees. The GOP
ticket will face Democrats Daniel
Ortolani, first ward, a senior vicepresident of Worldwide Customer
Services at Information Builders, a
software technology firm; Martin
Rothfelder, third ward, an attorney,
CONTINUED ON PAGE 10
Brian Horton for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
SMILE…There was a steady stream of families getting their photos taken with
the Easter Bunny at Forest Road Park in Fanwood Saturday.
an Award of Merit for her piece,
“Courage.” Sixth grader Eve Harrison
received an Outstanding Interpretation award for her piece, “Stuck.”
Jennifer Schug, an eighth grader, received an Award of Merit for her
piece entitled “True Friends.”
Three students won an award for
Film Production. Lily Cantwell, a third
grader, won an Outstanding Interpretation Award for her work, “No Homework.” Sixth grader Ryan Agnello
received an Award of Merit for his
piece, “Spread your Happiness.”
Sophomore Stephanie Judge received
an Honorable Mention for her film,
“Look Up.”
For Literature, fourth grader Lauren
Mirenda received an Honorable Mention for her story, “Consequences.”
Erica Schug, sixth grade, won an
Award of Merit for her piece, “A
Celebration of Colors.”
Lastly, for Visual Arts,
kindergartener Shreyan Katiyer won
an Award of Merit for his work, “Solar Light Planter.” Seventh grader
Margaret Wang received an Outstanding Interpretation award for her piece,
“Better World with Peace, Love and
Care.”
Some of these students have been
winners for multiple years and the
board members congratulated the students on their achievements. Board
member Charlotte Schirmer noted,
“It’s amazing we have so much talent
in our school system here. And some
of you have had not your first time,
but your second and third time; it’s
amazing.”
Superintendent Margaret Hayes
said she was “impressed with the age
range of the students… Parents, whatever you’re doing to encourage this,
keep doing it. Students, thank you so
much for your good work; you never
know where this will take you.”
The other main point of board busiCONTINUED ON PAGE 10
Paul Lachenauer for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
LIVE DEMONSTRATION…JCC of Central New Jersey in Scotch Plains held a “Family Fun Fest” Sunday afternoon.
A large variety of activities and entertainment was offered. Pictured is the Scotch Plains Police Department K-9 unit as
it puts on a demonstration.
Fanwood Planning Board Okays
Resolution for K-9 Resorts
By CHRISTINA M. HINKE
Specially Written for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
FANWOOD — The planning
board on Wednesday at its regular
meeting had no applications to be
heard. The board approved the resolution for applicant K-9 Resorts
LLC, located at 57 South Avenue.
The application to subdivide the lot
was approved unanimously last
month.
K-9 Resorts’ plan is to create a
new doggie day care facility on the
Rahway, Clark Residents
Object to Park Turf Field
By PAUL J. PEYTON
Specially Written for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
COUNTY — Opponents of a
lighted turf field at Rahway River
Park showed up to voice their displeasure of the project at the Union
County Freeholder Board meeting last
Thursday night. Objectors raised issues ranging from seating capacity
and noise to the impact on the environment.
As previously reported, plans call
for the replacement of an existing
field at the park with a turf field, track
and lights paid for by the county.
Bleachers, team pavilions, a public
address system, scoreboard, restroom
facilities and concession stand, and a
press box would be paid for by
Rahway. The county portion in preliminary plans was $2.6 million with
Rahway paying $2.3 million.
County Manager Al Faella, who
spoke prior to members of the public,
said the field would have bleachers
for 1,200 persons, not the 5,000 that
had been sought by Rahway.
“This is an upgrade of an existing
field, not a new stadium-type facility,” Mr. Faella said. He also said the
new field would be constructed according to New Jersey Department of
Environmental Protection (DEP)
regulations, saying it would not “destroy the open nature” of the park as
noted at change.org, the website for
the Coalition to Save Historic Rahway
River Park, which is opposed to the
project.
He said comments on the website
and by some who spoke at the meeting are incorrect in stating that the
park is historic. He said the park is not
listed on the state or federal registers
of historic places.
Due to the condition of the playing
field after rain, a turf field is being
constructed, “so that more county
residents can partake in a valuable
county resource that is in very short
supply in our densely populated area,”
Mr. Faella said.
Rahway Business Administrator
Cherron Rountree, a former Union
County employee, said Rahway
“strongly supports this project.” She
said “after careful consideration and
concerns from residents” the city
agreed to a seating capacity of 1,200.
She said the field would be used for
Rahway High School home football
games of five to seven games a year.
She said the games attract “a couple
hundred” spectators. She said the
additional seating would be used in
anticipation of attracting county-wide
track meets, “and that would be maybe
once a year.”
adjacent lot it is leasing. Co-owners Steven and Jason Parker held a
groundbreaking ceremony last
Thursday.
There is a grand opening planned
for Sunday, June 14, from noon
until 4 p.m. Steven Parker told The
Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times Friday that he is expecting 400 to 500
people at the event, which will include kids’ activities with a bouncy
house, and catered food and beverages. During the grand opening,
people will be able to tour the facility.
The new doggie daycare facility
will have about double the space
and will include a new daycare area
for smaller dogs. “We will have one
room for dogs 30 pounds and up
and one room for 30 pounds and
smaller,” Mr. Parker told The Times.
Dog owners can choose from
three boarding options: luxury
suites, executive rooms, and traditional boarding rooms.
“We are going to have Rodeo
Drive luxury suites that are styled
after a Beverly Hills streetscape,”
said Mr. Parker, and which will include working lampposts modeled
after those found in the famed shopping mecca.
Another new feature is a 5,000square-foot private, outdoor dog
park made of a special artificial
turf, and the area will have benches,
lampposts and murals painted on
the fence. The building will be fully
sprinklered and have a generator in
the event of a power outage.
Both Steven Parker and his
brother, Jason, live in Fanwood less
than a mile from the facility, as
does the general manager of K-9.
K-9 was rated number three in the
country by Ilovedogs.com, and is
rated number one in New Jersey by
New Jersey Monthly magazine and
the Courier News as best doggie
daycare facility.
Zoning Officer Raymond
Sullivan said he anticipates three
new applications — an addition, a
generator and a pergola — at the
board’s next regular meeting on
Wednesday, April 22.
Planning Board member Jack
Molenaar, who also serves on the
borough council, said he talked to
the council Wednesday night and it
is hoping to introduce at the next
council meeting an ordinance that
will rezone part of South Avenue.
The ordinance would then be reviewed by the planning board, with
a second reading by the borough
council in May.
After it was questioned at a recent planning board meeting, Board
Secretary Pat Hoynes said the board
CONTINUED ON PAGE 10
CONTINUED ON PAGE 10
SP-F BOE to Hold
Info. Sessions on
Proposed Budget
SCOTCH PLAINS – Information sessions on the Scotch PlainsFanwood Public Schools’ proposed 2015-2016 school budget
will take place on Wednesday,
April 1, and Tuesday, April 14, at
7:30 p.m. Both sessions will be
held at the Board of Education
Offices located on Evergreen Avenue and Cedar Street.
Please join Margaret Hayes,
School Superintendent, and members of the board of education to
hear the proposals that will highlight the district’s operating budget, including enrollment and staffing needs, educational initiatives
supported by the budget, facilities
projects and the tax impact of the
2015-2016 school budget.
Paul Lachenauer for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
ARENDELLE IN SCOTCH PLAINS…Olaf delighted children at the JCC of
Central New Jersey in Scotch Plains “Family Fun Fest” on Sunday afternoon.
Dressed as Olaf was Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times Editor Lauren S. Barr.
PAGE INDEX
Regional ........
Editorial ........
Police ............
Community ...
Obituary ........
2-3, 20
4-5, 20
9
6-8, 20
8
Education ......
Sports ............
Real Estate ....
Classifieds .....
A&E ..............
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Page 10
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, April 2, 2015
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Cancun Fire Chief Visits
FW Fire Dept., Rescue Sqd.
Horace R. Corbin for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
FUTURE REPORTERS...Cub Scouts from School One in Scotch Plains get a
tour of the offices of The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
last week.
Rahway River Pk. Turf Field
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
She said the field would be used by
other towns and individuals when
Rahway is not using the facility.
“I think when everyone understands
what is laid out there and the importance, this will be a really great
project,” Ms. Rountree said.
Bob Carson of Rahway called the
park a “gem that is rare in Union
County.” He said he obtained “contracts” through the Open Public
Records Act (OPRA) that showed the
proposed facility “will change the
character of Rahway River Park immensely.”
A soccer coach for 20 years, he said
turf fields can reach a temperature of
160 degrees in the summer.
Freeholder Chairman Mohamed
Jalloh said there are no contracts for
the project as the freeholders have
not passed any resolutions to date.
Kelly Tropeano of Clark called the
project a “costly and unnecessary
upgrade to the facility.” A member of
the Coalition to Save Historic Rahway
River Park, she also raised health
concerns regarding turf fields. She
said 2,700 persons have signed an
online petition opposing the project.
She said the coalition is opposed to
the project based on “safety, quality
of life, projected costs, impact to the
environment and habitat to the park.”
She said the park is suited for soccer,
not football.
Ms. Tropeano said adding lights
and extending playing time will
“change the dawn-to-dusk nature of
the park.”
Jeff Freeman of Rahway said the
field would “drastically reduce our
property values.” He said residents
will be faced with noise from large
crowds and the loudspeakers as well
bright lights in the evening.
“Ninety percent of the people are
against this development,” Mr. Freeman said. He called the project “just
totally inappropriate.”
James Coyle of Rahway commented, “This is wrong...I didn’t purchase my house to be within two
blocks of the sports complex.” He
questioned why fixing Veterans Field,
the current home to Rahway High
School football, has not been discussed.
“I don’t want to sit in my living
room and hear, ‘first and 10, ball on
the 20-yard line.’ It’s unfair,” Mr.
Coyle said.
Former Clark councilwoman Maria
Soyka said the athletic facility “will
ruin the whole footprint of that park.”
During freeholder comments, Freeholder Angel Estrada said, “This is a
very moving issue and we’ll see what
happens.”
Freeholder Chris Hudak added, “I
think people should hold judgment
until there are actual plans in place
that people can scrutinize and make
comments on....We’re not talking
about Met Life Stadium in the middle
of Rahway River Park.”
Freeholder Jalloh said he wants to
hold a public forum with Rahway
officials in the city once plans are set.
In other topics raised during public
comments, representatives of Communications Workers of America
(CWA) Local 1080 spoke of negotiations with the county on a new contract for social services employees.
Jeff Robinson said the union has not
been treated fairly. Local 1080’s contract expired in June of 2013.
Summit Council President Robert Rubino said he was “hoping for
a better proposed (county) budget”
after the sale of Runnells Specialized Hospital. He said he would
“enjoy seeing” a flat tax levy or
even a tax cut, urging the freeholders to cut the budget more. Mr.
Rubino said the Summit city budget has gone down to 21 percent of
the Summit tax bill with the county
portion at 29 percent.
MARCH FOR MEALS...Pictured, left to right, Meals on Wheels volunteers
Maureen O’Rourke of Chatham and Christine Melendez of Summit, and New
Jersey State Senate Minority Leader Tom Kean, Jr. (R-21st, Westfield) deliver
meals to older adults in Summit on Tuesday. Senator Kean participated in the
Meals on Wheels America’s “March For Meals” campaign, which is coordinated
by SAGE Eldercare in Summit. During the entire month, a total of 24 dignitaries
delivered meals with SAGE volunteers. On a daily basis, SAGE volunteers deliver
meals and check in on approximately 120 older residents in parts of Union, Essex
and Morris Counties. For more information on the program, call (908) 273-5554
or visit sageeldercare.org.
Paul Lachenauer for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
ON YOUR MARK…Costumed characters make the rounds during the JCC of
Central New Jersey in Scotch Plains’ “Family Fun Fest” on Sunday afternoon.
FANWOOD — The Fanwood Fire
Department and Rescue Squad received a visit this weekend from the
fire chief of the Mexican tourist resort of Cancun.
Tom Hurtado, director general of
the Cancun Bomberos, is the equivalent of a fire chief in a U.S. community and has been touring firehouses
in central and northern New Jersey.
He is here at the invitation of New
Jersey first responders and instructors who have been to Cancun on
several occasions to help train his
team.
For the past several years, this coalition of instructors, including Melissa Padulsky, owner of Little Hearts
Big World CPR and First Aid Instruction based in Fanwood, have traveled
to Cancun to donate training and
equipment to Mr. Hurtado’s operation, which is using gear that is up to
30 years old.
“We take our vacations down there
and use some of the time to do this
training,” said Ken Smith, leader of
the Maryland-based Region 4 Rescue Team of the American Power
Boat Association, a group of volunteers who provide EMS at power
boat races.
The City of Cancun has a population of one million and is visited by
11 million tourists a year. Building
construction ranges from modern,
masonry hotels to thatch houses.
Despite the large population and diversity of building types, Mr. Hurtado
is forced to constantly solicit dona-
FW Planning
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
does not need a liaison to the historic preservation committee.
“It was a past practice, but it is
not a bylaw,” Mr. Molenaar said.
Mr. Molenaar said the board
would keep the lines of communication open when a project comes
up in which the historic preservation committee may have an interest.
SP-F BOE
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
ness came from a recent push on
behalf of the state to lessen its burden
of the teacher and school employees’
pension system. A recent 70-page report commissioned by Governor Chris
Christie suggests strongly that the
pension system should be turned over
as a responsibility of local school
districts. The Scotch Plains-Fanwood
BOE deliberated the wording of a
resolution to be sent to the state that
strongly stands against the policy of
the pensions being turned over. This
resolution is coming in conjunction
with the New Jersey School Boards
Association, which also strongly opposes the potential shift in pension
plans.
Additionally, this report calls for
the “significant reduction of benefits… that were promised to teachers for the life of their service,” said
board member Betty Anne Woerner
and that “in the age range of 20 to 60,
those younger will be able to build up
a reasonable retirement package, not
as good as what they have… the
people in their 50s and on will see a
sizeable reduction and the report admits this.”
Board member Trip Whitehouse
said, “Employee contributions imposed at the district level will cost
over a billion dollars. The state would
like to pass on their burden of funding
health and pensions benefits. For every dollar you obligate, the state will
want 30 cents on the dollar.”
The board decided to review the
wording of the resolution and discuss
it at the next meeting.
In other business, the board voted
to purchase and install new laboratory equipment for: Scotch PlainsFanwood High School room 128 Science Lab through Longo Associates
for $92,904.83 and for high school
room 129, Science Lab, also through
Longo Associates, for $92,904,83,
and room 130, Science Lab for
$122,529.49; room 131, science lab
for $115,569.68; and room 133, science lab, for $118,112.47.
The board also voted to accept
$70,000 from the New Jersey
Achievement Coaches Grant Program
to empower eight district educators
to provide direct support to their peers
through high quality training and resources.
Board President Nancy Bauer said
she wanted to mention the passing of
Lawrence Andrews, and recognize
his service to the district. He was a
past-president of the board of education.
Dell Simeone contributed to this
story.
tions of everything from bandages to
heavy equipment to fight fires. EMS
in Cancun is provided by the Red
Cross, but a number of his firefighters
are paramedics and he would like to
acquire an ambulance to assist with
EMS. As a firefighting force, his team
answers many calls that are unique to
Cancun.
“We answer calls for propane fires
several times a week,” he said. Many
homes in Cancun use propane for
heat and cooking. “Then, there are
the alligators.”
It is not uncommon for Mr.
Hurtado’s firefighters to be called to
a home with an alligator lurking in
the backyard. “We take a coat and
throw it over its head so it can’t see,
then three or four firemen jump on
top of it,” he said, as Fanwood Fire
Chief John Piccola and Assistant
Chief Dave Zawodniak listened in
awe. Currently, New Jersey
firefighters are not trained in alligator removal.
The cross-border relationship between the Mexican and New Jersey
first responders has been beneficial
for all concerned. “This group of
firefighters works hard,” said Ms.
Padulsky. “They do 24-hour shifts on
a rotating schedule. They are so willing to learn anything we can teach
them. They don’t have formal training or standards like we do here in the
U.S. While they don’t have a lot of
money or equipment, they treat us
like family.”
Officers and members of the Fanwood Fire Department and Rescue
Squad showed Mr. Hurtado their apparatus in detail, then treated him to
a ride on a fire engine before moving
to his next stop in Piscataway.
Candidates
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
and Kimberly Palmieri-Mouded,
fourth ward, in November, who most
recently was associate dean for student life at St. John’s University.
In Fanwood, Mayor Colleen Mahr,
who heads the Union County Division of Strategic Planning and Intergovernmental Relations, is seeking a
fourth term. She is joined on the
Democratic ticket by Councilman
Jack Molenaar, director of transportation services with Rutgers University, and council candidate Erin
McElroy Barker, who is replacing
Councilman Daniel Levine, who is
not seeking re-election. No Republicans filed for council seats for the
second year in a row.
Garwood Borough Council members William Nierstedt, director of
planning for Plainfield, and Ann
Tarantino, a project manager with
AT&T, are seeking re-election. They
face a Republican challenge in November from Ileen Bocchino Cuccaro,
a realtor with Coldwell Banker, and
Joseph R. Sarno III, a senior accountant with SS&C GlobeOP in Cranford.
Cranford Township Committeeman
Thomas H. Hannen, Jr., the lone
Democrat on the five-member committee, is being challenged in his bid
for a second term by Republican
Michael A. Petrucci, who serves as an
alternate member on the Cranford
Planning Board. Mr. Hannen was
mayor in 2013.
In Mountainside, Republican
Mayor Paul N. Mirabelli is seeking
another term along with GOP borough council incumbent Robert
Messler and newcomer Wendy FechCaccamo, who replaces Councilman
William Lance, who did not seek reelection. No Democrats filed for council seats.
There is no municipal election in
Scotch Plains this year.
At the state level, candidates filed
for the General Assembly. The State
Senate will face re-election in 2016.
In the 21st legislative district, Republican incumbents, Assemblyman
Jon Bramnick of Westfield and Assemblywoman Nancy Munoz of Summit, face a fall challenge from Democrats Jill Anne Lazare of Summit, an
attorney who ran for the Assembly in
2013, and David Barnett of Springfield, a member of the Springfield
Township Committee currently serving as mayor. Mr. Barnett owns an
information technology company.
In the 22nd legislative district, Assemblyman Jerry Green (Plainfield)
is joined on the Democratic ticket by
his new running mate, former Rahway
mayor James Kennedy, who replaces
Assemblywoman Linda Stender
(Scotch Plains), who is not seeking
re-election following a scandal involving her husband’s shore home.
They will face Republicans, former
Scotch Plains councilman William
Vastine, a finance manager with the
Plainfield YMCA, and William
Michelson, an attorney and land use
planner from Plainfield.
DEDICATED SERVICE...Recently, Scotch Plains Police Sergeant Ernesto M.
Hernandez completed a project for the Scotch Plains Fire Department using their
own decommissioned hose and made a three-foot by five-foot flag to honor their
dedicated service. UNICO was to present the flag to the fire departmnent last
night (after press deadline) during its monthly meeting at Giovanna’s on South
Avenue in Plainfield.
Paperboard Plant Is Declared
Area In Need of Redevelopment
By BRIAN TRUSDELL
Specially Written for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
GARWOOD – The planning board
has declared the Garwood Paperboard
plant property on North Avenue an
“area in need of redevelopment” and
has forwarded its recommendation
to the borough council for further
action.
The decision on March 25 was the
first step in possibly transforming the
4.54-acre plot on the east edge of the
borough, a largely vacant, hulking,
four-story, 115-year-old structure
with smaller buildings, into another
use, such as an over-55 housing unit
and/or nursing home.
If the borough agrees with the determination, it can develop a plan for
the property and work with the owner
to implement it.
Zoning Code Official Victor
Vinegra, who works for the planning
board’s designated engineering firm
Harbor Consultants of Cranford, explained how his firm determined that
the property met three of the state’s
eight criteria for declaring it “in need
of redevelopment.” Only one is required for the declaration.
Highlighting Harbor Consultants’
77-page report, Mr. Vinegra noted
how the buildings are largely empty
and contain broken windows with tin
or wood covering them. Moreover,
much of the underdeveloped areas of
the property has overgrown vegetation.
While the building is not crumbling, he said, those conditions met
criteria “B” of a “discontinuance of
use” that made it in “so great a state of
disrepair as to be untenable.”
Additionally, Mr. Vinegra explained, the property met criteria “D”
that the age of the buildings’ obsolescent design and state of dilapidation
made them “detrimental to the safety,
health, morals, or welfare of the community.”
And finally, the parcel was “consistent with smart growth planning
principles” – criteria “H” – due to its
location along the NJ Transit Raritan
Valley Rail Line and Garwood being
“more or less a transit village,” Mr.
Vinegra said.
Richard Kozel, the attorney representing the property’s owner, Millen
Industries Inc., and its principal, Ken
Schulman, did not dispute the report,
but he would not state whether he
agreed with its conclusion that the
paperboard plant was in need of redevelopment.
Board Attorney Donald Fraser
pressed Mr. Kozel four times if he
agreed or disagreed with Harbor’s
determination. But Mr. Kozel deferred each time, acknowledging on
one occasion with a laugh that he was
not directly answering the question.
Instead, he said only that such a determination would make transitioning
the property to another use easier.
Mr. Kozel also said the plant has
environmental contamination contained within the perimeter of the
plant walls that likely would cost
between $800,000 and $1 million to
correct. Until the exact level of contamination is specified, he could not
offer an opinion on the determination.
He bristled at the use of the word
“blight” although two residents, including former planning board member Al Del Conte, described the property as “blighty” and “an eyesore.”
Planning Board Chairman Steve
Greet referred to it as “blightful.”
Mr. Kozel told the board how the
plant is operating at a minimal level,
with five people for recycling various types of paper. At its peak, he
said, the plant, which was built to
produce musical organs, had more
than 105 employees spread out over
three shifts as it operated 24 hours a
day.
But about 10 years ago, he said, the
price of recycled paper plummeted to
one sixth of its previous value, about
$20 a ton, with countries such as
China and India dominating the market.
The Schulmans, who purchased
the property in the 1970s, investigated redeveloping the property, but
with the price of recycled paper rebounding in recent years, the family
also is considering amping up production again.
Mr. Kozel said Millen looked into
a mixed-use of retail and housing,
but rejected the idea when it could
not find many interested developers.
The most promising proposal was
some combination of elderly housing, such as an age 55-and-up community, assisted living facility, nursing home or a mixture of all three.
“It’s something very, very interesting,” he said. “We intend to look in
that direction, but I don’t want the
board to think we’ve foreclosed the
idea of reopening the plant.”
Except for the abstentions of Mayor
Charles Lombardo and Borough
Council President Bill Nierstedt, the
board voted unanimously to declare
the site in need of redevelopment.
In other action, the board sent its
recommendations to the borough
council regarding its still yet to be
introduced ordinance on temporary
sidewalk signs.
The board spent more than half an
hour before deciding to ask the council to: consider prohibiting lighted
temporary signs, allow a “T sign” in
addition to A-frame and easel types,
restrict the signs being permitted to
only during hours of operation, mandate that they must be stored inside
when not in use and that they be no
wider than two feet and greater than
eight square feet.
It rejected a suggestion from Mr.
Nierstedt that plastic be banned as
the signs’ composition. Although
North and South Avenues are replete
with the signs already, borough ordinances do not permit them.
See it all on the Web!
www.goleader.com
Paul Lachenauer for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
HUG THE EASTER BUNNY…Kids enjoy the Cranford Junior Women’s
Club’s “Breakfast with the Easter Bunny” event Saturday morning at the
Cranford Community Center.
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WESTFIELD, GARWOOD, SCOTCH PLAINS, MOUNTAINSIDE, CRANFORD, FANWOOD, CLARK,
SPRINGFIELD, KENILWORTH, SUMMIT, BERKELEY HEIGHTS and NEW PROVIDENCE
Thank You!
For Reading Our Publications
The Westfield Leader & The Scotch Plains-Fanwood TIMES
PO Box 250, 251 North Ave. West, Westfield, NJ 07091
Tel 908 232-4407; Fax 908 232-0473 Email [email protected]
Page
2
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, April 2, 2015
SP Police Officers Receive
Awards for Saving Two Lives
S C OT C H P L A I N S — T h e
Scotch Plains Police Department
has announced that three of our
officers; Officer Dave Lavery, Officer Robert Lewis and Officer
Luis Pereira were just awarded
the Life Saving Medal for actions
that they took that resulted in the
saving of two lives, both in the
same day.
On March 19, 2015, at 07:49 a.m.,
Officers Lavery and Pereira were dispatched to a Mary Ellen Lane on the
call of a 56-year-old male having
chest pains. Upon arrival, Officer
Lavery said he immediately recognized that the male was having a
heart attack. He and Officer Pereira
began to administer life saving measures, they hooked up their defibrillator and followed the instructions by
beginning CPR.
The Scotch Plains Rescue Squad
arrived and transported the patient to JFK Hospital. The patient
was shocked twice with the
defibrillator before regaining consciousness.
Later that same day, at 12:25 p.m.,
Officer Lavery and Officer Robert
Lewis were dispatched to Black Birch
Road on the call that a 55-year-old
male had passed out. Officer Lewis
and Officer Lavery began taking life
saving measures by hooking up the
defibrillator and administering CPR.
The Scotch Plains Rescue Squad
again responded and transported the
patient to JFK Hospital. The patient
was shocked four times with the
Christie Signs Excess
Military Equip. Bill
TRENTON – Legislation increasing controls on the acquisition and
deployment of military surplus equipment by law enforcement agencies
has been signed into law by Governor Chris Christie.
The bill, A-3901/S-2364, requires
local government approval prior to
application for enrollment in the federal 1033 program. The 1033 program authorizes the transfer of armored vehicles, weapons and other
equipment from the Department of
Defense (DOD) to state, county and
local police departments.
The distribution of excess DOD
equipment to federal and state agencies is authorized by Congress. The
military gear is intended to assist
officers in their mission, with an
emphasis on counter-drug and
counter-terrorism efforts.
[email protected]
The Westfield Leader &
The Scotch Plains-Fanwood
TIMES
Assembly OKs Bill to
Establish ‘Opt-Out’
Process for Testing
TRENTON – Legislation that establishes a process for opting out of
standardized testing in the schools
was approved Thursday by the General Assembly. The bill, A-4165,
would allow the parent or guardian of
a student to provide written notification to the school district that the
student will not participate in PARCC
testing.
A-4165 would not exempt a student from any high school graduation requirement established under
current law.
Tues., May 12 Last Day
To Register for Primary
COUNTY — The last day to register for the Tuesday, June 2, Primary
Election is Tuesday, May 12.
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Westfield Dems Announce
2015 Candidate Slate
defibrillator before regaining consciousness.
For the actions these officers
took in the saving of two lives,
Officer Lavery, Officer Lewis and
Officer Pereira received the Life
Saving Medal award. (Officer
Lavery was awarded two Life Saving Medals for assisting on both
of the calls).
The members of the Scotch Plains
Rescue Squad that responded and
transported the victims were: EMT’s
Thomas Snihur, Nicholas Letkowski,
Joan Lozowski and Lucas
Cimafonte.
REPORTERS NEEDED
Current openings for reporters
to cover town council, BOE,
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NEW RIG... The Mountainside Rescue Squad recently received its new ambulance, the first in over a decade. It sits outside the squad’s building at New
Providence Road and Route 22 East.
GOP Picks Cuccaro, Sarno
To Run for Garwood Council
GARWOOD — The Garwood Republican Committee has selected
Ileen Bocchino Cuccaro and Joseph
R. Sarno III as its 2015 nominees for
borough council.
Ms. Cuccaro has resided in
Garwood for nearly 50 years, where
she raised her son, Eric Meyer. As a
businesswoman serving the
Garwood community, she has a an
insight into why people choose to
sell their homes in Garwood and
why new residents continue to come
here. Ms. Cuccaro is a realtor for
Coldwell Banker, having sold scores
of homes in the community. She
attended Union County College
where she studied urban studies and
creative writing.
Mr. Sarno is a lifelong New Jersey
resident. He attended Albright College in Reading, Pa., and graduated
cum laude with a degree in accounting and political science. In college,
he also starred as a cross country and
long distance runner for the track and
field team. He currently works at
SS&C GlobeOP in Cranford as a
senior accountant and has over nine
years of accounting and analytical
experience in the alternative investment world. His service has assured
that investors are protected from securities fraud, embezzlement, and
other forms of theft.
Garwood GOP Chairman Jim
Mathieu said he is enthusiastic about
Ms. Cuccaro and Mr. Sarno running
for Garwood borough council.
“I first met each of them when I
challenged the Republican establishment in the 2013 Garwood Republican primary. Ileen and Joe are shining examples of the new type of
candidates our party is selecting —
people of character who will vote
like Republicans. I expect each of
them to bring fresh ideas and approaches to keeping Garwood affordable for current and future residents.”
To volunteer, contribute or meet
the candidates in person, please contact Mr. Mathieu at (917) 626-0207
or
by
e-mail
at
[email protected]
Bill to Hike Adjustment For Disabled
Vets OK’d By Assembly Panel
TRENTON – An Assembly panel
released legislation, on March
19th, to provide an increase and
annual adjustment in allowance
paid to veterans with certain wartime service-connected disabilities.
Currently, the state pays an annual allowance in soldiers and veterans with certain disabilities. A blind
veteran, under current law, receives
$750 annually under the Blind Veterans’ Allowance Program; this
amount has not been changed since
1971.
A veteran with certain other described disabilities also receives
$750 annually under the Paraplegic
and Hemiplegic Veterans’Allowance
Program; this amount has not been
changed since 1981. This bill increases these annual payments to
$1,500.
The legislation also provides for
an annual adjustment in this allowance in direct proportion to the percent change in the Consumer Price
Index over each 12-month period
beginning November 1 and ending
October 31. Under the bill, the adjustment is to be made only if the
percent change in the Consumer Price
Index results in an increase in the
allowance; the allowance would not
be reduced if the index experiences a
decline.
The sponsors note in the bill that
the purpose of the adjustment is to
provide a mechanism for ensuring
that, for the benefit of these disabled
soldiers and veterans, the amount of
this allowance would keep pace with
cost-of-living increases.
The bill was released by the Assembly Military and Veterans Affairs
Committee.
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A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
WESTFIELD — Daniel Ortolani,
Martin Rothfelder, and Kimberly
Palmieri-Mouded will be running for
Westfield Town Council to represent,
respectively, the first, third, and fourth
wards. Their candidacies were announced by Janice Siegel, chairwoman of the Westfield Democratic
Committee. Their petitions were be
filed on Monday to place them on the
ballot for the primary election on
Tuesday, June 2.
Ms. Siegel said the Westfield
Democratic Committee is excited to
endorse these candidates because
each exudes enthusiasm for civic life,
cares about people and the Town of
Westfield, and has the professional
background to bring to the work of
the town council.
Dan Ortolani and his wife, Reyna
Ortolani, have lived in Westfield for
10 years. They have two children,
Luke, a 6th grader at Roosevelt Intermediate School, and Emma, in 4th
grade at Franklin School. Dan and
Reyna are an interfaith couple with
membership in Temple Emanu-El and
Holy Trinity Roman Catholic Church.
Mr. Ortolani is known through his
tenure as Pack Leader and committee
chairman for Franklin School’s Cub
Scout Pack 172. He’s also coached
basketball and helped to raise funds
for non-profit causes and organizations. Fundraising efforts have been
in support of the Franklin Bash, and
the Hedgehog and Feather theater
group. His band, Little Secret, which
plays folk/bluegrass music, will be
performing at a benefit sponsored by
the Westfield Women’s Club on Saturday, May 16 at the Crossroads in
Garwood. Proceeds go to the National Alliance on Mental Illness for
N.J.
Mr. Ortolani is senior vice-president of Worldwide Customer Services at Information Builders, a software technology firm. He’s been in
senior positions in product innovation and customer services since 1987.
Mr. Ortolani received his Bachelor of
Science degree in Business Management from Sacred Heart University
in Fairfield, Conn., and completed
the executive program at Stanford
University.
Mr. Rothfelder has lived in
Westfield for 17 years. He is the father of three children who are products of the Westfield schools (Wilson, Roosevelt, and Westfield High
School). Marissa is a recent graduate
of Suffolk University in Boston, Mass.
Alex is a junior at Clark University in
Worcester, Mass., and Claire is a
freshman at the University of Vermont. All three played soccer through
the Westfield Soccer Association with
Marty providing assistance to their
coaches. They also were involved in
activities at the Westfield Area ‘Y.’
Mr. Rothfelder has served as president of the board of trustees at the
Unitarian Church in Summit. He also
served on the strategic planning, social action, and the ministerial search
committees. For 15 years, he has
taught in the religious education program, and acted as an advisor to the
youth group. His volunteer efforts
include tutoring in Irvington, and
work on feeding the hungry in Newark, Irvington, and New York City
with Bridges Outreach of Summit.
He is an attorney whose work deals
with public utilities. He is associate
general regulatory counsel for
PSE&G. Earlier in his career he was
managing partner for the Westfield
law firm Rothfelder Stern, and before that he was a partner with the
New Jersey municipal bond law firm
McManimon and Scotland. There he
was lead attorney in developing the
telecommunications, energy and public utility practice. Mr. Rothfelder is
a graduate of the University of Wisconsin in Madison, Wis. and the Washington University School of Law in
St. Louis, Mo. He is past president of
the public utility law section of the
New Jersey State Bar Association.
Ms. Palmeri-Mouded and her husband, George Mouded, moved to
Westfield a year-and-a-half ago. They
have twin sons, Matthew and Christopher, age 2½, and a 1-year-old
named Nicholas.
Kim was born and raised in Union
County and, from a young age, actively participated in various community and church initiatives and
programs.
At St. John’s University, from
which she holds a Bachelor of Arts
degree in English and Master of Professional Studies in Criminal Justice,
she was elected to several executive
boards, including chairperson for the
Student Union, and secretary and then
president of Phi Eta Chi Sorority. She
was selected to serve as a member of
the President’s Society.
Upon graduation, her alma mater
hired her to work in its Division of
Student Affairs. She quickly advanced to associate dean for student
life. In addition to teaching courses
and managing a large financial budget, she supervised projects, events,
activities, and programs for the Office of Student Life. This work involved managing the student government board and 45 clubs, and
their budgets. She planned and organized out-of-classroom experiences and off-campus community
service projects for students, alumni,
faculty, and the local community. In
spring 2012, Ms. Palmeri-Mouded
partnered with the American Cancer
Society to bring the first Relay for
Life to St. John’s University campus
on Staten Island, an event attended
by more than 500 students and community members.
Ms. Palmeri-Mouded also volunteered in New Orleans following
Hurricane Katrina, and was a Caritas
volunteer in Rome, Italy.
Menendez Rips GOP
Federal Budget Proposal
WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Senator Robert Menendez (D-N.J.) last
week issued the following statement
blasting what he described as draconian cuts to the education system
within the proposed Republican budget:
“I consider a budget to be a reflection of our values, and this year the
Republicans in Congress have shown
us again what they value most: big
business over education. What else
would explain a proposal that slashes
billions in financial aid for college
students, guts early learning programs
for low-income youth, increases the
cost of college, yet expands big tax
breaks for the ultra-wealthy and Wall
Street?
“Instead of showering millionaires
and big corporations with tax cuts,
we must ensure our children aren’t
denied the opportunity to reach their
full potential by investing in their
education. That is why I will oppose
any proposal that tries to balance the
budget on the backs of our nation’s
students.
“I urge my Republican colleagues
to join us in passing a common-sense
budget that supports hard-working
families, creates good-paying jobs,
makes college more affordable, and
invests in our future.”
He said the Republican budget proposal on education would: slash Pell
Grants by 30 percent over the next 10
years; take away $27.5 million a year
from New Jersey low-income school
districts; cut almost $30 million a
year from New Jersey’s special education programs, and eliminate
110,000 children from Head Start
programs nationwide.
See it all on the Web!
www.goleader.com
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& Financial Needs
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· Estate and Inheritance Returns
· Form 1041 Fiduciary Returns
Call for an appointment
282 South Avenue, Suite 103
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Tel: 908-889-9500
www.sg-cpas.com
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Wines & Spirits
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Former PAL Treasurer
Admits to Taking Funds
ShopRite
SCOTCH PLAINS — A township
police officer has admitted to taking
approximately $18,000 from the
Scotch Plains-Fanwood Police Athletic League (PAL) for his own personal use a little more than a year ago,
acting Union County Prosecutor
Grace H. Park announced Thursday.
James Denman, 50, entered a guilty
plea last Wednesday before state Superior Court Judge William Daniel to
a single charge of third-degree attempted misapplication of trust funds.
A months-long investigation by the
Prosecutor’s Office’s Special Prosecutions Unit revealed that Denman,
the former treasurer of the local PAL
chapter, took the funds sometime in
December 2013, while he was offduty from his police work, according
to Union County Assistant Prosecutor John Esmerado, who is prosecuting the case. The funds were allegedly taken without the permission of
any executive or board member of
the PAL, which is a private nonprofit
organization with a focus on youth
sports.
Denman then repaid the sum total
of the previously taken funds back
into the PAL account by April 2014,
Mr. Esmerado said.
Sentencing in the case has been
scheduled for Friday, April 24 before
state Superior Court Judge Robert
Mega. At that time Denman is expected to forfeit his job, be permanently barred from again holding
public office in New Jersey, and be
sentenced to a term of probation.
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Board of Health
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FANWOOD — The regular meeting of the Fanwood Board of Health
postponed on March 5th due to inclement weather has been re-scheduled for Tuesday, April 7th at 7 p.m.
at the Fanwood Carriage House, located at 130 Watson Road.
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Lance Meets With
Mayors Council
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Rep.
Leonard Lance (R-7th) welcomed the
Mayors’ Council on Rahway River
Watershed Flood Control to Washington where he briefed the mayors
on two important meetings recently
held with the U.S. Army Corp of
Engineers and the chairman of the
Energy and Water Subcommittee on
Appropriations.
Mr. Lance informed the Mayors’
Council he told both the Army Corp
and the subcommittee chairman of
the great merits of the project and
asked for additional funding for the
Rahway River Basin Flood Risk
Management Feasibility Study. The
meetings come just weeks after Mr.
Lance and the Mayors’ Council saw
years of advocating for the project
pay-off when the Army Corp allocated $500,000 to the study in its
2015 Work Plan.
The Rahway River Basin Flood
Risk Management Feasibility Study
has been ongoing for 13 years. The
$500,000 commitment in the 2015
Work Plan is the most significant
allocation since Mr. Lance and other
New Jersey lawmakers began urging
the Army Corp to find the funding to
complete the Study.
Page 3
333 South Ave. East , Westfield, NJ • (908) 232-8700
Muñoz Bill to Prevent
Scooter, Biking Injuries
Clears Assembly Panel
TRENTON – Legislation sponsored by Assemblywoman Nancy F.
Muñoz (R-21st, Summit) that would
require children ages 17 and younger
to wear helmets when riding nonmotorized scooters and ice skating,
has cleared the Assembly Women
and Children Committee. The bill
would also increase the age for mandatory helmet use for bicycling,
skateboarding and roller skating
from 16 and younger to 17 and
younger.
According to the Brain Injury Association of America, nearly 90 percent of injuries sustained in scooter
crashes happen to children under the
age of 15, yet the proper use of helmets can reduce brain injuries by 85
percent.
Asw. Muñoz’ bill, A-1437/2192,
would amend current law that applies to operators, sellers, and
manufacturers of roller skates and
skateboards to include scooters and
ice skates. The helmets would have
to meet the American National
Standards Institute’s standards for
bicycle helmets, the Snell Memorial Foundation’s 1990 Standard
for Protective Headgear for Use in
Bicycling or the American Society
for Testing and Materials’ standards.
Parents or guardians of children
who violate the law under the bill
would face a fine of $25 for a first
offense and up to $100 for any subsequent offense.
Thursday, April 2, 2015
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For the address of the store nearest to you please call... 1-800-SHOPRITE
Prices established by ShopRite Wines & Spirits of Lincoln Park, 60 Beaverbrook Rd., Lincoln Park, N.J. ShopRite WINES & SPIRITS STORES ARE INDIVIDUALLY OWNED AND OPERATED
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Page
4
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, April 2, 2015
The Westfield Leader
The Scot
ch Plains–F
anwood
Scotch
Plains–Fanwood
Times
— Established 1890 —
Members of:
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Scotch Plains Business & Professional Association • Fanwood Business & Professional Association
Periodicals – Postage Paid at Rahway, New Jersey
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Scotch Plains, N.J. 07076
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Candidate Filings Are Official
Kickoff of Political Season
Although the calendar may say April Fools’ Day,
the officially start of the fall campaign began with
Monday’s deadline to file nominating petitions for
the State General Assembly as well for county
freeholder boards and municipal council seats (please
see front page article and political party press releases on page 2.) This year — the third year in the
four-year election cycle — is expected to result in a
low turnout as the State Assembly will be at the top
of election ballots.
For the last 15 years, Democrats have held the
majority in both houses of the State Legislature.
They also have held all nine seats on the Union
County Board of Chosen Freeholders since 1998.
In Westfield, where Democrats have the registration advantage (30 percent) over Republicans (24
percent) and have won the last six Presidential
elections in Westfield, the GOP holds the mayor’s
office and all eight seats on the town council. Since
46 percent are not affiliated with any party,
Westfielders seem to vote for the most qualified
candidate instead of a person based on their party
affiliation.
In other towns in the county such as Elizabeth,
Plainfield and Hillside, voting is strictly the Democrat Party line, even if Mickey Mouse is running.
This year there are town council races in Westfield,
Garwood, and Cranford. While candidates are run-
ning in Assembly races in District 21, which includes Westfield, Cranford, Garwood and
Mountainside, and District 22, which includes Scotch
Plains and Fanwood, we don’t see an upset in the
making as gerrymandering has the GOP dominating
District 21 with Democrats doing the same in District 22. The same is so at the county level where if
Republicans can come within a few thousand votes
of victory it is a good year.
There is some local interest this year with former
Scotch Plains councilman William Vastine running
for state Assembly and township resident Richard
Fortunato seeking a freeholder seat along with
Mountainside Councilman Rene Dierkes.
While funding state pensions and the Transportation Trust Fund are key issues in state Assembly
races, in our view, maintaining property tax levels
and filling potholes and paving roads are big issues
at the local level. A school funding formula that
increases aid or reduces expenditures of local school
districts like Westfield, Cranford and Scotch PlainsFanwood will be needed before property taxes can
be stabilized. Westfield’s school budget has doubled
to $104 million since the mid 1990s.
We encourage all candidates to run issue-oriented
campaigns and to take advantage of the space offered by this newspaper to reach the voters.
Unaffiliated voters will just watch for now.
Will Clark, Rahway Residents
Win Fight Against Turf Field?
Clark and Rahway residents are fighting a $5million plan for a multi-purpose turf field to be
constructed on an existing field at Rahway River
Park, which lies in both communities. The field,
which will have a track, lights, bleachers, a public
address system, restroom facilities and a concession
stand, is being opposed on issues from noise and
lights to environmental concerns. The opposition is
being led by the Coalition to Save Historic Rahway
River Park.
As a Green Acres parcel, and a county park, when
this field is not being used by Rahway High School’s
football team or other sports programs, it will be
available to other Union County residents. This is
the case at other county parks such as Meisel Avenue
Field in Springfield where walkers and joggers use
the track. In our view, the county and Rahway need
to work together to communicate what the actual
plans are for this field. We believe Freeholder Chairman Mohamed Jalloh’s proposal for a public forum
ABCDICTIONOPQRSTDECEPTIONUVWXYZ
Letters to the Editor
Since 1959
Legal Newspaper for the County of Union, New Jersey
and for Westfield, Mountainside, Scotch Plains, Fanwood, Cranford and Garwood
P.O. Box 250 • 251 North Avenue, West
Westfield, N.J. 07091
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
in Rahway, once final plans are in place, is a good
idea.
The county has backed away from projects before such as a petting zoo that was planned for the
20-acre Ponderosa Farm property on Cooper Road
in Scotch Plains and when New Providence voters
in 2010 were given the option of transferring the
ownership of Oakwood Park from the borough to
the county which was to make improvements totaling $3.5 million, they overwhelmingly rejected the
proposal, 58 percent to 42 percent. The county said
they only spend that kind of money on countyowned land, as it far exceeded what they give out in
county grants.
So with 2,700 people already signing an online
petition opposing the Rahway field, a number that is
expected to grow significantly, we don’t expect this
issue to go away any time soon. It will be interesting
to watch to see if the effort is successful or if the
county gets it way.
Generator Lighting Disrespects the
Westfield Residents Near Kehler Field
Surely when you purchase a home
near a school or a football field, you
expect some noise from the events.
The field is in use seven days a week,
weather permitting. Now, due to an
effort by the WFBOE (Bd. of Ed.)
and the WSA (soccer assoc.), I am
subject to lights and the sound and
smell of generators.
Let’s look at some facts:
1. Some believe that said use is a
violation of land use regulations.
2. The athletic director stated publicly that the field would be used by
high school teams. Safety standards
established by the NJSIAA and the
NFHSSA would never permit actual
competition to take place with the
low light level that the portable light
provide.
3. What price should I need to pay
to have my quality of life impacted
by an arbitrary decision? The smell
of gasoline? The sound of generators, which violate the town’s own
noise variance — recall the sounds of
Hurricane Sandy — and try to sit
peacefully with family or friends on
private patio and enjoy the evening.
If one is a conspiracy theorist, perhaps the WBOE and the WSA want
this effort to fail so that they can put
forth a proposal for taller permanent
light which will be quiet and much
higher thus maybe NOT shining directly into my home.
And then, there are the students.
Westfield prides itself on the high
achieving students but now, this decision is adding three to four additional
practice hours and taking away time
for studying and homework.
Westfield students already face the
stress of academics, athletics, religious age related milestones, and for
many add music and theater to their
daily regiments. When is enough —
enough? This entire matter disrespects the Westfield residents who
live near Kehler Field.
It likely violates land and noise
ordinances. It is mired with back door
politics and deals to serve the few but
impact many? I urge the WBOE and
the WSA to reconsider this “temporary decision” and start showing some
respect for those of us who pay taxes
and support the school budgets rather
than continue to escalate the
adversarial relationship, which has
now been forged.
Marie Koch
Westfield
Letter Re: ‘Legitimate Voting Public’
Confuses and Offends Reader
I wish to address the letter to the
editor for March 26th by Warren Victor concerning the “legitimate” voting public, prominently placed in the
upper left side of the editorial page,
making it appear to be endorsed by
The Leader. What jumps off the page
is Mr. Victor’s clear implication that
those who voted for Barack Obama
(and presumably those who would
vote for Hillary Clinton) are not ‘legitimate’ voters. I don’t know if he
means they are not citizens, or that
they vote more than once each, or
that their lack of legitimacy just derives from the fact that they see things
differently from him.
He mentions “the legitimate voting public on this side of the border.”
Does he mean our national border?
Or is he speaking metaphorically
about racial, ethnic, economic, or
political borders?
I voted for the president twice (once
for each election) and I am a duly
registered, ‘legitimate’American citizen. I am offended by Mr. Victor’s
characterization of my citizenship,
and of the millions of others (indeed
the clear majority) who voted as I
did.
Robert Anderson
Westfield
Garwood Councilpersons Explain the
Difficult Tax Increases Coming
Although the Garwood Borough
Council faced many difficult increases this year, the council finance
committee wishes to advise residents
that the council was able to work on
the budget and reduce it to the
borough’s 3rd lowest increase in the
past 13 years. As a finance committee, we are upset to have to announce
an increase for us all, and we would
like to shed some light on why.
For one, the largest increase we
faced this year was an $86,000 increase from the Rahway Valley Sewer
Authority (RVSA), which equates to
$45 on the average home. In other
words, if Garwood separated sewer
charges from the tax bill, as so many
of our neighboring towns do, the
average home would expect a $40 tax
increase this year instead of $85. (The
other $45 would be ‘hidden’ in our
separate sewer bills — we would still
have to pay it.) That would be the
second lowest tax increase in 13 years
(next to $39 from last year).
Although this year’s tax increase
may appear to be larger than our
neighboring towns, one should remember that we keep sewer and garbage inside the tax bill unlike the
others. We do not believe in separating these items, as doing so is simply
a game, and would reduce our property tax deduction on our federal income taxes, thereby increasing our
federal income taxes.
While some would like to attribute
the tax increase to our debt, in fact the
second largest portion of the tax in-
State LD-21
Sen. Thomas Kean, Jr. (R)
425 North Ave. E.
Westfield, N.J. 07090
(908) 232-3673
Asm. Jon Bramnick (R)
251 North Ave. West
Westfield, N.J. 07090
(908) 232-2073
Asm. Nancy Munoz (R)
57 Union Place, Suite 310
Summit, N.J. 07901
(908) 918-0414
LD-21 includes Westfield,
Mountainside, Garwood,
Summit and Cranford.
State LD-22
Sen. Nicholas Scutari (D)
1514 E. Saint Georges Ave.
Linden, N.J. 07036
(908) 587-0404
Asw. Linda Stender (D)
1801 East Second St.
Scotch Plains, N.J. 07076
(908) 668-1900
Asm. Jerry Green (D)
17 Watchung Ave.
Plainfield, N.J. 07060
(908) 561-5757
LD-22 includes Scotch Plains,
Fanwood, Plainfield, Clark and
Linden.
7th Congressional District
Representative Leonard Lance (R)
425 North Avenue E., Westfield, NJ 07090
(908) 518-7733
[Westfield, Mountainside, Garwood, Summit and Cranford
are in the 7th Congressional District]
12th Congressional District
Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman (D)
XXX
XXX
[Fanwood, Plainfield and most of Scotch Plains
are in the 12th Congressional District]
[email protected], [email protected]
[email protected], [email protected]
[email protected], [email protected]
Union County Freeholders
Elizabeth, New Jersey
(908) 527-4200
Al Faella, Mgr. [email protected]
Mohamed Jalloh, chair
[email protected]
TM
Diction Deception
Below are four arcane words, each
with four definitions – only one is correct. The others are made up. Are you
sharp enough to discern this deception of
diction?
If you can guess one correctly – good
guess. If you get two – well-read individual. If you get three – word expert. If
you get all four – You must have a lot of
free time!
All words and correct definitions
come from the board game Diction
Deception.
Answers to last week’s arcane words.
1. Procellous – Stormy
2. Eurycerous – Broad-horned
3. Catadioptrics – The science of the
reflection of light and its observance
4. Patena – A grassy area in the hilly
parts of Ceylon (Sri Lanka)
DASYMETER
1. An instrument used in testing the
density of gases
2. An instrument used to determine
depth in bodies of water
3. An instrument used to test the
proofage of alcoholic beverages
4. An official or umpire of the pretwentieth century baseball era
QUINDISM
1. A fifth
2. A fifteenth
3. Belief in the power of the pentagram
4. Divination of the sea scallops
METOPOMANCY
1. Dissecting cadavers to study organs, vessels and other internals
2. A Caesarean section
3. A study of mollusks
4. Fortunetelling by human features
PLEBICOLIST
1. One who caters to vulgarity or seeks
the favor of the common people
2. A member of the lower class in
Roman times
3. A member of the freshman class of
the United States Military Academy or
the Naval Academy
4. A person who writes about the strife
of the common people
See more letters on
pages 5 and 20
Letters to
the Editor
Garwood, Big Heart,
Big Taxes
Freeholder Al Mirabella. It would
not be a surprise that within a year or
two we will have a “connected” person as recreation and public works
directors in Scotch Plains, if not more.
If Assemblyman Green and all those
in office have been so successful at
keeping our costs down, why does
New Jersey have the highest property taxes in the nation?
Assemblywoman Stender, who is
also the Scotch Plains Democrat chair
person, is joined in disgrace by another local Democrat chair — Perth
Amboy’s Democrat Chairwoman
Leslie Dominguez-Rodriguez. She
was forced to resign due to voter
fraud in the Perth Amboy’s November city elections. What is with these
Democrats?
Assemblyman Green is too busy
doing Democrat Party business to
explain his actions not just as he
terms it to a “customer,” but also
someone who is his employer. This
failure to communicate is something
that we are familiar with on federal,
state, county and local levels.
Again, I ask the Assemblyman to
please explain why he is allowing
taxpayer monies to continue to be
used for this high-paying public job
of Assemblywoman Stender given
that he will not support her for reelection.
There they go again, justifying,
spinning and actually bragging about
increasing taxes. With 19 homes for
sale, another eight in pre-foreclosure, the Garwood finance committee just doesn’t seem to get that we
cannot afford their reckless spending
and tax increases. In a recent letter to
the editor, they make a failed attempt
at trying to explain away the increase
by taking no accountability and ignoring the facts. Increases to the 2015
budget include: an addition $31,000
for the Athletic Complex (last year
they said it would be $2,000), $33,000
in debt service payments due to the
AFC and neglected infrastructure
projects, $7,000 increase to the recreation department, $17,000 for the
planning board, $11,100 to the municipal clerk, $23,845 initial cost for
computer software, $20,000 taxes
raised, $18,800 in legal fees, $17,000
for pension line items, and $37,000
in municipal roof repairs that should
be covered in the “surplus.” In addition, the failure of the finance committee to understand and prepare for
fluctuations in RVSA fees will now
cost us $86,000 even though the fees
are flat over the past five years.
The budget proposed by the
Garwood finance committee is more
per household than Westfield and
Cranford combined. How can a borough of 4,200 people see such drastic
increases year after year? It is because we have people in charge that
have zero real world budget experience. They simply copy and paste
from the previous year and add increases. They have no plan, no solution. They push through their pet
projects without allowing the people
to vote on them and now our small
town with a big heart is starting to see
the ramifications of their carelessness.
By approving the $3.2-million AFC
without putting it up for the people of
Garwood to vote on, the council ignored capital expenditures the borough requires like police dispatch
computer system, police dictaphone
system, DPW equipment that is 30+
years old, the 30+ year old fire trucks
and lack of a $1-million ladder truck
to fight fires at The Pointe, St. Anne’s
senior housing (which, when opened,
is going to create an even bigger
drain on resources) and the fire on
Second Avenue. There are streets in
Garwood that have not been repaved
in 40 years, sidewalks falling into
disrepair, etc. Now we have to pay for
all the items we already needed to
borrow money for but hid from the
public when the AFC was approved.
In addition, there is no synergy
between the municipality and the
board of education. We work in silos,
which creates blown up budgets that
hurt us, the taxpayers. The BOE has
already said they are raising taxes an
average of $217 per house, which
may have been avoided with smart
collaboration. For years they have
gotten away with irresponsible increases. The numbers don’t lie and
we love this town too much to allow
it to continue in the direction it’s
headed.
Albert Muller
Scotch Plains
Sal Piarulli
Garwood
crease is due to the contractual increase of $40,000 ($21 per home) to
our police department for salaries. As
of last year, the police department
became whole again at 16 officers
with the unanimous support of the
council and of course, we are required to pay for this. The third largest are the funds required to pay for
the emergency roof repairs at Borough Hall at $37,000 ($19 per home).
The fourth increase is the debt service bill of $34,000 ($18 per home),
which allows for the bond sale this
year to permanently finance the
borough’s capital projects for the past
11 years. These projects include a
garbage truck, senior citizen bus,
many road improvements, the new
recreation complex, and more.
We will continue to strive for ways
to save taxpayer dollars without jeopardizing services Garwood residents
deserve and have come to expect.
Presently, the council is looking at
opportunities for shared services.
Also, the finance committee is working with a company that would provide residents with tax incentives to
shop locally. At least one other town
is interested in teaming up with us to
make this worthwhile. We look forward to reaching out to the local
business community in the near future to see if they would be interested
in this program.
Garwood Councilpersons
Louis Petruzzelli
Sara Todisco
Mike Martin
How Can the Democrats Justify Giving
Stender a High Paying Public Job?
A couple of weeks ago I wrote a
letter to our Assemblyman Gerald
Green and our Senator Nicholas
Scutari, asking, since Assemblywoman Linda Stender has lost the
confidence of the Democrat Party for
re-election, how could they allow her
to keep her $90,000 county job as
director and project manager of the
Union County Improvement Authority. There has been no word from
Senator Scutari. However, Assemblyman Green did call my house and
left a phone number. I returned the
call, but never got a call back from
him.
On March 16 in an interview, he
was quoted as saying, “I learned
people skills – how to listen and how
to communicate. I use those skills in
the position I’m in today. The voter is
a customer of mine that I have to
satisfy if I want to stay in this business.” He further went on to be quoted,
“The Linda Stender I know worked
hand-in-hand with me to bring the
right services to the 22nd District.”
I guess that means providing pension padding for likes of Assemblywoman Stender, along with
Fanwood’s Mayor Colleen Mahr and
DD
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Letters to the Editor
Political Corruption:
Why New Jersey?- Part 2
By Sal Caruana
Former Westfield Councilman
New Jersey has been trapped for decades in a candidate selection process
ruled by county political bosses and
often morally compromised by their selfinterests and backroom deals; however,
there are other institutional factors that
also contribute to political corruption in
New Jersey and they have been extensively studied by Baruch College Professor Brian Murphy.
Shortly after the American Revolution that the practice of plural office
holding was deemed abusive and banned
by the states because of corruption and
conflicts of interest during British colonial rule. In New Jersey, this practice
was not banned until 300 years later in
2008 (my guess is that Democrat Sharpe
James’ dual office of Newark mayor and
state senator was the last felonious straw).
Currently, there is no limitation on an
elected official also holding an appointed
public sector job, often with a big salary
and full pension credit too.
Professor Murphy says this loophole
exposes a major weakness in New Jersey: our state and county legislatures are
part-time positions and many players in
New Jersey politics have become desensitive to, and almost protective of,
the need for their elected brethren on
both sides of the aisle to earn additional
income even when there is an appearance of impropriety. For example, when
the state legislature ended the practice of
dual offices it also made sure to grandfather in 19 of its existing members. And
as the new Scotch Plain’s town manager
job launches Union County Democratic
Freeholder Al Mirabella’s income from
$30,000 to $175,000 per year, our oneparty Freeholder board covers his back
and sits mute in response to legitimate
public questions about their crony’s conflict of interest. Sadder yet has been the
silence of the board’s attorney who we
pay to safeguard the public interest.
A political culture, which frequently
bends to protect the financial self-interests of those in the game, is one that is
also asking for trouble. New Jersey is
home to a large state government, 21
counties, 565 separate municipalities and
590 school districts, and with various
utilities and public agencies too. Professor Murphy says the total count is over
1,100 subdivisions of government.
New Jersey clearly has too much gov-
ernment, and he points out that its immense size creates more corruption risks
with too many points of contact for
wrongdoing and too many public contracts for influence peddling. He believes that the fundraising demands of
all these elective offices in a geographically expensive media market opens
another door to temptation and many
prosecuted acts of quid pro quo corruption in New Jersey often involve favors
for campaign cash, rather than the vacations and personal gifts that Democratic
Senator Robert Menendez is reportedly
about to be charged with.
Also stop for a moment to consider
the staffing needs of a government that
is this incredibly large, and the huge
number of hiring decisions for jobs with
good salaries, health benefits and pensions. These can be traded, too, for campaign cash or other favors from those
who come asking on behalf of friends or
family members.
On the flip side, Murphy also points
to recent studies which claim that the
corruption risk in New Jersey is actually
one of the lowest in the nation once you
factor in the enormous size of our government. So why the negative reputation? Why is political corruption in New
Jersey a national punch-line? My opinion: when there is a steady stream of
front-page stories no one really cares
about statistical excuses in a footnote.
Especially when the misdeeds occur on
a grand or audacious scale, such as when
mayor/senator/ 54-foot yacht owner
Sharpe James rigged the sale of nine
Newark city lots for $46,000 to his mistress who quickly resold them for
$665,000. That one, like so many other
brazen corruption schemes in New Jersey, was laugh out loud funny on late
night TV. But not so amusing to those of
us living in the Garden State with these
parasitic worms.
Clearly, our best hope to improve the
political culture in New Jersey would be
to shrink the overall size of government.
We can start by eliminating the wasteful
county layer, which also sustains another major defect: the county political
bosses who decide the ballot choices in
state and local elections — a situation
that David Letterman might quip “sounds
just like Putin in Russia.” And if he did,
he would be more right than wrong.
Lights and Generators at Kehler Cause
Fumes and Noise, Disturb the Peace
The generators smoke, with diesel
fumes filling the air. Their noise reverberates across a turf field that amplifies
the sound. The lights are glaring into
homes and onto properties, preventing
residents from enjoying their yards and
their homes on a spring night. This will
continue for the next 10 weeks.
The partnership of the Westfield Board
of Ed and the Westfield Soccer Association, comprised of 70 teams of paying
customers, started this lights program to
be used Monday through Friday until
9:45 p.m. Over the objections of many
area residents, who wrote letters, made
calls, and spoke at meetings; the plan was
pushed through by the BOE. Did anyone
think about any resident who lives nearby
and wants some peace after work. Did
anyone think about residents who may
try to sell their home and will take a hit on
their price with this in place. Outside of
one member who had a conscience, the
obvious answer is no.
Take a look around, Westfielders —
there are 10 schools — if you don’t make
your voices heard, this could be coming
to a neighborhood near you. Write to
[email protected]
Eugene Collins
Westfield
Reader Defends Obama’s Record
From Claims of Letter Last Week
I would like to offer a counterpoint
to the somewhat hysterical diatribe
criticizing the Obama administration
authored by Warren Victor.
I am not an unabashed cheerleader
for President Obama. I feel he has
made mistakes in the arena of foreign
policy, particularly the “line in the
sand” comment concerning President
Assad of Syria and his use of chemical weapons. Despite this and other
issues ( NSA tapping of the phones of
foreign leaders as an example) I assert that we are held in much higher
esteem now than under the Bush
neocon leadership and, thus, I dispute Mr. Victor’s claim that we have
become “the laughing stock of the
world’s body of politicians.”
It is indisputable that the economy
is in far better condition than it was
under the disastrous Bush administration. Employment is nearing the
level deemed to be full capacity. The
much-cited workplace participation
rate has improved considerably, indicating that more potential workers
are reentering the workplace, confident of finding employment. Wages
are increasing gradually, yet inflation, which Mr. Victor claims “will
make the pensioneers (sic) pension
useless” is quite tame. The stock
market has rocketed to new highs,
thus demonstrating investor confidence, and the real estate market has
rebounded nicely from the depths of
the slump. Much of this improvement is due to the economic stimulus
plans utilized so judiciously by the
Obama administration. I am sure that
the large majority of the readers of
this publication are enjoying a greater
net worth than when George W. Bush
left office.
President Obama has also driven
the movement toward universal health
coverage through The Affordable
Care Act, under which over 10 million Americans are now enjoying a
better quality of life knowing that
they have a health safety net beneath
them. The most vulnerable sectors of
the population are the beneficiaries
of this plan, and even though the
critics of Obamacare (including the
publisher of The Leader) decry the
increase in the cost of health insurance, those of us who have bought
our health insurance as individuals
have actually seen a slower increase
in the cost of insurance. (Please note:
I did not say a reduction in the cost,
but a slower rate of increase.) America
has now joined the ranks of the rest of
the industrialized world who view
basic health care as a right of all
citizens.
As to Mr. Victor’s query” ...will
enough of the LEGITIMATE (sic)
voting public on this side of the border, support a new president that
should be a clear leader from the
Republican Party..”, I am not sure
how many illegitimate voters from
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outside our borders actually get to
vote in our elections. The nominee of
the Republican Party will have to be
a candidate who will seek to repeal
Obamacare, and thus take the health
insurance from the over 10 million
Americans who have it through this
program, who opposes women’s reproductive rights and marriage equality for same sex couples, and who
support restrictive voter i.d. laws,
which effectively disenfranchise a
segment of the population. . Some of
more fringe candidates, ( “wacko
birds” in the opinion of Republican
Senator John McCain) espouse eliminating the IRS, the Department of
Health, Education and Welfare, and
the Federal Reserve. The Republican
economic model can be exemplified
by the disasters that are Louisiana
under Governor Bobby Jindal, Kansas under Governor Sam Brownback,
and New Jersey under Governor
Christie. Is this the type of society
that Americans want or deserve? Mr.
Victor may crave this, but I certainly
don’t.
Bill Gottdenker
Mountainside
Help Foster Care
Individuals
Did you know about 800 youth age out
of New Jersey’s foster care system every
year? Many of these young adults are ill
equipped to suddenly be on their own,
with no resources, insufficient education, no place to live, and no responsible
adults who can help them. Roots and
Wings is a New Jersey non-profit organization whose sole mission is to help
these young adults become self-sufficient members of society.
As chairperson of the upcoming
Author’s Luncheon on April 16 at the
Spring Brook Country Club in
Morristown, I invite you to come, learn
and support the work we are doing.
Regina Calcaterra, author of the New
York Times best-selling memoir “Etched
in Sand,” will share her inspirational
story of surviving in and around the
foster care system while raising her four
siblings. It’s difficult to imagine living in
the shadow of society, but that’s the reality for many youth who are often in and
then age out of foster care.
Roots and Wings was founded in Morris County in 1999, and expanded into
Union County in 2014. We are a small,
local organization that needs the support
of our area residents to help us grow. I
hope you can join us on April 16 (ticket
deadline is April 3). To order tickets or to
learn more about Roots and Wings, please
call (973) 453-6666 or online,
rootsandwingsnj.org.
Wendy Masteller
Westfield
Thursday, April 2, 2015
Page 5
When Will Political Leaders Tell The
Truth, A New Standard In Politics?
Secretary of State Clinton, e-mailing an advisor after a State Department official had testified before a
Congressional committees, asked
“Did we survive the day?” “Survive,
yes,” the advisor e-mailed back to
her! According to Politico, she was
afraid of a Benghazi blowback.
But the four Americans, including
Ambassador Chris Stevens, did not
survive the day the American diplomatic post in Benghazi was attacked
by terrorists!
Is this how government is being
run? That what matters is not the
public interest but the political survival of the public official?
President Obama, reacting to the
terrorist attack on a kosher grocery
store in Paris that left four Jews dead
and others hiding in the store’s basement freezer for hours, talked about
“a bunch of zealots who behead
people or randomly shoot a bunch of
folks in a deli in Paris!”
President Obama, “If you like your
doctor, you can keep your doctor. If
you like your health care plan, you
can keep your health care plan.”
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, “But
we have to pass the bill (Affordable
Care Act) so that you can find out
what’s in it….”
Dissembling may be a politician’s
modus operandi but fashioning and
executing public policy require honesty!
President Reagan, knowing that
political leaders cannot always be
taken at their word, famously advised, “Trust, but verify.” Consider
these examples when statements are
not verified:
President Lyndon B. Johnson during his president campaign in 1964,
“We don’t want to get tied down in a
land war in Asia.”
Presidential nominee George W.
H. Bush in his acceptance speech at
the Republican National Convention
in New Orleans, “Read my lips: no
new taxes.”
British Prime Minister Neville
Chamberlain after signing the Munich
Agreement, “I believe it is peace for
our time.”
National Security Advisor Susan
Rice on the 2014 release of Sgt. Bowe
Bergdahl, he “served the United
States with honor and distinction.”
(The Army on March 25th charged
him with “desertion with intent to
shirk important or hazardous duty”
and “misbehavior before the enemy
by endangering the safety of a command, unit or place.”)
President Obama on September 10,
2014, “This strategy of taking out
terrorists who threaten us, while supporting partners on the front line, is
one that we have successfully pursued inYemen and Somalia for years.”
(The American, British, and French
embassies closed in the last month
and American Special Forces were
evacuated on March 21st all because
of security concerns after the Yemeni
government abruptly fell because of
a resurgent Al Qaeda!)
Governor Christie in his budget
address this year stated he had balanced the state budget. (Superior
Court Judge Mary C. Jacobson subsequently ruled that he may not balance the budget by cutting $1.57 billion from a promised state payment
to the state employee pension fund.)
When will political leaders tell the
truth, the whole truth, and nothing
but the truth?
Stephen Schoeman
Westfield
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6
Thursday, April 2, 2015
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Library to Present Programs
On Gardening, Organization
WESTFIELD — The Westfield
Memorial Library, located at 550
East Broad Street, has announced
the dates and details for two upcoming programs.
“Basics of Backyard Gardening”
will take place on Saturday, April
11, beginning at 1:30 p.m. This
program will be geared to anyone
who loves touring formal gardens
or enjoys landscapers’ displays and
has aspirations of creating the same
in their own backyard, patio or deck.
Presenter Karen Camden will cover
the basics of gardening, including
soils, tools and plant choice. She
also will discuss what it takes to
design, plan and execute a garden.
A question-and-answer session will
follow.
Ms. Camden has given multiple
presentations at the library, including computer classes, and other
workshops on gardening, kitchen
gardens, re-purposing and clutter
control. She is president of Camden
Associates, a consulting firm that
provides services in communications
and people skills, organizational assessments and clutter control. Additionally, she is an avid gardener.
On Saturday, May 16, at 1:30
p.m., Ms. Camden will return to the
library to present “Learn How to
Control Your Clutter.” She will help
audience members get organized
by defining habits, eliminating time
wasters and setting goals and priorities.
Both programs are free and open
to Westfield Memorial Library and
MURAL cardholders. MURAL
cardholders belong to libraries that
are part of the Middlesex Union
Reciprocal Agreement Libraries. Individuals should check with their
library to see if it participates. To
register for these programs, visit
the Westfield Memorial Library’s
website at wmlnj.org and click on
the Online Calendar, or call (908)
789-4090, option 0.
Library hours are 9:30 a.m. to 9
p.m., Monday through Thursday;
9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday; and 1 to 5 p.m. on Sunday.
For more information on library
programs and services, call (908)
789-4090, visit wmlnj.org and sign
up for the monthly e-newsletter,
“Library Loop,” or stop by the library for a copy of its award-winning, quarterly newsletter, “Take
Note.”
AARP Chapter to Hear
Talk on Financial Issues
WESTFIELD — The Westfield
Area AARP Chapter 4137 will meet
on Monday, April 6, at 1 p.m., at
the Scotch Hills Country Club, located at Jerusalem Road and
Plainfield Avenue in Scotch Plains.
The chapter had to cancel its February and March meetings due to
the weather.
Chapter members will welcome
guest speaker Steve Goldberg, an
account executive with Family Investors Company located on South
Avenue in Fanwood, at Monday’s
meeting.
As a financial consultant Mr.
Goldberg will talk about financial
matters that should be of interest to
senior citizens, among them stocks,
bonds and tax-free investments. The
chapter’s business meeting, along
with refreshments and fellowship,
will follow the program.
Beginning with this meeting, reservations and payment will be
taken for the chapter’s Monday,
June 1 luncheon, which will be
held at noon at Giovanna’s Restaurant in Plainfield. The cost for the
luncheon will once again be $30.
During its May meeting, the chapter will present a slate of officers
for the 2015-2016 year and will
accept nominations from the floor
as well. Members are reminded to
bring a non-perishable food item to
the meeting to be given to the
Westfield Food Pantry.
Meg Kolaya Retires As Dir.
Of Scotch Plains Library
MADE WITH LOVE...The Second Westfield Senior Citizens Housing (SWSCH)
Community Service Group, comprised of 16 women, donated more than 100
hand-knitted and crocheted baby caps, booties, blankets, mother’s caps, ponchos and scarves March 18 to Raphael’s Life House in Elizabeth, a transitional
residence that helps homeless and pregnant women to rebuild their lives.
Raphael’s Life House volunteer Rose Stallmeyer, left in back row, visited
SWSCH to receive the items from the seniors and to share information on the
many services provided to these young women and their babies.
Garwood Residents Eligible
For Free Tree Seedlings
GARWOOD — Free tree seedlings will be available to Garwood
residents during the month of April
as part of the New Jersey Tree Recovery Campaign. This program helps
communities replace trees damaged
or destroyed by Superstorm Sandy.
From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, April 11, residents will be able to
pick up tree seedlings at the Garwood
Day Event held at the Garwood Sports
and Recreation Complex, located at
140 Myrtle Avenue. Seedlings, available on a first-come, first-served basis, also come with instructions on
how to store, care for and plant them.
The guides help residents to choose
the right place on a property to plant
a tree while keeping in mind the
tree’s full-grown size in the future.
Residents should plant the seedlings
within two days after pickup in order
to prevent the roots from drying out.
The goal of the Tree Recovery
Campaign is to distribute more than
500,000 tree seedlings to New Jersey
residents over the course of the next
five years. It is a joint effort between
the Shade Tree Department of
The Aunt Betty Frazee Project
“restoring the historic Frazee house and parkland to a beautiful public place”
Remember this all happened in Union County!
This is the last installment being
presented in The Scotch PlainsFanwood Times to inform you of the
project the Fanwood-Scotch Plains
Rotary Club has dedicated itself to, in
order to preserve and restore this
historical house for our community.
We hope you haven’t missed previous captions to learn more about our
local heroine. If you have enjoyed
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
this illustrated bit of history that took
place here in Union County 240 years
ago, and feel it is a worthy project to
save Aunt Betty’s beloved home,
please join us.
Garwood, State Forestry Services,
New Jersey Soil Conservation Districts, Sustainable Jersey, Arbor Day
Foundation, Brothers International,
BJ’s Wholesale Club, Wyndham Vacation Resorts and FedEx.
When properly planted and maintained, trees can be assets to a community. They improve the visual appeal of a neighborhood or business
district, increase property values, reduce home cooling costs, remove air
pollutants and provide wildlife habitat, among many other benefits.
For a list of all distribution locations
across the state, visit forestry.nj.gov
or facebook.com/newjerseyforests.
For further information, contact
Christina Ariemma, Shade Tree Officer, at (908) 789-0710 or by e-mail
at [email protected]
Cranford Rec. Offers
Stretch-N-Grow Class
CRANFORD — The Cranford
Recreation and Parks Department will
present the Fabulously Fun Fitness
program Stretch-N-Grow, which is
designed to promote exercise and
wellness for preschool-age children.
The class, for children ages 2 to 5,
will take place on Wednesdays, April
15 to June 3, from 9:30 a.m. to 10:15
a.m. It will be held at the Cranford
Community Center, located at 220
Walnut Avenue.
This program focuses on balance,
coordination and sports readiness skills.
Youngsters participate in weekly sessions, which include warm-up, cardio,
cool down and stretching, including
Kids Yoga, taught by a trained StretchN-Grow coach. The goal is for children
to have fun while learning to enjoy
exercise and building good habits.
Registration is for Cranford residents only and may be done in person
at the Cranford Community Center or
online at cranford.com/rec through
Community Pass. The cost is $85. For
more information, call the Cranford
Community Center at (908) 709-7283.
Fanwood Museum
Slates Tree Program
FANWOOD — The Fanwood
Museum at the historic train station
will celebrate Arbor Day a little early
this year with a special program on
Sunday, April 12, at 2:30 p.m., entitled “The Top 10 Trees You Are
Most Likely to See in Fanwood.”
Steve Falco, an 18-year Fanwood
Shade Tree Commission volunteer and
commissioner, will present a look at
the most popular trees in Fanwood.
Mr. Falco will share his passion for the
borough’s shade trees through an interactive presentation counting down
the most abundant species in the borough. Everyone in attendance will
receive a voucher for a free seedling to
arrive by Arbor Day, Friday, April 24.
The museum will be open from 2
to 4 p.m., and refreshments will be
served. Visitors can explore the maps,
photographs and memorabilia in the
museum’s collection.
The Fanwood train station and
museum is located near the intersection of North and Martine Avenues
and is normally open on the first
Sunday of every month.
Westfield Y Begins
Spring 2 Registration
We hope you are enjoying these original illustrations prepared by Frank Thorne in 1950. We wanted to jog your
memory as to the importance Union County played in our war to free ourselves from British rule. A war we won thanks
to the contributions of brave women such as Aunt Betty Frazee. It is for this reason that the Fanwood-Scotch Plains
Rotary Club has worked so hard to resurrect her home. BUT, if we are to save this historical gem for our
community…we need your help! We ask that you make a tax deductible contribution, either online at:
www.crowdrise.com/AuntBettyHouseRestoration1a1b
or to Andrew Calamaras, President Frazee House Project 232 N. Martine Avenue, Fanwood, NJ 07023 908-322-2511
[email protected]
WESTFIELD — The Westfield
Area Y has revealed that registration
will commence for its Spring 2 Session today, Thursday, April 2, for Gold
and Silver individual and family members. Members can register online.
Open registration for program and
new members will begin at 7:30 a.m.
on Monday, April 6. The Spring 2
Session runs from April 26 to June 20.
The Westfield Area Y is featuring a
variety of programs for all ages this
session for the communities of
Cranford, Garwood, Mountainside
and Westfield. Highlights and new
programs include: Intro to Dance,
Beginning Jazz/Hip Hop, Ballet 1,
Jazz/Hip Hop 1, Disc Golf Clinic,
Cardio, Core & Strength Intervals,
Fantasy Film Festival, Field Hockey
Clinic and a CPR/AED and Basic
First Aid Certification Course.
To learn more about Westfield Area
Y programs, visit westfieldynj.org or
call (908) 233-2700. Financial assistance is available for those who qualify.
SCOTCH PLAINS — Meg Kolaya, Kolaya pioneered library inclusion
a familiar fixture in the community for all community members through
for several decades, retired from the “Libraries and Autism” outreach and
Scotch Plains Public Library yester- the Next Chapter Book Club for individuals with intellectual and develday, April 1.
Michelle Willis, head of Children’s opmental disabilities.
Before coming to the
Services, has been apScotch Plains Public Lipointed as the new library
brary, Ms. Kolaya served
director by the Scotch
as director of the Clark
Plains Public Library’s
Public Library from 1997
board of trustees.
to 2002, and was head
“I have been fortunate
librarian
of
The
to have worked with Meg.
Wa r d l a w - H a r t r i d g e
I have learned so much
School during the 1980s
from her,” stated Ms.
and 1990s.
Willis. “She is a consumShe was honored at a
mate professional, always
retirement dinner given
striving to make the library
by the trustees of the
a welcoming space for evMeg Kolaya
Scotch Plains Public Lieryone in the community.
brary on March 24. DurI look forward to building
ing this gathering at the Scotch
upon the legacy she leaves us.”
Assuming the directorship in Oc- Plains Italian-American Hall, towntober 2002, Ms. Kolaya proceeded ship officials, library trustees and
to introduce new programs and to staff, Friends of the Library and
greatly expand library services. Pro- colleagues from the library comgram attendance tripled and library munity paid tribute to Ms. Kolaya’s
circulation and the number of li- achievements and integrity. All
brary cardholders doubled. Equip- agreed that her leadership has enment and materials for the public hanced the quality of life in Scotch
reflected global trends in informa- Plains and that she will be missed.
Along with her husband, John,
tion technology and communications, with the introduction of com- Ms. Kolaya plans to travel, spend
puters for public use, wireless more time with her children and
Internet, a library app, online cata- grandchildren, and volunteer at the
log and electronic resources that give library book sales. She remarked, “I
library customers 24/7 access to am most appreciative of the people
who turned out to bid farewell, and
books, films and information.
Working with Fanwood Memorial appreciate this community’s generLibrary Director Dan Weiss, Ms. osity and good wishes.”
Christopher Nicholls Attains
Eagle Rank In Boy Scouts
WESTFIELD — Christopher terian Church of Cranford for finanNicholls, a member of Boy Scout cially supporting his project. AddiTroop No. 273 of Jefferson School in tionally, Chris would like to thank his
Westfield, recently earned the high- fellow Scouts and their parents who
helped paint signs and asest honor in Boy Scoutsemble shelves, and offers a
ing — the Eagle Scout
special thanks to Home
Award.
Depot, which generously
Christopher’s Eagle
donated materials and supScout project consisted
plies.
of installing shelves for
The new Eagle Scout also
the new Baby Supplies
would like to thank his
shed at Furniture Assist,
Scoutmaster, Dr. Eric
a charitable organization
Deutchman, and all of his
in Kenilworth. He also
other Scout leaders for helpoversaw a group of voling him on his journey to
unteers in painting more
Eagle over the past seven
than 25 signs for the various sheds and driveways Christopher Nicholls years with Troop No. 273.
Christopher currently is a
at Furniture Assist. The
senior at Westfield High
organization supplies furniture and household goods to fami- School, where he participates in the
Marching Band and Wind Ensemble.
lies in need throughout New Jersey.
Christopher would like to thank all He also is a member of the First
those who donated time, materials Presbyterian Church of Cranford and
and hard work to complete this the Model Railroad Club of New
project. He also expresses apprecia- Jersey. Christopher plans on attendtion to Dawson Yeomans of Furniture ing Champlain College next fall,
Assist for his valuable input and to where he will major in computer netthe congregation of the First Presby- work administration.
Westfield Library to Hold
Intro. Computer Class
WESTFIELD — The Westfield
Memorial Library will present a new,
two-part Introductory Computer Class
for those who are completely unfamiliar with computers. The library is
located at 550 East Broad Street.
Introduction to Computers, Part I
will take place Tuesday, April 7, from
10 to 11:30 a.m., and Introduction to
Computers, Part II will be held the
following Tuesday, April 14, also
from 10 to 11:30 a.m.
Part I will be a hands-on course
designed to introduce beginning computer users to the basic elements of
running a computer. Topics will include keyboard basics, the taskbar,
the desktop, icons, start menu and
shortcuts.
The second part of this course will
cover how to navigate around the
computer, and will introduce Word
features such as creating a document,
cutting and pasting, using the menu
bar, page setup and spell check.
These classes will be free and open
to Westfield Memorial Library and
MURAL cardholders. MURAL
cardholders belong to libraries that are
part of the Middlesex Union Reciprocal Agreement Libraries. Individuals
should check with their library to see if
it participates. As seating in the classes
is limited, interested persons must register by visiting the Westfield Memorial Library’s website at wmlnj.org and
clicking on the Online Calendar, or by
calling (908) 789-4090, option 0.
Mountainside Library Posts
Upcoming Events For April
MOUNTAINSIDE — The
Mountainside Public Library, located
at One Constitution Plaza, has slated
multiple programs for April.
Tuesday Night Movies this month
will include two of this year’s Academy Award-winning films. On April
7 at 6 p.m., the library will screen
Boyhood (Rated R), for which
Patricia Arquette received an Oscar
for Best Actress in a Supporting
Role. Written and directed by Richard Linklater, the film also stars
Ellar Coltrane and Ethan Hawke.
On April 14 Birdman (Rated R),
the Academy Award winner for Best
Picture and for Best Director, will be
shown at 6:30 p.m. Directed by
Alejandro Iñárritu, it stars Michael
Keaton, Zach Galifianakis and Edward Norton.
On Thursday, April 9, “Vegetable
Gardens” will take place between 7
and 8 p.m. Brian Lowe will present
the second in his series of gardening lectures. Participants will learn
how to prepare and care for a new
or existing vegetable garden. Topics will include site selection, soil,
drainage, planting and composting.
For the Friday Opera Series, Le
Roi d’Ys will be featured on April 10
from 1 to 3 p.m. Mena Clemson will
present Edouard Lalo’s opera about
the King’s daughter, Margarede, in
the legendary lost Breton city of Ys.
Patrick Davin conducts the Opéra
Royal de Wallonie.
The Community Concert Series
offering will be “One Fine Tapestry:
A Carole King Tribute Show” on
Saturday, April 18, from 2 to 3 p.m.
Gerard and Diane Barros, a husbandand-wife keyboard and guitar duo
specializing in two-part harmonies,
will be featured. They will perform
several of Carole King’s own hits and
also a selection of chart toppers that
she composed for other performers.
To register for these programs, visit
the library or call (908) 233-0115.
Author to Spotlight
Jersey Shore History
CRANFORD — The Crane’s Ford
Daughters of the American Revolution will sponsor a program entitled
“History of the Jersey Shore” on Saturday, April 11. Presented by Kevin
Woyce, it will take place at 1 p.m. at
the Cranford Community Center, located at 220 Walnut Avenue.
Mr. Woyce is an author, photographer and lecturer. A lifelong resident
of New Jersey, he has written many
books on regional history of New
Jersey and New York.
His program “History of the Jersey
Shore” will be illustrated with original photography and vintage images
of Jersey shore beaches, boardwalks,
lighthouses and hotels. All are welcome and refreshments will be served.
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Westfield Easter Egg Hunt
To Be Held on Saturday
WESTFIELD — The Lions Club
of Westfield will hold its 80th annual
Easter Egg Hunt in Mindowaskin Park
this Saturday, April 4, at 1 p.m., for
Westfield children up to age 7. Participants and their parents are asked
to assemble in the playground area of
the park by 12:45 p.m. as the hunt
will start precisely at 1 p.m., weather
permitting.
There will be three age-appropriate areas set aside for the children:
toddler to age 3; 4- and 5-year-olds,
and 6- and 7-year-olds. More than
1,200 plastic eggs will be hidden in
the playground area next to North
Euclid Avenue.
Immediately after the hunt, complimentary bags containing gourmet jelly
beans will be distributed to the children. The Easter Bunny will be available from noon on for pictures with
the children. Parents are invited to
bring their own cameras.
Voluntary donations will be accepted to help defray the costs of
the hunt.
In the event of poor weather conditions there will not be a rain date.
The Lions Club extends its appreciation to Town Administrator
James Gildea and the Department
of Public Works for their assistance
with the hunt. This year’s hunt is
under the aegis of Lions President
Kirsten Zellner.
Lions Clubs International is a worldwide service club, counting amongst
its members former United States
presidents. It is dedicated to sight conservation and assistance to the sightand hearing-impaired worldwide.
The Lions Club of Westfield
would like to hear from anyone
who has pictures from the early
years of the hunt, which started in
1936. The club may be contacted at
P.O. Box 572, Westfield, N.J. 07091.
Ms. Allie Feldman and Scott Taylor
Ms. Allie Feldman
Engaged to Scott Taylor
Cranford Rec. Plans
Youth Typing Classes
Networking Group to Focus
On Storytelling to Get Hired
SCOTCH PLAINS — The Scotch
Plains-Mountainside Public Libraries’ Career Networking Group will
present a program on Monday, April
13, at 6:30 p.m., entitled “How to Use
Storytelling to Get Hired.” Free and
open to all, it will take place at the
Scotch Plains Public Library.
Career Search Counselor John
Hadley will inform participants how
they can tell their story to prospective
employers in a manner that is interesting, that flows, and that shows the
progression in the applicant’s career,
and which will steer the interviewer
to ask follow-up questions that will
advance the applicant’s candidacy.
Mr. Hadley also will share his “To
Care” template for telling accomplishment stories that prove an applicant will deliver, while engaging the
interviewer.
The program will focus on such
elements as whether an applicant can
give a “two-minute pitch” that is compelling and leaves the interviewer
eager to hear more, and whether an
applicant has concise, engaging, re-
sults-oriented stories to back up every point he or she wants to make
during the interview.
Mr. Hadley is the principal at John
Hadley Associates. He teaches job
seekers strategies and skills that enable them to tap into the “hidden” job
market and find the best jobs. Additionally, he works with professionals
struggling to achieve the visibility
that leads to new opportunities at
work. Mr. Hadley’s Career Tips newsletter offers advice on marketing oneself to more than 9,000 subscribers.
For more information, visit
JHACareers.com/Newsletter.htm.
Interested persons may register for
this program online at scotlib.org, by
calling (908) 322-5007, extension no.
204,
or
by
e-mail
at
[email protected] Individuals are
invited to connect with the Career
Networking Group on LinkedIn, Career Networking Group at SPPL.
The Scotch Plains Public Library
is located at 1927 Bartle Avenue, one
block from Park Avenue, in the center of the township.
Page 7
FUMC Reschedules Course
On Bonhoeffer-Life Together
Sue and Mike Feldman of Westfield
are happy to announce the engagement of their daughter, Ms. Allie
Feldman, to Scott Taylor. He is the son
of Kathy Gilpatrick of Baxter, Tenn.
and Craig Taylor of Cookeville, Tenn.
A 1999 graduate of Westfield High
School, the bride-to-be received a
Bachelor of Science degree in Mar-
AN EGGCELLENT DAY...The Lions Club of Westfield invites families to its
80th annual Easter Egg Hunt this Saturday, April 4, in Mindowaskin Park, for
Westfield children up to age 7. Participants are asked to assemble in the
playground area by 12:45 p.m. The egg hunt will begin at 1 p.m. sharp. Gourmet
jelly beans and pictures with the Easter Bunny also will be part of the festivities.
Thursday, April 2, 2015
CRANFORD — The Cranford Recreation and Parks Department has announced that it will offer spring typing
classes for youngsters. They will be
held at the Cranford Community Center, located at 220 Walnut Avenue.
These classes, for students in grades
3 to 8, will be held on Mondays, April
27 to May 18, or Wednesdays, April
29 to May 20. Grades 3 to 5 will meet
from 3:45 to 4:45 p.m. and grades 6
to 8 will meet from 5 to 6 p.m. The
class requires students to bring their
own laptops with Internet capability.
Registration is for Cranford residents only and may be done in person
at the Cranford Community Center
or online at cranford.com/rec through
Community Pass. The cost is $35.
Registration must be completed by
Friday, April 17.
For more information, call the
Cranford Community Center at (908)
709-7283.
Caregivers Group
To Meet April 13
WESTFIELD — A support group
for those caring for elderly or chronically ill loved ones will meet on Monday, April 13, at 7:30 p.m., in the
parish center of St. Helen’s Roman
Catholic Church on Lamberts Mill
Road in Westfield. Meetings typically take place on the first non-holiday Monday of each month. These
are information and sharing sessions.
For more information about this support group, call Marilyn Ryan at (908)
232-1214.
keting and a Master of Science degree in American Politics and Policy
from Florida State University. She is
the director of NYCLASS, the animal rights advocacy group leading
efforts to ban horse-drawn carriages
in New York City.
The future bridegroom graduated
from Cookeville High School in
1998 and from Florida State University with a Bachelor of Arts degree
in Music Performance. He is a software engineer for The New York
Times and core developer for
WordPress by day, and a musician
with Goodbye Picasso by night.
Allie, Scott and their cat, Willa,
live in Brooklyn.
The couple will be married in June
of 2015 near Woodstock, N.Y.
Westfield Y to Host
Family Fun Events
WESTFIELD — The Westfield
Area Y will host two events for families with young children during spring
break at its Robert and Virginia Bauer
Branch, located at 422 East Broad
Street, Westfield.
The first event will be the Joe Fisher
Magic Show, geared to parents and
children, on Monday, April 6, from
11 to 11:45 a.m.
The second event will be the Preschool of Rock Music Show, an entertaining and educational music
show for children, on Thursday, April
9, from 11 to 11:45 a.m.
Both events are open to the community and will take place in the gym
at the Bauer Branch. Advance ticket
purchase is required and can be done
online at westfieldynj.org or in person at the Bauer Branch or the Main
Y Facility at 220 Clark Street,
Westfield. There will be drawings for
giveaways and information available.
For more information regarding
any of the Westfield Area Y Preschool or Kindergarten programs, call
Eileen Rooney at (908) 233-2700,
extension no. 423, or e-mail
[email protected]
WESTFIELD — The First
United Methodist Church, located
at 1 East Broad Street, Westfield,
has rescheduled its five-week
course on “Dietrich Bonhoeffer
and Life Together.”
Beginning April 12, the course
will run on consecutive Sundays at
9 a.m., preceding the 10 a.m. worship service, and will be taught by
the Reverend Nancy Duff. Parking
is available in the Ferris Place lot;
the class will meet in the Fellowship Room. All are welcome.
When Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s siblings challenged his decision to
become a theologian, saying the
church was, “a poor, boring, petty,
and bourgeois institution,” he replied, “In that case I shall reform
it.”
Pastor Bonhoeffer spent much
of his life seeking to reform the
church that was losing its way in
Nazi Germany. On April 9, 1945
he was executed because, although
an avowed pacifist, he supported a
plot to assassinate Hitler.
This Sunday school class will
introduce the life and thought of
Dietrich Bonhoeffer in response to
his invitation in Life Together to
consider the nature of Christian
community. During the five-week
course participants will consider:
April 12 — “Who Was Dietrich
Bonhoeffer?”
April 19 — “Flags in Church?
Nationalism Then and Now”
April 26 — “The Body of Christ
in the World: the Church and Judaism”
May 3 — “Life Together and
Christian Worship Today”
May 10 — “Remembering World
War II: the Church, War, and Pacifism”
Reverend Duff, an associate professor of Christian Ethics at
Princeton Theological Seminary,
earned her Master of Divinity from
Union Presbyterian Seminary in
Virginia and her Ph.D. from Union
Theological Seminary in New
York. She focuses her research on
the theological foundations of
Christian ethics. She is married to
the Reverend David C. Mertz, senior pastor of the First United
Methodist Church in Westfield.
T h e ch u r c h ’s w e b s i t e i s
fumcwestfield.org/.
Center For Hope Auxiliary
Plans Spring Benefit Events
WESTFIELD — The Center for
Hope Hospice and Palliative Care
Auxiliary has announced two fundraising events coming up this Spring.
The first event will be a night at
the Westfield Community Players
Theater on Friday, May 15, with a
performance of The 25th Annual
Putnam County Spelling Bee. This
one-act musical centers on an annual spelling bee with six young and
somewhat quirky adolescent contestants who throughout the show
reveal their hopes, struggles and
dreams for the future while trying to
become the spelling champion.
Three equally eccentric adults are
there to guide them through this
process. The resulting musical is a
“riotous ride” made even more comical by the addition of audience participation.
Tickets are $25. The Westfield
Community Players Theater is located at 1000 North Avenue, West in
Westfield. To obtain tickets, visit the
Hope Chest Thrift Store at 26 Prospect Street, Westfield; call the store
at (908) 233-9973 or contact Dana
Gillie at (908) 233-6720.
The second fundraiser of the season will be a wine tasting on Sunday,
June 7, from 1 to 4 p.m. It will be
held at 16 Prospect Wine Bar and
Bistro, located on Prospect Street in
Westfield.
The event will include wine-tasting and hors d’oeuvres and a silent
auction. Prizes will include electronics; artwork; golf and lunch for four
at several area golf courses; theater
tickets with dinner; baskets of wine
and wine accessories; an experience
in a flight simulator, and tickets to
various New Jersey attractions.
Tickets are $50 and can be purchased from Helga Thomas at (908)
889-6287. Inquiries also can be made
at the Hope Chest Thrift Store.
The Auxiliary supports the Center
for Hope Hospice and Palliative
Care, a non-profit organization located in Scotch Plains that provides
loving care to patients and their families in two residential facilities or in
a patient’s home.
The Auxiliary always welcomes
new members. For more information regarding the Auxiliary, visit
the Hope Chest Store and speak with
a volunteer, call the Center for Hope
at (908) 889-7780 or visit the website
centerforhope.com.
Probitas Verus Honos
The Chelsea at Fanwood invites you to an
OPEN HOUSE
Saturday, April 4th
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Westfield Pediatric
Dental Group
SEE OUR ASSISTED LIVING,
INDEPENDENT LIVING AND
ALZHEIMER’S PROGRAM
and a free seminar...
Healthy You,
Healthy Heart!
THE CHELSEA
Speaker:
Frances San Andres, RN
Facts about heart health
295 SOUTH AVENUE
FANWOOD, NJ 07023
AT FANWOOD
Please RSVP: 908-654-5200
www.chelseaseniorliving.com
DUGHI, HEWIT & DOMALEWSKI
Criminal Defense Matters
State and Municipal Criminal Court
Motor Vehicle Tickets • DWI
Dentistry for Infants, Children
Adolescents, and Special Needs
• New Patients Welcome
• Laser Dentistry
• In Office General Anesthesia
Timothy P. McCabe, D.M.D.
Board Certified
Julie Jong, D.M.D.
Board Certified
Kelly Walk, D.D.S.
Board Certified
John Chang, D.D.S.
Call Brandon Minde, Former Prosecutor
Board Certified
Mention this ad for a complimentary conference
908-232-1231
340 North Avenue, Cranford, NJ
(908) 272-0200 • www.dughihewit.com
555 Westfield Avenue, Westfield
www.kidsandsmiles.com
Celebrate Easter at First Congregational Church
&IRST#ONGREGATIONAL#HURCHINVITESYOUTOEMBRACETHEPOWEROF
LOVETOOVERCOMEEVILASWELLASTHEBLESSINGSOFFORGIVENESSAND
RECONCILIATIONTHISWEEKANDTHROUGHOUTTHEYEAR
Maundy Thursday
!PRILPM
#ANDLELIGHT3ERVICEOF
3CRIPTURE(YMNS2EmECTION
AND#OMMUNION
Good Friday
!PRILPM
3ERVICEOF-EDITATION
AND2EmECTION
IN0ATTON!UDITORIUM
Easter Sunday
!PRILANDAM
-USICFORORGANANDBRASS
BY7IDORAND(ANDEL
/NEROOM
SCHOOLHOUSE
ANDINFANTCARE
ATBOTHSERVICES
#OFFEEHOUR
ATAM
%LMER3TREET7ESTlELDsFCCOFWESTlELDORGs
Member of the United Church of Christ
Everyone’s Welcome – Especially You!
Page
8
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, April 2, 2015
– Obituaries –
Eugene G. Walker, Jr., 55, Executive;
Enjoyed Cars and Riding His Harley
Eugene G. Walker, Jr., 55, of South
Plainfield died on Friday, March 27,
2015, at Overlook Medical Center in
Summit.
Born in Cleveland, Ohio, he grew
up in Scotch Plains and lived in South
Plainfield for over 20 years.
Gene was the vice-president of
Metropolitan Compactor Service in
Westfield, a business founded by his
father, the late Eugene Walker. He was
an avid car enthusiast and a skilled
mechanic. On any nice day you would
find Gene working on his cars or riding
his Harley. He was always there to
lend a hand to anyone in need.
He is survived by his brother,
Michael Walker (and his wife, Nancy)
of Scotch Plains; his sisters, Diana
Pasquarella of Bridgewater and Anne
Johnson (and her husband, Ken) of
Warren; four nieces, Tamie, Valerie,
Amanda and Victoria, and three nephews, Michael, Jr., Thomas and Ryan.
Visitation and a prayer service were
held on Sunday, March 29, at Memorial Funeral Home, 155 South Avenue, Fanwood.
In lieu of flowers, donations may
be made to the American Cancer
Society (www.cancer.org). For additional information or to sign the
guestbook,
visit
www.fanwoodmemorial.com.
April 2, 2015
$3 Million Verdict Is Upheld In
Bramnick Firm Personal Injury Case
SCOTCH PLAINS — The New
Jersey Superior Court, Appellate
Division recently upheld a
$3,000,000 jury verdict previously
awarded in a 2013 personal injury
case tried by Casey J. Woodruff, a
lawyer with the firm of Bramnick,
Rodriguez, Grabas & Woodruff,
LLC.
The lawsuit stemmed from a motor vehicle accident which occurred
in the summer of 2010. The then
13-year-old plaintiff had just
graduated from eighth grade and
was riding his bicycle in Newark.
As he continued his ride onto
Broadway he was struck by a police vehicle returning to a nearby
precinct. The young plaintiff suffered severe injuries to his right
leg as a result of the accident. Prior
to trial, the defendants offered to
settle the matter for $150,000.
However, the case proceeded to
trial and the jury awarded plaintiff
$3,000,000 for his pain and suffering.
Following the decision of the
jury, the defendants appealed on
the basis that the police officer
involved in the accident should be
entitled to immunity from liability
under New Jersey law. After hearing arguments from both parties,
the higher court ultimately ruled
that the police officer was not engaged in the kind of police activities that would have changed the
standard of care under the law.
Therefore, he was not entitled to
the immunity and the $3,000,000
verdict was upheld.
Mr. Woodruff, who has been a
trial attorney with Bramnick
Rodriguez for over 15 years, argued the case on behalf of the plaintiff before the Appellate Division.
Bramnick Rodriguez has been a
New Jersey personal injury firm
since 1984 and has tried or negotiated hundreds of successful cases
for their clients. With offices located throughout New Jersey, the
firm continues to represent clients
in personal injury matters and is
dedicated to achieving the best possible result in each and every case.
Paid Bulletin Board
goleader.com/express
Cranford Chamber Holds
Meet and Greet at Kilkenny
CRANFORD — The Cranford
Chamber of Commerce held its first
After Hours Networking Meet and
Greet event on March 24 at the
Kilkenny House in Cranford.
This event was very well attended
by many chamber members and retailers. Members and future members had a chance to mingle with
other attendees while exchanging
information and promoting their
businesses. The Chamber will host
three additional After Hours Networking events this year.
The Chamber expressed appreciation to Kilkenny House owner
Barry O’Donovan and his staff for
hosting this successful networking
event for the organization. Mr.
O’Donovan opened the Kilkenny
House six years ago on South Avenue in Cranford and according to
the Chamber has always been very
supportive of the community.
The Cranford Chamber of Com-
MASTER
MEMORIALS
524 Central Avenue
Westfield, NJ (908) 233-2350
www.mastermemorials.com
Designer • Builders of fine
MONUMENTS
MARKERS
MAUSOLEUMS
Lettered • Cleaned
Tim Doerr
Sally Bauer Doerr
(established 1939)
Also: 300 Rt. 37 East
Toms River, NJ
(732) 349-2350
merce holds a networking event
each month. For additional information or to respond for an event,
interested persons are asked to contact
(908)
272-6114
or
[email protected]
SHERIFF’S SALE
SHERIFF’S FILE NO.: CH-15001314
SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY
CHANCERY DIVISION
UNION COUNTY
DOCKET NO. F-0044539-10
Plaintiff: NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC
VS.
Defendant: EDWARD G. AHERHN JR.; BANK
OF AMERICA, N.A. AND KRISTA NICKEL, TENANT
Sale Date: 04/29/2015
Writ of Execution: 11/26/2014
By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution
to me directed I shall expose for sale by public
vendue, at the UNION COUNTY ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, 1ST FLOOR, 10 ELIZABETHTOWN PLAZA, Elizabeth, New Jersey on
WEDNESDAY, at two o’clock in the afternoon of
said day. All successful bidders must have 20%
of their bid available in cash or certified check at
the conclusion of the sales.
The judgment amount is: ***Four Hundred
Twenty-Seven Thousand Five Hundred FortyThree and 90/100*** $427,543.90.
The property to be sold is located in the TOWNSHIP OF SCOTCH PLAINS, County of Union
and State of New Jersey.
It is commonly known as 2406 HAMLETT
PLACE, SCOTCH PLAINS, NEW JERSEY 07076
It is known and designated as Block 7201, Lot
25.
The dimensions are approximately 43.72 feet
wide by 110.01 feet long.
Nearest cross street: Plainfield Avenue
Prior lien(s): Sewer account past due in amount
of $267.81
Total Upset: ***Four Hundred Thirty-Eight
Thousand Two Hundred Sixty-Eight and 18/
100*** $438,268.18 together with lawful interest
and costs.
Subject to any unpaid taxes, municipal liens or
other charges, and any such taxes, charges,
liens, insurance premiums or other advances
made by plaintiff prior to this sale. All interested
parties are to conduct and rely upon their own
independent investigation to ascertain whether
or not any outstanding interest remain of record
and/or have priority over the lien being foreclosed and, if so the current amount due thereon.
Surplus Money: If after the sale and satisfaction of the mortgage debt, including costs and
expenses, there remains any surplus money, the
money will be deposited into the Superior Court
Trust Fund and any person claiming the surplus,
or any part thereof, may file a motion pursuant to
Court Rules 4:64-3 and 4:57-2 stating the nature
and extent of that person’s claim and asking for
an order directing payment of the surplus money.
The Sheriff or other person conducting the sale
will have information regarding the surplus, if
any.
There is a full legal description on file in the
Union County Sheriff’s Office.
The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this
sale for any length of time without further advertisement.
Joseph Cryan
Sheriff
Attorney:
STERN, LAVINTHAL & FRANKENBERG, LLC
105 EISENHOWER PARKWAY
SUITE 302
ROSELAND, NEW JERSEY 07068
(973) 797-1100
4 T - 04/02, 04/09, 04/16
& 04/23/14
Fee: $189.72
William August ‘Bill’ Best, 94,
Westfield Native Son Dies
William August “Bill” Best, Cap- and New Zealand, and attended the
tain USMCR Retired, age 94, died on Norfolk Opera every season. He evenThursday, March 26, at his residence tually lost his eyesight but listened to
at The Landing in Williamsburg, Va. about 25 books a month on CD.
He was a dedicated family man
He died peacefully in his sleep after
who pursued many hobbies includdeclining health.
ing restoring a 1969
He was born August
XKE Jaguar, gardening,
17, 1920 in Westfield,
making beer and furniN.J. to Frederick and
ture, developing his own
Alice Lundelius Best.
photographs, and acThere he grew up on
tively studying genealBrightwood Avenue with
ogy of his Best roots. He
his sister, Marion, and
is most proud of his time
brothers, Fred and Dick.
serving with Boy Scouts
His family also spent
of America Troop 172,
memorable summers on
in Westfield, N.J., teachCranberry Lake, N.J. In
ing his sons and the other
1939, while a sophomore
boys camping, survival,
at Dartmouth College, he
boating, about stars and
joined the Marine Retrees, and helping to run
serves and was called to
the Klondike Derby.
Active Duty after the atWilliam A. Best
Many summers with the
tack on Pearl Harbor.
Assigned to the 1st Marine Divi- troop were spent on the Saranac Lakes
sion 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing in San in New York State.
He will be remembered by his famDiego, he was sent to Guadalcanal in
the Solomon Islands in 1942, where ily as a hero, and as a kind and honhe served as communications officer. orable man.
Bill is preceded in death by his
When his division was sent to
Auckland, N.Z. for a scheduled relief sweetheart, Marian, just one year ago,
in April 1943, he met the love of his and by sons Warwick (Rick) and Jeflife, Marian Esther Punch, whom he frey. He is survived by children Kerry
married January 21, 1944. After a and her husband, Raymond Johnson,
brief honeymoon, she traveled on the of Williamsburg, Va.; Michael of
Norwegian liner, M.V. Torrems, to Salisbury, Conn.; Peter and his wife,
live with his parents as a “war bride” Michele, of Basking Ridge, N.J.;
while he completed active service. Leslie and her husband, Christopher
He was honorably discharged in 1946. Rich, of Dobbs Ferry, N.Y.; his daughter-in-law, Caroline Best of Lenexa,
They were married 70 years.
Employed at AT&T his entire ca- Kan., and eight grandchildren.
There will be no service. Interment
reer, he was assigned first to Washington, then Philadelphia, and in will be at Arlington National Cem1960, to New York. He and his grow- etery later this summer with Full
ing family moved to Westfield where Military Honors.
Bill would be pleased to have any
he and his four boys spent untold
hours refurbishing their historic house memorial donations sent to Patriots’
on Kimball Avenue. During his final Path Council, The Boy Scouts of
years with AT&T he worked on the America, 1 Saddle Road, Cedar
Knolls, N.J. 07927.
anti-trust case against MCI.
The family would like to thank the
Upon retirement in 1981, he first
moved to Kill Devil Hills, N.C. His staff at Woodhaven at The Landing,
engineering skills came in handy as Heartland Hospice Care, and fellow
he built a prefabricated “Deck” house Marine Howard Smith of Oleta Coach
on a hill overlooking Colington Har- Lines for their caring attendance to
bor. He was also able to indulge his Bill during his final days.
“Once a Marine Always a Marine.”
love of sailing on his trimaran Kiwi
April 2, 2015
Magic. The trophy for the annual
Albemarle 100 mile round-trip race
from Colington to Edenton, “The
Quest for the Best,” was named “The
ECF Tricky Tray
Bill Best Cup” in recognition of his
To Benefit Families
many years of service to the Colington
SCOTCH PLAINS — The
Harbor Yacht Club.
As one of the dwindling number of Emmanuel Cancer Foundation (ECF),
surviving soldiers, he attended the which serves families with children
50th anniversary of the Guadalcanal with cancer, will conduct its First Annual Tricky Tray Fundraiser on FriCampaign Veterans in Guadalcanal.
He spent the last fourteen years in day, May 1. It will take place at St.
Williamsburg at The Landing. He Bartholomew Academy, located at
built a workroom, traveled to Europe 2032 Westfield Avenue, Scotch Plains.
Doors will open at 6 p.m.; the first
SHERIFF’S SALE
prize will be called at 8 p.m.
SHERIFF’S FILE NO.: CH-15001403
Ticket prices are $15 in advance
SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY
CHANCERY DIVISION
and $20 at the door. The price inUNION COUNTY
cludes one sheet of 25 tier one tickDOCKET NO. F-039063-13
Plaintiff: FIFTH THIRD MORTGAGE COMets. Attendees are invited to bring
PANY
VS.
their own food, beer and wine. ResDefendant: JORGE COLLANTES AND ROSA
ervations for tables of eight are
COLLANTES
Sale Date: 04/29/2015
available. A variety of prizes will
Writ of Execution: 02/19/2015
By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution
be featured, with varied tier levels,
to me directed I shall expose for sale by public
50/50 and door prizes.
vendue, at the UNION COUNTY ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, 1ST FLOOR, 10 ELIZABETHInterested persons are asked to
TOWN PLAZA, Elizabeth, New Jersey on
WEDNESDAY, at two o’clock in the afternoon of
contact
Barbara at (908) 322-4323,
said day. All successful bidders must have 20%
extension no. 17, or at
of their bid available in cash or certified check at
the conclusion of the sales.
[email protected], or
The judgment amount is: ***Three Hundred
Ninety-Six Thousand Three Hundred Sisty-Five
Jody at (732) 381-7339 or
and 72/100*** $396,364.72.
[email protected]
The property to be sold is located in the Borough of Garwood.
In the County of Union and the State of New
Jersey.
Premises commonly known as: 67 Third Avenue
Block 206, Lot 8
Dimensions of Lot (approximately): 40 feet x
150 feet.
Nearest Cross Street: Oak Street
Subject to: 0.00
Total Upset: ***Four Hundred Five Thousand
Nine Hundred Thirty-Eight and 49/100***
$405,938.49 together with lawful interest and
costs.
Surplus Money: If after the sale and satisfaction of the mortgage debt, including costs and
expenses, there remains any surplus money, the
money will be deposited into the Superior Court
Trust Fund and any person claiming the surplus,
or any part thereof, may file a motion pursuant to
Court Rules 4:64-3 and 4:57-2 stating the nature
and extent of that person’s claim and asking for
an order directing payment of the surplus money.
The Sheriff or other person conducting the sale
will have information regarding the surplus, if
any.
There is a full legal description on file in the
Union County Sheriff’s Office.
The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this
sale for any length of time without further advertisement.
Joseph Cryan
Sheriff
Attorney:
MCCABE, WEISBERG & CONWAY, P.C.
216 HADDON AVENUE
SUITE 201
WESTMONT, NEW JERSEY 08108
(856) 858-7080
4 T - 04/02, 04/09, 04/16
& 04/23/14
Fee: $165.24
N
ow Offering the New
Willow View Mausoleum,
A Unique Concept in
Memorial Properties.
B
eauty, Dignity & Peace
Overlooking Bunnell Pond.
Family Lots, Single Graves, Niches & Community Mausoleums
Faithfully Serving the Public Since 1868, on 105 Picturesque Acres.
Fairview Cemetery
Nonprofit • Nonsectarian
1100 East Broad Street • Westfield, NJ
908-232-0781
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Friends of Westfield Library
Offer ‘2Fer’ Museum Passes
WESTFIELD – Beginning Monday, April 6, the Friends of the
Westfield Memorial Library will
launch the new “2Fer” Museum
Pass Program. This new program
will enable Westfield patrons to
borrow two museum passes at a
time to 14 specific museums.
The museums in the “2Fer” program include: the Children’s Museum of Manhattan (New York),
Cooper Hewitt National Design
Museum (New York), Frick Collection (New York), Garden State
Discovery Museum (New Jersey),
Montclair Art Museum (New Jersey), Morris Museum (New Jersey), Museum of Arts and Design
(New York), Museum of the City
of New York (New York), Museum
of Early Trades and Crafts (New
Jersey), Museum of the Moving
Image (New York), National Academy Museum and School (New
York), New York Historical Society (New York), Skyscraper Museum (New York), and the Stickley
Museum at Craftsman Farms (New
Jersey).
In addition to being part of the
2Fer program, the Museum of the
Moving Image is the newest addition to the Museum Pass Program,
which was created by the Friends
in 2008. Since its inception, more
than 5,600 passes have been borrowed.
In total, there are 19 museums in
the Museum Pass program. Five
museums are considered Premium
Museums, and they are excluded
Cranford Historical Society
Marks End of Civil War
CRANFORD — April 2015 marks Wesley Rogers Batchelder, who witthe end of the 150th anniversary of the nessed the assassination of President
Civil War. To commemorate this pe- Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865 in
riod in American history,
Washington. An additional
the Cranford Historical
feature of the display will
Society has scheduled
be a grouping of original
several public events in
Southern documents, never
April, including an exbefore exhibited, showing
hibit at the Cranford Pubthe treatment of Africanlic Library, which will
Americans before, during
run throughout the
and after the Civil War. The
month.
library is located at 224
Included in the exhibit
Walnut Avenue.
will be a timeline of the
To complement the lilast year of the war, notbrary exhibit, local Civil
ing some of the key
War historian Steven Glazer
battles and the Cranford
will speak at the CraneJudge Batchelder
citizens who fought in
Phillips House Museum
them. Also on display
about Cranford’s role in
will be original letters and pictures bringing an end to the war. His illusonce owned by Cranford justice trated presentation will take place on
Sunday, April 12, at 2:15 p.m. Doors
will open at 2 p.m.
Seminar to Address
Admission is free but reservations
Alcohol Dependency
are required.
ELIZABETH — In recognition
Interested persons are asked to
of Alcohol Awareness Month, respond by calling the Cranford
Trinitas Regional Medical Center Historical Society’s office at (908)
will present a free seminar entitled 276-0082
or
e-mailing
“Alcohol Dependency: Message in [email protected]
a Bottle” on Tuesday, April 7. It will The Crane-Phillips House Museum
take place from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
is located at 124 North Union AvCarol Safner, a Licensed Clini- enue, Cranford.
cal Alcohol and Drug Counselor,
A companion article to the library
will be the guest speaker for the exhibit and museum presentation will
seminar.
be in the Spring issue of “The Mill
A light dinner will be included. Wheel,” the Cranford Historical
The program will be held in the Society’s newsletter, received by all
CORE Building, located at 1164 members of the organization. Mr.
Elizabeth Avenue, Elizabeth. At- Glazer also will address the sixthtendees may enter the parking lot grade students of Orange Avenue
from South Broad Street, next to School during April regarding
the fire house. To register, call Cranford’s Civil War heritage.
(908) 994-8939.
SHERIFF’S SALE
SHERIFF’S FILE NO.: CH-15001152
SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY
CHANCERY DIVISION
UNION COUNTY
DOCKET NO. F-0592-09
Plaintiff: BLUE ASSET MANAGEMENT POOL
1 LLC
VS.
Defendant: DAVID EVANS, HIS HEIRS, DEVISEES AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES, AND HIS, HER, THEIR OR ANY OF
THEIR SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT, TITLE, AND
INTEREST, AND GINA EVANS, HER HEIRS,
DEVISEES, AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES, AND HIS, HER, THEIR OR ANY OF
THEIR SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT, TITLE AND
INTEREST, KVAL PROPERTIES, LLC, UNION
COUNTY BOARD OF SOCIAL SERVICES AND
ALBERT ANGELET11, MD, HIS HEIRS, DEVISEES, AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES,
AND HIS, HER, THEIR OR ANY OF THEIR
SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT, TITLE AND INTEREST
Sale Date: 04/22/2015
Writ of Execution: 10/31/2014
By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution
to me directed I shall expose for sale by public
vendue, at the UNION COUNTY ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, 1ST FLOOR, 10 ELIZABETHTOWN PLAZA, Elizabeth, New Jersey on
WEDNESDAY, at two o’clock in the afternoon of
said day. All successful bidders must have 20%
of their bid available in cash or certified check at
the conclusion of the sales.
The judgment amount is: ***Seven Hundred
Eighty-Five Thousand Six Hundred Eighty-Eight
and 75/100*** $785,688.75.
The property to be sold is located in the Town
of Westfield in the County of Union, State of New
Jersey.
Commonly known as: 919 Grandview Avenue,
Westfield, New Jersey 07090
Tax Lot No.: Lot 17 in Block 4808 on the Town
of Westfield Tax Map
Dimensions of Lot: 50 x 100
Nearest Cross Streets: Elizabeth Avenue, Pine
Street
Subject to any open taxes, water/sewer,
municipal or tax liens that may be due.
Tax and prior lien info: No open taxes or prior
liens.
Prior Mortgages and Judgments (if any):
None
Total Upset: ***Eight Hundred Twenty-Three
Thousand Three Hundred Fifty-Seven and 55/
100*** $823,357.55 together with lawful interest
and costs.
Surplus Money: If after the sale and satisfaction of the mortgage debt, including costs and
expenses, there remains any surplus money, the
money will be deposited into the Superior Court
Trust Fund and any person claiming the surplus,
or any part thereof, may file a motion pursuant to
Court Rules 4:64-3 and 4:57-2 stating the nature
and extent of that person’s claim and asking for
an order directing payment of the surplus money.
The Sheriff or other person conducting the sale
will have information regarding the surplus, if
any.
There is a full legal description on file in the
Union County Sheriff’s Office.
The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this
sale for any length of time without further advertisement.
Joseph Cryan
Sheriff
Attorney:
MCELROY, DEUTSCH, MULVANEY &
CARPENTER, LLP
1300 MOUNT KEMBLE AVENUE
P.O. BOX 2075
MORRISTOWN NEW JERSEY 07962-2075
(973) 993-8100
4 T - 03/26, 04/02, 04/09
& 04/16/15
Fee: $210.12
from the 2Fer program. This means
that only one of these museum’s
passes can be checked out at a
time: the American Museum of
Natural History (New York),
Grounds for Sculpture (New Jersey), Intrepid Sea, Air and Space
Museum (New York), the Museum
of Modern Art (New York) and the
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
(New York).
Westfield Memorial Library
cardholders and current members
of the Friends of the Westfield Memorial Library may borrow museum passes for four days at a time.
Passes are checked out on a firstcome, first-served basis.
According to Linnea Rhodes,
past president of the Friends and
founder of the Museum Pass Program, “We are very excited about
this new bonus to the Museum Pass
Program. Although the program
has continued to be very popular,
we thought that allowing patrons
to sign out two passes at one time
would increase the usage of the
passes and would benefit those who
are traveling into the city or who
are planning to entertain guests.
Our purpose is to have more passes
signed out at one time, and we
hope that the 2Fer program will
accomplish this goal.”
To learn more about the Friends’
Museum Pass program, or any
other Friends news, visit the
library’s website at wmlnj.org and
click on the “Museum Pass” link
or the “wml friends” link.
SHERIFF’S SALE
SHERIFF’S FILE NO.: CH-15001013
SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY
CHANCERY DIVISION
UNION COUNTY
DOCKET NO. F-056648-10
Plaintiff: FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE
CORPORATION
VS.
Defendant: JOSEPH J. MADDEN; WELLS
FARGO BANK, NA; UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA
Sale Date: 04/08/2015
Writ of Execution: 10/17/2014
By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution
to me directed I shall expose for sale by public
vendue, at the UNION COUNTY ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, 1ST FLOOR, 10 ELIZABETHTOWN PLAZA, Elizabeth, New Jersey on
WEDNESDAY, at two o’clock in the afternoon of
said day. All successful bidders must have 20%
of their bid available in cash or certified check at
the conclusion of the sales.
The judgment amount is: ***Three Hundred
Fifty-Nine Thousand Four Hundred and 86/100***
$359,400.86.
The property to be sold is located in: the
Borough of Garwood, County of Union, State of
New Jersey.
Commonly known as: 239 Third Avenue,
Garwood, New Jersey 07027.
Tax Lot No.: 5 in Block: 205
Dimensions of Lot: (Approximately) 80 x 150
Nearest Cross Street: Oak Street
Subject to any open taxes, water/sewer, municipal or tax liens that may be due.
Subject to Tax and prior lien info: At the time
of publication taxes/sewer/water information was
not available-you must check with the tax collector for exact amounts due.
Subject to Prior Mortgages and Judgments
(if any): None
Total Upset: ***Three Hundred Seventy Thousand One Hundred Eighty-Seven and 32/100***
$370,187.32 together with lawful interest and
costs.
Surplus Money: If after the sale and satisfaction of the mortgage debt, including costs and
expenses, there remains any surplus money, the
money will be deposited into the Superior Court
Trust Fund and any person claiming the surplus,
or any part thereof, may file a motion pursuant to
Court Rules 4:64-3 and 4:57-2 stating the nature
and extent of that person’s claim and asking for
an order directing payment of the surplus money.
The Sheriff or other person conducting the sale
will have information regarding the surplus, if
any.
“The Fair Housing Act prohibits”any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of
race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make such
preference, limitation or discrimination” in connection with any aspect or a residential real
estate transaction, Zucker, Goldberg, and
Ackerman, LLC encourages and supports the
equal housing practives of the Fair Housing Act
in the conduct of its business.”
There is a full legal description on file in the
Union County Sheriff’s Office.
The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this
sale for any length of time without further advertisement.
Joseph Cryan
Sheriff
Attorney:
ZUCKER, GOLDBERG & ACKERMAN, LLC
200 SHEFFIELD STREET
SUITE 301
MOUNTAINSIDE, NEW JERSEY 07092
(908) 233-8500
File No.: XWZ-144333
4 T - 03/12, 03/19, 03/26
& 04/02/15
Fee: $206.04.
See it all on the Web!
www.goleader.com
SHERIFF’S SALE
SHERIFF’S FILE NO.: CH-15001413
SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY
CHANCERY DIVISION
UNION COUNTY
DOCKET NO. F-014484-12
Plaintiff: WELLS FARGO BANK. N.A.
VS.
Defendant:
BARRY
J.
PILGRIM,
JACQUELINE K. PILGRIM
Sale Date: 04/29/2015
Writ of Execution: 02/17/2015
By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution
to me directed I shall expose for sale by public
vendue, at the UNION COUNTY ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, 1ST FLOOR, 10 ELIZABETHTOWN PLAZA, Elizabeth, New Jersey on
WEDNESDAY, at two o’clock in the afternoon of
said day. All successful bidders must have 20%
of their bid available in cash or certified check at
the conclusion of the sales.
The judgment amount is: ***Three Hundred
Fifty-Eight Thousand Twenty-One and 70/100***
$358,021.70.
MUNICIPALITY: Scotch Plains Township,
COUNTY: UNION, STATE OF NEW JERSEY.
STREET & STREET NO: 2200 Mountain Avenue
TAX BLOCK AND LOT: BLOCK: 3002, LOT:
1.
DIMENSIONS OF LOT: 50.74 feet x 100.00
feet.
NEAREST CROSS STREET: Beginning at a
point formed by the intersection of the southeast
sideline of Mountain Avenue (66 feet wide R.O.W.)
with the northeast sideline of Westfield Road
(52.5 feet R.O.W.).
SUPERIOR INTERESTS (if any):
Scotch Plains Township holds a claim for
taxes due and/or other municipal utilities such as
water and/or sewer in the amount of $1951.28 as
of 05/01/2015.
Scotch Plains Township holds a claim for
taxes due and/or other municipal utilities such as
water and/or sewer in the amount of $142.57 as
of 07/01/2014.
Total Upset: ***Three Hundred Sixty-Six Thousand Nine Hundred Sixty-Six and 74/100***
$366,966.74 together with lawful interest and
costs.
Surplus Money: If after the sale and satisfaction of the mortgage debt, including costs and
expenses, there remains any surplus money, the
money will be deposited into the Superior Court
Trust Fund and any person claiming the surplus,
or any part thereof, may file a motion pursuant to
Court Rules 4:64-3 and 4:57-2 stating the nature
and extent of that person’s claim and asking for
an order directing payment of the surplus money.
The Sheriff or other person conducting the sale
will have information regarding the surplus, if
any.
There is a full legal description on file in the
Union County Sheriff’s Office.
The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this
sale for any length of time without further advertisement.
Joseph Cryan
Sheriff
Attorney:
POWERS KIRN - COUNSELORS
728 MARINE HIGHWAY
PO BOX 848 - SUITE 200
MOORESTOWN, NEW JERSEY 08057
(856) 802-1000
4 T - 04/02, 04/09, 04/16
& 04/23/14
Fee: $189.72
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Thursday, April 2, 2015
Page 9
Cranford Historic Murals
Awarded Nat’l Recognition
Westfield
Monday, March 23, the owner of
a property on the 600 block of
Carleton Road reported that unknown suspects trespassed on his
property. When confronted and
asked what their purpose was for
being there, the suspects fled the
scene, police said.
Monday, March 23, a victim reported that unknown suspects removed documents, valued at $100,
from a sealed letter that was deposited with the U.S. Postal Service.
The theft was discovered when the
letter reached its destination.
Monday, March 23, Christopher
Coladonato, 45, of Westfield responded to police headquarters to
satisfy an active Kenilworth traffic
warrant. He was processed and released after posting the full cash
bail of $89.
Tuesday, March 24, a resident of
the 100 block of Amy Drive reported an incident of identity theft
in which someone unknown fraudulently filed a tax return using the
victim’s Social Security number.
The monetary value of the theft was
unknown at the time of the report.
Tuesday, March 24, Joan Portaro,
48, of Hillside was arrested on an
outstanding Union traffic warrant for
$1,000 pursuant to a motor vehicle
stop on the 100 block of Central
Avenue. She was transported to police headquarters, processed and released after posting the requisite bail.
Tuesday, March 24, a business
on the 200 block of South Avenue
West reported a shoplifting incident that occurred at the establishment at approximately 2:45 p.m.
The suspect, described as a white,
middle-aged female, selected two
items and placed them in her purse
before exiting the store. The items
were described as “toothbrush
heads” with a total value of approximately $50.
Tuesday, March 24, a resident of
the 100 block of Gallowae reported
an incident of identity theft in which
someone unknown fraudulently filed
a tax return using the victim’s Social
Security number. There was no monetary loss reported at the time.
Tuesday, March 24, an incident
of fraud/theft was reported on the
600 block of North Avenue West. A
representative of the victim stated
that one or more unknown suspects
passed several bad checks in return
for merchandise totaling $4,781.76.
Wednesday, March 25, an incident of shoplifting was reported on
the 200 block of East Broad Street.
Someone unknown reportedly removed approximately $62.96 in
merchandise from the store without paying for it.
Wednesday, March 25, a resident
of the 700 block of Clark Street
reported an incident of identity theft
in which an unknown suspect
fraudulently filed a tax return using
the victim’s identification. There
was no apparent monetary loss at
the time of the report.
Wednesday, March 25, Damon
Ross, 43, of Roselle was arrested
on outstanding traffic warrants from
Westfield and Plainfield, with bail
amounts of $1,475 and $780, respectively, pursuant to a prisoner
pickup at the Cranford Police Department. Ross was transported to
Westfield police headquarters, processed and held in lieu of bail.
Wednesday, March 25, Davion
Williams, 37, of East Orange was
arrested at police headquarters on
outstanding warrants from
Westfield, for $262, and Cranford,
for $89. Williams was processed
and released after posting bail.
Friday, March 27, Thomas
Macken, 21, of Newark was arrested on an outstanding Hillside
traffic warrant, for $750, and another traffic warrant from Scotch
Plains, for $500, pursuant to a stop
on the 100 block of Elm Street.
Macken was transported to police
headquarters, processed and turned
over to the Scotch Plains Police
Department. He was released on
his own recognizance as per the
Hillside Police Department.
Saturday, March 28, while investigating a report of a suspicious
motor vehicle on the 200 block of
East North Avenue, police arrested
Cleveland Smith, Jr., 44, of
Maplewood and charged him with
hindering apprehension. According
to police, Smith provided a false
name, date of birth and address to
evade arrest on two criminal warrants, one from Newark, for $5,000,
and the other from Roselle, for $250.
He was transported to police headquarters and issued a warrant with
bail set at $1,000 (no 10-percent
alternative). Smith was unable to
post bail and was committed to the
Union County jail.
During the investigation, police
also arrested Luis Green, Sr., 51, of
Irvington on a no-bail warrant from
the Essex County Sheriff’s Department, along with warrants from
Montclair, Irvington, Kenilworth
and Newark, with bail of $1,000 set
for each, and Morris Township, with
$550 bail. Green was turned over to
the Essex County Sheriff’s Department.
Fanwood
Tuesday, March 24, Carlos TistaTemu, 19, of Plainfield was arrested,
processed and charged with hinder-
ing apprehension and motor vehicle
violations following a motor vehicle stop. He was released pending
his court hearing.
Wednesday, March 25, someone
reported that between 5:35 a.m. and
7:30 p.m. a locked bicycle was stolen from the Fanwood Train Station. The value of the bicycle is
$20.
Friday, March 27, Rachel Hester,
20, of Somerset was arrested on an
active warrant out of Mountainside
following a motor vehicle stop. She
was processed, posted bail and released.
Cranford
Friday, March 20, following a
motor vehicle stop, Manuel Soto,
42, of Elizabeth was arrested and
charged with possession of a hypodermic syringe; and Brian Sarratt,
47, of Elizabeth was arrested and
charged with possession of heroin,
possession of paraphernalia and hindering apprehension.
Saturday, March 21, Damon Ross,
43, of Roselle was charged with
driving while intoxicated (DWI) following a motor vehicle stop. He
was processed and released pending an appearance in Municipal
Court.
Saturday, March 21, Joao
DaSilva, 51, of Roselle Park was
arrested and charged with unlawful
possession of a weapon following a
motor vehicle stop. Police recovered a pellet handgun from the vehicle. DaSilva was processed and
released pending an appearance in
Superior Court.
Saturday, March 21, Demor Barber, 24, of Irvington was arrested
and charged with possession of less
than 50 grams of suspected marijuana and possession of paraphernalia following a motor vehicle stop.
Sunday, March 22, Luis
Maldonado, 23, of Newark was arrested and charged with possession
of less than 50 grams of suspected
marijuana and possession of paraphernalia following a motor vehicle
stop.
Sunday, March 22, Corey
Youmans, 25, of Elizabeth was arrested and charged with possession
of less than 50 grams of suspected
marijuana and possession of paraphernalia following a motor vehicle
stop. Youmans was processed and
released pending an appearance in
Municipal Court.
Monday, March 23, Santiago
Herrera, 24, of Perth Amboy was
arrested and charged with possession of cocaine and possession of
paraphernalia following a motor
vehicle stop. Herrera was processed
and released pending an appearance in Superior Court.
Monday, March 23, Joseph Madden, Jr., 24, of Garwood was arrested and charged with possession
of heroin, possession of a hypodermic syringe and possession of paraphernalia following a motor vehicle
stop. He was processed and released
pending an appearance in Superior
Court.
Tuesday, March 24, Kenny
Harrigan, 18, of Jersey City was
arrested and charged with hindering apprehension after he allegedly
provided police with multiple false
identities in an attempt to conceal
the existence of an outstanding arrest warrant from Jersey City. He
was charged, processed and released
after posting bail on the Jersey City
warrant.
CRANFORD — Cranford’s Historic
Murals Restoration Project achieved
national recognition at a ceremony on
March 14, hosted by the Crane’s Ford
Daughters of the American Revolution
(DAR) at the Cranford Municipal Building. The local chapter had submitted
the mural project for the award sponsored by the National DAR in Washington, D.C.
It was presented by Cranford DAR to
those who were instrumental in the
painting restoration of four historic murals now prominently displayed on the
walls of the municipal building meeting room. Each mural is 78 inches wide
by 50 inches high and provides a visual
history of Cranford in vivid colors.
The award is specifically for volunteer efforts. The requirements read,
“The Historic Preservation Recognition Award is designed to recognize
worthy local individuals and groups
for outstanding achievements in all areas of historic preservation. The recipients are expected to have contributed to
their community in an outstanding volunteer manner.”
The award presented to the Township by Cranford DAR was a framed
certificate including the history of the
murals and their restoration. Union
County Freeholder Bette Jane Kowalski
presented a county resolution commending the award recipients.
The lengthy credentials required for
the award application were prepared by
Cranford DAR American History Chairwoman Barbara Krause. In presenting
the award, Mrs. Krause indicated, “The
people we honor today worked
collaboratively for four years with little
public recognition. This is our way of
showing appreciation for the successful
restoration of these four murals which
illuminate this room with rich colors
depicting our town’s history for generations to come.”
The five recipients include: former
Cranford Mayor Robert Puhak; former
Cranford High School history teacher
and township historian Larry Fuhro
(posthumously), whose award was accepted by his wife, Laura Fuhro;
Cranford artistic consultant for the restoration, Deb Leber; Cranford Public
SHERIFF’S SALE
SHERIFF’S FILE NO.: CH-15001079
SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY
CHANCERY DIVISION
UNION COUNTY
DOCKET NO. F-013956-14
Plaintiff: PENNYMAC LOAN SERVICES, LLC
VS.
Defendant: JOSEPH MIRABILE, JULIE A.
MIRABILE
Sale Date: 04/15/2015
Writ of Execution: 01/22/2015
By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution
to me directed I shall expose for sale by public
vendue, at the UNION COUNTY ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, 1ST FLOOR, 10 ELIZABETHTOWN PLAZA, Elizabeth, New Jersey on
WEDNESDAY, at two o’clock in the afternoon of
said day. All successful bidders must have 20%
of their bid available in cash or certified check at
the conclusion of the sales.
The judgment amount is: ***Three Hundred
Forty-Five Thousand Three Hundred Fifty-Four
and 04/100*** $345,354.04.
MUNICIPALITY: Scotch Plains
COUNTY: UNION, STATE OF NEW JERSEY
STREET & STREET NO: 2072 Grand Street
TAX BLOCK AND LOT: BLOCK: 2703, LOT: 7
DIMENSIONS OF LOT: 125.00 feet x 50.00
feet
NEAREST CROSS STREET: Northeasterly
line of Cook Avenue
SUPERIOR INTERESTS (if any):
Scotch Plains Twp holds a claim for taxes due
and/or other municipal utilities such as water
and/or sewer in the amount of $2123.46 as of 02/
01/2015.
Total Upset: ***Three Hundred Sixty Thousand Seven Hundred Seventy-One and 75/100***
$360,771.75 together with lawful interest and
costs.
Surplus Money: If after the sale and satisfaction of the mortgage debt, including costs and
expenses, there remains any surplus money, the
money will be deposited into the Superior Court
Trust Fund and any person claiming the surplus,
or any part thereof, may file a motion pursuant to
Court Rules 4:64-3 and 4:57-2 stating the nature
and extent of that person’s claim and asking for
an order directing payment of the surplus money.
The Sheriff or other person conducting the sale
will have information regarding the surplus, if
any.
There is a full legal description on file in the
Union County Sheriff’s Office.
The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this
sale for any length of time without further advertisement.
Joseph Cryan
Sheriff
Attorney:
POWERS KIRN - COUNSELORS
728 MARINE HIGHWAY
PO BOX 848 - SUITE 200
MOORESTOWN, NEW JERSEY 08057
(856) 802-1000
4 T - 03/19, 03/26, 04/02
& 04/09/15
Fee: $167.28
School District Board of Education, represented by BOE president Mary
Venditti; Township of Cranford, represented by Mayor Andis Kalnins.
The four murals were originally
painted during the Depression-era Works
Progress Administration of the 1930s
by Cranford artist Everett S. Ward and
completed in 1942. They tell the story of
Cranford through four scenes of town
history: The original Lenape Indian tribe;
first European settlers; Revolutionary
War; railroad and Victorian era.
Originally hung in Cranford High
School library, they were removed during school renovation in the 1960s and
stored away, not rediscovered as a set
until 2008, when Larry Fuhro and Bob
Puhak began the process of public awareness, realizing their unique historic value.
The board of education shared that value,
secured grant funding and provided work
space at the high school where staff and
students could observe the two-year restoration effort. Ms. Leber retained restoration specialist Angelito David to perform the extensive artistic work required
to repair years of dust and damage to the
canvases. Mr. Fuhro lent his vast knowledge of Cranford history to the research
required.
Crane’s Ford DAR Regent Mary
Leonard welcomed more than 60 guests
attending the ceremony including the
Cranford family of the original mural
artist Everett Ward. The entire township
committee: Mayor Kalnins; Deputy
Mayor Lisa Adubato; Commissioners
Tom Hannen, Jr., Mary O’Connor and
Robert D’Ambola attended with Township Administrator Terence Wall and
Police Chief James Wozniak.
Also attending were members of the
Cranford Historical Society and President Margaret Gerlach; Cranford Preservation Advisory Board; Union County
Historical Society and New Jersey State
DAR representative Kitty Bowers. A
guest reception was hosted by the
Cranford DAR.
SHERIFF’S SALE
SHERIFF’S FILE NO.: CH-15001388
SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY
CHANCERY DIVISION
UNION COUNTY
DOCKET NO. F-026096-14
Plaintiff: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.
VS.
Defendant: ANDREW S. BENO
Sale Date: 04/29/2015
Writ of Execution: 01/05/2015
By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution
to me directed I shall expose for sale by public
vendue, at the UNION COUNTY ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, 1ST FLOOR, 10 ELIZABETHTOWN PLAZA, Elizabeth, New Jersey on
WEDNESDAY, at two o’clock in the afternoon of
said day. All successful bidders must have 20%
of their bid available in cash or certified check at
the conclusion of the sales.
The judgment amount is: ***Three Hundred
Seven Thousand Two Hundred Ninety-two and
64/100*** $307,292.64.
PROPERTY TO BE SOLD IS LOCATED IN:
Township of Scotch Plains, County of Union,
State of New Jersey.
PREMISES COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 13
Kevin Road, Scotch Plains, New Jersey 07076
TAX LOT # 21, BLOCK # 15303
NEAREST CROSS STREET: Cushing Road
APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 000.990 AC
**Subject to tax sale certificate #: 13-0113
The sale is subject to any unpaid taxes and
assessments, tax, water, and sewer liens and
other municipal assessments. The amount due
can be obtained from the local taxing authority.
All interested parties are to conduct and rely
upon their own independent investigation to ascertain whether or not any outstanding interests
remain of record and/or have priority over the lien
being foreclosed and, if so, the current amount
due thereon. **If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall only be
entitled to a return of the deposit paid. The
Purchaser shall have no further recourse against
the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney.**
Total Upset: ***Three Hundred Seventeen
Thousand Five Hundred Fifty-Six and 09/100***
$317,556.09 together with lawful interest and
costs.
Surplus Money: If after the sale and satisfaction of the mortgage debt, including costs and
expenses, there remains any surplus money, the
money will be deposited into the Superior Court
Trust Fund and any person claiming the surplus,
or any part thereof, may file a motion pursuant to
Court Rules 4:64-3 and 4:57-2 stating the nature
and extent of that person’s claim and asking for
an order directing payment of the surplus money.
The Sheriff or other person conducting the sale
will have information regarding the surplus, if
any.
There is a full legal description on file in the
Union County Sheriff’s Office.
The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this
sale for any length of time without further advertisement.
Joseph Cryan
Sheriff
Attorney:
MILSTEAD & ASSOCIATES, LLC
1 EAST STOW ROAD
MARLETON, NEW JERSEY 08053
(856) 482-1400
4 T - 04/02, 04/09, 04/16
& 04/23/14
Fee: $187.68
RESTORATION RECOGNITION...Recipients of the Historic Murals Restoration Award are recognized for their efforts at a ceremony March 14 at the
Cranford Municipal Building. Pictured, from left to right, are: Barbara Krause
and Regent Mary Leonard, Crane’s Ford Daughters of the American Revolution,
with artist Deb Leber; former mayor Robert Puhak; Board of Education
President Mary Venditti; Mayor Andis Kalnins and Laura Fuhro.
Hist. Trust Announces New
Funding Round for Grants
TRENTON – New Jersey Department
of Community Affairs (DCA) Commissioner Richard E. Constable, III has announced that New Jersey Historic Trust,
an affiliate of the DCA, is now accepting
applications for the Corporate Business
Tax (CBT) Historic Preservation Fund.
Applications must be submitted by Saturday, June 25. Governor Chris Christie’s
proposed fiscal year 2016 budget allocates $1.4 million in historic preservation grant funds from the CBT revenue to
be administered by the DCA. The amount
of available funding is pending resolution of the fiscal year 2016 budget.
This year’s grant round is for capital
preservation grants. The maximum grant
request is $150,000 and requires a match
of $2 for every $3 in award money. Capital
preservation grants may be used for construction expenses related to the preservation, restoration, repair, and rehabilitation
of historic property and professional fees
SHERIFF’S SALE
SHERIFF’S FILE NO.: CH-15001060
SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY
CHANCERY DIVISION
UNION COUNTY
DOCKET NO. F-03908-13
Plaintiff: WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION,
AS
TRUSTEE
FOR
C1TIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2004-OPT1, ASSET BACKED PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-OM
VS.
Defendant: BARBARA J. MURPHY; SEAN
MURPHY A/K/A SEAN T. MURPHY; LEWIS
WETSTEIN, MD; WANDA I MURPHY; SUN
NATIONAL BANK; ASSET ACCEPTANCE LLC,
MERCHANTS COMMERCIAL CREDIT ASSIGNEE OF PRO VIDIAN BANK ASIA; DISCOVER BANK; FORD MOTOR CREDIT CO.;
UNDERWOOD MEMORIAL HOSPITAL; STATE
OF NEW JERSEY
Sale Date: 04/15/2015
Writ of Execution: 01/30/2015
By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution
to me directed I shall expose for sale by public
vendue, at the UNION COUNTY ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, 1ST FLOOR, 10 ELIZABETHTOWN PLAZA, Elizabeth, New Jersey on
WEDNESDAY, at two o’clock in the afternoon of
said day. All successful bidders must have 20%
of their bid available in cash or certified check at
the conclusion of the sales.
The judgment amount is: ***Five Hundred
Fifty-Two Thousand One Hundred Forty-Six and
10/100*** $552,146.10.
PROPERTY TO BE SOLD IS LOCATED IN:
Scotch Plains, County of UNION, State of New
Jersey.
PREMISES COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 6
Gaycroft Drive, Scotch Plains, New Jersey 07076,
Union TAX LOT #: 6, BLOCK #: 11902
APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: Single Family Residence Lot Size: 1.03 acres
NEAREST CROSS STREET: Feinmore Drive
SUBJECT TO ANY OPEN TAXES, WATER/
SEWER, MUNICIPAL OR TAX LIENS THAT
MAY BE DUE.
PRIOR MORTGAGES AND/OR JUDGMENTS: N/A
Total Upset: ***Five Hundred Sixty-Seven
Thousand Three Hundred Sixty-Eight and 20/
100*** $567,368.20 together with lawful interest
and costs.
Surplus Money: If after the sale and satisfaction of the mortgage debt, including costs and
expenses, there remains any surplus money, the
money will be deposited into the Superior Court
Trust Fund and any person claiming the surplus,
or any part thereof, may file a motion pursuant to
Court Rules 4:64-3 and 4:57-2 stating the nature
and extent of that person’s claim and asking for
an order directing payment of the surplus money.
The Sheriff or other person conducting the sale
will have information regarding the surplus, if
any.
There is a full legal description on file in the
Union County Sheriff’s Office.
The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this
sale for any length of time without further advertisement.
Joseph Cryan
Sheriff
Attorney:
UDREN LAW OFFICES, P.C.
111 WOODCREST ROAD
WOODCREST CORPORATE CENTER
SUITE 200
CHERRY HILL, NEW JERSEY 08003
(856) 669-5400
4 T - 03/19, 03/26, 04/02
& 04/09/15
Fee: $197.88
necessary to prepare and complete the construction project. All proposed projects
should be supported by previous investigations, such as preservation plans or assessments. Eligible applicants must be nonprofit organizations or units of county or
municipal government. Eligible properties
must be listed on the New Jersey Register of
Historic Places by December 31, 2015.
The Historic Trust requests that Letters of Intent to Apply be submitted by all
potential applicants by Tuesday, April 14.
Potential applicants will be asked to provide information about their organization,
property ownership, historic registration
and anticipated grant request. Applications and guidelines are available on the
Trust’s website. To request an application
by mail, call (609) 984-0473 or e-mail:
[email protected]
SHERIFF’S SALE
SHERIFF’S FILE NO.: CH-15001188
SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY
CHANCERY DIVISION
UNION COUNTY
DOCKET NO. F-015075-14
Plaintiff:HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR NOMURA ASSET ACCEPTANCE CORPORATION, MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-APi
VS.
Defendant: YOUNG-KI SHIM; TBF FINANCIAL LLC; MARK A MUSCATELLO ESTATE OF
Sale Date: 04/22/2015
Writ of Execution: 02/20/2014
By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution
to me directed I shall expose for sale by public
vendue, at the UNION COUNTY ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, 1ST FLOOR, 10 ELIZABETHTOWN PLAZA, Elizabeth, New Jersey on
WEDNESDAY, at two o’clock in the afternoon of
said day. All successful bidders must have 20%
of their bid available in cash or certified check at
the conclusion of the sales.
The judgment amount is: ***Six Hundred
Eleven Thousand Seven Hundred TwentyFour and 80/100*** $611,724.80.
Property to be sold is located in the BOROUGH of MOUNTAINSIDE, County of UNION,
State of New Jersey.
Premises commonly known as: 236
PEMBROOK ROAD, MOUNTAINSIDE, NEW
JERSEY 07092-1721
BEING KNOWN as LOT 1E, BLOCK 3A on
the official Tax Map of the BOROUGH of
MOUNTAINSIDE.
Dimensions: 161.38 Feet x 100.00 Feet X
167.16 Feet X 89.09 Feet
Nearest Cross Street: Force Drive
Total Upset: ***Six Hundred Thirty-Five Thousand Three Hundred Ninety-Four and 84/100***
$635,394.84 together with lawful interest and
costs.
Subject to any unpaid taxes, municipal liens or
other charges, and any such taxes, charges,
liens, insurance premiums or other advances
made by plaintiff prior to this sale. All interested
parties are to conduct and rely upon their own
independent investigation to ascertain whether
or not any outstanding interest remain of record
and/or have priority over the lien being foreclosed and, if so the current amount due thereon.
If the sale is set aside for any reason, the
Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only a
return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall
have no further recourse against the Mortgagor,
the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney.
Surplus Money: If after the sale and satisfaction of the mortgage debt, including costs and
expenses, there remains any surplus money, the
money will be deposited into the Superior Court
Trust Fund and any person claiming the surplus,
or any part thereof, may file a motion pursuant to
Court Rules 4:64-3 and 4:57-2 stating the nature
and extent of that person’s claim and asking for
an order directing payment of the surplus money.
The Sheriff or other person conducting the sale
will have information regarding the surplus, if
any.
There is a full legal description on file in the
Union County Sheriff’s Office.
The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this
sale for any length of time without further advertisement.
Joseph Cryan
Sheriff
Attorney:
PHELAN HALLINAN & DIAMOND, PC
400 FELLOWSHIP ROAD
SUITE 100
MOUNT LAUREL, NEW JERSEY 08054
(856) 813-5500
4 T - 03/26, 04/02, 04/09
& 04/16/15
Fee: $208.08
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The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Cougars Stop Raider Lax Boys
In Cole’s Cup – Story Next Week
THE WEEK
IN
Thursday, April 2, 2015
SPORTS
Page 11
Sports Section
Pages 11-17
LIDDY NETS 2 GOALS, 4 ASSISTS; GRETSKY SCORES 2
No. 3 Oak Knoll Royals Rock
Blue Devil Lady Laxers, 15-7
Prepared By DAVID B. CORBIN
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
No. 3 ranked Oak Knoll rolled into
Westfield on March 25 and scored the
first eight goals of the game en route
to a 15-7 rocking of the Westfield
High School girls lacrosse team in a
home opening battle of two top-20
teams. The 1-0 Royals exploited
weaknesses in the No. 16 Blue Devils’ defense and never relented. On
March 28, however, the visiting Lady
Blue Devils regrouped and nipped
Morristown, 11-10, in overtime.
Ali Baiocco scored six of the Oak
Knoll Royals’ goals, three in the first
half and three in the second, while
Nicole Baiocco slipped in two goals
an added a pair of assists. Cassie Ford
flicked in a pair of goals and added an
assist. Annabelle Zebrowski and
Morgan Ryan each netted two goals
and Allison Saylia put in one goal.
Sophomore midfielder Hannah
Liddy proved to be the most productive Blue Devil with two goals and
four assists. Midfielder Julia Gretsky
scored twice. Defender Julia Frontero,
attacker Sophie Bass and center
midfielder Parker Yarusi each scored
one goal.
The Royals won the vast majority
CONTINUED ON PAGE 14
More photos at
Ballyhoo Sports
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
HARD MAN TO DEFEND AGAINST...Blue Devil co-captain Pat Aslanian, No. 9, made it very difficult for any Crusader
defender in the lacrosse game in Clark. Aslanian scored three goals and had two assists in the 20-3 triumph.
PRYBYLSKI NETS 4 GOALS; ASLANIAN 3 GOALS, 2 ASST.
No. 9 Blue Devil Boys Thrash
ALJ Crusader Laxmen, 20-3
By DAVID B. CORBIN
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
More photos at
Ballyhoo Sports
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
CHECKING A ROYAL...Blue Devil Julia Gretsky, No. 25, checks Royal Kelsea Krauss, No. 15, at Kehler Stadium in
Westfield on March 25. The No. 3 Oak Knoll Royals defeated the No. 16 Blue Devils, 15-7.
Elegant Homes
Three days after mangling West
Morris Mendham, 15-3, in the season
opener, the No. 9 ranked Westfield
High School boys lacrosse team took
the A.L. Johnson Crusaders to the
woodshed in a 20-3 thrashing in Clark
on March 28. The 2-0 Blue Devils
built a 16-1 lead by halftime, which
set up an automatic “Mercy Rule”
running clock for the second half.
Senior co-captains, attacker Luke
Prybylski and midfielder Pat Aslanian
had four goals and an assist, and three
goals and two assists, respectively,
while attacker Kyle Rittendale and
freshman midfielder Jake Warnow
each netted three goals and an assist.
Midfielder James Brucia fired in three
goals, attacker James Bohlinger put
in one goal but assisted on five and
midfielder Brandon Leuthold scored
two goals and added an assist.
Midfielder Blake Taylor scored once.
Last year, the Blue Devils captured the Group 4 title with a 10-6
triumph over Southern Regional at
Somerville High School so much is
expected from them this season even
with a schedule loaded with top-20
ranked teams.
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CONTINUED ON PAGE 16
Page 12
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, April 2, 2015
REMLEY, LEONARD, CHRISTIANO LED IN SCORING
Devil’s Den
First He Cut Calories,
Then He Cut Times
Injuries Derailed Cranford Boys
In Disappointing Hoops Season
By ALEX LOWE
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
There was not a whole lot to cheer
about for the Cranford High School
boys’ basketball team this season.
Things started off poorly and got
worse from there. Decimated by a
rash of early injuries, the Cougars
were unable to find a flow and
struggled to a 6-17 finish.
“Injuries played a major role in our
season,” said Cranford Head Coach
Ryan Huber. “We lost Eric Donahue
for the season after one game. Steve
Wills missed significant time with a
high ankle sprain and Jack Schetelich
got mono.”
Cranford’s games followed a familiar pattern all season. The Cougars would play well for long stretches
of games only to be undone by a
scoring drought or a sloppy sequence
at some key point. The injuries and a
lack of size were usually factors in
most of their defeats.
But there were also glimpses of
what might have been. Against Mount
Olive (15-7), Cranford led most of
the way before melting down in the
game’s final minutes in a 75-70 loss.
The Cougars also had a 65-50-blowout victory over Hillside in the opening round of the Union County Tournament.
“Our best win of the season was the
65-50 victory against Hillside in the
first round of the county tournament,”
said Huber.
The Cougars lose eight seniors from
this year’s team. Dante Anderson, Luke
Christiano, Eric Donahue, Albert
Gargiulo, James Kellet, Liam McKay,
Kevin Trotter and Steven Wills all
depart. Luke Christiano was the only
returning starter heading into the season making the break in continuity all
the more difficult to overcome.
Christiano had 35 FGs (8.7 ppg)
this season and made 13 three point
attempts. Kellet averaged 4.1 points
per game. Trotter averaged 4.3 points
per contest. In a truncated season,
Wills managed 8.1 points per game.
“None of them are going on to play
basketball in college,” said Huber.
“But, Luke signed a scholarship to
play football at Lehigh, Eric is deciding on either baseball or football in
college, and I believe Albert may be
playing baseball next year.”
One benefit of having to shuffle the
lineup as much as he did this season
is that Huber had to reach deep down
into his bench and got to see many
different combinations of players.
Many of those players performed well
under fire and figure to be that much
better for it next year.
The Cougars will return nine letter
winners next season, including Ryan
Bakie, David Fonseca, Will Fries,
Sean Leonard, Joe Norton, Chris
Remley, Hunter Remley, Jack
Schetelich and Michael Smith.
Hunter Remley averaged 11.8
points per game and buried 38 threepoint shots. Leonard scored 193 points
for the season, while playing in 20
games for a healthy 9.7 average. Joe
Norton averaged 4.7 points per game.
Fries a 6’6” 280 pound junior should
return next season to give the Cougars some much needed size and
strength in the interior. Fries is recognized as one of the state’s top football
offensive linemen. Fonseca averaged
4.8 points per game.
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© 2015 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.
An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
By BRUCE JOHNSON
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
When Jeff Knight first met with his
2011-12 swim team, he saw a loaded
senior class, a small but solid junior
class, a loaded sophomore class and a
freshman group that included two
outstanding swimmers (Stephen
Husch and John Lindros) and another
(Jack Rose) with good potential. He
wasn’t expecting much from the rest
of the Class of 2015.
That was especially true of Kevin
Clauss. He was a nice kid, but just
another overweight freshman, a
backstroker who was trying to find a
place on the team, and mostly hoping
to not get cut.
Three and a half years later, after
recently finishing an outstanding senior season at WHS and qualifying
for YMCA Nationals in seven events,
you could make a strong case that
Clauss was WHS’s most improved,
most spirited and even most valuable
swimmer. He’s certainly the guy
Knight would recommend for a before-and-after video about high
school swimming.
“Before I joined the high school
team, I had thought about quitting
swimming,” Clauss said. “It didn’t
seem fun or exciting, and it didn’t get
the respect like other sports get. But
my freshman year my whole perspective changed. I learned to love
swimming and the team mentality,
where you’re not just doing it for
yourself but for your teammates.”
Knight and WestfieldY coach Brian
Guidera both deserve credit for
Clauss’ development. It was Knight
who got Clauss off his daily 2,000calorie liquid lunches.
“I was a big boy,” Clauss said,
“maybe 5-(foot-)6, 190 pounds by
my sophomore year. So, yeah, you
could say I was overweight. Jeff put
me on a diet because I would average
maybe three cokes, two Snapples and
two Gatorades a day. As my weight
went down, my times improved. But
the end of the year I was down to 160;
I’d lost 30 pounds over the course of
the season.”
The rest, as they say, is history.
This week Clauss joins eight teammates at Y Nationals in Greensboro,
N. C. He’s swimming the 100 and
200 back, the 100 and 200 breast, the
200 IM, and two relays.
“It’s absolutely amazing to think
where Kevin was as a freshman and
where he is now,” Knight said. “He
was overweight and unable to crack a
minute back then. Now he’s one of
the top swimmers in school history.
It’s pretty cool what he’s done.”
Clauss worked his way to the No. 6
spot on the Boys Swimming Top-15
List in the 100 backstroke with a
53.96. He also swam the backstroke
leg on a school record 200 medley
relay (1:36.65, with Husch, Lindros
and junior Ryan Daniel). But it doesn’t
end there. Clauss became an outstanding IMer, eventually clocking a
1:58.28, No. 5 all-time.
That would be a great story if it
ended there, but there’s more. Clauss
swam the 500 free for strategic purposes and clocked in at 4:49.84, No.
7 all-time. He swam the third leg on a
3:14.01 400 relay at the state finals,
No. 2 all-time. And then at the state
YMCA championships, in addition
to improving on his times in the backstroke (52.33) and IM (1:57.06) from
high school, he gave the 100 breaststroke a shot, and was timed in 58.91.
WHS has only had seven sub-minute
breaststrokers in its history, and
Clauss’s time would’ve been No. 4.
“When I learned that we could win
a state championship based on depth,
I decided that I wanted to be one of
the guys counted on to bring that
crucial fourth or fifth place,” Clauss
said. “If we were going to win again,
I had to be ready for when my name
was called. I was no stud, and I’m still
no stud, but I make sure I do my job.”
Led by senior captains Alex Bond,
Brennan Haley and Matt Trinkle,
WHS won the 2012 state Public A
championship with an 86-84 victory
over Bridgewater-Raritan. They repeated as champs in 2013 and 2014
before losing to Cherry Hill East 8684 in this year’s final. That loss was
an especially tough one for Clauss, as
a senior co-captain.
“I’m doing better now, but for a
solid week I kept thinking about that
400 free relay and what we could’ve
done better or what we screwed up,”
Clauss said. “There is no such thing
as a perfect race. There are always
things to improve on. But as a team
with such a rich history we expect
perfection. Now I realize that we
swam the second fastest 400 free relay in school history. And we have to
give Cherry Hill East some credit,
because they had close to a perfect
meet from their swimmers. I still think
we are the faster team, I mean we
were the fastest public school in state
history (in power points). But when
all is said and done we aren’t the state
Kevin Clauss
champions.”
Clauss will most likely be swimming collegiately at Montclair State,
where Guidera feels he will continue
to improve.
“I think when Kevin goes to college and can focus on just a few
events he will have a tremendous
growth,” Guidera said. “He is a really
talented breaststroker but has been
swimming out of place for the betterment of both (WHS, WY) teams.”
While it’s always nice to be handed
an age-group superstar, there are few
better feelings for any coach than to
see an unheralded freshman develop
into a … well, a Kevin Clauss.
“He’s a self-made athlete,” Knight
said. “His success is directly related
to his work ethic, and his mental
approach. He was all-in and a leader
both in and out of the pool. And there
was no ego involved. He would do
whatever it took for the team’s suc-
WF’s DeMartino Stars
For Gettysburg Nine
GETTYSBURG, Pa. – Freshman
Brad DeMartino of Westfield tossed
seven shutout innings, while senior
Scott Zanghellini (Randolph, N.J.)
went 3-for-4 with a key two-run
single in the fifth, leading the
Gettysburg College baseball team
to a 4-0 victory in its home opener
on March 24 in non-conference action at Kirchhoff Field.
DeMartino (2-1) scattered eight
hits and one walk while striking out
four. He did not have a three-up,
three-down inning but allowed only
three base runners into scoring position. Freshman Andrew Jacobson
(Wilton, Conn.) and junior Luke
Lawrence (West Chester, Pa.) would
nail down the win with one scoreless inning in relief each.
M
D
cess. That was the best part of him.
He was all about winning for the
team, not for individual glory.”
A LITTLE Y NATS HISTORY
The YMCA National Swimming
and Diving Championships have been
held annually since 1923, except for
some years during World War II. They
were held at local Y’s in, among other
places, San Francisco, Brooklyn,
Toronto, Battle Creek, Little Rock
and in 1965, at the two-year-old
Wallace Pool in Westfield.
This year’s meet, which started
Monday and runs through tomorrow,
is being held in Greensboro, N.C.
Swimming for coach Brian Guidera
this week are Kevin Clauss, Stephan
Warren, Stefan Crigler, Ryan Daniel,
Aedan Collins, Caroline Basil, Amy
West, Gwyn Devin and Kimberly
Jimenez.
Westfield made its first appearance
at Y Nationals in 1930, a year after the
local Y was built and around the time
Olympian
Johnny
(Tarzan)
Weismuller attended the opening ceremonies for the brand new Rooke
Pool. Art Rule and George Coale
brought back national championships
from that meet in Wilmington, Del.,
as WY finished second to Toronto.
Future Westfield mayor Burr Towl
was on that team, as were Burton
Kellogg and Don Warner.
But that would be the last Westfield
entry until 1964, when diver Steve
McCoy and swimmer Gregg
Smolenski qualified for the meet in
Youngstown, Ohio.
The Westfield YMCA’s national
champions:
1930: Art Rule (50 free), George
Coale (200, 400 free); 1964: Steve
McCoy (1-meter); 1965: Steve
McCoy (3-meter), Dave Perkowski
(100, 200 breast), Peter Heesch (50
free, 400 medley relay (Ketcham,
Perkowski, Gerber, Heesch), 400 free
relay (McCoy, Perkowski, Ketcham,
Heesch); 1966: Doug McOwen (50
free), John Ketcham (100 back), 400
medley relay (Ketcham, Greene,
Gerber, McOwen), 400 free relay
(Cairns, McCoy, McOwen, Gerber),
800 free relay (Demarest, Cairns,
McCoy, Haertlein);
1967: Jay Hoffacker (100 back),
Bruce McLay (3-meter); 1968: Jay
Hoffacker (100 back); 1969: Jay
Hoffacker (100 back), Gordon Clark
(50 free), 400 free relay (Clark,
Hoffacker, Perkowski, Schmitt);
1970: Gordon Clark (50 free); 1975:
Steve Schramm (1-meter, 3-meter);
1976: Steve Schramm (1-meter, 3meter); 1988: Chris McFadden (500
free).
The WestfieldYWCA also had several national champions:
1979: Mary Beth Dervin (3-meter),
Kirsten Conover (1-meter), Erin Scott
(500 free); 1980: Erin Scott (200 fly,
500 free, 800 free), Kelly Scott (50,
100, 200 free), 400 free relay
(Frawley, Zimmer, Scott, Scott), 800
free relay (Frawley, Zimmer, Scott,
Scott).
(Note: there could be more champions, but that’s all I could find in The
Leader archives.)
IN PASSING
Jim Johnson, the father of former
WHS center fielder Brett Johnson
(’10), died on March 26 at age 57. A
lawyer in town, he was captain of his
high school (Hillsborough) and college (Muhlenberg) basketball teams.
John Renbourn, co-founder with
Bert Jansch of the British baroque
folk group Pentangle, died on March
26 at age 70.
Hot Rod Hundley, a two-time AllAmerican at West Virginia (his 54
points in 1957 is still the school
record) and later a longtime announcer
for the Utah Jazz, died on March 27 at
age 80.
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A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, April 2, 2015
Page 13
DiLOLLO NOTCHES GOAL, O’CONNOR MAKES 12 SAVES
No. Highland Girls Thump
Raiders, 15-1, in Lax Opener
showed resilience and never ducked
their heads even as the game was
getting away from them. That team
[Northern Highlands] is a very good
team. They are one of the Top-5 teams
in Bergen County.”
They certainly made that point
quickly as Julia Bradbury scored from
in front of the net less than 30 seconds
into the game to stake Northern Highlands to a 1-0 lead.
and could do little to mount a threat in
the first half. Were it not for six saves
Scotch Plains-Fanwood found out
from junior goalie Erin O’Connor,
the hard way that it has a lot of work
things could have gotten way out of
to do if it is going to compete with the
hand.
top girls lacrosse teams on its schedTo their credit though, the Raider
ule this season. The Raiders were
defense hung in there for much of the
overwhelmed, 15-1, in their season
rest of the half, keeping the score at 3opening loss to Northern Highlands
0 until the final two minutes. But then
on March 25 in Scotch Plains. Julia
the floodgates opened. Northern
Corriston scored four goals and had
Highlands exploded for three
goals, with two coming in the
last 30 seconds to take a commanding 6-0 lead into the break.
“Erin O’Connor kept us in
the game early,” said Coach
Rafferty. “She made a lot of
saves, especially in the first half.
Right at the end of the first half
we gave up a lot of goals in a
very short stretch of time. That
really turned it into a game
where we were in chase mode
the rest of the way.”
The second half looked bleak
also as the Highlanders notched
three goals in the first five minutes. The Raiders finally got on
the scoreboard with their sole
goal when junior Sabrina
DiLollo found the back of the
net with 16:34 remaining in the
game.
“I felt like defensively we
were able to do what we wanted
to do,” said Northern Highlands
Head Coach Mike Manzella.
“We pressured the ball and dicAlex Lowe for The Westfield Leader and The Times tated the tempo of the game.
LENDING A HELPING HAND...Raider Kelly McHorter, No. 2, sets up in front of We always want to be able to
goaltender Erin O’Connor in the game against Northern Highlands in Scotch Plains. force the opposition to go where
we want them to go and I think
A goal by Corriston at 16:50 made we did that pretty well today. To be
an assist to lead the visiting Highlanders. Teammates Julia Bradbury it 2-0. Then Lauren Donato swept able to hold a team to just one goal is
added four goals, while Lauren through the middle of the Raider de- an accomplishment in this game no
Donato scored three goals for North- fense less than two minutes later on matter how you look at it.”
her way to netting another goal. While
ern Highlands.
Last season, Northern Highlands
“Our girls battled,” said Raider the Highlander offense was prolific, finished with a 15-7 record and adCONTINUED ON PAGE 14
Head Coach Robert Rafferty. “They the Raiders’ offense was sputtering
By ALEX LOWE
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
SENIOR POWER...Five seniors will lead the Blue Devils softball team to a successful season this Spring. Pictured, left to
right, are: Kristen Toth, Sam Velez, Bobbi Snyder and Shelby Estevez. Missing from photo: Cera Montes.
VELEZ, SNYDER, ESTEVEZ, TOTH, MONTES TO LEAD
Blue Devils to Begin New Era
In Softball With Young Team
By DAVID B. CORBIN
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
Freshman power with speed that
stepped onto the softball field at
Westfield High School five years
(2010) ago demanded and received
the attention of its Union County
opponents, and by the time that group
graduated, the Blue Devils have
played in three Union County Tournament championship games, coming away with the title in 2013 and
2014, and finished with a 65-35 record
during that span. Now the time has
come for Blue Devil Head Coach
Caitlin MacDonald to virtually start
from scratch with a relatively inexperienced group of athletes.
“It’s really sad to see that group of
seniors go. They were once freshmen
too on the varsity team, so we do have
a fairly young team that we are starting from scratch with. They are going
to have different talents. They are
going to have different strengths and
different weaknesses and we are goCONTINUED ON PAGE 14
Congratulations
Agents of the Month!
WETHERALL, DOLAN ON MOUND; FERETTI CATCHER
Bormann Takes Over Young
Cranford Softball Squad
By ALEX LOWE
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
Heather Bormann hopes that aiming for smaller goals will help the
Cranford High School softball team
achieve bigger and better things. The
first year head coach takes over a
Cougar team that finished 6-13 last
year and which looks to replace four
starters lost to graduation. Among
those are Jessica Casale who will be
playing at Gettysburg.
“We spoke to the team and asked
them about their goals,” said
Bormann. “They want to win the
counties, of course. We need to take
care of smaller goals first and from
there, hopefully, the larger goals fall
into place. Right now, we are focusing on the fundamentals and on communicating better during games.
Those have to be the first steps. We
are a young team. It is a learning
process.”
Bormann comes to Cranford after
serving as an assistant varsity coach.
She played high school softball at
Brick Memorial and went on to play
later at York College. With two scrimmages under their belt already,
Bormann is beginning to get a feel for
her team’s personality, strengths and
potential weaknesses.
“One thing I’ve noticed is that we
are very versatile,” said Bormann.
“We have a lot of flexibility in that
our girls can play different positions
well. The defensive play has been
solid so far. We have to work on our
hitting and offense. Although, in a
recent
scrimmage
against
Woodbridge the top of the lineup
really hit the ball well.”
The Cougars will set up with junior
Morgan Feretti behind the plate.
Sophomore Jill Skalski will also see
time behind the plate. Both girls saw
time on the varsity last season and
each can shift over and play third
base when not starting at catcher.
Junior Julia Palozzola will handle
first base. Another junior, Candice
Durant, will back her up. Durant is
also in the mix at third base. Senior
Vienna Stivala is the second baseman
with junior Rebecca Scott in reserve.
Junior Jen Shore will patrol the shortstop position.
The outfield will feature very young
players. Taylor Reitzel and Alex
Tachowski, both freshmen, are vying
for starting spots, along with sophomore Tessa Ferentinos. Rebecca Scott
will also compete for time here.
A pair of seniors in Bonnie Caldwell
and Nicole Schemmenti will provide
experience and depth in utility roles.
Cranford seems well armed on the
pitching staff. The Cougars will have
senior southpaw Theresa Wetherall
and freshman right-hander Grenna
Dolan as their lead hurlers.
“Both Theresa and Grenna are hard
throwers,” said Bormann. “But the
great thing is that each girl has five
pitches so they can both keep hitters
from leaning back on the fastball.”
While much of the batting order is
to be determined, Bormann feels good
about the top of the lineup.
“Morgan Feretti, Jill Skalski,
Vienna Stivala and Jen Shore have
done a nice job of hitting for us sp
far,” said Bormann. “They are all
confident batters and I hope the rest
of the lineup feeds off of that.”
Bormann expects a few familiar
faces to once again top the list of
contenders once the season starts.
“Westfield always has a strong
team,” said Bormann. “Governor
Livingston also should be good and
Arthur Johnson is pretty good too.”
Cranford got the season under way
with an April 1 home game against
Arthur Johnson.
Experience,
Trust, Reliability & Service
John Papa
Sales Associate
Jayne Bernstein
Sales Associate
Frank D. Isoldi
Broker Sales Associate
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WESTFIELD
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WESTFIELD
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Large 4BR, 3 1/2BA Ranch on a beautiful 100 X
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Custom built 5BR, 4BA Col, gourmet kit w/granite & SS applncs, fin bsmnt w/full bth, kit & frplc,
MLS 3193807
garage w/loft, in-ground pool.
SCOTCH PLAINS
$777,000
Beautiful, One-of-a-kind Ranch style home on a
cul-de-sac. Spacious rooms,Large EIK w/center
island, Sunken LR opens to FDR. MLS 3204135
WESTFIELD
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Charming 4BR Colonial on quiet street w/beautiful architectural details, Handsome archways &
MLS 3204711
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WESTFIELD
$699,500
Beautifully maintained 4BR COL w/inviting front
porch, grand FLR w/fp flanked by built-in display
MLS 3198281
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WESTFIELD
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Beautiful lrg windows, spacious rooms, high ceilings, HWF & a fab 23'X17' addt'n. MLS 3175064
SCOTCH PLAINS
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Meticulously maintained 4BR, 3BA home on 1 ac
lot, quiet cul-de-sac loc, opn flr pln, spacious &
bright rms, FR w/HWF & WBFP. MLS 3193795
SCOTCH PLAINS
$435,000
Chrmng, well maint. 3BR, 2BA Col, Updtd Kit
w/new appl, FDR w/French doors to deck/patio,
Sun Rm off kit overlooks backyard. MLS 3196266
SCOTCH PLAINS
$409,000
Lovely 3BR, 2BA home w/bright & sunny rooms
features beautiful wood flrs, updated kitchen &
deck overlooking large backyard. MLS 3200493
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© 2015 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.
Page 14
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, April 2, 2015
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Lady Blue Devils to Begin New Era in Softball
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
ATTACKING THE GOAL...Blue Devil Sam Paoletti, No. 6, sprints towards the goal in the game against the Oak Knoll
Royals at Gary Kehler Stadium in Westfield on March 25.
No. 3 Oak Knoll Royals Rock Blue Devil Laxers
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11
of the draws and took no less than 31
shots on goals, while the Blue Devils
took 16 shots. Blue Devil goalkeeper
Mallory Weisse made 10 saves in the
first half and added six more in the
second half. Royal goalkeeper Jackie
McCall made nine saves.
Less than three minutes into the
game Nicole Baiocco penetrated the
middle and fired a shot past Weisse
then two minutes later Ali Baiocco
rippled the net. Ryan notched the
Royals’ third goal then midway
through the half Ali Baiocco netted
her second goal.
With 11:20 on the clock, Ali
Baiocco fired in her third goal. Four
minutes later Zebrowski sidearmed
in a goal to make the score 6-0. Ryan
nailed the seventh goal then, with 39
seconds remaining in the half,
Zebrowski upped the Royals’ lead to
8-0. Finally with two seconds on the
clock, Liddy fed Gretsky for her first
goal.
Within the first five minutes of the
second half, the score jumped to 101 when Saylia and Nicole Baiocco
punched in respective goals. Two
Probitas Verus Honos
minutes later, Ford slam dunked in a
goal from pointblank range.
The sweetest goal of the game came
with 12:41 remaining when Liddy
used her basketball fakes to lure two
Royal defenders towards her. Liddy
took a few steps toward the left sideline then as the two defenders charged
forward, she simply slipped between
them to set up a one-on-one situation
with goalkeeper McCall and shuffled
in the goal.
After Ali Baiocco scored her fourth
goal, Liddy set up Frontero to make
the score 12-3. Ali Baiocco and Ford
scored then Liddy set up Bass for a
score, which would be the first of
three straight Blue Devil goals.
Gretsky scored with 4:30 remaining
then Liddy scored with under two
minutes on the clock. Ali Baiocco
scored her sixth goal then Yarusi, on
an assist from Liddy, scored the final
goal.
Against the Morristown Colonials,
Liddy fired in six goals, which included two in the overtime period.
Gretsky scored two goals and added
an assist, while attacker Sam Paoletti
netted two goals and Lila Hutchins
scored one. Weisse recorded 22
saves, which included the 600th of
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
TOWNSHIP OF CRANFORD
CRANFORD, NEW JERSEY
her career.
Allie Ferrara scored five goals for
the Colonials and Annika Begley
scored twice. Goalkeeper Amelia
Drake made six saves.
Oak Knoll
Westfield
Westfield
Mo-town
6
6
8
1
3
3
7
6
2
1
15
7
11
10
ing to build it for their skills,” Coach
MacDonald said.
The outgoing group consisted of
four-year varsity starters Elena
Scarano, Cali Chambliss, Julia
Criscuolo, Chrissy Ferraro and Shannon Schaefer, along with Lizzie Fox
and Becca Kaufman, who broke into
the starting lineup last year. This season, the Blue Devils will look to five
seniors, Sam Velez, Bobbi Snyder,
Shelby Estevez, Kristen Toth and Cera
Montes to take the lead.
Velez, in her third year at varsity,
offers a lot across the board. Last
year, she exercised her versatility,
playing multiple positions, and
showed her moxie on the base paths.
Velez finished with a .338 batting
average (BA) and as a catcher, outfielder and third baseman, she recorded 10 assists and 41 putouts. This
season, Velez may be spotted mostly
behind home plate.
“Sam is returning and we are looking for her to do a lot of catching, but
she can play a little bit of anywhere,”
Coach MacDonald said.
Snyder, a two-year letter winner, had
a .340 BA with 17 hits, including two
doubles, nine RBI and 14 runs scored.
Defensively, Snyder will play first base.
Estevez is expected to occupy right
field, while Toth and Montes will be
moving in and out of the lineup.
“Bobbi, who was primarily a DP for
us last year and the year before, is
going to get a little bit of first base time
this year,” Coach MacDonald said.
Taking over the role on the mound
is junior Elena Elliott, who was in the
starting lineup playing all 25 games
last year mostly in the outfield but
also with some time on the mound
This year the Westfield High
School Ice Hockey team celebrated
its 20th anniversary (1995-2015).
Coach Joe Bertucci’s team was supposed to be in a “rebuilding” year
after losing eight seniors and playing six freshmen.
Call them “overachievers” but this
hard working, dedicated young team,
who believed in themselves, had a
great year. With a 16-6-1 record they
advanced to the NJ State Tournament quarterfinals before losing to
the eventual champion Randolph.
Also for the third straight year, they
made the finals of the Union County
championship falling to Summit.
The team was led by senior goalie
and co-captain Dan Do Campo, who
was voted All-Union County Regular Season MVP with seven shutouts and a fantastic .922 save percent. The defense was led by junior
Luke Hiltwein, who was voted AllUnion County Second Team defense and led the team with 27 points
and 17 assists. Also Dante Anastario
with 12 goals and freshman Kenny
Meyer with 14 assists made WHS
defense one of the best in Union
County.
The offense featured senior cocaptain Andrew Marino who was
voted All-Union County Honorable
Mention with 19 points. Also senior
forward Matt Friedman and freshman Matt Rittendale both had a team
high 13 goals each.
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING ARTICLE VIII, SECTION 219-67OF CHAPTER 219 “REVISED ORDINANCES OF THE TOWNSHIP OF CRANFORD,
NEW JERSEY (1988),” BY AMENDING SCHEDULE XVII AND INCLUDING
CERTAIN PORTIONS OF ROADWAYS AS INDICATED IN SECTION 1
BELOW AND DESIGNATING SAME AS “TIME LIMIT PARKING”
BE IT ORDAINED by the Township Committee of the Township of Cranford, New
Jersey as follows:
Section 1. That schedule XVII of Section 219-67 Article VIII, Chapter 219, “Revised
Ordinances of the Township of Cranford, New Jersey (1988),” be and the same is hereby
amended by adding certain portions of roadways as indicated below, and designating
same as “Time Limit Parking.”
Schedule XVII
Side
Hours/Days
Location
North Avenue East
North
1.5 hrs.; 9:00 am to 6:00 pm/
Every day except Sundays
and Holidays
From a point 120 feet
west of Alden St to
North Union Ave
North Avenue West
North
1.5 hrs.; 9:00 am to 6:00 pm/
Every day except Sundays
and Holidays
From North Union
Ave to a point
48 feet east of
Eastman St
North Avenue West
North
1.5 hrs.; 9:00 am to 6:00 pm/
Every day except Sundays
and Holidays
From a point 40 feet
west of Miln St to a
point 60 feet west
thereof
Section 2. All other ordinances or portions thereof in conflict or inconsistent herewith
are hereby repealed.
Section 3. This ordinance will take effect upon publication after final passage as
required by law.
NOTICE OF PENDING ORDINANCE
The foregoing ordinance was introduced and approved on first reading at a meeting of
the Township Committee of the Township of Cranford, New Jersey on March 24, 2015,
and will be further considered for final passage after public hearing to be held at the
Municipal Building, 8 Springfield Avenue, Cranford, New Jersey on April 21, 2015 at
8:00PM or as soon thereafter as this matter can be reached. All persons interested will
be given the opportunity to be heard concerning such ordinance.
Tara Rowley
Municipal Clerk
1 T - 4/2/15, The Leader
Fee: $75.48
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
TOWNSHIP OF CRANFORD
CRANFORD, NEW JERSEY
ORDINANCE NO. 2015-10
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING ARTICLE V, SECTION 219-73 OF CHAPTER
219 “REVISED ORDINANCES OF THE TOWNSHIP OF CRANFORD, NEW
JERSEY (1988),” BY AMENDING SCHEDULE XXIII AND INCLUDING
CERTAIN PORTIONS OF ROADWAYS AS INDICATED IN SECTION 1
BELOW AND DESIGNATING SAME AS “PARKING METER ZONES.”
BE IT ORDAINED by the Township Committee of the Township of Cranford, New
Jersey as follows:
Section 1. That schedule XXIII of Section 219-73 Article V, Chapter 219, “Revised
Ordinances of the Township of Cranford, New Jersey (1988),” be and the same is hereby
amended by adding certain portions of roadways as indicated below, and designating
same as “Parking Meter Zones.”
Schedule XVII
Name of street
Side
Hours/Days
Location
North Avenue East
North
1.5 hrs.; 9:00 am to 6:00 pm/
Every day except Sundays
and Holidays
From a point 120 feet
west of Alden St to
North Union Ave
North Avenue West
North
1.5 hrs.; 9:00 am to 6:00 pm/
Every day except Sundays
and Holidays
From North Union
Ave to a point 48 feet
east of Eastman St
North Avenue West
North
1.5 hrs.; 9:00 am to 6:00 pm/
Every day except Sundays
and Holidays
From a point 40 feet
west of Miln St to a
point 60 feet west
thereof
Section 2. All other ordinances or portions thereof in conflict or inconsistent herewith
are hereby repealed.
Section 3. This ordinance will take effect upon publication after final passage as
required by law.
NOTICE OF PENDING ORDINANCE
The foregoing ordinance was introduced and approved on first reading at a meeting of
the Township Committee of the Township of Cranford, New Jersey on March 24, 2015,
and will be further considered for final passage after public hearing to be held at the
Municipal Building, 8 Springfield Avenue, Cranford, New Jersey on April 21, 2015 at
8:00PM or as soon thereafter as this matter can be reached. All persons interested will
be given the opportunity to be heard concerning such ordinance.
Tara Rowley
Municipal Clerk
1 T - 4/2/15, The Leader
Fee: $75.48
sity, some girls may be pulled up
from the JV squad in the near future.
“We do have two freshmen, who
we are looking to be players for us.
One is going to be our second
baseman, Devyn Tibbals, and the
other one is going to be our
centerfielder, Jordan Sacher. Our
sophomores are pretty young and our
juniors are pretty young because they
are not returning varsity. We are looking for all of them, even though they
are first year varsity, to make a mark,”
Coach MacDonald said. “We are looking forward to the challenge and we
are going to be a good team.”
The Blue Devils opened their season at Elizabeth on April 1 then they
will host Governor Livingston today,
Thursday, April 2, at 4 p.m.
Blue Devil Mascot
Rumored to Re-emerge
After many years in absentia, the
Blue Devil Mascot — the Blue Devil
— may emerge and be seen at various events during the Spring season.
Westfield High School junior Hopper Murray has spearheaded the effort for the revival of the Blue Devil
Mascot and it appears that it will
definitely become a reality.
See it all on the web in color . . .
www.goleader.com
Blue Devil Icemen Celebrate
20th Anniversary on Ice
ORDINANCE NO. 2015-11
Name of street
where she finished with a 3-0 record.
“Elena Elliott was our starting right
fielder all last year. She pitched a
game or two. She pitched really, really well in our scrimmage the other
day. We are looking for her to be our
number 1 [pitcher],” Coach
MacDonald said.
Sophomore Danielle Rinaldi will
take over the shortstop position vacated by Chambliss. Last year, she
played in 20 games.
“She’s one of two of our sophomores [who] both played basketball
this winter, so both are coming off a
really strong season in another sport.
We are looking for them to really do
a good job,” Coach MacDonald said.
The other sophomore with basketball proficiency, Shannon Devitt, is
expected to play third base.
“Shannon is going to primarily play
third base and she also looked pretty
good pitching in our scrimmage the
other day, and Rinaldl is looking pretty
good at shortstop, so we will have her
there for a while,” Coach MacDonald
said.
Two freshmen are expected to be in
the starting lineup. Devyn Tibbals
will play second base and Jordan
Sacher will patrol centerfield. Junior
Hailey Reilly will occupy leftfield.
With 11 players presently on the var-
The Westfield Blue Devil ice hockey team
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
TOWNSHIP OF CRANFORD
CRANFORD, NEW JERSEY
be billed to the owner of the premises on a
monthly basis, with payment due to the
Township of Cranford within thirty days of
the date of invoice. Failure to remit the
required false alarm fees shall result in a
lien being placed by the Township of
Cranford on the subject premises and penalties as outlined in §55-9.
§ 55-7. Fees.
A. (No Change)
B. (No Change)
C. (No Change)
D. Fee payment requirements. All fees
due the Township of Cranford pursuant to
the provisions of this chapter shall be paid
on or before December 15 of the preceding year. Any payment not received by
January 31 of the subject year shall have
a fifty-dollar late fee assessed. Thereafter,
the owner of any registered alarm for which
the late fee has not been paid shall be
notified, by certified mail and first class
mail simultaneously, of the potential to be
disconnected. However, absent instruction by the owner or owner designee in
writing to disconnect the alarm, it will continue to be monitored and the fees shall be
assessed as a lien against the subject
premises.
§ 55-8. Rule-making authority.
(No Change)
§ 55-9. Violations and penalties.
(No Change)
§ 55-10. Indemnification of Township.
(No Change)
SECTION 2. All ordinances or parts of
ordinances inconsistent herewith are
hereby repealed to the extent of such
inconsistency.
SECTION 3. If any portion of this ordinance shall be determined to be invalid,
such determination shall not affect the
validity of the remaining portions of said
ordinance.
SECTION 4. This ordinance shall take
effect upon final passage and publication
in accordance with law.
ORDINANCE NO. 2015-15
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND
CHAPTER 55 (ALARM SYSTEMS) OF THE CODE OF THE
TOWNSHIP OF CRANFORD.
BE IT ORDAINED by the Township
Committee of the Township of Cranford,
New Jersey:
SECTION 1. The following changes shall
be made to Chapter 55 Alarm Systems:
Chapter 55. ALARM SYSTEMS
§ 55-1. Purpose.
(No Change)
§ 55-2. Applicability.
(No Change)
§ 55-3. Definitions.
As used in this chapter, the following
terms shall have the meanings indicated:
ALARM CONSOLE
(No Change)
ALARM DEVICE
(No Change)
DESIGNATED REPRESENTATIVE
(No Change)
FALSE ALARM
Any alarm device actuated by inadvertence, negligence or intentional or unintentional act of someone other than an intruder, and shall include as well alarms
caused by the malfunctioning of the alarm
device or other relevant equipment.
FIVE ALARM
(DELETE)
LOCAL ALARM
(No Change)
MONITORED ALARM
(No Change)
PERMITTEE
(No Change)
PERSON
(No Change)
§ 55-4. Alarm console.
(No Change)
§ 55-5. Regulations.
(No Change)
§ 55-6. False alarms.
A. Any person having knowledge of a
false alarm shall immediately notify the
Police Department that such alarm has
been activated without the existence of a
real emergency situation.
B. (No Change)
C. (No Change)
(1) (No Change)
a. (No Change)
b. (No Change)
c. (No Change)
d. (No Change)
(2) For the first three false alarms in any
year, there is no charge. All such fees shall
NOTICE OF PENDING ORDINANCE
The foregoing ordinance was introduced
and approved on first reading at a meeting
of the Township Committee of the Township of Cranford, New Jersey on March 24,
2015, and will be further considered for final
passage after public hearing to be held at
the Municipal Building, 8 Springfield Avenue, Cranford, New Jersey on April 21,
2015 at 8:00PM or as soon thereafter as
this matter can be reached. All persons
interested will be given the opportunity to
be heard concerning such ordinance.
Tara Rowley
Municipal Clerk
1 T - 4/2/15, The Leader
Fee: $104.04
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
COUGAR ATHLETES OF THE WEEK...Ryan Shupp (right), a senior goaltender
on the lacrosse team, had an outstanding performance in the Cougars’ season
opening victory over St. Peter’s Prep, which included 19 saves. He also demonstrates outstanding team leadership. Hannah Ross, a junior on the lacrosse team,
in the Cougars last two games notched nine goals and three assists. She is a key
player on the offense, defense and midfield.
N. Highlands Thump Raiders
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13
vanced all the way to the state semis
before losing to Mendham. The early
indications are that they are capable
of repeating that performance this
season.
“We made a lot of mistakes in the
first half,” said Manzella. “I think our
girls were a little excited being the
season opener and all. We cleaned
things up a bit in the second half. We
did a better job off of the draw controls and picking up loose balls. This
is a game where possession favors the
victor and I felt like we did a good job
possessing the ball, especially after
the break.”
Julia Pash scored two goals and
had four assists, and Katelyn Ewell
scored two goals to fill up the offensive stat sheet for Northern HighPUBLIC NOTICE
TOWNSHIP OF CRANFORD
CRANFORD, NEW JERSEY
ORDINANCE NO. 2015-14
CALENDAR YEAR 2015 ORDINANCE TO ESTABLISH A
CAP BANK (N.J.S.A. 40A: 445.14)
WHEREAS, the Local Government Cap
Law, N.J.S. 40A:4-45.1 et. seq., provides
that in the preparation of its annual budget,
a municipality shall limit any increase in
said final budget appropriations to 1.5%
unless authorized by ordinance to increase
it to 3.5% over the previous year’s final
appropriations; and
WHEREAS, a municipality may, by ordinance, bank the difference between its
final budget appropriations and the 3.5%
percentage rate as an exception to its final
appropriations when said difference is not
appropriated as part of the final budget;
and
WHEREAS, the Township Committee
of the Township of Cranford, County of
Union, hereby determines that this difference in the amount of $ 505,856.50 that is
not appropriated as part of the final budget
shall be retained as an exception to the
final appropriations in either of the next two
succeeding years.
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED
that any amount authorized herein above
that is not appropriated as part of the final
budget shall be retained as an exception to
final appropriation in either of the next two
succeeding years; and
BE IT FURTHER ORDAINED that a
certified copy of this ordinance as introduced be filed with the Director of the
Division of Local Government Services
within five (5) days of introduction; and
BE IT FURTHER ORDAINED that a
certified copy of this ordinance, upon adoption, with the recorded vote included
thereon, be filed with said Director within
five (5) days after such adoption.
NOTICE OF PENDING ORDINANCE
The foregoing ordinance was introduced
and approved on first reading at a meeting
of the Township Committee of the Township of Cranford, New Jersey on March 24,
2015, and will be further considered for
final passage after public hearing to be
held at the Municipal Building, 8 Springfield Avenue, Cranford, New Jersey on
April 21, 2015 at 8:00PM or as soon thereafter as this matter can be reached. All
persons interested will be given the opportunity to be heard concerning such ordinance.
Tara Rowley
Municipal Clerk
1 T - 4/2/15, The Leader
Fee: $53.55
lands. Victoria Marino had four saves
in goal.
For the Raiders, there was not a
whole lot to talk about statistically.
Aside from DiLollo’s lone goal,
O’Connor managed to record 12 saves
between the pipes and Micayla
Mirabella made three. Other than that
head coach Rafferty will look to regroup knowing full well that the
schedule gets even tougher in the
days ahead.
“We lost our composure a little bit
at certain times in the game,” said
Rafferty. “We need to improve on
that. It will come over time. We only
have three seniors playing and we’ve
got five freshmen in the lineup, so we
are definitely learning as we go. We’ve
got to get better on the ground balls.
We were outworked early in the game.
In the second half we won some small
battles which is a good thing.”
No. Highlands
Sc. Pl.-Fanwood
6
0
9
1
15
1
PUBLIC NOTICE
TOWNSHIP OF CRANFORD
CRANFORD, NEW JERSEY
ORDINANCE NO. 2015-06
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING
CHAPTER 136, ATTACHMENT 1 OF SCHEDULE 1 OF
THE
“REVISED
ORDINANCES OF THE TOWNSHIP
OF CRANFORD, NEW JERSEY (1988),” TO MODIFY THE
MAXIMUM BUILDING COVERAGE FOR RESIDENTIAL
USE
WHEREAS, the Township of Cranford
desires to amend the Land Development
Ordinance to adjust the maximum building
coverage for residential uses, R-1, R-2, R3, R-4, R-5 (single family) and R-5(two
family) to better reflect the desired standard for the size of homes and additions.
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED
by the Township Committee of the Township of Cranford, New Jersey as follows:
Section 1. Section 136, Attachment 1,
Schedule 1, Township of Cranford, Union
County, New Jersey, Schedule of Zone
District Area, Yard and Building Requirements, is hereby amended in pertinent
part to read as follows:
Zone
R-1
R-2
R-3
R-4
R-5 (single family)
R-5 (two family)
Maximum
Building
Coverage
(percent)
25%
25%
28%
30%
30%
30%
Section 2. All other provisions of Section136, Attachment 1, Schedule 1 Township of Cranford, Union County, New Jersey, Schedule of Zone District Area, Yard
and Building Requirements, shall remain
in full force and effect.
Section 3. This ordinance shall take
effect as provided by law.
STATEMENT
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
foregoing ordinance was finally passed at
a meeting of the Township Committee of
the Township of Cranford, New Jersey on
March 24, 2015.
Tara Rowley
Municipal Clerk
1 T - 4/2/15, The Leader
Fee: $48.96
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, April 2, 2015
Page 15
NIZOLAK NOTCHES 4 GOALS, DUFFY MAKES 20 SAVES
Raiders Fall to St. Joseph’s
In Boys Lacrosse Action, 11-7
By ALEX LOWE
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
The overall performance was better this time, but in the end the result
was the same. The Scotch PlainsFanwood High School boys’ lacrosse
team dropped its second straight game
to open the season, this time falling
11-7 to St. Joseph’s of Metuchen on
March 28 in Scotch Plains. Scott
Nizolak led the Raiders with four
goals but it was not enough to keep
the Raiders from slipping to 0-2 out
of the gates.
“This is not the way we want to
start the season,” said Scotch PlainsFanwood Head Coach Nick Micelli.
“Two winnable games. We got outworked each time.”
St. Joseph’s of Metuchen (1-1) got
strong performances from Timmy
Day, who scored three goals and had
two assists, and Paul Laki (three
goals).
The Raiders got off to a fast start,
taking a 2-0 first-quarter lead with
goals from Matt Heath and Nizolak.
But St. Joseph’s answered with five
straight goals of its own. In a seesaw
first half battle, the two teams stood
tied at 5-5 at halftime. Nizolak helped
the Raiders build momentum with two
goals in the final four minutes of the
second quarter to force the stalemate.
But St. Joseph’s surged in the second half, outscoring the Raiders 6-2
on their way to victory. The visiting
Falcons scored three goals in a twominute span towards the end of the
third quarter to establish firm control
of the contest at 9-6.
“We went to a different offensive
set in the third,” said St. Joseph’s
Head Coach Marc Moreau. “We created movement with the midfielders
which opened up the middle. We were
able to spread out their defense a little
bit and it gave us better opportunities
and more space.”
Max Bischoff had two goals and
five assists and Brett Krause and Ryan
Matusiewicz each scored a goal in the
decisive second half run.
“We got the initial stops against
them all day,” said Micelli. “We just
could not gain possession. We did not
do a good job of picking up the ball.
When you give a team two and three
and four opportunities each time it’s
going to come back to hurt you.”
Kevin Kerby (2 assists), David
Walker (assist, 6 ground balls) and
Matthew Heath each had a goal for
Scotch Plains-Fanwood. Jack Gerrity
had two assists, John Bruckman, Ryan
Connors and Harrison Parada scooped
four ground balls apiece.
“I thought that when we had the
ball today we went to the cage better
than we did in our first game against
Old Bridge,” said Micelli. “I thought
we were a little timid that first game
but we were more aggressive today.”
The Raiders got a standout performance from goalie Christopher Duffy
who had 20 saves in net, while Ryan
Hultberg made 14 for the Falcons.
Still, the effort did not translate into a
victory for the Raiders and with tough
games ahead on the schedule, including a visit from New Providence on
Thursday, April 2, Micelli knows there
is a lot of work to be done.
“We just have to get tougher when
it comes to picking the ball up,” said
Micelli. “And we need to do it fast
because it doesn’t get any easier from
here on out.”
St. Joe (Metuchen) 3
Sc. Pl.-Fanwood
2
2
3
4
1
2
1
11
7
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
GETTING OFF TO A GOOD START...A few days after their scrimmage game against Bridgewater-Raritan, above, the
Lady Cougar lacrosse team defeated the Livingston Lancers, 16-8, in their regular-season opener at Livingston.
SARAH ROSS, HANNA ROSS, POWER PROVIDE OFFENSE
Cougar Lax Ladies Have Big
Hopes, Unseat Lancers, 16-8
By DAVID B. CORBIN
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
Alex Lowe for The Westfield Leader and The Times
GETTING HIS FIRST GOAL...Raider Scott Nizolak, No. 4, whips in his first of four goals in the game against St. Joseph’s
(Metuchen) in Scotch Plains. The Falcons, however, won 11-7.
Cranford High School girls lacrosse
first year head coach Carlee Dragon
had high hopes for her team and in
return her team gave her even more
enlightenment when they overwhelmed the Livingston Lancers, 168, in their season opener at Livingston
on March 25.
The Lady Cougars relied on a “Powerful” trio of juniors to subdue the
Lancers. Junior center Megan Power
stuffed in three goals and added three
assists, while junior midfielders Sarah Ross netted four goals and assisted on four and her sister Hannah
Ross rippled the net four times and
assisted with two. Senior/co-captain
midfielder Kristin Leu lit the
scoreboard three times and sophomore attacker Jeannie Padden put in
one goal and added an assist, while
senior Tara O’Reilly netted one goal.
Sophomore goalkeeper Niamh
O’Donavah made five saves.
Emily Waldenberg led the Lady
Lancers with three goals and a pair of
assists. Tatum Peacock also hit the
hat trick with three goals, Kayla
Francione scored a goal and had an
assist, and Sydney Merkin netted a
goal.
“Megan Power takes our draws,
while Sarah Ross and Hannah Ross
are on the circle. I am very happy to
start the season on a high note,” Coach
Dragon said. “Our team executed our
plays well on offense and we defended together as a team. There is
still a lot we need to work on as a team
and we look forward to improving
each day. I am excitedly anticipating
what the remainder of the season has
in store for us.”
Cranford
Livingston
9
3
7
5
16
8
Last year, the trio of Ross, Ross and
Power combined for 155 goals, so
much is expected from them on the
offensive side, but according to Coach
Dragon, “I am very fortunate to have
Hannah and Sarah Ross. They each
have their own unique abilities but
most important, they are team players. Their individual abilities in combination with the other talented play-
ers on our team, raise high expectations for this season. Scoring is important but limiting opponents’ opportunities to score is of equal importance.” So much of the Cougars’ focus this season will be on defense.
Junior Melissa Stone and Moya
Plant, along with senior Marissa
Dankowsky will be in the defensive
back with O’Donavah shoring up the
last line of defense as goalkeeper.
Leu, Sarah and Hannah Ross, and
junior Caroline Plick will make up
the midfield with Power in the center.
The attack force will consist of senior
co-captain Carley Quirin, senior Elyse
Mackenzie and Padden.
From the bench, the first sub in will
be O’Reilly. Delaney Fay, Katherine
Hartnett, Gabrielle Meadows, Erin
Readie and Maggie Roman will also
move on an off the field.
Coach Dragon has quite a startling
list of lacrosse credentials with her
exploits as a Bridgewater-Raritan
High School Panther. She frayed the
net with 258 goals and dished out 274
CONTINUED ON PAGE 16
Page 16
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, April 2, 2015
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Lady Cougars Top
Lancer Laxers
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
RIPPING IN A GOAL...Blue Devil co-captain Luke Prybylski, No. 10, rips in a goal past a Crusader defender and
goalkeeper Ryan Bohm in the lacrosse game in Clark. Prybylski scored four goals and had an assist in the 20-3 triumph.
No. 9 Blue Devil Boys Thrash Crusader Laxmen
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11
“We lost some great seniors to
graduation last year, but our senior
class captains with me, Pat and Jack
[Simcox] are now leading the way,”
Prybylski said. “The juniors and
sophomores are following us. We have
a couple of freshmen, Jake Wornow,
Nicky Bond, are playing great. We
are all having fun out there too, so
that’s important.”
The two huge wins out of the shoot
were great but with the much stiffer
competition on the horizon there
could be concern of possible overconfidence.
“That gives us confidence, but we
are not going to get cocky. It’s early in
the year. We did return a lot of starters, but other teams are going to be
able to catch up with us. We are not
going to be able to put up 20 points
and only allow three, but Jack Cash is
killing them on face-offs and we are
preparing for a late season run. We
want to peak at the right time and hit
the playoffs strong,” Prybylski said.
“We have a lot of great returning
players, a lot of young guys ready to
step up and we are really looking
forward to it. We got a big week
coming,” Aslanian said.
“We are just trying to get ourselves
together. These first couple of games
are about us. We are trying to square
things away. We are trying to use stuff
that we have been working on in
practice and the kids did a great job of
that today,” Blue Devil Head Coach
Pat Tuohy said. “We are still finding
our way, so it’s good to click like we
did today.”
The clicking did really work well
PUBLIC NOTICE
BOROUGH OF MOUNTAINSIDE
BOARD OF EDUCATION
The Mountainside Board of Education is
seeking proposals from educational consultants in response to a Request for Proposals (“RFP”) for a Feasibility Study to
evaluate a send/receive relationship. The
RFP can be found on the District’s website
at www.mountainsideschools.org or by
calling (908) 232-3232, Ext 140. All proposals must be submitted to the Board
Office at 1497 Woodacres Drive,
Mountainside, New Jersey 07092, or
emailed
to
[email protected], by 10:00
am on April 7, 2015.
1 T - 4/2/15, The Leader
Fee: $16.32
PUBLIC NOTICE
BOROUGH OF FANWOOD
PLANNING BOARD
Please take notice that on April 22, 2015
at 7:30 PM at the Fanwood Borough Hall,
located at 75 North Martine Avenue,
Fanwood, New Jersey, the Planning Board
will hold a hearing on the application of the
undersigned. The property in question is
located at: 21 Woodland Avenue,
Fanwood, New Jersey, also known as Block
15 Lot 12, as shown on the Fanwood Tax
Map, owned by Richard A. O'Brien.
The applicant requests family room/bathroom addition which is in violation of:
Section 184-115 (9) of the Fanwood
Land Use Code. Variance Requested:
maximum improvement coverage; Permitted: 35%; Present: 33.14%; Proposed:
39.41%.
Section 184-115 (2) of the Fanwood
Land Use Code. Variance Requested: Lot
Width; Permitted: 75; Present: 50; Proposed: 50.
Section 185-115 (5) of the Fanwood
Land Use Code. Variance Requested: Side
Yard Setback; Permitted: 8.0; Present:
3.85; Proposed: 3.85.
Section 184-115 (1) of the Fanwood
Land Use Code. Variance Requested: Lot
Area; Permitted: 7,500; Present: 6,026;
Proposed: 6,026.
Section 184-115 (4) of the Fanwood
Land Use Code. Variance Requested:
Front Yard Setback; Permitted: 30 feet;
Present: 29.80 feet.; Proposed: 29.80 feet.
Section 186-163 (C) of the Fanwood
Land Use Code. Variance Requested:
Driveway Set Off; Permitted: 3.0 feet;
Present: -1.40 feet; Proposed: 0.
The applicant will also seek such other
relief as may be determined necessary at
the public hearing based upon review of
the application or amendment(s) to the
application.
The file pertaining to this application is
available for public inspection during normal business hours (8 AM - 4 PM, Monday
through Friday) from the Secretary of the
Planning Board at the Administration Office of the Borough of Fanwood at 75 North
Martine Avenue, Fanwood, New Jersey.
Any interested party may appear at said
hearing and participate therein in accordance with the rules of the Fanwood Planning Board.
Applicant:
Richard A. O'Brien
21 Woodland Avenue
Fanwood, New Jersey 07023
1 T - 4/2/15, The Times
Fee: $49.98
as there were a number of threepronged assists set up by Aslanian
and Prybylski that were quite impressive.
“Hockey assists! We had a lot of
great poles. They were able to give us
the ball in transition, so it puts us in
good opportunities to give it to our
guys to score. I was on the point of
the break a lot and I gave one to
Rit[tendale]. He gave it to Luke, so
we were really quick on firing on all
cylinders,” Aslanian said. “We are
playing good lacrosse and we have to
do it for the rest of our season.”
“The hockey assists are huge and
basically to see two passes ahead is
huge. It’s guys with really good lax
IQ. They are thinking two passes
ahead before the ball even comes
down the field. That’s great, because
when you play these good teams
moving forward, you got to have
contributions from everybody,”
Coach Tuohy said.
The Blue Devils’ stubborn defense
spearheaded by senior co-captain
Jackson Simcox and the aggressiveness of the offense complimented
each other.
“We let up three goals last game
and three goals this game, so our
defense is playing great,” Aslanian
said.
The Blue Devils held a 7-2 advantage in face-offs in the first quarter
and rolled to a 7-1 lead. Aslanian set
up Warnow for the first goal then
Bohlinger followed with a wraparound goal. With 6:08 on the clock,
Aslanian set up Brucia then Bohlinger
set up Prybylski for his first goal. The
Aslanian-to-Rittendale-to-Prybylski
combination made the score 5-0 then
Brucia won a scramble and slicked
PUBLIC NOTICE
SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY
CHANCERY DIVISION
UNION COUNTY
DOCKET NO. F-045356-14
FILE NO. 19145-14
NOTICE TO ABSENT DEFENDANT
(L.S.) STATE OF NEW JERSEY TO:
S & A HOLDINGS, LLC;
YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED AND
REQUIRED to serve upon PELLEGRINO
AND FELDSTEIN, LLC, plaintiff’s attorneys, whose address is 290 Route 46
West, Denville, New Jersey, an Answer to
the Complaint filed in a Civil Action, in
which PRO CAPITAL FUND I, LLC BY ITS
CUSTODIAN, US BANK is the plaintiff and
S & A HOLDINGS, LLC, ET ALS; are
defendants, pending in the Superior Court
of New Jersey, Chancery Division, UNION
County and bearing Docket No. F-04535614 within thirty-five (35) days after April 2,
2015 exclusive of such date. If you fail to
answer or appear in accordance with Rule
4:4-6, Judgment by Default may be rendered against you for relief demanded in
the Complaint. You shall file your Answer
and Proof of Service in duplicate with the
Clerk of the Superior Court of New Jersey,
Hughes Justice Complex - CN 971, Trenton, New Jersey 08625, in accordance
with the Rules of Civil Practice and Procedure.
You are further advised that if you are
unable to obtain an attorney you may communicate with the Lawyer Referral Service
of the County of Venue and that if you
cannot afford an attorney, you may communicate with the Legal Services Office of
the County of Venue. The telephone number of such agencies are as follows: Lawyer Referral Service 908-353-4715 - Legal
Services Office 908-354-4340.
THE ACTION has been instituted for the
purpose of foreclosing the following tax
sale certificate:
1. A certain tax certificate 11-00134,
sold on 6/4/2012, dated 6/14/2012, and
was recorded on 8/8/2012 in Book 13386
at Page 402, made by PAUL M. LESNIAK,
Collector of Taxes of ELIZABETH, and
State of New Jersey to PRO CAPITAL
FUND I, LLC BY ITS CUSTODIAN, US
BANK and subsequently assigned to plaintiff, PRO CAPITAL FUND I, LLC BY ITS
CUSTODIAN, US BANK. This covers real
estate located in ELIZABETH, County of
UNION, and State of New Jersey, known
as LOT 518 BLOCK 4 as shown on the Tax
Assessment Map and Tax Map duplicate
of ELIZABETH. and concerns premises
commonly known as 693 GARDEN ST,
ELIZABETH, New Jersey.
YOU, S & A HOLDINGS, LLC, are made
party defendant to the above foreclosure
action because you are the owner of a
property which is the subject of the above
entitled action.
DATED: March 27, 2015
Michelle M. Smith, Clerk
Superior Court of New Jersey
PELLEGRINO & FELDSTEIN, L.L.C.
Denville Law Center
290 Route 46 West
Denville, New Jersey 07834
(973) 586-2300
1 T - 4/2/15, The Leader
Fee: $63.24
the ball into the net. Warnow slam
dunked in the seventh goal with 3:22
on the clock then Kyle Myers scored
the Crusaders’’ first goal.
The Blue Devils pounded in nine
unanswered goals in the second quarter beginning with Aslanian taking
only eight seconds to move the ball
straight down the center and rippling
the net. Aslanian scored twice in the
quarter, while Rittendale and
Prybylski each scored three and
Leuthold scored once. Prybylski’s
third goal in the quarter was the sweetest when approached Crusader goalkeeper Dylan Bohm from the right
then dove further to his right to slip a
sidearm shot past Bohm’s legs.
“That was mainly James Bohlinger.
He gave a good pick for me and I
slipped under. That was mostly him,”
Prybylski said.
With the “Mercy” running clock in
affect and a 16-1 lead entering the
second half, it turned out to be a
perfect opportunity for the starters to
take a rest and the reserves to come
surging in just after Aslanian scored
his third goal. Taylor and Warnow
scored upping the score to 19-1 as the
third quarter ended. In the fourth quarter, Luethold scored the Blue Devils’
final goal with an underhanded
shuffle. Matt Pedicine and Brett
Roessle scored for the Crusaders.
Blue Devil starting goalkeeper
Toby Burgdorf made four saves in the
first half. Chris Caminiti made three
saves in the third quarter and Sam
Salberg made five in the fourth.
“We gave everyone a little bit of
experience. If some guys go down
with injuries, we will have other guys
ready to step up,” Aslanian said.
Westfield
AL Johnson
7 11
1 0
3
0
1
2
20
3
PUBLIC NOTICE
TOWN OF WESTFIELD
BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT
The Board of Adjustment of the Town
of Westfield, New Jersey will meet on
April 13, 2015 in the Council Chambers at
the Municipal Building, 425 East Broad
Street, Westfield, New Jersey at 7:30 p.m.
to hear and consider the following appeal
for bulk (c) and/or (d) variance relief from
requirements of the Westfield Land Use
Ordinance.
Erika & Erik Qualben, 739 Coleman
Place. Applicant is seeking approval to
construct a two story addition contrary to
Sections 11.09E5, 11.09E6, 11.09E13 and
11.09E14 of the Land Use Ordinance.
Ordinance requires a street side yard setback for a corner property of 20 feet. Proposed is 19 feet. Ordinance requires a side
yard setback of 10 feet. Proposed is 9.4
feet. Ordinance allows a maximum continuous side wall length of 25 feet. Proposed is 34.5 feet. Ordinance requires a
one car garage. Proposed is no garage.
Jean Genievich, 99 Surrey Lane On
June 11, 2012, Applicant received approval to construct a new single family
home with the front of the home facing
Surrey Lane. This configuration resulted in
a rear yard setback variance wherein a
setback of 35 feet is permitted and 10 feet
was approved. Applicant is seeking an
amended approval to permit a change to
the building footprint. No new variances
are created as a result of the proposal and
the rear yard setback variance previously
granted remains unchanged.
Russell & Rachel Peachman, 824
Dorian Road. Applicant is seeking approval to construct an attached garage
with a mudroom contrary to Section
11.08E6 of the Land Use Ordinance. Ordinance requires a minimum side yard setback of 10 feet. Proposed is + 6.47 feet.
John and Kirti Davis, 238 Grove
Street. Applicant is seeking approval to
construct a two story addition at the rear of
the existing house contrary to
Sections11.09E13 and 12.04F of the Land
Use Ordinance. Ordinance allows a maximum wall length at a zoning side yard of 25
feet. Proposed is 39.7 feet. Ordinance
allows a maximum coverage for buildings
and above ground structures of 20% /
1,294 square feet. Proposed is 21.9%/
1,555 square feet.
Joel Rosenthal, 29 Summit Court.
Applicant is seeking approval to construct
a second story addition contrary to Section
11.07E5 of the Land Use Ordinance. Ordinance requires a minimum side yard setback of 20 feet. Proposed is 14. 8 feet.
Variances, waivers or exceptions from
certain site plan details or relief from requirements may be sought as appropriate.
Plans and application are on file in the
office of the Town Engineer, 959 North
Avenue West, Westfield, New Jersey and
may be seen Monday through Friday from
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Kathleen Nemeth
Board Secretary
1 T - 4/2/15, The Leader
Fee: $62.73
assists for 532 total points, which
may still be a state record. Coach
Dragon plans to pass some of her
drive, experiences and skills on to her
newly acquired team.
Her sister Alyssa Dragon Frazier is
the head coach of the Panther girls
lacrosse team, as well as the field
hockey team. Two days prior to the
Livingston game, Carlee, now a Cougar, and Alyssa, still a Panther, were
on the opposite ends of the field in a
scrimmage game in Cranford. The
sisters plan to run their own lacrosse
camps this summer, known as Dragon
Duo, in Bridgewater and Cranford.
Cranford is also familiar territory
to Carlee’s parents as her father Roy,
Jr. and mother Tammara both began
teaching and coaching in the system.
Both parents were standout all-around
athletes and her brother Roy III was
an exceptionally strong wrestler and
football player at BridgewaterRaritan.
Coach Dragon has also acknowledged that there is life after lacrosse
and noted, “I encourage my studentathletes to play another high school
sport. Not only does it keep them in
good physical condition, it keeps them
competitive. I also stress the importance of playing club lacrosse in their
off-season and to play club competitively during the summer.”
The Cougars will host Warren Hills
at Memorial Field this Saturday, April
4, at 11 p.m.
St. Bart’s Softball Sets
Annual ‘Draft Night’
What separates the St.
Bartholomew Men’s Oldtimers
Softball League from others in the
area, is that new teams are chosen
each year. This makes it easy to
meet the 120 players, in what sometimes seems more like a “fraternity”
than a softball league. This year’s
player draft will be held on Friday,
April 24, at 7 p.m. at the St.
Bartholomew School Cafeteria, on
the lower level.
Sunday practices at LaGrande
Park at 10 a.m. begin on April 12.
The practices are open to all St.
Bart’s players, including rookies. A
few players are still needed for this
season. Interested men, over 30,
can apply on-line at our website at
www.stbartssoftball.com
Reading is Good For You
goleader.com/subscribe
PUBLIC NOTICE
TOWNSHIP OF SCOTCH PLAINS
NOTICE OF ADOPTED RESOLUTION
RESOLUTION NO. 2015-071
Resolution establishing the 2015 billing
rates for the Scotch Plains Sewer Utility
and authorizing sewer billing adjustment
to any property billed incorrectly.
WHEREAS, the Mayor and Township
Council of the Township of the Scotch
Plains on April 20, 2010 adopted Ordinance No. 3 2010 entitled “an Ordinance
Supplementing and Amending Ordinance
No. 8-2009 Which Supplemented and
Amended Chapter XII Entitled “Sewer and
Water” of the Revised General Ordinances
of the Township of Scotch Plains, 1978,
and Established the Sewerage Utility of
the Township of Scotch Plains”; and
WHEREAS, subclause b.(iii) of Section
127.1 entitled “Annual Service Charge”, of
Ordinance No. 3-2010 contemplated the
adoption by Resolution of the Mayor and
Township Council of the per gallon rate for
each gallon of water consumed in excess
of 27,500 gallons per annum for residential and apartment complex categories;
and
WHEREAS, subclause j.(iii) of Section
127.1 entitled “Annual Service Charge” of
Ordinance No. 32010 contemplated the
adoption by Resolution by the Mayor and
Township Council of the per gallon rate for
each gallon of water consumed in excess
of 27,500 gallons per annum for the nonresidential category; and
WHEREAS, it is the intent of this Resolution to establish the final 2015 billing rate
for the nonresidential category, the residential category and for the apartment
complex category.
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, by the Mayor and Township
Council of the Township of Scotch Plains,
County of Union, State of New Jersey, as
follows:
1. The Mayor and Township Council do
hereby establish the nonresidential category rate, after the 27,500 gallon threshold, of $0.007 per gallon as more particularly detailed on the Final 2015 Billing
Formulas, on file with the Township Engineer.
2. The Mayor and Township Council do
hereby establish the residential category
rate, after the 27,500 gallon threshold, of
$0.00025 per gallon as more particularly
detailed on the Final 2015 Billing Formulas, on file with the Township Engineer.
3. The Mayor and Township Council do
hereby establish the apartment complex
category rate, after the 27,500 gallon
threshold, of $0.00025 per gallon as more
particularly detailed on the Final 2014 Billing Formulas, on file with the Township
Engineer.
4. The Mayor and Council do hereby
authorize the Tax Collector to make any
necessary billing corrections to any property that was billed incorrectly as deemed
incorrect by the Township Assistant Engineer and issue correct billings.
5. The Township Clerk is directed to
publish a notice of the adoption of this
Resolution in the official newspaper of the
Township of Scotch Plains within ten (10)
days from the adoption of this Resolution.
Dated: March 17, 2015
Bozena Lacina, RMC
Township Clerk
1 T - 4/2/15, The Times
Fee: $66.30
REMEMBER THE TITANS...The Titans, a team made up of fourth graders
from Westfield and Scotch Plains, captured the title in the Hoop Heaven Real
March Madness Tournament this past weekend in Whippany. The boys went 30 in pool play to win the 10U age group. Pictured, left to right, are: kneeling; Tim
Dursee, Jack DeCicco and Pete Meixner; standing, Aidan Dursee, Parker Smith,
Matthew Nervi, Cameron Pigge, TJ Halloran, Kevin Cull and George Dursee.
See it all on the web in color . . .
www.goleader.com
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
TOWNSHIP OF CRANFORD
CRANFORD, NEW JERSEY
ORDINANCE NO. 2015-12
AN ORDINANCE FIXING THE SALARIES AND WAGES OF CERTAIN
OFFICIALS AND EMPLOYEES OF THE TOWNSHIP OF CRANFORD, NEW
JERSEY FOR THE YEAR 2015
BE IT ORDAINED by the Township Committee of the Township of Cranford, New
Jersey:
SECTION 1. CERTAIN OFFICIALS, FULL-TIME AND UNCLASSIFIED PERSONNEL
The annual salary of certain officials, full-time employees and unclassified employees
of the Township of Cranford for calendar year 2015 is to fall within the following ranges:
POSITION TITLE
Administrative Secretary – Library
Administrative Secretary
Administrative Secretary/
Administrative Secretary/Technical Assistant
Assistant Director of Library
Assistant Manager – Downtown Management Corp.
Assistant Supervisor - Emergency Medical Service
Building Inspector
Attorney - Board of Adjustment
Communications Officer
Deputy Court Administrator
Director of Library
Electrical Sub-Code Official
Emergency Management Coordinator
Engineering Aide II
Executive Supervisor Emergency Medical Service
Fire Inspector
General Maintenance Person II
General Maintenance Person III
Graphic Technician – TV35
Mayor
Member of Township Committee
Municipal Judge
Office Assistant
Parking Enforcement Officer
Plumbing Sub-Code Official
Principal Clerk I
Scribe
Senior Account Clerk
Senior Payroll/Financial Specialist
Traffic Maintenance Person
TV 35 Station Manager
Wastewater Collection System Operator
2015
SALARY RANGE
32,200 - 56,100
31,172 - 51,045
31,172 - 51,045
31,172 - 51,045
62,748 - 81,600
30,273 - 51,465
33,558 - 39,748
54,820 - 70,686
12,318- 17,364
31,172 - 51,045
30,000 - 51,045
66,950 – 102,000
59,590 - 86700
3,547 - 10,200
49,593 - 67,544
34,112 - 42,195
30,000 - 56,994
28,458 - 46,970
35,423 - 54,198
3,000 - 12,240
2,818
2,557
35,464 - 57,939
10,000 - 41,136
35,880 - 39,482
38,574 - 73,124
28,458 - 41,136
7,083 - 10,838
28,458 - 46,236
48,205 - 64,627
42,509 - 65,036
20,000 - 40,000
10,000 - 15,000
SECTION 2. PART-TIME PERSONNEL
The hourly salary for part-time employees of the Township of Cranford for calendar year
2015 is not to exceed the following:
2015
POSITION TITLE
PER HOUR
Assistant Head Pool Manager
9.00 - 20.40
Assistant Playground Director
8.60 - 9.45
Assistant Pool Manager
9.00 - 20.40
Assistant Tennis Instructor
8.50 - 10.70
Babysitter
8.50 - 12.25
Basketball Coordinator
12.50 - 13.50
Basketball Referee (per game)
25.00 - 45.00
Community Center Supervisor
9.00 - 13.50
Conservation Center
10.53 - 18.80
Court Escort
14.13
Crossing Guard
14.62
Desk Clerk
8.50-18.36
Emergency Medical Technician (per diem)
15.00-18.00
Fitness Desk
8.50-18.36
Handyman
15.45-18.63
Head Pool Manager
10.00-20.40
Head Tennis Instructor
9.50-12.75
Instructor
8.50-15.30
Kidz Club Counselor
8.50-15.30
Kidz Club Supervisor
8.50-17.34
Library Page
7.15-12.00
Lifeguard
8.38-17.34
Office Assistant
12.42-17.34
Park Maintenance
9.25-12.00
Playground Coordinator
12.50-13.50
Playground Director
9.50-12.75
Pool Recreation Director
8.50-15.30
Public Works Assistant
10.20
Recreation Maintenance
10.00-12.00
Registration Clerk
8.50-17.34
Reserve Guard
13.57
Senior Account Clerk
13.82-26.41
Senior Citizen Bus Driver
12.48-17.69
Senior Citizen Programmer/Coordinator
13.61-18.81
Social Service Program Instructor
12.42-15.68
Special Law Enforcement Officer
25.00-70.00
Swim Pool Maintenance
8.50-17.34
Traffic - Summer
11.17
TV 35 Assistant
12.78
TV 35 Station Manager
23.50-35.00
Youth Open Center
8.50-10.71
SECTION 3. SEASONAL PERSONNEL
The salary for seasonal employees of the Township of Cranford for calendar year 2015
is not to exceed the following:
POSITION TITLE
Assistant Summer Basketball Director
Assistant Summer Swim Team Coach
Elementary Cooking Instructor
Field Hockey Assistant Instructor
Field Hockey Instructor
Kinder Arts & Crafts
Kinder Cooking Instructor
Summer Basketball Director
Summer Swim Team Coach
Volleyball Supervisor
PER SEASON
225.00 - 280.00
2,600.00
135.00 - 200.00
215.00 - 280.00
285.00 - 380.00
135.00 - 250.00
135.00 - 250.00
400.00 - 550.00
2,900.00
350.00 - 600.00
SECTION 4
The annual salary for the Attorney-Board of Adjustment shall be the salary as set forth
by the Township Committee within the salary ranges as set forth opposite the respective
classification per Payroll Action Form. In addition to said salary, the Attorney-Board of
Adjustment shall be entitled to receive compensation at a rate of $114.00 per hour for
additional litigation services rendered, as may be authorized by the Township Committee
and the Board of Adjustment respectively. Any higher hourly rate will require separate
approval of the Township Committee.
SECTION 5
An employee, in order to be eligible for the higher annual salary or wage established
by this Ordinance, must be an employee of the Township when this Ordinance becomes
effective, except those employees involuntarily terminated due to taking retirement, or
death.
SECTION 6
The salary and compensation set forth shall be the annual salary payable bi-weekly.
SECTION 7
A Communications Officer may elect to be paid at his/her regular daily rate of
compensation or elect time off in lieu of pay (“H” Day) for any or all of the thirteen paid
holidays per year with the prior consent of the Chief of Police and Township Administrator.
SECTION 8
In the event any such officials or employees shall die, resign or be dismissed during the
year, the person selected to fill the position or office shall receive salary for the balance
of the year as may be determined by Resolution of the Township Committee.
SECTION 9
All Ordinances or parts of Ordinances inconsistent herewith are repealed.
NOTICE OF PENDING ORDINANCE
The foregoing ordinance was introduced and approved on first reading at a meeting of
the Township Committee of the Township of Cranford, New Jersey on March 24, 2015,
and will be further considered for final passage after public hearing to be held at the
Municipal Building, 8 Springfield Avenue, Cranford, New Jersey on April 21, 2015 at
8:00PM or as soon thereafter as this matter can be reached. All persons interested will
be given the opportunity to be heard concerning such ordinance.
Tara Rowley
Municipal Clerk
1 T - 4/2/15, The Leader
Fee: $237.66
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
CHILDCARE NEEDED
Childcare needed in my Westfield
home to take care of my 4 and 2
year old daughters. Mon, Tues,
Thurs, and Fri from 7:30am- 4:30pm.
Please call Caryn
(908) 872-3248
Must have ref. and be flexible.
HELP WANTED
CYO AND TOURNEY CHAMPS...Westfield’s Holy Trinity Interparochial
School Girls JV Basketball team won the Suburban Catholic League Greg Frost
Tournament Championship game at St. Michaels in Cranford, defeating St.
Michaels of Union, 24-16. They were also the CYO champions defeating St.
Joseph, 29-9. The girls have been coached by Jay Ahlbeck (center), Pete Newall
(right), Jayne Hiel (left) and David Cushing.
Holy Trinity School Harvests
Five Titles in Basketball
WESTFIELD – The Holy Trinity
Interparochial School basketball program added multiple titles to their
gym’s championship banners this
year. The junior varsity girls and varsity boys teams each won two regular
season and post-season titles; and the
varsity girls won the regular season
title.
The eighth grade varsity boys won
the Suburban Catholic League championship March 9, defeating Aquinas
Academy, 42-40, and took the title in
the CYO league on March 8, defeating Plainfield’s Koinonia Academy,
32-25. They also won the regular
players included: Jack Keating, Jamel
Green, Brian McGovern, James
DeCicco, P.J. Skinner, Connor Chase
and Jack Chase.
The JV Girls, comprised of fifth
and sixth graders, played in two
leagues this year, winning titles in
each.
They won the SCL Greg Frost Tournament Championship game at St.
Michaels in Cranford, defeating St.
Michaels of Union, 24-16, and finished 11-0 in the regular season. They
defeated St. Joseph, 29-9, for the CYO
title and finished 14-0. The girls have
been coached by Jay Ahlbeck, Pete
Shackamaxon Country Club is
looking for part time servers and
seasonal
grounds
labor
employees. Please apply in
person. Pay rate varies with
experience. Shackamaxon is
located at 1607 Shackamaxon
Drive, Scotch Plains or submit
resume to [email protected]
Please indicate the position you
are interested in when emailing.
CHILDCARE NEEDED
Nannies - Housekeepers
BabyNurses Needed
Live-in / -out, Full/Part-time
Solid References Required.
CALL (732) 972-4090
www.absolutebestcare.com
POLISH CLEANING LADY
“Great work, Free estimates”
References available.
If you need a hardworking
person with great experience to
clean your house or apartment
Call Agnes (908) 787-3003
MID-CENT MOD
Sculptural coffee table, end table,
Adrian Pearsall or Vladimir Kagan,
$800. Set of 3 Majestic Boomerang
lamps, two table lamps and one
floor lamp, six matching shades,
$1,600. Buffet, $400. Heywood
Wakefield couch, chair, $1,000.
Or Best Offer - (917) 301-3116
DEYCI’S CLEANING SERVICES
Are you tired? Let me help you!
Experience & Excellent Work
Residential, Apartments,
Commercial, Offices
Free Estimates 100% Guaranteed
References Available
(908) 510-2542
Thursday, April 2, 2015
CLASSIFIEDS
Scotch Plains Recreation
Page 17
SPORTING GOODS SALES
Now hiring Full/Part Time for
Soccer Store in Westfield.
Experience not a must, will train.
Please apply in person at
317 South Ave West.
Summer Employment Opportunities
Summer Day Camp & Small Fry Camp
Day Camp Supervisor
- Minimum of twenty-one (21) years of age
- Education and Experience with children in day camp setting,
- (Teaching Certification Preferred)
- Reporting to the Day Camp Asst. Director/Director; to supervise
the operation of a stimulating and enriching day camp program for
children in grades 1st through 7th at our Brookside location
Head Counselor
- Minimum of Eighteen (18) years of age
- Education and Experience with children in day camp setting
- Reporting to the Site Supervisor/Director; to supervise and lead
a group of children in a stimulating and enriching day camp
program for children
Junior Counselor
- Minimum of Sixteen (16) years of age
- Experience with children in day camp setting
- Reporting to the Head Counselor/Site Supervisor/Director; to
supervise and lead a group of children in a stimulating and
enriching day camp program for children
Counselors in Training
- Minimum of Fourteen (14) years of age
- Experience with children
- Reporting to the Head Counselor/Site Supervisor/Director; to
assist in supervising and leading a group of children in a stimulating and enriching day camp program for children
Parks Maintenance
Summer Parks Laborer/Golf Course
- Minimum of Eighteen (18) years of age
- Experience in Landscaping and Grounds Maintenance as well as
Golf Course Maintenance
- CDL Preferred
Park Ranger
- Minimum of Eighteen (18) years of age
- Driver’s License in good standing
- Must Patrol as well as Basic Park Cleanup (Bathroom Cleaning
and Trash Removal)
- Must have Flexible Schedule (Nights and Weekends)
Scotch Hills Country Club
Golf Course Cashier/Ranger
- Minimum of Eighteen (18) years of age
- Experience in Customer Service positions
- Knowledge of Golf preferred.
Applications can be found on www.scotchplainsnj.gov
or at the Recreation Department Office at
Town Hall, 430 Park Avenue, Scotch Plains
GOLF CLUB POSITIONS OPEN
Prestigious private golf club
located in Springfield, NJ is hiring
for full and part time Servers,
Bussers, and Food Runners.
Great work environment, partial
uniforms, meals, and benefits
are included. Great opportunity
for students and those looking
for supplemental income.
Please send your resume to
[email protected] EOE
CLEANING SERVICES
Responsible Cleaning Lady, with
Goog References to Clean Your
House or Office. Please Call
(973) 752-9002 or (201) 349-8428.
Thanks, God Bless You!
- ANTIQUES FOR SALE -
HISTORIC CLARK ESTATE,
WESTFIELD: Victorian Carved
Mahogany Upholstered Rocker
With Button Back And Arms,
Owned By Addison S. Clark
(b.1825), $795. Young Bros., NY
Beaver Top Hat With Initials A.H.C.
In Original Case, Owned by
Addison H. Clark (b.1869), $395.
Both Notable Descendants of
Abraham Clark (b.1726), Signer
of Declaration of Independance.
(908) 654-6091
FREELANCERS WANTED
Strong, detail-oriented writers
with professional demeanor
needed to cover local
government meetings. Must be
able to meet deadlines, know
how to write a lead, and take
an active interest in their beats
in order to develop news
stories.
Please
email
resume and clips to:
[email protected]
Cranford PAL Girls Capture
League Basketball Title
LEAGUE CHAMPS...Westfield’s Holy Trinity Interparochial School Varsity
Boys Basketball team won the Suburban Catholic League championship defeating Aquinas Academy, 42-40, and took the title in the CYO league defeating
Plainfield’s Koinonia Academy, 32-25. The team is coached by Athletic Director
Rich Wieszczek (right) and Joe DeCicco (left).
season title in both leagues with overall records of 17-1 in the SCL, and
14-1 in CYO.
The boys, coached by outgoing
Athletic Director Rich Wieszczek and
Joe DeCicco, went 21-0 two years
ago in the SCL, winning the SCL and
Fr. Whalen Tournament (FWT) championships.
Jack Pettit and Jack Cushing were
selected First Team All-League and
the FWT All-Tourney team this year.
Pettit won the FWT 3-point shooting
contest at St. Agnes in Clark. In the
final round, he hit 16 of 25.
The team’s 8th graders include:
Pettit, Cushing, Joe DeCicco, Parker
Eicke, Nick Hiel, Mike Marano,
Matthew Monaco, Aidan Nolte,
Mathew Preite and Sean Wieszczek.
Pettit, Cushing, Marano, Alex Gray,
Patrick Corrao and Joseph Del Sol
represented the school in the SCL
All-Star games. DeCicco, Nolte and
Wieszczek played in the CYO AllStar game.
In the JV All-Star Game, HTIS
Newall, Jayne Hiel and David Cushing.
As voted by their teammates, the
CYO All-Stars for the JV girls were
sixth graders Joy Mulzoff and
Alexandra Ahlbeck. The SCL AllStars were fifth graders Riley Newall
and Martina Marano.
The varsity girls, coached by Brian
Cull and Pete Newall, won the SCL
regular season championship for the
third time. They have also won two
Greg Frost titles – two years ago as
JV’s and last year as varsity. This year
they lost to Union’s Holy Spirit for
the title.
Eighth graders Caroline Cull and
Olivia Keating played in the SCL AllStar Game. The other graduating players include: Maddie Newall, Faith
Hrinkevich, Hope Wegryn, Hannah
Seewald, Erica MacDonald and
Giulia Goggi.
The boys Pee Wee team, made up
of fourth graders and coached by
Holy Trinity alumnus and parent Tim
Dursee, were also undefeated in CYO
regular season, with a record of 12-0.
BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION CHAMPS...The Scotch Plains-Fanwood PAL
7th Grade Team won the JBA Championship by defeating Roselle. The team had
a 16-0 regular-season record in the JBA League. They also won the Branchburg
Holiday Tournament and finished with a 39-6 overall record. Pictured, left to
right, are: bottom row; Charlie Levine, Ryan Widman, Will Brady, Eli Wolman
and Kyle Rigney; top row, Coach John Lusk, Ryan Lusk, Aidan Hickey, Shane
Murphy, Justin Guy, Justin Fletcher, Sean Ryan, Coach Robert Fletcher and
Coach Mark Wolman.
FLYING HIGH...Westfield “Y” Flyers, Benjamin Spergel, left, displays his
medal for being named AAU National Champion and Melissa Endy displays her
winning medal at the USATF Hershey Youth Indoor Championship.
Three WF ‘Y’ Flyers Place
At AAU National Track
Three athletes from the Westfield
Area “Y” Flyers Track Club recently
competed in the AAU and USATF
Track and Field National Indoor
Championships and returned with
honors.
Benjamin Spergel competed in the
AAU National Indoor Youth Championship meet in Ypsilanti, Mich.,
held on March 6 and 7, and was
crowned National Champion in the
60-meter hurdles for 12-year-old
boys. Melissa Endy and Thomas
Whitehead competed at the USATF
HersheyYouth Indoor Championship,
held on March 13-15 in Landover,
Md. Whitehead finished eighth in the
3000-meter run and 22nd in 800 for
15-16-year-old boys. Endy competed
in 3000-meter race/walk and won the
silver medal for 15-16 girls.
The Westfield Area Y Flyers have
been providing competitive Track and
Field opportunities for young athletes for over a decade. In the last five
years, the program has expanded from
its flagship in Westfield to include a
middle school program in Cranford.
The Flyers spring season started on
March 16 and lasts until May 15.
Practices are held three days a week
at Kehler Stadium. The Flyers are a
USATF certified club that serves over
700 athletes throughout the year. For
inquiries about the Flyers programs,
call Paul Garwood at (908) 233-2700
or visit the Flyers website at
YFlyersTrackClub.com.
Probitas Verus Honos
PUBLIC NOTICE
BOROUGH OF GARWOOD
PLANNING BOARD
NOTICE OF DECISION
IN-TOWN CHAMPS...Team Duke girls middle school basketball team won the
Westfield In-Town championship with a 22-12 victory over UConn on March 19.
Pictured is the Duke team.
On March 25, 2015, the Borough of
Garwood Planning Board adopted a Resolution memorializing the granting of Preliminary and Final Site Plan approval, to
the Applicants/Owners, Sandro Villaraut
and Angela Villaraut, for the property located at 484 Fourth Avenue, Block 102,
Lot 10 on the Tax Map of the Borough of
Garwood. The approval involves the construction of a multi-family residential development consisting of 9 townhouses on
the property. A copy of the Resolution is on
file and available for inspection by the
public in the Planning/Zoning Office located in the Borough of Garwood Municipal Building, 403 South Avenue, Garwood,
New Jersey, during that Office’s normal
business hours.
HEHL & HEHL, P.C.,
Attorneys for the Applicant
1 T - 4/2/15, The Leader
Fee: $21.93
The Y is the nation’s leading nonprofit committed to strengthening
communities through youth development, healthy living and social responsibility.
Visit
www.westfieldynj.org to learn more
about Westfield Area Y programs.
Financial assistance is available for
those who qualify.
The Cranford PAL Eighth Grade
Girls Basketball team turned in a spectacular season that concluded with a
three-point win over league rival and
number one seed, St. Matthews of
Edison, to capture the championship
title. Cranford prevailed 49-46, to
win the Garden State Basketball
League’s American Division title.
With just under a minute remaining, the score was tied 46-46, but the
Cougars were able to pull ahead on a
clutch three pointer to clinch the
crown. The win was a thrilling conclusion to a successful season that
featured a full team effort each time
on the court.
In addition to its league title, the
team also won the 11th Annual Clark
Winter Tournament and opened the
season by placing second in the Hoop
Group Turkey Shoot Out. In that contest, the team fell just short in overtime play to a powerful Mendham
squad.
“These girls gave it their all each
and every time on the court,” said
Coach John Frieri. “They never, ever
gave up and pulled out some incredible wins against formidable oppo-
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
SCOTCH PLAINS-FANWOOD
BOARD OF EDUCATION
Each bid shall be accompanied by the
following:
All bidders are put on notice that this
project is subject to provisions of a NJSDA
(New Jersey Schools Development Authority) ROD Grant Agreement as noted in
the Project Manual. Bidders shall be required to comply with any/all requests by
the Board of NJSDA for compliance with
said Grant Agreement or its Regulations.
1. The District shall require that all Bidders submit with their Bids an unconditional certified check, cashier’s check, or
bid guarantee in an amount of ten percent
(10%) of the Bidder’s Base Bid, but not in
excess of $20,000. Such bid guarantee
serves as a guarantee that, should a
Bidder’s bid be accepted, the Bidder will
execute and comply with the Contract.
Within ten (10 Days after delivery to the
District of a Contract executed by the selected Bidder, together with all other items
that may be required to be submitted therewith, the District shall return the Bid guarantee to each unsuccessful Bidder.
If the selected Bidder fails to execute the
Contract or to provide all guarantees, insurance and other items required, the funds
represented by such Bidder’s Bid guarantee shall be released to the District and
become and remain the property of the
District. Delivery of the Bid guarantee constitutes the Agreement of the Bidder and
the surety or other entity that issued the
Bid guarantee that such amount shall be
released to the District in such event.
All Bid guarantees must be issued by a
surety licensed to issue such guarantees in
the State and must be acceptable to the
District and the Development Authority. Certified or cashier’s checks shall be drawn on
a state or national bank rated “A” by at least
two nationally recognized agencies. Checks
shall be made payable to the District.
2. Certificate from a surety company
stating that it will provide the Bidder with a
Performance, Payment Bond and Maintenance Bond in such sum and form as is
required in the Specifications.
3. Affidavit showing Notice of Classification in accordance with the standards of
and by the New Jersey Department of the
Treasury, Division of Property Management and Construction, for bids $20,000
and over, for prime Bidders and all subcontractors, prior to the date that Bids are
received.
Notices of Classification must include
as a Prime Bidder:
C008 General Construction or C009
General Construction/Alterations and Additions.
Any Structural Steel, Gas, Electric or
HVAC Work is considered incidental and,
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that
sealed bids will be received by the Scotch
Plains-Fanwood Board of Education
(the District), in the County of Union, for
the furnishing of the hereinafter described
labor, material and equipment for Proposed Classroom Waterproofing at
Park Middle School, Scotch Plains, New
Jersey (hereinafter, the “Project”) and
opened and read in public at the Scotch
Plains-Fanwood Board of Education, Evergreen Avenue and Cedar Street, Scotch
Plains, New Jersey on April 21, 2015, at
10:00 a.m. prevailing time. Bids to be
received for this work shall be Combined/
Lump Sum Bids for all the work required.
Bidding Documents may be examined
at the office of Potter Architects, L.L.C.,
410 Colonial Avenue, Union, New Jersey
07083, during business hours. A copy
thereof may be procured in person only on
or after April 2, 2015, at the Architect’s
office for the purpose of bidding. Bidders
shall notify the Architect in advance prior to
obtaining bidding documents (Plans and
Project Manual) by calling Potter Architects (908-686-2547). Documents will not
be mailed. Cash or check to the order of
said Architect in the sum of $75.00 (compact disk) or $100.00 (hard copy) is required, which is non-refundable. Neither
Owner nor Architect assumes any responsibility for errors, omissions, or misinterpretations resulting from the use of incomplete sets of Bidding Documents, or copies
of Bidding Documents obtained in electronic media form, internet plan rooms or
other internet plan sites, or copies of Bidding Documents obtained from any source
other than the Architect’s Office.
All bids must conform to the Project
Manual. Bids must be made on standard
bid forms in the manner designated by the
Project Manual, must be enclosed in sealed
envelopes bearing the name and address
of the bidder, the contract being bid on the
outside thereof, addressed to Owner and
should be delivered in person to the Owner.
Owner will not be responsible for bids sent
by mail or delivery service.
There will be a Pre-Bid Meeting at
Park Middle School, 580 Park Avenue,
Scotch Plains, New Jersey 07076, on
April 7, 201 5 at 10:00 a.m., prevailing
time, for the purpose of observing the work
site, discussing the bid documents and
expected procedures, and to review questions posed by Bidders. Attendance at the
Pre-Bid Meeting is strongly encouraged,
but not mandatory.
nents. I’m so proud of their effort.”
The Cougars posted an overall
record of 22-8 and ended the season
by winning 11 out of their last 12
games. As Assistant Coach Lou
Bringuier noted, “These girls are just
winners, plain and simple.”
The teams consisted of Gianna
Torretta, Olivia Speer, Ellie Rokicki,
Gabrielle Litterio, Monika Wlodarski,
Lauren Williamson, KC Pringle and
coaches John Frieri and Lou
Bringuier.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF CONTRACT AWARDED BY
THE TOWNSHIP OF SCOTCH PLAINS
The TOWNSHIP OF SCOTCH PLAINS
has awarded a Fair and Open Contract for
the following Professional. This Contract,
and the Resolution authorizing it, are available for public inspection in the Municipal
Building.
AWARDED TO: Hatch Mott MacDonald,
111 Wood Avenue South, Iselin, New Jersey 08830-4112
SERVICES: Township Engineer
TIME PERIOD: April 1, 2015 - December 31, 2015
DATE: March 17, 2015
BOZENA LACINA
Municipal Clerk
1 T - 4/2/15, The Times
Fee: $17.34
PUBLIC NOTICE
therefore, Notices of Classification in those
trades is not required.
4. A statement setting forth the names
and addresses of all stockholders owning
10% or more of the stock in the case of a
corporation, or 10% or greater interest in
the case of a partnership, or acknowledgment that no person or entity has 10% or
greater proprietary interest in the Bidder.
Bidders are notified as follows:
1. Addendum may be issued by the
Owner in accordance with the Project
Manual up to seven (7) business days
prior to receipt of Bids.
Bidders are notified that they must comply with the provisions of N.J.S.A. 34:1156.37 and 34:11-56.38 et seq. (Wages on
Public Works) and that the contract to be
awarded in the case shall contain a stipulation that the wage rate must be paid to
workmen employed in the performance of
the contracts shall not be less than the
prevailing wage rate as determined by the
Commissioner of the Department of Labor
and Industry of the State of New Jersey.
Bidders are notified that they must comply with the provisions of P.L. 1999, c.238
(The Public Works Contractor Registration Act), which became effective on April
11, 2000, and P.L. 2004, c.57 (Business
Registration of Public Contractors) which
became effective on September 1, 2004.
Bidders are notified that they must comply with the provisions of N.J.S.A. 52:31-1
to 52:33-4, the statutes on the use of
domestic materials on public work.
Bidders are put on notice that the Owner
is an exempt organization under the provisions of the New Jersey State Sales and
Use Tax (N.J.S.A. 54:32B-1 et. seq.) and is
not required to pay sales tax.
Bidders are put on notice that they are
required to comply with all rules and regulations and orders promulgated by the
State Treasurer pursuant to N.J.S.A. 10:531 et. seq. and with all provisions of N.J.S.A.
10:2-1 through 10:2-4 (Affirmative Action),
and N.J.A.C. 17:27.
No Bidder may withdraw his Bid for a
period of sixty (60) days after the date set
for the opening thereof. The Owner reserves the right to consider the Bids for
sixty (60) days after receipt thereof, and
further reserves the right to reject any and
all Bids and to waive any informalities in
any Bid or Bids, and to make such awards
as may be in the best interest of the Owner.
By order of the Scotch Plains-Fanwood
Board of Education, in the County of Union,
New Jersey.
Ms. Deborah S. Saridaki,
Business Administrator
Board Secretary
1 T - 4/2/15, The Times
Fee: $155.04
Thursday, April 2, 2015
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
land Street, $660,000.
Westfield: 01/12/15
Michael J. and Kathleen M. Gross
Johanna P. Doerrer to Tower Homes to Robert and Francine Scherer, 1723
For more info see:
http://clerk.ucnj.org/UCPA/DocIndex
LLC., 901 Harding Street, $525,000. Boynton Avenue, $360,000.
Jason K. Cheung and Shara M.
Scotch Plains: 12/04/14 Scotch Plains: 12/23/14 Scotch Plains: 01/23/15
Dellatore to Shui Sang Cheung and
Ting Ting Lai Cheung, 215 Livingston
John R. Zegray and D. Lopez to
Kevin and Marisa Aspell to Igor
Mumjot Singh to Michael J. Spinelli
Street. $450,000.
Bhee Properties LLC., 1370 Raritan and Diana Lekhtman, 7 Laurie Court, and Alisa Apo, 2231 New York AvAnthony J. Vavrica to Gemini Prop- Road, $275,000.
$735,000.
enue, $558,600.
erties Group Limited, 218 West Grove
John M. Keenen to Thomas J. and
Christopher J. and Debra L. MadLaverne Maxime and M.
Street, $999,000.
Kathleen T. Miller, 35 Burnham Vil- den to Anthony Amalfe and Jessica Pettinicchio to Chase A. and Filipa C.
Robert and Francine Scherer to lage, $295,000.
Hampson, 2117 Cheyenne Way, Clough, 875 Ternay Avenue,$415,000.
Eric Levine and Dana Leshko-Levine,
Adam and Illana Margolis to Daniel $480,000.
Louis and Ann R. Beckerman to
226 West Grove Street, $989,000.
R. and Magdalena E. Finnerty, 1688
Calvin Harris to Green 1118 Brian S. and Allison Cohen, 3 HighJohn M. Annunziata to Mitchell A. Oakwood Terrace, $799,000.
Jefferson Ave LLC., 1118 Jefferson lander Avenue, $730,000.
and Tanya Gambert, 767 Boulevard,
Fanny C. Ho to Ronald and Maylyn Avenue, $212,500.
Scotch Plains: 01/31/15
$610,000.
Miller, 2340 Concord Road,
Cherie Aliff to Christopher and
Denise P. Sottilare and Peter C. $555,000.
Donald L. Malizia to Reaganjack
Nicole Barnes, 337 Willow Avenue,
Waeschle to Michae Kopech and
Charles Kelk to Sathyan and $204,000.
Real Estate LLC., 8 Fieldcrest Drive,
Jamie A. Hellman, 233 Midwood Amirtharaj Narasingh, 2071
Donna Alfieri to Catherine M. $412,500.
Place, $855,000.
Westfield Avenue, $437,500.
Manuel J. and Michelle L. Rosa to
DeAppolonio, 358 Jackson Avenue,
Amelia L. Smith to Daniel and
Danny and Tinna Ferrara to Jamila $320,000.
Brian and Jill Morrissey, 2077 NewBarbara Caparro and Danuta S. and Nicolas Chillemi, 387
ark Avenue, $710,000.
Scotch Plains: 12/31/14
Machnowski, 709 Boulevard, Montague Avenue, $469,600.
Al and Ann E. Aguiler to Ana and
$610,000.
Jeffrey S. and Christine M. Valen- Marco Fernandes, 2412 Malcom
Scotch
Plains:
12/10/14
Gerard and Emily Hickey to Richtine to Lauren Leddy Lockwood, Place, $315,000.
Arthur C. and Jennifer B. Smith to 2210 Greenside Place, $464,500.
ard Cadigan and Lan Hoang, 714
Richard and Rudolph Lukacovic to
Oliver Boreham and Tamara Lover, 5
Boulevard, $1,399,000.
Ernest Fantini to David L. Huettl Linda Suriano, 352 Evergreen BouleRonald and Marijo Labin to Marian Aberdeen Road, $567,000.
and Chaundra Hoover, 1005 Penny vard, $260,000.
Bayview Loan Servicing LLC. to Lane, $925,000.
and Richard Wuchte, 676 Summit
Penny Mac Corp. to Evelyn N. Fiallo
Heritage Legacy Holdings, 1310
Avenue, $625,000.
June S. Fischer to Dominick and and Robert Gonzalez, 2201 Mountain
Darren and Meghan Cannon to Cushing Road, $305,000.
Angela Tricarico, 9 Maddaket Vil- Avenue, $330,000.
Steven Parker and Jason D. Parker lage, $340,000.
Shuan M. McElroy and Holly N.
Linda Suriano to Lois M. Read, 530
Burr, 426 Washington Street, to Nicholas A. and Kathleen M.
Paul N. Furbacher and Lili Zhang Park Avenue, $220,000.
Gumpel, 8 Clinton Lane, $740,000.
$721,000.
to Thomas E. Draghi and Lauren
Scotch Plains: 02/06/15
Daniel A. and Lindsay S. Abt to Goreczny, 1972 Lake Avenue,
Estate of Laura A. C. Swicker to
Anad and Geetha P. Subramanian
Benjamin and Melissa Gyure, 454 Samuel and Nicole Schecter, 2118 $360,000.
Dogwood Drive, $500,000.
Beechwood Place, $570,000.
Romano and Mary Delroio to John to John P. and Brooke E. Hamel, 1205
CNJOS Properties LLC. to Francis and Rosemarie Pearce, 2117 Newark Sunnyfield Lane, $885,000.
John D. Eadie to Hong V Le and
P.
and Erika Briamonte, 2050 Jersey Avenue, $585,000.
Roxanne Overton to 850 Raritan
Bao Vu, 679 Rahway Avenue,
Avenue, $789,000.
$425,000.
Susan Sawyer and J. Westbrook to LLC., 850 Raritan Road, $320,000.
Lisa A. Lesiak to Michael Novello, Dipen and Chirag Patel, 2668
Peter and Beverly Cirino to david
Robert A. and Sandra D. Spina to
O. De Fouw, 20 Aberdeen Road,
Georgiy Diloyan and Ruzanna 2416 Hill Road, $305,000.
Plainfield Avenue, $54,000.
Robin and Mario Azcarraga to Juan
Zaziyants, 14 Westbrook Road,
Carolyn Bunnell to Joseph and $759,000.
and Carolina Sanisidro, 61 Canter- Bethany Rodrigues, 2284 Sunrise
Bhaskar Rajkumar and Zeenal
$565,000.
Thakare to Jessica and Jose Lopes,
Robert H. and Judith Tell to Michael bury Lane, $550,000.
Court, $415,000.
David and Deborah Abrams to
2214 Mountain Avenue, $412,000.
and Lauren Schwimmer, 849
Scotch Plains: 01/06/15
Matthew
P. and Leah Carder, 221
Kenneth C. and Debra L. Heger to
Knollwood Terrace, $875,000.
Robert and Helene Jones to Michael Christopher and Donielle Reeve, 2019
Jay S. and Iris S. Slomovitz to Erez Hawthorne Street, $370,000.
Mario and Robin Azcarraga to V. Galbraith, 660 Jerusalem Road, Birch Street, $387,000.
and Melissa Liebermann, 12
Kevin Browne, 530 Park Avenue, $465,000.
Yong Yi Bi and Yeuying Li to
Normandy Drive, $971,500.
Russell and Linda Greenburg to Xiangyu Gui and Ling Ling Zhuang,
Randall and Kristen Ackerman to $160,000.
Neghan Edson to Martin O. Yalcin Anthony P. and Venesha Hunter, 36 420 Farley Avenue, $350,000.
Marsha M. and Charles P. Elam, II,
and
D. Balbuena, 1718 Front Street, Copperfield Road, $398,000.
840 Tice Place, $630,000.
Scotch Plains: 02/19/15
Glenn and Colleen Mcdonald to
Ralph Rapuano to Michael S. $250,000.
Federal National Mortgage AssoPaola Campos to Carlos Martinez, Gregory and Lori J. Diaz, 2422
Goldberg and Deborah E. Zeidner,
ciation
to Perry MAse Contracting
415
Hunter
Avenue,
100,000.
Allwood Road, $675,100.
123 Greene Place, $700,000.
LLC., 404 Victor Street, $255,000.
Donald
Hilliard
to
Rebecca
Denis,
Carnita
and
Tyrone
Brown
to
Paulo
Wei Tang and Xuefeng Yin to Paul
Joseph Cryan Acting Sheriff to FedMatias and Sofia Ribeiro, 844
Madsen and Alicia M. Dos Santos, 369 Jackson Avenue, $268,000.
eral National Mortgage Association,
ODonnell
Avenue,
$410,000.
811 Grandview Avenue, $380,000.
Scotch Plains: 12/12/14
Max H. Lopp and Irene Reichert to 108 Donato Circle, $150,000.
D. Villane Construction to Jianxin
Erick A. Shea and Elizabeth Day to Laura Miller, 32 Eastham Village,
Kelly L. Ancien to Carlos Peruyera,
Liu and Jing Peng, 240 Sycamore Pierre-Olivier and Maya Polack, 6
816
Cleveland Avenue, $396,000.
$275,000.
Street, $980,000.
Laurie Court, $692,000.
Pupa Homes LLC. to Scott and
Alice
and
Marvin
Aghran
to
Cara,
Cindy Miller to Chunrui Sun and
Bassam I. and Patricia Markho to
Jamie Berger, $839,000.
Jingwei Li, 225 Welch Way, Subramanian Ganesan, 2447 Hill Scott and Steven Agran, 1996 WindWeston and Lorie Williams to
ing
Brook
Way,
$625,000.
$580,000.
Road, $730,000.
Ravindra and Rameshwari Kharde,
Paul J. and Linda J. Petrarca to
Scotch Plains: 01/10/15 1266 Woodside Road, $528,000.
Gearge Caldes Trust to Valmir and
Michael Mahoney LLC., 127 Har- Fatmire Marke, 37 Canterbury Drive,
Union County Sheriff to Pleasant
Jennifer L. and William Campanile
row Road, $385,000.
$350,000.
Brook Properties, 448 Hunter Av- to Adam M. and Amanda Palmentieri,
Mitchell A. and Tanya Gambert to
Lousie Duboius to Tuna and Pinar enue, $220,000.
1564 King Street, $500,000.
Valerio and Diana Bruscianelli, 110 Yelkikanat, 2665 Sky Top Drive,
Fannie Mae to Zen Dens LLC.,
Bernard A. Katz, J. Gross and E.
Cottage Place, $385,000.
$495,000.
449 Farley Avenue, $199,999.
Katz to 2100 Gamble LLC., 2100
Michael Mahoney LLC. to Michael
Ralph Froehlich Sheriffs Office to
Joel C. and Julianne Gorton to Hugo Gamble Road, $225,000.
Besaw and Pamela Lai, 5 Faulkner Federal National Mortgage Associa- A. Pereira and Allison Decker, 210
Bette A. Tuthill to Vitally and Galina
Drive, $1,250,000.
tion, 404 Victor Street, $201,000.
Hawthorne Street, $357,500.
Polyansky, 17 Tisbury Village,
Premier Design Custom Homes
Warren D. Libutti to Jason T. Lester
Lorretta Vetere and M. Smikovecus $286,000.
LLC. to Francis Cerullo, 62 Tamaques and Melissa R. Barrella, 214 Harding to Liberty Star Holdings LLC., 2518
William K. and Donna B. Peart to
Way, $1,289,000.
Road, $465,000.
Tack Circle, $240,000.
Steven L. Goodgold and K. Kabel, 2
Suejin Kim to Gopalan and
Michael Owens to Carmillo
Eric M. Leoser and Qinghong Lu Wellington Downs, $779,500.
Sumathy Iyer, 1220 Rahway Avenue, Angelozzi, 1937 Portland Avenue, to Benjamin L. Smith, 2393 RichScotch Plains: 02/26/15
$557,500.
$250,000.
mond Street, $226,700.
Ralp A. Rapuano, Jr. and Allan
Linda Garcia to Marissa L. Malady
Richard A. Thunberg to Guenevere
Geoffrey A. and Claudia D. Collyer
Chrone to Roberta Malgieri, 20 North M. Zucker and A. Cattano, 530 Park to Wesam Saad and Suzanne and Brian P. Bischoff, 2353 Morse
Wickom Drive, $550,000.
Avenue, $130,000.
Hamilton, 2565 Mountain Avenue, Avenue, $470,000.
Thomas J. and Stacey Delvecchio
Messercola Bros. Building Co. to
Scotch Plains: 12/17/14 $409,000.
to James M. Smaldone and Jacqueline
Venkat and Anita Kishen to Jyotsna John and Heather Stagaard, 4 Hidden
A. Gray, 238 Virginia Street,
Delecia and Jerry P. Lewis to L. Reddy, 1743 Ramapo way, Meadow Drive, $1,100,000.
$795,000.
Michael S. and Kelly A. Fagan
Gerard and Janet Bruno to Joseph
$543,000.
Jason and Carolyn O’Leary to
Steven Tarczynski and Adms RiStephan and Carol A. Giamboi to Montemaggiore and R. Batista, 2272
Selvanayagam Savarimuthu and chard to Matthew and Meredith Peitz, Michael A. and Deborah Chustek, 70 Westfield Avenue, $772,500.
Sophia Diana Antonisamy, 237 Mary- 8 Bonus Hill Drive, $463,000.
Robert J. and Tracie Volpe to AnClydesdale Road, $750,000.
drew T. and Anuradha R. Heximer,
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
315 Cedar Grove Terrace, $551,000.
Moira Monasterio to Thomas P.
Mongiove, 10 Aberdeen Road,
Page 18
Recent Home Sales
2015 MUNICIPAL BUDGET
TOWNSHIP OF CRANFORD, COUNTY OF UNION
FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR ENDED
DECEMBER 31, 2015
Revenue and Appropriation Summaries
SUMMARY OF REVENUES - CURRENT FUND
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Surplus
Total Miscellaneous Revenues
Receipts from Delinquent Taxes
Minimum Library Tax
Local Tax for Municipal Purposes
Total General Revenues
SUMMARY OF APPROPRIATIONS - CURRENT FUND
1. Operating Salaries & Wages
Other Expenses
2. Deferred Charges & Other Appropriations
3. Capital Improvements
4. Debt Service
5. Judgements
6. Reserve for Uncollected Taxes
Total General Appropriations
Total Number of Employees - Full & Part Time
ANTICIPATED
2015
1,845,000.00
9,704,736.00
979,700.81
1,274,665.00
21,915,280.00
$35,719,381.81
2014
1,500,000.00
9,750,625.70
1,050,000.00
1,253,094.10
21,526,422.38
$35,080,142.18
2015 BUDGET
$13,619,739.72
13,232,440.09
2,939,818.00
250,000.00
4,017,384.00
FINAL
2014 BUDGET
$13,049,496.33
13,442,067.03
2,816,716.82
300,000.00
3,811,862.00
1,660,000.00
$35,719,381.81
353
1,660,000.00
$35,080,142.18
353
2015 DEDICATED SWIM POOL UTILITY BUDGET
ANTICIPATED
2015
2014
1. Surplus
$46,000.00
$60,000.00
2. Miscellaneous Revenues
1,713,359.00
1,800,314.00
Total Revenues
$1,759,359.00
$1,860,314.00
SUMMARY OF REVENUES
SUMMARY OF APPROPRIATIONS
1. Operating Salaries & Wages
Other Expenses
2. Capital Improvements
3. Debt Service
4. Deferred Charges & Other Appropriations
Total Appropriations
Total Number of Employees - Full & Part-time
2015 BUDGET
$956,609.00
627,000.00
26,000.00
73,250.00
76,500.00
$1,759,359.00
177
FINAL
2014 BUDGET
$977,064.00
733,500.00
73,250.00
76,500.00
$1,860,314.00
177
BALANCE OF OUTSTANDING DEBT 12/31/14
GENERAL
SWIM POOL UTILITY
Bond Principal
$15,000,000.00
Loan Principal
$5,543,434.81
Outstanding Balance
$20,543,434.81
Notice is hereby given that the budget and tax resolution was approved by the Township Committee of
the Township of Cranford, County of Union on March 24, 2015.
A hearing on the budget and tax resolution will be held at the Municipal Building on April 21st, 2015 at
8:00 o’clock (PM) at which time and place objections to the Budget and Tax Resolution for the year 2015
may be presented by taxpayers or other interested persons.
Copies of the detailed budget are available in the office of Tara Rowley, Township Clerk, at the Municipal
Building, 8 Springfield Avenue, Cranford, New Jersey 07016, (908) 709-7200, during the hours of 8:00
(A.M.) to 4:30 (P.M.).
1 T - 4/02/15, The Leader
Fee: $171.36
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
$425,000.
Dominick and Lillian Intartaglia
to Steven A. Tardy, 1 Alton Way,
$950,000.
John and Maria Scofani to Marc
Cooper, 1946 Raritan Road,
$360,000.
Michael and Keyren Burgess to
Mark and Ramaydalis Keddis, 2387
North Avenue, $382,250.
Federal Home Martgage Corp. to
Andres Cevallos and Maya Fridman,
905 Westfield Road, 342,000.
2057 Newark Avenue LLC. to
Manuel J. and Michelle Rosa, 2057
Newark Avenue, $675,000.
Fanwood: 01/06/15
Fanwood: 02/20/15
F. Rodgers Stormcrest Limited Ptnr
to Raymond Rodgers, 57 South Avenue, $500,000.
Jonathan and Kristin Defouw to
Janice Hassett, 92 Cray Terrace,
$490,000.
Public Invited to Westfield
School Spring Concerts
The Fine Arts Department of the
Westfield Public Schools invites the
public to attend any of the 30 musical
events scheduled for this spring. Approximately 2,500 students in grades
kindergarten through high school will
be performing district-wide. All concerts are free and begin at 7:00 PM
unless otherwise noted. School addresses are available on the district
website at www.westfieldnjk12.org.
The dates and locations for the spring
concerts are listed below.
3/24/15
Westfield High School
Madrigal Dessert – 7:30 pm
4/14/15
Washington
Elementary School 4th & 5th grade
Band
4/20/15
Franklin Elementary
School Advanced Band
4/22/15
Jefferson Elementary
School Band & Chorus
4/23/15
Franklin Elementary
School -- Intermediate Band
4/23/15
Tamaques Elementary
4th grade Band – 6:45 pm
5/1/15 Westfield High School /
Edison & Roosevelt Intermediate
Schools Jazz Night @ WHS – 6:00
pm
5/6/15 Westfield High School Orchestra – 7:30 pm
5/7/15 Tamaques Elementary
School 5th grade Band & Chorus
5/14/15
Westfield High School
Band – 7:30 pm
5/16/15
Westfield High School
May-Hem
5/19/15
Westfield High School
Chorus – 7:30 pm
5/26/15
Franklin Elementary
School Chorus
5/26/15
McKinley Elementary
School Band & Chorus
5/26/15
Washington
Elementary School Chorus
5/27/15
All Elementary
Intermediate Strings @ Edison Intermediate School
5/28/15
All Elementary
Beginner Strings @ Edison Intermediate School
6/1/15 Edison Intermediate School
Concert - 6th Gr. Strings & 7th Gr.
Chorus – 7:30 pm
6/1/15 Roosevelt Intermediate
School Concert – Concert Bands &
Jazz Ensembles
6/2/15 Edison Intermediate School
Concert – 6th Gr. Band & Chorus –
7:30 pm
6/2/15 Roosevelt Intermediate
School Concert – Instrumental Chamber Music Night
6/3/15 All City Festival (select
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
MAS, his heirs, devisees and personal
representatives, and their or any of their
successors in right, title and interest; MARGARET GLENN THOMAS; RUTHIE THOMAS a/k/a RUTHIE M. THOMAS a/k/a
RUTHIE M. BURR a/k/a RUTHIE
RODRIGUEZ a/k/a RUTHIE M.
RODRIGUEZ a/k/a RUTHIE THOMPSON
a/k/a RUTHIE M. THOMPSON; MAURICE
THOMAS, his heirs, devisees and personal representatives, and their or any of
their successors in right, title and interest;
KYRIE THOMAS; HENRY DWIGHT THOMAS a/k/a HENRY DWIGHT THOMPSON,
his heirs, devisees and personal representatives and their or any of their successors in right, title and interest; MICHELLE
THOMAS; STATE OF NEW JERSEY;
MALIK CARTER; GAIL WAITHE CARTER,
Individually; GENERAL MOTORS ACCEPTANCE CORP.; NEWARK BETH ISRAEL
MEDICAL CENTER; PRIMUS AUTOMOTIVE FINANCIAL SERVICES INC.; FORD
MOTOR CREDIT CO. a/k/a FORD MOTOR CREDIT COMPANY, LLC; PORTFOLIO RECOVERY ASSOC. LLC; AMERICAN EXPRESS CENTURION BANK; TD
BANK NA; that the defendant, CARLA
POLK, filed a Non-Contesting Answer; that
plaintiff has produced before this court tax
sale certificate #111102, certified to be a
true copy, which certificate is dated December 13, 2011, and is of record in the
Union County Clerk’s Office on February
10, 2012, in book 13265, page 924, as
instrument #543360, which covers Block
603, Lot 17, in the Township of Hillside.
Said certificate has been marked Exhibit
P-1 on the part of the plaintiff. More than
two years have elapsed since the sale of
said lands by the Township of Hillside, and
the lands have not been redeemed from
the tax sale; that plaintiff has produced
before this court its Certification showing
that there is due on said tax sale certificate,
together with subsequent taxes and interest, the sum of $33,133.38 as of February
20, 2015; and
IT IS on this 25th day of March, 2015,
ORDERED AND ADJUDGED that the
amount required to redeem the premises
referred to in the aforementioned tax sale
certificate is the sum of $33,133.38, which
includes the amount due on said tax sale
certificate, subsequent taxes and interest
as of February 20, 2015, together with
costs duly taxed in the sum of $2,000.00.
An exact redemption amount must be obtained from the municipal tax collector;
and
IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that the
11th day of May, 2015, between the hours
of nine o’clock in the forenoon and four
o’clock in the afternoon, at the office of the
U.S. BANK CUSTODIAN FOR
PHOENIX
FUNDING;
PLAINTIFF(S) VS. JOHN C.
THOMAS, HIS HEIRS, DEVISEES AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES, AND THEIR
OR ANY OF THEIR SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT, TITLE AND
INTEREST;
MARGARET
GLENN THOMAS; RUTHIE
THOMAS A/K/A RUTHIE M.
THOMAS A/K/A RUTHIE M.
BURR
A/K/A
RUTHIE
RODRIGUEZ A/K/A RUTHIE
M.
RODRIGUEZ
A/K/A
RUTHIE THOMPSON A/K/A
RUTHIE M. THOMPSON;
MAURICE THOMAS, HIS
HEIRS, DEVISEES AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES,
AND THEIR OR ANY OF THEIR
SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT,
TITLE AND INTEREST; KYRIE
THOMAS; HENRY DWIGHT
THOMAS A/K/A HENRY
DWIGHT THOMPSON, HIS
HEIRS, DEVISEES AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES
AND THEIR OR ANY OF THEIR
SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT,
TITLE AND INTEREST;
MICHELLE THOMAS; STATE
OF NEW JERSEY; MALIK
CARTER; GAIL WAITHE
CARTER, INDIVIDUALLY;
GENERAL MOTORS ACCEPTANCE CORP.; NEWARK
BETH ISRAEL MEDICAL CENTER; CARLA POLK; PRIMUS
AUTOMOTIVE FINANCIAL
SERVICES INC.; FORD MOTOR CREDIT CO. A/K/A FORD
MOTOR CREDIT COMPANY,
LLC; PORTFOLIO RECOVERY ASSOC. LLC; AMERICAN EXPRESS CENTURION
BANK; TD BANK NA;
DEFENDANT(S)
THIS MATTER being opened to the court
by Goldenberg, Mackler, Sayegh, Mintz,
Pfeffer, Bonchi & Gill, A Professional Corporation, Attorneys for Plaintiff, and it appearing that default has been entered
against the defendants, JOHN C. THO-
Fanwood: 02/06/15
Mary Jo Myszka to Brian Nigro
and Holly Gentile, 196 Hunter Avenue, $272,000.
Diane M. Masi to Andrew M. and
Christine C. Christakos, 77 Montrose
Avenue, $400,000.
Songsong Cao and Jie Mai to
Danielle M. Schultz and James Bothe,
9 Laurel Place, $492,000.
I Sar Inc. to Southavenue Realty
Associates LLC. 15 South Avenue,
$1,479,500.
SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY
UNION COUNTY
CHANCERY DIVISION
DOCKET NO. F-010437-14
FILE NO: 51333-483
FILED: MARCH 25, 2015
CIVIL ACTION
ORDER SETTING TIME, PLACE AND
AMOUNT OF REDEMPTION
Fanwood: 01/23/15
Raul and Rita Vazquez to Geekay
Cheung and Chong Tsai Tong, 123
Woodland Avenue, $400,000.
Richard H. and Patricia L.
Longshore to Paul R. and Michelle
Shenenberger, 477 La Grande Avenue, $595,000.
students from each elementary
school) – 7:30 pm @ Westfield High
School Auditorium
6/5/15 WHS Jazz / Percussion –
7:30 pm
6/8/15 Edison Intermediate School
Concert – 7th Gr. Band & Strings, 8th
Gr. Strings & Chamber Strings – 7:30
pm
6/8/15 Roosevelt Intermediate
School Concert – 6th & 8th Gr. Chorus
6/8/15 Roosevelt Intermediate
School Concert – 6th & 8th Gr. Orchestra @ 8:00 pm
6/9/15 Edison Intermediate School
Concert – 8th Gr. Band & Chorus,
Broadway Singers & Jazz Ensemble
– 7:30 pm
6/9/15 Roosevelt Intermediate
School Concert – 7th Gr. Chorus &
Sharps and Flats
6/9/15 Roosevelt Intermediate
School Concert – 7th Gr. Orchestra
& Early Morning Orchestra @ 8:00
pm
6/11/15
Lincoln School
Celebration 9:30; 10:30; 1:15; & 2:15
According to Linda King, Westfield
Supervisor of Visual and Performing
Arts, “Studies have shown that young
people who participate in the arts for
at least three hours, three days a week
for a year are four times more likely
to be recognized for academic
achievement, three times more likely
to be elected to class office within
their schools, and four times more
likely to participate in a math and
science fair.”
“In Westfield we give children every opportunity to succeed in the Arts
and I thank the community for its
continued support. We make sure they
are getting their fair share of arts education, which can also lead to children
becoming more well-rounded individuals. We invite you to enjoy a
concert and take pride in the accomplishments of Westfield’s children
under the guidance of our wonderful
teachers/directors,” added Ms. King.
Reading is Good For You
goleader.com/subscribe
PUBLIC NOTICE
Tax Collector of the Township of Hillside,
1409 Liberty Avenue, Hillside, New Jersey, be and the same is hereby fixed as the
time and place for the redemption of the
said lands as described in the Second
Amended Complaint and making up the
premises concerning which the Second
Amended Complaint is filed, and that thereupon the defendant who redeems shall be
entitled to the certificate of tax sale duly
endorsed for cancellation; and
IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that in default of the said defendants paying to the
Tax Collector of the Township of Hillside,
and the plaintiff, the said sum, interest and
costs aforesaid, the said defendants stand
absolutely debarred and foreclosed of and
from all right and equity of redemption on,
in and to said lands and premises and
every part thereof, and the plaintiff shall
have an absolute and indefeasible interest
of inheritance in fee simple, to said lands
and premises. Anything to the contrary
notwithstanding, redemption shall be permitted up until the entry of final judgment
including the whole of the last date upon
which judgment is entered; and
IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that if the
addresses of the defendants are not known,
a copy of this Order or Notice thereof
directed to such defendants shall be published in The Westfield Leader, a newspaper circulating in Union County, at least
one time, not less than ten days prior to the
date fixed for redemption by this Order;
and
IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy
of this Order or a Notice thereof be served
upon the defendants, whose addresses
are known, by mailing to each of them such
a copy or notice not later than ten days
prior to the date fixed for redemption of the
lands and premises by this Order; and
IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy
of this Order be delivered to the Tax Collector of the Township of Hillside, and that
said Tax Collector of the Township of Hillside certify to this Court whether the premises were or were not redeemed from the
plaintiff’s tax sale certificate in accordance
with the terms of this Order.
PAUL INNES, P.J. CH.
Respectfully recommended
R.1:34-6 Office of Foreclosure
KEITH A. BONCHI, ESQUIRE – KAB
032321983
GOLDENBERG, MACKLER, SAYEGH,
MINTZ, PFEFFER, BONCHI & GILL
A Professional Corporation
Attorneys At Law
660 New Road, Suite 1-A
Northfield, New Jersey 08225
(609) 646-0222
Attorneys for Plaintiff
1 T - 4/2/15, The Leader
Fee: $156.06
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Westfield High School Principal,
Peter Renwick, announces the second marking period honor roll for the
2014-2015 school year. Westfield
High School recognizes student
achievement every marking period at
two levels: Honor Roll and Distinguished Honor Roll. Determination
of inclusion on the Honor Roll is
based on the following criteria: For
the Distinguished Honor Roll, the
GPA must be between 3.75 and 4.0
with no grade lower than a B. For the
Honor Roll, the GPA must be between 3.5 and 3.74 with no grade
lower than a B.
Distinguished Honor Roll
Grade 9
Connor Abrams, Melanie Agne,
Jason Alvarez, Georgos Angelides,
Marlo Avidon, Olabimpe Badmus,
Yallen Bai, Harrison Bailey, Thomas
Beck, Jordan Binkowitz, Niklas Birse,
Sofia Blacker, Emily , Bloomfield,
Emily Boll, Natalie Bond, Nicholas
Bond, Stephanie Borr, Daniel Bracco,
Hannah Brogan, Allison Bronander,
Chloe Brown, Tess Brown, Eric Brunt,
Julian Bryen, Julia Buoscio, Ryan
Burns, Joshua Camacho, Alexander
Campbell, Matthew Canabarro,
Michael Canabarro, Benjamin
Cappiello, Grace Cash, Matthew
Cetlin, Ryan Chirichella, Jack Cifelli,
Asa Coleman, William Collum,
Zachary Composto, Emma Conlon,
Eve Crandall, Shannon Cutinello,
John Dannevig, Madeline Davis,
Jacob Dayon, Andrew Dazzo, John
Devanney, Steven DiMaria, Nicole
Dispenza, Paige Dumont, Sean
Dwyer, McKenna Edmondson, Shea
Elliott, Katharine Encinas, Noah
Ensslin, Emma Escaldi, Nicholas
Estrada, Robert Faktor, Emily Finn,
Charlotte Fountain-Jardim, Sarah
Fox, Lindsay Freidenrich, Chelsea
Frisch, Jessica Fritz, Samantha Fritz,
Greta Frontero, Xavier Gaines,
Lindsey Garnhart, Ashley Gigon,
Fiona Gillespie, Anna Glueck,
Kathryn Gonzalez, Inna Gorelik,
Josephine Greenwood, Evan Gruters,
Alexandra Gulla, Annie Harrington,
Erica Hayden, Kaeley Hazard,
Rachael He, Stephanie Hoodja, Ally
Hornstein, Yenteen Hu, Russell
Hughes, Claire Hunter, Bridget
Hyland, Jiana Ingrassia, Aryeh Iosif,
Sara Isser, Andrew Johnson-Milstein,
Ryan Kirby, Michael Knapp, Zachary
Kronheimer, Tate Kronick, Julia
Kuhn, Abigail Lafemina, Darika
Lara-Rodriguez, Isabel Lee, Ava
Lehavi, Marissa Lehmberg, Audrey
Leonard, Marisa Li, Jordan Lipkind,
Elena Lisci, Jason Little, William
Magnanini, Keira Mangam, Ethan
Manning, Joshua Markowitz, Nadia
Matin, Allison Mattessich, Julian
Mazzola, Timothy McAuliffe, Melina
McDevitt, Olivia McElheny, Madison McKenna, Mia Melao, Dawens
Menardy, Joshua Mendelson, Noelle
Mesbah, Matthew Meusel, Kenneth
Meyer, Laura Meyer, Kayla
Miedrzynski, Marissa Millwater,
Matthew Mineo, Benjamin Mizrach,
Catherine Moriarty, Olivia Morrison,
Haley Mykytka, Juliette Naeveke,
Mark Natiello, Christopher
O’Connor, Thomas Omberg, Drew
Ortiz, Michael Paglialunga, Ryan
Palmer, Emily Palumbo, Sydney
Paoletti, Leigh Papadopoulos, Gianna
Parsekian, Madison Pena, Katherine
Pink, Alison Plump, Catherine
Posyton, Claire Prevoznak, Dean
Pucciarelli, Ryan Qin, William
Rackear, Allison Rever, Nathaniel
Reyes, Brendan Riccardi, Sean
Riccardi, Kayla Rinn, Jessica
Ripperger, Lucille Ritter, Julia Robb,
Christine Rogers, Emma Rogers,
Victoria Ronge, Linzy Rosen, Abby
Rothenberg, Casey Ryan, Jordan
Sacher, Clara Saint-Denis, Perry
Salberg, Joseph San Giacomo,
Madeleine Sanford, Lauren Sgro,
Lindsey Sharlow, Daniel Shenker,
Jessica Shih, Isabella Silber, Jonathan
Silva, Andrew Smith, Justin Smith,
Mackenzie Smith, Daniel Sokolin,
Luke Spellman, Charles Spinardi,
David Sprung, Caroline Stockwell,
Timothy Storms, Joshua Stryker,
Stefan Sujanthakumar, Sydney
Swingle, Jacob Tananbaum, Rollins
Terry, Nathalie Tucker, Juliana Tully,
Kayla Tupper, Saranya Turimella,
Gianna Tyahla, Erica Varga, Adriana
Vergara, Matthew Viscido, Danielle
Vo, Julia Vricella-Stokes, Christopher Wagner, William Walsweer, Sarah Ward, Megan Webber, Nicholas
Weiner, Julia Whitman, Jacob
Wornow, Junlin Yi, Sophia Yodice,
Kimberly Zimmermann
Grade 10
Nina Alameno, Nicolina Albano,
Benjamin Albert-Halevy, Mia Anderson, Madeleine Armstrong, Alisha
Asija, Daniel Audino, Olivia
Aurigemma, Jared Bansky, Catherine
Barry, Owen Bartok, Emily Beattie,
Carly Bechtloff, Taylor Bechtloff,
Matthew Bernstein, Dale Beyert,
Cullen Birkel, Kayla Bleich, Dana
Boretz, Grace Brindle, Elizabeth
Brown-Cordero, Elizabeth Brucia, Eli
Burk, Loukas Carayannopoulos, German Cardenas-Caceres, Ava Carey,
Rafael Cestero, Zoe Chadowitz, Erica
Cheung, Hsiao-Yi Chiang, Patrick
Chirichella, Soo Min Chung, Quinn
Clarke-Magrab, Olivia Clausen,
Aaron Coleman, Sara Correa, Emma
Cravo, Stefan Crigler, John
Cunningham, Matthew DeBenedetto,
Amanda DePinto, Nicholas DePinto,
Samantha Della Fera, Shannon
Devitt, Christina DiBella, Joshua
Ebel, Michael Echausse, Nicole
Eisenberg, Marie Eisenhauer, Melissa Endy, Abby Erasmus, Haley
Farella, Mark Fico, Spencer Fishman,
Katherine Foley, Karen Forbes,
Hannah Frankel, Sara Frankel, Tho-
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Honor Roll
Westfield High School - 2nd Marking Period
mas Fuccillo, Michael Gagliardi, Sara
Gargiulo, Skylar Geoghan, Charlotte
Gilbertson, Gabriel Givelber,
Brendan Glenn, Jaret Gold, Sofia
Gonzalez-Nolde, Sydney Gordner,
Samantha Gould, Emily Greaney,
Samantha Greenaway, Lucy Hale,
Jack Hall, Olivia Hamilton, Michael
Hauge, Maggie Hinel, Christopher
Hoerrner, Emily Holtzman, Sophie
Hurwitz, Jenna Iorio, Sara Israel,
Alexandra Jackman, Madelyn Jacobs,
Alistair Kapadia, Hayley Kasko, Benjamin Kelly, Max Kleiman-Lynch,
Riley Kopser, Mark Kostyack, Olivia
Kuzman, Rafaela Laitamaki, Amy
Liang, Emmy Liederman, Nicholas
Maher, Maximillion Martin, Philip
Martini, Carl Mazzara, Julia
Mazzucco, Cameron McLaughlin,
Zachary Model, Griffin Morgan,
Meme Morgan, Michael Moriarty,
Lea Moynihan, Ryan Murphy,
Victoria Napolitano, Hailey Nettler,
Christopher Ng, Nicholas Nolan,
Coston O’Brien, Matthew Omberg,
Andrew Orenberg, Emily Oster,
Ethan Otis, Christian Panarese, Sean
Pass, Elizabeth Penn, Charlotte Perez,
Emma Pettit, Natali Pinho, Cindy
Qiang, Zoe Rader, Noah Reich, Kevin
Reinhard, Sofia Reverendo,
Samantha Ricci, Alexis Riley,
Danielle Rinaldi, Owen Ripperger,
Logan
Robertson,
Michael
Rodriguez, Conor Root, Charles Rule,
Henry Sacco, Benjamin Salerno,
Cameron Scalera, Leigh Scarano,
Chloe Schafer, Olivia Scheuermann,
Matthew Schiff, Eleanor Scott,
Kathleen Seaman, Caroline Seery,
Christina Seery, Braden Siegel,
Hannah Siegel, Aditya Singh, Sarah
Slavin, Rebecca Smoot, Emma Stern,
Sean Stirrup, Eric Storms, Kyra
Sullivan, Jason Telsey, Michelle
Telsey, Brooke Tepper, Jacob Triarsi,
Kevin Tsui, John Tyahla, Matthew
Varano, Grace Venezia, Daniel
Vergilis, Paul Vernick, Darlena Vo,
Kevin Wang, Keelyn Weber, Miranda
Whelan, Katherine Whipple, Megan
Why, Arthur Xiao, Juliana Yang,
Nicholas Youssef, Philip Zanfagna,
Natalia Zeller MacLean, Andrew
Zhou, Eli Zidel
Grade 11
Devin Anderson, Ryan Anderson,
Matthew Baker, Jake Barrow, Chloe
Beauchamp, Dylan Belka, Catherine
Bergin, Noelle Blackford, Ryan Bowman, Kevin Bronander, Katherine
Brown, Lauren Brumfield, Mitchell
Bryk, Lauren Busardo, Matthew
Busardo, Christina Caggiano, Daniel
Campbell, Courtney Casale, Claire
Cassie, Albert Chen, Gabrielle
Cofone, David Collins, Brendan Collum, Owen Colwell, Santiago Correa,
Greta Crandall, Ryan Dang, Theodore
Dannevig, Sarah Davis, Marina
DeCotiis, Kayla Derman, Julia
Dibella, Jessica Doyle, Sidharth
Eleswarapu, Edward Encinas, Alan
Fang, Carlie Fasano, Jack Fico, Cecile
Fountain-Jardim, Alexander Frisch,
Julia Frontero, Danielle Gabuzda,
Isabella Gelfand, Kelly Giacone,
Jonathan Gorczyca, Mary Gouldson,
Jarek Gozdieski, Molly GreenGorelick, Veronica Grycan,
Frankanthony Guerriero, Hannah
Haar, Tadj Hayward, Emily Hecht,
Eloise Hendricks, Jordan Hindes,
Kenneth Hoerle, Paul Jakobovic,
Alison Jaruzelski, Maya Jonsson,
Samuel Karnofsky, Catherine King,
Emily Kirschner, Nicholas Lawrie,
Madeline Levy, Raquel Levy, Briana
Litchholt, Jesse Liu, Erin Malley,
Michael
Masciale,
Rachel
Mattessich, Paige McCann, Kyle
McIntyre, Hannah McLane, Alyssa
Meek, Megan Melillo, Ben Meltzer,
Felicia Mermer, Carlee Miller,
Michael Mizus, Michael Mobarakai,
Sarah Morton, Nicholas Mueller, Julia
Myers, Lukas Naeveke, Andrew
Natko, Kevin Palmer, Anthony
Pericolo, Danielle Pinney, Nova Qi,
Jenna Reed, Bryanna Reinhardt, Eric
Reynolds, Christopher Rinaldi, Jacob
Ritter, Evan Rooney, Tyler Roth,
Hope
Rothenberg, Andrejs
Rumpeters, Connor Russell, Holden
Sabato, Chloe Salvato, Claudia
Savickas, Brooke Schaeffer, Lauren
Schnepf, Dylan Scott, Haley Sharlow,
Julia Simpson, Molly Skowron,
Christina Sloan, Elizabeth Smith,
Julia Soalheiro, Helen Sparrow, Sarah Steiner, William Stern, Emma
Stierhoff, Alexa Stiles, Robert
Suriano, Kelsey Swingle, Gary Taks,
Aaron Tavasi, Blake Taylor, Shelby
Taylor, Allyson Tazbin, Evan Trott,
Megan Troutman, Matthias White,
Paige Whitman, Connie Wu, Diana
Wu
Grade 12
Marissa Alvarez,
Lauren
Androconis, Sameena Asija, Patrick
Aslanian, Elise Ballan, Benjamin
Bass, Sophie Bass, John Birle, Megan
Blutfield, Liam Boland, Miranda
Bonina, Seth Botos, Valeria
Bouchoueva, Victoria Breza,
Samantha Bromberg, James Brucia,
Eliza Bryen, Bianca Buecklers, Taylor Bulger, John Bunting, Lisa
Calello, Christopher Caminiti, Nicholas Cannone, Paige Carlin, Eamon
Caton, Sabrina Cavanagh, Amanda
Cheung, Bryan Chou, Grace Cook,
Alyssa Cox, William Crenshaw,
Daniel Cronin, Katherine Crowley,
Taylor Cummings, Lauren D’Amico,
Michael Dazzo, Kayleigh Denner,
Joseph Detrano, Nicole DiGiorgio,
Daniel DoCampo, Francesca Dos
Santos, Julie Dwyer, Kevin Echausse,
Max Flysch, Emily Forcht, Jane
Franks, Andrew Frantz, Rebecca
Freer, Matthew Friedman, Jackson
Frontero, Gregory Gao, Jared
Geoghan, Kyle Giordano, Hannah
Goldring, Christina Griesmer, Jaime
Gunchar, Erin Hart, Raquel
Henriques, Benjamin Howell,
Isabelle Ick, Leah Iosif, Kevin Irving, Bryan Jackler, Kyle Jason, Amber Johnson, Brian Johnson, Bryn
Johnston, Carly Kalis, Benjamin Kim,
Katherine Ko, Alison Krakauer, Andrew Kuznetsov, Kaitlyn Larkin,
Jorge Ledesma, John Lindros,
Frances Ling, Jason Liu, Maria Lizzo,
Rachel Logan, Michael Maguire,
Jameson Maher, Natalie Marcotullio,
Leandra
Margolies,
Sara
McCutcheon, Judy McDonald, John
McKinley, Johanna Mermer, Scott
Messing, Mary Meyo, Kevin Miller,
Erica Millwater, Helen Mizrach,
Julian Mone, Griffin Mooney, Maya
Moritz, Kelly Morrison, Rita Murphy,
Jacqueline Napolitano, Melanie
Nettler, Anna O’Brian, Charlie
O’Brien, Samantha Paoletti, Corinne
Petersen, Anthony Pirrone, Emily
Posyton, Jacob Rabinowitz, Chelsea
Rader, Anna Reid, Kyle Rittendale,
Jordan Robertson, Thomas
Rohwetter, Claudia Romeo,
Alexandra Rood, Michela Sabba,
Emily Schuman, Lillian Scott, Caitlyn
Serafin, Emily Serafin, Ellie Shirk,
Jack Siegel, Georgia Slater, Juliette
Smith, Anastasia Smolenski, Melanie
Snyder, Caroline Stocking, Lindsey
Strauss, Hermes Suen, Michael
Tivenan, Kristen Toth, Nina Wang,
Mallory Weisse, Christopher Why,
Olivia Windorf, Eli Wirtshafter, Andrew Zale, Katelyn Zelko
Honor Roll
Grade 9
Lukas Adriaens, Leah Andrews,
Ethan Bandelli, Rutger Barraza, Lee
Beauchamp, Camden Beinhaker,
Charles Billek, Cory Billings,
Michael Birle, Kimberly Boado,
Aidan Boland, Alexandra Borg, Robert Brown, Jack Butera, Liam Campanile, James Cerria, Jessica Chicola,
Brianna Cho, Nicholas Christopher,
Katherine Clark, Julia Clifford,
Marie Ann Cuenca, Thomas Cugno,
Colin Daniel, Jack Dobosiewicz,
Matthew Doyle, Alexandra Dulski,
Lucy Earl, Joseph Ensslin, Elizabeth Evans, Drew Fasano, Julia Friss,
Carson Gama, Zoe Garceau, Jason
Glickstein, Lucy Gretsky, Charles
Heyder, Julia Hinderliter, Daniel
Hoerle, Emma Jackler, Sydney
Keenan, Benjamin Kevelson,
Mohammad Sa’id Kharboutli, Alex
Kingsley, Ana Maria Kobori, Emma
Koznecki, Kylinn Kraemer, Samuel
Lamchek, Michael Leniart, Jake
Lerie, Hannah Martin, Emilia
McCormack, Olivia Milford, Evelyn
Miller, Morgan Miovski Catherine
Moore, Peter Morariu, Asia Muselli,
Kayla Neal, Henry Ohlig, Natalie
Patterson, Alexandra Piscitelli,
Stuart Pollock, Tomas Rios, Matthew Rizzi, Fiona Romano, Julia
Roth, Damien Ruparel, Molly Ryan,
Aman Sachdev, David Sampson,
Evan Schaefer, Vraj Shah, Molly
Sheil, Matthew Shendell, Leah
Sherman, William Sherry, Lauren
Singer, Jessica Stern, Jonathan Stiles,
Maxine Stone, Graham Studwell,
Devyn Tibbals, Devon Tikku,
Tehreem Uzma, Tessa Verga, Steven
Warren, Leo Warsh, Sarah
Wasserman, Eli Weaver, Spencer
Weigand, Alex Wendel, Devin
Wendel, Amanda Wisniewski,
Nicholas Wojno-Oranski, Karolina
Zboralska
Grade 10
Samantha Alfano, Luke Altman,
Joelle Ballecer, Aliyah Barnes, Spencer Beals, Stella Billek, Andrew
Boley, Noah Bram, Marcus
Budashewitz, Kevin Campanello,
Robert Catania, Joseph Chen,
Katherine Clancy, Katherine
Colleran, Mark Daaleman, Kyle
Dombroski, Claudia Dougherty,
Katherine Driscoll, Jack Edmondson,
Lauren Fernandez, Allie Freer,
Rebecca Goldberg, David Greenburg,
Christina Harvey, Brianna Heard,
Beau Heffron, John Heimall, Sara
Hipschman, Lauren Ho, Matthew
Hopen, Lila Hutchins, Abigail Jones,
Max Kaplan, Matthew Kaufman,
Owen Kessler, Victoria Knaul, Daniel
LaMastra, Kiere Lassiter, Evan
Latowsky, Philip Martinez, Caroline
Martini, Sarah Mastrocola, Jack
Meiselman, Michael Mohr-Ramirez,
Kelsey Moum, Esther Nam, Benjamin
Norton, Josue Olivera, Marie-Elena
Pafumi, Christopher Parmelee, Sonya
Peregrim, Daniel Piscitelli, Hannah
Prieto, Connor Ragoza, Emily
Riordan, Emily Sackett, Lexa Samer,
John Sanders, Margaret Schantz, Sarah Schneider, Kyle Shirk, Elizabeth
Sottung, Brett Spass, Paul Stefanov,
Brittney Tiffault, Olivia Turner, Elizabeth Villane, Isabelle Wright
Grade 11
Isaac Amador, Dante Anastario,
Nicholas Antonelli, Caroline Basil,
Luke Beaulieu, Jonathan Bergman,
Madeline Berry, Samantha Beurer,
Sarah Boyle, Cameron Bremer, Sarah Broughton, Anna Browne,
Victoria Cappo, Max Carle, Christopher Cerrachio, John Ciarrocca,
Isabelle Cohen, Benjamin Cook,
Daniel Criscuolo, Nicole Cristiano,
Jack Curry, Isabella D’Olier-Lees,
Ryan Daniel, Leo Delaney, Christian
Dobosiewicz, Kelly Dorry, Daniel
Evans, Lucas Fan, Jared Foley,
Katharine Gillen, Jessica Gold, Matthew Greeley, Tabitha Hanay-Reaves,
Bridget Harrington, Lexi Holzer,
Abigail Hurwitz, Ana Ionescu,
Stephanie Jung, Carly Kandel, Natalie
Karter, Mara Kaveney, Jessica
Keenan, Shanna Kelly, William Kelly,
Madeline Kevelson, Jake Klofta, AnnSophie Koglin, Kevin Law, Brian
Lawrence, Mackail Liederman, Elise
Lloyd, Celeste Loffredo, Olivia Loggia, Olivia Luzzi, Christian
Mancheno, Jack Manning, Grace
Mastronardi, Gabriela McDaniel,
Carly McDevitt, Katherine
McDonald, Kayla McMillan, Edward
Mebane, Lillian Metzger, Emily
Mordkovich, Allyson Morgenthal,
Gali Moritz, Owen Murray, Maria
Nemeth, Kathleen Nogan, Timothy
Norris, Jack Oates, Rowan Oberman,
Alyssa Pascoguin, Julia Pikaart,
Emilee Ramirez, Jenna Rediker, J.
Mack Rembisz, Lauren Rigney,
Nicholas Rizzi, Brett Robertshaw,
Fiona Rosenthal, Julia Ross, Michael
Rossi, Drew Russo, Thomas Sabato,
Alexandra Sacher, Jacob Sagal,
Claudia Sarkos, Danielle Sawyer,
Chanel Shum, Ryan Siegel, Erica
Simmons, Douglas Smith, Ethan
Smith, Pavel Stepaniouk, Ryan
Stroever, Kelly Travers, Scott Tupper,
Aleksei Urusov, Katarina Von Der
Wroge, Michael Vricella-Stokes, Ava
Wadman, Gillian Wadman, Allison
Worms, Laine Yamano, Jessica
Zimmermann, Olivia Zito, Devin
Zrebiec
Grade 12
Sabra Anderson, Carli Arena, Brittany Ballard, Tyler Bansky, Morgan Biglin, Stephanie Brown, Julie
Brownstone, Madeline Capodanno,
William Chandler, Elena Chermak,
Amanda Christian, Jeremy Cohen,
Caitlin Collins, Nicholas Costa,
Katherine Duffy, Amanda Durante,
Lauren Echausse, Kate Edmondson,
Sean Elliott, Brennan Erickson, Zoe
Federbusch, Erin Frankel, John
Fuller, Nicole Graf, Aidan
Hamilton, Molly Hart, Rachel
Hayden, Kaelyn Heard, Eric Herber,
Austin Hinel, James Hunter,
Alexandru Ionescu, Margot
Johnston, Norna Jules, Sarah Kasko,
Christopher Kim, John Kirkland,
Ian Knapp, Jessica Koenigsberg,
Corinne Kuntz, David LaVelle,
Matthew Lanzano, Hongju Lee,
Alexandra Little, Jianhong Liu,
Angel Lopez, Andrew Malacrea,
Olivia Manning, Jamie Miller, Mia
Miller, Ariel Moise Kleinman, Cera
Montez, Sean Moore, Briana
O’Brien, Leah Pesenson, Christopher Pettit, Meghan Pettit, Christopher Prasek, Jason Previlon, Jack
Reinhard, Annie Resnikoff,
Samantha Riley, Jenna Rizkalla,
Christopher Romano, Jack Rose,
Mariah Russo, Logan Schwartz,
Victoria Scognamiglio, Dana
Seigelstein, Lisa Simon, Kaelyn
Smith, Dhruv Tikku, Dominique Vo,
Kelly Webber, Amy West, Joshua
White, Emma Williams, James
Yannazzno, Alexander Zornitsky
See More Education
News on Page 21
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Thursday, April 2, 2015
Page 19
LEARNING NEVER STOPS...Jeanine Gottko, K-5 Master Technology Teacher
in the Westfield Public Schools, was among more than 9,000 educators, administrators and technologists from all 50 states and more than 40 countries at the
National First Ed-Tech Conference held this winter. The purpose of the conference was to learn new strategies for implementing technology in the PK-12
environment. She connected with many leaders in the field of educational
technology to discuss the newest additions to their products and how to effectively
train the teachers in Westfield. She is pictured here with Moby, the mascot from
Brain Pop, a subscription based service used widely at the elementary level.
Westfield Teacher Attends
National Ed-Tech Conference
WESTFIELD – Jeanine Gottko,
K-5 Master Technology Teacher in
the Westfield Public Schools, was
among more than 9,000 educators,
administrators and technologists from
all 50 states and more than 40 countries at the National First Ed-Tech
Conference (FETC) held this winter.
The purpose of the conference was to
learn new strategies for implementing technology in the PK-12 environment. As a first-time attendee of the
annual conference, Ms. Gottko – who
has been a faculty member in
Westfield for 15 years -- had access
to more than 450 sessions and 500
interactive vendor exhibits. Sessions
which she attended over the course of
the four-day conference covered topics such as: advancements in elementary technology, Google Apps for
Education, maker spaces, augmented
reality, iPads, and many more.
She also had the opportunity to
connect with many frontrunners in
the field of educational technology
to discuss the newest additions to
their products and how to effectively train the teachers in Westfield.
Miss Gottko commented on how
grateful she was to attend one of the
most prominent technology conferences in the country. “I have
learned so much from the leaders in
this ever-changing field. This conference has provided me with the
tools I need to help the students and
teachers in Westfield advance and
become 21st century learners.”
Miss Gottko has already shared
some of the resources from the conference with teachers through her
bi-weekly emails, her website, and
in professional development
classes. “I look forward to continuing to educate teachers on how to
best use educational technology to
meet the needs of their students and
to best prepare them for the world in
which we live.”
Edu. Foundation of Garwood
Announces Annual Dinner
GARWOOD – The Education
Foundation of Garwood (EFG), a
non-profit volunteer organization
that seeks to partner with the schools
and the community in the pursuit of
educational excellence, has set
Thursday, April 23 as its next fundraising event. The Annual Appreciation Dinner, which will be held at
the Westwood in Garwood, recognizes the accomplishments of the
“Garwood Educator of the Year” as
well as the “Garwood People Making a Difference” award. The “Making a Difference” award is given
annually to honor a person or persons from Garwood who has impacted and contributed to the Borough in a positive way.
The EFG will honor the recipient of
the Garwood Educator of the Year,
Ms. Tara Ridente. Ms. Ridente is a
Speech Language Specialist in Lincoln School. Additionally, she is serves
as a paraprofessional in the district.
This year’s “People Making a Difference Award” will be given to Ms.
Mary Guare and Mr. Bill Connolly;
both are being honored for their
volunteerism and contributions to
the community. The evening will
also feature a Tricky Tray and raffle.
Tickets for the evening, which includes a buffet dinner, beer, wine and
music are available for $35 per person, and are available for purchase
from the school office, EFG Trustees
or by calling (908) 789-0331 ext.
1450. Tickets are also available at the
Garwood Public Library located at
411 Third Avenue during regular library hours. You may also send contributions or direct inquiries to the
EFG, c/o Lincoln School -400 Second Avenue Garwood, NJ 07027
EFG will use the proceeds from
the Appreciation Dinner to fund grant
programs benefiting Garwood’s public schools and provide Garwood
students scholarships awards.
THE
WARDLAW-HARTRIDGE
SCHOOL
1295 Inman Avenue, North Edison, NJ
Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12 independent,
co-educational, college-preparatory school
Our Early Childhood Education program provides a
nurturing learning environment and stimulates growth,
independence and intellectual curiosity.
Prepare for a global world in a global learning environment
Early Childhood Education
Admission Information Session:
Saturday, April 18 at 9:30 a.m.
Register online at www.WHschool.org
or contact us for a Personal Tour
For more information, call (908) 754-1882, Ext. 155
Page 20
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, April 2, 2015
Support Groups to Begin For
Ventilator-Pulmonary Issues
WESTFIELD — Westfield Center,
a Genesis HealthCare Skilled Nursing
Facility located at 1515 Lamberts Mill
Road, Westfield, will offer two support groups beginning next week.
A Ventilator Unit Support Group
for family members and friends of
residents requiring ventilator support
at the Westfield Center will begin on
Monday, April 6, at 6 p.m. This group
will present the opportunity to foster
an awareness and develop methods
that will allow caregivers to better
provide for their loved one while
they are receiving ventilator support.
It also will offer families an opportunity for open discussions on qualityof-life issues as they relate to all the
health challenges of their ventilatordependent loved ones.
Additionally, a Pulmonary Support
Group for residents, family members
and friends of residents at Westfield
Center, as well as the general public,
will be available at 1 p.m. starting
Wednesday, April 8. This group will
provide the opportunity to promote
education and develop methods to
help caregivers better provide for
loved ones diagnosed with lung disorders such as Chronic Obstructive
Pulmonary Disease (COPD), chronic
bronchitis and asthma. The group
also will assist in connecting these
patients and their families within the
facility and provide them the resources to better manage their lung
disease and will offer families the
opportunity to discuss quality-of-life
issues as they relate to the health and
wellness challenges of their loved
ones.
For each support group, a member
of the interdisciplinary team, consisting of physicians, a respiratory
therapist, nurses, a nutritionist, Social Services and members of the
rehabilitation team (physical therapist, occupational therapist and
speech therapist), will host the meetings and select topics relevant to the
care process within the ventilator unit
and the pulmonary unit. In each case,
the team will present topics based on
the expressed interest of family members and those in attendance.
Meetings of the Ventilator Unit
Support Group will be held on the
first Monday of the month at 6 p.m. in
the Center’s Conference Room. Meetings of the Pulmonary Support Group
will be held on the first Wednesday of
the month at 1 p.m. in the Center’s
Conference Room.
Registration is not required for
these support groups. Anyone with
questions may contact Robert
Guardabasco at (908) 301-8210 or
by
e-mail
at
[email protected]
Kenilworth Hist. Soc. Offers
Benefit Afternoon Tea Event
KENILWORTH
—
The
Kenilworth Historical Society will
present “Teapot Tales,” an elegant
afternoon Tea and program on Saturday, April 25, featuring a vast
collection of unique teapots from
around the world.
The stories behind the teapots
and insight into the practice of
teapot collecting will be the focus
of the featured program, “Confessions of a Teapot Collector,” to be
presented by certified professional
PUBLIC NOTICE
SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY
CHANCERY DIVISION
UNION COUNTY
DOCKET NO. F-004028-15
FILE NO. 51333-549
NOTICE TO ABSENT DEFENDANTS
STATE OF NEW JERSEY TO:
ALBERTA STATEN, WIDOW,
HER HEIRS, DEVISEES AND
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES AND THEIR OR ANY
OF THEIR SUCCESSORS IN
RIGHT, TITLE AND INTEREST;
YOU ARE HEREBY summoned and required to serve upon the Law Offices of
Goldenberg, Mackler, Sayegh, Mintz,
Pfeffer, Bonchi & Gill, A Professional Corporation, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose
address is 660 New Road, Suite 1-A,
Northfield, New Jersey 08225, an answer
to the Complaint filed in a civil action in
which US Bank Custodian for Phoenix is
plaintiff and Alberta Staten, Widow, her
heirs, devisees and personal representatives and their or any of their successors in
right, title and interest, et al. are defendants, pending in the Superior Court of
New Jersey, within 35 days after April 2,
2015, exclusive of such date. If you fail to
do so, judgment by default may be rendered against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint. You shall file your answer and proof of service in duplicate with
the Clerk of the Superior Court, Hughes
Justice Complex, P.O. Box 971, Trenton,
New Jersey, 08625, in accordance with
the rules of Civil Practice and Procedure.
You are further advised that if you cannot
afford an attorney, you may call the Legal
Services office in the county where you live
or the Legal Services of New Jersey
Statewide Hotline at 1-888-LSNJ-LAW
(1-888-576-5529). If you do not have an
attorney and are not eligible for free legal
assistance, you may obtain a referral to an
attorney by calling one of the Lawyer Referral Services. The names and telephone
numbers of such agencies are as follows:
Lawyer Referral Service: (908) 353-4715.
Legal Service: (908) 354-4340.
THE ACTION has been instituted for the
purpose of foreclosing Tax Sale Certificate #12-00058 dated October 19, 2012
made by Terri Malanda, Collector of Taxes
of the Township of Union, County of Union,
and State of New Jersey, to US Bank
Custodian for Phoenix and covers real
estate located at 118 Carnegie Place in
the Township of Union, County of Union
and State of New Jersey, known as Lot
7.17, Block 5708, as shown on the Tax
Assessment Map and Tax Map duplicate
of the Township of Union. Said tax sale
certificate was recorded in the Clerk’s Office of Union County on December 20,
2012, in Book 13477 of Mortgages, page
444, as instrument #562705.
YOU, ALBERTA STATEN, WIDOW, are
made a defendant in the above entitled
action because you are the record owner
of the property.
YOU, HEIRS, DEVISEES AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES OF
ALBERTA STATEN, WIDOW, AND THEIR
OR ANY OF THEIR SUCCESSORS IN
RIGHT, TITLE AND INTEREST, AND
EACH of you are made defendants in the
above entitled action because Alberta
Staten, Widow, died on January 13, 2014,
a resident of Union County, survived by
her daughter, Saundra Everett-Best and
son, Dennis Shakir-Ullah, as sole heirs-atlaw and next-of-kin. Inasmuch as no estate has been found for Alberta Staten,
Widow, plaintiff joined her, her heirs, devisees and personal representatives, and
their or any of their successors in right, title
and interest as party defendants.
The nature of which and the reason that
you and each of you are joined as defendants is set forth with particularity in the
Complaint, a copy of which will be furnished you on request addressed to the
attorneys of the plaintiff at the above mentioned address.
DATED: April 2, 2015
MICHELLE M. SMITH, Clerk
Superior Court of New Jersey
GOLDENBERG, MACKLER, SAYEGH,
MINTZ, PFEFFER, BONCHI & GILL
A Professional Corporation
660 New Road, Suite 1-A
Northfield, New Jersey 08225
(609) 646-0222
1 T - 4/2/15, The Leader
Fee: $88.74
tea specialist Darlene MeyersPerry, owner/president of The Tea
Lover’s Archives.
The Tea will begin at noon at the
Kenilworth Gospel Chapel Hall,
located at 103 South 23rd Street,
Kenilworth, where the ambience
of a tearoom is being created for
the event. In addition to providing
an array of assorted teas, tea sandwiches, scones and desserts, the
event will include a gift auction
and door prizes.
Admission is $28. Advance reservations by Thursday, April 16,
are required, as seating is limited.
For reservations/tickets, call (908)
709-0434 or (908) 709-0391 or visit
Especially Yours Florist, located at
13 North 20th Street, Kenilworth.
This year’s annual Tea is being
dedicated to Kenilworth Historical Society board member and lifelong Kenilworth resident Eleanor
Combs, who passed away last September. Ms. Combs always looked
forward to the Historical Society’s
Teas and contributed significantly
to their successful evolution over
the years.
Proceeds from the Tea will benefit the Kenilworth Historical
Society’s circa 1880 Oswald J.
Nitschke House “living history”
museum and cultural arts center
by helping defray the cost of an
elevator that makes all levels of
the newly-restored and furnished
site fully accessible to everyone.
The Kenilworth Historical Society is an independent, non-profit,
tax-exempt, 501(c)(3) organization
dedicated to the research, preservation and interpretation of the
Oswald J. Nitschke House, local
history and culture.
PUBLIC NOTICE
SCOTCH PLAINS-FANWOOD
BOARD OF EDUCATION
REQUEST FOR BIDS
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that
sealed bids will be received by the Scotch
Plains-Fanwood Board of Education, in
the county of Union, State of New Jersey,
for the furnishing of iPad Airs & Carts,
and opened and read in public at the
Scotch Plains-Fanwood Board of Education Offices, Evergreen Avenue and Cedar
Street, Scotch Plains, New Jersey 07076,
on April 16, 2015 at 3:00 p.m. prevailing
time. Bids to be received for this equipment shall be Combined/Lump Sum Bids
for all equipment.
TITLE OF BID – IPAD AIRS &
CARTS BID – APRIL 2015
Bid specifications and bid forms may be
obtained upon written request to: Deborah
S. Saridaki, Business Administrator, Scotch
Plains-Fanwood Board of Education, Evergreen Avenue & Cedar Street, Scotch
Plains, New Jersey 07076, Fax 908-8890258 or Email [email protected]
Bids must be sealed, the envelope to
bear the Title of Bid and the name and
address of bidder. The bids must be received and/or delivered to the Business
Office, Scotch Plains-Fanwood Board of
Education on or before Thursday, April
16, 2015 no later than 3:00 p.m.
The bid opening process will begin on
the above date and time. No bids shall be
received after the time designated in the
advertisement. (N.J.S.A. 18A:18A-21 (b)).
The Board of Education does not accept
electronic (e-mail) submission of bids.
Failure to comply with Instructions to
Bidders and to complete and submit all
required forms may be cause for disqualification and rejection of the bid.
The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Board of
Education is an affirmative action employer
and pursuant to Federal and State regulations (Executive Order 11246) as amended
and N.J.S.A. 18A:36-20 as amended as
well as N.J.A.C. 6A:4-1.6, we hereby advise you of our intent to transact business
only with other affirmative action employers. Any contractors and sub-contractors
with whom we contract are obliged to take
affirmative action to provide equal employment opportunity without regard to race,
creed, color, national origin, age or sex.
Proposers must also comply with the requirement of P. L. 1975, c. 127.
The Board of Education reserves the
right to reject any or all bids pursuant to
N.J.S.A. 18A:18A-2(s), (t), (x), (y), 18A:18A4(a), 18A:18A-22, and to waive any informalities.
Ms. Deborah S. Saridaki,
Business Administrator
Board Secretary
1 T - 4/2/15, The Times
Fee: $56.10
Letters to the Editor
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4
Spring Cleanup Time Helps the Needy
And Protects the Environment
Now that spring may finally have
arrived, and we will all begin our
spring cleaning, I want to reprint
this letter to all readers to encourage
reduce-reuse-recycle of so much of
our ‘stuff”. Such actions will reduce
our consumption of natural resources, and protect our air, water
and land from further pollution. So,
with an eye towards reducing our
‘bulk waste, I remind all readers of
the following:
Furniture assist in Kenilworth
takes furniture, tables, chairs, small
working appliances, beds, kitchen
utensils, pictures, knick-knacks,
lamps, yard tools, toys, clothing,
and books among other things for
reuse by those in need. The Red
Cross takes medical items such as
walkers and crutches. There are
clothing bins at the Home Depot.
The Lupus and Leukemia Society
(Unique on Route 22) will take pictures, lamps, knock-knacks, tools,
clothing, pots and pans and many
other items. Foam Pak in Springfield recycles Styrofoam. The
Fanwood Recycling Center accepts
car batteries, compact discs, and
DVDs.
We can take hazardous materials
to the Union County Hazardous
Waste recycling days, and computers, televisions, phones, and anything electronic to the County Electronic recycling days. Vehicle, including bicycle tires, can be brought
to the hazardous waste day. Home
Depot accepts fluorescent bulbs.
Garwood and Cranford libraries
accept books for reuse. The Westfield
Rotary Club collects bicycles and
sewing machines for reuse in foreign countries. Home Depot and
Radio Shack accept rechargeable and
lithium batteries. Appliances can be
placed at the curb for pick-up.
UPS accepts packaging for reuse.
Clothes hangers can be brought to
dry cleaners. Shop Rite and Pathmark
accept plastic bags. The Garwood
Lions Club accepts glasses and hearing aids in their mailbox on Center
Street; damaged/ripped American
flags can be brought to the mailbox
right next to it.
Metal can be brought to scrap dealers in Plainfield or Newark for cash!
The Cranford recycling center accepts plastics with numbers 5,6, and
7 on them. Garwood residents are
supposed to recycle cans, glass, aluminum, plastic containers, milk and
OJ containers, newspapers/mail, corrugated cardboard and magazines.
Wood can be burned in a fireplace.
When you get down to it, the vast
majority of items that are placed in
bulk waste pick-up can be recycled
or reused. I urge all Garwood residents to go through our ‘junk’ to see
if it can be reduced, reused or recycled. I know there are other places
to which we can bring our ‘stuff’
that I have not listed. I urge you to
call the Borough Recycling Coordinator or me if you are uncertain as to
how to properly dispose of something. Together, we can reduce our
waste, repurpose our tax dollars, and
protect our environment.
Bill Nierstedt
Garwood Councilman
Lance Urges Obama to
Stop Med. Advantage Cuts
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Rep.
Leonard Lance (R-7th), a member
of the House Energy and Commerce
Health Subcommittee, joined likeminded members of Congress in
sending a letter to the Centers for
Medicare and Medicaid Services
Acting Administrator urging the
Obama Administration to reverse
course on its proposed changes to
the Medicare Advantage (MA) program.
The members write, “The newly
proposed cuts [to the Medicare
Advantage program] could represent a significant threat to the
health and financial security of
seniors in our congressional districts who rely on their Medicare
Advantage plans to meet their
health care needs.”
Today nearly one-third of senior
PUBLIC NOTICE
TOWNSHIP OF CRANFORD
CRANFORD, NEW JERSEY
ORDINANCE NO. 2015-13
AN ORDINANCE RESCINDING CERTAIN PROVISIONS
OF THE CODE OF THE TOWNSHIP OF CRANFORD
BE IT ORDAINED by the Township
Committee of the Township of Cranford,
New Jersey as follows:
SECTION 1. Chapter 38 PERSONNEL
POLICIES, Sections 1 through 87 is hereby
rescinded in its entirety.
SECTION 2. Chapter 58 ALCOHOLIC
BEVERAGES, Article 1 Licensing, Section 5, Golf Course conditional licenses, is
hereby rescinded in its entirety
SECTION 2. This ordinance shall take
effect as provided by law.
NOTICE OF PENDING ORDINANCE
The foregoing ordinance was introduced
and approved on first reading at a meeting
of the Township Committee of the Township of Cranford, New Jersey on March 24,
2015, and will be further considered for
final passage after public hearing to be
held at the Municipal Building, 8 Springfield Avenue, Cranford, New Jersey on
April 21, 2015 at 8:00PM or as soon thereafter as this matter can be reached. All
persons interested will be given the opportunity to be heard concerning such ordinance.
Tara Rowley
Municipal Clerk
1 T - 4/2/15, The Leader
Fee: $32.13
PUBLIC NOTICE
citizens are enrolled in the MA program, including more than 200,000
in New Jersey. A recent state-bystate analysis by Oliver Wyman and
Company suggests that the proposed
cuts and policies put forth by the
Obama Administration would cost
New Jersey MA beneficiaries, on
average, an additional $100 to $120
per month.
Mr. Lance is joining a bipartisan
coalition of members of Congress
in urging the Administration to reverse course on proposed policy
changes. Mr. Lance and others
wrote, “We strongly believe that
cuts to MA benefits would be deeply
unfair to millions of our constituents who are counting on Congress
and the Administration to stabilize
the program….we urge you to protect Medicare beneficiaries by reversing the proposed payment cuts
and providing a stable policy environment for the MA program.”
PUBLIC NOTICE
TOWNSHIP OF SCOTCH PLAINS
PLANNING BOARD
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE, that on April
13, 2015, at 7:30 pm., the Planning Board
will hold a public hearing in First Floor
Council Chambers, Municipal Building, 430
Park Avenue, Scotch Plains to hear the
application of Juanita DeNizo, for 1920
Bartle Avenue, Block 1501, Lot 12, B-2
Zone who proposes to construct a threestory, mixed use building with office or
retail on the first floor with two apartments
on the second floor and two apartments on
the third floor. The following variances are
requested:
Section 23-2.3(l)7-Off Street Parking;
Required: 16 spaces on the same lot.
Proposed: None. The applicant proposes
to use the Municipal Lots
Section 23-3.11d1-Truck Loading and
Unloading; Required: Loading and Unloading on the same lot. Proposed: None
The Applicant is also requesting any and
all variances and or waivers deemed to be
necessary at the time of the hearing.
All interested persons may be present
and be heard. The plans pertaining to this
application are in the office of the Planning
Board and available for public inspection
during normal office hours.
Barbara Horev
Secretary to the Board
1 T - 4/2/15, The Times
Fee: $28.56
PUBLIC NOTICE
NEW JERSEY DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT, BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION SERVICES
1035 PARKWAY AVENUE, PO BOX 600
TRENTON, NEW JERSEY 08625
Notice is hereby given that bid proposals will be received via the Internet until 10:00:59
A.M. on 4/23/15, downloaded, and publicly opened and read, from Bidders classified
under N.J.S.A. 27:7-35.1 et seq.; in the CONFERENCE ROOM-A, 1st Floor F & A
Building, New Jersey Department of Transportation, 1035 Parkway Avenue, Trenton,
New Jersey 08625; for:
Route 78, from Drift Road/Dale Road to Route 124 (Springfield Avenue),
Pavement Preservation, Contract No. 042153080, Berkeley Heights Township,
City of Summit, Springfield Township, Union Township, Mountainside
Borough, Watchung Borough, Millburn Township, Union, Somerset, and Essex
Counties; Federal Project No: NHP-078-5(117) UPC NO: 153080; DP No: 15106
Bidders are required to comply with the requirements of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act
of 1964. Specifically, “the contractor, sub recipient or subcontractor shall not discriminate
on the basis of race, color, national origin, or sex in the performance of this contract. The
contractor shall carry out applicable requirements of 49 C.F.R. part 26 in the award and
administration of DOT-assisted contracts. Failure by the contractor to carry out these
requirements is a material breach of this contract, which may result in the termination of
this contract or such other remedy as the recipient deems appropriate.
Pursuant to N.J.S.A. 52:32-44, contractor must submit the Department of Treasury,
Division of Revenue Business Registration of the contractor and any named subcontractors prior to contract award or authorization.
Pursuant to N.J.S.A. 34:11-56.51, contractors must be registered with the New Jersey
Department of Labor, Division of Wage and hour Compliance at the time of bid.
The Department, in accordance with Title VI Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252
U.S.C., 49 C.F.R., Parts 21 and 23 issued pursuant to such Act, and Section 504 of the
Rehabilitation Act of 1973 will afford minority business enterprises full opportunity to
submit bids in response to this invitation and will not discriminate against any bidder on
the grounds of race, color, sex, national origin, or handicap in the project award.
Plans, specifications, and bidding information for the proposed work are available at Bid
Express website www.bidx.com. You must subscribe to use this service. To subscribe
follow the instructions on the website. Fees apply to downloading documents and plans
and bidding access. The fee schedule is available on the web site. All fees are directly
payable to Bid Express.
Plans, specifications, and bidding information may be inspected (BUT NOT OBTAINED) by contracting organizations at our Design Field Offices at the following
locations:
200 Stierli Court
One Executive Campus Rt 70 West
Mt. Arlington, NJ 07856
Cherry Hill, NJ 08002
973-601-6690
856-486-6623
3 T - 4/2/15, 4/9/15 and 4/16/15, The Leader
Fee: $217.26
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Friends of Westfield Library
To Seek Book Sale Donations
WESTFIELD — The Friends of
the Westfield Memorial Library has
announced that plans are underway
for the organization’s 42nd Annual
Book Sale. The Friends welcome
donations of adult and children’s
hardcover and paperback books, CDs
and DVDs and recorded books in
good, sellable condition. VHS tapes,
cassettes, records, encyclopedias,
textbooks, condensed books, magazines, outdated or moldy books will
not be accepted. Book donations are
tax-deductible and receipts will be
provided upon request.
Donation Days at the library’s arcade entrance, located at 550 East
Broad Street, Westfield, are as follows: Thursday, April 23, 10 a.m. to
3 p.m.; Friday, April 24, 10 a.m. to 3
p.m., and Saturday, April 25, 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m.
The sale will open with a selection
of about 30,000 books with a Members Only Preview on Tuesday, April
28, from 6 to 8 p.m., and Wednesday, April 29, from 9 a.m. to noon, in
the main meeting room. Memberships will be available at the door.
The sale will be open to the public
Wednesday, April 29, from 2 to 8
p.m.; Thursday, April 30, 10 a.m. to
8 p.m.; Friday, May 1, 10 a.m. to 8
p.m., and Saturday, May 2, 9:30
a.m. to 1 p.m.
All items will be half-price on
May 1, and on May 2 attendees
may fill a bag with books for just
$5. Proceeds will benefit the
Westfield Memorial Library.
Muñoz Selected to Receive
Millicent Fenwick Award
TRENTON – The Somerset County
Federation of Republican Women
(SCFRW) has selected Assemblywoman Nancy F. Muñoz (R-21st,
Summit) as the recipient of its 23rd
Annual Millicent Fenwick Award for
Outstanding Public Service.
The award is presented each year
to an individual who, like Rep.
Fenwick, epitomizes distinguished
public service, and serves as a role
model for women.
“Millicent’s life-long dedication
to public service is inspirational. She
never compromised her principles
and always did what was in the best
interests of her constituents. That’s
what made her such an effective
leader in both the New Jersey Legislature and Congress,” Asw. Muñoz
said. “I’m grateful to (Assembly
Minority) Leader (Jon) Bramnick
for nominating me and the Somerset
County Federation of Republican
Women for this recognition. The
Federation has an outstanding record
of supporting Republican women in
our state and helping them make a
difference in the communities they
serve.
“It’s my honor to serve the people
of New Jersey and, in particular, those
in the 21st Legislative District,” Asw.
Muñoz said. “Improving the quality
of life for our residents, by making
our state safe and more affordable, is
my top priority.”
Asw. Muñoz will receive the award
at a dinner reception on Wednesday,
May 20 at the Raritan Valley Country
Club in Bridgewater for her advocacy on issues affecting women, children and healthcare. She was the
prime sponsor of the “Jessica
Lunsford Act,” which increased
criminal penalties on those who commit sex crimes against minors. The
bill was signed into law by Governor
Chris Christie last year. She also sponsored bills to battle the state’s heroin
epidemic, assist victims of domestic
violence, repeal the estate tax and
eliminate costly unused sick leave
payouts to public employees. Chief
Justice Stewart Rabner recently
named her to a study commission on
domestic violence.
Rep. Fenwick was a former member of the Bernardsville Board of
Education and the Bernardsville
Borough Council. She served as a
New Jersey assemblywoman and as
director of consumer affairs. At age
64 in 1975, she was elected to the
U.S. House of Representatives
where she was one of only 16 Congresswomen out of 432 members,
and she served four terms. President Ronald Reagan appointed her
as U.S. Ambassador to the United
Nations Food and Agriculture Organization in Rome.
Scholastic Shooting Sports
Names WF’s Wade to Board
SAN ANTONIO, Texas – The
Scholastic Shooting Sports Foundation (SSSF) has named two new members, Joseph P. DeBergalis, Jr. and
PUBLIC NOTICE
TOWNSHIP OF CRANFORD
ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT
TAKE NOTICE that on the 23rd day of
March, 2015, the Zoning Board of Adjustment of the Township of Cranford, in the
County of Union took the following actions:
1. Application #ZBA-15-003: Granted
approval to Steven and Sandra Zaki, Applicants, to permit construction of a twostory rear yard addition with the following
variances: to exceed the maximum allowable lot and building coverage and with the
following pre-existing non-conforming conditions: less than the minimum required lot
area, lot width and maximum distance
from front street on Block 308, Lot 22 as
designated on the Township Tax Map,
also known as 16 Sylvester Street, in the
R-3 Zone.
Mary Ann Hay
Board Secretary
1 T - 4/2/15, The Leader
Fee: $19.89
PUBLIC NOTICE
TOWNSHIP OF CRANFORD
CRANFORD, NEW JERSEY
ORDINANCE NO. 2015-16
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND
CHAPTER 168-3 (PEDDLING,
CANVASSING, SOLICITING,
AND ITINERANT VENDING)
OF THE CODE OF THE TOWNSHIP OF CRANFORD.
BE IT ORDAINED by the Township
Committee of the Township of Cranford,
New Jersey:
SECTION 1. The following changes shall
be made to Chapter 168 Peddling, Canvassing, Soliciting, and Itinerant Vending:
Chapter 168. PEDDLING, CANVASSING, SOLICITING AND ITINERANT VENDING
Article II. Peddlers and Solicitors
§ 168-3. Application for license.
A. (No Change)
B. (No Change)
C. A request for a criminal history record
information search (SBI212) shall be conducted in a manner specified by the New
Jersey State Police, State Bureau of Identification, for each applicant. The applicant
shall pay the fee for this search in the
amount and manner specified by the New
Jersey State Police.
SECTION 2. All ordinances or parts of
ordinances inconsistent herewith are
hereby repealed to the extent of such
inconsistency.
SECTION 3. If any portion of this ordinance shall be determined to be invalid,
such determination shall not affect the
validity of the remaining portions of said
ordinance.
SECTION 4. This ordinance shall take
effect upon final passage and publication
in accordance with law.
NOTICE OF PENDING ORDINANCE
The foregoing ordinance was introduced
and approved on first reading at a meeting
of the Township Committee of the Township of Cranford, New Jersey on March 24,
2015, and will be further considered for
final passage after public hearing to be
held at the Municipal Building, 8 Springfield Avenue, Cranford, New Jersey on
April 21, 2015 at 8:00PM or as soon thereafter as this matter can be reached. All
persons interested will be given the opportunity to be heard concerning such ordinance.
Tara Rowley
Municipal Clerk
1 T - 4/2/15, The Leader
Fee: $50.49
Mark T. Wade, to its Board of Directors. The new members assumed their
roles last week at the board’s annual
meeting in San Antonio.
DeBergalis, of West Seneca, New
York, is a board member of the National Rifle Association (NRA) where
he chairs the NRA Education and
Training Committee. He is also Vice
President of the New York State Rifle
and Pistol Association and is active in
many other shooting organizations.
Wade is the Managing Principal of
Echelon Wealth Strategies, LLC in
Westfield, New Jersey. He has been
an active member of the Amateur
Trapshooting Association for more
than 30 years and is a Life Member of
the National Sporting Clays Association and National Skeet Shooting Association.
Probitas Verus Honos
Fanwood Earth Day
Is Set For April 25
FANWOOD — The Fanwood Clean
Communities Committee has announced that the borough’s annual
community cleanup will be held on
Saturday, April 25. This year marks
the 26th year of the Earth Day cleanup.
Volunteers are asked to assemble
at 8:30 a.m. at the south-side train
station parking area. They will be
assigned to clean a specific area.
Adults and children are invited to
become “pick-up partners” and clean
litter from the borough’s parks and
public areas. The work should be
completed before 11 a.m.
Earth Day T-shirts, work gloves
and litter bags will be furnished to all
participants.
Fanwood Public Works Director
Clint Dicksen chairs the committee
and is joined by Bob McCarthy, Margaret Chowdhury, Linda Talcott and
Dean Talcott. The committee is working in conjunction with the Fanwood
Department of Public Works (DPW).
Volunteers are asked to notify the
Fanwood DPW in advance by calling
(908) 322-7404. Walk-ins also will
be welcome.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF CONTRACT AWARDED BY
THE TOWNSHIP OF SCOTCH PLAINS
The TOWNSHIP OF SCOTCH PLAINS
has awarded a Fair and Open Contract for
the following Professional. This Contract,
and the Resolution authorizing it, are available for public inspection in the Municipal
Building.
AWARDED TO: Robert Pansulla,
Finazzo, Cossolini, O’Leary, Meola and
Hager LLC, 36 Cattano Avenue, Suite 500,
Morristown, New Jersey 07960
SERVICES: Township Prosecutor
TIME PERIOD: Calendar Year 2015
DATE: March 17, 2015
BOZENA LACINA
Municipal Clerk
1 T - 4/2/15, The Times
Fee: $17.34
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Tamaques Staff Takes on
Harlem Wizards May 28th
the event extra exciting; the Wizards
get the crowd involved. Your child/
grandchild/neighbor may be on the
floor as part of the show.
For the Tamaques team, Carlos
Torres will be coaching in his role of
Team Captain. Staff playing will
include Acting Principal Duelks, Victor Alfonso, Josh Miller, Mary Montes and Stephen Markowski, with surprise appearances by others. Tickets
will be raffled off for parents to play
on the Tamaques team as well.
Tickets will be available for purchase through several channels:
Through MyFoodDays.com starting
on Monday, April 13 and at Edison
School on Tuesday, April 14 at lunchtime. The doors will open at 6:15 p.m.
for the 7 p.m. event. General admission tickets will cost $18, reserved
tickets will cost $28 and VIP tickets
will cost $35. The tickets are limited,
and the tickets will be on a first-come,
first-served basis. For additional questions,
please
email
[email protected]
Three Tamaques mothers are responsible for making this event happen: Lori Sternberg, Dianna Snyder
and Binaifer Vesuna. Mrs. Vesuna
summed up the event, “Last year’s
event not only was a laugh-out-loud
evening, but it also was a huge night
for school spirit and fundraising for
an incredible cause. The Tamaques
PTO is thrilled to have the Wizards
back to our community again.”
Union Catholic Announces
Hall of Fame Inductees
SCOTCH PLAINS – On Friday,
May 1, Union Catholic is hosting its
Hall of Fame Induction Dinner at
Shackamaxon Country Club in Scotch
Plains from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Typically
held once every two years, this year
marks UC’s 11th Hall of Fame “Induction Class”. Tickets to this event
are available to the public and all are
welcome to attend. For ticket purchasing information, see
Union Catholic’s Hall of
Fame
website
at
www.unioncatholic.org/
alumni/hof.php.
Currently in the Hall of
Fame, there are seven
sports teams, two religious
orders, and 35 individuals
including coaches, faculty/
staff, alums, parents, and
friends.
The 2015 inductees are:
Educator Award: Lou
Merola ’66 of South Plainfield. A member of Union Catholic’s
first graduating class, Lou dedicated
his professional teaching career at UC
to actively encouraging his art students to explore and follow their creative dreams. Mr. Merola retired in
2009 after 39 years at UC.
Myrna McManus of Scotch Plains.
Ms. McManus joined the faculty of
UC in 1978 and made it her home for
24 years, touching the minds and
hearts of countless students with her
knowledge and enthusiasm.
Alumni Award: Ken Clifford ’74 of
Tenafly. Managing Director & Chief
Financial Officer at Metalmark Capital, a leading private equity firm in
New York City, Mr. Clifford is an
enthusiastic and generous alumnus of
Union Catholic.
Athletic Award: Al Ashmont ’84 of
Clark. Mr. Ashmont’s pitching dominance in Union County led UC to two
Watchung Conference Champion-
Turbana Launches
Garden Exch. Prog.
WESTFIELD – Turbana, one of the
largest fresh produce providers in the
U.S., and its social foundation,
Fundauniban partnered with The New
Jersey Agricultural Society’s “Learning Through Gardening” program to
create the International Sister School
Garden Exchange. The program provides Westfield, New Jersey’s
Tamaques Elementary School fifth
graders with the opportunity to connect
with Churido Pueblo Elementary
School sixth graders in Uraba, Colombia. The Garden Exchange works toward developing cultural understanding among global youth by getting students from different countries excited
to interact with one another.
The program consists of a variety of
activities intended to expand the 130
students’ worldview by having them
tend to a garden and share their experiences with their peers in another country. Fun activities build excitement and
facilitate communication in both Spanish and English between the children of
the two schools. One such activity is a
card exchange, where students write to
their sister school in the language they’re
learning. They share what is growing in
their garden and what they have discovered
“It has created a tremendous amount
of good will and excitement in both
schools, and the children cannot wait to
show off their gardens and crops, while
sharing their stories, culture and language,” said Carolyn Taylor, director
of the New Jersey Agricultural
Society's Learning through Gardening program.
ships, the 1984 Union County Championship and the 1984 State Parochial title. Al was named New Jersey
Player of the Year in 1984.
1973-74 Boys Soccer Team:
Widely recognized as one of Union
Catholic’s best soccer teams ever, the
’73-’74 Boys Soccer team made a
great run to the Parochial A State
final. This team was the first in school
history to compete in a
state final.
1988-89 Girls Softball
Team: The 1989 team distinguished itself as the only
UC softball team to win
the Union County Tournament. The team finished
19-3 and ultimately ranked
third in New Jersey that
historic season.
Community Leader
Award: Jane Albert of High
Bridge. Ms. Albert enjoyed
a 44-year career in elementary and secondary education that
included service as Principal of Union
Catholic Girls High School (19791981); administrator during the
merger of UC’s Boys and Girls
Schools; and as principal of St.
Dominic Academy (1981-1987).
Parents Award: Barbara and Bill
Butler of Scotch Plains. Having given
their three children the gift of a Union
Catholic education, Mr. & Mrs. Butler were integral in the launching of
UC’s technological advances and remain invested members of the UC
Community.
For 50 years, Union Catholic High
School has earned its reputation as
one of New Jersey’s foremost Catholic secondary schools. For information, visit unioncatholic.org.
Public Invited to WF
School Concerts
WESTFIELD – The Fine Arts Department of the Westfield Public
Schools invites the public to attend
any of the 30 musical events scheduled for this spring. Approximately
2,500 students in grades kindergarten
through high school will be performing district-wide. All concerts are
free and begin at 7 p.m. unless otherwise noted. School addresses are
available on the district website at
www.westfieldnjk12.org. The dates
and locations for the spring concerts
through May are listed below.
Tuesday, April 14, Washington Elementary School 4th and 5th grade
Band. Monday, April 20, Franklin
Elementary School Advanced Band.
Wednesday, April 22, Jefferson Elementary School Band and Chorus.
Thursday, April 23, Franklin Elementary School Intermediate Band and
Tamaques Elementary 4th grade Band
at 6:45 p.m. Friday, May 1, Westfield
High School (WHS), Edison and
Roosevelt Intermediate Schools Jazz
Night at WHS at 6 p.m. Wednesday,
May 6, Westfield High School Orchestra at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 7,
Tamaques Elementary School 5th
grade Band and Chorus. Thursday,
May 14, Westfield High School Band
at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 16,
Westfield High School May-Hem.
Tuesday, May 19, Westfield High
School Chorus at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday,
May 26, Franklin Elementary School
Chorus, McKinley Elementary
School Band and Chorus and Washington Elementary School Chorus.
Wednesday, May 27 all Elementary
Intermediate Strings at Edison Intermediate School. Thursday, May 28,
all Elementary Beginner Strings at
Edison Intermediate School.
Page 21
Cranford Band Splittree
Releases Debut Album
More Education News
WESTFIELD – On Thursday, May
28, at 7 p.m., the famous Wizards will
battle Tamaques Elementary School
staff (with participation by acting Principal David Duelks). This will be an
exciting two-hour event for both kids
and adults filled with laughter, talent,
and community spirit. This is the second time the Wizards have battled
Tamaques staff; last year, also sponsored by Planet Honda, the event was
a huge success, with tickets selling
out.
Funds raised will go towards the
Paul Jackson fund and towards enhancing Tamaques facilities. The Paul
Jackson Fund serves as a resource of
last resort for individuals and families in the tri-state area facing a financial crisis due to a debilitating longterm illness or disability. The Fund
provides grants to qualifying individuals for health-related needs as
well as for family and household
needs.
The Harlem Wizards, one of two
remaining show basketball teams (the
other is the Harlem Globetrotters),
aim to to entertain the crowd and help
out with community fundraising. At a
Wizards game, the audience will witness amazing basketball talent combined with high-energy comedy. The
athleticism, tricks, fancy teamwork
and ball-handling wizardry, plus wild
dunks not even seen in NBA games,
engages and wows hoops fans of all
ages. Audience participation makes
Thursday, April 2, 2015
CRANFORD – Local Cranford band
Splittree, made up of three Cranford
High Seniors, released their debut album, “Mind Tricks” on March 3. The
trio, comprised of Tom Stoke, John
Anclien and Kean MacLelland, released
the album via iTunes, Bandcamp,
Soundcloud, physical copies, as well
as other music streaming services.
The band, who write original, alternative sounding tunes wrapped up recording on their 13 song debut album
in early January and worked with industry professionals for the mastering,
production and distribution.
“Never Look Back,” an upbeat song
with punchy drums and the signature
alternative sounding guitars, talks about
embracing the future, and was the first
single from the new record, which the
band released on December 12, 2014.
In one night the song received over 200
listens alone on Soundcloud, and has
since surpassed 1,000 listens and downloads total.
“Our next step is to support this
album by touring, radio interviews,
and any sort of promotion possible, and
we are coordinating all this on our own
because we don’t have record label
backing yet,” said singer and guitarist
Mr. MacLelland.
For a free download of the album, or
to listen, visit the band at https://
splittree.bandcamp.com/album/mindtricks.
Union County Employees
Invited to Exhibit Artwork
SOMEWHERE OVER THE SUMMER...Ukulele is just one of several musical
opportunities offered in the NJWA Summer Workshop.
NJWA Summer Workshop
Offers Music, Dance Lessons
WESTFIELD – As the days start to
get longer and warmer temperatures
hint that summer is around the corner,
parents eagerly search for opportunities that will augment their child’s
summer vacation and make these relaxing months a time of exploration,
discovery and creativity. The New
Jersey Workshop for the Arts (NJWA)
Summer Workshop offers inspirational programming that develops a
student’s creative expression skills
through a variety of music and dance
classes.
Violin, chorus and creative movement are activities found in the multifaceted early elementary curriculum,
designed for those students entering
either junior kindergarten, kindergarten or first grade in September.
Exposure to the arts provides a wonderful foundation for further artistic
endeavors.
Ukulele is offered to students entering grades 3 to 5 and grades 6 to 8.
This class is designed for beginners,
and “uke” fundamentals such as tuning, strumming, and basic chord progressions are explored. Basic note
reading and rhythmic notation are
emphasized and lead to playing familiar and lively tunes. This unique
instrumental class brings a fun taste
of the tropics and is a perfect summer
activity. Rental or purchase arrangements are available through the NJWA
Summer Workshop.
Sticks and Strings, offered to those
entering grades 2 to 3 and 4 to 5, is a
high-energy music workshop that utilizes traditional and non-traditional
instruments. Basics of tempo, meter
and note values are explored through
percussive instruments and treble clef
note reading is honed through violin
study. All instruments are provided
for daily in-class use.
Students enjoy the excitement of
electric guitar in the high- voltage
frets and fingers classes, Amped Up
(for beginners) and Amped Up II (for
those with some experience) Beginners in the Amped Up class learn the
basics of guitar fingering, chord progressions and strums through a variety of popular songs. Amped Up II
builds on previously learned fundamentals and progresses students to
more advanced playing. These
courses are designed for students entering grades 4 to 5 or 6 to 8 in the fall.
Guitars and amps are provided for inclass usage.
Dance classes at the Summer Workshop are designed for those students
with little or no dance experience.
Capture the magic, energy and excitement of Broadway with playful
choreography that incorporates dance
and creative movement in the course
Broadway Dance. This course is designed for students entering grades 2
to 3 and grades 4 to 5. Jazz and HipHop offer an introduction to modern
music and students entering grades 4
to 5 and grades 6 to 8 will dance to
current music combining these two
dance elements. Instructors are from
TheYvette Dance Studio in Cranford.
This year’s NJWA Summer Workshop will run weekdays from Monday, July 6 to Friday, July 24, 8:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and will be held at
the Edison Intermediate School, 800
Rahway Avenue, Westfield. The
Workshop offers diverse programming for students in junior kindergarten to grade 8.
In addition to the regular Workshop hours, an optional early morning drop-off is available for those
needing coverage starting at 7:30 a.m.
The Summer Workshop partners with
the Westfield area YMCA and offers
Afternoon Adventures for those needing a full day program. A registered
nurse is on staff during regular workshop hours.
To view, download or print the
2015 brochure, visit us on-line at
www.njwasummerworkshop.com.
Completed applications should be
mailed or delivered to the address
provided on the form. Please note
that registration is on-going and is on
a first-come-first-served basis.
The NJWA Summer Workshop is a
division of the New Jersey Workshop
for the Arts, a 501c3 non-profit organization. For additional information
about the summer program, please
call (908) 518-1551 or email
[email protected]
or visit the New Jersey Workshop for
the Arts studios at 150-152 East Broad
Street in downtown Westfield.
Kean Players to Present
Theatre for Young Audiences
UNION – Kean University senior
Becca Dagnall is no stranger to the art
of theatre or the art of teaching. In
fact, she’s a rare double major pursuing a B.A. in Theatre and New Jersey’s
Early Childhood certification.
“I don’t see these as two separate
disciplines,” Ms. Dagnall explained
during a recent break from rehearsing
Dennis Foon’s Kindness, a play for
ages six and up. “All theatre teaches,
and teaching is a form of performing.” Kean’s upcoming production,
which Ms. Dagnall directs, will perform Wednesday, April 1 through 8
on the campus of Kean University,
then tour to local elementary schools.
Kean’s Department of Theatre periodically offers a spring course called
“Children’s Theatre on Tour,” a performance experience for academic
credit. The ensemble of students prepares the show from January until
spring break, performs on campus,
and then takes the play into the community. “I learned so much about
engaging children when I performed
in the 2012 tour of A Fairy Tale Life:
The Story of Young Hans Christian
Andersen,” stated Ms. Dagnall. “I
saw the effect we were having on the
young people in the audience, and I
knew what we were doing was impor-
tant.” It was after that experience Ms.
Dagnall expressed interest in directing a tour herself.
“The Department prepared me well
to take on this challenge,” said Ms.
Dagnall. “I’m bringing everything I
learned in the last four years to the
project.” A Piscataway native graduating in May, Ms. Dagnall selected
the play, and - during the fall of 2014
- prepared with Theatre Education
professor and advisor Rachel Evans
before auditioning the actors. From
the beginning of this semester, her
last one at Kean, Ms. Dagnall has
been leading the design and rehearsal
process.
Kindness, by playwright and
screenwriter Dennis Foon (the
former artistic director of Green
Thumb Theatre), uses the real-world
experiences of young people to address the importance of compassion
and empathy in children’s development. Touching on issues like bullying, loss, and self-esteem, Kindness
depicts a group of youngsters as
they navigate through relationships
and feelings. With twelve Kean students in the cast, the production will
run in the Zella Fry Theatre before
hitting the road for ten days in
schools from Paterson to Elizabeth.
COUNTY – Since 2002, employees of the County of Union and family
members have participated in a unique
program that gives them the opportunity to display their artistic creations.
In its ongoing effort to recognize and
encourage creative and artistic accomplishment, the Union County
Board of Chosen Freeholders, in partnership with The National Arts Program, announces the thirteenth an-
Musical Club of WF
Offers Free Concert
WESTFIELD – The Musical Club
of Westfield invites the public to its
Free Afternoon Concert program to
be held at the First Baptist Church of
Westfield, 170 Elm St. on Wednesday, April 8 at 1:30 p.m.
The concert will feature a varied
program performed by club members
and guests.
Edwin Lopez and Ronald Thayer
will collaborate in a series of piano
duets featuring Danses Sacree and
Profane by Claude Debussy, Sonata
Op. 87 composed by Ernst Toch, El
Choclo, a Tango, by Angel Villoldo
and Variations on I’ve Got Rhythm by
George Gershwin.
Baritone Glen Crane will sing
Gustav Mahler’s Kindertoten Lieder,
Songs on the Death of Children, a
song cycle setting the poems of
Ruechert, accompanied by Mary Beth
McFall on piano.
Pianist Yuly Verbitsky will be on
the
program
performing
Tchaikovsky’s Scenes from a Russian Village, Op. 12, Arensky’s Romance in A flat major, Op. 12 and
Chopin’s Scherzo No. 2 in b flat minor, Op. 31
The audience is invited to a reception after the program to enjoy some
light refreshment and to meet the performers.
The Musical Club of Westfield is a
501c3 organization now in its 99th
season, and offers scholarships to
promising young musicians who are
pursuing a musical education. Membership in the club is open to anyone
who in interested in music. Those
wishing information about membership in the Musical Club of Westfield
as a performer or an associate member
may
visit
www.musicalclubofwestfield.org.
Talent Sought for
Fanwood Spring Fair
FANWOOD – On Saturday, May
9 the Borough of Fanwood will be
holding a Juried Arts & Crafts Fair
in the heart of their downtown at
the Fanwood Train Station. This
event will feature over 100 artisans
selling and displaying their original work. Open to the public from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m., a wide variety of
items such as, paintings, sculpture,
ironworks, metalworks, glassworks,
pottery, jewelry, fashion clothing,
garden works and much more can
be purchased.
A very successful component of
the event is “Open Mic” which features local talent from the area.
Young and old, singers, bands,
dancers, demonstrations, musicians, etc. are welcome to participate. Artists will need to submit a
sample of your talent by CD, DVD,
You Tube or any other wayit can be
reviewed.
Local civic, non-profit organizations and merchants are also invited to become a part of this event.
This is an opportunity for local businesses and groups to promote their
establishments or organization.
Special price consideration is given
to local businesses who participate.
For more information please call
JC Promotions, Inc. (201) 998-6311
or email [email protected]
Entries Sought for
Nassau Film Festival
PRINCETON – Nassau Film Festival (NFF) is now accepting submissions for Short Films (20 minutes or
less). The deadline for submission is
Thursday, April 30. Please visit
www.nassaufilmfestival.org for submission guideline and forms as well
as sponsorship information.
NFF welcomes both student and
non-student filmmakers. Nassau Film
Festival is presented under the auspices of Libelula Productions.
nual exhibition of artwork by County
of Union workers and their families.
“What a pleasure it is to see the
outstanding artwork done by Union
County employees and family members,” said Freeholder Bette Jane
Kowalski, liaison to the Cultural and
Heritage Programs Advisory Board.
“Whether they are new artists or
people who have exhibited before,
the participants display a wide variety of work that always impresses
with its quality.”
Entries will be accepted in the categories of painting, photography, artworks on paper, sculpture and crafts.
Recognized artists and art professionals will serve as judges, selecting
entrants for cash awards and honorable mention in the exhibition’s five
artistic classifications: amateur (little
or no experience); intermediate (some
experience, art students); professional
(serious art training or employed in
an art related job); teens 13 to 18
years old; and youth age 12 and
younger.
“We are happy to extend the invitation to enter the show to Union County
program volunteers, retired Union
County employees, and their families,” said Freeholder Chairman
Mohamed S. Jalloh. “We share the
goal of The National Arts Program to
reach as many people as possible of
all ages, offering them a chance to
display their artistic talents in a public exhibition.”
In the adult classifications, each
first-place winner will receive $300;
second place will receive $200 each;
and third place; $100 each. There is
one $300 prize for Best in Show. In
each youth classification, $75 will go
to first-place winners; $50 to second
place; and $25 to third place. The
prizes are provided by The National
Arts Program.
With 82 exhibitions held within 38
states, The National Arts Program
displays around 15,000 pieces of visual art each year, demonstrating to
the general public a human dimension of employees previously hidden,
making it a vital part of the local
cultural community.The National Arts
Program allows artists to upload their
artwork, free of charge, to their online
Interactive Gallery. To learn more
about the program and see photos
from past exhibits, or for Union
County employees to register online,
please
visit
http://
www.nationalartsprogram.org/venues/union-county. Early registration
is encouraged.
Registration for the art exhibit is
required by Thursday, April 16. To
request a registration form and further information, contact the Union
County Office of Cultural and Heritage Affairs, 633 Pearl Street, Elizabeth, NJ 07202. Telephone: (908)
558-2550
or
e-mail:
[email protected] . NJ relay users call 711. For more information
about programs and activities of the
Union County Office of Cultural and
Heritage Affairs, visit their web site:
http://ucnj.org/cultural .
Town Book Store Hosts
Children’s Authors
WESTFIELD – The Town Book
Store will be hosting a Meet the Author event for authors Nicola Gutgold,
Abigail Kennedy and illustrator Jane
Ramsey for their children’s book
Madam President: Five Women Who
Paved the Way on Saturday, April 4,
2015 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. For ages
6 to 12, it is the true story of five
women who ran for President of the
United States from 1964-2008. The
book will encourage children to go
for their dreams, regardless of how
difficult it may be.
Whoever that first woman president may be, she will be indebted to
the other women who trail blazed
before her. We have had over forty
presidents in the United States since
the country began, and all of them
have been men. Madam President
tells the story of five pioneering
women who made a bid at the presidency: Margaret Chase Smith, Shirley
Anita St. Hill Chisholm, Patricia Scott
Schroeder, Elizabeth Hanford Dole,
and Hillary Rodham Clinton.
The Town Book Store located at
270 East Broad Street in Westfield
(corner of East Broad and Elmer
Streets). For more information contact The Town Book Store at (908)
233-3535.
Page 22
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, April 2, 2015
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
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Gothic Style Manor to be Featured
On NJFO Tour of Notable Homes
WESTFIELD – The lusty month of
May is waiting in the wings with a
special opportunity to visit four of
Westfield’s most picturesque homes
for the benefit of the New Jersey
Festival Orchestra (NJFO). Once
again the Friends of the NJFO will
present their Tour of Notable Homes,
this year on Saturday, May 9 according to co-chairs Jennifer Colamedici
and Michelle Pierce.
“For a $35 ticket for instance, visitors will be welcomed to this Gothicstyle manor house and perhaps imagine
they hear the hoof beats of phantom
medieval horses carrying their knights
to its porte-cochere,” according to Ms.
Pierce. “This stunning home evokes the
striking charm and romance of the manors that to this day pepper the English
countryside. It is the splendid result of
a recent major remodeling.”
Outside and in visitors will see
meticulously customized authentic
12th century architectural elements,
amenities and details. All are demonstrative of the shrewd devotion of its
owners and craftsmen. Colamedici
elucidates, “The exterior of the manor
is surrounded by an outstanding landscape. Once inside there are four beautiful and whimsical levels to view
featuring such attractions as marble
flooring, brass chandeliers, an array
of wonderful color solutions, faux
painted walls - many accented with
silver leafing, fabulous window treatments, leaded glass windows, oak
beams and flooring, and granite and
quartzite kitchen counter tops. A studio adjacent to the garage is devoted
to the practice of Yoga.
Proving that good design is ageless, weather permitting, a fabulous
Tesla new electric roadster will be on
display in the manor’s circular driveway and tourists will be invited to
participate in an “Own a Tesla for the
Day” ticketed raffle.
Musical entertainment will be provided in each of the homes on the
tour. Other choices during “Notable
Homes Saturday,” according to
Colamedici and Pierce, include refreshments, a Mother’s Day plant sale
of hardy, seasonal blooms, door prizes
and a variety of boutique raffle items.
The Festival Orchestra’s Music Director, David Wroe, congratulates the
Friends on their continuing diligence
and devotion to the orchestra’s mission. “This tour is vital to the funding
equation. The sale of concert tickets
each season funds just a third of the
budget. Westfield is among only a
few small towns across the nation that
can boast of having a professional
symphony orchestra. We must assure
the orchestra’s tradition of more than
32 years of providing symphonic music for future generations.”
Tickets for this year’s Tour of Notable Homes are $35 and can be purchased
on-line
at
www.njfestivalorchestra.org. On the
day of the tour ticket prices are $40.
Beginning Monday, April 6, tickets
can be purchased at the following
area stores: Baron’s Family Pharmacy,
Westfield; The Town Book Store,
Westfield; Christoffers Flowers and
Gifts, Mountainside; Norman’s Hallmark, Fanwood, and Periwinkle’s
Fine Gifts, Cranford.
Provident Bank Foundation
Funds Playwriting Residency
UNION – Premiere Stages, the professional theatre company in residence
at Kean University, is partnering with
The Provident Bank Foundation to offer an innovative seven-week, in-school
playwriting residency this spring at the
Terence C. Reilly School No. 7 located
in Elizabeth. The residency, which affords twenty-one seventh grade students with access to professional actors
and teaching artists, is held in partnership with William Culp, a history teacher
at the school.
Premiere Stages’ residencies are
specifically designed to support classroom learning objectives and are designed to support the Common Core
Curriculum, reinforcing literacy skills,
encouraging creativity and collaboration, and bolstering student selfesteem.
For more details regarding the Premiere Play Factory Residency Program, please call (908) 737-4092 or
contact the staff via email at
[email protected]
HOME TOUR ANNOUNCED...This gothic-style manor house in Westfield will be one of four homes featured on the New
Jersey Festival Orchestra’s annual home tour which is planned for Saturday, May 9.
Rahway Plans Taste of Spring
Food Tasting Event for April 17
RAHWAY – The Rahway Taste of
Spring, one of the top annual restaurant and gourmet food tasting events
in the NJ/NY metro area, will be held
on Friday, April 17 from 5:30 p.m. to
9 p.m.
The 15th annual Rahway Taste of
Spring returns to the Rahway Recreation Center at 275 E. Milton Avenue
Rahway. Ticket price remains unchanged for 2015: $30 in advance;
limited tickets will be available at the
door for $40.
The Rahway Taste of Spring features the culinary delights of more
than 35 regional food establishments,
interspersed with over 30 tasting stations of fine wine, aperitifs, and boutique beer, presented by national companies and distributors.
This 18,000-square-foot event features a delicious array of cuisines
from around the globe. There is something for every taste: from all-American favorites to the flavors of Cuba,
Peru, Mexico, Italy, Spain, Portugal,
Japan, Ireland, and specialty cuisines,
like seafood, BBQ, soul food, and
fusion blends. Many venues will offer samples of customer favorites and
fresh-made house specialties.
Renowned area bakeries will serve
up bite-size sweets such as miniature
pastries and regional delicacies like
luscious Portuguese pastéis de natas
(custard cups), fresh Italian cannoli,
flaky Greek baklava, and much more.
Live entertainment creates a festive and fun atmosphere, and guests
can browse displays and booths from
local organizations, merchants, artists, and sponsors, as well as a car
display by Miller Buick.
Top tri-county food vendors compete for a spot in the 2015 Chefs’
Winners’ Circle in six categories, including best appetizer, entrée, side
dishes, ethnic, pasta, bakery & frozen
desserts, and table presentation.
Attendees are asked to support the
Taste of Spring canned food drive by
bringing an unopened boxed or
canned food item.
Tickets are available online via
RahwayTaste.com, and in-person at
the following Rahway businesses:
Witty’s Liquors, Beana’s Mexican
Restaurant, Rahway Recreation Center (check or money order, only), and
in Linden at Metro Liquors.
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For details please contact
Director of Membership David Miniman
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Page S-1
Thursday, April 2, 2015
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Ballyhoo
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Sports, Humor and Commentary
SARAH ROSS, HANNA ROSS, MEGAN POWER PROVIDE OFFENSE; O’DONAVAH GOALKEEPER
Cougar Lax Ladies Have Big Hopes, Unseat Lancers, 16-8
team and we look forward to
improving each day. I am excitCranford High School girls la- edly anticipating what the recrosse first year head coach mainder of the season has in
Carlee Dragon had high hopes store for us.”
for her team and in return her Cranford
9
7
16
team gave her even more en- Livingston
3
5
8
lightenment when they overLast year, the trio of Ross, Ross
whelmed the Livingston Lancers,
16-8, in their season opener at and Power combined for 155
Livingston on March 25.
The Lady Cougars relied on a
“Powerful” trio of juniors to subdue the Lancers. Junior center
Megan Power stuffed in three
goals and added three assists,
while junior midfielders Sarah
Ross netted four goals and assisted on four and her sister
Hannah Ross rippled the net four
times and assisted with two. Senior/co-captain midfielder Kristin
Leu lit the scoreboard three times,
while sophomore attacker
Jeannie Padden put in one goal
and added an assist, while senior
Tara O’Reilly netted one goal.
Sophomore goalkeeper Niamh
O’Donavah made five saves.
Emily Waldenberg led the Lady
Lancers with three goals and a
pair of assists. Tatum Peacock
also hit the hat trick with three
goals, Kayla Francione scored a
goal and had an assist, and
Sydney Merkin netted a goal.
“Megan Power takes our draws,
while Sarah Ross and Hannah
Ross are on the circle. I am very
happy to start the season on a
high note,” Coach Dragon said.
“Our team executed our plays
well on offense and we defended
together as a team. There is still
a lot we need to work on as a
By DAVID B. CORBIN
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
Ballyhoo
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goals, so much is expected from
them on the offensive side, but
according to Coach Dragon, “I
am very fortunate to have Hannah
and Sarah Ross. They each have
their own unique abilities but most
important, they are team players. Their individual abilities in
combination with the other talented players on our team, raise
much of the Cougars’ focus this
season will be on defense.
Junior Melissa Stone and Moya
Plant, along with senior Marissa
Dankowsky will be in the defensive back with O’Donavah shoring up the last line of defense as
goalkeeper. Leu, Sarah and
Hannah Ross, and junior Caroline
Plick will make up the midfield
Story on page 13
of The Westfield Leader
high expectations for this season. Scoring is important but limiting opponents’ opportunities to
score is of equal importance.” So
l'ennemi du journaliste
with Power in the center. The
attack force will consist of senior
co-captain Carley Quirin, senior
Elyse Mackenzie and Padden.
From the bench, the first sub in
will be O’Reilly. Delaney Fay,
Katherine Hartnett, Gabrielle
Meadows, Erin Readie and Maggie
Roman will also move on an off
the field.
Coach Dragon has quite a startling list of lacrosse credentials
with her exploits as a
Bridgewater-Raritan High School
Panther. She frayed the net with
258 goals and dished out 274
assists for 532 total points, which
may still be a state record. Coach
Dragon plans to pass some of her
drive, experiences and skills on
to her newly acquired team.
Her sister Alyssa Dragon Frazier
is the head coach of the Panther
girls lacrosse team, as well as
the field hockey team. Two days
prior to the Livingston game,
Carlee, now a Cougar, and Alyssa,
still a Panther, were on the opposite ends of the field in a scrimmage game in Cranford. The sisters plan to run their own lacrosse camps this summer,
known as Dragon Duo, in
Bridgewater and Cranford.
Cranford is also familiar territory to Carlee’s parents as her
father Roy, Jr. and mother
Tammara both began teaching
and coaching in the system. Both
parents were standout all-around
athletes and her brother Roy III
was an exceptionally strong wrestler and football player at
Bridgewater-Raritan.
Coach Dragon has also acknowledged that there is life after lacrosse and noted, “I encourage
my student-athletes to play another high school sport. Not only
does it keep them in good physical condition, it keeps them competitive. I also stress the importance of playing club lacrosse in
their off-season and to play club
competitively during the summer.”
The Cougars will host Warren
Hills at Memorial Field this Saturday, April 4, at 11 p.m.
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Thursday, April 2, 2015
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Ballyhoo
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Sports, Humor and Commentary
WETHERALL, DOLAN TO APPEAR ON MOUND; FERETTI, SKALSKI TO BE BEHIND PLATE
Bormann Takes Over Young Cranford Softball Squad
By ALEX LOWE
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
Heather Bormann hopes that
aiming for smaller goals will help
the Cranford High School softball
team achieve bigger and better
things. The first year head coach
takes over a Cougar team that
finished 6-13 last year and which
looks to replace four starters lost
to graduation. Among those are
Jessica Casale who will be playing at Gettysburg.
“We spoke to the team and
asked them about their goals,”
said Bormann. “They want to win
the counties, of course. We need
to take care of smaller goals first
and from there, hopefully, the
larger goals fall into place. Right
now, we are focusing on the fundamentals and on communicat-
ing better during games. Those
have to be the first steps. We are
a young team. It is a learning
process.”
Bormann comes to Cranford after serving as an assistant varsity coach. She played high school
softball at Brick Memorial and
went on to play later at York
College. With two scrimmages
under their belt already, Bormann
is beginning to get a feel for her
team’s personality, strengths and
potential weaknesses.
“One thing I’ve noticed is that
we are very versatile,” said
Bormann. “We have a lot of flexibility in that our girls can play
different positions well. The defensive play has been solid so far.
We have to work on our hitting
and offense. Although, in a re-
cent
scrimmage
against
Woodbridge the top of the lineup
really hit the ball well.”
The Cougars will set up with
junior Morgan Feretti behind the
plate. Sophomore Jill Skalski will
also see time behind the plate.
Both girls saw time on the varsity
last season and each can shift
over and play third base when
not starting at catcher.
Junior Julia Palozzola will handle
first base. Another junior, Candice
Durant, will back her up. Durant
is also in the mix at third base.
Senior Vienna Stivala is the second baseman with junior Rebecca
Scott in reserve. Junior Jen Shore
will patrol the shortstop position.
The outfield will feature very
young players. Taylor Reitzel and
Alex Tachowski, both freshmen,
are vying for starting spots, along
with
sophomore
Tessa
Ferentinos. Rebecca Scott will
also compete for time here.
A pair of seniors in Bonnie
Caldwell and Nicole Schemmenti
will provide experience and depth
in utility roles.
Cranford seems well armed on
the pitching staff. The Cougars
will have senior southpaw
Theresa Wetherall and freshman
right-hander Grenna Dolan as
their lead hurlers.
“Both Theresa and Grenna are
hard throwers,” said Bormann.
“But the great thing is that each
girl has five pitches so they can
both keep hitters from leaning
back on the fastball.”
While much of the batting order is to be determined, Bormann
feels good about the top of the
lineup.
“Morgan Feretti, Jill Skalski,
Vienna Stivala and Jen Shore
have done a nice job of hitting for
us sp far,” said Bormann. “They
are all confident batters and I
hope the rest of the lineup feeds
off of that.”
Bormann expects a few familiar faces to once again top the list
of contenders once the season
starts.
“Westfield always has a strong
team,” said Bormann. “Governor
Livingston also should be good
and Arthur Johnson is pretty good
too.”
Cranford got the season under
way with an April 1 home game
against Arthur Johnson.
HUNTER REMLEY, SEAN LEONARD, LUKE CHRISTIANO LED COUGAR TEAM IN SCORING
Injuries Derailed Cranford Boys in Disappointing Hoops Season
By ALEX LOWE
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
There was not a whole lot to
cheer about for the Cranford High
School boys’ basketball team this
season. Things started off poorly
and got worse from there. Decimated by a rash of early injuries,
the Cougars were unable to find a
flow and struggled to a 6-17 finish.
“Injuries played a major role in
our season,” said Cranford Head
Coach Ryan Huber. “We lost Eric
Donahue for the season after one
game. Steve Wills missed significant time with a high ankle sprain
and Jack Schetelich got mono.”
Cranford’s games followed a
familiar pattern all season. The
Cougars would play well for long
stretches of games only to be
undone by a scoring drought or a
sloppy sequence at some key
point. The injuries and a lack of
size were usually factors in most
of their defeats.
But there were also glimpses of
what might have been. Against
Mount Olive (15-7), Cranford led
most of the way before melting
down in the game’s final minutes
in a 75-70 loss. The Cougars also
had a 65-50-blowout victory over
Hillside in the opening round of
the Union County Tournament.
“Our best win of the season was
the 65-50 victory against Hillside
in the first round of the county
tournament,” said Huber.
The Cougars lose eight seniors
from this year’s team. Dante
Anderson, Luke Christiano, Eric
Donahue, Albert Gargiulo, James
Kellet, Liam McKay, Kevin Trot-
ter and Steven Wills all depart.
Luke Christiano was the only returning starter heading into the
season making the break in continuity all the more difficult to
overcome.
Christiano had 35 FGs (8.7 ppg)
this season and made 13 three
point attempts. Kellet averaged
4.1 points per game. Trotter averaged 4.3 points per contest. In
a truncated season, Wills managed 8.1 points per game.
“None of them are going on to
play basketball in college,” said
Huber. “But, Luke signed a scholarship to play football at Lehigh,
Eric is deciding on either baseball
or football in college, and I believe Albert may be playing baseball next year.”
One benefit of having to shuffle
the lineup as much as he did this
season is that Huber had to reach
deep down into his bench and
got to see many different combinations of players. Many of those
players performed well under fire
and figure to be that much better
for it next year.
Reading is Good For You
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The Cougars will return nine
letter winners next season, including Ryan Bakie, David
Fonseca, Will Fries, Sean
Leonard, Joe Norton, Chris
Remley, Hunter Remley, Jack
Schetelich and Michael Smith.
Hunter Remley averaged 11.8
points per game and buried 38
three-point shots. Leonard
scored 193 points for the season, while playing in 20 games
for a healthy 9.7 average. Joe
Norton averaged 4.7 points per
game. Fries a 6’6” 280 pound
junior should return next season
to give the Cougars some much
needed size and strength in the
interior. Fries is recognized as
one of the state’s top football
offensive linemen. Fonseca averaged 4.8 points per game.
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9th Ranked Westfield Blue Devils Thrash A.L. Johnson Crusader Boys in Lacrosse, 20-3
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9th Ranked Westfield Blue Devils Thrash A.L. Johnson Crusader Boys in Lacrosse, 20-3
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More on next page
3rd Ranked Oak Knoll Royals Rock No. 16 Westfield Lady Blue Devils in Lacrosse, 15-7
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3rd Ranked Oak Knoll Royals Rock No. 16 Westfield Lady Blue Devils in Lacrosse, 15-7
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GW Council Hires New Recycling Collector
By BRIAN TRUSDELL
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
GARWOOD – The borough council on March 24 decided to accept
the bid of Equipment Rental Services to replace the Houstonheadquartered Waste Management as the borough’s recycling
collector, choosing the company
after a debate which sparked a
heated discussion and concerns
of corruption.
Councilman Jim Mathieu was
the lone opponent to Equipment
Rental, of Staten Island, N.Y.,
Brian Trusdell for The Westfield Leader which Borough Administrator/
ADDRESSING PLANNING BOARD… Richard Kozel, the attorney for Borough Clerk Christina Ariemma
Millen Industries and the Schulman family, owners of the Garwood Paper- disclosed was owned by the son
board plant, speaks to the Garwood Planning Board on March 25.
of the borough’s former recycling collector, Great Northern.
Mr. Mathieu said he was unequivocally against the return to
any company affiliated with Great
Northern, recalling how he and
other council members in 2011
received the specifications for
By BRIAN TRUSDELL
eight
criteria
for
declaring
it
“in
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
renewing at “the 11th hour” and
need of redevelopment.” Only “were put under a lot of pressure
GARWOOD – The planning one is required for the declarainternally” to extend the conboard has declared the Garwood tion.
tract with the company without
Paperboard plant property on
Highlighting Harbor Consult- going for bid.
North Avenue an “area in need of ants’ 77-page report, Mr. Vinegra
“What I’m trying to say is there
redevelopment” and has for- noted how the buildings are
were
shenanigans,” Mr. Mathieu
warded its recommendation to largely empty and contain brothe borough council for further ken windows with tin or wood said. “I’m just saying there are
some advocates within this adaction.
covering them. Moreover, much
The decision on March 25 was of the underdeveloped areas of ministration for Great Norththe first step in possibly trans- the property has overgrown veg- ern...”
“He means me,” interjected Ms.
forming the 4.54-acre plot on etation.
Ariemma, who earlier in the disthe east edge of the borough, a
While the building is not crum- cussion said she had received
largely vacant, hulking, four- bling, he said, those conditions
story, 115-year-old structure met criteria “B” of a “discontinu- numerous more complaints about
with smaller buildings, into an- ance of use” that made it in “so Waste Management than with
other use, such as an over-55 great a state of disrepair as to be
Reading is Good For You
housing unit and/or nursing untenable.”
home.
Additionally, Mr. Vinegra exIf the borough agrees with the plained, the property met critedetermination, it can develop a ria “D” that the age of the buildplan for the property and work ings’ obsolescent design and
with the owner to implement it. state of dilapidation made them
Zoning Code Official Victor “detrimental to the safety, health,
Vinegra, who works for the plan- morals, or welfare of the comning board’s designated engi- munity.”
neering firm Harbor Consultants
And finally, the parcel was “conof Cranford, explained how his sistent with smart growth planfirm determined that the prop- ning principles” – criteria “H” –
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CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
erty met three of the state’s
Paperboard Plant Declared
Area In Need of Redevelopment
Great Northern. “I don’t know
what you’re implying, councilman, but I’m telling you the truth,
the facts. There’s no improprieties.”
Mr. Mathieu and Ms. Ariemma
disputed the details of the 2011
contract, with Mr. Mathieu saying Waste Management’s bid
saved the borough money and
Ms. Ariemma saying the bids were
“pennies” apart.
The conflict arose out of the
council’s desire to match the
borough’s recycling contract with
the calendar year for producing a
collection schedule and budgeting. The current contract expires
Wednesday, July 1. Waste Management, which originally insisted on renewing only on a
yearly basis, according to Ms.
Ariemma, submitted a bid of
$28,578 to complete the year,
while Equipment Rental offered
to charge only $16,900.
When
Councilman
Lou
Petruzzelli questioned that, with
a difference of $11,678, why
there was any question as to
which bid to accept, Mr. Mathieu
shot back.
“Because we’re worried about
corruption here, that’s why. Because we’re worried about corruption,” he said. “I’m trying to
protect the borough from corruption.”
That spurred Mayor Charles
Lombardo to gavel the meeting
back into order.
In another budgetary contract
matter, Mr. Mathieu, the buildings and grounds committee
chairman, said the Garwood
school board had agreed to extend the shared-services agreement at a 2-percent increase
with regard to custodial maintenance.
The issue of adding the Garwood
Sports and Recreation Complex
field house to the agreement was
still a matter of some discussion
with the school board. The exact
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
Paul Lachenauer for The Westfield Leader
EASTER BUNNY AND PANCAKES… TheCranford Jaycees held their annual Pancake Breakfast with the Easter Bunny Sunday morning at the
Cranford VFW hall on South Avenue. The event raised money for the
Cranford First Aid Squad. Pictured are the Easter Bunny greeting Mia and
Amy Andre.
Page S-8
Thursday, April 2, 2015
goleader.com/ballyhoo
Ballyhoo
New Jersey
Sports, Humor and Commentary
GW Council Hires
Recycling Collector
Paperboard Plant Area in Need
due to its location along the NJ
Transit Raritan Valley Rail Line
and Garwood being “more or less
a transit village,” Mr. Vinegra
said.
Richard Kozel, the attorney representing the property’s owner,
Millen Industries Inc., and its
principal, Ken Schulman, did not
dispute the report, but he would
not state whether he agreed with
its conclusion that the paperboard plant was in need of redevelopment.
Board Attorney Donald Fraser
pressed Mr. Kozel four times if he
agreed or disagreed with Harbor’s
determination. But Mr. Kozel deferred each time, acknowledging
on one occasion with a laugh that
he was not directly answering
the question. Instead, he said
only that such a determination
would make transitioning the
property to another use easier.
Mr. Kozel also said the plant
has environmental contamination contained within the perimeter of the plant walls that likely
would cost between $800,000
and $1 million to correct. Until
the exact level of contamination
is specified, he could not offer an
opinion on the determination.
He bristled at the use of the
word “blight” although two residents, including former planning
board member Al Del Conte, described the property as “blighty”
and “an eyesore.” Planning Board
Chairman Steve Greet referred
to it as “blightful.”
Mr. Kozel told the board how the
plant is operating at a minimal
level, with five people for recycling
various types of paper. At its peak,
he said, the plant, which was built
to produce musical organs, had
more than 105 employees spread
out over three shifts as it operated
24 hours a day.
But about 10 years ago, he
said, the price of recycled paper
plummeted to one sixth of its
previous value, about $20 a ton,
with countries such as China and
India dominating the market.
The Schulmans, who purchased
the property in the 1970s, investigated redeveloping the property, but with the price of recycled paper rebounding in recent years, the family also is
considering amping up production again.
Mr. Kozel said Millen looked
into a mixed-use of retail and
housing, but rejected the idea
when it could not find many interested developers.
The most promising proposal
was some combination of elderly
housing, such as an age 55-andup community, assisted living
facility, nursing home or a mixture of all three.
“It’s something very, very interesting,” he said. “We intend to
look in that direction, but I don’t
want the board to think we’ve
foreclosed the idea of reopening
the plant.”
Except for the abstentions of
Mayor Charles Lombardo and
Borough Council President Bill
Nierstedt, the board voted unanimously to declare the site in
need of redevelopment.
In other action, the board sent
its recommendations to the borough council regarding its still
yet to be introduced ordinance
on temporary sidewalk signs.
The board spent more than half
an hour before deciding to ask the
council to: consider prohibiting
lighted temporary signs, allow a
“T sign” in addition to A-frame
and easel types, restrict the signs
being permitted to only during
hours of operation, mandate that
they must be stored inside when
not in use and that they be no
wider than two feet and greater
than eight square feet.
It rejected a suggestion from
Mr. Nierstedt that plastic be
banned as the signs’ composition. Although North and South
Avenues are replete with the
signs already, borough ordinances do not permit them.
level of service and cost was to
be determined as the month of
April progressed, Mr. Mathieu
said.
That drew a tone of concern
from Councilwoman Sara
Todisco, who felt the building
would not require a lot of work
and asked for an update before
the council’s next meeting on
Tuesday, April 14.
The council met in an executive
session for about 30 minutes to
hear an update from its attorney
with regard to contract negotiations before a mediator with the
Paul Lachenauer for The Westfield Leader police officers’ union. No details
HUG THE EASTER BUNNY… Kids enjoy the Cranford Junior Woman’s were revealed after the closedClub’s “Breakfast with the Easter Bunny” event Saturday morning at the door session.
Councilwoman and Parking
Cranford Community Center.
Committee Chairwoman Ann
Tarantino told the council that
she had received a commitment
from the manager of the Burger
King restaurant on North Avenue
about increasing the number of
commuter parking spots from
the current 15. The exact number was still a matter of discussion with higher management at
Although the Garwood Borough ‘hidden’ in our separate sewer Burger King.
Council faced many difficult in- bills — we would still have to pay
In another parking issue, Mayor
creases this year, the council it.) That would be the second Lombardo said he had discussed
finance committee wishes to ad- lowest tax increase in 13 years residents’ concerns about traffic
vise residents that the council (next to $39 from last year).
and cars around Lincoln School
was able to work on the budget
Although this year’s tax increase with Schools Superintendent
and reduce it to the borough’s may appear to be larger than our Teresa Quigley, who agreed to
3rd lowest increase in the past neighboring towns, one should send reminders to parents about
13 years. As a finance commit- remember that we keep sewer drop-off and pick-up regulations.
tee, we are upset to have to and garbage inside the tax bill
announce an increase for us all, unlike the others. We do not
and we would like to shed some believe in separating these items,
Reading is Good For You
light on why.
as doing so is simply a game, and
For one, the largest increase would reduce our property tax
we faced this year was an $86,000 deduction on our federal income
increase from the Rahway Valley taxes, thereby increasing our
Sewer Authority (RVSA), which federal income taxes.
equates to $45 on the average
While some would like to athome. In other words, if Garwood tribute the tax increase to our
separated sewer charges from debt, in fact the second largest
the tax bill, as so many of our portion of the tax increase is due
neighboring towns do, the aver- to the contractual increase of
age home would expect a $40 $40,000 ($21 per home) to our
tax increase this year instead of police department for salaries.
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CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
$85. (The other $45 would be
Local Letters to the Editor
GW Councilpersons Explain the
Difficult Tax Increases Coming
Page S-9
Thursday, April 2, 2015
goleader.com/ballyhoo
More Letters to the Editor
Garwood, Big Heart, Big Taxes
There they go again, justifying, spinning and actually bragging about increasing taxes.
With 19 homes for sale, another eight in pre-foreclosure,
the Garwood finance committee just doesn’t seem to get
that we cannot afford their reckless spending and tax increases.
In a recent letter to the editor,
they make a failed attempt at
trying to explain away the increase by taking no accountability and ignoring the facts.
Increases to the 2015 budget
include: an addition $31,000
for the Athletic Complex (last
year they said it would be
$2,000), $33,000 in debt service payments due to the AFC
and neglected infrastructure
projects, $7,000 increase to the
recreation department, $17,000
for the planning board, $11,100
to the municipal clerk, $23,845
initial cost for computer software, $20,000 taxes raised,
$18,800 in legal fees, $17,000
for pension line items, and
$37,000 in municipal roof repairs that should be covered in
the “surplus.” In addition, the
failure of the finance committee to understand and prepare
for fluctuations in RVSA fees
will now cost us $86,000 even
though the fees are flat over the
past five years.
The budget proposed by the
Garwood finance committee is
more per household than
Westfield and Cranford combined. How can a borough of
4,200 people see such drastic
increases year after year? It is
because we have people in
charge that have zero real world
budget experience. They sim-
Probitas Verus Honos
ply copy and paste from the
previous year and add increases. They have no plan, no
solution. They push through
their pet projects without allowing the people to vote on
them and now our small town
with a big heart is starting to
see the ramifications of their
carelessness.
By approving the $3.2-million
AFC without putting it up for the
people of Garwood to vote on,
the council ignored capital expenditures the borough requires
like police dispatch computer
system, police dictaphone system, DPW equipment that is
30+ years old, the 30+ year old
fire trucks and lack of a $1million ladder truck to fight fires
at The Pointe, St. Anne’s senior
housing (which, when opened,
is going to create an even bigger drain on resources) and the
fire on Second Avenue. There
are streets in Garwood that have
not been repaved in 40 years,
sidewalks falling into disrepair,
etc. Now we have to pay for all
the items we already needed to
borrow money for but hid from
the public when the AFC was
approved.
In addition, there is no synergy between the municipality
and the board of education. We
work in silos, which creates
blown up budgets that hurt us,
the taxpayers. The BOE has already said they are raising taxes
an average of $217 per house,
which may have been avoided
with smart collaboration. For
years they have gotten away
with irresponsible increases.
The numbers don’t lie and we
love this town too much to allow
it to continue in the direction
it’s headed.
Sal Piarulli
Garwood
Ballyhoo
Difficult Tax Increase
As of last year, the police department became whole again at 16
officers with the unanimous support of the council and of course,
we are required to pay for this.
The third largest are the funds
required to pay for the emergency roof repairs at Borough
Hall at $37,000 ($19 per home).
The fourth increase is the debt
service bill of $34,000 ($18 per
home), which allows for the bond
sale this year to permanently
finance the borough’s capital
projects for the past 11 years.
These projects include a garbage
truck, senior citizen bus, many
road improvements, the new recreation complex, and more.
We will continue to strive for
ways to save taxpayer dollars without jeopardizing services Garwood
residents deserve and have come
to expect. Presently, the council is
looking at opportunities for shared
services. Also, the finance committee is working with a company
that would provide residents with
tax incentives to shop locally. At
least one other town is interested
in teaming up with us to make this
worthwhile. We look forward to
reaching out to the local business
community in the near future to
see if they would be interested in
this program.
Garwood Councilpersons
Louis Petruzzelli
Sara Todisco
Mike Martin
New Jersey
Sports, Humor and Commentary
Spring Cleanup Time Helps Needy
And Protects the Environment
Now that spring may finally
have arrived, and we will all begin our spring cleaning, I want to
reprint this letter to all readers to
encourage reduce-reuse-recycle
of so much of our ‘stuff”. Such
actions will reduce our consumption of natural resources, and
protect our air, water and land
from further pollution. So, with
an eye towards reducing our ‘bulk
waste, I remind all readers of the
following:
Furniture assist in Kenilworth
takes furniture, tables, chairs,
small working appliances, beds,
kitchen utensils, pictures, knickknacks, lamps, yard tools, toys,
clothing, and books among other
things for reuse by those in need.
The Red Cross takes medical
items such as walkers and
crutches. There are clothing bins
at the Home Depot.
The Lupus and Leukemia Society (Unique on Route 22) will
take pictures, lamps, knockknacks, tools, clothing, pots and
pans and many other items. Foam
Pak in Springfield recycles
Styrofoam. The Fanwood Recycling Center accepts car batteries, compact discs, and DVDs.
We can take hazardous materials to the Union County Hazardous Waste recycling days, and
computers, televisions, phones,
and anything electronic to the
County Electronic recycling days.
Author to Spotlight Jersey Shore History
CRANFORD — The Crane’s
Ford Daughters of the American Revolution will sponsor a
program entitled “History of
the Jersey Shore” on Saturday, April 11. Presented by
Kevin Woyce, it will take place
at 1 p.m. at the Cranford Community Center, located at 220
Walnut Avenue.
Mr. Woyce is an author, photographer and lecturer. A life-
long resident of New Jersey, he
has written many books on regional history of New Jersey
and New York.
His program “History of the
Jersey Shore” will be illustrated
with original photography and
vintage images of Jersey shore
beaches, boardwalks, lighthouses and hotels. All are welcome and refreshments will be
served.
Vehicle, including bicycle tires,
can be brought to the hazardous
waste day. Home Depot accepts
fluorescent bulbs.
Garwood and Cranford libraries accept books for reuse. The
Westfield Rotary Club collects
bicycles and sewing machines
for reuse in foreign countries.
Home Depot and Radio Shack
accept rechargeable and lithium
batteries. Appliances can be
placed at the curb for pick-up.
UPS accepts packaging for reuse. Clothes hangers can be
brought to dry cleaners. Shop
Rite and Pathmark accept plastic
bags. The Garwood Lions Club
accepts glasses and hearing aids
in their mailbox on Center Street;
damaged/ripped American flags
can be brought to the mailbox
right next to it.
Metal can be brought to scrap
dealers in Plainfield or Newark
for cash! The Cranford recycling
center accepts plastics with numbers 5,6, and 7 on them. Garwood
residents are supposed to recycle cans, glass, aluminum, plastic containers, milk and OJ containers, newspapers/mail, corrugated cardboard and magazines. Wood can be burned in a
fireplace.
When you get down to it, the
vast majority of items that are
placed in bulk waste pick-up can
be recycled or reused. I urge all
Garwood residents to go through
our ‘junk’ to see if it can be
reduced, reused or recycled. I
know there are other places to
which we can bring our ‘stuff’
that I have not listed. I urge you
to call the Borough Recycling
Coordinator or me if you are
uncertain as to how to properly
dispose of something. Together,
we can reduce our waste,
repurpose our tax dollars, and
protect our environment.
Bill Nierstedt
Garwood Councilman
Page S-10
Thursday, April 2, 2015
goleader.com/ballyhoo
Ballyhoo
New Jersey
Sports, Humor and Commentary
CR Historic Murals Awarded Nat’l Recognition
RESTORATION RECOGNITION...Recipients of the Historic Murals Restoration Award are recognized for their efforts at a ceremony March 14 at the
Cranford Municipal Building. Pictured, from left to right, are: Barbara Krause
and Regent Mary Leonard, Crane’s Ford Daughters of the American Revolution, with artist Deb Leber; former mayor Robert Puhak; Board of Education
President Mary Venditti; Mayor Andis Kalnins and Laura Fuhro.
CRANFORD
Friday, March 20, following a
motor vehicle stop, Manuel Soto,
42, of Elizabeth was arrested
and charged with possession of a
hypodermic syringe; and Brian
Sarratt, 47, of Elizabeth was arrested and charged with possession of heroin, possession of paraphernalia and hindering apprehension.
Saturday, March 21, Damon
Ross, 43, of Roselle was charged
with driving while intoxicated
(DWI) following a motor vehicle
stop. He was processed and released pending an appearance in
Municipal Court.
Saturday, March 21, Joao
DaSilva, 51, of Roselle Park was
arrested and charged with unlawful possession of a weapon
following a motor vehicle stop.
Police recovered a pellet handgun from the vehicle. DaSilva
was processed and released
pending an appearance in Superior Court.
Saturday, March 21, Demor
Barber, 24, of Irvington was arCONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
CRANFORD — Cranford’s Historic Murals Restoration Project
achieved national recognition at
a ceremony on March 14, hosted
by the Crane’s Ford Daughters of
the American Revolution (DAR)
at the Cranford Municipal Building. The local chapter had submitted the mural project for the
award sponsored by the National
DAR in Washington, D.C.
It was presented by Cranford
DAR to those who were instrumental in the painting restoration of four historic murals now
prominently displayed on the
walls of the municipal building
meeting room. Each mural is 78
inches wide by 50 inches high
GOP Picks Cuccaro, Sarno
To Run for Garwood Council
GARWOOD — The Garwood Republican Committee has selected
Ileen Bocchino Cuccaro and Joseph R. Sarno III as its 2015
nominees for borough council.
Ms. Cuccaro has resided in
Garwood for nearly 50 years,
where she raised her son, Eric
Meyer. As a businesswoman serving the Garwood community, she
has a an insight into why people
choose to sell their homes in
Garwood and why new residents
continue to come here. Ms.
Cuccaro is a realtor for Coldwell
Banker, having sold scores of
homes in the community. She
attended Union County College
where she studied urban studies
and creative writing.
Mr. Sarno is a lifelong New
Jersey resident. He attended
Albright College in Reading, Pa.,
and graduated cum laude with a
degree in accounting and political science. In college, he also
starred as a cross country and
long distance runner for the track
and field team. He currently works
at SS&C GlobeOP in Cranford as
a senior accountant and has over
nine years of accounting and
analytical experience in the alternative investment world. His
service has assured that investors are protected from securities fraud, embezzlement, and
other forms of theft.
Garwood GOP Chairman Jim
Mathieu said he is enthusiastic
about Ms. Cuccaro and Mr. Sarno
running for Garwood borough
council.
“I first met each of them when
I challenged the Republican establishment in the 2013 Garwood
Republican primary. Ileen and
Joe are shining examples of the
new type of candidates our party
is selecting — people of character who will vote like Republicans. I expect each of them to
bring fresh ideas and approaches
to keeping Garwood affordable
for current and future residents.”
To volunteer, contribute or
meet the candidates in person,
please contact Mr. Mathieu at
(917) 626-0207 or by e-mail at
[email protected]
and provides a visual history of
Cranford in vivid colors.
The award is specifically for
volunteer efforts. The requirements read, “The Historic Preservation Recognition Award is
designed to recognize worthy
local individuals and groups for
outstanding achievements in all
areas of historic preservation.
The recipients are expected to
have contributed to their community in an outstanding volunteer manner.”
The award presented to the
Township by Cranford DAR was a
framed certificate including the
history of the murals and their
restoration. Union County Freeholder Bette Jane Kowalski presented a county resolution commending the award recipients.
The lengthy credentials required for the award application
were prepared by Cranford DAR
American History Chairwoman
Barbara Krause. In presenting
the award, Mrs. Krause indicated,
“The people we honor today
worked collaboratively for four
years with little public recognition. This is our way of showing
appreciation for the successful
restoration of these four murals
which illuminate this room with
rich colors depicting our town’s
history for generations to come.”
The five recipients include:
former Cranford Mayor Robert
Puhak; former Cranford High
School history teacher and township historian Larry Fuhro (posthumously), whose award was accepted by his wife, Laura Fuhro;
Cranford artistic consultant for
the restoration, Deb Leber;
Cranford Public School District
Board of Education, represented
by BOE president Mary Venditti;
Township of Cranford, represented by Mayor Andis Kalnins.
The four murals were originally
painted during the Depressionera Works Progress Administration of the 1930s by Cranford
artist Everett S. Ward and com-
pleted in 1942. They tell the
story of Cranford through four
scenes of town history: The original Lenape Indian tribe; first European settlers; Revolutionary
War; railroad and Victorian era.
Originally hung in Cranford
High School library, they were
removed during school renovation in the 1960s and stored
away, not rediscovered as a set
until 2008, when Larry Fuhro
and Bob Puhak began the process of public awareness, realizing their unique historic value.
The board of education shared
that value, secured grant funding and provided work space at
the high school where staff and
students could observe the twoyear restoration effort. Ms. Leber
retained restoration specialist
Angelito David to perform the
extensive artistic work required
to repair years of dust and damage to the canvases. Mr. Fuhro
lent his vast knowledge of
Cranford history to the research
required.
Crane’s Ford DAR Regent Mary
Leonard welcomed more than
60 guests attending the ceremony including the Cranford
family of the original mural artist Everett Ward. The entire
township committee: Mayor
Kalnins; Deputy Mayor Lisa
Adubato; Commissioners Tom
Hannen, Jr., Mary O’Connor and
Robert D’Ambola attended with
Township Administrator Terence
Wall and Police Chief James
Wozniak.
Also attending were members
of the Cranford Historical Society and President Margaret
Gerlach; Cranford Preservation
Advisory Board; Union County
Historical Society and New Jersey State DAR representative
Kitty Bowers. A guest reception
was hosted by the Cranford DAR.
Probitas Verus Honos
Page S-11
Thursday, April 2, 2015
goleader.com/ballyhoo
rested and charged with possession of less than 50 grams of
suspected marijuana and possession of paraphernalia following a motor vehicle stop.
Sunday, March 22, Luis
Maldonado, 23, of Newark was
arrested and charged with possession of less than 50 grams of
suspected marijuana and possession of paraphernalia following a motor vehicle stop.
Sunday, March 22, Corey
Youmans, 25, of Elizabeth was
arrested and charged with possession of less than 50 grams of
suspected marijuana and possession of paraphernalia following a motor vehicle stop.
Youmans was processed and released pending an appearance in
Municipal Court.
Monday, March 23, Santiago
Herrera, 24, of Perth Amboy was
arrested and charged with possession of cocaine and possession of paraphernalia following a
motor vehicle stop. Herrera was
processed and released pending
an appearance in Superior Court.
Monday, March 23, Joseph
Madden, Jr., 24, of Garwood
was arrested and charged with
possession of heroin, possession of a hypodermic syringe
and possession of paraphernalia following a motor vehicle
stop. He was processed and released pending an appearance
in Superior Court.
Tuesday, March 24, Kenny
Harrigan, 18, of Jersey City was
arrested and charged with hindering apprehension after he
allegedly provided police with
multiple false identities in an
attempt to conceal the existence of an outstanding arrest
warrant from Jersey City. He
was charged, processed and released after posting bail on the
Jersey City warrant.
Probitas Verus Honos
Ballyhoo
Garwood Residents Eligible
For Free Tree Seedlings
GARWOOD — Free tree seedlings will be available to Garwood
residents during the month of
April as part of the New Jersey
Tree Recovery Campaign. This
program helps communities replace trees damaged or destroyed by Superstorm Sandy.
From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on
Saturday, April 11, residents will
be able to pick up tree seedlings
at the Garwood Day Event held
at the Garwood Sports and Recreation Complex, located at 140
Myrtle Avenue. Seedlings, available on a first-come, first-served
basis, also come with instructions on how to store, care for
and plant them. The guides help
residents to choose the right place
on a property to plant a tree
while keeping in mind the tree’s
full-grown size in the future. Residents should plant the seedlings
within two days after pickup in
order to prevent the roots from
drying out.
The goal of the Tree Recovery
Campaign is to distribute more
than 500,000 tree seedlings to
New Jersey residents over the
course of the next five years. It is a
joint effort between the Shade Tree
Department of Garwood, State
Forestry Services, New Jersey Soil
Conservation Districts, Sustainable
Jersey, Arbor Day Foundation,
Brothers International, BJ’s Wholesale Club, Wyndham Vacation Resorts and FedEx.
When properly planted and
maintained, trees can be assets
to a community. They improve
the visual appeal of a neighborhood or business district, increase
property values, reduce home
cooling costs, remove air pollutants and provide wildlife habitat,
among many other benefits.
For a list of all distribution locations across the state, visit
forestry.nj.gov or facebook.com/
newjerseyforests.
For further information, contact Christina Ariemma, Shade
Tree Officer, at (908) 789-0710
or
by
e-mail
at
[email protected]
Cranford Chamber Holds
Meet and Greet at Kilkenny
CRANFORD — The Cranford
Chamber of Commerce held its
first After Hours Networking Meet
and Greet event on March 24 at
the Kilkenny House in Cranford.
This event was very well attended by many chamber members and retailers. Members and
future members had a chance to
mingle with other attendees
while exchanging information
and promoting their businesses.
The Chamber will host three additional After Hours Networking
events this year.
The Chamber expressed appreciation to Kilkenny House
owner Barry O’Donovan and his
staff for hosting this successful
networking event for the organization. Mr. O’Donovan opened
the Kilkenny House six years
ago on South Avenue in Cranford
and according to the Chamber
has always been very supportive of the community.
The Cranford Chamber of
Commerce holds a networking
event each month. For additional information or to respond for an event, interested
persons are asked to contact
(908)
272-6114
or
[email protected]
New Jersey
Sports, Humor and Commentary
Cranford Historical Society
Marks End of Civil War
CRANFORD — April 2015 marks hibited, showing the treatment
the end of the 150th anniversary of African-Americans before, durof the Civil War. To commemo- ing and after the Civil War. The
rate this period in American his- library is located at 224 Walnut
tory, the Cranford Historical So- Avenue.
To complement the liciety has scheduled sevbrary exhibit, local Civil
eral public events in
War historian Steven
April, including an exGlazer will speak at the
hibit at the Cranford
Crane-Phillips House
Public Library, which will
Museum
about
run throughout the
Cranford’s role in bringmonth.
ing an end to the war.
Included in the exhibit
His illustrated presenwill be a timeline of the
tation will take place on
last year of the war,
Sunday, April 12, at 2:15
noting some of the key
p.m. Doors will open at
battles and the Cranford
2 p.m.
citizens who fought in
Judge
Batchelder
Admission is free but
them. Also on display
will be original letters and pic- reservations are required.
Interested persons are asked
tures once owned by Cranford
justice
Wesley
Rogers to respond by calling the Cranford
Batchelder, who witnessed the Historical Society’s office at (908)
or
e-mailing
assassination of President 276-0082
Abraham Lincoln on April 14, [email protected]
1865 in Washington. An addi- The Crane-Phillips House Mutional feature of the display will seum is located at 124 North
be a grouping of original South- Union Avenue, Cranford.
A companion article to the liern documents, never before exbrary exhibit and museum presentation will be in the Spring
REPORTERS NEEDED
issue of “The Mill Wheel,” the
Current openings for reporters Cranford Historical Society’s
to cover town council, BOE, newsletter, received by all memand recreation commission bers of the organization. Mr.
meetings. We seek community- Glazer also will address the sixthminded, detail-oriented writers grade students of Orange AvSchool during April regardwith professional demeanor enue
ing Cranford’s Civil War heritage.
needed. Must be able to meet
deadlines, know how to write a
lead, and take an active interest
in a regular beat in order to
develop news stories. Great for
stay-at-home moms, a second
income or just for those who
love to write. E-mail resume
and clips to:
Reading is Good For You
[email protected]
The Westfield Leader &
The Scotch Plains-Fanwood
TIMES
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Page S-12
Thursday, April 2, 2015
goleader.com/ballyhoo
Edu. Foundation of GW
Announces Annual Dinner
GARWOOD – The Education
Foundation of Garwood (EFG), a
non-profit volunteer organization
that seeks to partner with the
schools and the community in
the pursuit of educational excellence, has set Thursday, April 23
as its next fund-raising event.
The Annual Appreciation Dinner,
which will be held at the
Westwood in Garwood, recognizes the accomplishments of the
“Garwood Educator of the Year”
as well as the “Garwood People
Making a Difference” award. The
“Making a Difference” award is
given annually to honor a person
or persons from Garwood who
has impacted and contributed to
the Borough in a positive way.
The EFG will honor the recipient of the Garwood Educator of
the Year, Ms. Tara Ridente. Ms.
Ridente is a Speech Language
Specialist in Lincoln School. Additionally, she is serves as a paraprofessional in the district.
This year’s “People Making a
Difference Award” will be given
to Ms. Mary Guare and Mr. Bill
Connolly; both are being honored for their volunteerism and
contributions to the community.
The evening will also feature a
Tricky Tray and raffle.
Tickets for the evening, which
includes a buffet dinner, beer,
wine and music are available for
$35 per person, and are available for purchase from the school
Reading is Good For You
goleader.com/subscribe
office, EFG Trustees or by calling
(908) 789-0331 ext. 1450. Tickets are also available at the
Garwood Public Library located
at 411 Third Avenue during regular library hours. You may also
send contributions or direct inquiries to the EFG, c/o Lincoln
School -400 Second Avenue
Garwood, NJ 07027
EFG will use the proceeds from
the Appreciation Dinner to fund
grant programs benefiting
Garwood’s public schools and
provide Garwood students scholarships awards.
Ballyhoo
Sports, Humor and Commentary
Cranford Band Splittree
Releases Debut Album
try professionals for the mastering, production and distribution.
“Never Look Back,” an upbeat
song with punchy drums and the
signature alternative sounding
guitars, talks about embracing
the future, and was the first single
from the new record, which the
band released on December 12,
2014. In one night the song received over 200 listens alone on
Soundcloud, and has since surpassed 1,000 listens and downloads total.
“Our next step is to support this
album by touring, radio interviews, and any sort of promotion
possible, and we are coordinating all this on our own because
we don’t have record label backing yet,” said singer and guitarist
Mr. MacLelland.
For a free download of the al(908) 709-0434 or (908) 709- bum, or to listen, visit the band
0391 or visit Especially Yours at
https://
Florist, located at 13 North 20th splittree.bandcamp.com/album/
Street, Kenilworth.
mind-tricks.
This year’s annual Tea is being
dedicated to Kenilworth Historical Society board member and
lifelong Kenilworth resident
Eleanor Combs, who passed away
last September. Ms. Combs always looked forward to the Historical Society’s Teas and conCRANFORD — The Cranford
tributed significantly to their suc- Recreation and Parks Department
cessful evolution over the years. will present the Fabulously Fun
Proceeds from the Tea will ben- Fitness program Stretch-N-Grow,
efit the Kenilworth Historical which is designed to promote
Society’s circa 1880 Oswald J. exercise and wellness for preNitschke House “living history” school-age children.
museum and cultural arts center
The class, for children ages 2 to
by helping defray the cost of an 5, will take place on Wedneselevator that makes all levels of days, April 15 to June 3, from
the newly-restored and furnished 9:30 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. It will be
site fully accessible to everyone. held at the Cranford Community
The Kenilworth Historical Soci- Center, located at 220 Walnut
ety is an independent, non-profit, Avenue.
tax-exempt, 501(c)(3) organiThis program focuses on balzation dedicated to the research, ance, coordination and sports
preservation and interpretation readiness skills. Youngsters parof the Oswald J. Nitschke House, ticipate in weekly sessions, which
local history and culture.
include warm-up, cardio, cool
CRANFORD – Local Cranford band
Splittree, made up of three
Cranford High Seniors, released
their debut album, “Mind Tricks”
on March 3. The trio, comprised
of Tom Stoke, John Anclien and
Kean MacLelland, released the
album via iTunes, Bandcamp,
Soundcloud, physical copies, as
well as other music streaming
services.
The band, who write original,
alternative sounding tunes
wrapped up recording on their
13 song debut album in early
January and worked with indus-
Kenilworth Hist. Soc. Offers
Benefit Afternoon Tea Event
KENILWORTH — The Kenilworth
Historical Society will present
“Teapot Tales,” an elegant afternoon Tea and program on Saturday, April 25, featuring a vast
collection of unique teapots from
around the world.
The stories behind the teapots
and insight into the practice of
teapot collecting will be the focus
of the featured program, “Confessions of a Teapot Collector,”
to be presented by certified professional tea specialist Darlene
Meyers-Perry, owner/president
of The Tea Lover’s Archives.
The Tea will begin at noon at
the Kenilworth Gospel Chapel
Hall, located at 103 South 23rd
Street, Kenilworth, where the
ambience of a tearoom is being
created for the event. In addition
to providing an array of assorted
teas, tea sandwiches, scones and
desserts, the event will include a
gift auction and door prizes.
Admission is $28. Advance reservations by Thursday, April 16,
are required, as seating is limited. For reservations/tickets, call
New Jersey
Cranford Rec. Plans
Youth Typing Classes
CRANFORD — The Cranford
Recreation and Parks Department has announced that it will
offer spring typing classes for
youngsters. They will be held
at the Cranford Community
Center, located at 220 Walnut
Avenue.
These classes, for students in
grades 3 to 8, will be held on
Mondays, April 27 to May 18, or
Wednesdays, April 29 to May
20. Grades 3 to 5 will meet
from 3:45 to 4:45 p.m. and
grades 6 to 8 will meet from 5
to 6 p.m. The class requires
students to bring their own
laptops with Internet capability.
Registration is for Cranford
residents only and may be done
in person at the Cranford Community Center or online at
cranford.com/rec through
Community Pass. The cost is
$35. Registration must be completed by Friday, April 17.
For more information, call the
Cranford Community Center at
(908) 709-7283.
Cranford Recreation Offers
Stretch-N-Grow Class
down and stretching, including
Kids Yoga, taught by a trained
Stretch-N-Grow coach. The goal
is for children to have fun while
learning to enjoy exercise and
building good habits.
Registration is for Cranford residents only and may be done in
person at the Cranford Community Center or online at
cranford.com/rec through Community Pass. The cost is $85. For
more information, call the
Cranford Community Center at
(908) 709-7283.
Probitas Verus Honos
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