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CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
Newspaper of the Archdiocese of San Francisco
www.catholic-sf.org
SERVING SAN FRANCISCO, MARIN & SAN MATEO COUNTIES
APRIL 17, 2015
$1.00 | VOL. 16 NO. 17
Pope: Year of
Mercy time to
heal, forgive
Pope says church
called to strength,
frankness, courage
CINDY WOODEN
LAURA IERACI
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
VATICAN CITY – Mercy is what
makes God perfect and all-powerful,
Pope Francis said in his document
officially proclaiming the 2015-2016
extraordinary Holy Year of Mercy.
“If God limited himself to only
justice, he would cease to be God, and
would instead be like human beings
who ask merely that the law be respected,” the pope wrote in “Misericordiae Vultus,” (“The Face of Mercy”),
which is the “bull of indiction” calling
a Holy Year to begin Dec. 8.
Standing in front of the Holy Door
of St. Peter’s Basilica April 11, Pope
Francis handed copies of the document to the archpriests of the major
basilicas of Rome and to Vatican
officials representing Catholics
around the world.
Portions of the 9,300-word proclamation were read aloud before Pope
Francis and his aides processed into
St. Peter’s Basilica to celebrate the
first vespers of Divine Mercy Sunday.
VATICAN CITY – The church today is
called to be frank and courageous, just as
the apostles were after the Resurrection,
said Pope Francis at his first daily Mass
after a two-week break for Holy Week
and Easter.
“Even today, the message of the
church is the message of frankness and
Christian courage,” the pope said April
13. In attendance at Mass at the Domus
Sanctae Marthae were the nine members
of thepope’s advisory Council of Cardinals, who were to begin another round of
meetings that day.
Reflecting on the day’s first reading
(Acts 4:23-31), the pope said the apostles
Peter and John were simple men, without
a formal education. But by the Holy Spirit,
they were granted strength and courage.
“And from fear they moved to frankness, to saying things with freedom,” he
said.
Reflecting on the day’s Gospel reading
(John 3:1-8), the pope reiterated that only
the Holy Spirit “can give us the grace of
courage to proclaim Jesus Christ.”
“And this courage to proclaim is what
distinguishes us from simple proselytism. We do not do advertising, says
Jesus Christ, to have more members in
our spiritual association,” he said. “This
is not useful, it is not Christian. A Christian proclaims with courage. And the
proclamation of Jesus Christ provokes,
through the Holy Spirit, that wonder that
impels us to go forward.”
When Jesus in the day’s Gospel passage speaks of being born anew, the
pope said, he teaches that “only the Holy
Spirit can change our attitude, the story
of our life.”
“The path of Christian courage is a
grace the Holy Spirit gives,” he said. “If
the Spirit is not present, we can do many
things, much work, but it serves nothing.”
After Easter, the church prepares to receive the Holy Spirit, the pope continued,
inviting those present at Mass “to ask
for the grace to receive the Spirit so that
he gives us the true courage to proclaim
Jesus Christ.”
SEE POPE, PAGE 20
(CNS PHOTO/STEFANO SPAZIANI, POOL)
Pope Francis processes into St. Peter’s Basilica on Divine Mercy Sunday at the Vatican April 11.
Seeking better church response to traumatic events
CHRISTINA GRAY
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
Few pastors have the knowledge
or experience to apply effective “psychological and spiritual first aid”
to their parishioners in the wake
of a disaster or tragedy, according
to a former Marin County church
worker.
Mike Morison hopes to change
that. An Our Lady of Mount Carmel Parish pastoral associate since
2008, Morison retired from the Mill
Valley church last month in order
to complete his doctor of ministry
degree at the San Francisco Theological Seminary in San Anselmo.
His dissertation project, which will
(PHOTO BY CHRISTINA GRAY/CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO)
Mike Morison, a longtime pastoral associate at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Parish in
Mill Valley, is retiring to pursue a vocation in
disaster ministry.
be completed this summer, is called
“Ministering in Disaster.”
“What I would like to facilitate is a
greater awareness of what is involved
at any level of disaster so that our
faith communities can be better prepared to help people in crisis,” Morison, 62, told Catholic San Francisco.
Morison’s doctoral project is the
culmination of nearly 40 years of
training and experience ministering
to the needs of people directly and
indirectly affected by catastrophic
events. He’s been a longtime volunteer with the American Red Cross,
has led disaster teams with the New
Hampshire Bureau of Emergency
SEE DISASTER MINISTRY, PAGE 20
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INDEX
On the Street . . . . . . . . .4
National . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
World . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
Opinion. . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Faith. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . .26
2 ARCHDIOCESE
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
Cemeteries director: Water cutbacks a ‘moral mandate’
CHRISTINA GRAY
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
When California Gov. Jerry Brown
issued the first-ever statewide mandatory water reduction order April 1
after the lowest winter snowpack on
record, cemeteries, along with golf
courses, universities and other keepers of large, irrigated grounds were
expected to immediately implement
water efficiency measures consistent
with statewide 25 percent reduction
targets.
According to cemeteries director
Monica Williams, water usage has
already been evaluated and restricted
at all five of the cemeteries operated
by the Archdiocese of San Francisco,
including those that use only reclaimed or well water.
Williams told Catholic San Francisco on April 10 that she considers
cutbacks not just a legal requirement
but a moral mandate. “It’s the right
thing to do,” she said.
At Holy Cross Cemetery in Colma;
Holy Cross Cemetery in Menlo Park;
Mt. Olivet Cemetery in San Rafael;
Our Lady of the Pillar Cemetery in
Half Moon Bay; Tomales Cemetery in
Tomales; and St. Anthony Cemetery
in Pescadero, water-saving measures
include the less frequent watering
(PHOTO COURTESY MONICA WILLIAMS/HOLY CROSS CEMETERY)
A tree-planting program at archdiocesan cemeteries gives more shade cover and a chance to remember a loved one with a drought-resistant tree.
of lawns, the planting of droughtresistant landscaping, the use of
new water-efficient hoses and irrigation equipment and the planting of
drought-resistant shade trees.
Holy Cross Cemetery in Colma,
which is built on an aquifer, an underground layer of water-permeable
rock, gravel, sand or silt from which
groundwater can be extracted, used
30 percent less water in 2014 than the
previous year by changing its watering schedule, according to Willams.
SHIPWRECK, MISSION DOLORES PASTORS ANNOUNCED
Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone has appointed Father Manuel Igrobay
pastor of St. Paul of the Shipwreck
Parish, San Francisco. St. Paul of
the Shipwreck was administered
by Franciscans, Order of Friars
Minor from its beginnings in 1915
through 1997 when Conventual
Franciscans took over leadership
there.
Father Manuel
Father Igrobay, a priest of the
Igrobay
Archdiocese of San Francisco,
has served as administrator at
Church of the Assumption of
Mary in Tomales and neighboring Sacred Heart Church, Olema,
since 2013.
Archbishop Cordileone has
also announced appointment of
Father Francis Garbo as pastor of
Mission Dolores Basilica Parish.
Father Garbo has served as pastor
Father Francis
of St. Timothy Parish, San Mateo,
Garbo
since 2007.
Both of the new appointments are effective July 1.
LIVING TRUSTS WILLS
PROBATE
“We came off what was a daily watering schedule to an every other day
watering schedule,” she said.
She is also looking into newer technologies for accurately measuring
and maintaining the level of water in
cemetery wells.
Williams said the cemeteries will
continue to monitor the health and
appearance of lawns, balancing the
need to use water wisely with the need
to maintain peaceful-looking grounds.
“Our cemeteries are such a part of
Faith leaders invited to free training on
responding to homelessness
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
Religious congregation leaders are invited to
“Responding to Homelessness on Our Doorsteps,” a free training April 30 from 9 a.m.noon in the St. Francis Room at St. Mary’s
Cathedral.
Sponsored by the San Francisco Interfaith
Council, the program will be presented by
the San Francisco mayor’s office of Housing
Opportunity, Partnerships & Engagement as
an update to a conference held for religious
congregations at the cathedral in 2013.
“This is really a match between the resources
that are available and the congregation leaders
who are on the front lines,” said Michael Pappas, executive director of the interfaith council.
“The training will impart to the congregations
leaders a strategy they can employ in response
to the homeless they find at their doors.”
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The training comes at a time when the city
has opened a Navigation Center equipped to
temporarily house entire encampments of the
homeless and help guide people toward permanent housing. The center opened in March at
16th and Mission streets.
Pappas said homelessness is a chronic problem faced by religious congregations in the city
and has been amplified by income inequality.
“This a challenge that clergy have across the
gamut of faiths,” Pappas said.
The interfaith council operates the San
Francisco Interfaith Winter Shelter, hosted by
St. Mary’s Cathedral, St. Boniface Parish, St.
Mark’s Lutheran Church and the First Unitarian Universalist Society.
Contact Cynthia Zamboukos at (415) 474-1321 or
[email protected] Register at http://
conta.cc/1P3G60r.
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone Publisher
Rick DelVecchio Editor/General Manager
EDITORIAL
Valerie Schmalz, assistant editor
Tom Burke, On the Street/Calendar
Christina Gray, reporter
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Every Day is
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the Catholic tradition and we don’t
want to take away from the serenity
they offer,” she said.
Williams said that because “there is
still room for improvement,” the new
25 percent reduction order is doable.
“But should the drought continue for
several more years,” she said. “It is
likely we will see some browning of
lawns in some areas.”
Areas of the cemetery without burials would be the first to be impacted,
she said.
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ARCHDIOCESE 3
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
Catholic Charities Sunday:
Loving our neighbors in San Francisco
Catholic Charities, the social services
arm of the Catholic Church in the
Archdiocese of San Francisco, serves
more than 35,000 individuals, children
and families in the Bay Area. On May
9 and 10, Catholic parishes in the
three counties of the archdiocese will
take a second collection to support
the work of Catholic Charities. This
is the first of three articles featuring
stories of people at risk in our communities who are supported by Catholic Charities.
‘The measure of the greatness of a
society is found in the way it treats
those most in need, those who have
nothing apart from their poverty!’
POPE FRANCIS
Rio de Janiero, Brazil, July 25, 2013
JEFF BIALIK
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CATHOLIC CHARITIES
Scripture gives us a clear list of
lifelong priorities. The first priority is to love God with everything
we have. The second is to love our
neighbor as ourselves. For more
than 100 years, Catholic Charities
has reached out with compassion to
our most vulnerable neighbors in
San Francisco in a number of relevant ways. In 1907, Catholic Charities offered care to the homeless victims of the devastating earthquake.
In the 1980s, Catholic Charities was
the first in the country to provide
stable housing for neighbors who
were dying from AIDS. Today, as our
children struggle to stay safe and
healthy, Catholic Charities has developed a physical education curriculum for area schools that combines
physical fitness with classes on how
to cook and eat for a healthier life.
Here are a few stories of people
in our community who, because of
your generosity, are being lifted out
of poverty by Catholic Charities
today:
After years of battling chronic illness while living at Catholic Charities’ Derek Silva Community, Bart’s
health began to improve. He felt
he was ready to stand on his own
two feet and go back to work. Bart
found a job and moved into his own
apartment, but after encountering
some difficulties at his new job,
he wasn’t able to stay employed.
During unemployment his rent
increased, so Bart was on the brink
of homelessness. A staff member
at Catholic Charities’ Derek Silva
Community who was still in touch
with Bart helped him apply for un-
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employment, get his rent reduced,
and keep his health care. Thanks
to Catholic Charities, Bart now has
enough income for stable housing
which offers him the opportunity to
plan for his future.
Adelia came to Catholic Charities’
Maureen & Craig Sullivan Youth
Services with her family, including three children, 9, 6 and 3 years
old), who were enrolled in Catholic school. She and the children’s
father decided to separate which
meant that Adelia and the children were relocated through the
San Francisco Housing Authority.
Around the same time, the father
had some immigration issues which
created more complications for the
family. After the housing relocation, Catholic Charities’ Maureen
& Craig Sullivan Youth Services
kept the two older girls enrolled
in school on a scholarship and
helped place the youngest boy in
Head Start to offer them stability
and support. Now the children are
better adjusted, sociable and doing
well in school. With support from
the program staff, both parents
have been able to consistently
demonstrate their desire to improve their parenting style to raise
healthy, thriving children.
Marta needed a stable place to
live and help in raising her 11-yearold son. For months, Marta and
her son were sharing a small living
space with friends. Knowing their
housing situation was not sustainable, they came to Catholic Charities’ Rita de Cascia Community for
help. The Catholic Charities staff
assisted Marta with referrals to
supportive housing organizations
throughout San Francisco. Through
this diligent effort, Marta and her
son were able to receive shelter and
stability and successfully apply and
move into a beautiful, sunny twobedroom apartment with hope for
the future.
Bart, Adelia and Marta, are our
neighbors. Please consider giving
to this year’s Catholic Charities
Sunday second collection at your
parish on May 9 or 10. By putting
your faith in action, you show your
love for thousands of brothers and
sisters in your community.
4 ON THE STREET WHERE YOU LIVE
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
‘I love being a
cantor at St. Mary’s
Cathedral,’ chief
song leader says
TOM BURKE
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
Anyone attending liturgy at St. Mary’s Cathedral
is in very good hands with cantor
Stephen Walsh leading song.
“I want them to have a wonderful experience in our liturgies at
St. Mary’s Cathedral,” Stephen
told me via email. “I want them to
remember that they felt at home at
the cathedral. I want them to feel
like it is their church because it is,
in fact, their cathedral.”
Stephen Walsh
Stephen has three jobs at the
cathedral including primary cantor, music office
assistant and as a section leader in the cathedral’s
adult choir and its breakout ensemble or schola. He
has served at the cathedral for 22 years, beginning
as substitute cantor just after Easter in 1993.
“I will be honest; it took me three weeks to
become comfortable singing in so large a space,”
Stephen said about acclimating himself to the
cathedral. He said most all of the churches he had
sung in up to that time could probably fit into the
cathedral.
The congregation also sits in what Stephen calls
“the round” and having the assembly all around
him and not just in front of him was something
new to deal with, too.
Stephen’s idea of the cantor is “soloist and song
leader” and one who “allows the congregation to
hear themselves sing.”
Diction and presence are very necessary tools
of the trade Stephen said. “Over the years I have
learned it is important that my face expresses the
words coming out of my mouth. There is nothing
more awkward than seeing someone sing ‘Alleluia’
with a frown or expressionless look on their face.
I’ve learned to be joyous at every Mass.”
Is the cathedral assembly a singing assembly?
“In my experience, with good guidance from the
cantor, congregations can sing and sing joyfully,”
Stephen said noting that right out of the gate cathedral worshippers did not sing but things got better.
He uses the closing hymn as a barometer.
“More and more people actually were staying for
all of the verses of the closing hymn. I still watch
at every Mass to see whether people are leaving
before the last note!”
While Stephen sings regularly with cathedral
parishioners, he also leads song at larger archdiocesan liturgies with “a congregation from all over
the archdiocese, the country and even the world,”
he said.
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HIGH SCHOOL BOWL: In fashion of the many-years-ago “GE College Bowl” local high schools have for eight years been competing in a Bay Area Catholic High School Quiz Bowl, this year held at Archbishop Riordan Riordan High School. The 2015 winning team was
from Junipero Serra High School guided by longtime Serra faculty members Randy Vogel and Bruce Anthony. Pictured from left are Chad
Crews, Ryan Cao, Jeffrey Dalli, Miles Moriarty, Kyle Crews, Mitch Nunes, Glenn McDonnell, Randy and Bruce.
STICK IT: Congrats
to Sacred Heart
Cathedral sophomore
Will Bogdan who
won the state boy’s
gymnastics Level 9
title March 21 and
took second place in
a Mandarin poetry
competition at the
Chinese Consulate
in San Francisco
March 27.Will
speaks Mandarin
as a graduate of the
Chinese American
International School.
He is also a member
of the youth group at
Holy Name of Jesus
Parish.
He does his best to make everyone comfortable.
“I pay special attention to being a confident and
clear leader with clear hand signals and mike
technique, listening to when they are singing and
when they might need more direction.”
“I love being a cantor at St. Mary’s Cathedral,”
Stephen said. “It’s a real blessing. I love to lead
the music, to sing the Psalms, to be at the liturgies, to be a part of the team that keeps the liturgy flowing smoothly and effortlessly. It is called
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415.283.6953 | 650.580.6334
415-614-5503
This number is answered by Renee Duffey,
Victim Assistance Coordinator.
This is a secured line and is answered only
by Renee Duffey.
If you wish to speak to a non-archdiocesan
employee please call this number. This is
also a secured line and is answered only by
a victim survivor.
GIRLS EVENING OUT: Mercy High School, San
Francisco is calling grads to an all-school reunion May 2. The fun starts at 4 p.m. in Mercy’s
McAuley Pavilion. The $35 ticket includes a wine
and hors d’oeuvres reception. I remain a big fan
of reunions and my high school in Jersey was
having one of the “all in” type every couple of
years that a lot of folks attended. Mercy, SF grads
can check in with Audrey Magnusen at (415) 3377218 or [email protected] You can also
register at www.mercyhs.org.
CHANGE OF PLANS: Though announced for a
different date in previous listings EWTN’s Raymond Arroyo is guest speaker at Star of the Sea
Church, San Francisco May 3 at 7 p.m. The wellknown church watcher will tell of people he considers signs of hope including Capuchin St. Padre Pio,
EWTN founder Mother Angelica, and St. John Paul
II. You can tape “60 Minutes.”Admission is free,
(415) 751-0450.
Email items and electronic
pictures – jpegs at no less than
300 dpi to [email protected] or mail to Street, One Peter Yorke Way,
San Francisco 94109. Include a follow-up phone
number. Street is toll-free. My phone number is
(415) 614-5634.
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
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ARCHDIOCESE 5
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
Catechumens
baptized at
the Easter Vigil
(PHOTOS BY DARWIN SAYO/CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO)
PAID ADVERTISEMENT
At the Easter Vigil April 4 at St. Mary’s Cathedral, Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone
baptized catechumens into the Catholic
faith. Those baptized included, clockwise
from top, Robert Tricaro; Lana Wright;
Eva Rose, pictured with cathedral rector
Auxiliary Bishop William J. Justice; Sasha
Perez. Throughout the archdiocese, more
than 500 people entered the faith at the
Easter Vigil by receiving the sacraments
of initiation. They included nearly 200
catechumens who, to prepare for baptism,
received training in doctrine and discipline
through the Rite of Christian Initiation
of Adults at their parishes. At the Rite of
Election, held the first Sunday in Lent,
the catechumens appeared with their
sponsors before Archbishop Cordileone to
declare their desire to be baptized.
6 ARCHDIOCESE
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
Salesian Sisters called to educate
young women of the archdiocese
Catholic San Francisco is featuring one religious
congregation from the archdiocese in each installment
of this periodic column marking the Vatican’s Year of
Consecrated Life.
SISTER DEBBIE WALKER, FMA
DAUGHTERS OF MARY HELP OF CHRISTIANS (SALESIAN SISTERS)
(COURTESY PHOTOS)
The first Daughters of Mary Help of Christians, commonly known as the Salesian Sisters, came to America in 1908. Seven
sisters arrived in North Beach in San Francisco in 1950 to serve at Sts. Peter and Paul Parish school. Currently eight sisters
minister in the archdiocese.
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The Daughters of Mary Help of Christians,
commonly known as the Salesian Sisters, is the
largest congregation of women
religious, founded
in 1872 by St. Mary
Mazzarello and St.
John Bosco for the
of young
WAKE UP THE WORLD ! education
girls. The first
2015 Year of Consecrated Life
missionary sisters
came to America
THE SALESIANS
in 1908 to bring the
Salesian charism to
OF DON BOSCO
the eastern part of
the United States.
In 1950, the SaleFULL NAMES OF
sian priests were
ORDERS: Salesian Society
already working in
of St. John Bosco (Salesian
Fathers); Daughters of Mary the parish of Sts.
Peter and Paul in
Help of Christians (Salesian
the North Beach
Sisters)
section of San
Francisco. North
DATES FOUNDED: SaleBeach had been setsian Fathers founded in
tled largely by Ital1859, in Italy, by St. John
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Bosco; Salesian Sisters
that time. They had
founded in 1872, in Italy,
built a spacious and
by St. John Bosco and St.
beautiful parish
Maria Domenica Mazzarello
church still today
called the “Italian
ARRIVED IN SAN
Cathedral.” The
FRANCISCO: Salesian
school was built
Fathers in March 1897;
above and around
Salesian Sisters in 1950
the church and
could be reached by
ORIGINAL MINISTRY:
climbing more than
Schools and parishes
100 steps. Originally, the Presentation
CURRENT MINISTRIES:
Sisters established
Schools, youth centers,
the school and colparishes
laborated with the
Salesians.
NUMBER OF SALESIANS
The pastor’s
MINISTERING IN THE
request for the
ARCHDIOCESE: 10
Salesian Sisters
priests, one brother, eight
was answered in
sisters
August of 1950.
Seven sisters made up the first community in
North Beach, one of whom was Sister Anita
SEE SALESIAN SISTERS, PAGE 7
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ARCHDIOCESE 7
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
How Don Bosco’s Salesians came to San Francisco
The Salesian story here started
in 1870. “The orphanage is 20
miles north of San Francisco and
cares for about 200 children ...
The weather is always serene and
healthy ... The property comprises
fields and gardens, and cattle
and horses graze freely on the
grounds...” Thus did Archbishop
Joseph Sadoc Alemany of San
Francisco describe the Eden-like
setting of St. Vincent’s Orphanage
in the hills between San Rafael and
Novato just off what is now Highway 101.
Archbishop Alemany had written
to Don Bosco at his then-fledgling
Salesian Society in Torino, Italy:
He was seeking a religious group to
staff the orphanage. Don Bosco had
accepted the offer, with a promise to
send several of his Salesians within
the next six months. But for reasons
which have never been documented
and explained, the invitation died
before coming to birth. No Salesian
walked El Camino Real until 27
years later.
It was Jesuit Father Joseph Sasia,
an enthusiastic admirer and friend
of Don Bosco, who was the Piedmontese (from the Piedmont region
of Italy) connection that induced
Archbishop Patrick Riordan to
secure the services of the first
Salesians to minister to the Italian
community in San Francisco. So in
early March 1897, Father Raphael
Piperni, with three Salesians in
tow, arrived in New York harbor,
California-bound, and on Sunday,
March 13, two days after his arrival,
Father Piperni celebrated a solemn
high Mass in the wooded frame
church of Sts. Peter and Paul, then
located at the corner of Filbert and
Dupont (now Grant Avenue). On
the following day, in the presence
of the pastor Father De Caroli and
of Father Piperni, Archbishop
Riordan transferred the parish to
the Salesians. That historic meet-
ing took place in the then-chancery
office and rectory at 1100 Franklin
St., which, by a serendipitous twist,
was purchased 70 years later by the
Salesians to become the present
Salesian Provincial Office, yes, at
1100 Franklin St.
Father Piperni soon realized that,
unless something was done, the Italian immigrants in his adopted city
would continue to remain secondclass citizens. He organized the very
first Americanization School in
California. This new venture, with
its English and its American citizenship classes, enjoyed a remarkable success.
At the time of the 1906 earthquake
Sts. Peter and Paul had become a
haven for the Italian community.
The Americanization School was in
great demand; baptisms that year
had reached 700; confirmation and
first Communion were administered twice a year; Sunday school
had an enrollment of 2,000 children.
The annual Madonna del Lume
feast and procession, and the blessing of the fleet at Fisherman’s
Wharf, soon became popular North
Beach events.
For over a century Sts. Peter and
Paul has been the “Italian National
Catholic Church” in San Francisco.
In practice, that meant that anyone
with a connection to Italy – born
there, married to an Italian, etc. –
could have baptisms, weddings and
funerals celebrated there without
asking anybody else’s permission –
a providential arrangement for the
Italian immigrants, especially for
those who could not speak English.
Because of the growing Chinese
Catholic presence in North Beach,
the “Italian Cathedral of the West”
has added a very well attended Sunday Mass in Chinese since 1977, and
today what was called “Little Italy”
has become an ethnically diverse
parish, still retaining much of its
Italian culture and heritage.
SALESIAN SISTERS: Called to educate young women of the achdiocese
FROM PAGE 6
Ferrari, the first vocation from
the parish. The parishioners and
parents of the students were very
happy to have the Salesian Sisters
in the school. Eventually, the Italians moved to the suburbs and the
Chinese and Japanese immigrants
moved into the area of North
Beach. The conviction that evangelization is as important as keeping
the faith has allowed our mission
of educating the young to be alive
and well to this day. For more than
Pettingell
Book Bindery
30 years, the Salesian Sisters were
also present in San Francisco’s
Corpus Christi Catholic School. We
are still present in the parish and
coordinate the religious education
program.
The education of youth is our
primary focus in schools, parishes,
clubs and wherever we encounter
the young. We strive to collaborate
with the laity in all of our ministries. Lisa Harris has been the
lay principal of Sts. Peter and
Paul Salesian School for the past
16 years. We work together as the
Your peace of mind is our goal…
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Berkeley, CA 94704
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Complete CSF digital
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A complete digital library of
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http://archives.catholic-sf.org/
Olive APA/SFArchdiocese
Access, save and share articles,
images, ads and pages that
have appeared in print since the
inaugural issue Feb. 12, 1999.
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administration of the school, Dr.
Harris as the principal and a sister
in the position of vice principal. We
strive to promote the educational
method of St. John Bosco which is
based on reason, religion and loving kindness.
We are grateful for the opportu-
nity to minister to the young in the
San Francisco archdiocese. We pray
that young women will be inspired
by our lives of prayer, ministry and
community. May they want to become a part of our Salesian family
in order to pass on the faith to the
youth of today.
8 NATIONAL
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
US deports retired Salvadoran general linked to civil war atrocities
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
PALM COAST, Florida – The U.S.
government April 8 deported retired
Salvadoran Gen. Carlos Eugenio
Vides Casanova, a former director of
the Salvadoran national guard, to El
Salvador.
In early 2014, the U.S. Department of
Justice issued a deportation order for
Casanova and retired Salvadoran Gen.
Jose Guillermo Garcia, the former defense minister, also living in Florida.
Officials said at the time deportation
proceedings can be a slow process, and
Garcia’s deportation order remains
under appeal.
According to Reuters and other
news reports, Casanova was arrested
at his home in Palm Coast, which is
north of Daytona Beach. He had lived
there as a legal resident since 1989.
Casanova and Garcia were both accused of human rights abuses during
the bloody civil war in El Salvador,
which lasted roughly from 1979 to
1992.
More than 75,000 Salvadoran civil-
EDUCATION AND SUMMER CAMPS
ians, clergy and missionaries were
killed during that era, including
Archbishop Oscar Romero and four
U.S. churchwomen, Maryknoll Sisters
Ita Ford and Maura Clarke, Ursuline
Sister Dorothy Kazel and lay volunteer
Jean Donovan, in 1980.
Many civilians left the tiny Central
American country and fled for protection to the United States, Europe and
Australia, among other places. Others
were “disappeared” and have never
been found.
In 2002, Casanova and Garcia were
found guilty in a civil trial for the tor-
ture of three Salvadorans, and ordered
to pay $54.6 million to the victims.
James Green, a West Palm Beach attorney, told Catholic News Service last
year when the deportation order was
made public that such action by the U.S.
government is something the U.S. “has
only begun doing in the past 10 years
against known human rights violators.”
Green was not involved in the deportation proceedings but was a co-lead
council that won the monetary award
from Garcia and Casanova for the
survivors of the Salvadoran civil war
who sued them.
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707 874 0200 | [email protected]
NATIONAL 9
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
LAITY CALLED TO BE ON ‘FRONT LINES’ OF
USING MEDIA IN NEW EVANGELIZATION
WASHINGTON – Laypeople are meant to be “out
on the front lines” of using media
in the new evangelization, said a
speaker at an April 13 panel discussion at The Catholic University
of America in Washington.
The “Media and the New Evangelization” panel, held in honor of
the 75th anniversary of Archbishop Fulton Sheen’s first televised
Archishop
service on Easter of 1930, included
Sheen
Father Robert Reed, president
of the CatholicTV Network of
the Boston Archdiocese; Basilian Father Thomas
Rosica, founding CEO of Canada’s Salt and Light
Catholic Media Foundation; and Michael Warsaw,
CEO of the Eternal Word Television Network.
Father Rosica said that he takes away two important lessons from the life and example of Archbishop Sheen.
“The first is that faith cannot be relegated” to
private sanctuaries, but that it “can only develop in
the public square.” The second lesson, according to
Father Rosica, is that “when faith becomes ideology,
it loses its identity,” which he said should remind
the faithful how to spread the Gospel to others.
Gov. Sam Brownback signed the measure April 7
during a private ceremony in Topeka.
Called the Unborn Child Protection from Dismemberment Abortion Act, it is “the first of what we
hope will be many state laws banning dismemberment abortions,” said Tobias.
Except in cases of medical need for the mother,
the law bans a common second-trimester method for
aborting pregnancies. Physicians call the procedure
a “dilation and extraction” abortion, but the state
uses the terminology “dismemberment abortion.”
The method involves dilating a woman’s cervix and
removing a fetus with forceps or other devices.
According to National Right to Life, “dismemberment abortions are as brutal as the partial-birth abortion method, which is now illegal in the United States.”
‘AMICUS’ BRIEFS FLOOD COURT ON MARRIAGE QUESTION
WASHINGTON – When it takes up same-sex marriage cases from four states April 28, the Supreme
Court will consider just two constitutional questions.
But judging from the outpouring of friend-of-the-court
or “amicus” briefs, the court is expected to affect the
very definition of marriage in American society.
Around 120 “amicus” briefs filed by the court’s early
April deadline offer the views of everyone from people
who have sought same-sex marriages and states that
support them to scholars and religious institutions
that come down on both sides of the question, plus
business leaders, sociologists and others.
In agreeing in January to take the cases, the court
said it would consider whether the 14th Amendment
requires a state to license a marriage between two
people of the same sex, and whether it requires a state
to recognize a marriage between two people of the
same sex when their marriage was lawfully licensed
and performed out of state.
The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops filed a brief
saying it is “reasonable and just” for states to treat heterosexual marriages as having more value than other
kinds of relationships. “The sexual union of one man
and one woman is the only union capable of creating
new life,” and homes with a father and a mother are
the optimal environment for children, the bishops said.
KANSAS LAW COULD ‘TRANSFORM’ ABORTION POLICY
TOPEKA, Kansas – A new Kansas law banning an
abortion procedure that results in dismemberment
of an unborn child “has the power to transform the
landscape of abortion policy in the United States,”
said Carol Tobias, president of National Right to Life.
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Academic Programs
Sports Camps
Non-Sports Camps
ONLINE REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN!
T
($ OGETH
44 ER
0)
415-731-7500, ext. 288 | www.siprep.org/summer | [email protected]
ST. CHARLES SCHOOL
located at 3250
18th Street near South Van Ness
invites all to our
School Open House
Sunday April 19th
9am to 2pm
Summer School & Sports Camp
Featuring Fr. John Jimenez and
Mr. Preston “Mr. Crusader”
June 15 - July 10
Mon. - Fri. 8:30 - 4pm
$200 for one student,
$50 for Additional Siblings
for more information please call
the school at (415) 861-7652
TRAINING
CAMP
STANFORD BASEBALL
SUMMER CAMPS 2015
The Stanford
Baseball School
The Stanford Baseball Games Camp
(Ages 7-12) ($220)
The Stanford Baseball School
(9am-12:15pm) is an
opportunity to learn individual
skills, baseball fundamentals and
team strategy at the beautiful
and newly renovated Sunken
Diamond on Stanford Campus.
Players will be grouped by age,
ability and prior experience,
and will be taught outfield play,
infield play, pitching, rundowns,
base running, sliding, double
plays and much more.
(Ages 7-12) ($220)
The Stanford Games Camp
(12:45-4pm) is an opportunity to
utilize skills learned in the Baseball
school, in real life game situations.
Teams consisting of 9 players will
be grouped together with a coach
for the entire week. 50% of each
session is devoted to games and
the other 50% to hitting in batting
cages and viewing Baseball videos.
Games will be played on Sunken
Diamond, our turf field, and
adjoining grass fields.
WHEN REGISTERING ONLINE: You may choose M-TH
WHEN REGISTERING ONLINE: You may choose M-TH
option for
for both
both camps.
camps.Read
Readselections
selectionscarefully.
carefully.
option
TO REGISTER OR FOR MORE INFORMATION:
WWW.STANFORDBASEBALLCAMP.COM
*******
PLEASE
NOTE
*******
The School and Games
Camps are TWO
SEPARATE CAMPS, but
are designed TO BE
TAKEN TOGETHER. These
two camps are for ages
7-12. There is a
Supervised Lunch Break.
Kids may purchase lunch
(pay at camp) or bring
lunch from home.
SUMMER
2015
DATES
WEEK 1 JUNE 15-19
School/Games
WEEK 2 JUNE 22-26
School/Games
WEEK 3 JULY 6-10
Games/Games
10 WORLD
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
Gospel, Vatican II can help religious
face challenges, cardinal says
LAURA IERACI
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
VATICAN CITY – Consecrated men and women
can face their current challenges
by turning to the Gospel, the
teaching of the Second Vatican
Council and papal teachings for
guidance, said Cardinal Joao Braz
de Aviz.
The prefect of the Congregation for Consecrated Life and
Institutes for Apostolic Life
spoke April 8 at the opening of an
Cardinal Braz
international conference in Rome
of about 1,200 religious formation directors. The
theme of the April 7-12 conference was “Living in
Christ according to the Way of Life of the Gospel.”
It was drawn from “Perfectae Caritatis,” the 1965
conciliar decree on the renewal of religious life.
Cardinal Braz told those present they must embrace the future with hope, despite the challenges
of fewer vocations, aging memberships, economic
difficulties, globalization, relativism, marginalization and feelings of being socially irrelevant. He
also spoke of the challenge to be the Good News in
new places and cultural contexts.
SENIOR LIVING
It is in these difficulties that consecrated men
and women must “activate their hope, fruit of
the faith in the Lord,” he said. This hope is not
based on “numbers or works but on the one
(God) in whom we have placed our trust,” he
said.
The Gospel must be the “vade mecum” or
handbook of consecrated life, and the documents
of the Second Vatican Council and the teachings
of the popes can serve as guidelines on how to
face these challenges, he said.
But religious orders and their members are not
living just for themselves, he said. “In a society
of confrontation, difficult coexistence among
different cultural groups, the subjugation of the
weakest and inequality, we are called to offer a
concrete model of community that, in recognizing the dignity of every person and sharing the
gifts each brings, allows us to live fraternally.”
The cardinal invited those present to reflect on
whether they truly refer to the Gospel daily, as
their founders did. Their founders’ experiences,
he said, must be looked upon as inspiration to
take on the complexities and current challenges.
He recalled that Pope Francis exhorted them
to live the present with passion and to become
experts and artisans of communion.
The conference is one of several events organized by the congregation for the Year of Consecrated Life, which Pope Francis opened last
November.
Consecrated denounce
persecution of Christians
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
ROME -- Consecrated men and women from
around the world issued a message April 10 “to
urgently denounce” the persecution of Christians and to urge the international community
to “implement concrete interventions” for peace.
The message was signed by Cardinal Joao Braz
de Aviz, prefect of the Congregation for Consecrated Life and Institutes of Apostolic Life,
on behalf of the nearly 1,300 Catholic religious
gathered for an international congress in Rome.
The participants at the April 7-11 conference
represent dozens of religious congregations and
thousands of religious men and women worldwide.
“We feel particularly close to those in the
world who are suffering because of their faith
in Jesus Christ and we express our communion
with all consecrated men and women who, in the
various peripheries of the world, suffer because
they are Christian and consecrated,” said the
message.
The religious thanked their suffering brothers
and sisters for “their witness of fidelity” to their
vocation and mission and for remaining “close
to those who suffer,” assuring them of their
prayers. They also said they join Pope Francis
and the whole church in praying “so that peace,
the gift of the risen Lord, can overcome hatred
and violence and so that all people can recognize
themselves as brothers and sisters.”
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WORLD 11
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
Pope: Vocations are calls to
‘journey to Promised Land’
CAROL GLATZ
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
VATICAN CITY – Following a vocation to the priesthood or religious life
is to live an experience of “exodus”
– to joyfully leave behind all that
enslaves and journey to a Promised
Land of love, service and mission,
Pope Francis said.
“Responding to God’s call, then,
means allowing him to help us leave
ourselves and our false security
behind, and to strike out on the path
which leads to Jesus Christ, the
origin and destiny of our life and our
happiness,” the pope said in his message for the 2015 World Day of Prayer
for Vocations. The day will be celebrated April 26 at the Vatican and in
many dioceses around the world.
The message, released at the
Vatican April 14, was dedicated to
the theme: “Exodus: A fundamental
experience of vocation.”
Every Christian vocation is rooted
in this sense of movement, of journeying and going forward since “belief means transcending ourselves,
leaving behind our comfort and the
inflexibility of our ego in order to
center our life in Jesus Christ,” the
pope wrote.
Just like Abraham, Moses and the
people of Israel, all children of God
are called to leave behind the land
they know and trust completely in
God to show them the way to a whole
new world.
The journey is not about running
away in “contempt” from life and
reality, but of finding it anew, in
abundance and brought to its fulfillment, he wrote.
“The Christian vocation is first
and foremost a call to love, a love
which attracts us and draws us out
of ourselves, ‘decentering’ us and
triggering ‘an ongoing exodus out
of the closed inward-looking self
toward its liberation through selfgiving, and thus toward authentic
self-discovery and indeed the discovery of God,’” he wrote, quoting
retired Pope Benedict XVI.
A vocation, just like Christian
life in general, demands constant
renewal and “an attitude of conversion and transformation, an incessant moving forward, a passage from
death to life like that celebrated in
every liturgy, an experience of Passover,” he said.
The journey is God’s work as “he
leads us beyond our initial situation, frees us from every enslavement, breaks down our habits and
our indifference, and brings us to
the joy of communion with him and
with our brothers and sisters,” Pope
Francis wrote.
A vocation to priesthood or religious life doesn’t just transform the
individual, he wrote, it also has an
impact on all of society as the individual feels compelled to serve God’s
kingdom on earth and inspired “to
solidarity in bringing liberation to
our brothers and sisters, especially
the poorest.”
The pope’s message called on
young people to recognize that “this
exodus toward God and others fills
our lives with joy and meaning.”
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12 WORLD
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
Pope warns religious against
‘crisis of quality’ in consecrated life
LAURA IERACI
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
VATICAN CITY – Despite fewer vocations to
consecrated life, those responsible for formation
in religious institutes must know how to say no to
unsuitable candidates, so as to avoid a “graver crisis
of quality” down the road, said Pope Francis.
During an audience with about 1,300 novice directors and other formation ministers at the Vatican
April 11, the pope said seeing consecrated people
“in such great numbers” would give the impression
“that there is no vocations crisis.”
“But in reality, there is an indubitable decrease
in quantity, and this makes the work of formation –
one that might truly form the heart of Jesus in the
hearts of our young people – all the more urgent,”
he said.
The formation staffs were in Rome for an international congress April 7-11, organized by the Congregation for Institutes of Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life. The congress was one of several
events organized for the Year of Consecrated Life,
which Pope Francis opened in November. Its aim was
to reflect upon the main aspects of consecrated life
and the demands placed on formation today.
The pope described consecrated life as “beautiful” and “one of the most precious treasures of the
church.” He called it is “a privilege” to be in formation work and to “participate in the work of the Father, who forms the heart of the Son, in those whom
the Spirit has called.”
Novice directors and others responsible for formation must have “a great heart for the young, so as to
form in them great hearts, able to welcome everyone, rich in mercy, full of tenderness,” he said.
He also noted that initial formation is only the first
step of a lifelong process.
Rejecting the idea that young people today are
“mediocre and not generous,” he said they need to
experience that it is “more blessed to give than to
receive, that there is great liberty in an obedient life,
great fruitfulness in a pure heart, and great richness
in possessing nothing.”
ECO GUIDE
(CNS PHOTO/MASSIMILIANO MIGLIORATO, CATHOLIC PRESS PHOTO)
A nun prays during an April 11 Mass in St. Peter’s Basilica at
the Vatican. The Mass was for participants in an international
congress organized by the Congregation for Institutes of
Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life.
He emphasized the need for formation staff members to be “lovingly attentive” to each candidate
and “evangelically demanding” in every phase of
formation, so that the “crisis of quantity might not
produce a much graver crisis of quality,” he said,
adding that “this is the danger.”
Underlining the importance of vocational discernment, the pope noted that psychologists and spiritual directors have said “young people, who unconsciously feel they have something of an imbalance ...
or a deviation, unconsciously seek solid structures
that protect them, to protect themselves.”
“And here is the discernment: knowing how to say
no,” the pope said.
Just as formation experts accompany candidates
upon entry to their institutes, so too sometimes they
must “accompany the exit, so that he or she will find
a life path, with the necessary help,” he continued.
Those involved in formation also must imitate God
in exercising the virtue of patience, the pope counseled.
“God knows how to wait. You, too, must learn this
attitude of patience, which many times is a little
martyrdom,” he said.
The pope noted the fine quality of many consecrated people. He said there is much to learn in particular from the faithful, years-long witness of missionary sisters and the wisdom among the aged. He said
visiting elderly consecrated people would be good for
young people, who seek wisdom and authenticity.
Thanking the formation staffs for their “humble
and discreet service,” he urged them not to be “discouraged when the results do not correspond to the
expectations” and to learn from these “failures” as
part of their own formation.
“It is painful when a young man or young woman,
after three or four years (of formation) comes and
says, ‘This is no longer for me. I found another love
that is not against God, but I cannot (continue) and
I am leaving.’ This is difficult. But this is also your
martyrdom,” he said.
The pope said some religious who work in formation may live their charge as a burden. “But this is a
lie, a temptation,” he said.
When they feel their work is not appreciated, he
said, they should “know that Jesus follows you with
love and the entire Church is grateful.”
“Some say consecrated life is heaven on earth,” the
pope said. “No. If anything it is purgatory! But go
forward with joy.”
The pope also said he is “convinced” there is no
vocations crisis where consecrated people witness to
“the beauty of consecration.”
“If there is no witness, if there is no coherence,
there will not be vocations,” he told the group. “This
is the testimony to which you are called. This is your
ministry, your mission. You are not only ‘teachers.’
You are above all witnesses to the discipleship of
Jesus within your proper charism.”
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WORLD 13
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
Harmony, sharing, patience are
signs of Spirit’s presence, pope says
CINDY WOODEN
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
VATICAN CITY – The presence of the Holy Spirit
makes Christian communities
places of harmony and sharing
where wealth is not accumulated,
but put at the service of the needy,
Pope Francis said.
A Christian community shows it
is filled with the Holy Spirit “when
it is a community that seeks
harmony” and does not allow
Pope Francis
internal divisions to fester, “when
it seeks poverty” and “not the accumulation of riches for itself because wealth is for
service,” he said April 14 at his early morning Mass
in the Domus Sanctae Marthae.
What’s more, he said, a sure sign of the Spirit’s
presence is that community members “do not
get angry or feel offended as soon as a difficulty
arises,” but they are as patient as Jesus was.
According to Vatican Radio, the pope quoted from
the day’s reading from the Acts of the Apostles
(4:32-37): “No one claimed that any of his possessions was his own, but they had everything in
common.”
While the reading begins by saying, “The community of believers was of one heart and mind,” Pope
Francis noted that the problems they faced began
rather quickly.
The next chapter of the Acts of the Apostles,
he said, describes how a married couple – Ananias and Sapphira – try to fool the community by
pretending they are giving all the proceeds from
the sale of their property, when they kept some for
themselves.
“These are like the patrons or benefactors who
approach the church, enter to help, but use the
church for their own ends, aren’t they?” he said.
But even bigger troubles are looming, he said.
The persecution of Christians begins soon after the
Resurrection, just as Jesus foretold.
The clearest sign of the Spirit’s presence among
the early Christians, the pope said, was their
“patience in enduring: enduring the problems,
enduring the difficulties, enduring the malicious
gossip and slander, enduring sickness and enduring pain,” especially regarding the death of their
loved ones.
As the Easter season continues and Christians
prepare to celebrate Pentecost, Pope Francis said
“it would do us good to think about our communities – whether they are dioceses, parishes, families
or something else – and ask for the grace of harmony, which is more than unity – it’s a harmonious
unity.”
Christians also should ask for “the grace of
poverty,” which is the ability to manage money and
material things with generosity for the common
good, and for “the grace of patience,” the pope said.
The Bible makes clear that the Holy Spirit gives
those gifts not just to individuals, he said, but also
to communities.
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POPE TO VISIT LATIN AMERICA JULY 6-12
MEXICO CITY – Pope Francis is expected to
arrive July 6 in Ecuador, starting a three-country
tour of his home continent, The Associated Press
reported from Quito.
The trip, the pope’s second to South America
since being elected in March 2013, also would
include stops in Bolivia and Paraguay, two fastgrowing countries in recent years, but still among
the poorest on the continent.
The pope is expected to spend two days in Ecuador, celebrating Mass July 7 in Quito and meeting
with priests and seminarians the next day at the
Our Lady of the Presentation of El Quinche shrine,
20 miles from Quito, Archbishop Luis Cabrera Herrera of Cuenca told the news service.
The Italian blog Il Sismografo, citing local news
reports, said Pope Francis would fly July 8 to La
Paz, Bolivia, where he would spend six hours and
celebrate Mass in the neighboring city of El Alto –
situated at an elevation of more than 13,000 feet. He
would then spend July 9 in Santa Cruz de la Sierra,
Bolivia, the country’s economic hub and located at a
lower elevation, then move on to Paraguay July 10.
In Paraguay, Pope Francis is expected to arrive
in the capital, Asuncion, and visit Caacupe, the
Catholic heart of the country, July 11, Il Sismografo
reported. There, according to Archbishop Edmundo
Valenzuela Mellid of Asuncion, the pope is to meet
with religious in the Our Lady of Caacupe Basilica,
and celebrate a Mass, which is expected to draw
1 million people from Paraguay and neighboring
Argentina.
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For most of our history it was part of
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and vegetables and walked to where they
had to go. People would use the services of
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But following the Industrial Revolution and
after the advent of the Steam Locomotive,
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14 WORLD
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
(CNS PHOTO/PAUL JEFFREY)
Sister Mariya Soosai, a member of the Daughters of Mary Immaculate, leads a group of children March 7 in an arithmetic class in a camp for internally displaced families inside a U.N. base in
Juba, South Sudan. Some 34,000 people have sought protection at the base since violence broke out in December 2013.
South Sudan bishops urge peace path
PAUL JEFFREY
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
JUBA, South Sudan – Church leaders in South Sudan are trying to breathe new life into their country’s
stalled peace talks.
Stating that they spoke “with divine authority,”
leaders of the South Sudan Council of Churches,
which includes Catholics and Protestants, issued a
statement in late March lamenting that many leaders
in the country’s civil war “genuinely can’t see how to
make peace; they can’t see a way out of the pit they
have fallen into.”
Catholic Archbishop Paulino Lukudu Loro of Juba
was one of the signers of the March statement, which
noted that advances in the peace process “are difficult
when there is a complete lack of trust between the
parties, and when each is promoting its own interests.
The church is trusted by the people of South Sudan
and has no interests except those of the people, for
peace and justice. We ourselves will create a forum to
help the parties to build trust and to discover where
compromises can be made.”
Fighting broke out in Juba in December 2013
between ethnic Dinka and Nuer in the presidential
guard, months after President Salva Kiir, who is
Dinka, fired his vice president, Riek Machar, who is
Nuer. The fighting spread quickly to other parts of the
country. As many as 10,000 people have been killed
and more than 1 million displaced in the months
since. Recent weeks have seen renewed fighting in
several areas.
Peace talks, mediated by regional governments,
have been held in Ethiopia’s capital, Addis Ababa, but
the few agreements reached there have been consistently ignored on the ground.
John Ashworth, an adviser to both the church
council and to the country’s Catholic bishops, said
the March statement marks a new protagonism by
religious leaders. Council leaders were meeting in
early April with international church leaders in Addis
Ababa, then were to go on a retreat to plan the details
of their peace campaign, which Ashworth said would
consist of a series of meetings with politicians, military officials and civil society leaders from both sides.
‘We became sort of chaplains to the
peace talks. Especially at the beginning,
there was a lot of hate, and the two sides
couldn’t even talk to each other.’
BISHOP EDWARD HIIBORO KUSSALA OF TOMBURA-YAMBIO
“We’re going to create a genuinely neutral forum,
because these people can’t agree on anything by
themselves. There’s no trust between them. But the
church is still trusted enough by everyone to play a
critical role. We want to create a trusting environment that’s not politically charged,” Ashworth, a
former Mill Hill priest, told Catholic News Service.
Ashworth said the discussions will take place
outside the country so that members of the armed
opposition can participate – but not in Addis Ababa,
where official talks take place.
Catholic leaders have participated at the edge of the
Addis Ababa talks, but as part of a larger faith-based
contingent that includes Christians and Muslims.
The religious groups were invited to the talks by the
Intergovernmental Authority on Development, a
coalition of regional governments known as IGAD.
“We became sort of chaplains to the peace talks.
Especially at the beginning, there was a lot of hate,
and the two sides couldn’t even talk to each other,”
Bishop Edward Hiiboro Kussala of Tombura-Yambio
told CNS.
“We didn’t pressure anyone, or they would have
begun to mistrust us. Our job was to encourage and
animate. If anything, we were a bit soft on them,” he
said.
Ashworth said being an official part of the peace
talks contributed to the church losing some of its
moral authority.
“The church leaders in Addis Ababa got sucked in
and became too identified with IGAD, which was paying a lot of their expenses. The IGAD leaders started
seeing the church as something at their beck and call,
and some church leaders felt they were being used.
So they’ve decided to frame their participation on
their own terms,” he said.
According to Bishop Hiiboro, who has earned the
ire of some government officials for his resistance to
army recruitment efforts in his diocese, the church
continues to play a critical role in working for peace.
“We blame ourselves that at independence we left
the government to run the country, and we focused
on our church program, only to find out that these
guys weren’t doing the right thing,” Bishop Hiiboro
said.
“The church can still talk to people and mobilize
the community. We can help the people be more
aware of their rights and dignity and their responsibility toward the country. If they don’t find a solution
soon, we’re going to have a nationwide conflict. We
can help the peace process by helping the participants understand the gravity of the situation.”
Ashworth said the church leaders have no illusions
about bringing the war to a rapid end.
“Neither side is ready to make peace. Both are
seeking military advantage. Riek Machar wants to be
president, but he’d never win an election in the real
world, so the only options to him are violence or the
manipulation of the peace process,” Ashworth said.
He said Machar does not totally control his opposition movement, which is led in the field by ethnic
warlords who have been fighting for some time.
“By aligning themselves with Machar’s opposition
movement, they became rebels with a cause,” Ashworth said. “Riek Machar is afraid to sign anything
lest they kill him.”
Ashworth said the government’s military is more
unified and, in theory, under the president’s command, but it, too, was cobbled together from several
ethnic militias, and Kiir has struggled for years to
keep disaffected factions from slipping away.
Bishop Hiiboro said the bishops have maintained a
close relationship with the president.
“He’s a good man, and we have talked a lot with
him. He’s not interested in war. But we are concerned about the circle of people around him. After
we talk to him, he goes home and these people come
to him and he does exactly what we thought he
would not do.”
ARCHDIOCESE 15
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
Archbishop visits
Our Lady of the Pillar Parish
1st chief shepherd to celebrate Mass
at St. Anthony Mission since 1968
PHOTOS BY DEBRA GREENBLAT
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone visited Our
Lady of the Pillar Parish April 11-12, celebrating the
Saturday vigil Mass at the rural church of St. Anthony Mission in Pescadero, confirming 13 teens at Our
Lady of the Pillar Church on Divine Mercy Sunday
and taking part in three receptions with parishioners.
Mass at the packed St. Anthony chapel was the
first celebrated by an archbishop since the mission’s centennial in 1968, parish administrator Father Shouraiah Pudota told Catholic San Francisco.
“For me the experience was like Jesus and his
disciples, praying with him, dining with him and
talking one-on-one as truly a father and good shepherd bringing his care and concern for all of us,”
Father Pudota said.
The administrator said most people had received
their impressions about the archbishop from the
media. “It’s amazing to me how people changed
their opinions so fast, knowing him,” Father Pudota said, calling the archbishop “a great listener.”
He added, “I believe the archbishop went away with
a positive impression of our priests and our parish.”
A highlight of the archbishop was his homily
during confirmation Mass, where he explained the
meaning of the bishop’s miter and crosier to the
teenage confirmands, Father Pudota said.
Our Lady of the Pillar is the geographically largest parish in the archdiocese, serving 5,000 families
in six communities – Half Moon Bay, Pescadero, El
Granada, La Honda, Moss Beach and Montara – on
the San Mateo County coast.
Parish administrator Father Shouraiah Pudota and Deacon
John McGhee are pcitured with Archbishop Cordileone.
Massgoers gathered with the archbishop outside St. Anthony Mission church.
Worshippers, including this young lady who helped set up, filled the pews for the Saturday vigil Mass.
Father Charles Onubogu is in residence at Our Lady of the Pillar.
16 OPINION
The greatness
of being you
M
ost people never think of
themselves as great, but if you
think about it, you are quite
extraordinary. For instance, from
the beginning
when you were
very little, you
won a race
against a lot
of contenders
in the struggle
to see who
would reach
your mother’s
womb first.
What an
FATHER JOHN
amazing
CATOIR
beginning!
It shows you
were great
right from the start. Granted, everyone around can say the same thing,
but enjoy the moment.
After that, you not only successfully managed to endure the trials
of childhood with all its ups and
downs, but you kept your spiritual
balance right up to your teen years.
Then, you may have hit a wall of
emotional upheavals with growing
pains and authority issues – all of
which began to cloud the horizon.
You may have felt knocked down a
peg and started to doubt yourself.
This doubt may have left you feeling
inferior and vulnerable.
But you were not to be denied. You
fought your way back and entered
the adult world with enthusiasm,
perhaps a bit bruised, but buoyed
nevertheless.
The scars of doubt were there, but
they no longer overpowered you.
Freed from this teenage angst, you
gradually matured in your clarity
and self-acceptance. As you grew
in self-respect, you began to realize
more and more what an extraordinary person you are.
This confidence and perseverance
brought you to the place you are
today. You have earned the badge of
honor we call self-realization, or at
least you’re close to it.
That’s why you must never doubt
your worthiness. Doubt will only
blind you to the truth that you are
incredibly made and a miracle to
behold. You must never say the cup
is half-empty. No, no. You must say
the cup is full and overflowing with
grace and goodness.
Your faith will protect you from
the mediocre thinkers and pessimistic naysayers who try to put down
giants like yourself.
You are among the great ones
because you know how to rejoice
in the knowledge of God’s love.
Your greatness is in the realm of
the supernatural. It is not based on
feelings.
Do not let your emotions tell you
differently. You are a favored child
of God. Feelings are not facts. Unchallenged feelings lead to sadness
and doubt.
Be assured that your particular
set of life skills are based on the
revelations of Jesus Christ. He is
the one who called you a child of
God.
The best thing about reaching this
glorious level of self-transcendence
is that it gives you the right to say,
along with our blessed Mother: “My
soul proclaims the greatness of the
Lord; my spirit rejoices in God my
savior.”
How great is that?
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
LETTERS
Supporting doctrinal integrity
I just want to tell you that I
am profoundly supportive of the
archbishop’s (very brave) stance
in the matter of the teacher contracts in Catholic schools, which
has recently stirred up the press.
I think that the Catholic teaching
on sexuality is “hard,” as they
say, but beautiful and even vital in
a society that has apparently lost
the ear to hear the spiritual truths
of chastity and marriage
I know how hard it can be to
uphold a good and right teaching
that even some fellow religionists have given up, or are not-sosecretly ashamed of. Please do not
capitulate on these matters. Although I am not a Catholic, I think
that a Catholic school should be
exactly that: Catholic. This cannot
happen if the dominant theological message is: Go ahead and pick
and choose what you think the
church should teach, and then
expect that church leadership
comply. It sounds like the Catholic identity of many Catholic
schools is in danger in precisely
this way. This is a shame, because
our world needs more (genuine)
religiously affiliated institutions.
I think very highly of the charitable tone that the church in San
Francisco has adopted in these
matters, but at least as highly of
the stance it has taken on doctrinal integrity.
Tom Spencer
Department of German & Russian
Brigham Young University
Provo, Utah
Augustine, teachers and freedom
Can a fourth-century bishop
clarify the conflict over standards
of conduct for high school teachers? St. Augustine would see this
as a skirmish in the war that the
City of Man continuously wages
against the City of God. Freedom
in the City of Man is to do whatever one wants – even to create
one’s own reality. St. Augustine
sees this as the same deception
practiced in the Garden of Eden,
encouraging us to claim the power
of autonomous little gods. In the
City of God, however, it is the
truth that sets us free, as Jesus
said (John 8:32). Freedom is rooted
in an objective reality created by
God, and real freedom is to become
the persons and community God
wants us to be.
The City of God is composed of
those willing to bear witness in
love to the truth God makes known
through both faith and reason. St.
Augustine points out, however,
that this witness – even when offered with gentleness and love – is
always offensive to the City of Man
because the very ideas of objective truth and morality challenge
its assumptions. It is impossible,
moreover, to rationally disprove
the existence of objective truth. If
the arguments used are not true,
what good are they? If they are
true, then there must be some objective truth. If there is no objective truth, furthermore, what basis
is there for real community? Our
schools ultimately must educate
either in the isolating freedom of
the City of Man or in the objective
truth of the City of God. If schools
are faithful to the City of God,
they will attract the ire of the City
of Man. This is what happened to
Jesus, and it happens to his followers as well.
Deacon Bill Turrentine
Fairfax
The writer serves at St. Sebastian Parish, Greenbrae.
Opposition proves need for action
The large volume of the opposition to Archbishop Cordileone’s
removing of ambiguities in our
Catholic high school policies by
teachers and students clearly
proves the desperate need for his
actions. After all, how effectively
can a teacher teach the truth if
he or she doesn’t believe it? And,
while teaching by example can be
very effective, a negative example
is equally destructive.
G. P. Heckert
San Mateo
Peculiar viewpoint
Your self-described “social
justice and peace columnist”
Tony Magliano has a peculiar
viewpoint: Apparently peace and
justice only flow in one direction –
the politically correct one.
Last year he bullied military
chaplains – apparently their
unselfish ministry is an affront to
his feelings that a strong military
causes war. History suggests that
weakness is actually what arouses
hegemons but it’s hard to wise
up a guy who fancies himself the
arbiter of justice and peace.
His latest is the usual clichéd
juxtaposition of Holy Days and Israel. But Tony’s riff isn’t as clever
as those yuletide perennials which
begin: “Today Mary and Joseph’s
journey to Bethlehem would end
at an Israeli checkpoint.”
Nowhere in 600-plus words about
Israel’s misdeeds does Tony mention the thousands of rockets fired
from Gaza into Israel. He criticizes Israel’s blockade but knows
it exists to stop the smuggling of
rockets. He has pity for Palestinians queuing at checkpoints but
no emotions for Israeli civilians
killed by suicide bombers from
Gaza – the reason for those checkpoints. He condemns the Israeli
offensive into Gaza knowing the
objective was to destroy weapons caches and rocket launchers
(some concealed in hospitals) and
to eliminate the tunnel system
Hamas used for raids into Israel.
He criticizes American foreign aid
to Israel but ignores $400 million
given to the Palestinian Authority
(now partners with Hamas). He
quotes the pope on a “two-state
solution” but skips mentioning
Hamas’ rejection of Israel’s right
to exist.
Tony’s biases might be credible had not Israel, in a unilateral
peace gesture, returned Gaza to
the Palestinians only to see it become a base for raids and missile
strikes into Israel.
When Catholic San Francisco
contacts Tony to get his immediate
EMAIL [email protected]
WRITE Letters to the Editor, Catholic San Francisco,
One Peter Yorke Way, San Francisco, CA 94109
reply, ask him: (a) What separates
journalism from propaganda and
(b) what about Israel’s rights to
justice and peace?
Kent Grealish
San Mateo
The writer is a member of Immaculate
Heart of Mary Parish, Belmont.
Peace in the Holy Land
Tony Magliano’s April 3 opinion
piece “Unholy political positions in
the Holy Land” was nothing more
than a misinformed propaganda
piece. What Mr. Magliano either
doesn’t know or chooses to ignore
is that the Palestinians have been
given least three opportunities to
establish a Palestinian state since
1948.
In 1948, the original United Nations plan for the partition of the
then-British protectorate called
Palestine was for two states, a
Jewish state called Israel and a
separate Palestinian state. The
Jews accepted this proposal but
the Palestinians and the other
Arab states rejected it and immediately tried to destroy the new
state of Israel and drive the Jews
into the sea.
Between 1948 and 1967, Jordan
controlled the West Bank and
could have easily established a
Palestinian state there. And why
didn’t they do that? Because their
true goal was and still is the destruction of the state of Israel and
driving the Jews into the sea.
In 2000, U.S. President Bill Clinton convened a peace summit between Palestinian President Yasser
Arafat and Israeli Prime Minister
Ehud Barak in which Prime Minister Barak offered the Palestinian
leader approximately 95 percent
of the West Bank and the entire
Gaza Strip. Arafat turned down
the proposal. Why? Because they
were never interested in a Palestinian state, only the destruction
of Israel.
So, the next time Tony Magliano
wants to put pen to paper on this
issue he should do so based on
facts and not ideological propaganda.
Edward Sullivan
San Francisco
Long shadow of
physician-assisted death
Senate Bill 128 pending in Sacramento would permit governmental
physician-assisted suicide. Thankfully the American Medical Association and the American Nurses
Association, disabled people, lowincome minorities and 46 states
wisely oppose “P-AS.” In the 1930s
an advanced nation decreed that
physicians “grant a merciful death
to chronically ill incurable patients.” The first were the mentally
ill and handicapped, second were
gypsies, and homosexuals; then,
certain ethnic groups and finally
a religious group. It will happen
again. “Those who forget the past
are doomed to repeat it.”
Mike DeNunzio
San Francisco
The writer is a retired San Francisco
and California Commissioner on Aging
Adult Services.
LETTERS POLICY
NAME, address and daytime phone number for verification
required.
SHORT letters preferred: 250 words or fewer
OPINION 17
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
Principles for interfaith dialogue
W
e live inside a world and inside religions
that are too given to disrespect and violence. Virtually every newscast today documents the prevalence of disrespect and violence
done in the name of religion, disrespect done for
the sake of God (strange as
that expression may seem).
Invariably those acting in
this way see their actions as
sacral, justified by sacred
cause.
And, if history is to be
believed, it has always been
so. No religion, Christianity
no less than any other, has
FATHER RON
been innocent. Every one
ROLHEISER
of the great religions of the
world has been, at various
times, both persecuted and
persecutor. So this begs the question: What are
some fundamental principles we are asked to live
out apposite our relationship to other faiths, irrespective our particular faith?
What’s best in each of our traditions would suggest these ten principles:
1. All that is good, true, and beautiful comes
from one and the same author, God. Nothing that
is true, irrespective of its particular religious
or secular cloak, may be seen as opposed to true
faith and religion.
2. God wills the salvation of all people, equally,
without discrimination. God has no favorites. All
people have access to God and to God’s Spirit,
and the whole of humankind has never lacked
for divine providence. Moreover each religion is
to reject nothing that is true and holy in other
religions.
3. No one religion or denomination has the full
and whole truth. God is both infinite and ineffable. For this reason, by definition, God cannot
be captured adequately in human concepts and
human language. Thus, while our knowledge of
God may be true, it is always only partial. God
can be truly known, but God cannot be adequately thought.
P
Within our lives and within our
relationship to other religions, respect,
graciousness, and charity must
trump all other considerations.
4. All faiths and all religions are journeying
toward the fullness of truth. No one religion or
denomination may consider its truth complete,
something to permanently rest within; rather
it must see it as a starting point from which to
journey. Moreover, as various religions (and denominations and sectarian groups within those
religions) we need to feel secure enough within
our own “home” so as to acknowledge the truth
and beauty that is expressed in other “homes”.
We need to accept (and, I suggest, be pleased)
that there are other lives within which the faith
is written in a different language.
5. Diversity within religions is a richness,
willed by God. God does not just wish our unity;
God also blesses our diversity which helps reveal the stunning over-abundance within God.
Religious diversity is the cause of much tension,
but that diversity and the struggle to overcome
it will contribute strongly to the richness of our
eventual unity.
6. God is “scattered” in world religions. Anything that is positive within a religion expresses
something of God and contributes to divine
revelation. Hence, seen from this aspect, the
various religions of the world all help to make
God known.
7. Each person must account for his or her
faith on the basis of his or her own conscience.
Each of us must take responsibility for our own
faith and salvation.
8. Intentionally all the great world religions
interpenetrate each other (and, for a Christian,
that means that they interpenetrate the mystery
of Christ). A genuine faith knows that God is solicitous for everyone and that God’s spirit blows
freely and therefore it strives to relate itself to
the intentionality of other religions and to other
denominations and sectarian groups within its
own religion.
9. A simple external, historical connection to
any religion is less important than achieving a
personal relationship, ideally of intimacy, with
God. What God wants most deeply from us, irrespective of our religion, is not a religious practice but a personal relationship that transforms
our lives so as to radiate God’s goodness, truth,
and beauty more clearly.
10. Within our lives and within our relationship to other religions, respect, graciousness,
and charity must trump all other considerations.
This does not mean that all religions are equal
and that faith can be reduced to its lowest common denominator, but it does mean that what
lies deepest inside of every sincere faith are
these fundamentals: respect, graciousness, and
charity.
Throughout history, great thinkers have
grappled with the problem of the one and the
many. And, consciously or unconsciously, all
of us also struggle with that tension between
the one and the many, the relationship between
unity and diversity; but perhaps this not so much
a problem as it is a richness that reflects the
over-abundance of God and our human struggle
to grasp that over-abundance. Perhaps the issue
of religious diversity might be described in this
way:
Different peoples, one earth
Different beliefs, one God
Different languages, one heart
Different failings, one law of gravity
Different energies, one Spirit
Different scriptures, one word
Different forms of worship, one desire
Different histories, one destiny
Different disciplines, one aim
Different approaches, one road
Different faiths - one Mother, one Father, one
earth, one sky, one beginning, one end.
OBLATE FATHER ROLHEISER is president of the Oblate School
of Theology, San Antonio, Texas.
Stigma of mental illness
sychotic outbursts are not unfamiliar in
many of our inner-city churches by people
with mental illness. In Psalms 34:18 we read,
“The righteous cry out, the Lord hears and he
rescues them from all their
afflictions.” But do we as
the disciples of Jesus hear
their cry and rescue them
from all their afflictions?
People in the pews are
often rattled by a psychotic
outburst hoping that docents and security guards
will remove the troubled
person from the midst of
their worship. No matter
DEACON
the location or environCHRISTOPH
ment people with mental
SANDOVAL
illness make everyone notice. The irony is that one
in four persons sitting in
our pews has a family member struggling with
mental health issues.
The National Alliance for the Mentally Ill
defines mental illness as “a group of disorders
causing severe disturbances in thinking, feeling,
and relating” which diminishes one’s ability to
cope with normal demands.
In our present-day society one in four adults,
which is approximately 61.5 million Americans
experience mental illness in a given year. One in
17, about 13.6 million live with a serious mental
illness such as schizophrenia, major depression or bipolar disorder. Mental illness touches
everyone. Nearly half of all Americans have a
risk of a mental disorder in the course of their
lifetimes. We all know someone – grandparent, parent, sibling, child, friend, colleague or
neighbor – who has suffered or is suffering from
a mental health condition. Suicide is the third-
MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES
Visit the NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON MENTAL
HEALTH at www.nimh.nih.gov/index.shtml.
For a Catholic mental health professional referral, see
CATHOLIC PSYCHOTHERAPY ASSOCIATION,
www.catholicpsychotherapy.org/; CatholicTherapists.
com; www.catholictherapists.com.
For a local mental health emergency please contact
SAN FRANCISCO GENERAL HOSPITAL PSYCHIATRIC EMERGENCY SERVICES, 1001 Potrero
Ave., (415) 206-8125.
WESTSIDE COMMUNITY SERVICES CRISIS
CLINIC AND ADULT OUTPATIENT SERVICES,
245 11th St., San Francisco, CA 94103. (415)
355-0311. The clinic provides culturally competent
crisis and urgent care services to San Francisco
adults (18 years or older). It is a voluntary, drop-in
service open to any adult in need of emergency
psychiatric care. The clinic is designed to stabilize low-income residents in a mental health crisis
and refer that person to an appropriate source for
follow-up treatment.
leading cause of death among young people
ages 10-24 in the United States. Our veterans,
who have given so much for their homeland, are
among the most vulnerable. Every day 22 American veterans take their own lives. Just as tragic
are the stories of the many Americans living
in chronic unbearable pain that is never diagnosed or treated. Too frequently, our society’s
response to mental disorders is to assign blame,
leaving millions of Americans stigmatized,
abandoned, disparaged, or incarcerated because
of their illness.
As people of faith we are instructed in Proverbs 31 8-9 to “Open your mouth in behalf of the
mute, and for the rights of the destitute; Open
your mouth, judge justly, defend the needy and
the poor!” It is time to challenge the pervasive
pandemic of stigma against people with mental illness. Our tendency to recoil, isolate and
escort people with mental Illness out of our
churches is not in keeping with our tradition.
We must open our mouth.
Three out of four men, women and children
with a mental illness report that they have
experienced stigma. Stigma is a mark of disgrace that sets a person apart. When a person is
labeled by their illness they are seen as part of
a stereotyped group. Negative attitudes create
prejudice, which leads to negative actions and
discrimination. As church we have historically
confined our ministry toward those with mental
illness to behavioral health services in clinics,
hospitals and treatment facilities with Catholic
mental health professionals and chaplains. We
need to erase stigma, which amplifies tenfold
the human suffering caused by mental illness.
Perhaps now is the time to ponder and plan parish level stand-alone mental health ministries
to address the stigma, isolation and silence on
mental illness in our pews.
At the International Conference for Health
Care Workers, on Illnesses of the Human Mind,
on Nov. 30, 1996, St. John Paul II issued the
clarion call to compassionate care when he said,
“Whoever suffers from mental illness ‘always’
bears God’s image and likeness in themselves,
as does every human being. In addition, they
‘always’ have the inalienable right not only to be
considered as an image of God and therefore as
a person, but also to be treated as such.”
DEACON SANDOVAL serves at St. Mary’s Cathedral.
y
18 FAITH
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
SUNDAY READINGS
Third Sunday of Easter
And he said to them, ‘Thus it is written that the Christ would suffer and rise from the dead on the third day and that
repentance, for the forgiveness of sins, would be preached in his name to all the nations, beginning from Jerusalem.’
LUKE 24:35-48
ACTS 3:13-15, 17-19
Peter said to the people: “The God of Abraham,
the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, the God of
our fathers, has glorified his servant Jesus, whom
you handed over and denied in Pilate’s presence
when he had decided to release him. You denied the
Holy and Righteous One and asked that a murderer
be released to you. The author of life you put to
death, but God raised him from the dead; of this
we are witnesses. Now I know, brothers, that you
acted out of ignorance, just as your leaders did; but
God has thus brought to fulfillment what he had
announced beforehand through the mouth of all
the prophets, that his Christ would suffer. Repent,
therefore, and be converted, that your sins may be
wiped away.”
PSALM 4:2, 4, 7-8, 9
Lord, let your face shine on us.
When I call, answer me, O my just God, you who
relieve me when I am in distress; have pity on me,
and hear my prayer!
Lord, let your face shine on us.
Know that the Lord does wonders for his faithful
one; the Lord will hear me when I call upon him.
Lord, let your face shine on us.
O Lord, let the light of your countenance shine
upon us! You put gladness into my heart.
Lord, let your face shine on us.
As soon as I lie down, I fall peacefully asleep, for
you alone, O Lord, bring security to my dwelling.
Lord, let your face shine on us.
1 JOHN 2:1-5A
My children, I am writing this to you so that
you may not commit sin. But if anyone does
sin, we have an Advocate with the Father, Jesus
Christ the righteous one. He is expiation for our
sins, and not for our sins only but for those of
the whole world. The way we may be sure that we
know him is to keep his commandments. Those
who say, “I know him,” but do not keep his commandments are liars, and the truth is not in them.
But whoever keeps his word, the love of God is
truly perfected in him.
LUKE 24:35-48
The two disciples recounted what had taken
place on the way, and how Jesus was made
known to them in the breaking of bread. While
they were still speaking about this, he stood in
their midst and said to them, “Peace be with
you.” But they were startled and terrified and
thought that they were seeing a ghost. Then he
said to them, “Why are you troubled? And why do
questions arise in your hearts? Look at my hands
and my feet, that it is I myself. Touch me and see,
because a ghost does not have flesh and bones
as you can see I have.” And as he said this, he
showed them his hands and his feet. While they
were still incredulous for joy and were amazed,
he asked them, “Have you anything here to eat?”
They gave him a piece of baked fish; he took
it and ate it in front of them. He said to them,
“These are my words that I spoke to you while I
was still with you, that everything written about
me in the law of Moses and in the prophets and
psalms must be fulfilled.” Then he opened their
minds to understand the Scriptures. And he said
to them, “Thus it is written that the Christ would
suffer and rise from the dead on the third day
and that repentance, for the forgiveness of sins,
would be preached in his name to all the nations,
beginning from Jerusalem. You are witnesses of
these things.”
Christ’s revolutionary message
O
ften I am stuck thinking that in order to meet
God I must set out on the road. Instead, I am
shocked to find he’s coming to meet me. But
like Aslan, he is not a tame lion. He often walks
through walls, minds and
hearts to reach me where I
am.
Jesus reveals himself to
his apostles when they are
in community after the Resurrection. He approaches
the whole group surprising
them behind closed doors.
He’s come to reassure them
about the efficacy of his
death by explaining how
his resurrection works.
“Why are you troubled?”
Jesus bodily reaches out to
them to give them certainty.
“’Touch me and see’… and
SISTER MARIA
as he said this, he showed
CATHERINE, OP
them his hands and his
feet.”
The Lord goes on, “He opened their minds to understand the Scriptures.” As a reader, this drives
me nuts. How did he open their minds? What
realizations do they have that leave them amazed
SCRIPTURE
REFLECTION
and full of a different kind of knowing? What
changed in those moments? But I’m not privy to
the playbook. Instead, like a good teacher, he gives
me and the apostles a moment to process this, by
asking an ordinary question, “Have you anything
here to eat?”
Jesus is asking for them to believe, even as he
stops to swallow some baked fish. “See, I’m really
real,” he says to them. Believing in God is the
appropriate response when I get a glimpse of his
presence. Faith is man’s response to God who
reveals himself (see CCC 166). There is a limit to
doubting when the apostles see him doing ordinary, human activities.
He signals, too, that his resurrection leads to the
possibility of our repentance, since “Christ died
for us while we were yet sinners” (Romans 5:8).
To emphasize how important this is, he ends with
a statement that implies legal language. “You are
witnesses of these things.” Just like Christ says,
“where two or more are gathered in my name,” so
we also require witnesses to give any credibility to
a legal document. With the words he speaks in this
passage, Jesus constitutionally ratifies their experience of God being man, walking among them,
dying and rising. This gives them the authority
to declare to others that they can be legally and
definitively forgiven of past wrongs.
Jesus moves them from their small, intimate,
maybe even individual experience of this miracle
to a broader vision of his purpose. They can’t see
it now, but Jesus shockingly passes on so much
authority to them to do the very things he describes in these verses. The apostles will be a part
of the fulfillment of his mission for “the forgiveness of sins, would be preached in his name to all
the nations, beginning from Jerusalem.”
Christ’s message is radically new and revolutionary. Now instead of the law, which either
makes allowance (or excuse) for my weakness in
sinning or mercilessly abandons me to justice, Jesus’ resurrection gives the same law effectiveness
in my own heart to work with his grace for my
unburdening. Through the church’s sacraments, I
can experience this freedom in grace.
In my own life, this passage reminds me of who
God is and who the church becomes because of
him. May we all use this Easter season to renew
our desire to participate in the life of God’s grace
in the sacraments of the church. To be one with
the church is to be one with Christ and his saving
resurrection.
SISTER MARIA CATHERINE is a member of the Dominican
Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist, and teaches
English at Marin Catholic High School.
LITURGICAL CALENDAR, DAILY MASS READINGS
MONDAY, APRIL 20: Monday of the
Third Week of Easter. Optional Memorial of St. Beuno in Wales. ACTS 6:8-15.
PS 119:23-24, 26-27, 29-30. MT 4:4b.
JN 6:22-29.
TUESDAY, APRIL 21: Tuesday of the
Third Week of Easter. Optional Memorial of St. Anselm, bishop and doctor.
ACTS 7:51-8:1a. PS 31:3cd-4, 6 and
7b and 8a, 17 and 21ab. JN 6:35ab. JN
6:30-35.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22: Wednesday
of the Third Week of Easter. ACTS
8:1b-8. PS 66:1-3a, 4-5, 6-7a. SEE JN
6:40. JN 6:35-40.
FIDELIS OF SIGMARINGEN
1577-1622
April 24
Born in Sigmaringen (Germany), Mark Roy studied
philosophy and law at the University of Freiburg in
Breisgau. After tutoring young aristocrats and traveling Europe with them, he began practicing law in
Alsace, where he quickly became “the poor person’s
lawyer.” But, disillusioned over other lawyers’ behavior, he gave up the law to enter a vocation in religious life. As an ordained
Capuchin named Fidelis, he was renowned for his holiness, preaching and
leadership. He was superior at several houses before being invited to eastern
Switzerland to call Protestants back to Catholicism. This mission, complicated by the politics of the time and hatred of the Catholic Habsburgs,
became increasingly dangerous and led to his murder by opponents. He was
canonized in 1746.
THURSDAY, APRIL 23: Thursday of
the Third Week of Easter. Optional
Memorial of St. George, martyr and
St. Adalbert, bishop and martyr. ACTS
8:26-40. PS 66:8-9, 16-17, 20. JN 6:51.
JN 6:44-51.
FRIDAY, APRIL 24: Friday of the Third
Week of Easter. Optional Memorial of
St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen, priest and
martyr. ACTS 9:1-20. PS 117:1bc, 2.
JN 6:56. JN 6:52-59.
SATURDAY, APRIL 25: Feast of St.
Mark, Evangelist. 1 PT 5:5b-14. PS
89:2-3, 6-7, 16-17. 1 COR 1:23a-24b.
MK 16:15-20.
ARTS & LIFE 19
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
Books view Pope Francis from varied perspectives
REVIEWED BY ALLAN F. WRIGHT
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
“POPE FRANCIS: LIFE AND REVOLUTION” BY
ELISABETTA PIQUE. Loyola Press (Chicago, 2014).
312 pp, $22.95.
“FIORETTI: THE LITTLE FLOWERS OF POPE
FRANCIS” BY ANDREA TORNIELLI. Ignatius
Press (San Francisco, 2014). 185 pp, $16.85.
“THE SPIRIT OF ST. FRANCIS: INSPIRING
WORDS FROM POPE FRANCIS,” EDITED BY
ALICIA VON STAMWITZ. Franciscan Media (Cincinnati, 2015) .179 pp, $19.99.
“POPE FRANCIS: A GUIDE TO GOD’S TIME” BY
CINDY WOODEN AND PAUL HARING. Catholic
News Service (Washington, 2014). 120 pp, $21.95
Elisabetta Pique, an internationally respected
journalist, had an inside track into the lifestyle
and manner of leadership Pope Francis exhibits
because of her personal and familial relationship
with him years before he was elected pope. Her
friendship with the current pontiff began in 2001
when she was acquainted with then-Archbishop
Bergoglio as a reporter for Argentina’s main newspaper, La Nacion.
Pique’s “Pope Francis: Life and Revolution: A
Biography of Jorge Bergoglio” gives an insider’s
perspective into the man who would become pope.
The author introduces you to “Padre Jorge” and
allows you to walk with him through various stages
of his life, putting you in St. Peter’s Square as he is
elected pope.
It is said that the Holy Father thinks like a Jesuit
and acts like St. Francis and the reader can easily distinguish these similarities throughout her
biography. The pope remains a poor man for the
poor no matter the level of hierarchy he rises to,
even the papacy, a man true to himself and to Jesus
Christ whom he serves.
The most fascinating sections of this book deal
with the inner workings of the Roman Curia and
the challenges the pope faces in dealing with corruption. To those who view the Catholic Church
through rose-colored glasses, the level of dishon-
esty and vice within the church and those who
govern and lead will be shocking. Sex scandals,
financial corruption and questions of a “gay mafia”
are treated head on with full transparency.
(In July 2013, Pope Francis was asked about
reports of a gay lobby at the Vatican protecting
certain priests by threatening to blackmail others.
According to a Catholic News Service report, the
pope said he was aware of such reports but emphasized the need to “distinguish between a person
who is gay and someone who makes a gay lobby. A
gay lobby isn’t good.”)
The reader of Pique’s book needs to be prepared
for some sudden shifts as the author tells her
compelling story of this man in short sequences
and not always as a fluid documentary. Her friendship with Pope Francis provides insight to a simple,
humble, strong and steady leader who would be the
first to tell you that he is a sinner.
Andrea Tornielli’s book, “Fioretti”, offers inspiring stories, encounters and excerpts from the
writings and talks of Pope Francis through his first
year as pope. The title echoes the “Little Flowers of
St. Francis,” the famous collection of stories about
St. Francis of Assisi, whose name the pope adopted
for himself.
Cynics may decry Pope Francis’ leadership style,
his breaking with tradition, his speaking off the
cuff so his words are misunderstood or mistranslated by the media. Yet his actions and love for Jesus,
the poor and those who are forgotten cannot be
mistaken. The personal stories of his desire to be
treated not as a prince of the church but as a fellow
disciple inspire and call the reader to reflection and
conversion.
These stories hone in on spiritual and social
themes which are important to Pope Francis and
those which he has “put on flesh” during his pontificate. Mercy, forgiveness, charity, prayer, justice,
the Eucharist, Our Lady and many more themes
are examined through the words and writings of
Francis and by the reflection of Tornielli.
“The Spirit of St. Francis: Inspiring Words from
Pope Francis” is a collection of quotes from Pope
Francis. In a short period of time, this shepherd
who came from the ends of the earth has managed
to transmit to us the joy of the Gospel through
simple words and profound gestures that have
moved many to take up their cross and to follow
Jesus in simplicity. The book offers the words of
Pope Francis as delivered in his Angelus addresses,
daily homilies, general audiences and brief Tweets,
containing messages that are uplifting, challenging and spiritual . An excellent book for those who
desire inspiration for each day.
CNS Vatican correspondent Cindy Wooden and
photographer Paul Haring have put together the
words of Pope Francis with compelling photographs taken within the Holy Father’s brief pontificate through which the reader can glimpse the
heart of the man who leads the Catholic Church by
word and deed. In “Pope Francis: A Guide to God’s
Time,” the author provides an overview of the liturgical year and offers an introduction to the biblical
themes Pope Francis sees as being most important.
This beautifully illustrated book offers more than
just outstanding photographs for it delves into
the heart of the good news which can be found in
mercy, forgiveness, love and in an encounter with
Jesus Christ.
Also of interest: “Reflections from Pope Francis: An
Invitation to Journaling, Prayer and Action” by Susan
Stark and Daniel J. Pierson. Tarcher/Penguin (New
York, 2015). 293 pp., $15.95.
“Pope Francis’ Revolution of Tenderness and Love:
Theological and Pastoral Perspectives” by Cardinal
Walter Kasper. Paulist Press (Mahwah, New Jersey,
2015). 128 pp., $16.95.
WRIGHT is author of five books on Scripture and is
academic dean for evangelization in the Diocese of
Paterson, New Jersey.
Bishop hopes ‘fictional memoir’ has appeal for Catholics, non-Catholics
MARK PATTISON
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
WASHINGTON– “I’m no author,” averred retired
Bishop Francis A. Quinn of Sacramento.
Well, he is now.
Bishop Quinn, at age 93, has become a first-time
author, telling his life story in what he termed a
“fictional memoir,” chronicling the lives of three
priests from their days in a high school seminary
in “Behind Closed Doors: Conflicts in Today’s
Church.”
Anyone interested in buying it online shouldn’t
look for “Bishop” in the author’s name. Instead, he
used Francis Anthony Quinn.
In a telephone interview with Catholic News Service from the assisted-living facility in Sacramento
where he lives, Bishop Quinn said, laughing, “I figured it (‘bishop’) would draw some people but scare
others off; they think it’s going to be a religious
book. And it could scare off non-Catholics, people
of other faiths, thinking this was just going to be a
Catholic book.”
The three main characters are David Carmichael,
wanting to be well-liked but quiet and unsure of
himself; Ladd Franklin, a restless, questioning sort
who eschews parish ministry for Catholic Relief
Services; and Tyler Stone, who is accused of sexual
misconduct near the end of his priestly ministry.
Bishop Quinn said there’s “50 or 60 percent” of
himself in the character of Carmichael – the only
one who, like him, is ordained a bishop – about 50
percent in the Franklin character, as Bishop Quinn
himself served many years overseas with CRS, but
only about 10 percent in the character of Stone,
putting Stone’s upbringing in Tucson, Arizona, on a
parallel with his own. The bishop hastened to say he
had never, unlike Stone’s character, been accused of
any sexual misconduct during his priestly ministry.
The dramatic tension in
“Behind Closed Doors” comes
courtesy of the Caprice family.
There’s Msgr. Gordon Caprice,
the super-smart and superskilled seminarian who becomes
a chancery big shot; his sister,
Willow, who has an unrequited
love for Ladd Franklin and becomes a career Foreign Service
officer (“the relationship with
Willow is strictly fictional,” he
said); and their father, George,
head of a group called Guardians of Doctrine –
GOD for short – ready to pounce upon any pastoral,
theological or liturgical abuse, real or imagined, and
protest it to the highest levels necessary.
The book’s chronology begins in the years before
World War II, although not much time is spent
on the war because, at Bishop Quinn’s fictional
seminary, students weren’t allowed to listen to the
radio. It ends decades later, with the appointment
of a new archbishop for the make-believe Archdiocese of San Tomas.
While written as fiction, the characters are
“based on reality, people that I’ve known, or priests
and bishops that I’ve known,” Bishop Quinn told
CNS. “Those things like the visit to Russia and
the visit to the Philippines, being awakened in the
middle of the night with a gun at my head and a
flashlight in my eyes, that really happened, but the
chase through Argentina and Brazil with someone
trying to recapture that tape, that’s fiction. I was
down in those countries but not for any purpose
other than helping out at CRS.”
Apart from the fictionalized elements of “Behind
Closed Doors,” “there are homilies in there that
I wanted to intersperse in the story, hoping that
people who read it as a novel would get some infor-
mation about the church,” Bishop Quinn said. “It
probably slows up the narrative, but they (readers)
can skip over that and follow the novel part.”
Bishop Quinn said he wrote the book over a sixyear period after he retired as Sacramento’s bishop
in 1993 and did mission work among American Indians in Arizona. “I had a lot of time on my hands,”
he said.
He spent more than a dozen years traveling from
reservation to reservation in a recreational vehicle
given to him by priests of the Sacramento diocese.
In 2007, he returned to his native California.
As bishop, he was known for his one-on-one ministry with the poor in Sacramento, sharing words
and perhaps some money with the homeless, serving free meals or washing dishes at a soup kitchen,
and visiting migrant labor camps in the summer.
The concept for the book, as well as its title, came
from Bishop Quinn’s idea that “I thought it would
be good to aim it at Catholics to learn what priests
do besides Sunday Mass.” He said he thinks “an
ordinary Catholic doesn’t realize what a priest does
most of the week. I thought that would be good for
them to know. And then for people of all faiths, to
know what Catholics believe and what the church
is all about.”
Any royalties from “Behind Closed Doors” will
be directed to the Quinn Cottages, a facility named
after the bishop that shelters homeless people,
newly released prisoners and those just out of drug
rehabilitation for up to two years while they look
for work.
Don’t expect any author tour. At his age, Bishop
Quinn said, he is “limited to a wheelchair and
walker” to get around the assisted living facility,
which is run by the Sisters of Mercy.
In fact, the head of a Guardians of Doctrine-like
group is a fellow resident. “We’re real buddies
now,” Bishop Quinn said.
20 FROM THE FRONT
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
POPE: Holy Year of Mercy will be time to heal, to help, to forgive
FROM PAGE 1
In his homily at vespers, the pope said he proclaimed
the Year of Mercy because “it is the favorable time
to heal wounds, a time not to be weary of meeting
all those who are waiting to see and touch with their
hands the signs of the closeness of God, a time to offer
everyone the way of forgiveness and reconciliation.”
The boundless nature of God’s mercy – his willingness always to forgive anything – has been a constant
subject of Pope Francis’ preaching and is explained
in detail in the document, which outlines some of the
specific projects the pope has in mind for the year.
The Old Testament stories of how God repeatedly
offered mercy to his unfaithful people and the New
Testament stories of Jesus’ compassion, healing and
mercy demonstrate, the pope said, that “the mercy
of God is not an abstract idea, but a concrete reality
through which he reveals his love,” just like mothers
and fathers love their children.
“How much I desire that the year to come will be
steeped in mercy, so that we can go out to every man
and woman, bringing the goodness and tenderness of
God,” he wrote. “May the balm of mercy reach everyone, both believers and those far away, as a sign that
the kingdom of God is already present in our midst.”
Nothing in the church’s preaching or witness, he
said, can be lacking in mercy.
Pope Francis asked that all dioceses around the
world designate a “Door of Mercy” at their cathedral
or another special church or shrine, and that every
diocese implement the “24 Hours for the Lord” initiative on the Friday and Saturday before the fourth
week of Lent. In Rome the last two years, the pope has
opened the celebration with a penance service in St.
Peter’s Basilica and churches around the city were
open for the next 24 hours for confessions and eucharistic adoration.
The pope said he will designate and send out “Missionaries of Mercy” to preach about mercy; they will
be given special authority, he said, “to pardon even
those sins reserved to the Holy See.” Under church
law, those sins involve: a man who directly participated in an abortion and later wants to enter the priesthood; priests who have broken the seal of confession;
priests who have offered sacramental absolution to
their own sexual partners; desecrating the Eucharist;
and making an attempt on the life of the pope. Usually,
the Apostolic Penitentiary, a Vatican court, handles
those cases.
And he urged all Catholics to spend more time practicing what traditionally have been called the corporal
and spiritual works of mercy. The corporal works are:
(CNS PHOTO/ANDREA SOLARO, REUTERS POOL)
Pope Francis stands in front of the Holy Door prior to first
vespers of Divine Mercy Sunday in St. Peter’s Basilica at the
Vatican April 11.
Feeding the hungry, sheltering the homeless, clothing
the naked, visiting the sick, visiting the imprisoned,
giving drink to the thirsty and burying the dead. The
spiritual works are: converting sinners, instructing
the ignorant, advising the doubtful, comforting the
sorrowful, bearing wrongs patiently, forgiving injuries
and praying for the living and dead.
The date the pope chose to open the year – Dec.
8 – is the feast of the Immaculate Conception and the
50th anniversary of the closing of the Second Vatican
Council. Both dates, he wrote, are related to the Year
of Mercy.
Mercy, he said, is “the bridge that connects God and
man, opening our hearts to a hope of being loved forever despite our sins.” That bridge was made concrete
when God chose Mary to be the mother of his son.
The Year of Mercy, Pope Francis wrote, is also a way
to keep the Second Vatican Council alive. “The walls
which too long had made the church a kind of fortress
were torn down and the time had come to proclaim the
Gospel in a new way,” he said. The council recognized
“a responsibility to be a living sign of the Father’s love
in the world.”
The life and action of the church, he said, “is authentic and credible only when she becomes a convincing
herald of mercy,” a mercy that “knows no bounds and
extends to everyone without exception.”
While some people try to argue that mercy, even
God’s mercy, is limited by the demands of justice, Pope
Francis said mercy and justice are “two dimensions
of a single reality that unfolds progressively until it
culminates in the fullness of love.”
Preaching mercy, he said, is not the same as ignoring
sin or withholding correction. Instead, mercy invites
repentance and conversion and ensures the sinner
that once God forgives a sin, he forgets it.
The pope addressed direct appeals in the document
to members of the mafia and other criminal organizations as well as to officials and others involved in
corruption. “For their own good, I beg them to change
their lives,” he wrote. “I ask them this in the name
of the Son of God who, though rejecting sin, never
rejected the sinner.”
“Violence inflicted for the sake of amassing riches
soaked in blood makes one neither powerful nor immortal,” he continued. “Everyone, sooner or later, will
be subject to God’s judgment, from which no one can
escape.”
At the same time, Pope Francis wrote, many of those
who insist first on God’s justice are like the Pharisees
who thought they could save themselves by following the letter of the law, but ended up simply placing
“burdens on the shoulders of others and undermined
the Father’s mercy.”
“God’s justice is his mercy,” the pope said. “Mercy
is not opposed to justice, but rather expresses God’s
way of reaching out to the sinner, offering him a new
chance to look at himself, convert and believe.”
Recognizing that they have been treated with mercy
by God, he said, Christians are obliged to treat others
with mercy. In fact, the Gospel says that Christians
will be judged by the mercy they show others.
“At times how hard it seems to forgive,” he said.
“And yet pardon is the instrument placed into our
fragile hands to attain serenity of heart. To let go of
anger, wrath, violence and revenge are necessary
conditions to living joyfully.”
Pope Francis also noted that God’s mercy is an
important theme in Judaism and Islam, and he urged
efforts during the Year of Mercy to increase interreligious dialogue and mutual understanding with followers of both faiths.
DISASTER MINISTRY: Improving response to traumatic events
FROM PAGE 1
Management and is a disaster chaplain with the Civil
Air Patrol.
In 1979, as a high school religion teacher living in
Chicago, he was dispatched by the Red Cross to the
crash site morgue of the deadliest airline crash in U.S.
history. American Airlines Flight 191 crashed shortly
after takeoff, killing all 277 people onboard. Morison
spent three days helping identify remains and retrieving property, work he called life-altering, but “sacred.”
Morison distinguishes between pastoral crisis
intervention, which is a ministry of presence and
support, and pastoral care and counseling, which
helps people of faith find meaning and peace in the
aftermath of disaster.
Faith leaders without sufficient training in crisis
response can fail to recognize pastoral opportunities that can mitigate collective or individual
trauma associated with catastrophic events, regardless of whether the events directly involve the
community, he said.
“I would say the majority of priests have not been
oriented toward an understanding of the different
types of disaster and how those types can affect
their congregation,” he said.
Morison’s project outlines three distinct levels
of disasters and the different and optimal types of
pastoral crisis intervention.
The first level is a disaster or tragedy that does
not directly involve a church or parishioners. He
used the example of 9/11, which primarily happened in New York City but deeply affected people
all over the country.
‘As a pastor, I should have a sense of
knowing and being comfortable with
approaching my congregation in these
moments so they can be recognized for
their sacredness.’
MIKE MORISON
“Parishioners can be affected by shock,” he said,
adding that the replaying of television news for
hours on end can be traumatizing.
For some people in a congregation, he said, a disaster even thousands of miles away can revive trauma
from a past event.
“As a pastor, I should have a sense of knowing and
being comfortable with approaching my congregation in these moments so they can be recognized for
their sacredness,” he said. “Even though I’m not
looking for it and my people are not speaking directly
to it, many of them might desperately need it.”
Level 1 disasters can also provide “teachable moments” for faith leaders, according to Morison, who
took 250 middle-school students to the Museum of
Science and Industry the day after the Challenger
space shuttle exploded in January 1986, killing all
seven crew members.
“Our message to the kids the next morning was
that these were people who were doing what they felt
was important, what that they felt was going to con-
tribute to making life better and we need to celebrate
their lives,” he said.
What Morison calls Level 2 disasters do directly affect some or all members of a congregation. Examples can include natural disasters like earthquakes
and floods, crime or accidents that directly affect
a local community. But the disaster doesn’t always
have be local to have a strong impact.
As pastoral associate for his New Hampshire parish
at the time of the Challenger accident, Morison was
able to help parish deal with the loss of astronaut
Christa McAuliffe, who had been a CCD teacher there.
“We had to know how to bring perspective to
those that were directly connected with her,” he
said. “And in a real way, we all were.”
Level 3 crisis intervention is ministering as a
chaplain first responder to a widespread disaster or
tragedy.
As far as Morison knows, the field of faith-based
disaster response has not been formalized.
“There are lots of individual reflections from
priests and ministers who have been caught in
some sort of a disaster and share the experiences
and offer theological reflections,” he said, and some
good how-to materials, but pastoral crisis intervention remains a vague field.
His ultimate goal is to raise consciousness and
conversation about what disaster ministry is and
should be within parishes and dioceses.
“I hope to raise the consciousness of pastors,
priests and seminarians about disaster and catastrophic crisis ministry and appropriate pastoral
responses during the first few days and hours following a traumatic event,” he said.
COMMUNITY 21
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
OBITUARIES
SISTER DOROTHY OWEN, RSCJ –
TAUGHT AT SACRED HEART SCHOOLS
Religious of the Sacred Heart Sister Dorothy
Owen died April 2 at Oakwood,
her congregation’s elder care
center in Atherton. Sister Dorothy entered the Society of the
Sacred Heart on Aug. 13, 1955;
professed first vows Feb. 17, 1958,
and made final profession Feb.
4, 1964. She would have been 80
years old April 21.
Sister Dorothy
Sister Dorothy, an alumna of
Owen, RSCJ
Convent of the Sacred Heart
School, San Francisco, had a long
tenure as teacher including assignments at Sacred
Heart Schools in Atherton and San Francisco.
“She was known as an exceptional elementary
school teacher,” her congregation said in a statement. Sister Dorothy also spent many summers as
director of day camps for young children in San
Francisco and Seattle. “When someone was sick,
she would visit. When someone asked for prayers,
she would follow up faithfully,” the sisters said.
She is survived by siblings Marie Owen, Emeryville; Cathy Gaynor, San Francisco; Christine
Owen, Redwood City; Theresa Owen, San Rafael;
Mary Ann Houston, Oregon; John Owen, Clayton;
Jim Owen, Walnut Creek; and Ray Owen, Virginia.
A funeral Mass was celebrated at Oakwood
April 11 with burial in the sisters’ cemetery at
Oakwood.
Memorial contributions may be made to the
Society of the Sacred Heart, 4120 Forest Park Ave.,
St. Louis, MO 63108.
SISTER VERONICA SKILLIN, SND –
FORMER NDNU PRESIDENT
Notre Dame Sister Veronica Skillin died April 9
at Sequoia Hospital from injuries
suffered in a fall. Sister Veronica
was a former president of the
congregation’s Notre Dame de
Namur University in Belmont
serving in the role for 15 years
under its original name College
of Notre Dame. Sister Veronica
was 86 years old and a Sister of
Sister Veronica
Notre Dame for 69 years.
Skillin, SND
Born in San Francisco, Sister
Veronica graduated from Notre
Dame High School, San Francisco and held a graduate degree in English from Stanford University.
“The entire NDNU community is deeply saddened
by the passing of one of this university’s greatest
leaders,” said current school president, Judith Maxwell Greig. “Sister Veronica’s tenure was marked
by a significant expansion in university programs,
which helped set the stage for the elevation of NDNU
from a college to a university. She had great love for
the university and its students, faculty and staff and
remained involved in university life right up until
her passing.”
During her tenure as president, 1980-1994, the college grew from 1,400 to more than 1,600 students.
“Sister Veronica believed in the importance of the
entire community, and would bring small groups of
freshmen into her office each fall so that they would
know who she was and could then ‘pop in’ and visit
her during their time on campus,” the school said
in a statement. “We are all teachers and learners,
whether we are faculty, staff, or students,” Sister
Veronica is quoted as saying.
Her brothers Father Harmon Skillin of the Diocese
of Stockton and Joe Skillin of Georgia, as well as
nephew Adili Skillin survive her.
A funeral Mass will be celebrated April 20 at 10:30
a.m. in Cunningham Chapel on the Notre Dame de
Namur University campus.
Remembrances may be made to the Sisters of Notre
Dame de Namur, 1520 Ralston Ave., Belmont 94002.
SCRIPTURE SEARCH
Gospel for April 19, 2015
Luke 24:35-48
Following is a word search based on the Gospel
reading for the Third Sunday of Easter, Cycle B: the
appearance of the flesh and blood Jesus. The words
can be found in all directions in the puzzle.
SAID TO THEM
TERRIFIED
MY FEET
BONES
A PIECE
LAW OF MOSES
SUFFER
How do I know if I’m called to religious life?
Come with your friends.
Evening Prayer at 7:30 p.m. in Chapel.
CSF CONTENT
IN YOUR INBOX:
Visit catholic-sf.org to sign
up for our e-newsletter.
STARTLED
GHOST
TOUCH ME
TO EAT
I SPOKE
OPENED
WITNESSES
FLESH AND BONES
“What do you want to do with your one,
wonderful life?”
In this Year of Consecrated Life, we
invite young women to Evening Prayer
and conversation about vocation
discernment.
PEACE
SEEING
MYSELF
ANYTHING
FISH
PSALMS
FORGIVENESS
L
S
E
S
S
E
N
T
I
W
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© 2015 Tri-C-A Publications www.tri-c-a-publications.com
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DOMINICAN SCHOOL OF PHILOSOPHY & THEOLOGY
April 24--Walking joyfully in the Spirit
Presentation and sharing til 9:15 p.m.
Mercy Center, 2300 Adeline Drive, Burlingame.
RSVP: Sr. Jean 650-373-4508
or [email protected] No charge.
Important Announcement!
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5:30 pm Mass, 6:30 pm Reception and Dinner
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22
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
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COMMUNITY 23
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
‘WOMEN AND SPIRIT’ SCREENS APRIL 21
(COURTESY PHOTO)
Pictured from left at Serra’s Pack Out are Ryan Fitzgerald, Benjamin Khoury, Marc Blais, Eduardo Ruano and David Gilbert II.
Serra students prepare packaged
meals to combat hunger
packets of food are going to be used,”
said Ann Ponty, mom of Serra senior
Kevin Ponty. “Through a project like
this, they are able to see Jesus in other
people.”
In February, Affeldt spoke to students to raise awareness about hunger
in San Mateo County and in Nicaragua.
According to Serra’s communication director Antonia Ehlers: “Affeldt
talked about his baseball career path
and stressed the importance of having
a purpose and a ‘why.’ He pointed out
that all the money in the world cannot buy happiness. He spoke of his
own faith and love of Jesus, which has
driven his desire to raise awareness
and promote social justice causes.”
Students from Junipero Serra High
School joined with Generation Alive,
a nonprofit founded by San Francisco
Giants relief pitcher Jeremy Affeldt
to raise almost $8,000 and pack almost
30,000 meals for people in San Mateo
County and Nicaragua.
The event named a Pack Out involved
more than 600 Serra students and 50 of
their moms March 23.
“This is a good project because it
reminds us how blessed we are and
it keeps us honest,” said Serra senior
Aaron Deocampo.
Generation Alive works with about 30
schools a year to serve 1 million of the
prepackaged meals.
“Our students are learning how these
As a response to the call of Pope
Francis to declare 2015 the Year of
Consecrated Life, the archdiocesan
Council of Religious is presenting
the film “Women and Spirit,” based
on the exhibit of the same name
which toured throughout the United
States and was praised by the hundreds of thousands of people who
saw it.
The film chronicles the history of
the thousands of sisters who came
to the United States and founded the
Catholic school system, built hospitals, orphanages, homes for the
poor, mental institutions, and many
more programs benefiting the poor
and marginalized.
“Women and Spirit” will be shown
April 21 at 7 p.m. at Immaculate
Heart of Mary Parish Center, 1040
Alameda de las Pulgas at Ralston
Avenue, Belmont.
Following the film, there will be a
panel of four religious women from
different congregations – the Daughters of Charity, Mercy Sisters of
Burlingame, a Franciscan Sister, and
a Sister of Notre Dame de Namur –
speaking of their work in the Archdiocese of San Francisco as well as
throughout the world. The event is
sponsored by the Immaculate Heart
of Mary Parish, Belmont; the Knights
of Columbus, San Mateo Council; and
the San Mateo Serra Club.
“All are welcome as our guests,”
said Presentation Sister Rosina
Conrotto, director of the Office of
Consecrated Life.
For more information, call Notre Dame
Sister Roseanne Murphy, (650) 508-3551.
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www.duggansserra.com
“Here’s wishing happiness and wellbeing to
all the families of the Archdiocese. If you
ever need our guidance please call at any
time. Sincerely, Paul Larson ~ President.”
The Peninsula’s Local Catholic Directors…
Chapel of the Highlands
Funeral & Cremation Care Professionals
www.driscollsmortuary.com
588-5116
Duggan’s Serra Catholic Family Mortuaries
El Camino Real at 194 Millwood Dr., Millbrae
www.chapelofthehighlands.com
CA License FD 915
Duggan’s Serra Mortuary 500 Westlake Ave., Daly City FD 1098
Driscoll’s Valencia St. Serra Mortuary 1465 Valencia St., SF FD 1665
Sullivan’s Funeral Home & Cremation 2254 Market St., SF FD 228
www.duggansserra.com
7747 El Camino Real
Colma, CA 94014 | FD 1522
&
www.sullivanfuneralandcremation.com
Celebrating 90 years!
x Highly Recommended / Family Owned
x Please call us at (650)
650/756-4500
415/970-8801
415/621-4567
McAVOY O’HARA Co.
S ERV ING WI TH TRUST AND CONFI DE NCE
SI NCE 1850
111 Industrial Road suite. 5
Belmont, CA 94002 | FD 1923
Affordable Catholic Funeral & Cremation Services
Specializing in Chapel Services & interments at Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery
We provide on-line arrangements
Nationally Certified Bereavement Facilitators
5 Star Yelp Reviews
650.757.1300 |
fax 650.757.7901
|
toll free 888.757.7888
Eve r g r e e n M o r tu a r y
4545 G E A RY B O U L E VA R D a t T E N T H AV E N U E
For information prearrangements, and assistance, call day or night (415) 668-0077
FD 523
| www.colmacremation.com
The Catholic Cemeteries ◆ Archdiocese of San Francisco
www.holycrosscemeteries.com
H OLY C ROSS
HOLY CROSS CATHOLIC
MT. OLIVET
CATHOLIC CEMETERY
CEMETERY
CATHOLIC CEMETERY
TOMALES CATHOLIC
CEMETERY
1500 Mission Road,
Colma, CA 94014
650-756-2060
1400 Dillon Beach Road,
Tomales, CA 94971
415-479-9021
Intersection of Santa Cruz Avenue,
Menlo Park, CA 94025
650-323-6375
A TRADITION
OF
270 Los Ranchitos Road,
San Rafael, CA 94903
415-479-9020
ST. ANTHONY
CEMETERY
OUR LADY OF THE
PILLAR CEMETERY
Stage Road
Miramontes St.
Pescadero, CA 94060 Half Moon Bay, CA 94019
650-712-1679
415-712-1679
FAITH THROUGHOUT OUR LIVES.
24
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
St. Jude Novena
PUBLISH A NOVENA
May the Sacred Heart
of Jesus be adored,
glorified, loved &
preserved throughout
the world now &
forever. Sacred Heart
of Jesus pray for us.
St. Jude helper of the
hopeless pray for us.
Say prayer 9 times a
day for 9 days.
Thank You St. Jude.
Never known to fail.
You may publish.
New! Personal prayer
option added
Pre-payment required
Mastercard or
Visa accepted
Cost
$26
If you wish to publish a Novena in the
Catholic San Francisco
You may use the form below or call (415) 614-5640
M.L.
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
CLASSIFIEDS
TO ADVERTISE IN CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
CALL (415) 614-5642 | VISIT www.catholic-sf.org | EMAIL [email protected]
Your prayer will be published in our newspaper
Prayer to the Blessed
Virgin never known to fail.
Name
Address
Phone
MC/VISA #
Exp.
SELECT ONE PRAYER:
❑ St. Jude Novena to SH
❑ Prayer to the Blessed Virgin
❑ Prayer to St. Jude
❑ Prayer to the Holy Spirit
❑ Personal Prayer, 50 words or less
Please return form with check or money order for $26
Payable to: Catholic San Francisco
Advertising Dept., Catholic San Francisco
1 Peter Yorke Way, San Francisco, CA 94109
Most beautiful flower of
Mt. Carmel Blessed Mother
of the Son of God, assist me
in my need. Help me and
show me you are my mother.
Oh Holy Mary, Mother of
God, Queen of Heaven and
earth. I humbly beseech you
from the bottom of my heart
to help me in this need.
Oh Mary, conceived
without sin. Pray for us (3X).
Holy Mary, I place this
cause in your hands (3X).
Say prayers 3 days.
M.L.
USED CAR NEEDED
Retired Senior
needs used car
USED VEHICLE NEEDED
CAR WANTED
in good condition,
for medical appts.
and errands.
Please Call (415) 290-7160
Email: [email protected]
Private individual wants
to buy a car, pick-up or SUV
Willing to pay up to $15,000
PLEASE CALL GRANT
AT 415 5175977
PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT
It’s Time to Celebrate!
Get reacquainted with old friends
at Mercy High School, San Francisco!
Saint Peter
Mother’s Day
Orchid Sale
ALL CLASS REUNION
1956-2014
May 2, 2015
4:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Mercy High School, San Francisco
McAuley Pavilion
Wine, Drinks & Hors d’oeuvres Recepon
Tours of the School
Photo Booth Fun
$35 per person
Register on line at www.mercyhs.org
Or send a check ($35.00 per person) to
MHS All Class Reunion
3250 Nineteenth Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94132
Include full name, maiden name, graduang year,
email, phone and guest name
Please RSVP no later
than April 27, 2015
For more informaon call
the Alumnae Relaons office
415.337.7218 or
email [email protected]
Double stem orchid $20.00 / living plant
Order pick up date: Sunday May 10, 2015
(Selection of pink, yellow or pink and white orchid flowers.
First come first served)
Order pick up time:
After 9:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. mass
Inside Church meeting room
Orchids must be pre-ordered. Forms are available
in the rectory. Pre-orders must be paid in advance and
no later than May 4, 2015.
Proceeds from this FUNraiser benefits
Saint Peter Catholic Church debt reduction
700 Oddstad Blvd., Pacifica, CA 94044
Questions, contact Vivian Queirolo (650) 720-2308 or email [email protected]
25
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
HELP WANTED
CLASSIFIEDS
PARISH ADMINISTRATOR
TO ADVERTISE
IN CATHOLIC
SAN
FRANCISCO
CALL
(415) 614-5642
FAX
Star of the Sea parish is seeking to hire
Share your heart Share your home
Become a Mentor today.
California MENTOR is seeking loving families with a spare bedroom in the counties of San Francisco,
San Mateo and Marin to support adults with special needs. Receive a competitive monthly stipend
and ongoing support. For information on how you can become a Mentor call 650-389-5787 ext. 2
(415) 614-5641
Family Home Agency
VISIT
www.catholic-sf.org
EMAIL
(/(0(17$5<6&+22/
35,1&,3$/628*+7
advertising.csf
@sfarchdiocese.org
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VHW'LVWULFW)RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQDERXWWKHVFKRRO\RXPD\
YLVLWRXUZHEVLWHZZZVWJDEULHOVIFRP
If you would
like to add your
tax-deductible
contribution,
please mail a
check, payable
to Catholic
San Francisco,
to: Catholic
San Francisco,
Dept. W,
One Peter
Yorke Way,
San Francisco
CA 94109
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Principal Position
Commencing July 1, 2015
St. John the Baptist School in Healdsburg
Noted for its high student achievement and its
actively supportive parent body, this Catholic,
parish-based K-8 school is located in the heart
of Healdsburg, a city with European charm
some 75 miles north of San Francisco. Applicant must be a practicing Catholic, with five
or more years of teaching experience, and in
possession or pursuit of either an administrative credential or masters degree in Catholic
school leadership. The deadline for applying
is April 24, 2015. Applicants should send a
letter of interest and curriculum vitae to Department of Catholic Schools, P.O. Box 1297,
Santa Rosa, CA 95402. Access related information on-line at www.santarosacatholic.org,
“Catholic Schools.”
a parish administrator. This full-time, except
position will oversee:
• financial controls and development
• maintenance of physical plant
• human resources
• communications
• and information technology
Incumbant also assures compliance with local, state,
and federal laws and regulations along with diocesan
norms and polices. A college degree in business
administration or related field and five years of
experience in business management are required.
This position is available immediately.
Please submit letters of inquiry and resume to:
Fr. Joseph Illo
Star of the Sea Parish
4420 Geary Blvd., San Francisco, CA 94118
725 Diamond Street
San Francisco, CA 94114
Pre-School Director Opening
We are seeking candidates to fill a full-time, benefited, Pre-school
Director position. This position is responsible for overseeing staff, including hiring, evaluating and fostering professional development. The
director also manages the physical space so it is well maintained and
in compliance with licensing guidelines. This position also requires
instruction between 5 and 10 hours/week, continually evaluating the
program providing recommendations.
Qualifications and Requirements:
Applicants shall have completed one of the following prior to employment:
i High school graduation or GED and 15 semester units at an accredited
college in specified early childhood education classes. Three of the
required units shall be in administration or staff relations and 12 units
shall include courses that cover the area of child growth and development; child, family and community; and program/curriculum and four
years of teaching experience in a licensed center or comparable group
child care program OR
i Two years of experience are required if the director has an AA degree
with a major in child development OR
i A Child Development Site Supervisor Permit or Child Development Program Director permit issued by the California Commission on Teacher
Credentialing.
The Archdiocese of San Francisco will only employ those who are legally authorized to work in
the United States for this opening. Any offer of employment is conditioned upon the successful
completion of a background investigation. The Archdiocese of San Francisco will consider for
employment qualified applicants with criminal histories. We are an Equal Opportunity Employer. Employment decisions are made without regard to race, color, religion, national or ethnic
origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, disability, protected veteran
status or other characteristics protected by law.
Send resumes to:
Rev. Tony P. LaTorre
[email protected]
Fax: 1-415-282-8962
26 CALENDAR
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
SATURDAY, APRIL 18
HANDICAPABLES MASS: The first 50
years of this good work continues to
be celebrated throughout 2015 with
monthly Mass and lunch at noon in
lower halls of St. Mary’s Cathedral,
Gough Street at Geary Boulevard,
San Francisco, Gough Street entrance. All disabled people and their
caregivers are invited. Volunteers
are always welcome to assist in this
cherished tradition. Joanne Borodin,
(415) 239-4865.
PORZIUNCOLA ROSARY: Knights
of St. Francis Holy Rosary Sodality
meets Saturdays for the rosary at
2:30 p.m. in the Porziuncola Nuova,
Vallejo Street at Columbus Avenue,
San Francisco. Chaplet of Divine
Mercy is prayed at 3 p.m. All are
welcome. www.knightsofsaintfrancis.
com.
CONSOLATION HELP: Holy Cross
Cemetery, Colma, ministry of consolation training. [email protected];
(415) 681-6153. For new ministers
or those who wish a refresher; 8:30
a.m.-3 p.m. Bring lunch. Requested
donation $10.
IHM DINNER: “A Heavenly Affair,”
themes Immaculate Heart of Mary
Parish auction and dinner dance, 5:30
p.m., San Mateo Marriott Hotel, with
dinner, wine and dancing until midnight, reservations required: (650) 5936157 and ask for Gail. Reserve online
auction.ihmbelmont.org. Proceeds
benefit parish and school.
FASHION SHOW: “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” fashion show and lunch benefit-
SATURDAY, APRIL 25
FIESTA: Mater Dolorosa Parish,
307 Willow at
Miller, South
San Francisco,
commemorates the feast
of Our Lady
of Manaoag,
noon rosary,
Mass at 1 p.m.
Father Mark
followed by
Ruburiano
procession
and reception. Father Mark Ruburiano,
pastor, St. Isabella Parish, San
Rafael, principal celebrant and
homilist. OL Manaoag statues
will be blessed. (650) 9528238.
ing St. Stephen School, San Francisco,
Olympic Club, Lakeside. Tina Gullotta,
[email protected]
REUNION: St. Stephen School class of
‘65, Mass, St. Stephen Church, 4:30
p.m., tours and refreshments until 6:15
p.m., dinner 6:30 p.m., Gold Mirror
Restaurant, 18th Avenue and Taraval,
San Francisco. Katherine Moser, [email protected], (415)
664-8331; Steve Laveroni, [email protected]
siprep.org.
YOUTH FOOD FAST: Archdiocesan
Food Fast hosted by the Office
of Religious Education and Youth
Ministry and Catholic Relief Services,
10 a.m.-6 p.m., St. Peter Church,
Pacifica. The event is free, although
there is a suggested donation of $10
for CRS. The day will end with Mass
at 5 p.m. and families and community
members are invited. Registration for
the Food Fast is available at www.
sforeym.org/node/303 along with the
permission form that can be downloaded.
SUNDAY, APRIL 19
‘TIME FOR TEA’: St. Robert Parish,
345 Oak Ave., San Bruno, 1:30-4 p.m.
$ 20 adults, children 10 and under $ 8.
Reservations required. (650) 589-2800
by April 13.
REUNION: St John Ursuline Alumnae Luncheon and Golden Diploma
Presentation honoring 1965 graduates,
9:30 a.m. Mass, St John Evangelist
Church, San Francisco followed by a
luncheon at the Irish Cultural Center, 45th Avenue at Sloat Boulevard,
San Francisco. (415) 661-2700. 1965
graduates contact Margie Van Dyke
Silva, [email protected]
MONDAY, APRIL 20
GRIEF SUPPORT: St. Pius Grief Ministry is offering a facilitated nine-week
support group session through April
20, 7 p.m., St. Pius Parish Center, 1100
Woodside Road at Valota, Redwood
City. If you are in the early stages
of your loss, or have not previously
attended a grief support group, this
program may benefit you. (650) 3610655; [email protected] Walk-ins
are welcome.
HEALING: Mindfulness meditation,
April 22, July 15, Oct. 21, 10 a.m.,
Dominican Sisters of MSJ Center for
Education and Spirituality at motherhouse 43326 Mission Blvd. entrance
on Mission Tierra Place, Fremont.
Each session includes a spiritual focus
and practice. Dominican Sister Joan
Prohaska, facilitator. Freewill offering
accepted. www.msjdominicans.org;
(510) 933-6335.
CHEF LUNCHEON: Mission Dolores
Academy Top Chefs Benefit Luncheon,
Four Seasons Hotel, San Francisco
featuring Charles Phan of The Slanted
Door restaurant. Proceeds benefit the
school. Tickets $175 with tables starting at $3,500. mdasf.org/topchefs; [email protected]; (415) 638-6212.
PAINTING
K. Plunkett
Construction
All Purpose
Cell (415) 517-5977
Grant (650) 757-1946
Lic# 745514
NOT A LICENSED CONTRACTOR
Home Remodels
Kitchens & Bath
Decks & Stairs
415.305.9447
CAHALAN CONSTRUCTION
Painting • Carpentry • Tile
Siding • Stucco • Dryrot
Additions • Remodels • Repairs Lic#582766
FENCES & DECKS
415.279.1266
[email protected]
Lic. #742961
John Spillane
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22
CONSTRUCTION
Quality interior and exterior painting,
demolition , fence (repairs), roof repairs,
cutter (cleaning and repairs), landscaping,
gardening, hauling, moving, welding
• Retaining Walls • Stairs • Gates
• Dry Rot • Senior & Parishioner Discounts
CONSECRATED LIFE: “Women and
Spirit,” a film chronicling women
religious and their work in the United
States, 7 p.m., Immaculate Heart of
Mary Parish Center, 1040 Alameda
de las Pulgas at Ralston Avenue,
Belmont. A panel of women religious
will speak about the sisters work in
the Archdiocese of San Francisco
and around the world. The event is
sponsored by the Immaculate Heart
of Mary Parish, Belmont; the Knights
of Columbus, San Mateo Council, and
the San Mateo Serra Club. All are invited. For more information, call Notre
Dame Sister Roseanne Murphy, Notre
Dame de Namur University, (650)5083551.
TO ADVERTISE IN CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
VISIT www.catholic-sf.org | CALL (415) 614-5642
EMAIL [email protected]
HOME SERVICES
HANDYMAN
TUESDAY, APRIL 21
650.291.4303
O’DONOGHUE CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen/Bath Remodel
Dry Rot Repair • Decks /Stairs
Plumbing Repair/Replacement
Call: 650.580.2769
Lic. # 505353B-C36
ELECTRICAL
ALL ELECTRIC SERVICE
ROOFING
650.322.9288
Service Changes
Solar Installation
Lighting/Power
Fire Alarm/Data
Green Energy
Fully licensed • State Certified • Locally
Trained • Experienced • On Call 24/7
COMMERCIAL
CONSTRUCTION
CA License #965268
• Design - Build
• Retail - Fixtures
• Industrial
• Service/Maintenance
• Casework Installation
Serving Marin, San Francisco
& San Mateo Counties
Discount
to CSF
Readers
415.368.8589
Lic.#942181
[email protected]
M.K. Painting
Interior-Exterior
Residential – Commercial
Insured/Bonded – Free Estimates
License# 974682
Tel: (650) 630-1835
S.O.S.
PAINTING CO.
Interior-Exterior • wallpaper • hanging & removal
Lic # 526818 • Senior Discount
John V. Rissanen
Cell: (916) 517-7952
Office: (916) 408-2102
Fax: (916) 408-2086
[email protected]
2190 Mt. Errigal Lane
Lincoln, CA 95648
DINING
(415) 786-0121 • (650) 871-9227
IRISH Eoin
PAINTING
Lehane
Italian American Social
Club of San Francisco
Lunch & Dinner, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday
Weddings, Banquets, Special Occasions
25 RUSSIA AVENUE, SAN FRANCISCO
www.iasf.com
415-585-8059
415-269-0446 • 650-738-9295
www.sospainting.net
F REE E STIMATES
Bill Hefferon Painting
Bonded & Insured
CA License 819191
Cell 415-710-0584
[email protected]
Office 415-731-8065
10% Discount to Seniors & Parishioners
Serving the
Residential Bay
Area for
Commercial over 30 Years
PLUMBING
HOLLAND
Plumbing Works San Francisco
ALL PLUMBING WORK
PAT HOLLAND
CA LIC #817607
BONDED & INSURED
415-205-1235
CALENDAR 27
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
FRIDAY, APRIL 24
DIVINE MERCY: North American Congress, April 24-26, Cathedral of Christ
the Light, Oakland, with theme of “Divine
Mercy – Fullness of the Faith.” Oakland
Bishop Michael Barber is among the presenters with EWTN’s Jesse Romero and
others. www.mercycongress.org; (925)
432-6404; (413) 298-1131.
EVENING PRAYER: Sisters of Mercy
invite women to four Fridays of evening
prayer and conversations about vocation, 7:30 p.m., Mercy Center, 2300 Adeline Drive, Burlingame, Mercy Chapel:
April 24, “Walking Joyfully in the Spirit”.
RSVP to Mercy Sister Jean Evans, (650)
373-4508; [email protected]
EWTN HOST SPEAKS: “An
Evening with
Raymond
Arroyo,” the
long-of-EWTN
host speaks on
people he considers signs of
hope including
St. Padre Pio,
Raymond Arroyo EWTN founder
Mother Angelica, St. John Paul II, 7 p.m.,
Star of the Sea Church, 4420
Geary Blvd. at Eighth Avenue,
San Francisco. Admission is
free. (415) 751-0450.
SATURDAY, APRIL 25
MARRIAGE ENCOUNTER: Restore,
rekindle, renew one-day Marriage
Encounter, Saturday’s through June 6,
Nativity Parish, Menlo Park, 7-9:30 p.m.
(650) 366-7093 for more information.
REUNION: St. Matthew all-school reunion, 910 S. El Camino Real, San Mateo, 5 p.m. Mass, followed by dinner,
and memories in school auditorium,
tickets $20 can be purchased on line at
www.stmatthewcath.org; [email protected]
stmatthewcath.org. (650) 343-1373,
ext. 139.
YOUNG ADULTS: “Living Life at the
Speed of Love,” 9:15 a.m.-3:30 p.m.,
Dominican Sisters of Mission San Jose
motherhouse, 43326 Mission Blvd.
with entrance on Mission Tierra Place,
Fremont. Suggested donations $15,
lunch included. Register online at www.
msjdominicans.org; (510) 933-6335.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29
INTERFAITH: Author Steven Nightengale reads from his new book “Grana-
THURSDAY, APRIL 30
SUNDAY, MAY 3
SATURDAY, MAY 9
MEMORIAL MASS: The life of
Blessed Alvaro
del Portillo,
late prelate of
Opus Dei, will
be commemorated May 9
with Mass
at St. Mary’s
Cathedral,
Blessed Alvaro
Gough Street
del Portillo
at Geary Boulevard, San
Francisco, 11 a.m. Blessed
Alvaro del Portillo was beatified on Sept. 27, 2014. All are
invited. Msgr. James Kelly of
Opus Dei’s Menlough Study
Center can be reached at
(650) 327-1675.
da – a Pomegranate in the Hand of
God,” 7:30 p.m., Presidio Chapel, 130
Fisher Loop, San Francisco. [email protected]
theregenerationproject.org; www.sfinterfaithcouncil.org/granada-interfaithreflection-and-discussion.
‘EAT YOUR HEART OUT’: Society
of St. Vincent de Paul of San Mateo
County signature fundraising event,
“Eat Your Heart Out” dinner at Viognier Restaurant, Draeger’s Market,
San Mateo. This year’s Fund-A-Need
will provide compassionate care and
support for THE homeless through
SVdP’s Homeless Help Centers. Jodie
Penner, director of development, (650)
373-0622, [email protected]; www.
svdpsm.org.
HOMELESSNESS: “Responding to
Homelessness on Our Doorsteps,”
training, 9 a.m.-noon. Free admission, St. Mary’s Cathedral, Gough
Street at Geary Boulevard, San
Francisco. Cynthia Zamboukos, (415)
474-1321; [email protected] Register at http://conta.
cc/1P3G60r.
FRIDAY, MAY 1
MASS AND TALK: Catholic Marin
Breakfast Club beginning with Mass
at 7 a.m. at St. Sebastian Church, Sir
Francis Drake Boulevard and Bon Air
Road, Greenbrae followed by breakfast and talk from University of San
Francisco president Jesuit Father Paul
Fitzgerald. Members breakfast $8,
visitors $10. (415) 461-0704, 9 a.m.-4
p.m.; [email protected]
SATURDAY, MAY 2
MERCY SF REUNION: Mercy High
School, San Francisco, all classes, 4-7
p.m. in the school’s McAuley Pavilion
with wine and hors d’oeuvres reception; $35 per person. www.mercyhs.
org/. Audrey Magnusen, (415) 3377218; [email protected]
FOOD FAIR: Food and fellowship at
the St. Ignatius College Preparatory
THE PROFESSIONALS
HEALTH CARE AGENCY
SUPPLE SENIOR CARE
CLOCK SALES AND REPAIR
415-573-5141
or 650-993-8036
*Irish owned
& operated
*Serving from San Francisco to North San Mateo
HOME HEALTH CARE
Unhealed wounds can hold you back - even
if they are not the “logical” cause of your problems
today. You can be the person God intended.
1450 Pine Street
Mon - Fri: 10am - 6pm
San Francisco, CA 94109 Sat: 1pm - 6pm
Tel: (415) 346-0228 Sun: By Appointment
Inner Child Healing Offers a
deep spiritual and psychological approach
to counseling:
REAL ESTATE
Real Estate
San Mateo
650.347.6903
San Francisco
415.759.0520
Marin
415.721.7380
www.irishhelpathome.com
‘JOY OF GOSPEL’: Pray, read and
discuss Pope Francis’ teaching during
presentations on Pope Francis’ new
document, 7 p.m., Dominican Sisters
of MSJ Motherhouse 43326 Mission
Blvd. entrance on Mission Tierra Place,
Fremont; Dominican Sisters Ingrid
Clemmensen and Marcia Krause facilitate; www.msjdominicans.org.
CELEBRATING MOTHERS: Epiphany
Center luncheon honoring mothers, St.
Francis Yacht Club, 700 Marina Blvd.,
San Francisco, 11:30 a.m. Hosted by
the Epiphany League, volunteer women dedicated to the center and its work
of caring for at-risk women, children
and families. www.epiphanycenter.org;
(415) 351-4055.
When Life Hurts
It Helps To Talk
• Family
• Work
• Relationships
• Depression • Anxiety • Addictions
Dr. Daniel J. Kugler
Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist
Over 25 years experience
Confidential • Compassionate • Practical
(415) 921-1619 • Insurance Accepted
1537 Franklin Street • San Francisco, CA 94109
“The Clifford Mollison Team”
Home Care Attendants • Companions • CNA’s
Hospice • Respite Care • Insured and Bonded
WEDNESDAY, MAY 6
COUNSELING
FREE ESTIMATE • HOUSE CALL COMPETITIVE
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CONTINUED SERVICE: Companions
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within local nonprofits. We are currently accepting applications for the
2015-2016 program year and will be
welcoming new participants until our
program is filled to its capacity; attend
upcoming session May 2, St Agnes
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gmail.com; (415) 375-0622; www.
ignatiancompanions.org.
TO ADVERTISE IN CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
VISIT www.catholic-sf.org | CALL (415) 614-5642
EMAIL [email protected]
Do you want to be more fulfilled
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International Food Faire, 4-8 p.m.,
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Miriam Sweeney, (415) 407-1197;
[email protected]
Born in Marin, Raised in Marin, Serving Marin.
30 years experience
Ask about our $1,000
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415.209.9036
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Tel: 415.972.9995
www.qlotussalon.com
28
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | APRIL 17, 2015
In Remembrance of the Faithful Departed Interred
In Our Catholic Cemeteries During the Month of March
HOLY CROSS
COLMA
Gregorio R. Abasolo
Peter Martin Acosta, III
Virginia Almarinez
Oliver R. Alonzo
Henry George Aragon
Reynaldo S. Bautista
Reme A. Bautista
Joseph Bendo
Luke Bennett
Babette Frances Bennett
Bruce Berning
Virginia M. Billante
Anthony F. Bitanga
Barbara Bosio
Mary Veronica Bouey
Ana Maria Brito
Robert L. Bruno
Pauline J. Brusatori
Pauline Buerger
Valeria Bulgo
Martha O. Burgos
Fernando Calderon
Richard Camacho
Mary E. Carberry
James F. Carrig
Patrick J. Casserly, Sr.
Estella Castillo
Pauline Chetcuti
Joseph Chetcuti
Marian Elizabeth Christie
Bessie R. Cleope
Lauren P. Coleman
Rita J. Collins
William Nolan Cosgrove
Shirley Ann Cottonham
Richard Cottonham
Mary Jean Crawford
Josephine Delfino Crewse
Daniel P. Cronin
Dorothy E. Dati
Charles M. del Valle, Jr.
Marcelina B. DePeralta
John Francis Devine
James P. Diestel, Jr., M.D.
Joan Diffley
Leo Dinneen
Antoinette K. Dixon
Teresa J. Dorcich
Connie Jo Edie-Weidlinger
Michael J. Edwards
Jean P. Feger
Alfonso Felix, Jr.
Seana Maire Gadbois
William H. Gainey
Priscilla Galassi
Arsenio J. Gemenes, Jr.
Albina Gianni
Alice Gicovate
Josefina V. Gutierrez
James Watson Handley, Sr.
Marie Sophia Harrington
William J. Harvey, Jr.
Margaret H. Healy
Patricia K. Holsten
William Hooper
Rose Marie Horgan
Emilio Javier Icabalceta, Jr.
Katazyna Jaciw
Louis P. Jimenez
Lorraine Frances Koel
Jerome E. Kolodzik
Barbara M. Lanthier
Juliette Leland
Ramon Lobregat
Tomas D. Lopez
Wesley R. Lowery
James Francis Lyden
Ricarte Madrid
Marvin S. Mamaradlo
Margaret Foisset Mangonon
Lucinda R. Mares
James F. Marino
Angela Patricia Martin
Jean McGuire
Raul Medina
Florence N. Meisel
Mario E. Melhado
Kathleen Pineda Montoya
William A. Morazan
Graciela R. Moreci
Neal S. Morehouse
Thomas John Mullaney
Elpidio Munar
Felisa F. Mutas
“Don” Jesus Navarro
Robert P. Navarro
Nancy G. Newell
Ignacio B. Nolasco
Thomas J. O’Rourke
Dolores Ortega
Rubina R. Ortiz
Emilio A. Padua
Luis Oliverio Palacios, Jr.
Hilda Ruth Pegueros
Edward “Teddy” Plousha
Marie C. Podesta
Vera Pogosian
Rose Marie Popescu
Gary Potter
Virginia Proano
Emmet John Purcell
Pilar S. Quiestas
Ines M. Ragghianti
Roy Jack Repak
Lucia M. Reyes
Lillian Robinson
Joseph F. Rodondi
Elizabeth Rodrigues
Harvey J. Rose
Adilia C. Ruiz
Aurora M. Sauceda
Laura Schnapp
Helen So
Aida Stahmer
Robert J. Stark
Dolores Cortez Stead
Eleanor M. Stephens
Gwendolyn King Sutton
Marilyn A. Sutton
Catherine Sweeney
Ricardo P. Tanega
Robert R. Vaccarezza
OUR LADY
OF THE PILLAR
June E. Torre
MT. OLIVET,
SAN RAFAEL
Joseph Beckner, Sr.
Dorothy De Marco
Walter J. Filippi
John “Jack” Jeffry
Julia Koshko
Italo E. Roncaglia
James F. “Jimmy” Smith
HOLY CROSS
MENLO PARK
Anne Morin Brown
Jodi Dawson Freeman
Tom Freeman, Sr.
Marcelle C. Galliant
Douglas Michael McDonnell “Bug”
Angel Axel Trejo Mendez
Sueinga Tau
Juan Valdez
Joseph E. Venosa
HOLY CROSS CATHOLIC CEMETERY, COLMA
FIRST SATURDAY MASS – Saturday, May 2, 2015
All Saints Chapel – 11:00 am
Rev. Augusto E. Villote, Celebrant – Pastor Our Lady of Perpetual Church
MEMORIAL DAY MASS – Monday, May 25, 2015
Holy Cross Mausoleum Chapel – 11 am
Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery
Santa Cruz Ave. @Avy Ave., Menlo Park, CA
650-323-6375
Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery
1500 Mission Road, Colma, CA
650-756-2060
Mt. Olivet Catholic Cemetery
270 Los Ranchos Road, San Rafael, CA
415-479-9020
Tomales Catholic Cemetery
1400 Dillon Beach Road, Tomales, CA
415-479-9021
St. Anthony Cemetery
Stage Road, Pescadero, CA
650-712-1675
Our Lady of the Pillar Cemetery
Miramontes St., Half Moon Bay, CA
650-712-1679
A Tradition of Faith Throughout Our Lives.