Staff, steps or stuff: What will SCSD1 fund?

A1 Front 0403.qxp_A Section Template 4/3/15 10:47 AM Page 1
FRIDAY
April 3, 2015
129th Year, No. 268
Serving Sheridan County,
Wyoming
Independent and locally
owned since 1887
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
75 Cents
Press
THE SHERIDAN
ON THE WEB: www.thesheridanpress.com
PHOTOS, VIDEO AND BREAKING
NEWS UPDATES
Broncs top Gillette
soccer 3-0.
Sports, B1
Staff, steps or stuff: What will SCSD1 fund?
BY ALISA BRANTZ
[email protected]
RANCHESTER — With an external cost
adjustment in hand and preliminary budgets for the 2015-16 school year
estimated, officials at Sheridan
County School District 1 began
early discussions Thursday
afternoon on how to spend the
money coming in.
The district has been the site
of much turmoil as of late as
Smith
financial difficulties led to two
years of no raises for teachers and cutbacks in overall staff.
Following the approval of the ECA by the
Wyoming Legislature, district administrators solicited wish lists from each school’s
administrator for what they need most
next year. The requests were consistent:
more staff.
“That is something we’ve heard loud and
clear: they’re being overworked because
we’ve taken staff away,” SCSD1 business
manager Jeremy Smith said.
Specific requests included a full-time
math interventionist, a media secretary for
Big Horn Middle School and High School
and special education support.
However, throughout recent school board
and other meetings, another request has
been trumpeted: the staff want raises.
Teachers in the district are on a salary
schedule with horizontal movements in
pay possible through furthering their education and vertical movements through
annual raises. The movements through the
schedule are called “steps” and members of
the board of trustees expressed concerns
during the work session Thursday that if
the staff doesn’t get a step, nothing else
will matter.
Though the district will not experience
the overall cuts and budgetary restraints
they feared had an ECA not been passed, a
reduction in their Regional Cost
Adjustment has left them with an overall
budget that will not allow for all requests
and desires to be funded.
Other high-cost items under review are
the district’s technology needs and how
staff insurance and retirement plans are
funded.
SEE FUND, PAGE 3
ACLU closing
Wyoming
office
because of
finances
CHEYENNE (AP) — The
American Civil Liberties
Union said it will close its
Wyoming office and most
of its employees in the
state will be laid off
because of funding issues.
‘I think Wyoming will
be the only state without
an office.’
Linda Burt
ACLU Wyoming executive director
ACLU staff members
learned Monday that the
office in Cheyenne will
close April 10, said Linda
Burt, executive director of
ACLU of Wyoming.
Three people will be laid
off and another staff member who works on gay and
transgender rights issues
under a grant will stay
with the organization,
although it’s unclear
where she will work, Burt
said.
“I think Wyoming will be
the only state without an
office,” she said. “I’m not
aware of any other cuts in
offices.”
The Wyoming office had
a $360,000 budget for the
fiscal year that ended in
March.
It was not able to raise
the money needed to be
self-sustaining and needed
help from the national
office in New York, said
Marsha Zeesman, deputy
communications director
for the national ACLU.
Burt told the Casper StarTribune that it’s difficult
to support an organization
such as the ACLU in a
small state like Wyoming.
Zeesman said in a statement that the ACLU will
still have a presence in the
state with restructured
staffing.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Under pressure
Sheridan freshman Grace Gustafson practices during the music festival Thursday at Sheridan High School. Eighty-five students from elementary through high school performed
individually before adjudicators for scoring and critique.
County P&Z OKs
N. Main quarry
permit
BY TRAVIS PEARSON
[email protected]
SHERIDAN — A local quarry
could provide construction materials for the future north Sheridan
interchange and combined state
projects after the County Planning
and Zoning Commission approved
an application Thursday evening.
Applicant John E. Rice and Sons,
Inc., doing business as The
Wrench Ranch, received the goahead from the Commission to use
the 40-acre, agricultural-zoned
property and remove all available
rock, sand and gravel to make
crushed base and hot plant mix for
the Wyoming Department of
Transportation jobs.
SEE QUARRY, PAGE 8
Longtime theater owner earns national recognition
BY MIKE DUNN
[email protected]
SHERIDAN — Bill Campbell grew up in front of the silver screen.
He’s a second-generation theater owner, working most of his life
in Sheridan’s only movie theater.
There may not be anyone who knows the theater industry better
than he does.
Later this month, Campbell will be honored with the highest
award in his industry. The National Association of Theatre Owners
has bestowed upon him the prestigious Marquee Award for his dedication in helping independently-owned theaters adjust to the
changing technologies of the movie industry.
SEE AWARD, PAGE 8
Bill Campbell will be honored by the National Association of Theatre
Owners with the Marquee Award at an event later this month.
SEE OFFICE, PAGE 2
MIKE DUNN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Scan with your
smartphone for
latest weather,
news and sports
The Sheridan Press
144 Grinnell Ave. Sheridan, WY 82801
307.672.2431
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
Today’s edition is published for:
Terry Johnson
of Sheridan
OPINION
PEOPLE
PAGE SIX
ALMANAC
4
5
6
7
SPORTS
COMICS
CLASSIFIEDS
PUBLIC NOTICES
B1
B4
B5
B7
A2 Open 0403.qxp_A Section Template 4/3/15 10:28 AM Page 1
A2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Pace of US hiring
weakens with just 126K
jobs added in March
WASHINGTON (AP) — The weakening U.S. economy
spilled into the job market in March as employers
added only 126,000 jobs — the fewest since December
2013 — snapping a streak of 12 straight months of
gains above 200,000.
The Labor Department said Friday that the unemployment rate remained at 5.5 percent.
The March jobs report raised uncertainties about the
world’s largest economy, which for months has been
the envy of other industrialized nations for its steadily
robust hiring and growth. Employers now appear wary
about the economy, especially as a strong dollar has
slowed U.S. exports, home sales have sputtered and
cheaper gasoline has yet to unleash more consumer
spending.
Some of the weakness may prove temporary: An
unseasonably cold March followed a brutal winter that
slowed key sectors of the economy.
Last month’s subpar job growth could make the
Federal Reserve less likely to start raising interest
rates from record lows in June, as some have been
anticipating. The Fed may decide that the economy still
needs the benefit of low borrowing costs to generate
healthy growth.
www.thesheridanpress.com
FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2015
Obama’s quest for Iran deal set to collide with Capitol Hill
WASHINGTON (AP) — After securing a surprisingly broad and detailed
framework for a nuclear agreement
with Iran, President Barack Obama
must now subject his signature foreign policy pursuit to the gauntlet of
partisan American politics.
A blueprint finalized Thursday
after marathon negotiations in
Switzerland did little to ease the
standoff between Obama and some
lawmakers over Congress’ role in a
final accord. The president has
vowed to veto legislation giving
Congress the ability to approve or
reject a deal, and he made a fresh
appeal for lawmakers to give the U.S.
and its international partners space
to hammer out a comprehensive
agreement ahead of a June 30 deadline.
“The issues at stake here are bigger
than politics,” Obama said. “These
are matters of war and peace.”
But Republican leaders reaffirmed
their intent to vote on legislation giving Congress the last word.
Tennessee Republican Sen. Bob
Corker, chairman of the Foreign
Relations Committee, said the panel
will vote on such a measure when
lawmakers return from a spring
recess on April 14.
“The administration first should
seek the input of the American people,” Corker said.
Some Democrats have backed
Corker’s quest for a congressional
vote on an Iran deal, raising the possibility that lawmakers could override a presidential veto. New Jersey
Sen. Bob Menendez, who is stepping
down as top Democrat on the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee after
his indictment on corruption
charges, is among those who backs
congressional action.
‘The issues at stake here are
bigger than politics. These are
matters of war and peace.’
Barack Obama
U.S. President
“If diplomats can negotiate for two
years on this issue, then certainly
Congress is entitled to a review period of an agreement that will fundamentally alter our relationship with
Iran and the sanctions imposed by
Congress,” Menendez said in a statement Thursday.
For Obama, achieving a nuclear
deal with Iran would be a crowning
foreign policy achievement and a validation of his pursuit of diplomacy.
His overtures to Iran date back to his
first presidential campaign in 2008,
when he said he would be willing to
talk with Tehran’s leaders without
preconditions. As president, he has
staked enormous political capital on
the nuclear negotiations, including
secretly approving backchannel talks
with Iran largely without the knowledge of Congress and key allies.
Senior aides said Thursday that
Obama has devoted more time to
Iran in recent weeks than any other
foreign policy issue, a striking
acknowledgment given the upheaval
in Yemen and U.S. military engagement in Iraq and Syria.
With Congress in the midst of a
two-week recess, the Obama administration has time to wage a campaign
to get lawmakers to hold off on legislative action. The president called
congressional leaders Thursday
afternoon and administration officials planned extensive briefings for
lawmakers on the details of the
framework.
Senior administration officials said
Obama is open to discussions about
how Congress can play an oversight
role, though they reiterated Obama’s
opposition to any legislative action
occurring while negotiators try to
hammer out a final agreement ahead
of a June 30 deadline. Officials also
did not specify what kind of oversight role they envisioned for lawmakers.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Lessons from a pro
University of Wyoming viola professor James Przygocki coaches Sheridan High School junior Anastasia Giljum on the cello during the music festival Thursday at Sheridan High School.
OFFICE: Legal work consisted primarily of advocacy
FROM 1
A Wyoming-based ACLU staff member will continue
ongoing advocacy work, supported by staff at the national
headquarters, she said.
Zeesman did not say whether people from the national
headquarters would lobby for issues before the Wyoming
Legislature, as the staff in Wyoming did.
Burt said she’s proud of the work of the Wyoming ACLU,
particularly in juvenile justice reform and helping prisoners practice their religion and obtain medical treatment.
“We were also some of the first people in the state to
work on LGBT rights,” she said.
The Wyoming ACLU didn’t file as many splashy lawsuits
as other ACLU chapters, Burt said.
Its legal work has been mostly advocacy, answering thousands of phone calls and letters from people about civil
rights issues.
Steve Klein of the Wyoming Liberty Group, a libertarian
group, said he frequently disagreed with the Wyoming
ACLU, but he acknowledged that local staff members had
high standards, integrity and zeal for their work.
“This is a guy who allegedly works in an extreme rightwing organization saying this about an extreme left-wing
organization,” Klein said. “I think this is a big loss for
Wyoming.”
With the closing of the ACLU office, a voice will be missing from policy discussions at the state Capitol, said Rep.
Tyler Lindholm, R-Sundance.
“I personally don’t agree with them 100 percent of the
time, probably not even 50 percent of the time,” Lindholm
said. “The fact of the matter is when you’re making these
policy decisions, any type of voice, any type of testimony
is wanted and needed.”
Rep. Mary Throne, D-Cheyenne, said she got to know
ACLU positions during the six years she served on a judiciary panel.
“Like all national organizations, it had Wyoming people
there, Wyoming people speaking,” she said. “We won’t
have that Wyoming ACLU perspective anymore, particularly on issues like juvenile justice. They were really valued.”
FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
LOCAL COURT BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Richard Alford, 36,
appeared before Judge William
Edelman Thursday in 4th Judicial
District Court for a pre-trial conference, entering a not guilty plea to a
third felony the state has filed
against him.
The charges stem from an October
2014 incident in which Alford is
accused of breaking into a home and
attempting to sexually assault a
woman who was there. He was initially charged with first degree
attempted sexual assault and burglary, both felonies.
On Thursday, Sheridan County
Deputy and Prosecuting Attorney
Christopher LaRosa asked Edelman
to approve the amended charges. The
amended charges lessen the first
degree sexual assault to attempted
third degree sexual assault. The
changes also make the burglary
charge aggravated burglary and adds
a second count of aggravated burglary.
Third degree sexual assault is punishable by up to 15 years in prison, a
$10,000 fine or both.
Each of the aggravated burglary
charges carry a penalty of 5-25 years
in prison, a $50,000 fine or both.
Alford entered a not guilty plea to
the second count of aggravated burglary Thursday and had previously
pleaded not guilty to the other two
counts.
Alford’s jury trial is set for May 4-5,
though LaRosa said he thought a
third day could be needed.
“We spend over $1 million on
health insurance in this district,” Smith said. “So maybe
we relook at that and ask if that
allocation is right?”
Depending on the employee’s
selection of plan coverage,
some staff of the district pay
nothing for their health insurance.
The district also pays 100 percent of retirement plans. The
current retirement system in
place does not ask for contributions from employees but legislation stating employees are
required to make part of the
investment from their annual
salary will likely change that
structure in the future.
“If we weren’t experiencing
the 1 percent reduction in the
The board answered that the
staff has been very clear, the
step needs to come first.
“If the step is the priority,
take out the technology, take out
all the additional staff, throw
the step in there, then if we’ve
Jeremy Smith got money left after that, work
SCSD1 business manager with that toward what the secondary goals are,” trustee Mary
Schilling said.
purchases, additional staffing
Smith will generate multiple
and assumed continuation of
sample budgets for the board to
100 percent retirement coverreview, showing with each what
age.
can and can’t be funded.
“Of those three things —
The board members will
additional staffing, steps or
select the budget they feel
‘stuff,’ meaning tech and retire- should be adopted during the
ment — of those three buckets,
regular monthly board meeting
what order do you want to tack- on April 14, after which time it
le them?” Smith asked the
will be referred to the Interest
board of trustees. “I went with
Based Negotiations Committee
additional staff, then stuff, then comprised of district staff and
the step.”
one trustee for review.
‘Of those three things — additional staffing, steps or
‘stuff,’ meaning tech and retirement — of those three buckets,
what order do you want to tackle them?’
regional cost, we’d be able to do
all this and have $150,000 for a
step, roughly,” Smith said.
“That’s the travesty of the
whole thing is that we don’t get
a full ECA adjustment that
some other districts are going
to get because we had a reduction in the RCA.”
Of the $15,088,000 anticipated
budget, preliminary distributions totaling $15,075,000 incorporated additional technology
Land’s End
performs
Cellist Beth Root-Sandvoss performs during the Land’s End
Ensemble concert Thursday
evening at First Baptist Church.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Fauber trial
to be rescheduled
SHERIDAN — The May 4-5 jury
trial dates set for the case of Joseph
Fauber, 42, will likely be rescheduled
if a settlement is not reached.
Fauber’s trial is stacked behind
another trial on those days and
Judge William Edelman of 4th
Judicial District Court said he would
look for other days the trial could be
held.
Fauber has been charged with
felony child abuse and misdemeanor
endangering children.The felony
charge has a maximum penalty of
five years in prison and a $10,000
fine. The misdemeanor charge could
include up to 1 year in prison and a
$1,000 fine.
Fauber has been accused of causing burns to a child’s head with a cigarette and taping a pacifier into a
child’s mouth.
20-year-old enters into
plea agreement on fraud,
forgery charges
SHERIDAN — Jacob Kethman, 20,
entered into a plea agreement with
the state Thursday in 4th Judicial
District Court.
Kethman has been charged with
two counts of felony unlawful use of
a credit card and two counts of
felony forgery. Each of the counts
carries a potential penalty of up to
10 years in prison, a $10,000 fine or
both.
Kethman is accused of using a
credit card belonging to Mountain
View Building company to purchase
fuel. He has also been accused of
forging a signature in order to obtain
automobile parts from Napa Auto
Parts.
In conjunction with a plea agreement, Kethman changed his plea to
guilty on all four counts Thursday.
According to the plea agreement,
the state will recommend a sentence
of two to five years in prison for each
count to be served consecutively, suspended in lieu of four years of supervised probation.
Judge William Edelman is not
bound by that agreement. A sentencing hearing will be set once the presentence investigation is completed.
Woman pleads not guilty
to nine counts of felony
forgery
SHERIDAN — Destiny Pyke pleaded not guilty to nine counts of felony
forgery Thursday in 4th Judicial
District Court.
Pyke has been accused of forging
checks on an account belonging to
the Tunnel Inn. The checks allegedly
totaled more than $6,500.
Each of the nine counts carries a
penalty of up to 10 years in prison, a
$10,000 fine or both.
Judge William Edelman explained
all of the charges and noted that a
scheduling document would be drafted to include Pyke’s pretrial conference date and trial date.
A3
FUND: Debating between additional staff, raises, retirement
FROM 1
Alford enters plea on third
felony charge
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
(ISSN 1074-682X)
Published Daily except Sunday
and six legal holidays.
©COPYRIGHT 2015 by
SHERIDAN NEWSPAPERS, INC.
307-672-2431
144 Grinnell Ave.
P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
Periodicals Postage Paid in
Sheridan, Wyoming.
Publication #0493-920
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Wyoming Board
of Education
begins work on
science standards
CHEYENNE (AP) — The Wyoming Board
of Education has reopened and expanded
the task force assigned to review the state’s
K-12 science standards.
This the second attempt at reviewing the
standards. The first attempt was halted last
year when a budget footnote ended all
financial support for the state to consider
the Next Generation Science Standards.
That footnote was removed during the
recent legislative session.
Although task force members had previously been selected, board members
Wednesday decided during a teleconference
they would give the public the opportunity
to weigh in by reopening seats on the task
force.
The board is looking to put together a 36member task force made up of educators,
parents and business leaders.
Though there was work in the spring of
2014 to gauge public interest in being on the
review committee, that search is being
restarted.
“I’d personally like to start a new process
so our community and parents know
they’re being included and asked to participate,” board member Kathryn Sessions
said. “I know it’s a tight timeline, but I
think in the whole scheme of things it
would be a good thing to do.”
Along with restarting the process to
gauge public interest in being on the committee, other public outreach is being
planned, Education Department chief policy officer Brent Young said.
“We can gather from the community their
thoughts on what’s important for science
education, and we can deliver it back to the
committee, and they can see where it fits,”
he said.
The task force’s first meeting is scheduled
for June 1 in Casper.
While the board can now consider the
Next Generation Science Standards, state
law requires it to independently examine
them.
The debate over the Next Generation
Science Standards has largely centered on
how the standards treat human influence
on climate change. Fossil fuels extraction is
the main industry in the state’s economy.
1 Mo.
3 Mos.
6 Mos.
1 Yr.
City
Carrier
$12.75
$35.25
$67.50
$126.00
Motor
Route
$14.75
$41.25
$79.50
$150.00
ONLINE RATES
2 Mos.
4 Mos.
6 Mos.
1 Yr.
$15.00
$28.00
$39.00
$69.00
County
Mail
$16.25
$45.75
$88.50
$168.00
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to The Sheridan Press,
P.O. Box 2006,
Sheridan, WY 82801.
EXECUTIVE STAFF
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Mark Blumenshine
Office Manager
Production Manager
THE DOG & CAT SHELTER
Open 12 p.m. - 6 p.m. Mon, Tues, Thurs & Fri, 11:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Sat.
And visit our web site at www.dogandcatshelter.org
Gwert is one-year-old Hound mix who is partially housebroken. He is not good with cats
and gets along with some dogs. Gwert has a high energy, sweet, and lovable
personality. He does calm down after getting all his energy out and then can sleep so
calmly and peaceful. Gwert is the typical Hound dog and loves for people to hear his
wonderful baying. He will need training on leash and to not jump on people. Gwert may
get along with children, loves treats, long walks, the outdoors, toys, and getting attention
from people. He would be a great companion for active person that is willing to train him
to be the best dog he can be. So come up to meet this handsome young boy Gwert!
Frankie is a handsome medium haired orange and
white three year-old young man. This boy is a very loving and
affectionate cat. Frankie is very curious about everything going on
around him. He does well with other cats, but does not like dogs.
Frankie will do great with a family that has lots of time to spend
with him and give him loving all the time. Come up and visit
Frankie, he will greet you at the door when you walk into the
room!
Please bring your aluminum cans either to our Can Hut just inside the
Shelter gates or to our can trailer at Scottyʼs Skate Castle. Recycling
proceeds are used to care for the animals. Thanks for your support.
This ad courtesy of:
BIG HORN BEVERAGE
Remember – if your pet
is missing, call us first
674-7694
84 EAST RIDGE ROAD
Sheridan, Wyoming
A4
OPINION
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Opening Day!
Mariners & Dodgers
T
ip of the Hat!
Dana Townsend is the successful moverand-shaker behind the recent “Bottoms Up
Bash” annually. It’s a fundraiser for colon
cancer awareness; she is a proud survivor,
four years now.
More than 160 people came to the county
fairgrounds, danced to “Narrow Gauge” out
of Denver, and had a good evening out for a
good cause.
FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2015
LETTER |
Parenting, treatment
essential in remedies
Re: Pot access in Colorado
Because of our proximity to
Colorado, Wyoming residents
presently have a heightened
awareness as to the pros and
cons of legalizing marijuana.
As with any substance, there
are many concerns regarding
the potential abuse of marijuana, regardless of whether
it is legal, decriminalized or
otherwise. But it is imperative
we don’t lose sight of substances that have historically
inflicted the greatest costs to
society.
For the foreseeable future,
alcohol and tobacco will continue to cause significantly
more problems than all other
substances combined in terms
of disease, death, addiction,
accidents, crime, violence and
lost productivity.
Methamphetamine use is
alive and well in our state,
continuing to ruin countless
lives and families. Much of
the public has become desensitized to its presence, especially
in contrast to the media’s fascination and interest 15 to 20
years ago.
Doctors have made highly
potent and addictive opiatebased pain meds a common
item in many people’s medicine cabinets, substances with
their own novel and unique
set of problems. And though
doctors may be culpable, the
consumers demanding them
are equally so.
Fortunately, the medical
••••••
Fearless prediction: It’s
the Mariners and the
Dodgers in the 2015 World
Series.
PUBLISHER’S
NOTEBOOK
|
••••••
Recommended reading…
…
Norman Lear’s memoir,
Stephen Woody
“Even This I Get to
Experience,” is an engaging accounting of
his successes and failures — most notably
his television show “All in the Family” and
its spinoffs — and of his love of country. He
fought a war to champion gender equality,
gay rights, First Amendment freedoms to
advance progress in the American home. En
route, he was poor, he was rich, he was
broke; he was rich again. Multiple marriages, divorces, children. He always considered himself a writer, then a director and a
producer. He’s produced Frank Sinatra and
Chris Rock and much in between. He’s a bigtime liberal and financier of progressive
causes. He doesn’t hold much back in this
book.
During WWII, he was the radio man and
top turret gunner on B-24s flying dangerous
bombing runs over Germany, protected by
the Tuskegee Airmen fighter pilots. The last
third of the book is a bit overwritten, too
much with the lifestyles-of-the-rich-andfamous mien, but it’s a good read altogether.
His fights with CBS’s “program practices”
over race, language and presentation during
his heyday as a TV producer are rich; quaint
in comparison of what’s on TV these days.
One of Lear’s mostly-overlooked gems of a
movie is “Cold Turkey” where a small, destitute town in Iowa gives up smoking in order
to land an Air Force base. The story is a
clever collision of morality, prejudice, media,
politics and a changing society. It’s from 1970.
It’s available at our local bookstore,
Sheridan Stationery, Books and Gallery
right in the middle of our Main Street.
•••••
Opening Day balls and strikes:
• For the first time, the average baseball
player’s salary will top $4 million per season;
$4.25 million projects The Associated Press.
Time was, you could get a middling infield
for that. (Or a whole franchise. The Yankees
once sold for $18,000.)
• Sports Illustrated has picked Cleveland to
win the whole enchilada come October. The
last time SI predicted the Indians, they lost
101 games. In 1987.
• Memo to the Colorado Rockies: Free Troy
Tulowitski.
OPENING DAY FOR :
• Bill Rohrbaugh’s Dodgers
• Vera Cole’s Indians
• Dave Alden’s Rockies
• Grover Overton’s Tigers
• Maggie Ashley’s Braves
• Jerry Iekel’s Red Sox
• Jim Wilson’s Cincinnati Reds
• Mary Dowling’s New York Yankees
• Dave Loeske’s Texas Rangers
• Dr. Joseph Katschke’s New York
Yankees
• Joe Wright’s Red Sox
••••••
Happy Easter, everyone!
THE SHERIDAN
Press
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Office Manager
Mark
Blumenshine
Production
Manager
Daniel Lindly
Sheridan
A
For John Bolton, war is the answer
fter the horrors of the Iraq War,
some former Bush administration
officials pursued healing activities.
Donald Rumsfeld set up a foundation, and White House chief of staff Josh
Bolten has done philanthropic work overseas. Iraq viceroy Jerry Bremer took up
painting, as did his old boss, George W.
Bush.
But John Bolton's avocation is exactly
what his vocation was: He makes war.
The former State Department official,
U.N. ambassador and
champion of the Iraq
War is exceptionally
good at his hobby. At
the moment, the
Obama administration
is trying to nail down a
nuclear agreement
with Iran, and hawks
in Congress are pushDANA
ing instead for tougher
MILBANK
sanctions. But Bolton,
|
now at the conservative
American Enterprise
Institute, is leading the
charge for a third alternative: immediate
bombing.
For the mustachioed man of war, force
is the option of first resort. The military
option isn't just on the table — it's the
only thing on the menu.
"The inescapable conclusion is that
Iran will not negotiate away its nuclear
program," Bolton wrote last week in a
New York Times op-ed. "Nor will sanctions block its building a broad and deep
weapons infrastructure. The inconvenient truth is that only military action"
like Israel's previous strikes on reactors
in Iraq and Syria "can accomplish what
is required."
He suggested that "the United States
could do a thorough job of destruction,
but Israel alone can do what's necessary."
DROP US A LINE |
The Sheridan Press welcomes letters to
the editor. The decision to print any submission is completely at the discretion of
the managing editor and publisher.
Letters must be signed and include an
address and telephone number – which
will not be published – for verification
purposes. Unsigned letters will not be
published, nor form letters, or letters that
we deem libelous, obscene or in bad taste.
Email delivery of letters into the Press
works best and have the best chance of
being published.
establishment is better
understanding the inherent
risks associated with viable
pain management. Control
of those controlled substances is improving. A logical, but perhaps unanticipated, consequence of
greater restriction to pain
meds is the rise in availability and use of heroin. That
product is also in Wyoming
and relatively affordable.
Residents of Wyoming
will hopefully continue to
value the ongoing need for
accessible and affordable
treatment options for those
suffering from substance
abuse and dependency. Our
lawmakers will certainly
have future opportunities to
support appropriate legislation and policy regarding
this critical issue.
Finally, it should be noted
that parents have the greatest opportunity and responsibility to prevent, or at
least minimize, the myriad
problems associated with
substance use.
To assume “Everyone is
doing it,” “It’s a normal
rite-of-passage,” or the
always inane “I’m OK with
them using in my house
because that way I know
they’ll be safe,” only teaches our kids how to behave
irresponsibly, while increasing their risk of addiction
to tobacco, alcohol and any
other number of licit and
illicit drugs.
That could buy three to five years to
work on "regime change in Tehran."
Bombs and regime change? It sounds
so 2003. But there's something refreshing
and honest about Bolton's assessment of
the situation. Even if one doesn't share
his skepticism that a diplomatic solution
in Iran is possible, he is almost certainly
correct that the alternative to a negotiated settlement is not stronger sanctions
— it's war.
On Wednesday, I went over to AEI to
hear Bolton expand on his views at a
forum asking "Is Iran the new North
Korea?" The answer, from Bolton's perspective, was obvious: Iran should be the
next Iraq — a war Bolton evidently is
still fighting.
"Now, what about the case of Iraq?"
Bolton asked rhetorically after discussing North Korea. "The sanctions
have been imposed in light of Security
Council decisions by the European
Union and others ... "
Fellow panelist George Perkovich of
the Carnegie Endowment for
International Peace interrupted Bolton.
"You mean Iran," he said. "You said
Iraq."
"Thank you. Appreciate it," Bolton
responded. "In the case of Iran ..."
Other than Perkovich, the other panelists, AEI's Nicholas Eberstadt and
Michael Rubin, were as dismissive as
Bolton was of the Obama administration's negotiations with Tehran.
Eberstadt, borrowing some imagery
from last week's Germanwings crash,
said Obama was trying to "lock the
Congress out of the cockpit in the negotiations that are ongoing now."
But Bolton, his trademark bushy mustache now white, had no use for that conservative complaint, pointing out that at
least 90 percent of international agreements since World War II have not been
subject to Senate ratification. "I don't
think it's so important that the Senate
actually gets a shot at this," he said. "I
think in many respects it's a diversion
from where I think [attention] should be,
which is what a wretched deal this is."
Also wretched, he argued, was the call
in Congress for new sanctions. "Many
people who oppose the Obama administration's negotiations with the ayatollahs
over the nuclear weapons issue have said
that economic sanctions can solve the
problem of a nuclear Iran. This is fundamentally false," he said.
That leaves one violent alternative — a
conclusion Bolton's AEI colleague Rubin
didn't share. Rubin said it would just
delay Iran's nuclear ambitions. "Without
having a policy in place to take advantage of that delay, it's an irresponsible
use of the U.S. military to kick the can
down the road," he said.
During the question time, I noted their
different views on bombing, and Bolton
interrupted. "So you can write a story
about disagreement at AEI — congratulations," he retorted, before letting me
finish.
"What is the solution — if negotiations
don't work and sanctions don't work and
maybe even military power doesn't work
— other than hide under our desks?" I
asked.
Rubin gave a thoughtful answer about
a comprehensive effort to undermine the
Iranian regime. Bolton didn't answer —
and when the session ended, he bolted
from the room, two steps ahead of a pursuing camera crew.
It probably didn't matter what the
question was. For Bolton, war is the
answer.
DANA MILBANK is a political reporter for The Washington Post and
has authored two books on national political campaigns and the
national political parties.
IN WASHINGTON |
Letters should not exceed 400 words. The
best-read letters are those that stay on a
single topic and are brief.
Letters can be edited for length, taste,
clarity. We reserve the right to limit frequent letter writers.
Write: Letters to the Editor
The Sheridan Press
P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyo. 82801
Email: [email protected]
President Barack Obama Rep. Cynthia Lummis
The White
1004
House
Longworth
1600
HOB
Pennsylvania
Washington,
Ave.
DC 20515
Washington,
DC 20500
Phone: 202-225-2311
Phone: 202-456-1111
Toll free: 888-879-3599
Fax: 202-456-1414
Fax: 202-225-3057
Sen. Mike Enzi
Sen. John Barrasso
Senate
307 Dirksen
Russell
Senate
Building 379A
Office Building
Washington,
Washington,
DC 20510
DC 20510
Phone: 202-224-3424
Toll free: 888-250-1879
Fax: 202-228-0359
Phone: 202-224-6441
Fax: 202-224-1724
The 1st Amendment: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the
freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.
A5 People 0403.qxp_A Section Template 4/3/15 10:25 AM Page 1
PEOPLE
FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
NEW FACES |
Thomas Cang Steger
Thomas Cang Steger was born
March 31, 2015, at Sheridan Memorial
Hospital.
He weighed 7 pounds, 13 ounces.
He was welcomed by parents
Joseph and Natalie Steger of
Sheridan.
His grandparents are Thomas and
Linda Steger of Big Horn, grandfather Cang Tran of Springfield,
Virginia, and grandmother Minh Dao
of Clifton, Virginia.
Scarlet Lorain Jean Fort
Scarlet Lorain Jean Fort was born
March 26, 2015, at Sheridan Memorial
Hospital.
She weighed 7 pounds.
She was welcomed by parents Chris
and Megan Fort of Sheridan.
Her siblings are sisters Lillian and
Paisley.
Her grandparents are Barb and
Randy Fort of Sheridan and Julian
and Wanda Martinez of Kingman,
Arizona.
Rosalie Eve Traylor
Rosalie Eve Traylor was born
March 26, 2015, at Sheridan Memorial
Hospital.
She weighed 7 pounds, 9 ounces.
She was welcomed by mother Sara
Traylor of Sheridan.
Her grandparents are Malcolm and
Reba Traylor of Sheridan.
Trypp Hayes Fisher
Trypp Hayes Fisher was born
March 27, 2015, at Sheridan Memorial
Hospital.
He weighed 6 pounds, 9 ounces.
He was welcomed by parents
Lindsey Joubert and Bryce Fisher of
Banner.
His grandparents are Larry
Joubert of Story, Tonjua French of
Buffalo, Jan Fisher of Buffalo and
Frank Fisher of Arvada.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Team practice
Thirteen-year-old Teegan Leno dismounts and runs to the goat during the goat tying school Saturday at the Sheridan College AgriPark. The
school teaches children looking to compete in the junior rodeo how to tie down goats competitively.
Conversations in History to be
held Wednesday at Senior Center
Science lecture to
focus on citizen science
FROM STAFF REPORTS
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The next “Casual Conversations in
History” discussion will focus on the “History of
Horse Racing to Fair Grounds and Flour Mills of
Sheridan County.”
The program will be held from 10-11 a.m. at the
Sheridan Senior Center.
Historian Helen Laumann will lead the event.
“Casual Conversations in History” is sponsored by
the Sheridan County Museum and the Sheridan Senior
Center. Discussions are free and open to the public.
The Sheridan Senior Center is located at 211 Smith
St.
Registration
open for Science
Kids summer
programs
SHERIDAN — The next installment of the spring 2015
lecture series at the Sheridan College Science Museum
will be held at 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Science
Museum/Mohns Center at Sheridan College.
The program, “WyoBio: A New Citizen Science Web
Portal for Wyoming Naturalists and Researchers,” will
focus on citizen science and be led by University of
Wyoming Biodiversity Institute Project Coordinator
Brenna Marsicek and Associate Director Dorothy Tuthill.
The lecture is free and open to the public.
For additional information, call 674-6446, ext. 3500.
The Sheridan College Science Museum/Mohn’s Center
is located at 3059 Coffeen Ave.
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Registration is now
open for a variety of Science Kids summer programs.
Register online at science-kids.org
for any of these upcoming events:
• June 8-11: Eat It, Leave It, Weave It
(ages 9-11)
• June 15-18: Leaf Leapers (ages 6-8)
• June 22-25: Art of Birding and Art
of Birding 2.0 (ages 9-11 and 12-14,
respectively)
• June 29-July 2: Bug Out (ages 9-11)
• July 7-9: Explorer Series (ages 9-11)
• July 13-16: Rock On! (ages 12-14)
• July 20-23: Creeks and Critters (ages
6-8)
• July 27-30: Audubon Adventures
(ages 6-8)
• Aug. 3-6: Young Naturalists (ages 68)
Ferrell, Wiig will be unlikely Lifetime movie stars
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Odd as it seems, Will Ferrell and
Kristen Wiig are joining the ranks of Lifetime movie stars.
The channel said Thursday they play a couple who
befriend a pregnant woman in hopes of adopting her child.
The film’s ominous title is “A Deadly Adoption.”
The actors and former “Saturday Night Live” stars are
unlikely actors for the Lifetime movie franchise, which
tends to strike a serious tone.
Ferrell and Wiig appeared together in the big-screen
movie “Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues,” playing it
strictly for laughs.
Lifetime has kept “A Deadly Adoption” under wraps but
says it already has been taped. A debut date hasn’t been
announced, but the channel is aiming for early summer.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A5
Playwright David Adjmi wins New
York infringement court case
NEW YORK (AP) — A playwright who was accused of
copyright infringement by lawyers representing the
TV show “Three’s Company” over his parody of 1970s
sitcoms has won a victory in court.
Loretta A. Preska, chief judge of the U.S. District
Court for the Southern District of New York, ruled
Tuesday that David Adjmi, whose play “3C” had a run
at Rattlestick Playwrights Theatre in 2012, is protected
under the doctrine of fair use.
“The play is a highly transformative parody of the
television series that, although it appropriates a substantial amount of ‘Three’s Company,’ is a drastic
departure from the original that poses little risk to the
market for the original,” the judge wrote, noting that
copyright law “is designed to foster creativity.”
Adjmi had the backing of many theater community
heavyweights, including Jon Robin Baitz, Stephen
Sondheim, Tony Kushner, John Guare and Terrence
McNally.
The play is about two girls — one a tomboy, the other
a sexy ditz — and a guy who spontaneously become
roommates in a rundown Santa Monica apartment
after a wild party.
They clash with a dislikable landlord who makes
offensive, homophobic jokes. The playwright is exploring the idea of a culture avoiding difficult issues and
problems by retreating into sex and drugs.
The law firm Kenyon & Kenyon, which represents
DLT Entertainment, the owners of the TV sitcom
“Three’s Company,” sent Adjmi a letter demanding
that he cease further performances of the play anywhere. The lawyers claimed that “3C” was damaging to
a proposed stage version of “Three’s Company.”
After the ruling, Adjmi tweeted: “Come and knock on
my door...”
A6
PAGE SIX
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2015
10 things to
know today
TODAY IN HISTORY |
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Your daily look at latebreaking news, upcoming
events and the stories that
will be talked about today:
1. IRAN, WORLD POWERS
FACE TOUGH NUKE TALKS
With one phase of negotiations over, the sides now
have an ambitious to-do list
that — if implemented —
will cut into Tehran’s
bomb-capable technology.
2. INDIANA, ARKANSAS TRY
TO STEM RELIGIOUS
OBJECTIONS UPROAR
The two states are now
looking to move forward
after taking different
approaches to changing the
legislation to ease concerns
about discrimination.
3. RUSSIA FOCUSES ON
TRAINING REBELS IN
UKRAINE
This is a tactical shift
apparently aimed at minimizing Moscow’s military
presence in the neighboring country, part of an
effort to persuade the West
to lift sanctions.
4. HOW ALLIES TRY TO
HELP SEN. MENENDEZ
They launch a public
relations campaign to support the politician through
a long legal fight over federal corruption charges.
5. GOVERNMENT
COMMITTED TO STOPPING
‘HOMEGROWN
EXTREMISTS’
Prosecutors say the
arrests of two New York
City women who talked
about recipes for homemade bombs show the
authorities will do everything they can to prevent
domestic terrorism.
6. WHERE RACISM
REMAINS LINGERING
PROBLEM
College students and
administrators are struggling to deal with racist
incidents on campuses
despite repeated condemnations.
7. DRONE OFFERS GLIMPSE
OF ANTIQUITIES LOOTING
At a Bronze Age cemetery in Jordan, aerial photographs taken by a homemade device help
researchers map where and
when these ancient tombs
were robbed.
8. DISASTER EXPO SHOWS
INNOVATIONS IN THRIVING
JAPANESE INDUSTRY
Some of the products on
display feature new materials, but many are just
inventive solutions for
challenges such as quickly
getting people out of
harm’s way.
9. TASTES GREAT, LESS
STICKY
The trip from tree tap to
bar tap underway again
this spring in upstate New
York as a brewery uses
maple sugar to create its
maple amber craft beer.
10. WHY TOP BLACK
COACHES FORM
ORGANIZATION
A group headlined by
Tubby Smith and Shaka
Smart are setting it up to
address the dwindling
numbers of minority head
coaches in college basketball.
Throwing sparks
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Sheridan junior Riley Simmons cleans up the edges on his rat rod metal sculpture during Project Construction Wednesday at
Sheridan High School.
LOCAL BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Nominate your neighbor
for a free roof
SHERIDAN — Wyoming Roofing recently
announced it is now accepting nominations for its
Nominate Your Neighbor Campaign. The community program is a way to help a deserving neighbor in need, by providing a new roof at no cost.
Wyoming Roofing, in partnership with Rocky
Mountain Exteriors, Sheridan Media and Knecht
Home Center, started the Nominate Your
Neighbor initiative last year as a way to give back
to their community.
Nominations are being accepted at
wyoroofing.com under the Nominate Your
Neighbor tab, now through May 1. Anyone can
participate and nominate a friend, neighbor or
family member in need of a new roof. From the
submissions, a team of local volunteers will
review all the nominees and the winner will be
revealed on May 15.
Property nominated must be within a 5-mile
radius from Sheridan City Hall, must be structurally sound and show no signs of rot or other
forms of decay/hazardous materials that would
require remediation. Nominee must be a permanent Sheridan resident for the past three years.
Qualified nominations will be required to have a
clear title report and be in good standing with
their mortgage. The property must be the nominee’s primary residence and continue to be the
primary residence for at least one year from the
substantial completion date.
For more information and complete rules about
the Nominate Your Neighbor program, call 6734469 or visit wyoroofing.com.
WY Outside Challenge
to engage youth statewide
CHEYENNE — WY Outside is launching a new
effort to connect Wyoming children and families
with outdoor recreation in the state — the WY
Outside Challenge.
The hands-on, outdoor event provides participants with an opportunity to complete a wide
variety of outdoor activities throughout 2015, then
document and submit their accomplishments,
with photos, on a scorecard.
The scorecard contains WY Outside Challenge
activities such as hiking, camping in a yurt, sleeping out under the stars, catching a fish, going
snowshoeing and climbing a tree. Points are
awarded for each activity and participants keep
track of their own score, taking a photo of each
challenge.
All entries for the 2015 Challenge are due on
Jan. 15, 2016. All photos and scorecards should be
submitted to the WY Outside Administrative
Coordinator.
Every participant who obtains 200 points will
receive a certificate proclaiming them a “WY
Outside Challenge Master.” They will then be
entered in a drawing to receive additional outdoor-themed prizes.
To participate in the 2015 WY Outside Challenge,
Wyoming youth can visit wyoutside.com and
download the official scorecard. Scorecards are
available online now and will also be distributed
at a variety of WY Outside-endorsed events
throughout the year.
For more information about WY Outside or the
2015 Challenge please contact WY Outside administrative coordinator Ashley Rooney at 307-7776560 or [email protected]
Cancer survivors support
group Monday
SHERIDAN — A cancer survivors support
group, “A Shared Journey,” has been formed. It
meets Monday evenings at 5:30 p.m. inside the
Sheridan Senior Center.
Survivors of cancer, regardless of diagnosis,
and those currently undergoing treatment, are
welcome to attend.
For more information, call Renea Parker at the
Welch Cancer Center, 674-6022.
SATURDAY EVENTS |
• 10 a.m., Sheridan Recreation District Easter Egg Hunt Eggs-Travaganza, Thorne-Rider Park (enter
on 14th Street)
• 10 a.m., Tongue River Valley Community Center Easter egg hunt, Scott Bicentennial Park, Dayton
• 11 a.m., Easter egg hunt with the pooch, Dan Madia Field (enter on 11th Street)
• 11 a.m., Grace Anglican Easter Carnival, Grace Anglican Church, 1992 W. Fifth St.
• 11 a.m., Landon’s Greenhouse and Nursery workshop on “Veggies 101” and “Creating the Edible
Landscape,” 505 College Meadows Drive
• 1 p.m., Walmart Easter egg hunt, back side of Walmart, 1695 Coffeen Ave.
• 7 p.m., Sheridan College/Community Wind Ensemble concert, Sheridan High School auditorium,
1056 Long Drive
TIPPED OVER |
Comedy writer Koch, who invented
parody sport squamish, dies
LAGUNA WOODS, Calif. (AP) — Writer Tom
Koch, who created sketches for the comedy team
Bob and Ray and invented a nonsensical, nearly
impossible-to-play sport called squamish, has died
at age 89.
Koch (pronounced Cook) died March 22 at his
Laguna Woods home, his son John told The New
York Times. The cause was pulmonary failure.
The funny man, who received a bachelor’s
degree in journalism from Northwestern
University, began his career writing for future
“Today” show host Dave Garroway’s NBC radio
program “Monitor.”
He tired of that work, however, and was living
with his wife’s family in St. Louis in 1955 when
Bob Elliott and Ray Goulding approached him
about writing for them.
Over the next 33 years he turned out thousands
of uncredited sketches for the pair.
“He certainly contributed a big part of the Bob
and Ray repertoire on radio,” Elliott told the
Times.
The sketches always arrived by mail. Elliott
recalled meeting Koch in person only three times
and believed his late partner saw Koch only once.
Segueing into television, Koch also wrote for
“The Lucy Show,” “My Mother the Car” and other
programs.
He might be best remembered, however, for
inventing the ridiculously complicated game of
squamish for a 1965 Mad Magazine story lampooning professionalism in college sports.
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On April 3, 1865, Union
forces occupied the
Confederate capital of
Richmond, Virginia.
On this date:
In 1860, the legendary Pony
Express began carrying mail
between St. Joseph, Missouri,
and Sacramento, California.
(The delivery system lasted
only 18 months before giving
way to the transcontinental
telegraph.)
In 1882, outlaw Jesse James
was shot to death in St.
Joseph, Missouri, by Robert
Ford, a member of James’
gang.
In 1936, Bruno Hauptmann
was electrocuted in Trenton,
New Jersey, for the kidnapmurder of Charles Lindbergh
Jr.
In 1946, Lt. Gen. Masaharu
Homma, the Japanese commander held responsible for
the Bataan Death March, was
executed by firing squad outside Manila.
In 1948, President Harry S.
Truman signed the Marshall
Plan, designed to help
European allies rebuild after
World War II and resist communism.
In 1965, the United States
launched the SNAP-10A
nuclear power system into
Earth orbit; it was the first
nuclear reactor sent into
space.
In 1968, the day before he
was assassinated in Memphis,
Tennessee, civil rights leader
Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his famous “mountaintop” speech to a rally of striking sanitation workers.
In 1974, deadly tornadoes
began hitting wide parts of
the South and Midwest before
jumping across the border
into Canada; more than 300
fatalities resulted from what
became known as the Super
Outbreak.
In 1985, the landmark
Hollywood Brown Derby
restaurant closed after 56
years in business.
In 1995, former United Way
of America President William
Aramony was convicted in
Alexandria, Virginia, of 25
counts of fraud, conspiracy
and money laundering for
stealing nearly $600,000 from
the charity. (Aramony ended
up serving six years of a
seven-year prison sentence.)
In 1996, an Air Force jetliner carrying Commerce
Secretary Ron Brown and
American business executives
crashed in Croatia, killing all
35 people aboard.
Ten years ago: A day after
the death of Pope John Paul
II, the body of the pontiff lay
in state. Millions prayed and
wept at services across the
globe, as the Vatican prepared
for the ritual-filled funeral
and conclave that would
choose a successor.
Five years ago: The leader
of the Anglican church,
Archbishop of Canterbury
Rowan Williams, said in
remarks released by the BBC
that the Roman Catholic
church in Ireland had lost all
credibility because of its mishandling of abuse by priests.
White supremacist Eugene
TerreBlanche, 68, was bludgeoned to death on his South
African farm in a dispute
with black farm workers over
wages.
One year ago: The
Associated Press reported that
the U.S. government had masterminded the creation of a
“Cuban Twitter” designed to
undermine the communist
government in Havana. Serial
killer Tommy Lynn Sells was
put to death in Texas after the
U.S. Supreme Court rejected
his lawyers’ demand that the
state release information
about where it had gotten its
lethal injection drug.
Thought for Today: “The
world is not black and white.
More like black and grey.” —
Graham Greene, English
author (born 1904, died this
date in 1991).
A7 Almanac 0403.qxp_A Section Template 4/3/15 10:55 AM Page 1
ALMANAC
FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A7
DEATH NOTICES |
More than just
playing doctor
Tobin Anne (Huson) Korsch
Tobin Anne (Huson) Korsch, 49, of Sheridan, passed
away on Thursday, April 2, 2015, at her residence after a 7
year battle with appendix cancer.
A Celebration of Tobin's Life will be held at 7:00 p.m. on
Tuesday, April 7, 2015, at the Rock Church at 1100 Big Horn
Ave., Sheridan, with Pastor Mike Garneau officiating.
In lieu of flowers, contributions in Tobin's name may be
made to Appendix Cancer Research at PMP Research
Foundation, 6415 Granger Rd., Ste. 200, Independence, OH,
44131, or donate at the websitewww.pmpcure.org. Thank
you!
Online condolences may be written at www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
Highland Park Elementary School fifthgrader Stevie Will writes down normal vital
signs to check on her clipboard during a
visit to the Wyoming Simulation Center on
Broadway Street. The youth are learning
about the medical field in the Sheridan
County School District 2 Seminar enrichment program, which is offered only to
high ability fourth- and fifth-grade students in the district.
Daniel Ray Amende
Daniel Ray Amende, 62, of Sheridan, passed away on
Tuesday, March 31, 2015, at his residence.
No services will be held at this time.
Online condolences may be written at www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
SERVICE NOTICES |
Carol S. Norcross
Carol S. Norcross, 65, of Sheridan, passed away on
Friday, March 27, 2015, at the Sheridan Memorial Hospital.
Services will be held at 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, April 8,
2015, at the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah Witness with Mike
Turley officiating.
Memorials to honor Carol may be made to the Kelly
Schreibeis Memorial Foundation at P.O. Box 6786,
Sheridan, WY, 82801, Sheridan Dog and Cat Shelter at 84
East Ridge Road, Sheridan, WY, 82801, or to the Hospice of
the Big Horns at 1401 West 5th St., Sheridan, WY, 82801.
Online condolences may be written at www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
REPORTS |
SHERIDAN
FIRE-RESCUE
Thursday
• Activated fire alarm,
1800 block Fort Road, 10:48
a.m.
SHERIDAN POLICE
DEPARTMENT
Information in the police
reports is taken from the
SPD website.
Thursday
• No reports available at
press time.
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
AMBULANCE
Thursday
• No reports available at
press time.
SHERIDAN COUNTY
SHERIFF’S OFFICE
Thursday
• Open door, Trail Drive,
Ranchester, 1:27 a.m.
• Dispute, Skyline Drive,
10:21 a.m.
• Sexual battery (cold),
Highway 335, Big Horn,
12:03 p.m.
• Littering, Soldier Drive,
SHERIDAN
MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL
Thursday
• No admissions or dismissals reported.
2:53 p.m.
• Burglar alarm, Highway
14 East, Clearmont, 3:09
p.m.
• Warrant service, Tongue
Canyon Road, mile marker
3.2, 10:20 p.m.
ARRESTS
Names of individuals
arrested for domestic violence or sexual assault will
not be released until those
individuals have appeared
in court.
Thursday
• Dennis Earl Failey, 40,
Sheridan, out of county
warrant (misdemeanor
theft), out of county court,
arrested by SCSO
• Patrick Brooks Reid, 51,
Sheridan, receive/conceal/dispose property, circuit court, arrested by SPD
JAIL
Today
Daily inmate count: 64
Female inmate count: 15
Inmates at treatment
facilities (not counted in
daily inmate count): 0
Inmates housed at other
facilities (not counted in
daily inmate count): 4
Number of book-ins for
the previous day: 2
Number of releases for
the previous day: 3
US Senate field hearing
to focus on coal in Indian country
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) —
A U.S. Senate field hearing
planned for next week will
focus on the importance of
coal to some American
Indian tribes in the West.
The Senate Committee on
Indian Affairs hearing will
be held April 8 at Little Big
Horn College on the Crow
Indian Reservation in
southeastern Montana.
U.S. Sen. Steve Daines, a
Montana Republican, said
the event will highlight
efforts by tribes such as the
Crow to become more independent by tapping into
their coal reserves.
Crow Chairman Darrin
Old Coyote is scheduled to
testify. The tribe has one
mine on its reservation and
a second mine has been proposed by Cloud Peak
Energy of Wyoming.
Also scheduled to appear
are Lorenzo Bates, speaker
for the Navajo Nation in
Arizona, and Montana
TONIGHT
SATURDAY
MONDAY
SUNDAY
26
Cloudy and
comfortable
Considerable
cloudiness
61
55
33
Almanac
Charter the
Sheridan Trolley!
Add a touch of nostalgia to your event!
Just $110 an hour (2 hour minimum) gets you and
30 of your friends and family to your destination.
Call 672-2485 to reserve your trolley today!
Temperature
High/low .........................................................46/20
Normal high/low ............................................54/27
Record high .............................................75 in 2011
Record low ............................................... -2 in 1975
Precipitation (in inches)
Thursday......................................................... 0.00"
Month to date................................................. 0.00"
Normal month to date .................................... 0.08"
Year to date .................................................... 2.13"
Normal year to date ....................................... 2.16"
30
Mainly cloudy,
showers around
52
32
57
Rise
Set
Today
Saturday
Sunday
6:46 a.m.
6:44 a.m.
6:42 a.m.
7:37 p.m.
7:39 p.m.
7:40 p.m.
Today
Saturday
Sunday
Full
Last
Rise
Set
7:08 p.m.
8:07 p.m.
9:07 p.m.
6:24 a.m.
6:51 a.m.
7:20 a.m.
New
9a 10a 11a Noon 1p
Parkman
28/59
Dayton
27/60
Lovell
26/60
2p
3p
4p
5p
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection. Shown is the highest
value for the day.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High;
11+ Extreme
Cody
30/57
Ranchester
26/60
SHERIDAN
Big Horn
26/63
Basin
27/63
26/61
Apr 11
Apr 18
Apr 25
For more detailed weather
information on the Internet, go to:
www.thesheridanpress.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2015
Gillette
26/62
Buffalo
30/59
Worland
26/64
Wright
26/61
Kaycee
27/59
Thermopolis
25/61
Apr 4
Clearmont
28/60
Story
27/55
First
Weather on the Web
UV Index tomorrow
Hardin
31/62
Broadus
27/62
30
The Sun
The Moon
Shown is Saturday's weather.
Temperatures are tonight's lows
and Saturday's highs.
Mostly cloudy
Big Horn Mountain Precipitation
24 hours through noon Thursday ................... 0.00"
National Weather for Saturday, April 4
TUESDAY
Sun and Moon
Sheridan County Airport through Thursday
Fries
Attorney General Tim Fox.
Billings
35/61
Mostly cloudy
Bobby Boykin, 65, of Sheridan, passed away on Sunday,
March 29, 2015, at his residence.
A Visitation will be held from 9:00 to 10:00 a.m. on Friday,
April 10, 2015. Funeral Services with Military Honors will
be at 10:00 on Friday, April 10, 2015, at Kane Funeral Home
with Pastor Tony Forman officiating. A reception will follow in the Kane Reception Hall. Interment will be in the
Oregon Trail State Veterans Cemetery at a later time.
Memorials to honor Bobby may be made to the Wounded
Warrier Project at P.O. Box 758517, Topeka, KS, 66675.
Online condolences may be written at www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
2146 Coffeen Ave. • 673-1100
2590 N. Main • 672-5900
Regional Weather
5-Day Forecast for Sheridan
Bobby Boykin
Regional Cities
City
Billings
Casper
Cheyenne
Cody
Evanston
Gillette
Green River
Jackson
Sat.
Hi/Lo/W
61/34/c
61/26/pc
56/29/s
57/31/c
57/30/s
62/33/pc
60/28/s
44/23/c
Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
49/33/c
64/33/c
63/33/s
53/35/c
61/30/pc
55/31/c
64/31/pc
49/28/sh
Mon.
Hi/Lo/W
52/34/sh
65/30/sh
66/33/s
53/33/sh
47/27/sh
58/33/c
53/26/sh
40/17/sh
City
Laramie
Newcastle
Rawlins
Riverton
Rock Springs
Scottsbluff
Sundance
Yellowstone
Sat.
Hi/Lo/W
51/23/s
59/31/pc
57/27/s
59/32/c
57/29/pc
67/29/s
57/28/pc
40/14/c
Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
58/30/s
56/29/c
64/35/pc
62/35/pc
61/33/c
72/32/s
51/28/c
42/18/sn
Mon.
Hi/Lo/W
60/26/s
49/29/pc
59/29/pc
57/33/sh
53/28/sh
71/33/s
49/28/c
36/10/sf
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Shown are
Saturday's noon
positions of
weather systems
and precipitation.
Temperature
bands are highs
for the day.
A8 Open 0403.qxp_A Section Template 4/3/15 10:27 AM Page 1
A8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2015
Trying new tricks at the
skate park
Get your Press on the Web at
www.thesheridanpress.com
Eleven-year-old Ayden Arnold does a 180 spin on his
scooter Thursday afternoon at the skate park at ThorneRider Park.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
AWARD: Helped others switch over to digital files
FROM 1
His father Ross owned several Sheridan theaters such as
the WYO Theatre, the Orpheus Theatre, the Skyline DriveIn then the Centennial Theatre, which was built in 1976.
During most of his youth, Campbell spent his time working under his father, helping in any way he could.
Campbell went to Montana State University and took over
the family business after graduation in 1985.
“I always knew I would be in the movie business somehow,” Campbell said. “… It’s a big part of my life. I was
born and raised into it; it’s the only business I’ve really
ever known.”
As the nostalgia of the drive-in theater declined nationwide, Campbell eventually closed down the Skyline DriveIn in 2004. He used the funds from the land to build another screen and remodel the Centennial Theatre downtown.
Running a theater is unlike any other business. Between
the equipment and infrastructure, it’s capital intensive to
start. Working with studios to get the latest movies is
always a challenge for a small independent theater.
A good portion of Campbell’s job is sifting through film
royalties — if a film has fantastic box office sales, it actually costs him more to keep the movie in his theater.
Campbell is always at the mercy of studios putting out a
quality product. A season with less-than-stellar movies
means his business takes a hit along with the studios.
Plus, technology is always changing in the theater business. A portion of why Campbell received his award was
that he volunteered his time with other members of NATO
to help independent theaters across the nation transition
from film projection to digital. Digital film keeps theaters
competitive with the largest chains in the nation.
“The film would degrade every time you ran it through a
projector. Now with a digital file, it’s as pristine as it was
from day one,” he said.
With Campbell’s and NATO’s efforts, 457 theaters featuring just under 3,000 screens nationwide have switched to
digital cinema.
“The future still looks good [for theaters],” Campbell
said. “There is always some new technology and some different way to watch, but the biggest thing is that people
always want to watch movies … with a big screen in a dark
room where no one is talking; that’s still the way many
people like to watch movies.”
While it’s always nice to be rewarded for his efforts, most
of Campbell’s satisfaction from his job comes from his customers.
“It’s a happy business; everyone is always walking out
happy,” Campbell said. “It’s almost like running Disney
Land — people enjoy the experience.”
QUARRY: For interchange
ephemeral drainages.
• The site should be staked
WYDOT resident engineer prior to commercial materiJerry Buckley explained
al excavation.
that the property sits adja• No site signage would be
cent to the future construcpermitted other than direction site and provides two
tional signs and those
private gravel roads conrequired by the Wyoming
necting directly to
Department of
Interstate 90. This will level Environmental Quality.
the playing field for contracCommissioner Ben Keller
tors bidding on the project
said, in similar situations,
while also lowering overall
the major concern is nearby
costs for the state.
landowners. However, only
“This pit will be used sole- one residence sits within a
ly for the purpose of prohalf-mile of the property.
duction of aggregate and
Plus, he added, any contracfor the construction of the
tor would still need to go
new north Sheridan interthrough a lot of red tape for
change and for the reconpermitting.
struction of North Main
“A lot of times quarries
Street from Fort Road to
are out in places that are
that interchange,” he said.
substantial distances away
The combined projects
or there are more neighbors
currently hold a $49 million affected,” Commissioner
price tag and a three-year
Bernie Bornong said. “But
timeline.
this one is kind of unique
“The project will require
in that it’s so close to the
approximately 37,000 tons of operations. Given that posiplant mix pavement and
tive proximity there, I think
approximately 30,000 tons of that’s really a benefit of
fresh base,” Buckley said.
having it located in this
The location of the pit and spot.”
access to the interstate
The Sheridan County
helps potential contractors, Commissioners will considbut the engineer said there
er the matter at the May 5
is no guarantee the selected meeting at 9 a.m.
contractor would opt to use
In other news, County
the quarry.
Planner Mark Reid reported
The Commission approved current P&Z Commissioner
the quarry permit with five Mike Schumacher does not
conditions:
plan to file for a second
• The permit is effective
term.
for four years.
“So if you know of any
• Operations will be perpeople out in the communimitted 24 hours a day
ty who might be interested
Monday through Saturday.
in serving, I would just
• The quarry activities
encourage them to get to the
must maintain a setback
county commissioners and
not less than 50 feet from
submit an application,”
the flow line of two
Reid said.
FROM 1
SPORTS
FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2015
Shaka Smart
leaving VCU to
coach Texas
basketball
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) —
Shaka Smart has been a hot
coaching commodity since
leading Virginia
Commonwealth to the Final
Four in 2011. He had reportedly shunned several bigtime offers, but the lure of
Texas was finally
too much to turn
down.
VCU sports
information
director Scott
Day confirmed
Thursday night
Smart
that Smart was
leaving the
Richmond university to take
over the program in Austin.
Smart met with VCU players
earlier in the evening at the
Siegel Center, the team’s
home arena, and at least one
player was seen crying
when he left.
Smart, who has won at
least 26 games in each of his
six seasons at VCU, is bolting for a Texas program that
hasn’t been able to unseat
Kansas atop the Big 12. But
the Longhorns also boast
the wealthiest athletic
department in the country
and easy access to some of
the nation’s most fertile
recruiting grounds in Dallas
and Houston.
Terms of Smart’s contract
were not immediately
released and VCU said a
statement would be released
Friday. Barnes made $2.62
million last season, while
Smart made $1.8 million
with the Rams.
Texas athletic director
Steve Patterson had zeroed
in on bringing Smart to
Texas immediately after firing former Longhorns coach
Rick Barnes last weekend.
Patterson flew to Richmond
on Thursday to close the
deal. Texas officials did not
have any immediate comment on the hire.
Smart did not speak to the
media gathered Thursday
and VCU players were
escorted from the building
by university public relations without offering comments.
That Barnes was pushed
out shows Patterson, a former NBA executive, expects
big things from basketball.
Barnes won three Big 12
titles and recruited elite talent to Austin. Former
Longhorns T.J. Ford (2003)
and Kevin Durant (2007)
won national player of the
year honors. But the program had plateaued and the
early-round exits in the
NCAA Tournament started
to mount, despite rosters
full of future NBA talent.
SEE SMART, PAGE B8
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Cruising past the Camels
B1
Bowling
Green fires
head men’s
basketball
coach
Chris Jans
BOWLING GREEN, Ohio
(AP) — Bowling Green has
fired coach Chris Jans after
“an investigation into his
recent public conduct,” the
university said in a statement on Thursday.
He led the Falcons to a 2112 record — a nine-game
improvement — in his first
year at Bowling Green.
The Falcons went 1-1 in
the CollegeInsider.com
Tournament after an 11-7
mark in the Mid-American
Conference.
In the statement issued by
the athletic department, the
university said “Jans’ public conduct failed to meet
his obligations as a head
coach.” The university
didn’t specify what the conduct was. Assistant Mark
Downey is taking over dayto-day operations of the program while a search for a
replacement begins.
Mountain
West teams
to play MVC
teams
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Sheridan Bronc Dontae Crow scores his second goal against Gillette Thursday at Sheridan High School. Sheridan defeated the Camels 3-0.
Crow’s two
goals lead
Broncs to win
over Gillette
BY MIKE PRUDEN
[email protected]
SHERIDAN — Senior midfielder
Joe Shassetz told his mom that in
his first three years at Sheridan
High School, he had never beaten
Gillette on the soccer field. That
changed last night when the
Broncs dominated the Camels in a
3-0 victory at Scott Field.
It didn’t take long for Dontae
Crow to get his head on the ball
and send it to the back of the net,
and Sheridan was in control for
the rest of the game.
In the early going, Gillette
pushed the ball. They spent four
minutes and some change putting
pressure on the Sheridan defense,
controlling the ball and getting it
inside the box at will.
But Sheridan never flinched.
Goalkeeper Jess Edens barked out
orders to his defenders as the
group sent balls away from the
net.
That’s when Crow struck.
The speedy forward broke away
from the defense as AJ Kassen
booted the ball downfield. With a
little help from the wind, the ball
bounced beautifully right to
Crow’s head, and then, without
hesitation, to the back of the net.
“(Gillette) controlled it,”
Sheridan head coach Matt
Johnson said. “Once we got that
goal, I think we kind of woke up
and thought we can play with
these guys and any sort of nervousness went away.”
The Camels got one decent look
with 13 minutes left in the first
half but missed long. They wouldn’t come that close again, and
another Gillette miscue gave the
Broncs a 2-0 halftime lead.
SEE CROW, PAGE B8
LARAMIE (AP) — The
Mountain West and
Missouri Valley conferences
are renewing their agreement for men’s basketball.
The agreement features
head-to-head competition
between 10 Mountain West
and 10 Missouri Valley
teams annually, with each
conference hosting five
games apiece each season.
The two conferences had a
similar agreement during
the 2009-10 through 2012-13
seasons.
In the 2015 season, games
will be played in November
and December. In future seasons, contests will primarily
be played during a nine-day
window beginning the weekend after Thanksgiving.
Under the agreement,
Wyoming will play at
Indiana State on Nov. 16
next season.
Stagnant Lady Broncs fall 1-0 to Gillette
BY MIKE PRUDEN
[email protected]
SHERIDAN — After the Sheridan girls soccer team
was held scoreless by the Gillette Lady Camels last
night, head coach Mallery Marshall was admittedly
surprised. Of all the things her Lady Broncs do well,
their offensive prowess is typically the best.
So a 1-0 loss to third-ranked Gillette was not what
the coach had in mind.
“We struggled really offensively,” Marshall said.
Robbi Ryan (21) battles with Gillette's Molly Kihbacher for
possession of the ball inside the box Thursday at Scott
Field.
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
“Typically things that we’re really good at — having
a really quick attack, good possession in the midfield
and working it out to the flanks. All those things
have been kind of natural for us were just not there
tonight.”
Despite the struggle offensively, Sheridan did a
good job keeping Gillette off of the board as well.
Specifically, freshman goalkeeper Zoie Jones was in
control of the box. Anytime the Camels pressured,
she was there for the save.
The score was nil-nil heading into halftime.
While the offense wasn’t much more productive for
either team in the second half, all it took was one,
and Gillette got one that was nearly impossible for
the Lady Broncs to stop.
SEE GOAL, PAGE B8
B2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2015
Paltry snowpack forces skiers to higher ground amid drought
BRIAN MELLEY
ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEQUOIA NATIONAL PARK,
Calif. (AP) — We've trudged
through deep powder, braved icy
slopes and weathered rain, wind
and snow in an annual quest to
reach a ski cabin in the wilderness of Sequoia National Park for
the past 13 years. We always had
skis on our feet — until this year.
The fourth year of the devastating drought that has dried up
wells, forced mandatory rationing
and jeopardized California crops
has also put a burden on backcountry skiers in search of their
powdery fix.
So it was that seven friends hit
a dusty trail in hiking shoes
Sunday, toting good food, tolerable
wine and hefty skis and boots
strapped to our backpacks, on a
hopeful quest for a few good runs.
Snow lovers who win the
November lottery for a bunk at
the Pear Lake Ski Hut dream for
months of the winter wonderland
that lies 6 miles up a tough trail.
Even in spring, you can expect
smooth turns on the white blanket covering the steep, dramatic
granite ridges, cirques and peaks.
A year ago, we skied from our
cars to the hut in fresh snow.
Then it dumped for two more
days, and we hooted as we shot
through the trees in knee-deep
powder toward the Marble Fork of
the Kaweah River.
This year, we hoofed through a
forest carpeted in brown to reach
a view of exposed gray granite in
the alpine zone. Ski wear was out
of the question in the hot sun.
Three in our party wore shorts,
and one wore a skirt.
It's never an easy trek in the
thinner air above 7,000 feet, but
the unwieldy 60-pound packs,
with ski tips soaring 3 feet overhead, snagging branches, added a
challenge.
Hikers, usually rare, were abundant and warned us there wasn't
much snow up ahead. Thanks, but
we didn't need to hear it a dozen
times. After huffing up 2,000 feet
in the first 4 miles, the trail
lurched downhill to Heather Lake.
A sometimes treacherous descent
on skis was now a welcome
respite from the relentless climb.
Ice we usually cross as a shortcut was melted along the edge of
the lake, forcing us to clamber
over two little hills and wind
around the shore. Snow was still
hanging on in places around 9,000
feet above sea level, but it was too
patchy and icy for skis and too
soft to trust with your full weight.
We moved slowly, trying not to
slip and stepping gingerly to
avoid the dreaded posthole — the
unexpected plunge through the
crusty snow. It didn't help. We all
broke through several times,
sometimes sinking crotch-deep
and needing help to get out.
It was nearly sunset when we
finally reached the cabin, a rustic,
granite-and-timber structure built
by the Civilian Conservation
Corps that opened to skiers in
1941 and serves as a summer
ranger station.
The next morning, after a good
meal and a good rest, we optimistically buckled on our skis
and searched for a route to higher
ground and better snow.
Several times we were thwarted
and had to take off our skis —
first, to cross a rushing creek and
then to scramble awkwardly in
ski boots hundreds of feet up a
steep, rocky incline.
When we crested the ridge
around noon, somewhere around
10,000 feet, we were finally looking at a sea of white. The sun had
softened the snow. It was perfect
for skiing.
Bronc, Ram
and Eagle
tracksters
battle
wind, each
other in
Gillette
FROM STAFF REPORTS
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Kicking past the defense
Gillette's Kaitlyn Foster, right, braces herself as Sheridan forward Gabbie Moore kicks the ball Thursday at Scott Field. The Lady Broncs fell 1-0 to Gillette.
Hanson named
All-American
Honorable
Mention
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Sheridan College
sophomore Tiana Hanson has been
named a National Junior College
Athletic Association All-American
Honorable Mention for the 2014-15
women’s basketball
season.
Hanson finished the
season with 20.2 points
and 10.5 rebounds a
game, both team
highs. Her 288 freethrow attempts were
the most in the coun- Hanson
try, and she was 11th
in the nation in points and 18th in
rebounds. She led the Lady
Generals to a 25-7 record and thirdplace finish in the conference.
Hanson was named to the Region
IX All-Region team and received
the most votes amongst honorees.
She was recently named the
Sheridan Press’ Female Winter
Sports Athlete of the Year.
Randle, Stanford beat
Miami 66-64 in OT in NIT title game
NEW YORK (AP) — Chasson
Randle hit two free throws with
3.4 seconds left in overtime, and
Stanford won the second NIT
title of his career, edging
Miami 66-64 on Thursday.
Sheldon McClellan’s doublepumping 3-point attempt that
would have won it at the buzzer
wasn’t close to going in.
The short-handed Hurricanes
had rallied from a 13-point second-half deficit to force the
extra period and led 64-61 with
less than a minute left. But
Randle twice got to the line,
making four straight foul shots
for the victory.
The senior, who became the
Cardinal’s all-time leading scorer in Tuesday’s semifinals, finished with 25 points Thursday
to end his career with 2,375.
McClellan led Miami with 17
points.
The experimental 30-second
shot clock being used in the
NIT proved critical after
Randle’s free throws pulled
Stanford to 64-63 with 38.9 seconds left. With the regular 35second clock, the Cardinal (2413) probably would have needed
to foul. Instead, they played
defense, and Deandre Burnett
missed a 3-point attempt that
might have clinched it.
Randle then leaned into
Davon Reed on a jumper to
draw a foul and the chance to
put Stanford in front.
Miami (25-13) threw the ball
away on the ensuing inbounds
pass, and after Brown made a
free throw with 3.1 seconds to
go, the Hurricanes appeared to
do it again. But the officials
went to the monitor and
reversed the call, ruling
Stanford touched the ball last.
That gave Miami one last
chance with the ball under the
basket and 1.8 seconds left.
With the scored tied 55-all and
just over a minute left in regulation, the game became a contest of the teams’ top scorers
driving to the hoop. Twice
Randle hit shots to put Stanford
in the lead only for McClellan
to draw a foul on the other end
and hit both free throws to tie
it.
After McClellan made it 59-59
with 16.8 seconds to go,
Stanford worked the ball
around for an open 3-point
attempt by Marcus Allen, who
had made some big second-half
shots. But he missed it at the
buzzer to send the game to overtime.
Stanford center Stefan Nastic
had fouled out late in regulation, and McClellan finally
started to find room in the
paint in OT. He drove the lane
for a dunk to give Miami its
first lead since nearly seven
minutes remained in the first
half, then dished to Reed for a
layup and the three-point lead.
McClellan shot just 5 of 16
from the floor with Brown playing tough defense on him, but
he was 6 of 7 from the foul line.
With the score tied at 18 and
less than six minutes left before
halftime, Randle had eight
points, an assist and a steal as
Stanford closed the half on a 143 run. The Cardinal quickly
extended the lead to 13 early in
the second half.
They were up 10 with under
13 minutes left, but the
Hurricanes wouldn’t go away.
Omar Sherman hit both ends of
a one-and-one with 3:27 remaining to tie the score at 53-53.
TIP-INS
Miami: The Hurricanes were
without starting point guard
Angel Rodriguez (wrist) and
center Tonye Jekiri (concussion). Backup point guard
Manu Lecomte (knee) played
only five minutes.
SHERIDAN — Fighting
both gusting winds and
some of the top competition
in the region, Sheridan
County track and field athletes put up fantastic earlyseason performances at the
Susan Windham Memorial
Invitational in Gillette
Thursday.
Sheridan’s Peyton Bomar
grabbed a handful of firstplace finishes in the 300meter hurdles, long jump
and the triple jump. Bomar
also finished second in the
100-meter dash. Pippen
Robison and Janika
Sweeney took second and
third in the 800-meter run,
respectively.
The Broncs’ Dayton
Bruney took first in the long
jump with a massive leap of
20 feet, 2.75 inches, while
Jered McCafferty took second in the 1600-meter run
and third in the 800-meter
run. Joe Klebba’s 127-foot, 1inch toss in the discus event
was good enough for second
place.
Dillon Lyons led the
Tongue River Eagles with a
second-place finish in the
boys long jump and Austen
Scammon took fifth in both
the 110-meter hurdles and
300-meter hurdles.
The Lady Eagles’ LeAnna
Mitchell crossed the line in
fourth place in the 100-meter
dash and Micaiah Huff took
third in the 110-meter hurdles.
Garrett Allen of Big Horn
took the top spot out of 46
competitors in the boys shot
put with a toss of 47 feet, 1
inch. The Rams’ Mason
Lube threw his way into
third in both shot put and
discus events and Christian
Mayer had a third-place finish in the 100-meter dash.
Bailey Bard had a pair of
fourth-place performances
for the Lady Rams in both
the 200-meter dash and 300meter hurdles. Emily
Blainey took fourth in the
long jump and fifth in the
triple jump.
Sheridan County schools
will have this weekend off
but will resume action next
weekend.
Tongue River will play
host to Big Horn and other
schools at the Pre-Prom
Invitational on April 10. The
Broncs head down to Casper
on April 10 to participate in
the Kelly Walsh Trojan
Invitational.
FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B3
NCAA tournament continues Saturday with Final Four
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALL TIMES EST
Friday
BOXING
9 p.m.
ESPN2 — Lightweights,
Gamaliel Diaz (39-11-3) vs. Petr
Petrov (35-4-2), at Corona, Calif.
GOLF
Noon
TGC — LPGA, ANA
Inspiration, second round, part
I, at Rancho Mirage, Calif.
3 p.m.
TGC — PGA Tour, Houston
Open, second round, at Humble,
Texas
6 p.m.
TGC — LPGA, ANA
Inspiration, second round, part
II, at Rancho Mirage, Calif.
MEN'S COLLEGE
LACROSSE
8:30 p.m.
FS1 — Villanova at Denver
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN — Oklahoma City at
Memphis
10:30 p.m.
ESPN — Portland at L.A.
Lakers
PREP BASKETBALL
3 p.m.
ESPN2 — Dick's Sporting
Goods Nationals, boys semifinal,
teams TBD, at New York
5 p.m.
ESPN2 — Dick's Sporting
Goods Nationals, boys semifinal,
teams TBD, at New York
TENNIS
1 p.m.
ESPN2 — ATP World
Tour/WTA, Miami Open, men's
semifinal, at Key Biscayne, Fla.
7 p.m.
ESPN2 — ATP World
Tour/WTA, Miami Open, men's
semifinal, at Key Biscayne, Fla.
Saturday
ARENA FOOTBALL
10:30 p.m.
ESPN2 — Arizona at Las
Vegas
AUTO RACING
6:30 p.m.
FS1 — FIA, Formula E
Championship, Long Beach
(Calif.) ePrix
BOXING
3 p.m.
CBS — Champion, Adonis
Stevenson (25-1-0) vs. Sakio Bika
(32-6-3), for WBC light heavyweight title, at Quebec City
GOLF
1 p.m.
TGC — PGA Tour, Houston
Open, third round, at Humble,
Texas
3 p.m.
NBC — PGA Tour, Houston
Open, third round, at Humble,
Texas
5 p.m.
TGC — LPGA, ANA
Inspiration, third round, at
Rancho Mirage, Calif.
HORSE RACING
5 p.m.
NBCSN — Thoroughbreds,
Blue Grass Stakes, at Lexington,
Ky.; Wood Memorial, at New
York; Santa Anita Derby, at
Arcadia, Calif.
MEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
6 p.m.
TBS/TNT/TRUTV — NCAA
Tournament, national semifinals, teams TBD, at Indianapolis
PREP BASKETBALL
10 a.m.
ESPN2 — Dick's Sporting
Goods Nationals, girls championship, teams TBD, at New York
Noon
ESPN — Dick's Sporting
Goods Nationals, boys championship, teams TBD, at New York
SOCCER
7:45 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League,
Liverpool at Arsenal
10 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League,
Aston Villa at Manchester
United
12:30 p.m.
NBC — Premier League, Stoke
City at Chelsea
4 p.m.
RCR appeals penalty
against Newman’s
team for tire bleeding
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Richard
Childress Racing has appealed the penalties NASCAR levied against Ryan
Newman’s team for allegedly manipulating tires.
NASCAR this week said tires taken
from Newman after the March 22 race in
California failed an independent inspection and had been altered to intentionally
release air pressure during the race.
Crew chief Luke Lambert was fined
$125,000 and suspended for the next six
races. The suspension also includes the
All-Star race in May. Lambert was also
placed on probation through the end of
the year.
PICKLES
NON SEQUITUR
Tire technician James Bender and engineer Philip Surgen also were suspended
six races and placed on probation
through Dec. 31.
Newman and car owner Childress were
docked 75 points each.
No date for the appeal was set
Thursday.
NASCAR said RCR requested to have all
the penalties deferred while the appeal
takes place. The sanctioning body granted the deferral for the suspensions and
fines, but did not reinstate the points for
Newman and Childress.
NASCAR said the points would be reinstated if RCR wins the appeal.
FS1 — Women's national
teams, exhibition, United States
vs. New Zealand, at St. Louis
TENNIS
1 p.m.
ESPN2 — ATP World
Tour/WTA, Miami Open,
women's championship, at Key
Biscayne, Fla.
Sunday
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
3 p.m.
ESPN2 — Oregon at UCLA
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC — Juniors, Drive, Chip &
Putt Championship, at Augusta,
Ga.
1 p.m.
TGC — PGA Tour, Houston
Open, final round, at Humble,
Texas
3 p.m.
NBC — PGA Tour, Houston
Open, final round, at Humble,
Texas
5 p.m.
TGC — LPGA, ANA
Inspiration, final round, at
Rancho Mirage, Calif.
MAJOR LEAGUE
BASEBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN2 — St. Louis at Chicago
Cubs
NBA BASKETBALL
1 p.m.
ABC — Houston at Oklahoma
City
3:30 p.m.
ABC — Chicago at Cleveland
NHL HOCKEY
Noon
NBC — Pittsburgh at
Philadelphia
7:30 p.m.
NBCSN — St. Louis at Chicago
SOCCER
8:30 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League,
Tottenham at Burnley
11 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League,
Newcastle at Sunderland
5 p.m.
ESPN2 — MLS, Real Salt Lake
at San Jose
7 p.m.
FS1 — MLS, Philadelphia at
Kansas City
TENNIS
1 p.m.
ESPN — ATP World
Tour/WTA, Miami Open, men's
championship, at Key Biscayne,
Fla.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
6:30 p.m.
ESPN — NCAA Tournament,
national semifinals, teams TBD,
at Tampa, Fla.
9 p.m.
ESPN — NCAA Tournament,
national semifinals, teams TBD,
at Tampa, Fla.
SCOREBOARD |
NHL |
National Hockey League
By The Associated Press
All Times EDT
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP
W
L
x-Montreal
78
47
22
x-Tampa Bay 79
47
24
Detroit
77
40
24
Boston
78
40
25
Ottawa
77
39
26
Florida
78
36
27
Toronto
78
29
43
Buffalo
77
22
47
Metropolitan Division
GP
W
L
y-N.Y. Rangers 77
49
21
Washington
78
43
25
N.Y. Islanders 78
45
27
Pittsburgh
77
42
24
Columbus
77
38
35
Philadelphia
77
31
29
New Jersey
77
31
33
Carolina
77
28
38
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP
W
L
x-Nashville
78
47
22
x-St. Louis
77
47
23
x-Chicago
77
47
24
Minnesota
77
44
26
Winnipeg
77
39
26
Dallas
77
37
30
Colorado
77
35
30
Pacific Division
GP
W
L
y-Anaheim
79
50
22
Vancouver
78
45
28
Calgary
78
42
29
Los Angeles 77
38
25
San Jose
77
38
30
Edmonton
78
23
42
Arizona
77
23
46
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Thursday’s Games
Columbus 4, N.Y. Islanders 3, SO
Washington 5, Montreal 4, SO
Ottawa 2, Tampa Bay 1, OT
Boston 3, Detroit 2
Florida 6, Carolina 1
N.Y. Rangers 3, Minnesota 2
St. Louis 4, Calgary 1
Chicago 3, Vancouver 1
Los Angeles 8, Edmonton 2
Friday’s Games
Chicago at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Montreal at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Colorado at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Arizona at San Jose, 10 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Philadelphia at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Columbus, 2 p.m.
Vancouver at Winnipeg, 3 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 7 p.m.
Washington at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Florida, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Nashville, 8 p.m.
San Jose at Arizona, 9 p.m.
Calgary at Edmonton, 10 p.m.
Colorado at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.
SPRING TRAINING |
Spring Training Glance
By The Associated Press
All Times EDT
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W
L
Oakland
22
9
Kansas City
18
10
Toronto
18
12
Boston
16
11
Houston
12
10
Tampa Bay
14
12
New York
16
15
Los Angeles 14
14
Cleveland
14
16
Minnesota
12
15
Chicago
11
17
Seattle
11
17
Baltimore
11
18
Detroit
11
19
Texas
9
18
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W
L
Los Angeles 16
10
New York
18
12
San Diego
17
12
Pittsburgh
15
11
Arizona
17
14
St. Louis
13
11
Miami
14
12
Colorado
16
14
Pct
.710
.643
.600
.593
.545
.538
.516
.500
.467
.444
.393
.393
.379
.367
.333
Pct
.615
.600
.586
.577
.548
.542
.538
.533
OT
9
8
13
13
12
15
6
8
Pts
103
102
93
93
90
87
64
52
GF
207
251
223
207
222
198
204
152
OT
7
10
6
11
4
17
13
11
Pts
105
96
96
95
80
79
75
67
GF
234
232
238
211
214
202
170
177
OT
9
7
6
7
12
10
12
Pts
103
101
100
95
90
84
82
GF
224
233
220
221
217
239
207
OT Pts
7 107
5 95
7 91
14 90
9 85
13 59
8 54
for overtime loss.
GF
232
225
230
209
217
188
161
Cincinnati
14
13
.519
Chicago
15
15
.500
Atlanta
14
16
.467
Philadelphia
12
17
.414
Milwaukee
11
16
.407
Washington
10
15
.400
San Francisco 11
21
.344
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings; games
against non-major league teams do not.
___
Thursday’s Games
St. Louis 0, N.Y. Mets 0, tie
Detroit 3, N.Y. Yankees (ss) 2
Tampa Bay 10, Philadelphia 1
N.Y. Yankees (ss) 6, Pittsburgh 2
Cleveland 4, Cincinnati 3
San Diego 6, Milwaukee 5
Arizona 10, Chicago White Sox 2
Atlanta 6, Baltimore 5
Boston 8, Minnesota 5
L.A. Angels 3, L.A. Dodgers 2
Oakland 8, San Francisco 2
Friday’s Games
Tampa Bay vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Washington vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Milwaukee vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Atlanta vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, Fla., 6:05 p.m.
Minnesota vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla., 7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati vs. Toronto at Montreal, 7:07 p.m.
Kansas City at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Colorado vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 10:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Oakland at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
NBA |
National Basketball Association
By The Associated Press
All Times EDT
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
L
Pct
GB
y-Toronto
45
30
.600
—
Brooklyn
34
40
.459
10½
Boston
34
41
.453
11
Philadelphia
18
58
.237
27½
New York
14
61
.187
31
Southeast Division
W
L
Pct
GB
z-Atlanta
56
19
.747
—
x-Washington 42
33
.560
14
Miami
34
41
.453
22
Charlotte
32
42
.432
23½
Orlando
22
53
.293
34
Central Division
W
L
Pct
GB
x-Cleveland
49
27
.645
—
x-Chicago
45
30
.600
3½
Milwaukee
37
38
.493
11½
Indiana
32
43
.427
16½
Detroit
29
46
.387
19½
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W
L
Pct
GB
x-Houston
52
24
.684
—
x-Memphis
51
24
.680
½
x-San Antonio 49
26
.653
2½
Dallas
46
30
.605
6
New Orleans 40
34
.541
11
Northwest Division
W
L
Pct
GB
x-Portland
48
26
.649
—
Oklahoma City 42
33
.560
6½
Utah
34
41
.453
14½
Denver
28
47
.373
20½
Minnesota
16
59
.213
32½
Pacific Division
W
L
Pct
GB
z-Golden State 62
13
.827
—
x-L.A. Clippers 50
26
.658
12½
Phoenix
38
38
.500
24½
Sacramento
26
48
.351
35½
L.A. Lakers
20
54
.270
41½
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference
___
Thursday’s Games
Cleveland 114, Miami 88
Houston 108, Dallas 101
Golden State 107, Phoenix 106
Friday’s Games
New York at Washington, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Toronto at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Orlando at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Denver at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Portland at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Philadelphia at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Brooklyn at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Memphis, 8 p.m.
0403_A Section Template 4/2/15 9:21 PM Page 1
B4
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BABY BLUES® by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman
COMICS
www.thesheridanpress.com
FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2014
DRS. OZ & ROIZEN
Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen
MARY WORTH by Karen Moy and Joe Giella
BORN LOSER® by Art and Chip Sansom
The heavy metal band
Manowar became the
Guinness World Records'
"World's Loudest Band" when
they hit 129.5 decibels in a
live concert in 1994. And why
isn't that cool? Because permanent hearing loss can hap-
pen from listening to 85 dBs
for an extended period of
time, and it takes only 15
minutes of 100 dBs for that
kind of damage to be done.
(A typical conversation is
about 60 dBs.)
According to a new World
Health Organization report,
hearing loss is a life-changing health issue that threatens 1.1 BILLION teens and
young adults around the
world. And it's mostly caused
by "unsafe use of personal
audio devices, including
smartphones, and exposure
to damaging levels of sound
at noisy entertainment venues such as nightclubs, bars
and sporting events."
If young folks become partially or severely deaf, the
report points out, they'll pay
a big price in mental and
physical health issues, not to
mention lost employment
opportunities and social difficulties. So listen up, Mom
and Dad! Protect your kids'
hearing by making them
aware of the risks associated
with earbuds (1 hour a day at
a low volume is optimal);
loud concerts (very uncool,
but they should wear
earplugs); and deafening
sporting events (earplugs
again). Convince them by
downloading a decibel meter
app to their smartphone:
Have them measure the volume in their earbuds (keep it
around 70) and at any venue,
so decades from now they can
hear the sounds of nature,
their children's voices and
the music they love.
DEAR ABBY
Pauline Phillips and Jeanne Phillips
GARFIELD by Jim Davis
FRANK & ERNEST® by Bob Thaves
REX MORGAN, M.D. by Woody Wilson and Tony DiPreta
ZITS® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
DILBERT by S. Adams
ALLEY OOP® by Dave Graue and Jack Bender
HUNGRY THERAPIST
SHOULD PLAN AHEAD FOR
LATE-MORNING SNACK
DEAR ABBY: We have a
daughter with severe developmental disabilities.
Thankfully, she receives 40plus hours of in-home therapy a week, which is covered
by insurance.
Her first therapist arrives
at 7:30 a.m. and leaves at 11:30
a.m. Some days, she will pick
up something to eat on the
way. Most days, I suspect she
hasn't eaten breakfast.
About once a week she'll
call out for me, asking for a
snack -- usually a breakfast
sandwich -- which I make for
her. Last week, she asked for
some chocolate-covered nuts I
had offered her once. I told
her we had eaten them. I
finally put out a bowl of old
hard candy to stop her from
asking. She has been eating it
for a while now and joking
that I'm making her gain
weight.
Must I continue providing
her snacks or say something
about her bringing her own?
I am grateful for the work she
does for our daughter and
hope I'm not sounding petty. -UNSURE IN KANSAS
DEAR UNSURE: You
should not be responsible for
feeding your daughter's therapist. Have a talk with the
therapist and suggest that if
she's "out of fuel" at the end
of your daughter's session
that she bring some individually wrapped cheese sticks or
fruit with her. It would be a
lot healthier than what you're
giving her and probably better for her.
DEAR ABBY: My 18-yearold son and his fiancee have
been kicked out of a few
apartments and have asked to
live with me. Wanting to help
him, I agreed.
When they moved in,
I gave them four rules to follow: No drugs in the house,
no sex, no coming upstairs
after 10 p.m., and the dishes
must be done every night or
they will pay $400 a month
rent.
Well, a week ago I caught
them doing drugs, so I called
the cops. They were arrested
that night. They are now asking to come back. I refuse to
allow it because I have an 11year-old at home with me and
another 18-year-old who I
want to keep away from this
kind of influence.
My son keeps texting me
and trying to guilt me into
changing my mind because
he got his fiancee pregnant.
Where I live it gets very cold,
but I need to show my other
children it's not OK to do
drugs.
Am I doing the right thing
by not letting them come
back, or am I a heartless
mother like he says? -- MOM
OF TOUGH LOVE
DEAR MOM: Regardless of
what your son says, you are
not heartless. You took him
in with certain conditions.
He and his girlfriend abused
your trust, and you handled
the situation wisely.
If the girl is really pregnant, she should not be using
drugs. If she's hooked on
something, she needs to get
into a rehabilitation program
ASAP. If she has parents,
perhaps they will take her in.
But you have done your part,
and if you allow your son
and his girlfriend to stay
with you, they will continue
to break your rules and you'll
wind up responsible for them
and the baby -- or two or
three. I advise against it.
CLASSIFIEDS
Phone: (307) 672-2431
FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2015
Fax: (307) 672-7950
www.thesheridanpress.com
Household Goods
Furnished Apts for Rent
Office Space for Rent
Help Wanted
"EASTLAKE" 3 drawer
dresser. Carved, very
nice. $200 firm.
307-683-7290
STAGE STOP MOTEL
CLEAN. Weekly &
Monthly rates. Internet,
cable & utilities incl.
307-672-2477.
CORNER SUITE w/
MTN VIEWS. 1,000 sq.
ft. 2 private offices,
conference & reception
areas. Utilities included.
307-672-8700.
TEMPORARY
FARMWORKERS
– 3/4 contract hrs and
the hourly rate noted
below guaranteed.
Additional monetary
benefits may apply.
Tools/supplies &, if
applicable, worker
housing provided.
Travel costs reimbursed
at 50% of contract and
upon completion of
contract (earlier if
appropriate). 20 days
experience & a
reference req'd. To
apply, contact the State
Workforce Agency
(SWA) below or any
local SWA.
JO# 2576975.
2 General Farm/
Irrigation Worker(s),
Padlock Ranch
Company,
Ranchester WY
$11.14/hr, 48 hrs/wk,
4/15/2015 to
12/15/2015
Casper, WY SWA,
307-233-4657
Miscellaneous for Sale
MARY KAY
products for sale.
Call fordetails.
307-660-4966.
WEDDING FLOWERS.
Turquoise & White.
Blingy! Bride's bouquet,
3 brides maids boquets
& boutonnieres. Sparkly
white table bottle
decorations. Call or text
752-3754.
Musical Instruments
BASIC
TECHNIQUES of
Singing. AMAZE
Your Friends at
Karaoke! SHINE in
Your Church Choir!
ROCK Your Metal
Band! Call Kristi at
307-763-3412.
Wanted to Buy
A CITY LOT in
Sheridan for building.
Approx 1/3 - 1/2 acre.
307-672-6288.
For Lease
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
2BR.
WASHER/DRYER.
$600 + Dep + Elec. No
smkg/pets. Lease. Call
for appt. 752-4735.
Broadway Apts.
2 bdrm, 1 bath
townhouse
Available in
Dayton, WY.
Rent based on
income.
Please call
307-751-1752 or
1-888-387-7368
Toll-Free for application
Equal Housing
Opportunity
EXTRA LG. 2 BR. Low
utils. $650/mo. + $500
dep. 1 yr. lease. Ref's
req'd. 307-751-2445.
1 BR. 242 S.
Thurmond. No
pets/smk. 600 sq. ft.
$485/mo.
Call 307-620-2167
2BR. RANCHESTER.
950 sq. ft. No pets.
$650. 763-3252.
BUILDINGS
FOR LEASE
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
Rail Road Land
& Cattle Co.
Has Shop Space,
Warehouse Space,
Retail Space,
Office Space and
much more
for lease!
CLEAN 1BR. 745 Park
St. New flooring and
bathroom. W/D furn.
$550/mo. City util pd.
NO SMK/PETS.
Ref's req'd. 1 yr lease.
672-9563.
673-5555
NEWLY RENOVATED
1BR cottage in
Sheridan. No smk/pets.
W/D hookups. $675/mo.
$500 dep. Call
307-655-9753.
Rooms for Rent
SMOKER FRIENDLY
ROOM for rent.
$250/mo incl wi-fi &
utilities $250 dep. ($50
non-refundable). Avail
now. 307-655-5243.
Furnished Apts for Rent
1BR. NO smk/pets.
$575 + elec + dep.
Coin-Op W/D.
307-674-5838.
WKLY FR $240.
America's Best Value
Inn. 672-9757.
Mobile Homes for Rent
HEIDI'S MOBILE
HOME CT. #60. 2 BR/1
Ba. $600/mo incl.
W/S/G & lot rent. 1st &
last req. No smk. 1 Pet
w/ dep. 763-0675.
Mobile Hm. Space for
Rent
Storage Space
E L D O R A D O
STORAGE Helping you
conquer space. 3856
Coffeen. 672-7297.
WOODLANDPARK
STORAGE.COM
5211 Coffeen
Call 674-7355
New Spaces
Available!
INTERSTATE
STORAGE. Multiple
Sizes avail. No
deposit req'd.
307-752-6111.
Help Wanted
ROOFING LABORERS
NEEDED
Call 307-278-0314
www.Landscaping
ServicesInc.
com/employment
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SATURDAY
APRIL 4 TH
HOSTED BY
BILL RAPP
10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
2350 Aspen Grove Dr.
$374,000 MLS# 15-139
P.O. Box 6308
Sheridan, WY 82801
(307) 674-6421
2015 SHERIDAN RECREATION
DISTRICT SUMMER JOB OPENINGS
# OF
POSITIONS:
POSITION:
Aquatics Director
1
Youth Baseball Umpires
4-6
Little Sluggers Baseball Coaches 2-4
SALARY:
11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
$12.00
2035 Quail Ct.
$15/$18 per gm
$9.35/hr.
$319,000 MLS# 14-734
6th Street & College Concession
2
$7.65/hr.
6th St & College Concession Mgr
1
$10.65/hr.
Youth Tennis Coaches
2-4
$10.65/hr.
Lifeguards/Swim Instructors
25
$8.45-$9.45/hr.
Park Maintenance Person
2
$9.35/hr
Athletic Field Maintenance
2
$9.35-$12.35 DOQ
Weed & Mosquito Technicians
2
$9.35/hr
306 N. Main St. Sheridan, WY
(307) 672-8911
Office Hours Sat 9am-2pm
www.eracrc.com
Feel free to call for more information about any of the positions
above. All wages are starting rates. (307)674-6421
Please contact the Sheridan Recreation District if interested
any of the above positions. Job descriptions are available to
be picked up at our Thorne Rider Park location. Office hours
are from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.
Please have all applications turned in by May 17th at 5:00 p.m.
RV SPACE, Big Horn.
By day, month or year.
674-7718.
LOST PET?
Place an ad in The Press!
Call 672-2431
Sheridan Recreation District Staff • 1579 Thorne Rider Park
(307) 674-6421 • www.sheridanrecreation.com
PRE-OWNED VEHICLES
CARS
For s!
r
a
e
y
8
7
49,995
$
2014 Chevy Silverado 2500 LTZ
‘15 BUICK LACROSSE
‘14 CHEVY IMPALA
‘12 INFINITY G25X
‘09 CADILLAC CTS
‘14 TOYOTA COROLLA S
‘14 TOYOTA COROLLA LE
‘10 VOLKSWAGON JETTA
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
28,495
23,495
22,995
20,495
18,995 Sheridan’s only
17,495
full service
15,495
dealership
TRUCKS AND SUV’S
‘14 CHEVY SILVERADO 2500 LTZ
‘12 CHEVY TAHOE
‘14 CHEVY SUBURBAN LT
‘14 CHEVY TRAVERSE
‘12 CHEVY SUBURBAN
‘11 FORD F-150
‘11 CHEVY SILVERADO LTZ
‘12 CHEVY 1500 CREW LT
‘11 CHEVY SILVERADO 3500 HD
‘14 FORD EDGE
‘10 FORD EXPEDITION
‘12 CHEVY SILVERADO
‘11 CHEVY SILVERADO
B5
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
31,995
$
2011 Chevy Silverado LTZ
TRUCKS AND SUV’S
49,995
42,495
42,495
38,495
35,495
31,995
31,995
29,995
29,995
107
29,995
29,495
28,495 ‘13 NISSAN SENTRA
27,995 ‘12 FORD FUSION SE
‘13 CHEVY SONIC
‘13 CHEVY CRUZE
‘09 TOYOTA CAMRY
‘11 TOYOTA COROLLA
‘11 NISSAN VERSA
‘07 CHEVY IMPALA
CARS
E. ALGER • 307.674.6419
$
$
$
$
$
$
14,995
14,495
OPEN
13,995
13,995 S A T U R D A Y S
12,995 U N T I L 4 P M
11,495
$ 9,995
$ 8,995
‘09 CHEVY SILVERADO
‘12 FORD F-150
‘06 CHEVY 2500
‘11 HONDA CRV
‘14 JEEP COMPASS
‘14 CHEVY CAPTIVA
‘05 DODGE RAM 1500
‘04 CHEVY SILVERADO
‘05 FORD F-150
‘05 HONDA PILOT
‘03 CHEVY SUBURBAN
‘04 SUZUKI XL-7
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
27,495
26,995
23,495
21,495
20,995
17,495
14,995
12,995
11,995
$ 8,995
$ 7,995
$ 7,995
LIKE US ON FACEBOOK AT
38,495
$
2014 Chevy Traverse
WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/HAMMERCHEVY
www.hammerchevy.com
13,995
$
2013 Chevy Sonic
CLASSIFIEDS
B6 THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Delivery
problems?
Call The Press at
672-2431
www.thesheridanpress.com
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
IT - SERVER
ADMINISTRATOR,
Sheridan College.
Full-time, excellent
benefits, great location
and facilities. Manage
and oversee windows
servers, administer
and troubleshoot
domain and enterprise
services.
Research and
evaluate software,
hardware, and
peripheral
purchases. Apply
online at: https://jobs.
sheridan.edu EOE.
PERKINS IS
currently accepting
applications for
SUMMER
EMPLOYMENT:
Kitchen Manager,
Dining Room Manager,
& all other positions. AM
& PM shifts avail. Apply
in person at 1373
Coffeen Ave
or online at www.
pleaseapplyonline.com/
sugarlandenterprises.
EOE
Bridge
Phillip Alder
IF YOU BID UP,
PLAY UP ALSO
Khalil Gibran, a
Lebanese artist,
poet and writer,
said, "The teacher
who is indeed wise
does not bid you to enter the
house of his wisdom, but rather
leads you to the threshold of
your mind."
That is so true.
At the bridge table, after bidding, you must apply your mind
to winning the requisite number of tricks. In today's deal,
South pushes into six hearts.
West leads the spade 10 to
South's ace. How should declarer continue?
In the auction, South's twoheart rebid was forcing, since
North's two-over-one response
guaranteed a rebid. When
South heard about respectable
heart support, he plunged into
Blackwood. He upgraded for his
secondary club fit.
If trumps are 2-2, there will be
no problems. If they are 4-0, the
contract has no chance. But
what if they are 3-1? Then it
looks as if declarer would need
the club finesse to work. However, there is another possibility.
South cashes his heart ace,
plays a diamond to dummy's
ace, ruffs a diamond in his
hand, leads a heart to dummy's
king (getting the bad news), and
ruffs the last diamond. Then declarer plays off his other two
spade winners. With his preparations complete, South exits
with a trump, giving East the
lead.
Here, East has only clubs left
in his hand, so must play away
from his queen into dummy's
ace-jack. Note, though, that if
East still has a spade or diamond in his hand, declarer
would ruff and take the club finesse.
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted, Office
Autos-Accessories
FULL TIME C.N.As
WANTED!!
If you are looking for
a position in a NO
LIFT work
environment- come
see us at Emeritus at
Sugarland Ridge. Our
full time team
members enjoy
employment which
offers access to
medical, dental, vision
insurance, paid time
off, flexible
scheduling,
computerized
continuing education
system, opportunities
for growth and
advancement, as well
as a warm, family-like
atmosphere. We
currently have
vacancies for NIGHT
SHIFT (10p-6a)
certified nursing
assistants. If you are
energetic, caring and
enjoy giving excellent
care to seniors, then
we want you to join
our family. Apply in
person at 1551
Sugarland Ridge.
ELM LOCATING &
UTILITY SERVICES
Locate Technician
Sheridan, WY area
*On the job training
*$13-$18/hr DOE
*Company vehicle
provided
*Must have a valid
driver’s license with a
good driving record
and be able to pass a
pre-employment drug
screen
*For complete job
description go to
www.elmllc.com
Fax resume to: 406327-6877 or email
[email protected]
cating.com
EEO
THE CITY of
SHERIDAN is actively
recruiting an energetic
and dynamic
individual with
excellent skills in
customer service and
multitasking for the
Full Time position of
Administrative
Assistant for the
Utilities Division.
This position is
responsible for
performing
administrative and
secretarial duties in
support of department
operations, including
but not limited to,
maintaining
department files,
answering phones and
walk-in customer
inquiries, and
preparing
correspondence. This
is a fully benefited
position including
health, dental, vision,
and life insurance,
state pension
retirement, tuition
reimbursement, paid
time off and a
wellness program.
The hiring range is
$17.17- $18.97/hour
DOE. Candidates
must pass a
comprehensive
background check.
Qualified applicants
should submit a
completed City of
Sheridan job
application to City
Hall, 55 Grinnell Plaza
by 4/3/15. Full job
description, required
minimum
qualifications and
application
can be found at
www.sheridanwy.net.
The City of Sheridan
is a drug-free work
place.
WATER PRODUCTS,
INC.
is actively seeking an
energetic & dynamic
person with excellent
skills in customer
service & multitasking
for FT position of
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT.
Knowledge of QB
preferred but will train
the right person. Must
be able to lift 50 lbs.
Pre-employment drug
testing & background
check required.
Pick up application @
Water Products, Inc.,
1831 S. Sheridan Ave.
FORD TIRES & 16"
RIMS. 8 hole. Set of 4.
$100.00 firm. 683-7290
NOW HIRING
housekeepers.
Apply at
Candlewood Suites
1709 Sugarland Dr.
ferent cities day after day,
as I do when giving
speeches. I also try to locate
a "landmark" to orientate
myself. I know where I am
when I see the Reunion
Tower in Dallas, the Arch
in St. Louis or the Space
Needle in Seattle when I
wake up and open the curtains. -- Heloise
GAS-SAVING IDEAS
Dear Readers: If you drive
a lot for work, or to and
from work, the price of gas
can really make a dent in
your budget. Gas prices
may be low now, but they
will go up one day, so take
advantage today and save
more money. Keep these in
mind:
* Make sure tires are
properly inflated. Underinflated tires cause the engine
to work harder, which uses
more gas.
* Don't idle, if possible. Reduce the time waiting for a
Now Hiring
Overnight
Security
Maintenance
*Wage DOE
Apply in person at the
Front Desk.
1809 SUGARLAND DRIVE
SHERIDAN, WY
EXECUTIVE
HOUSEKEEPER. Top
Wages. Apply in
person at Hampton
Inn,
980 Sibley Circle.
QDOBA NOW HIRING
cooks $11/hr DOE, &
line servers $10/hr
DOE. Apply in person
2112 Coffeen Ave.
Looking for a
LONG HAUL
LIVESTOCK
RELOCATOR.
Class A CDL required.
$1600+ per week. Will
train. New fancy
equipment.
307-752-5420.
Hints from Heloise
Photographic
Memory
Dear Heloise:
When traveling,
I often have a
hard time remembering the hotel address, and sometimes I
forget my room number.
When I check in, I grab a
BUSINESS CARD and take
a picture with my cellphone, and one of the room
number as well. I have access to the address and my
room number in case I forget. -- Ted, via email
Hello to another "road
warrior," and thanks for the
reminder. Can't tell you
how many cities I have been
to that have several of the
same-name hotels within a
few blocks. Also, with electronic keys, the hotel address is NOT usually on
them. This is especially true
if you stay in the same
chain of hotels in many dif-
FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2015
Heloise
friend with the car running,
or "warming up your car"
before leaving, etc.
* Lighten the load and reduce wind resistance. Don't
haul around heavy items
that you don't need to. Try
to carry big, bulky items inside the car instead of on
top, which creates a BIG
wind block and more resistance to moving forward,
and sucks up gas mileage.
Use the hints to save
money on gasoline. Keep
good habits up and the fuel
cost down. -- Heloise
SEND A GREAT HINT
TO:
Heloise
P.O. Box 795000
San Antonio, TX 782795000
Fax: 1-210-HELOISE
Email:
Heloise(at)Heloise.com
Get your
paper
ONLINE
at
SEEKING HVAC
INSTALLER,
Experience Preferred
but will Train the Right
Person.
Apply in Person @
Kosma Heating & AC,
529 N Main Street
FT CASHIER needed.
$10/ hr. Must be 21.
Opportunity for growth.
Send reply to box 228,
c/o The Sheridan Press,
PO
Box
2006,
Sheridan, WY 82801.
Help Wanted, Medical
**LPN
PROFESSIONALS**
Join a team that
supports you –
professionally and
personally
Correctional
Healthcare
Companies is
currently seeking topnotch Healthcare
professionals to join
our team at our
Sheridan County
Detention Facility in
Sheridan, WY
Healthcare
Opportunities Include:
Licensed Practical
Nurse – Full Time
We invite you to take
a look at our career
opportunities and the
benefits of working at
CHC.
Please apply online at
www.correctcaresoluti
ons.com Careers/
current openings/
Correctional
Healthcare openings
(CHC)
or Contact [email protected]
correctcaresolutions.
com. CHC is an EEO
Employer
20): Take your time. Excess
speed or a sudden change of
plans could put you at a disadvantage unless you make
an effort to retain your
poise. Prove that you're reliable and dependable no
matter what.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Pretty is as pretty does.
Have fun and enjoy yourself
this weekend because your
favorite companions may
be too busy to give you the
attention you deserve next
week. Lend a helping hand
to a neighbor.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Someone or something
playfully shocking could
grab your attention. You
may be tempted to meet
someone at a distance in an
online chat room for a safe
and anonymous adventure.
Just don't take any unrea-
Pickups
Help Wanted,
Professional
SHERIDAN COUNTY
School District #1 is
accepting applications
for
the
following
positions:
·Elementary Music
Teacher (Tongue
River)
·Kindergarten
Teacher (Tongue
River)
·Secondary Physical
Education Teacher
(Tongue River)
The candidate must
be eligible for a
Wyoming Teaching
certificate. Possible
coaching or student
activities may be
available. If interested,
contact Brandi Miller,
[email protected]
sheridan.k12.wy.us or
visit district website,
www.sheridan.k12.wy.
us for more
information and
application.
Position open until
filled. E.O.E.
Real Estate
FSBO
1742 Edwards Dr.
Colony South
Subdivision.
2400 Sq. Ft. 4BR/2Ba
Call 307-674-7031.
Photos available on
request.
Go online today!
www.thesheridanpress.com
1965 CHEVY 1/2 TON
PICK UP. $5000.
Standard
transmission.
V-8. 86,000 original
miles. Starts & drives
great. 406-638-2020.
FOUR ULTRA Moto
Sport Maverick 17''
Rims. Fits 2004-2008
Ford F150. $350 for all.
307-763-3652.
Motorcycles
2011 SOFTTAIL
DELUXE
5,800 Miles
Two-Tone Brown
$12,500
307-752-7131
Motor Homes
JAYCO 8' Pop-up slide
in Camper. Stove, Frig,
Heaster, all works.
Clean&nice cond. $500
firm. 307-683-7290
SLIDE IN PICKUP
CAMPER. $200 OBO.
307-763-3652.
Campers, Trailers
ALASKAN CAMPER
insert w/ homemade
trailer. Snug, Cozy &
clean. Stove, icebox
& storage. Great for
fishing trip. $850.
970-209-8448
Garage Sales
Autos-Accessories
1995 GMC ALL
WHEEL DRIVE VAN
Non smoker.
Duel A/C and Heat.
Runs great.
200k+ miles.
406-638-2020. $2700.
2002 CHEVY IMPALA.
Runs Great. 35 MPG.
Cruise. A/C. OnStar.
Remote Entry. $3995.
Call 752-3325
MOVING SALE. 428
Shadow Ridge Blvd.
Children's clothes &
toys, furniture,
household goods.
7am-12pm.
SATURDAY APRIL
4th from 8am to
noon, 2698 West
Loucks
Large selection of
Christmas
decorations,
collectibles,
nightstand, women
size 7 shoes, some
clothing, household
goods and so much
more..
See these and the weekend color comics online at
www.thesheridanpress.com
Omarr’s Daily Astrological
Forecast
BIRTHDAY GUY: Actor
James Roday was born in
San Antonio, Texas, on this
date in 1976. This birthday
guy, born James Rodriguez,
starred as Shawn Spencer
on TV's "Psych" from 20062014. He also starred in the
short-lived series "Miss
Match" and has appeared on
episodes of "Love Bites" and
"Fear Itself." On the big
screen, Roday's resume includes "Gravy," "The Dukes
of Hazzard" and "Showtime."
ARIES (March 21-April
19): Harness your energies
and use them wisely. Don't
let minor attractions or irritations get under your skin.
Follow through on an inspiring thought, whether it
comes through a mentor or
just a passing conversation.
TAURUS (April 20-May
PRIME RATE
MOTORS is buying
clean, preowned
vehicles of all ages.
We also install B&W
GN hitches, 5th Wheel
Hitches, Pickup
Flatbeds, Krogman
Bale Beds. Stop by
2305 Coffeen Ave. or
call 674-6677.
sonable chances.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Think outside the box without tearing it to pieces. You
won't struggle to make ends
meet if you use a little imagination. Someone might
give you a clue, an idea, a
small gratuity, or just some
plain old-fashioned advice.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Concentrate on being original and innovative without
upsetting anyone's applecart. Voicing your opinions
in the wrong venue might
stir up controversy or cause
a rift. Don't foolishly jump
in where angels fear to
tread.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
There's a full moon in your
sign. It's spring and a young
person's fancy may be
flamed into foolishness
under the light of the sil-
Jeraldine Saunders
very moon. Remain footloose and fancy free this
weekend as you consider
new romantic partnerships.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Brilliant friendships
take center stage. Someone
might share the same goals
as you and provide the
knowledge or skill you need
to make your sad little
piggy bank smile. Enlist
support from new-found allies.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): A one-of-a-kind
purchase might be tempting. If you're a shopaholic
you may be attracted to a
vintage item or a homemade knickknack from an
exotic location. Be sure you
don't end up with a white
elephant.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Don't issue ultimatums
and don't back down. Minor
irritations and unexpected
opposition to your plans
will fade in a few days. Just
stick to your guns and wait
for the mood to change.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): You're known by your
friends. True friends are always there by your side
through thick and thin.
Make the best of the current
conditions by concentrating
on what your companions
really want and need.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): There's safety in numbers. Participate in a group
discussion, visit a local
gathering place, or go out
on a double date. The
friendlier you are toward
others, the more likely
you'll get friendly feedback
in return.
IF APRIL 4 IS YOUR
BIRTHDAY: Reach for your
dreams during the next 4-6
weeks. Anything that's good
for you'll achieve with ease.
However, you may be protected from getting what's
not in your best interest.
Ambition may drive you to
burn the candle at both
ends for the next several
months, and starting any
new business plan might be
an uphill battle. If you work
hard and fulfill your obligations you can win the stardom you crave or the kudos
you deserve in September.
Circumstances may force
you to prove yourself again
and again, but rewards will
come. A helpful opportunity
in October might lighten
the load.
040315Legals_Layout 1 4/2/15 9:22 PM Page 1
YOUR ELECTED
OFFICIALS |
CITY
John Heath
Mayor
307-675-4223
Public Notices
FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
WHY PUBLIC NOTICES ARE IMPORTANT |
Kristin Kelly
Councilor
307-673-4751
Shelleen
Smith
Councilor
307-461-7082
Thayer
Shafer
Councilor
307-674-4118
Alex Lee
Councilor
307-752-8804
Jesus Rios
Councilor
307-461-9565
Kelly Gooch
Councilor
307-752-7137
COUNTY
Pete Carroll
Treasurer
307-674-2520
Eda
Thompson
Clerk
307-674-2500
Nickie Arney
Clerk of District
Court
307-674-2960
John Fenn
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
Shelley
Cundiff
Sheridan
County Circut
Court Judge
307-674-2940
William
Edelman
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
P.J. Kane
Coroner
307-673-5837
Mike
Nickel
Chairman
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Terry
Cram
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Tom
Ringley
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Steve
Maier
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Dave
Hofmeier
Sheriff
307-672-3455
Bob
Rolston
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Paul
Fall
Assessor
307-674-2535
Matt
Redle
County
Attorney
307-674-2580
STATE
Matt
Mead
Governor
307-777-7434
Rosie
Berger
Representative
House Dist. 51
307-672-7600
Mark
Jennings
Representative
House Dist. 30
307-461-0697
John
Patton
Representative
House Dist. 29
307-672-2776
Mike
Madden
Representative
House Dist. 40
307-684-9356
Dave
Kinskey
Senator
Senate Dist. 22
307-461-4297
307-278-6030
Bruce
Burns
Senator
Senate Dist. 21
307-672-6491
Public notices allow citizens to monitor their government and make sure that it is
working in their best interest. Independent newspapers assist in this cause by
carrying out their partnership with the people’s right to know through public
notices. By offering an independent and archived record of public notices,
newspapers foster a more trusting relationship between government and its
citizens.
Newspapers have the experience and expertise in publishing public notices and
have done so since the Revolutionary War. Today, they remain an established,
trustworthy and neutral source that ably transfers information between
government and the people.
Public notices are the lasting record of how the public’s resources are used and are
presented in the most efficient and effective means possible.
IN THE DISTRICT COURT
FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT
STATE OF WYOMING ss.
COUNTY OF SHERIDAN
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
Jill Mae Randolph a/k/a Jill M. Randolph,
Deceased. )
Probate No. PR 2015-47
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR DECREE OF
DISTRIBUTION
TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN SAID
ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that on March
30, 2015, Nicholas Petry, Richard Petry, and Steven
Petry filed in the above named Court an Application for
Decree of Distribution for the purpose of distributing, by
summary procedure, the following real property located
in Sheridan County, Wyoming:
Lots 1 and 2 of Block 7 in the
Krause Addition to the Town now
the City of Sheridan, Sheridan
County, Wyoming
Persons objecting to this Application shall immediately
notify the District Court.
DATED this 30th day of March, 2015.
CROWLEY FLECK PLLP
By: /s/ Alicia D. Kisling
Alicia D. Kisling (W.S.B. # 7-4540)
Attorneys for Applicants
101 West Brundage Street
Sheridan, WY 82801
(307) 673-3000
[email protected]fleck.com
Publish: April 3, 10, 2015.
IN THE DISTRICT COURT, FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT,
COUNTY OF SHERIDAN, STATE OF WYOMING
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
JANE M. LIX,
Deceased.
Probate No. PR 2015-30
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR DECREE
ESTABLISHING RIGHT AND TITLE TO REAL PROPERTY
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Thomas
Mefford, also known as Thomas L. Mefford, Marjorie
Seader and Ashley Inguagiato and Gayle Mefford, the
devisees under the Last Will and Testament of Jane M.
Lix, who died on November 25, 2014, has filed in the
above entitled court an Application for Decree
Establishing Right and Title to Real Property concerning
certain real estate which is described as follows:
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B7
GLOSSARY OF TERMS |
Default: Failure to fulfill an obligation, especially the obligation to
make payments when due to a lender.
Encumbrance: A right attached to the property of another that may
lessen its value, such as a lien, mortgage, or easement.
Foreclosure: The legal process of terminating an owner’s interest in
property, usually as the result of a default under a mortgage.
Foreclosure may be accomplished by order of a court or by the
statutory process known as foreclosure by advertisement (also
known as a power of sale foreclosure).
Lien: A legal claim asserted against the property of another, usually
as security for a debt or obligation.
Mortgage: A lien granted by the owner of property to provide
security for a debt or obligation.
Unit 3A and Garage 3A, Indian Hills
Estates Condominiums and Garage
Units, Sheridan County, Wyoming
All objections shall be made in writing and
shall be filed with the Clerk of the District Court of the
Fourth Judicial District, Sheridan County, Wyoming, no
later than eleven (11) days after the first publication of
this Notice. If no objections are filed by said date, the
District Court shall enter its Decree establishing all right,
title, and interest to the above-described real property
in Thomas Mefford, also known as Thomas L. Mefford,
Marjorie Seader and Ashley Inguagiato and Gayle
Mefford, pursuant to the facts set forth in the
Application.
Dated this 23rd day of March, 2015.
Nickie Arney
Clerk of the District Court
By: /s/ Sue Blackley
Deputy Clerk
Timothy S. Tarver
Attorney at Law
P.O. Box 6284
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
Publish: March, 27 and April 3, 2015.
CHEYENNE, WYOMING
NOTICE OF ACCEPTANCE OF
AND
FINAL SETTLEMENT FOR HIGHWAY WORK
Notice is hereby given that the State Transportation
Commission of Wyoming has accepted as completed
according to plans, specifications and rules governing
the same work performed under that certain contract
between the State of Wyoming, acting through said
Commission, and S & S Builders, LLC the contractor on
Highway Project Numbers B134035 & B134036 in
Sheridan county consisting of bridge rehabilitations &
miscellaneous work at various locations in
Transportation District 4 & the Contractor is entitled to
final settlement therefore; that the Director of the
Department of Transportation will cause said
Contractor to be paid the full amount due him under
said contract on April 30, 2015.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is March
20, 2015.
STATE TRANSPORTATION
COMMISSION OF WYOMING
By:/s/Kimberly Lamb
Project Resource Coordinator
Budget Program
Publish: March 20, 27, April 3, 2015.
Power of Sale: A clause commonly written into a mortgage
authorizing the mortgagee to advertise and sell the property in the
event of default. The process is governed by statute, but is not
supervised by any court.
Probate: The court procedure in which a decedent’s liabilities are
settled and her assets are distributed to her heirs.
Public Notice: Notice given to the public or persons affected
regarding certain types of legal proceedings, usually by publishing
in a newspaper of general circulation. This notice is usually
required in matters that concern the public.
Disclaimer: The foregoing terms and definitions are provided merely as a guide to the
reader and are not offered as authoritative definitions of legal terms.
Your Right
To Know
and be informed
of government
legal
proceedings is
embodied in
public notices.
This newspaper
urges every
citizen to read and
study these
notices.
We strongly
advise those
seeking
further
information to
exercise their right
of access to public
records and
public meetings.
LEGAL NOTICE POLICY
The Sheridan Press publishes Legal
Notices under the following schedule:
If we receive the Legal Notice by:
Monday Noon –
It will be published in
Thursday’s paper.
Tuesday Noon –
It will be published in
Friday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Saturday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Monday’s paper.
Thursday Noon –
It will be published in
Tuesday’s paper.
Friday Noon –
It will be published in
Wednesday’s paper.
• Complete information, descriptions
and billing information are required
with each legal notice. A PDF is
required if there are any signatures,
with a Word Document attached.
• Failure to include this information
WILL cause delay in publication. All
legal notices must be paid in full
an
"AFFIDAVIT
OF
before
PUBLICATION" will be issued.
• Please contact The Sheridan Press
legal advertising department at 6722431 if you have questions.
A group of unidentified men
is pictured here in front of
the original Bank of Commerce, then located across
the alley from the Mint Bar.
The 6th man from the left
with white shirt and black
kerchief could perhaps be
Bill Eaton. The sign above
advertises Kentucky Cigars.
To the left is a Real Estate
and Insurance office. The
photo is from the SorvikBurris collection, given to
Jack Sorvik by his neighbors,
the Joe Burris family.
They are in the Sheridan
County Museum's Memory
Book collection.
B8 Scores 0403.qxp_A Section Template 4/3/15 10:41 AM Page 1
B8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2015
CROW: Sealed the deal with second goal
FROM B1
A misjudged through ball by a Gillette
defender allowed Shassetz’s pass to find the
toe of Noah Iberlin, who poked it in for the
easy goal.
Despite the two-goal advantage, though,
Johnson knew how quickly the tides could
turn, especially with the wind blowing like it
was last night.
“We were a little more defensive minded,”
Johnson said of the second half adjustments.
“But we didn’t want to give up that pressure.
We didn’t want to just come back and play to
not lose. We wanted to play to win.”
The Broncs never let up. They nearly struck
just as early in the second half as they did in
the first, but a shot bounced off the post and
the ground and somehow didn’t go in the net.
It was Crow, this time with some fancy footwork, who closed the game just as he had
opened it.
One-on-one with his defender, Crow froze
his defender with moves that Michael Flatley
may borrow. He shook the defender, tapped
the ball to Shassetz, and Shassetz gave it right
back. Crow finished the highlight-reel play
with a low kick in the bottom corner of the
goal. 3-0. Broncs win.
It may have been their first win over
Gillette in a while, but Johnson doesn’t want
to focus too much on the Camels. Sheridan
travels to Laramie next week where they will
take on the defending state champs.
“This is not even close to the highlight of
our season,” he said. “We want to start this
and say, ‘What did we do that made us successful in this game, and how can we replicate that?’ It’s going to be a tough test for us.”
The Broncs will be on the road next weekend to take on Laramie and Cheyenne South.
Sheridan’s Cody Williams takes a shot at the goal
during the game against Gillette Thursday at
Sheridan High School.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SMART: Owes VCU $500,000 buyout
FROM B1
At VCU, Smart took over a
program that had had great
success under Jeff Capel,
and then Anthony Grant.
He hopes to avoid the pitfalls at Texas that his predecessors encountered when
they left to take over programs at universities considered “football schools.”
Capel lasted five years at
Oklahoma before being
fired, and Grant spent six at
Alabama before he was dismissed.
By leaving before May 1,
Smart owes VCU a $500,000
buyout. His contract also
contains a provision that if
he became a head coach at
another institution, that
school would have to play
VCU in a home-and-home
series, or pay VCU $250,000.
Barnes led Texas to 16
NCAA Tournaments in 17
seasons but his teams
haven’t made it out of the
first weekend since 2008.
His best years came from
2003-2008, when Texas made
its first Final Four in more
than 50 years and twice
more reached the tournament’s final eight. Texas
also earned the program’s
first No. 1 ranking in the
2009-2010 season.
Smart had some success
right away at VCU when the
Rams won the CBI postseason tournament in his first
year.
But it was VCU’s monumental run in the NCAA
Tournament the following
year that really got Smart
noticed.
The Rams went from
being a questionable selection, barely getting a bid
and playing in the First
Four in Dayton, Ohio, to
beating five major-conference schools to reach the
Final Four.
The Rams have been back
in the NCAA Tournament
each of the past four seasons, but were eliminated in
the round of 32 in 2012 and
2013 and lost their first
game in overtime each of
the past two seasons.
Beyond the Final Four
run, this year might have
been Smart’s best coaching
job at VCU.
The Rams lost Briante
Weber, the leader of their
“havoc” defensive style, on
Jan. 31 to a knee injury, and
played the last month and a
half with scoring leader
Treveon Graham bothered
by a high left ankle sprain,
sometimes even sidelined.
VCU (26-10) lost six of 10
late in the season, enduring
its first three-game slide in
Smart’s six seasons, before
winning five straight,
including four in four days,
to win the Atlantic 10 title.
Smart’s 26 wins in six
consecutive seasons is a
feat matched only by Duke.
With the interest he has
generated in basketball, a
$25 million basketball practice facility is under construction and scheduled to
be ready for use in the fall.
GOAL: Gillette capitalizes on free kick
FROM B1
Just five minutes into the half, a
bump from a Sheridan defender
allowed Gillette a free kick, some 40
yards out. The Lady Broncs formed
their typical wall and readied the
defense.
That’s when Gillette’s Emma
Jurewicz booted the free kick around
the wall and past any and all defenders.
Jones had no shot.
The goalie stretched her arms as far
as they could go, but it was no use.
That ball was headed right for the
upper 90, and nobody was stopping it.
The Lady Broncs came close to an
equalizer only once, but a scrum for
the ball in the box resulted in a Robbi
Ryan yellow card rather than a goal.
Sheridan never recovered.
“We still have people playing positions they haven’t played yet ever
before, and we’re still working on combinations,” Marshall said. “But still,
with that being said, it was flat tonight.
I’m not sure why. We had a great week
of practice. It just, unfortunately, didn’t
work out for us tonight.”
The Lady Broncs will look to bounce
back from last night’s loss when they
take on Laramie and Cheyenne South
next weekend. Both games will be
played at Scott Field.
Manfred: MLB’s decision on
Hamilton probably after opener
NEW YORK (AP) — Commissioner
Rob Manfred says a decision on possible
discipline against Los Angeles Angels
star Josh Hamilton likely will happen
after opening day.
Manfred had been hoping for a decision before the Angels start play
Monday at Seattle.
“I think that we’ll have something on
Hamilton in relatively short order —
probably has been a little slower just
because he’s not available to play,”
Manfred said Wednesday on SiriusXM
radio.
Asked whether it would be before
opening day, Manfred responded: “shortly after, probably.”
Hamilton has had a long history of
drug and alcohol abuse, and has been
suspended in the past. The Angels said
Hamilton met with baseball officials last
month, but neither side provided details
on the reason for the session.
He is recovering from shoulder surgery and his status for opening day was
in jeopardy even before the meeting
with MLB.
Hamilton is going into the third season of a $125 million, five-year contract
with the Angels.
No paws to Hank craze:
Brewers pup items are hot sellers
MILWAUKEE (AP) — The
fascination with Hank the
dog has legs.
The stray pup wandered
into the Milwaukee
Brewers’ spring training
facility in Arizona last year.
Later adopted by a team
executive, the fluffy white
pooch remains a top fan
favorite.
In time for Monday’s
home opener, a kiosk of
Hank-related items has
been erected on the field
level concourse at Miller
Park. It features a variety of
items for sale, including
Hank T-shirts, plush toys
and dog leashes.
A locked display case features an array of expensive
collectibles for the most
dedicated Hank fans. A
Hank-worn All-Star game
jersey, made especially for
him, can be purchased for a
whopping $1,200.
The dog’s bowl, with food
residue still visible, has a
$100 price tag. A bed on
which Hank once slept can
be had for $250.
Want a framed picture of
Brewers catcher Jonathan
Lucroy with the precious
pup that includes swatches
of jerseys worn by each?
Shell out $175 and take it
home.
“This is just of function
of the demand for Hank
merchandise,” Brewers
chief operating officer Rick
Schlesinger said Thursday.
The Wisconsin Humane
Society receives 20 percent
of revenue from the sale of
Hank merchandise. To date,
more than $200,000 has been
raised, the team said.
Hank again will be honored with a bobblehead doll,
which will be adorned in
pink and doled out to fans
attending a Mother’s Day
game.
“It doesn’t take a rocket
scientist to figure out that
Hank is extremely popular,”
Schlesinger said.
Hank visited the
Maryvale Baseball Park in
Phoenix last week to raise
awareness for pet adoption
programs at the Arizona
Humane Society. He will
make appearances for charitable causes in the
Milwaukee area during the
season, and return for several visits to Miller Park,
too.
Otherwise, Schlesinger
said things are also looking
up with ticket sales, which
are up more than 15 percent
from the same time a year
ago despite the team’s lateseason collapse. The
Brewers missed the playoffs
for a third straight year.
“Our fans shared our disappointment the finish last
year but they are committed to this team and are
showing it with ticket purchases,” he said.
To date, the Brewers have
sold about 1.6 million tickets.
The Brewers also unveiled
a variety of unusual food
options during a sneak preview Thursday at Miller
Park, including nachos on a
stick and an 18-inch
bratwurst topped with shoestring fries, gravy, cheese
curds, fried sauerkraut,
cheese sauce, fried
jalapenos, sour cream and
chives. Buffalo-based
Delaware North Cos., the
stadium’s food vendor,
developed the items.