More than your typical Easter egg To infinity and beyond

WEEKEND
Saturday, March 28, 2015
129th Year, No. 263
Serving Sheridan County,
Wyoming
Independent and locally
owned since 1887
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
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THE SHERIDAN
ON THE WEB: www.thesheridanpress.com
PHOTOS, VIDEO AND BREAKING
NEWS UPDATES
Sheridan soccer
teams battle
Riverton. B1
Beyond window
dressings, C1
Cover-up isn't the issue.
For most, windows are welcome — the more, the merrier. They usher in natural
light, and sunshine is a
surefire pick-me-up. There
is that privacy thing — you
don't want to feel like you're
living in a fishbowl. But
equally important, is the
matter of decor's finishing
touch, the punctuation and
warmth (both visual and
physical) that fabric adds, in
the form of well-chosen window treatments.
More than
your typical
Easter egg
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Above: Betty Wendtland displays an egg decorated in a traditional Ukrainian
method. Right: Wendtland, left, helps Cisco Gallegos mark a chicken egg as she
teaches a sixth-grade class to make the eggs last week at Holy Name Catholic
School.
Musician earns metal
fans’ dream, A3
SHERIDAN — Since its
inception in the early 1980s,
metal band Megadeth has
sold more than 50 million
albums worldwide and
played thousands of sold-out
shows in front of millions of
fans.
Sheridan resident
creates traditional
Ukrainian Easter eggs
BY ALISA BRANTZ
[email protected]
SHERIDAN — Traditionally,
Ukrainian women prepared themselves for Pysanky decorating by
purifying their spiritual state of
mind for the entire day prior —
living peacefully, avoiding gossip,
being patient with family and
preparing a fine dinner.
Today, if you want to partake in
the art of Easter egg dyeing, you
probably just boil some eggs and
dip them in store-bought colors
with your kids. But some local
artists, like Betty Wendtland, prefer to maintain some of the
Christian traditions behind the
ancient art of egg decorating.
Pysanky are Ukrainian Easter
eggs decorated by writing designs
on dried eggshells with beeswax
and layering dye on the exposed
areas, working from light to dark.
Historically, the Pysanky were
decorated during Lent, as a
sacred event done at night, as no
one was allowed to watch the
women work on the eggs. They
believed this process transferred
the goodness of the household to
the designs and pushed away the
evil.
As many as 60 eggs would be
finished per household by Holy
Thursday and everyone in the
community then received an egg
for Easter. The Pysanky were also
To infinity and beyond
Gillette, Sheridan company does work for NASA
A project with a noble
mission, A2
SHERIDAN — Abuse and
neglect can be overwhelming ordeals for a child and
made more difficult by an
arduous journey through
the court system on the way
to stability. The Children’s
Justice Project is the
Wyoming Supreme Court’s
way of making that journey
a little easier to travel.
GILLETTE (AP) — Next time NASA’s crawler transporter makes the 4.2-mile trip from the assembly shop to
the launch pad at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida,
the massive, lumbering 1960s machine will have new
capabilities and 88 new L&H Industrial logos engraved
into parts the Gillette company machined, installed and
tested.
Fifty years after the company first opened its doors,
L&H has tackled its biggest job to date and its first government contract, said Bill Schroyer, L&H’s project manager for the transporter rebuild.
“Just walking in the door was something,” Schroyer
said about working with NASA.
More specifically, NASA has tasked L&H to redesign the
lower rollers of the crawler, which carries the spacecraft
to the launching pad. The company’s work boosted the
machine’s carrying capacity from 18 million pounds to 24
million pounds, enough to allow the vehicle to carry
NASA’s new Space Launch System.
‘We’re used to
kind of making
our own
decisions.
The biggest difference
is the amount of
paperwork.’
Bill Schroyer
L&H manager for transporter build
SEE EGGS, PAGE 7
Wyoming population
reaches estimated
584,000 in 2014
CHEYENNE (AP) — Wyoming’s population
increased 0.2 percent over a year to 584,153 in July
2014, according to estimates released by the U.S.
Census Bureau.
The annual increase from July 2013 of 930 persons is the slowest increase since 2001.
After accounting for births and deaths, the estimated net migration indicates that nearly 2,200
more persons left Wyoming than moved into the
state between July 2013 and July 2014.
“Migration is mostly driven by changes in
employment, which is particularly true for
Wyoming,” said Wenlin Liu, principal economist
with state Economic Analysis Division.
People tend to move to areas where there are jobs
available and conversely may leave the area where
employment opportunities becomes limited.
SEE NASA, PAGE 8
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given to priests, placed on family
graves and placed in animal feeding troughs and under beehives to
ensure there were many young
born and much honey in the
combs.
SEE POPULATION, PAGE 8
The Sheridan Press
144 Grinnell Ave. Sheridan, WY 82801
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www.DestinationSheridan.com
Today’s edition is published for:
Franci Felde
of Sheridan
OPINION
VOICES
PAGE SIX
ALMANAC
4
5
6
9
SPORTS
B1
COMICS
B4
HOME & GARDEN C1
YOUTH
C3
A2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2015
A project with a noble mission
Children’s Justice Project focuses on children in need
BY KELLI HEITSTUMAN-TOMKO
[email protected]
SHERIDAN — Abuse and
neglect can be overwhelming ordeals for a child,
made more difficult by an
arduous journey through
the court system on the way
to stability. The Children’s
Justice Project is the
Wyoming Supreme Court’s
way of making that journey
a little easier to travel.
The Wyoming Supreme
Court started the CJP in
1999, utilizing funds that
the federal government pro-
vides to all 50 states to help
children, families and
tribes at risk or in crisis.
Part of those provisions are
for each state to make an
assessment of their foster
care and adoption laws and
processes and to develop
plans for a better system.
“The CJP focuses on
abuse and neglect situations with court-involved
cases,” CJP coordinator
Eydie Trautwein said. “One
of our purposes is to specialize quality representation for the families in
these cases. When they
have quality representation, then the process can
move smoothly and quickly.”
The process is complex,
ranging from determining
if a child needs to be taken
from the home to whether
charges need to be filed
against the parents or
guardians. Determinations
have to be made concerning
what charges need to be
filed. Child abuse charges
are criminal, but removing
a child from custody is a
civil matter. It can take the
combined efforts of defense
attorneys, prosecutors,
advocates, the Department
of Family Services, therapists and judges to maneuver the process.
Members of the CJP advisory council are appointed
by the Wyoming Supreme
Court chief justice and
include district court
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
In this photo illustration, a child’s toy is left on the divider inside the 4th Judicial District Court at
the Sheridan County Courthouse. Inside this room, rulings are made which affect the lives of children who live in abusive or unsafe family environments.
judges, prosecutors, defense
attorneys, state legislators
and a tribal representative
to help deal with complex
issues concerning the
Arapaho and Shoshoni
tribes in Wyoming. The
council meets quarterly,
often through teleconferencing, and has a conference once a year.
Sheridan Deputy County
Attorney Sheryl Bunting is
part of the CJP council as
is 4th Judicial District
Court Judge John Fenn.
Bunting has been a
guardian ad litem, representing the interest of children in cases, and a parents’ attorney, representing
them in court as well. In
law school, she said, she
knew she wanted to help
people, but she didn’t know
what direction that would
take.
“I’ve been on every side of
the table, so to speak,”
Bunting said. “One of the
things the CJP does is have
someone on every side of
the table who are mindful
of federal legislation efforts
concerning abused and neglected children.”
Members of the council
are experienced in their
field be it as an attorney, a
judge or a state legislator.
Permanent placement of
children in abusive situations is a goal for the CJP.
According to a 2008 report
by the U. S. Department of
Justice, Office of Juvenile
Justice and Delinquency
Prevention, remaining too
long in temporary foster
care homes can further
harm children already in
crisis. Sadly, that kind of
permanency isn’t always
possible.
“There are issues we
don’t know about yet,”
Bunting said. “Sometimes
we have a kid who is so
traumatized and so damaged, we’ll place them with
a family and it will all fall
apart. Then they have to
deal with another loss,
another trauma and another feeling of being abandoned.”
The CJP tries to keep the
entire process — from filing
charges to placing children
in safe homes to terminating parental rights or rehabilitating parents — running smoothly, making sure
families have quality advocates for both sides of a
custodial issue.
The organization also produces several books and
manuals including bench
books for attorneys and
judges new to the process
and children’s books helping explain the court
process to kids.
“There’s books for kids at
different age levels and
some for parents so everyone knows what’s happening throughout the
process,” Bunting said.
“There are also scholarships for judges and attorneys to attend trainings
across the country.”
“We’re really lucky (in
Sheridan County),”
Bunting said. “Everyone
here seems to be on the
same page, from the defense
attorneys, to the prosecutors, to the judges to DFS,
even the therapists and the
schools.”
Trautwein said the legal
world can change very
quickly, though.
“In these last elections,
there were 13 new county
attorneys elected across the
state,” Trautwein said.
“That could mean new
attorneys who have no
experience in juvenile justice.”
At the heart of the matter,
the project’s goal is to provide better outcomes for
children facing trauma
from abuse and neglect who
need a safe place to call
home.
“We’re kind of the quality
assurance of the program,”
Trautwein said. “It’s our
job to see that no family
languishes in the court system.”
Cancer survivors
start support
group
SHERIDAN — A cancer
survivors support group,“A
Shared Journey,” has been
formed. It meets Monday
evenings at 5:30 p.m. inside
the Sheridan Senior Center.
Survivors of cancer,
regardless of diagnosis, and
those currently undergoing
treatment, are welcome to
attend.
For more information, call
Renea Parker at the Welch
Cancer Center, 674-6022
SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Musician earns metal fans’ dream
Delivery as low as $108 a year! CallTODAY!!
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Shane Luckie of Sheridan plucks at his Dave Mustaine signature guitar in his home on Thursday.
Luckie won a guitar playing contest and will have the privilege of playing Black Sabbath’s
“Paranoid” with former Megadeth drummer, Shawn Drover, during the Shawn Drover Drum Madness
concert March 28 at the Retro Theatre in Glendive, Montana.
Contest win gives
Luckie chance
of a lifetime
BY TRAVIS PEARSON
[email protected]
SHERIDAN — Since its inception in the
early 1980s, metal band Megadeth has sold
more than 50 million albums worldwide
and played thousands of sold-out shows in
front of millions of fans.
Back in the ‘90s, Shane Luckie was just
another fan. The Sheridan native, then 17
years old, watched the band perform in
Billings, Montana. Little did he realize
back then, but his story had yet to come
full circle. Last Tuesday, he won a contest
that, for one song, will make him the envy
of metal fans everywhere.
The 35-year-old musician is headed back
to Montana today to take the stage with former Megadeth drummer and metal legend
Shawn Drover.
“It’s kind of hard to believe,” Luckie said.
“It probably won’t hit me until I’m up on
stage with him.”
Don’t let the last name fool you — Luckie
had to earn his spot under the bright
lights. The story started a few weeks ago,
when a contest out of Glendive, Montana,
caught his eye on Facebook.
“I checked it out, and it said two guitar
players will get chosen to play with Shawn
Drover,” Luckie explained. “I thought, ‘Oh,
that’s cool.’ I saw you just had to play three
songs, and that’s pretty much how it got
started.”
The guitarist, who grew up in the
Ranchester and Dayton areas and has lived
in Sheridan since he was 16, needed to
record versions of three songs: “Paranoid”
by Black Sabbath, “Highway to Hell” by
AC/DC and “Living After Midnight” by
Judas Priest.
For a couple weeks, Luckie and the rest of
his Sheridan-based band, Hate To Feel,
learned the songs so he could record his
performances in a live setting. He didn’t
want to play them like he was following
sheet music, though. He preferred to make
the songs his own.
“What I wanted to do — they’re fairly
easy songs — as far as ‘Paranoid,’ I wanted
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Shane Luckie of Sheridan holds his Dave
Mustaine signature guitar in his home on
Thursday.
to put my licks and stuff and make them, I
don’t want to say modern, but make them
more my taste,” he said. “Put my stamp on
them, basically.”
With the songs recorded, Luckie posted
the videos to the band’s Facebook page and
YouTube and sent links to the contest
organizers of all the submissions.
On March 17, Luckie got the good news.
Not only did he make the cut, but he also
discovered Drover handpicked the winning
musicians. Luckie will play “Paranoid,”
and a 16-year-old guitarist from Montana
will join Drover for “Living After
Midnight.” More than a week later, it’s still
hard for Luckie to describe his excitement
for the show. One of the best parts, he said,
has been support from friends and family
after more than 20 years playing music.
“I think a lot of people around here,
other than people I went to school with,
don’t even know I play guitar,” he said. “So
that’s been cool just getting the recognition
from friends and family saying congratulations and stuff like that.”
Of course, the highlight will be joining
Drover on stage at the Retro Theatre in
Glendive tonight.
Luckie said he enjoys all sorts of music,
everything from classical to blues to metal
and in between. But still, for a guy who
owns a Megadeth guitar, it’s hard to keep a
cool head when preparing to get up on
stage with Drover, a guy, as Luckie says,
“who’s traveled all over the world and
played big arenas.”
“I’m trying to downplay it so I don’t get
nervous, like, ‘You know, I’m just going up
there to play with some guy,’” Luckie said.
“But I know there are probably millions of
people who would want to play with him.”
The Shawn Drover Drum Madness
Concert will take place at the Retro Theatre
in Glendive, Montana, beginning at 8 p.m.
today. Tickets are $25 cash-only at the door.
AAUW panel to highlight
contributions over 100 years
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The
Sheridan Branch of the
American Association of
University Women and
First Interstate Bank invite
the public to view six creative panels highlighting
the involvement of the
branch’s contributions over
the past 100 years and current AAUW programs.
See all of the creative panels and meet members of
AAUW, to learn about how
you can participate, at a
reception to be held
Monday at 4 p.m. at the
First Interstate Bank at 4 S.
Main St.
Panel topics include the
branch’s creation of
Sheridan’s first children’s
theater program, paying the
debt for Indian Days and
assisting Sheridan College
since its inception.
Some panels display two
national endowments honoring Sheridan women, Dr.
Virginia Wright and Sue
Birkholz. Two Sheridan
women received national
funding toward their graduate studies.
First Interstate Bank, The
Sheridan Press, Sheridan
Media and the Homer A.
and Mildred S. Scott
Foundation sponsored the
Sheridan Branch AAUW
100th Anniversary luncheon
held this past October with
100 in attendance. At that
time, three of the six creative panels had been completed.
The front doors will be
open. For more information
call Val Burgess at 674-4080.
(ISSN 1074-682X)
Published Daily except Sunday
and six legal holidays.
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Publisher
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A4
OPINION
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN PRESS EDITORIAL |
Is Kobza a
leader without
followers?
S
heridan County School
District 1 Superintendent
Marty Kobza has reached a
point at which it no longer
matters if he’s good at his job.
On Tuesday, members of the
West Sheridan County
Education Association teachers
union told the district’s board
of trustees that a vote taken by
district employees showed a
lack of confidence in Kobza’s
abilities to lead them.
WSCEA President Shannon
Moline told the board that 65
percent of those eligible to vote
— everyone except for administrators — did so. Of those who
voted, Moline said a ratio of
two to one said they had no
confidence in the superintendent.
Reasons given for the sentiment have been vague —
morale, transparency, money
management. No specific examples of wrongdoing have been
cited, but the group has
expressed frustration along
with parents, that Big Horn
Middle School/High School
Principal George Mirich’s contract was not renewed.
Likewise, the school board
has done little to back its decision to renew Kobza’s contract
but not Mirich’s.
Due to laws protecting personnel issues, the true reason
for Mirich’s lack of renewal
may never be made public.
But the board should speak to
why they have put their faith in
Kobza. When the WSCEA and
others expressed concerns
Tuesday, the board should have
given specific reasons regarding why it has backed the
superintendent. Yet oddly, they
haven’t even discussed in public meetings the fact that Kobza
has been chosen as the northeast region nominee for
Wyoming Superintendent of
the Year by the Northeast
Superintendents of Wyoming.
Nobody seems to be in
Kobza’s corner. If the board
members had enough faith to
renew his contract, they should
explain in detail why. The
board members should not hide
behind superficial comments of
support for fear of angering
constituents who disagree. It
does little to reassure members
of the school district who are
unsure which side to believe.
Without his supporters going
to bat for him, though, Kobza
has a rough road ahead. With
morale low, it is difficult to get
educators and staff to focus on
moving forward. How do you
move forward under a leader
you don’t believe in? How do
you buy into a leader’s ideas if
you don’t support him?
You don’t. You get bogged
down in petty disagreements
bred by a lack of trust.
There is a saying that a
leader without any followers is
just a guy taking a walk. Unless
people start voicing their support for Kobza, his actions and
his policies, the superintendent
of the year candidate may end
up being a lone man wandering.
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2015
LETTER |
Grateful parent
Re: Proud of Arvada-Clearmont
schools
This week's ArvadaClearmont Spring Concert featuring Basque Heritage was a
pure delight.
I commend Mrs. Olson, the K12 music teacher for Sheridan
County School District 3, for
her ability to plan a unique,
lively and rich musical and
dance experience for our students. My heart swelled to see
my sometimes timid, 7-year-old
daughter singing and dancing
confidently in front of a
“packed house,” and Mrs.
Olson’s free-spirited participation showcased how she builds
this confidence in the classroom while she teaches a history and culture that gives our
area its flavor.
The audience clapped along,
Basque people in attendance
gave an impromptu fandango
demonstration, and everyone
was encouraged to “whoop” or
“holler” if they felt compelled
— more than a few did!
Additionally (and these words
are always overdue), I thank
our administrators and teachers in SCSD3. They have
worked tirelessly to keep parents informed regarding policy,
while continuing to provide a
safe and ambitious learning
environment.
When I sent my first child to
school for the first time, I was
overwhelmed by the responsibility that school staff carry
every day of their working
lives. Public school systems are
so “commonplace” today, but
shaping young minds is so powerful. How grateful I am to be so
proud of “my” school.
Misty Moore Stoll
Clearmont
QUOTABLES |
Disbelief, shock worldwide at
co-pilot’s role in Alps crash
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Incredulity, shock, disbelief and horror.
Around the world, from leaders to pilots to victims’ relatives to ordinary people, the news that
prosecutors believe a 27-year-old co-pilot deliberately sent Germanwings Flight 9525 straight into
a French mountain produced a range of emotions.
French prosecutor Brice Robin said Andreas
Lubitz was alone at the plane’s controls and
“intentionally” flew the Airbus A320 into the
mountain Tuesday on its way from Barcelona to
Duesseldorf, killing all 150 people on board.
Here are some reactions:
“Today, news has reached us that gives this
tragedy a new, simply incomprehensible dimension ... this news affects me exactly the same way
as it probably does most people. Something like
this goes beyond anything we can imagine.”
— German Chancellor Angela Merkel.
“One person can’t have the right to end the
lives of hundreds of people and families.”
— Spanish factory worker Esteban
Rodriguez, who lost two work friends in the
crash and spoke of his “feeling of impotence, of
rage” at the news.
Lufthansa has “no knowledge on what have
might have motivated the co-pilot to take this terrible action.”
— Carsten Spohr, the chief executive of
Lufthansa which owns Germanwings.
“I gave this information to my colleagues immediately, and they were just as stunned as I was. I
told them it is much, much worse than we had
thought. It doesn’t make the number of dead any
worse, but if it had been a technical defect then
measures could have been taken so that it would
never happen again.”
— Ulrich Wessel, principal of Joseph Koenig
High School in Haltern, Germany, which lost 16
students and two teachers in the crash.
“Shocked by the latest details provided by
investigators.”
— Tweet from Spanish Prime Minister
Mariano Rajoy, whose nation had dozens of
Germanwings crash victims.
“I was feeling bad, because I personally knew
her and her mother. But now the most recent
news, which I read while eating, if it turns out to
be true, is of no help to the families.”
— Manu Navas, tennis teacher for one victim,
12-year-old Emma Solera Pardo, at Sant Cugat del
Valles, a town near Barcelona.
“Right now, I don’t think there’s anyone who
isn’t worried. We are not immune, none of us, to
this kind of thing. Flying is a safe form of transport, but you can’t stop crazy. If someone decides
to act in a crazy manner, there’s nothing anyone
can do about it.”
— Steve Serdachny, 45, who had flown in to
Helsinki’s airport from Toronto and was headed
for Moscow.
The co-pilot’s ability to crash the jet how he did
“does seem incredible in this day and age when
there are so many different levels of security and
safety checks and measures. How could a pilot
lock another pilot out of the cockpit?”
— Osmo Karppinen, a church janitor leaving
Helsinki’s airport with his girlfriend for a week
of vacation in Turkey.
“We are trying to understand what happened.
The family wants clear answers.”
— Eran Betzalel, the brother-in-law of Eyal
Baum, the lone Israeli victim of the crash.
Sweaty palms,
turning
stomach
I
’ve always slightly dreaded
any need for publicly speaking in front of large groups. I
do it anyway, and I get over it,
but it always makes me nervous.
My palms get sweaty, my
stomach turns a little and my
thoughts tend
to get a little
jumbled.
So when I
was invited to
be a part of a
panel about
the media
recently for
the current
EDITOR’S
class of
COLUMN
Leadership
|
Wyoming, I
Kristen Czaban
immediately
agreed and
then immediately became nervous.
The organizers of the session
sent an email with ideas they
hoped I and the other panelists
would talk about. I studiously
took notes, prepared an introduction and tried to remember
everything I was taught in public speaking class in high
school.
The whole “Imagine everyone
in their underwear” thing
never worked for me. It kind of
seemed creepy to me.
Make eye contact — but with
who? Do I look at the person in
the front row? Or should I
direct my attention further
back in the room? There just
always seemed like so many
things to remember beyond
just what you wanted to say.
That explains why my nerves
always seem to be on edge
when I have to speak publicly.
But I have this thing, you see,
about doing things that scare
the living daylights out of me. I
hate heights, but I really want
to go skydiving. I still peer out
over tall bridges and even
muster the courage to walk out
on those glass floors that
stretch out from city skyscrapers.
I don’t like to do these things,
naturally. You would think my
fear would lessen seeing as
though nothing bad has happened to me. But, it hasn’t; so I
continue to do the things that
scare me in hopes that some
day that fear will diminish.
Of course, I showed up at the
event Thursday — my heart
racing just slightly — and
essentially threw all of the
preparation I had done out the
window.
I’m not sure I referred to my
notes once. I knew what was in
them, of course, but it turned
out I didn’t need them. We
stayed on topic and discussed
some of the items that had
been on the list sent out by
organizers, but mostly we
responded to questions and carried on a conversation with
members of the audience. It
was great!
Once I realized there really
was no need for me to be nervous — about 10 minutes into
the event — my voice leveled
out, my thoughts cleared and
my palms were (mostly) dry.
I have another public speaking duty today. Maybe this time
won’t be so nerve-racking.
IN WYOMING |
DROP US A LINE |
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ters are those that stay on a single topic and are brief.
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P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyo. 82801
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House Dist. 51
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Email: [email protected]
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COMMUNITY
VOICES
SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A5
COMMUNITY PERSPECTIVES |
Signs of spring also mean signs of tourism season beginning
I
f the view from our office at the Welcome
Center is any indication, then the darker
tones of the grassland surrounding
Sheridan and the receding snow in the
Bighorns is a clear sign that spring is here —
and tourism season won’t be far behind.
This is great news for
those of us in the community whose businesses
depend on visitor-generated revenue, and Sheridan
is poised to realize another year of positive economic impact from
tourism in 2015.
Since the beginning of
SHAWN
our fiscal year, (July 1,
BUCKLEY
2014), Sheridan Travel
|
and Tourism has collected
more than $516,000 in
gross lodging tax —
which represents a 16 percent increase versus last fiscal year at this time.
In January alone we collected over 238
percent more revenue than the same
month in 2014, which is more than 247 percent of the January monthly average.
These figures are incredible, but we’re
finding that to develop and sustain this
degree of positive economic impact we
have to maximize the efficiency of how and
where these dollars are allocated.
Some of these avenues are more traditional in their nature of marketing, and
some are more direct — especially in the
case of group tour operators and film production. Much of my year to date has been
spent traveling and working with our travel partners in person at various conventions, such as National Tour Association,
Regional Tourism Organization and the
GoWest Summit, as a means of attracting a
higher volume of group tours and conventions to the area.
Since we are one of very few Wyoming
communities represented on-site, it is a
tremendous asset to have not only our participation at these events but also the
resources necessary to ensure our group
travel clients and community partners
alike are working together to ensure a positive experience for everyone involved.
With that in mind, we recently acquired
the talents of Nicole Pearce as our new
Destination Development Manager. Nicole
has a wealth of experience in the hospitality industry and a strong familiarity with
Sheridan’s tourism market — especially as
it pertains to group tours and conventions,
and we look forward to the many successes
to come from her addition to our team.
We continue to actively pursue new film
projects as well, and I once again had the
opportunity to work side-by-side with Colin
Stricklin from the State Film Office at the
Association of Film Commissioners
International Locations show in Los
Angeles and South by Southwest in Austin
earlier this year. Both were excellent platforms in terms of showcasing Sheridan as
a stand-alone in a prominent film destination, and at the moment our office is
reviewing two production proposals that
are a direct result of attendance at these
shows.
One aspect of marketing tourism in
Sheridan that blurs the line between traditional and direct is the Welcome Center
where our offices are located.
This facility has historically served as an
information point complementary to the
offices of the Sheridan County Chamber of
Commerce, but it is literally in the process
of transforming into a full-service visitor’s
center — with the explicit purpose of driving traffic into Sheridan.
We found that over 48 percent of the
105,000 annual welcome center visitors
have not made their lodging reservations
before they have arrived, and we look forward to better positioning the facility to
capitalize on this revenue potential for the
community.
Keep an eye out for more to come of this
exciting transition as we work towards
making the most of the upcoming tourism
season.
SHAWN BUCKLEY is the executive director of Sheridan Travel and Tourism.
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W
The 2016 Republican racing form: First edition
ith Ted Cruz announcing and Rand Paul and Marco
Rubio soon to follow, it’s time to start handicapping
the horses and making enemies.
No point in wasting time on the Democratic field. There
is none. The only thing that can stop Hillary Clinton is an
act of God, and He seems otherwise occupied. As does
Elizabeth Warren, the only Democrat who could conceivably defeat her.
On to the GOP.
First Tier
1. Marco Rubio. Trails badly in current polls, ranking
seventh at 5 percent, but high upside potential.
Assets: Foreign policy looms uncharacteristically large
in this election cycle, and Rubio is the most knowledgeable
and fluent current contender on everything from Russia to
Cuba to the Middle East. The son of
Cuban immigrants, he can break into
flawless Spanish (so can Jeb Bush) and
speak passionately about the American
story in a party that lost the Hispanic
vote by 44 points in 2012.
Liabilities (in the primaries): His Gang
of Eight immigration apostasy, though
his current enforcement-first position
has wide appeal. Second, after Barack
CHARLES
Obama, will voters want another firstKRAUTHAMMER term senator with no executive experi|
ence? (Same for Cruz and Paul.)
Major appeal: Fresh, young, dynamic
persona is a powerful counterpoint to
Clinton fatigue.
Goes out at 3-1.
2. Jeb Bush. The consensus favorite (though I remain a
bit skeptical). Solid, soft-spoken, serious, with executive
experience and significant achievements as governor.
What he lacks in passion, he makes up for in substance.
And he has shown backbone in sticking to his semi-heretical positions on immigration and Common Core.
Obvious liability: His name. True, it helps him raise tens
of millions of dollars, but it saddles him with legacy and
dynastic issues that negate the inherent GOP advantage of
running a new vs. old, not-again campaign against Hillary.
Odds: 7-2.
3. Scott Walker. A fine record of conservative achievement. Has shown guts and leadership in taking on labor
unions and winning three elections (five if you count
proxy elections) against highly energized Democrats.
Good, rousing speech in Iowa, but has stumbled since,
flubbing routine questions on evolution and patriotism,
then appearing to compare the Islamic State to Wisconsin
demonstrators. Rookie mistakes, easily forgotten — if he
learns from them.
Pandered on ethanol and fired a staffer who complained
about Iowa’s unwarranted influence. Sure, everyone panders to Iowa, but Walker’s calling card is standing up to
pressure.
Most encouraging sign: ability to maintain altitude after
meteoric rise. Numbers remain steady. And his speeches
continue to impress.
Odds: 4-1.
Second Tier
4. Chris Christie. Some politicians have their one
moment. Christie might have missed his in 2012 when his
fearless in-your-face persona was refreshingly new. Over
time, however, in-your-face can wear badly. That plus
Bridgegate cost him traction and dropped him out of the
first tier. Biggest problem: being boxed out ideologically
and financially by Jeb Bush for the relatively-moderategovernor-with-cross-aisle-appeal slot. 12-1.
5. Ted Cruz. Grand, florid campaign launch with matching rhetoric. Straightforward base-oriented campaign. Has
developed a solid following. Could break out, especially in
debate. 15-1.
6. Mike Huckabee. Great name recognition, affable, popular. But highly identified with social/cultural issues —
how far can that carry him beyond Iowa and evangelicals?
15-1.
7. Rand Paul. Events have conspired against him.
Obama’s setbacks and humiliations abroad have created a
national mood less conducive to Paul’s non-interventionism. His nearly 13-hour anti-drone filibuster would not fly
today. Is trying to tack back, even signing the anti-Irandeal letter of the 47 senators. Strong youth appeal, though
outreach to minorities less successful thus far. Bottom
line: High floor of devoted libertarians; low ceiling in
today’s climate. 30-1.
Longer Shots
8. Carly Fiorina. Getting her footing. Given current
societal taboos, she is best placed to attack Hillary and has
done so effectively. Can she do a Huckabee 2008 and,
through debates, vault to the first tier? Unlikely. But
because she’s talented and disciplined, not impossible. 501.
9. Ben Carson. Polling high, but is a novice making
cringe-worthy gaffes, for example, on the origins of Islam
and on gay choice (“a lot of people who go into prison go
into prison straight, and when they come out, they’re
gay”). And not knowing that the Baltic states are in NATO.
Truly good man, brilliant doctor, great patriot. But not
ready for the big leagues. Chance of winning? Zero.
Others
Bobby Jindal, Rick Perry, Rick Santorum and John
Kasich — still below radar. If they surface, they’ll be featured in the next racing form.
CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER writes a weekly political column for The Washington Post. He is also a
Fox News commentator.
A6
PAGE SIX
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2015
TODAY IN HISTORY |
Detoxification
diets
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
U
sing the term “detoxification”
is a turn off for many dietitians
and traditional health care professionals, as it is seen to
describe diet approaches that are not
evidence based.
This is too bad, because there are
many great detoxification programs
available that provide significant
health benefits. Really, detoxification is just a different way of looking at a healthy lifestyle.
Detoxification is
the ways in which
our bodies identify,
neutralize and
eliminate things
that are unhealthy
for us. Tailored
Nutrition offers a
detox workshop
available for
GEORGIA
groups or individuals to help them
BOLEY
make the best
|
detox diet plan.
When evaluating
detox diets, there
are many questions to ponder.
What is your goal? If your goal
is to improve energy and overall
health, a detoxification diet may be
very helpful for you. If your goal is
primarily significant weight loss,
then detox diets are not for you.
This is because our liver detoxification systems require quite a bit of
energy to work well, so low calorie
diets are not ideal for good liver
detoxification support.
Does the plan help you identify
your potential toxin exposure? To
truly develop a tailored detoxification plan, you need to be able to pinpoint your toxin exposure and load,
as this helps determine the appropriate plan to make. We developed a
“Detox Decision Tree” to help this
process.
The University of Wisconsin
Department of Family MedicineIntegrative Medicine Patient
Handout on Detoxification lists
potential toxin sources as:
• anti-nutrients such as alcohol,
advanced glycation end products,
high fructose corn syrup and caffeine.
• normal metabolic by-products
including bile, urea, stool, carbon
dioxide and nitrogen.
• medications used improperly,
inappropriately or too often.
• heavy metals such as mercury,
arsenic, lead, cadmium and aluminum.
• chemicals including phthalates,
Bisphenol A, pesticides, herbicides,
cleaning products, solvents, glue and
tobacco products.
• allergens such as food, mold,
dust, pollen and chemicals.
• causes of infection including
bacteria, viruses, yeast and parasites.
• social, emotional and spiritual
challenges such as excess stress,
unhealthy mental states, distractions, over-stimulation, lack of spiritual connection, isolation, nature
deprivation and negative emotions.
Does the plan address the five
basic detoxification program
components?
These components are:
• exercise, every day, especially
outside.
• regular sweating, either with
your exercise or in a sauna or steam
room.
• healthy nutrition rich in organic
vegetables, legumes, fruit and water.
• self-reflection including meditation or breathing-focused relaxation.
• body work such as massage or
acupuncture.
Does the plan address and
honor your body’s natural detoxification systems? These systems
include the gastrointestinal system
and its accessory organ, the liver. It
also includes the kidneys, skin,
lungs, lymphatic system, circulation
and brain health.
Whether detoxification means
increasing your exercise and water
consumption or decreasing your
alcohol and stress, a well-developed
plan can be helpful for most.
Researching the many detoxification programs out there in the last
18 months, some of my favorite
finds include discovering the benefits of watercress, artichokes, pomegranates and green tea in aiding our
natural detoxification systems.
GEORGIA BOLEY (MS, RDN, LD, CSO) is the owner of Tailored
COURTESY PHOTO |
Rehearsing with Land’s End
The Land's End Chamber Trio rehearsed with two guest soloists recently. Pictured, from left, are Gerard
Gibbs, oboe; John Lowry, violin; Susanne Ruberg-Gordon, piano; Marcin Swoboda, viola and Beth RootSandvoss, cello. The trio and guests will perform at concert Thursday in Sheridan.
LOCAL BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Want a chance to stay at the
Historic Sheridan Inn?
SHERIDAN — Tickets are currently on
sale for the unveiling of the Historic
Sheridan Inn’s newly renovated rooms.
On April 18, the rooms at the Inn will be
raffled or auctioned for a one-night stay on
May 15, giving individuals the opportunity
to be the first guests since 1965 to have the
ability or option to stay the night.
The event on April 18 will begin at 5:30
p.m. with a social hour including cocktails
and heavy hors d’oeuvres. The evening
will also include games, raffles and a
silent auction. At 7 p.m., a live auction will
begin during which phone bids will be
accepted.
Seating at the event is limited.
Tickets are $500 for reserved sponsor
tables (seats eight) or $50 for an individual.
For additional information or to purchase a ticket, contact Renee Obermueller
at 751-2246 or email friendsofthesheri-
[email protected]
The Historic Sheridan Inn is located at
856 N. Broadway St.
U.S. Army Jazz Ambassadors to
perform free concert
SHERIDAN — The Jazz Ambassadors —
the official touring band of the U.S. Army
— will perform at the WYO Theater at 7:30
p.m. Tuesday.
The free concert will feature the 19-member ensemble formed in 1969.
Concerts by the Jazz Ambassadors are
designed to entertain all types of audiences. Custom compositions and arrangements will highlight the group’s talent and
soloists.
The band’s repertoire includes big band,
swing, bebop, Latin, contemporary jazz,
standards, popular tunes, Dixieland,
vocals and patriotic selections.
To reserve your seats, call the WYO
Theater box office at 672-9084.
The WYO Theater is located at 42 N.
Main St.
SUNDAY AND MONDAY EVENTS |
Sunday
• All day, Food for Fines amnesty week, Sheridan County public libraries
Monday
• 7-9 p.m., Wyoming Game and Fish Department presentation “Bear Aware,” Dayton
Town Hall, 608 Broadway St., Dayton
TIPPED OVER |
Swedish poet Tomas
Transtromer dies at 83
STOCKHOLM (AP) — Swedish poet and
Nobel Literature Prize winner Tomas
Transtromer has died at age 83, Swedish
publisher Bonniers said Friday.
The reclusive, mild-mannered wordsmith
— considered a master of metaphor and
one of the most important Scandinavian
poets of the post-World War II era — died
Thursday after a short illness said
Bonniers spokeswoman Anna Tillgren.
In famous collections such as the 1966
“Windows and Stones,” Transtromer used
imaginative metaphors to describe the
mysteries of the human mind. His work
has been translated into more than 60 languages and influenced poets across
Europe, the Middle East and the Americas.
In 2011 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in
Literature.
Transtromer’s works were characterized
by powerful imagery that explored the
mysterious sides of everyday life with little embellishment, and the focus on simplicity was also mirrored in the way he led
his life.
Working as a psychologist in Swedish
state institutions, Transtromer (TRAWNstroh-mur) wrote his poetry during
evenings and weekends and stood out for
his unpretentious demeanor. He preferred
to stay away from the public eye and largely avoided the political debates that
engaged many of his contemporaries.
The poet stopped writing after suffering
a stroke in 1990 that left him half-paralyzed
and largely unable to speak. When he
received the Nobel, aged 80, he had been a
favorite for the prize for so many years
that even his countrymen had started to
doubt whether he would ever win.
His most famous works include the 1966
“Windows and Stones,” in which he
depicts themes from his many travels, and
“Baltics” from 1974 about the democracies
and dictatorships surrounding the Baltic
Sea during the Cold War.
He published “The Sorrow Gondola” in
1996 with work that had been written
before the stroke and the “The Great
Enigma.”
Born April 15, 1931, Transtromer grew
up alone with his teacher mother in
Stockholm’s working-class district after
she divorced his father, a journalist. He
started writing poetry while studying at
the Sodra Latin school in Stockholm and
his work appeared in several journals
before he published his first book of poetry, “17 poems,” in 1954 to much acclaim in
Sweden.
He studied literature, history, poetics, the
history of religion and psychology at
Stockholm University and worked briefly
as an assistant at the university’s psychometric institution.
But he would spend the majority of his
professional life in the much less glamorous settings of state institutions in the
small Swedish towns of Linkoping and
Vasteras, where he lived in a terraced
house with his wife Monika, a nurse, and
their two daughters. He first worked at an
institution for juvenile offenders and later
at a state-funded labor organization, where
he helped disabled people choose careers
and counseled parole offenders and those
in drug rehabilitation.
Today’s Highlight in History:
On March 28, 1979, America’s
worst commercial nuclear accident
occurred with a partial meltdown
inside the Unit 2 reactor at the Three
Mile Island plant near Middletown,
Pennsylvania.
On this date:
In 1515, St. Teresa of Avila was
born Teresa de Cepeda y Ahumada.
In 1834, the U.S. Senate voted to
censure President Andrew Jackson
for the removal of federal deposits
from the Bank of the United States.
In 1854, during the Crimean War,
Britain and France declared war on
Russia.
In 1898, the Supreme Court, in
United States v. Wong Kim Ark, ruled
that a child born in the United States
to Chinese immigrants was a U.S. citizen.
In 1930, the names of the Turkish
cities of Constantinople and Angora
were changed to Istanbul and Ankara.
In 1935, the notorious Nazi propaganda film “Triumph des Willens”
(Triumph of the Will), directed by
Leni Riefenstahl, premiered in Berlin
with Adolf Hitler present.
In 1941, novelist and critic Virginia
Woolf, 59, drowned herself near her
home in Lewes, East Sussex, England.
In 1955, John Marshall Harlan II
was sworn in as an associate justice of
the U.S. Supreme Court.
In 1965, an earthquake of magnitude 7.4 struck La Ligua, Chile, leaving about 400 people dead or missing,
according to the U.S. Geological
Survey.
In 1969, the 34th president of the
United States, Dwight D. Eisenhower,
died in Washington D.C. at age 78.
In 1987, Maria von Trapp, whose
life story inspired the Rodgers and
Hammerstein musical “The Sound of
Music,” died in Morrisville, Vermont,
at age 82.
In 1990, President George H.W.
Bush presented the Congressional
Gold Medal to the widow of U.S.
Olympic legend Jesse Owens.
Ten years ago: The Colorado
Supreme Court threw out the death
penalty in a rape-and-murder case
because five of the trial jurors had
consulted the Bible and quoted
Scripture during deliberations. (The
U.S. Supreme Court refused to consider reinstating the death sentence of
Robert Harlan, who ended up being
resentenced to life in prison for the
murder of cocktail waitress Rhonda
Maloney.) A major earthquake off the
west coast of Indonesia killed some
1,300 people.
Five years ago: President Barack
Obama secretly visited Afghanistan
near the front lines of the increasingly bloody 8-year-old war. Actresswriter June Havoc, 97, whose childhood in vaudeville was immortalized
in the musical “Gypsy,” died in
Stamford, Connecticut. Jazz guitarist
Herb Ellis died in Los Angeles at age
88.
One year ago: Russian President
Vladimir Putin called President
Barack Obama to discuss a solution to
the crisis in Ukraine; the leaders
agreed that top U.S. and Russian
diplomats should work on the details.
Yuzuru Hanyu of Japan became the
first man in 12 years to win the
Olympic and world figure skating
titles in the same year. Jeremiah
Denton, 89, a former U.S. senator
who’d survived 7 1/2 years as a prisoner of war in North Vietnam, died in
Virginia Beach, Virginia. Ray Rice
married Janay Palmer a day after the
Baltimore Ravens running back was
indicted for aggravated assault for
punching his fiancee in an Atlantic
City, New Jersey, casino elevator.
(Charges against Rice were dropped
when he agreed to enter an intervention program.)
Today’s Birthdays: Former White
House national security adviser
Zbigniew Brzezinski is 87. Author
Mario Vargas Llosa is 79. Country
musician Charlie McCoy is 74. Movie
director Mike Newell is 73. Actress
Conchata Ferrell is 72. Actor Ken
Howard is 71. Actress Dianne Wiest
(weest) is 69. Country singer Reba
McEntire is 60. Olympic gold medal
gymnast Bart Conner is 57. Rapper
Salt (Salt-N-Pepa) is 49. Actress
Tracey Needham is 48. Actor Max
Perlich is 47. Movie director Brett
Ratner is 46. Country singer Rodney
Atkins is 46. Actor Vince Vaughn is
45.
Thought for Today: “Those who
say they give the public what it wants
begin by underestimating public taste
and end by debauching it.” — T.S.
Eliot, American-Anglo poet and critic
(1888-1965).
SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A7
EGGS: Depending on intricacy an egg can take up to 20 hours to complete
FROM 1
On Easter Sunday, the eggs were placed in
baskets outside the church at midnight
mass before being brought into the service
by alter boys in a joyous procession to be
blessed by the priest with holy water. The
eggs were exchanged Easter morning with
the brightly colored ones going to the
young, and the darker designs reserved for
older members of the community.
The Ukrainians believed that as long as
Pysanky are decorated, goodness would
prevail over evil in the world.
Wendtland is doing her part to spread
goodness in the world by following tradition, preparing Pysanky from Ash
Wednesday through Easter and
delivering them as gifts to
her
The original way of doing this was to just
let the egg dry out, but if the egg has any
flaws in the shell it could be exposed to bacteria and spoil.
Wendtland has dried eggs before, after
receiving a large batch of goose eggs to decorate from a friend.
“I put them in the back of the refrigerator and kept turning them and after several
months they became so dry that when you
turned the egg you could hear the yolk
rolling around in there,” she said. “Now I
blow them out.”
To blow the innards of the egg out without cracking the shell, a small tool is used
to insert a hole in the bottom and blow air
inside, forcing the contents out the hole.
The inside is then washed and
dried through the same
process.
flame and as it drips this beautiful design
appears,” Wendtland said.
A varnish is added to the finished product to protect the color from fading, but you
must be careful with these pieces of art as
nothing really protects them from breaking.
“There’s nothing there really, there’s just
that thin shell,” she added.
Now Wendtland is sharing her craft with
others through public demonstrations for
local children and senior citizens.
For the past seven years, she has led lessons on the art for the sixth-grade class at
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
priest, family and members of her congregation as gifts.
She learned the art 20 years ago from a
friend while living in Dubois and has been
mastering the craft annually since.
“I just enjoy making art and I particularly enjoy making Christ-centered art,”
Wendtland said. “I like doing these things
from a visual standpoint — I guess because
I am an artist I notice color and lines and
things — but when it can be connected to
my faith, so much the better.”
Unlike modern egg dyeing, this process is
not an easy, or quick, one.
Wendtland said depending on the intricacy of the design, the size of the egg and
how many colors are involved, one egg can
take from four to 20 hours to complete.
First, an eggshell must be prepared.
Next, a design must be created and drawn
on the egg in pencil and then the dyeing
process can begin.
A tool created for writing in wax called a
kistka is used to cover the portions of the
egg that should remain shell colored, and
then the first color of dye is applied. More
wax is added to the portions of the egg that
should remain the first dye color, and the
egg is dyed in the second color, and so on.
In the end, the egg looks like a messy,
lumpy wad of black wax, but then the egg
is placed next to a candle and the wax
begins to drip off. A cloth is used to wipe
away the wax as it melts and a multicolored
masterpiece is revealed.
“That’s the best part of the process
because you start with this kind of ugly
thing and as you hold it up against the
WYOMING BRIEFS |
3 arrested, charged in death of
man who was decapitated
CODY (AP) — Authorities have filed
charges against three people in the death of
a 30-year-old man who was found decapitated in northern Wyoming last year.
Juan Antonio Guerra-Torres was found
dead on Jan. 9, 2014, along a remote dirt
road.
The Park County Sheriff ’s Office identified the three taken into custody as 51-yearold John Louis Marquez; 27-year-old
Sandra Garcia; and 28-year-old Pedro
Garcia Jr.
The Powell Tribune reports that Marquez
was arrested in Texas, while the other two
were taken into custody in Georgia.
Marquez is charged with conspiracy to
commit murder in the first degree and
murder in the first degree, while Sandra
Garcia and Pedro Garcia, Jr. are each
charged with conspiracy to commit murder
in the first degree and aiding and abetting
murder in the first degree.
UW hires new law school dean
LARAMIE (AP) — The University of
Wyoming has hired a new dean for its
College of Law.
Klint Alexander is currently an attorney
in a major Southeastern law firm and senior lecturer in international law and politics at Vanderbilt University and the
University of London’s Institute of
Advanced Legal Studies.
He will take over as dean on July 1.
With interests that include energy law,
utilities regulation and international trade,
Alexander has served in teaching and leadership roles at several major institutions,
including Yale, Vanderbilt and the
University of London.
Since 2013, he has been a member of the
global business team of the law firm of former U.S. Sen. Howard Baker.
In a statement issued through the university, Alexander says he hopes to bring a
multidimensional vision and approach to
the college.
Sweetwater County inmates
face drug charges
ROCK SPRINGS (AP) — Three female
inmates at the Sweetwater County
Detention Center face additional charges
after authorities say they possessed or had
used drugs while in the jail.
A detention officer was conducting a routine search of female inmates on March 19
when she found about 1.63 grams of
methamphetamine in a plastic baggie in
one of the inmate’s socks.
The Rock Springs Rocket-Miner reports
that all female inmates were subsequently
tested for drugs, and two others tested positive for methamphetamine.
Taking controlled substances into jail
carries a maximum possible penalty of
three-year imprisonment and a $3,000 fine.
All three remain in custody at the
Sweetwater County Detention Center.
Legislature funds new passing
lanes on Highway 59
CASPER (AP) — Highway construction
season will begin soon in Wyoming.
In the session that adjourned March 6,
the Legislature approved a supplemental
budget providing up to $17 million for new
passing lanes on state Highway 59 in the
Powder River Basin.
But some critics say more money is needed for the busy highway. And others say by
earmarking money to one particular project, the Legislature will delay other highway construction and maintenance projects around the state.
Wyoming Transportation Department
Director John Cox tells the Casper StarTribune that it’s not yet known which projects could be delayed because of the
Highway 59 project.
Hess Corp gives $15 million to
University of Wyoming
LARAMIE (AP) — Energy firm Hess
Corp. has donated $15 million to the
University of Wyoming to bolster research
into extracting hard-to-get oil and gas
deposits.
With the new donation, Hess has now
invested a total of $25 million in UW since
2013.
This makes Hess the single largest corporate partner in the university’s history.
Gov. Matt Mead and UW President Dick
McGinity were joined by Hess Chief
Executive Officer John Hess and President
and Chief Operating Officer Greg Hill on
Thursday to announce the company’s gift.
Hess’s $15 million commitment includes
$5 million for the High Bay Research
Facility, $5 million for sponsored research
on unconventional oil and gas reservoirs,
$4.5 million for equipment and technology
and $500,000 for laboratory performance
development.
The state will match $14.5 million of the
gift.
Holy Name Catholic School.
“I started doing it over there because my
grandson was in the sixth grade over there
and the children seemed to enjoy it so
much,” Wendtland said.
One lucky student even gets to take home
a Wendtland original Pysanky through a
drawing give-away at the end of the demonstration.
But there is a lot more to the learning
than can be taught in a demonstration,
Wendtland added.
“There are several tools you need if
you’re going to do this; I usually order
online because there aren’t places close by
where you can get the supplies,” she said.
“I’ve got a video that I purchased at the
Ukrainian Gift Shop online that teaches it,
but you really would need someone to show
you too.”
A8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
POPULATION: Growth
FROM 1
Teton County led the
state with the fastest population growth of 2.5 percent
between July 2013 and July
‘Strong construction,
services and viable
tourism related
activities in Teton County,
without direct impact from
energy price fluctuations,
have resulted in a higher
demand for labor.’
Wenlin Liu
Principal economist with state economic
analysis division
2014.
Crook and Lincoln were
the only other counties that
saw population increases of
more than 1.0 percent.
“Strong construction,
services and viable tourism
related activities in Teton
County, without direct
impact from energy price
fluctuations, have resulted
in a higher demand for
labor,” Liu said.
The job growth rate was
3.9 percent in Teton
County, compared to 0.1
percent for the state
between 2012 and 2013.
Over half of Wyoming’s
counties experienced population declines. Niobrara,
Converse and Washakie
counties saw at least 1.5
percent declines.
“People tend to move to
areas where economies are
vibrant,” Liu said.
Mainly due to the drop in
natural gas price in early
2012, the mineral extraction industry lost jobs and
there was little total
employment growth during
the second half of 2012 and
most of 2013.
As a result, workers
responded and an outmigration occurred mostly
in the second half of 2013.
In addition, oil exploration in states such as
North Dakota, Texas, and
Colorado showed strong
expansion, which attracted
many Wyoming energy
workers and residents during that period.
“However, the state’s
economy gradually
regained strength in 2014,
thanks to the strong expansion of oil drilling,
rebounding construction,
and the strength of the
service providing industries,” Liu said.
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SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2015
NASA: L&H was awarded a contract in October 2012
COURTESY PHOTO | GILLETTE NEWS RECORD
Bill Schroyer, with L & H Industrial, kneels beside a hydraulic claw on March 6 that will be used this year to work on a crawler-transporter the company overhauled for NASA in 2013.
said.
The project also required attention
from everyone at the shop. Between
the Gillette and Sheridan shops, L&H
It can be a little intimidating to
think about the pedigree of those on sent 500,000 pounds of parts on 14
semis to Florida.
the NASA staff, he said. They have
It was larger than most jobs just
expertise and experience going back
decades that includes sending people because of how many parts were
involved, Schroyer said.
and billions of dollars of high-tech
Marion Power Shovel designed the
equipment into space.
crawler transporter in the 1960s and
They’re also down-to-earth and
based it on its power shovel designs.
easy to work with, Schroyer said.
And crucially, L&H’s work has value A truck similar to the tracks and
drive systems on those shovels is in
for NASA.
each of the transporter’s four corSince being awarded the contract
ners.
in October 2012, the company has
Since it is basically repurposed
also had an opportunity to see some
mine machinery, the work and the
of NASA’s operations up close.
Working at the space center and even size of the parts was not so out of
the ordinary for L&H to manufacgetting to see four or five launches
ture, Schroyer said.
while they were down there was difHaving to have every process
ferent from most of the company’s
approved by NASA, and working on
work locations, L&H field lead Luke
technical details about the project
Sigman said.
with the customer was much differ“It was definitely a nice environent for the company, he said. It meant
ment to work in,” Sigman said.
planning ahead so they had other
Before they headed out to Florida
tasks to tackle while waiting on
to install their parts, workers in
Gillette and Sheridan had to machine approval for changes to the plans.
“We’re used to kind of making our
everything they needed. The compaown decisions,” Schroyer said. “The
ny won the contract for its part of
biggest difference is the amount of
the rebuild at the end of 2012.
paperwork.”
They had to machine some parts
The government shutdown hit a
with a much smoother surface withfew weeks into the field work in
out grinding than is typical for a
Florida. That caused another wrinmine shovel. It pushed the machinkle in the operation that private secists at times to do work they didn’t
tor work didn’t prepare the company
know they could, Schroyer said.
for.
Typically, a surface as smooth as
After getting its first taste of govNASA wants would require grinding
ernment work, L&H recently won its
after a part is machined.
second NASA contract. It plans to
Grinding can also weaken a part,
which NASA wanted to avoid.
start work in April rebuilding the
Getting to that specification with a
transporter’s drive transmissions,
single-point lathe meant moving the
Schroyer said. They expect the compart much slower than is typical, he
ponents to get to Gillette by April.
FROM 1
In the company’s shops in Gillette,
welders are hard at work on drag
line dippers. In the machine shop
next door, newly made parts for
power shovel bushings sit next to
lathes and other machines the size of
living rooms.
Since setting roots serving the oil
industry, mines have formed the
business’s foundation, Schroyer said.
Now the company is expanding its
capabilities. It can do more complete
rebuilds than ever and is focusing
more on larger and different types of
contracts, he said.
Across the room from the dragline
dippers, welders are putting finishing touches on the first lift arm the
company has ever made.
In the mechanic shop, transmission
parts and tools show more evidence
of change at L&H. It started work on
transmissions about three years ago,
Schroyer said. It can now build and
service transmissions and had even
made its own designs.
Mechanics and machinists will put
that new area of expertise to work
when its next NASA contract starts.
There is even a rebranding, including a redesign of the logo, to go along
with the expanding focus.
Its work won’t be heading out of
this world any time soon, but soon it
will help with a crucial step in sending astronauts and other people’s
work farther into space than ever
before.
The upgrades to the crawler transporter were done in conjunction with
other contractors and addressed general ware picked up in about 50 years
of moving space vehicles to launch.
The transporter has carried shuttles
and every Saturn V rocket used on
the Apollo space missions.
ALMANAC
SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A9
OBITUARIES |
August Ernest Moerike II
Freda Douglas Thomas
Daren Buss
February 23, 2015
November 4, 1916 - March 24, 2015
March 22, 1963 - March 25, 2015
August Ernest Moerike II died February 23, 2015 and was
loved by all who knew him.
He worked for Mobile Manor Trailer Park. He loved to hunt,
fish and go camping.
He was preceded in death by Frankie and Carrie Wolff, Eva
Cummings, JoAnn Donoho and Burt Watkins.
Survivors include his wife of 28 years, Teressa Moerike,
Francine, Eric, Aiden and Jaxon Kovash, his dad August
Moerike, Willie Wolff, JoAnn Wolff, Regina Marin, Dee-Anna,
Chaun, Rebekah, Brytain and Chaun Dale Williams II, Ruby
Thompson, Kenneth, Amber and Andrew Astle, Barbara
Bradshaw, Anna Walkins, Don & Tina Thompson and Bob
Schaffer.
Memorial donations may be made to Teressa Moerike, 6214
N.E. 12th Ave. Sp111, Amarillo, TX 79107.
Freda Douglas Thomas was born in
Meadow, SD on November 4, 1916 to Jess
and Cleta Whitford. She passed away
Tuesday, March 24, 2015 at Sheridan Manor.
She married Gale Douglas on February 8,
1939. They had three children: James,
Freda Douglas Beverly and Larry. In 1993, Freda married
Thomas
Roy Thomas.
She is only survived by her son, Larry
and Victoria Douglas; eight grandchildren; 16 great-grandchildren; and one great-great grandchild.
At the family request, no services will be held at this time.
Arrangements have been entrusted with Champion Funeral
Home.
Daren Buss, 52, of Riverton, died on
Wednesday, March 25, 2015, at his home surrounded by his family. As were his wishes,
cremation has taken place and no services
will be held. A private family service will
be held at a later date.
Daren Buss
Daren David Buss was born on March 22,
1963 in Sheridan, WY to David Douglas and
Sharon Lee (Klinkosh) Buss. He grew up in Linch, WY and
attended grade school there. The family moved to Riverton
where he graduated from Riverton High School with the class
of 1981.
On December 19, 1981 he married Darsi Annette Bailey in
Riverton, WY. They raised their three children, Joe, Kayla, and
Janeen in Riverton where he spent his adult life.
His family said he was multi-talented and could fix anything.
Margaret “Peggy” Kepford
In his early career he was a welder. He worked 24 years in the
DEATH NOTICES |
November 5, 1914 - March 23, 2015
Maintenance Department at Fremont County School District
25. He was known for his strength and humor by his coworkers.
Margaret
“Peggy”
Kepford,
100,
of
Sheridan
passed
away
Carol S. Norcross
Daren enjoyed outdoor activities and camping with his famiMonday, March 23, 2015 at Westview Health Care Center. She
Carol S. Norcross, 65, of Sheridan, passed away on Friday, was born November 5, 1914 in Buffalo, WY to Thomas and ly and dogs. His interests were motorcycles and four wheelers,
guns, fishing, and hunting. He loved his grandchildren and
Joanna Corpe.
March 27, 2015, at the Sheridan Memorial Hospital.
Peggy enjoyed reading, word search puzzles, jigsaw puzzles, was a devoted family man. His major enjoyment in life was
No Services are planned at this time.
raising his three children with his wife and being present for
Online condolences may be written at www.kanefuneral.com. and watching Gunsmoke.
She was preceded in death by her husband, John; brothers, all of the children’s activities.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
He is survived by his wife of 33 years, Darsi; his son, Joseph
Harold Corpe and Thomas “Chick” Corpe; and sisters, Agnes
Buss and his wife Amanda of Cheyenne, WY; his daughters,
Van Auken and Betty Sturdevant.
Peggy is survived by her daughter, Sharon (Dave) Ogan of Kayla Buss-Rotroff and Janeen Buss both of Riverton; his
AGENDAS |
mother Sharon Buss of Cody, WY; his mother-in-law, Jannet
Tucson, AZ; and various nieces and nephews.
Cremation has taken place. A graveside service will be held Bath of Riverton, WY; his brother, Keven Buss and his wife
Sheridan County Planning
• Welcome, public comments, introduc- at 10 AM Tuesday, March 31, 2015 in the Sheridan Municipal Michelle of Cody, WY; his sister Jody Buss-Driver and her husand Zoning Commission
tions
band, Coleman of San Antonio, TX; his brother-in-laws, Mike
Cemetery with Pastor Doug Goodwin officiating.
5:30 p.m. Thursday
• Approval of March board meeting
Arrangements have been entrusted with Champion Funeral Bailey and his wife, June, and Darren Bailey both of Riverton;
Second floor commissioners board room
agenda
his sister-in-law, Janeen Malkovich of Fallen, NV; his six
Home.
Sheridan County Courthouse addition
• Approval of February board meeting
224 S. Main St.
minutes — Feb. 25
grandchildren, Korbynn, Evan, Brenna, Lily, Daven, and Lucas;
• Old business
and numerous nieces and nephews.
Ardis Leach
• Call to order and pledge
• Quality Committee report
He was preceded in death by his father, David Buss, and his
• Roll call
1. Utilization management
grandparents.
January
4,
1957
March
26,
2015
• Approval of agenda
plan
• Approval of minutes — March 5
• Medical staff report
Memorials may be made to his Grandchildren’s College
• Matters from the public (items not on
1. Recognition of radiology
Ardis Leach, 58, of Sheridan, passed Education Fund in care of Davis Funeral Home, 2203 West
agenda)
practitioner assistants
away on Thursday, March 26, 2015, at her Main Street, Riverton, WY 82501.
• New business
2. Privileging
On-line condolences may be made to the family at
residence with her husband by her side.
1. Q-15-001: Rice Pit No. 4
• Administration report
She was born in Sidney, MT, on January 4, www.TheDavisFuneralHome.com.
Quarry: This is an application request
1. Medical office building and
from John E. Rice & Sons, Inc. for a quarry
ICU
Services under the direction of Davis Funeral Home.
1957, to parents Howard and Helen
for a 40-acre area to operate in the
2. Strategic and operational
(Schwartzenberger) Norgard.
Ardis Leach
W½SW¼ Section 4, T. 56 N., R. 84 W. The
planning
Ardis married Rick Leach in Sheridan on
property is zoned (A) Agricultural. The
3. Joint commission update
January 3, 1997. She enjoyed snow skiing,
applicant proposes a four-year term.
4. Title 25 update
Access to the quarry would be provided by
5. Wyoming Life Flight
hiking, the outdoors, and camping. She worked as an equiptwo private gravel haul roads connecting
6. Cerner optimization
ment operator for 28 years at Decker Coal.
directly to Interstate 90. The quarry
• Finance Committee report
Ardis was preceded in death by her parents, Howard and
would be used to support construction of
1. Financial statements
Helen,
and her sister, Rosemary. She is survived by her hus2146 Coffeen Ave. • 673-1100
the new North Sheridan Interchange.
• Foundation report
band, Rick, sisters, Mary Norgard (Gale Geiser) of Sidney, MT,
2590 N. Main • 672-5900
• Matters from the staff
• Building Committee report
1. WYOPASS annual confer• Other business
Jeannie Norgard (Raul Macias), numerous nieces and nephews
ence, May 14-15 in Riverton
• Executive session
and her dogs, Cooper and Molly.
2. Upcoming Planning and
1. Real Estate
A Visitation will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. on Tuesday, March
Zoning Commission expirations on June
2. Legal
31, 2015, at Kane Funeral Home. Graveside Services will be held
30, 2015 (Audrey Brown and Mike
3. Personnel
Schumacher). Audrey Brown was reap• Adjournment
at 11:00 a.m. on Wednesday, April 1, 2015, in the Sheridan
pointed to serve another three-year term.
Municipal Cemetery with Pastor Phil Wold officiating. A
3. Action taken at March 17
Reception to follow in the Kane Reception Hall.
Board of County Commissioners meeting
Memorials to honor Ardis may be made to the Sheridan Dog
concerning planning Item (temporary perand Cat Shelter at 84 East Ridge Rd., Sheridan, WY 82801.
mit extension for Burgess Quarry).
• Matters from commissioners
Online condolences may be written at www.kanefuneral.com.
• Adjournment
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
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a year!
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Board of County Commissioners
staff meeting
9 a.m. Monday
Second floor Commission Library, #216
Sheridan County Courthouse addition
224 S. Main St.
• Call to order
• Reports from staff/elected officials
• Adjourn
Sheridan Memorial Hospital Board of
Trustees
3 p.m. Wednesday
Conference Room C
Sheridan Memorial Hospital
1401 W. Fifth St.
• Call to order
Georgia Hood Schroeder
July 8, 1935 - March 18, 2015
Here are the results
of Friday’s
Mega Millions
lottery drawing:
Winning numbers:
17-21-36-58-70;
Mega Ball 3
Megaplier 5X
Delivery
problems?
Estimated jackpot:
PENDING
Call The Press
at 672-2431
SUNDAY
Georgia Hood Schroeder of Roseville, CA
passed away peacefully on March 18, 2015 at
the age of 79. Georgia was born July 8, 1935
in Galeton, Colorado to Helen and Grady
Hood. Her family later moved to Laramie,
Wyoming where Georgia was raised.
She married Stuart L Schroeder in 1955
Georgia Hood
and begun her adventures as the wife of an
Schroeder
Air Force pilot and mother of four children. After residing in numerous places throughout the United
States, they settled in Camarillo, CA where they lived for 28
years prior to moving to Sun City Roseville in 1996.
Georgia lead an active life supporting her children in their
numerous activities and sports. She also enjoyed entertaining
her friends and family, playing bridge, adventuresome travels
and good books.
She is survived by her husband of 60 years, Stuart Schroeder,
and her four children: Alan Schroeder (Tracie), Jeri Schroeder
Albers (Steve), Todd Schroeder (Wendy), Chris Schroeder (Guy
Nelson). She also leaves behind 6 grandchildren and 4 greatgrandchildren.
Her ashes will be placed at a family site in Sheridan Wyoming
later this summer.
TUESDAY
MONDAY
WEDNESDAY
Billings
72/40
Winds becoming
strong
77
36
Cooler with
plenty of
sunshine
Mostly sunny
and warm
63
67
35
Almanac
37
Cloudy to partly
sunny
76
The Sun
Temperature
High/low .........................................................73/44
Normal high/low ............................................52/25
Record high .............................................75 in 1986
Record low ............................................... -2 in 2009
Precipitation (in inches)
24 hours through 5 p.m. Friday ...................... 0.00"
Month to date................................................. 0.40"
Normal month to date .................................... 0.82"
Year to date .................................................... 2.13"
Normal year to date ....................................... 1.92"
Today
Sunday
Monday
The Moon
Today
Sunday
Monday
Full
Last
37
56
Rise
Set
6:57 a.m.
6:55 a.m.
6:53 a.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:31 p.m.
7:32 p.m.
Rise
Set
1:22 p.m.
2:18 p.m.
3:16 p.m.
3:17 a.m.
3:56 a.m.
4:30 a.m.
New
9a 10a 11a Noon 1p
Parkman
71/36
Dayton
73/35
Lovell
69/36
2p
3p
4p
5p
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection. Shown is the highest
value for the day.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High;
11+ Extreme
Cody
68/38
Ranchester
73/36
SHERIDAN
Big Horn
73/35
Basin
73/35
77/36
Apr 11
Apr 18
Apr 25
For more detailed weather
information on the Internet, go to:
www.thesheridanpress.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2015
Gillette
73/35
Buffalo
72/37
Worland
76/34
Wright
74/35
Kaycee
74/33
Thermopolis
72/31
Apr 4
Clearmont
75/38
Story
70/33
First
Weather on the Web
UV Index tomorrow
Hardin
71/42
Broadus
78/39
29
Big Horn Mountain Precipitation
24 hours through noon Friday ........................ 0.00"
Shown is today's weather.
Temperatures are today's highs
and tonight's lows.
Very windy;
sunshine, cooler
Sun and Moon
Sheridan County Airport through 5 p.m. Fri.
National Weather for Saturday, March 28
Regional Weather
5-Day Forecast for Sheridan
TODAY
Big
Breakfast
Regional Cities
City
Billings
Casper
Cheyenne
Cody
Evanston
Gillette
Green River
Jackson
Today
Hi/Lo/W
72/40/s
74/31/s
71/38/s
68/38/s
63/30/s
73/35/s
68/31/s
52/21/c
Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
66/44/s
64/34/pc
61/37/pc
63/40/s
59/30/pc
61/39/s
63/28/c
49/23/sh
Mon.
Hi/Lo/W
70/46/s
67/37/s
66/38/s
67/43/s
62/36/s
65/40/s
65/30/s
52/27/s
City
Laramie
Newcastle
Rawlins
Riverton
Rock Springs
Scottsbluff
Sundance
Yellowstone
Today
Hi/Lo/W
66/32/s
72/37/s
69/30/s
72/35/s
66/32/s
81/37/s
69/36/s
46/16/pc
Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
59/33/c
58/33/s
61/31/c
63/36/c
61/32/c
66/34/pc
55/37/s
46/19/sh
Mon.
Hi/Lo/W
61/31/s
65/34/s
64/35/s
66/39/s
63/34/s
74/35/s
61/39/pc
49/23/s
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Shown are
today's noon
positions of
weather systems
and precipitation.
Temperature
bands are highs
for the day.
A10
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2015
Gowdy: Clinton wiped email server clean, deleted all emails
WASHINGTON (AP) — Hillary Rodham Clinton wiped
her email server “clean,” permanently deleting all emails
from it, the Republican chairman of a House
committee investigating the 2012 Benghazi
attacks said Friday.
Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., said the former secretary of state has failed to produce a single
new document in recent weeks and has refused
to relinquish her server to a third party for an
independent review, as Gowdy has requested.
Clinton
Clinton’s attorney, David Kendall, said Gowdy
was looking in the wrong place.
In a six-page letter released late Friday, Kendall said
Clinton had turned over to the State Department all workrelated emails sent or received during her tenure as secretary of state from 2009 to 2013.
“The Department of State is therefore in possession of
all Secretary Clinton’s work-related emails from the (personal email) account,” Kendall wrote.
Kendall also said it would be pointless for Clinton to
turn over her server, even if legally authorized, since “no
emails ... reside on the server or on any backup systems
associated with the server.”
Clinton, a likely Democratic presidential candidate,
faced a Friday deadline to respond to a subpoena for
emails and documents related to Libya, including the 2012
attacks in a U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi that
killed four Americans, including the U.S. ambassador to
Libya.
The Benghazi committee demanded further documents
and access to the server after it was revealed that Clinton
used a private email account and server during her tenure
at State.
Gowdy said he will work with House leaders to consider
options. Speaker John Boehner has not ruled out a vote in
the full House to force Clinton to turn over the server if
she declines to make it available by an April 3 deadline set
by Gowdy.
Rep. Elijah Cummings of Maryland, the top Democrat on
the Benghazi panel, said Kendall’s letter confirmed “what
we all knew: that Secretary Clinton already produced her
official records to the State Department, that she did not
keep her personal emails and that the Select Committee
has already obtained her emails relating to the attacks in
Benghazi.”
Cummings said it is time for Gowdy and other
Republicans to stop what he called a “political charade”
and instead make Clinton’s emails public. Gowdy also
should schedule Clinton’s public testimony before the
Benghazi panel as soon as possible, Cummings said.
Kendall said in his letter that Clinton’s personal attorneys reviewed every email sent and received from her private email address — 62,320 emails in total — and identified all work-related emails. Those totaled 30,490 emails or
approximately 55,000 pages. The material was provided to
the State Department on Dec. 5, 2014, and it is the agency’s
discretion to release those emails after a review.
Kendall said Clinton has asked for the release of all of
those emails. He said the State Department is reviewing
the material to decide whether any sensitive information
needs to be protected.
“Secretary Clinton is not in a position to produce any of
those emails to the committee in response to the subpoena
without approval from the State Department, which could
come only following a review process,” Kendall wrote.
Gowdy said he was disappointed at Clinton’s lack of
cooperation.
“Not only was the secretary the sole arbiter of what was
a public record, she also summarily decided to delete all
emails from her server, ensuring no one could check
behind her analysis in the public interest,” he said.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Working with fire
Duane Bomar uses a power hammer to draw out the end of a bar
Thursday afternoon at Bomar’s shop on Leopard Street. The annual
Forge-In is being held this weekend, bringing blacksmiths of various
skill levels from the region to learn and share their talents.
Obama urges
expansion of ‘take
child to work’ day
WASHINGTON (AP) —
President Barack Obama
says the White House will
open next month’s annual
Take Our Daughters and
Sons to Work Day to children whose parents don’t
work in the building.
He’s also asking private
businesses to include kids
who are left out of the experience because they don’t
have a workplace to visit.
Obama says in a video
released Friday that aides
are working with the Boys
and Girls Club and the
District of Columbia’s Child
and Family Services Agency
to invite kids from
Washington to join the children of White House
staffers on April 23 to learn
what it’s like to work at the
White House.
A highlight of Take Our
Daughters and Sons to Work
Day under Obama has been
a question-and-answer session with first lady Michelle
Obama.
SPORTS
SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B1
Broncs drop 1-0
heartbreaker
to Wolverines
BY MIKE DUNN
[email protected]
SHERIDAN — With the unseasonably warm weather the
stands filled with spectators, and with a new head coach
for the Broncs it was shaping up to be a perfect evening for
the Sheridan soccer squad to begin their season.
The outcome, however, was not nearly as pleasant.
The Broncs begin their season with a tally in the loss
column as they dropped a 1-0 heartbreaker to the Riverton
Wolverines last night in Sheridan. Worse still, the
Wolverines only goal came off of a penalty kick.
“This was a good indicator for us to see how we stand at
this point in the season,” rookie head coach Matt Johnson
said.
The game began with some tough breaks for Sheridan
near their opponent’s goal. Riley Session was on his way
to sending the ball to the back of the net on two separate
occasions in the first half before being denied by strong
goal keeping from Riverton. Dantae Crow also had a great
look in front of the goalie box before it was knocked away
by a handful of Wolverine defenders.
Both teams struggled with ball possession leading to a
stalemate for a majority of the game.
Despite battling the glare from the setting sun, keeper
Jess Edens had a fantastic first half with five saves.
However, the Wolverines drew a foul in the Broncs’ penalty area and easily drove in the game’s only goal.
“Giving up a goal on a (penalty kick) off of a foul is
tough,” Johnson said. “Without that, it’s a 0-0 game.”
The Broncs offense was just not clicking in the beginning part of the second half. Focused more on booming the
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Sheridan’s Dalton Legerski (20) brings the ball closer to the goal as Riverton defends during the soccer game Friday at Sheridan High
School.
ball up high and playing the ball on the bounce, the Broncs
weren’t able to find any type of rhythm. Johnson said his
team will need to stay away from that strategy in later
games.
A late offensive push was not enough for Sheridan.
Despite a handful of shots near the end of regulation, the
Cowgirls have big shoes to fill next season
LARAMIE (AP) — It’s rare that a
college basketball team doesn’t suffer
some attrition to graduation. But
some years are worse than others.
This is one of the “worse” years for
the University of Wyoming Cowgirls.
UW will graduate more than 3,000
points, 1,400 rebounds, 500 3-pointers
and 320 games played when Kayla
Woodward, Kaitlyn Mileto and Jordan
Sibrel leave the program.
That might seem like a daunting
task, to replace so much production.
But the cupboard isn’t exactly bare
for UW coach Joe Legerski and his
staff.
“Over my years we’ve had some
tremendous shooters, and (Mileto)
and (Woodward) go right into that category. It will be a great loss with the
points and experience,” Legerski said.
“Somebody’s still going to have to
shoot the basketball next year. The
experience factor might be a bigger
loss than the numbers that those two
put up.”
Wyoming finished 16-14 and tied for
fifth in the Mountain West standings
this past season. And it missed the
postseason for the second straight
year, a first for Legerski since his first
two seasons in Laramie.
As the record indicates, it was an
up-and-down year for the Cowgirls.
After a 5-5 nonconference schedule,
Go for it
Sheridan’s Dantae Crow
attempts to block a kick during
the soccer game Friday at
Sheridan High School.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
the Cowgirls started MW play 2-5,
then rattled off wins in six of their
next seven before finishing the season
3-3.
That included a season-ending loss
to Fresno State in the MW tournament quarterfinals.
“Some nights we played very well
and everyone was on the same page;
other nights we didn’t have our best
game,” Legerski said. “In the end you
end up being a little better than .500.”
One player who brought her “A’’
game almost every night was junior 5foot-7 point guard Marquelle Dent.
She led the team and was third in
the MW in scoring at 17.3 points a
game. She was tops in the conference
in assists (6.2 per game) and second in
steals (2.2).
Dent’s points and assists accounted
for nearly half of UW’s offense.
“We saw the growth of (Dent) and
her game this season,” Legerski said.
“She really took charge of this team.
I’m very happy to have (her) coming
back. She’ll provide the leadership
this team will need.”
UW also returns 5-10 wing Jordan
Kelley as a starter. She moved into the
starting lineup in December when
freshman forward Bailee Cotton was
lost for the season with a knee injury.
Despite playing out of position most
of that time, Kelley was fourth on the
team in scoring (7.6 ppg) and second
in rebounding (7.0 rpg).
Look for her to slide back to her
more natural guard position next
year.
“(Kelley) seemed to be the glue that
held this team together at times,”
Legerski said. “By giving her the
opportunity to not play against 6-foot2 players all night long, that will be a
big plus.
“(She) made our offense move, and I
know she’ll work hard this summer to
be more of a scorer for us next year.”
The 6-2 Cotton started her first 10
games as a freshman before tearing
an ACL against Colorado on Dec. 21.
Before the injury she averaged 6.3
points and 4.9 rebounds.
Legerski said the team expects her
to be back to full strength when
school begins in September.
UW’s other returning player with
starting experience is 6-4 post Kaylie
Rader. She played in all 30 games for
the Cowgirls, starting 10. She was
sixth on the team in scoring (5.2 ppg)
and rebounding (3.3 rpg).
The Cowgirls no doubt are hoping
that this year’s heralded freshman
class can make the strides necessary
to contribute next winter.
SEE UW, PAGE B3
Wall leads Wizards
past Hornets 110-107
in double-overtime
WASHINGTON (AP) — The
Washington Wizards were on
the verge of watching a fourthquarter lead dissolve into a bad
loss for the second game in a
row.
Instead, they won a thriller.
John Wall scored seven of his
game-high 32 points in the second overtime, and the Wizards
held off the Charlotte Hornets
110-107 on Friday night.
Wall’s pull-up jumper with 9.9
seconds left made it 110-107, and
Charlotte’s Mo Williams and Al
Jefferson missed 3-pointers in
the final seconds.
SEE OVERTIME, PAGE B3
Broncs weren’t able to capitalize and dropped their inaugural game of the season.
Sheridan will have to rebound quickly.
Today, the Broncs head down to Casper to take on Green
River, Rock Springs and Kelly Walsh in an all-day jamboree.
SHS track and field teams
take first in overall points
at Jerry Campbell invite
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — All of the track and field athletes of
Sheridan County had a chance to shine Friday as
Buffalo High School hosted the Jerry Campbell
Invite for nine girls teams and 10 boys teams competing in 17 events.
In the end, Sheridan High School took first in both
girls and boys overall points, but Big Horn High
School, Tongue River High School, ArvadaClearmont High School and Normative Services Inc.
Academy all had point earning finishes throughout.
Top three finishes for all Sheridan County
schools participating included:
• Girls 4x800 meter relay
1st SHS, time 10:53.74
• Boys 4x800 meter relay
1st SHS, time 9:07.81
• Girls 100-meter hurdles
2nd McKenzie Greenlesh, BHHS, time 17.18
• Boys 110-meter hurdles
2nd Micaiah Huff, TRHS, time 15.72
• Girls 100-meter dash
1st Bailey Bard, BHHS, time 12.91
2nd Alicia Stewart, SHS, time 13.13
3rd Cricket Cunningham, BHHS, time 13.44
• Boys 100-meter dash
1st Christian Mayer, BHHS, time 11.36
2nd Charlie Ringley, BHHS, time 11.64
• Girls 1600-meter run
2nd Xiomara Robinson, SHS, time 5:45.36
3rd Pippin Robison, SHS, time 6:01.32
• Boys 1600-meter run
2nd Micah Sweeney, SHS, time 5:01.28
3rd Jered McCafferty, SHS, time 5:04.22
• Girls 400-meter dash
1st Gabby Edeen, SHS, time 1:02.99
2nd Riley Rafferty, SHS, time 1:05.98
3rd Mariah Grant, SHS, time 1:08.22
• Boys 400-meter dash
3rd Brian Kjerstad, SHS, time 55.47
• Boys 300-meter hurdles
3rd Cameron Craft, SHS, time 44.58
• Girls 800-meter run
1st Pippin Robison, SHS, time 2:40.86
• Boys 800-meter run
1st Micah Sweeney, SHS, time 2:17.80
• Girls 200-meter dash
1st Gabby Edeen, SHS, time 26.27
2nd Mariah Grant, SHS, time 27.00
3rd Bailey Bard, BHHS, time 27.28
• Boys 200-meter dash
2nd Charlie Ringley, BHHS, time 23.91
3rd Brian Kjerstad, SHS, time 24.25
• Girls 3200-meter run
1st Marissa Hegy, SHS, time 14:12.24
2nd Cassandra Robinson, SHS, time 14:40.33
3rd Hannah Wiley, SHS, time 14:59.85
SEE TRACK AND FIELD, PAGE B3
B2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SPORTSWATCH |
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALL TIMES EST
Saturday
AUTO RACING
10 a.m.
FS1 — NASCAR, Sprint
Cup, practice for STP 500, at
Martinsville, Va.
11 a.m.
FS1 — NASCAR, Truck
Series, pole qualifying for
Kroger 250, at Martinsville,
Va.
1:30 p.m.
FS1 — NASCAR, Sprint
Cup, "Happy Hour Series,"
final practice for STP 500, at
Martinsville, Va.
2:30 p.m.
FS1 — NASCAR, Truck
Series, Kroger 250, at
Martinsville, Va.
8 p.m.
ESPN2 — NHRA, qualifying for Four-Wide Nationals,
at Concord, N.C. (same-day
tape)
2:30 a.m.
NBCSN — Formula One,
Malaysia Grand Prix, at
Kuala Lumpur
BOXING
6:15 p.m.
SHO — Champion Kell
Brook (33-0-0) vs. Jo Jo Dan
(34-2-0), for IBF welterweight
title, at Sheffield, England
10 p.m.
SHO — Super welterweights, Jermell Charlo (250-0) vs. Vanes Martirosyan
(35-1-1); champion Jhonny
Gonzalez (57-8-0) vs. Gary
Russell Jr. (25-1-0), for WBC
featherweight title, at Las
Vegas
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC — European PGA
Tour, Trophee Hassan II,
third round, at Agadir,
Morocco
1 p.m.
TGC — PGA Tour, Texas
Open, third round, at San
Antonio
3 p.m.
NBC — PGA Tour, Texas
Open, third round, at San
Antonio
TGC — Champions Tour,
Mississippi Gulf Resort
Classic, second round, at
Saucier
6 p.m.
TGC — LPGA, Kia Classic,
third round, at Carlsbad,
Calif.
HORSE RACING
12:30 p.m.
FS1 — Thoroughbreds,
Dubai (UAE) World Cup
SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2015
SCOREBOARD |
MEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
3 p.m.
CBS — NCAA Division II
playoffs, championship,
teams TBD, at Evansville,
Ind.
6 p.m.
TBS — NCAA
Tournament, regional final,
teams and site TBD
8:30 p.m.
TBS — NCAA
Tournament, regional final,
teams and site TBD
MEN'S COLLEGE
HOCKEY
3 p.m.
ESPN2 — NCAA, Division
I playoffs, teams and site
TBD
5:30 p.m.
ESPN2 — NCAA, Division
I playoffs, teams and site
TBD
MEN'S COLLEGE
LACROSSE
5:30 p.m.
FS1 — Yale at Penn
MOTORSPORTS
8 p.m.
FS1 — AMA Supercross, at
St. Louis
SOCCER
9:30 p.m.
ESPN2 — Men's national
teams, exhibition, Mexico
vs. Ecuador, at Los Angeles
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPN — NCAA
Tournament, regional semifinal, teams TBD, at Albany,
N.Y.
2:30 p.m.
ESPN — NCAA
Tournament, regional semifinal, teams TBD, at Albany,
N.Y.
4:30 p.m.
ESPN — NCAA
Tournament, regional semifinal, teams TBD, at
Spokane, Wash.
7 p.m.
ESPN — NCAA
Tournament, regional semifinal, teams TBD, at
Spokane, Wash.
Sunday
ARENA FOOTBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 — Philadelphia at
Orlando
AUTO RACING
1 p.m.
FS1 — NASCAR, Sprint
Cup, STP 500, at
Martinsville, Va.
2 p.m.
ESPN — NHRA, Four-Wide
Nationals, at Concord, N.C.
(same-day tape)
3 p.m.
ABC — IndyCar, Grand
Prix of St. Petersburg (Fla.)
CYCLING
11:30 p.m.
NBCSN — Criterium
International, final stage,
from Porto-Vecchio to Col de
l'Ospedale, Corsica (sameday tape)
GOLF
8:30 a.m.
TGC — European PGA
Tour, Trophee Hassan II,
final round, at Agadir,
Morocco
1 p.m.
TGC — PGA Tour, Texas
Open, final round, at San
Antonio
3 p.m.
NBC — PGA Tour, Texas
Open, final round, at San
Antonio
TGC — Champions Tour,
Mississippi Gulf Resort
Classic, final round, at
Saucier
6 p.m.
TGC — LPGA, Kia Classic,
final round, at Carlsbad,
Calif.
MEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
2 p.m.
CBS — NCAA
Tournament, regional final,
teams and site TBD
4:55 p.m.
CBS — NCAA
Tournament, regional final,
teams and site TBD
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
NBCSN — San Jose at
Pittsburgh
SOCCER
2:30 p.m.
ESPN2 — UEFA, qualifier
for European
Championship, Portugal vs.
Serbia, at Lisbon, Portugal
4:50 p.m.
ESPN2 — MLS,
Philadelphia at Chicago
7 p.m.
FS1 — MLS, Toronto at
Real Salt Lake
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPN — NCAA
Tournament, regional final,
teams TBD, at Greensboro,
N.C.
8:30 p.m.
ESPN — NCAA
Tournament, regional final,
teams TBD, at Oklahoma
City
NHL |
National Hockey League
By The Associated Press
All Times EDT
EASTERN CONFERENCE
GP
W
L
OT Pts
x-N.Y. Rangers 73
47
19
7 101
d-Montreal
75
46
21
8 100
Tampa Bay
75
46
22
7 99
N.Y. Islanders 75
44
26
5 93
Pittsburgh
74
40
23
11 91
Detroit
73
39
22
12 90
Washington
74
40
24
10 90
Ottawa
73
37
25
11 85
Boston
74
36
25
13 85
Florida
74
34
26
14 82
Philadelphia
75
30
29
16 76
New Jersey
74
31
31
12 74
Columbus
73
34
35
4 72
Carolina
73
27
36
10 64
Toronto
75
27
42
6 60
Buffalo
74
20
46
8 48
WESTERN CONFERENCE
GP
W
L
OT Pts
d-Anaheim
76
47
22
7 101
75
46
21
8 100
d-Nashville
St. Louis
74
46
21
7 99
Vancouver
74
43
27
4 90
Chicago
73
44
23
6 94
Los Angeles
74
37
23
14 88
Minnesota
74
42
25
7 91
Winnipeg
75
39
24
12 90
Calgary
74
40
27
7 87
Dallas
74
36
28
10 82
San Jose
74
36
30
8 80
Colorado
74
34
28
12 80
Edmonton
74
21
40
13 55
Arizona
75
23
44
8 54
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.
d-division leader
x-clinched playoff spot
Thursday’s Games
Anaheim 3, Boston 2, OT
Arizona 4, Buffalo 3, OT
Los Angeles 3, N.Y. Islanders 2
Washington 3, New Jersey 2, OT
Carolina 5, Pittsburgh 2
Florida 4, Toronto 1
N.Y. Rangers 5, Ottawa 1
San Jose 6, Detroit 4
Nashville 3, Tampa Bay 2
Winnipeg 5, Montreal 2
Colorado 4, Vancouver 1
Friday’s Games
Calgary at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Columbus at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Dallas at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Nashville at Washington, 12:30 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Boston, 1 p.m.
Anaheim at N.Y. Islanders, 1 p.m.
San Jose at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Arizona at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Detroit, 2 p.m.
Ottawa at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Florida at Montreal, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Columbus at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Buffalo at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Dallas at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 3 p.m.
Florida at Ottawa, 5 p.m.
Detroit at N.Y. Islanders, 5 p.m.
Boston at Carolina, 5 p.m.
Calgary at Nashville, 5 p.m.
Anaheim at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Winnipeg, 7:30 p.m.
NBA |
National Basketball Association
By The Associated Press
All Times EDT
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W
L
Pct
y-Atlanta
54
17
.761
x-Cleveland
47
26
.644
x-Chicago
44
29
.603
42
30
.583
x-Toronto
Washington
40
32
.556
Milwaukee
36
36
.500
GB
—
8
11
12½
14½
18½
Miami
33
38
.465
21
Boston
31
40
.437
23
Indiana
31
41
.431
23½
Brooklyn
30
40
.429
23½
Charlotte
30
40
.429
23½
Detroit
27
44
.380
27
Orlando
22
51
.301
33
Philadelphia
18
54
.250
36½
New York
14
58
.194
40½
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W
L
Pct
GB
13
.817
—
y-Golden State 58
x-Memphis
50
22
.694
8½
Houston
48
23
.676
10
d-Portland
45
25
.643
12½
L.A. Clippers 47
25
.653
11½
San Antonio
45
26
.634
13
45
27
.625
13½
Dallas
Oklahoma City 41
31
.569
17½
Phoenix
38
34
.528
20½
New Orleans 37
34
.521
21
Utah
31
40
.437
27
Denver
27
45
.375
31½
Sacramento
26
45
.366
32
L.A. Lakers
19
51
.271
38½
Minnesota
16
55
.225
42
d-division leader
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
___
Thursday’s Games
Milwaukee 111, Indiana 107
Friday’s Games
L.A. Clippers at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Washington, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Miami at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Sacramento at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Houston, 8 p.m.
Golden State at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Dallas at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Utah at Denver, 9 p.m.
Portland at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Atlanta at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
New York at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Golden State at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Utah, 9 p.m.
Denver at Portland, 10 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Houston at Washington, 12:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Brooklyn, 3:30 p.m.
Minnesota at New Orleans, 4 p.m.
Philadelphia at Cleveland, 4:30 p.m.
Detroit at Miami, 6 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Boston, 6 p.m.
Memphis at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
TRANSACTIONS |
Friday’s Sports Transactions
By The Associated Press
BASEBALL
COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE — Suspended Seattle LHP
David Rollins 80 games for violating the Joint Drug
Prevention and Treatment Program.
American League
CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Claimed RHP Kyle Drabek off
waivers from the Toronto Blue Jays.
CLEVELAND INDIANS — Optioned RHP Danny Salazar
to Columbus (IL).
DETROIT TIGERS — Optioned RHP Buck Farmer to
Toledo (IL). Assigned RHP Rafael Dolis to their minor
league camp.
TAMPA BAY RAYS — Released OF James Harris.
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES — Optioned RHP Williams Perez,
OF Eury Perez and LHP Manny Banuelos to Gwinnett
(IL).
CHICAGO CUBS — Released LHP Jeff Lorick.
COLORADO ROCKIES — Released OFs Brian
Humphries and Jared Simon and INF Matt Wessinger.
MIAMI MARLINS — Released 2B Alfredo Lopez.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Optioned LHP Bobby
LaFromboise to Indianapolis (IL). Reassigned RHPs
Deolis Guerra, Brad Lincoln and Josh Wall; INFs Brent
Morel, Gustavo Nunez and Deibinson Romero; INF/OF
Steve Lombardozzi; OFs Gorkys Hernandez and Jose
Tabata; LHP Charlie Leesman; and C Sebastian Valle to
minor league camp.
SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
UW: Offseason workouts to begin April 1
ing freshmen: 6-2 forward Rachel Tucker
of Pierce, Nebraska; 6-0 wing Daley
In addition to Cotton, 5-11 guard Liv
Handy of Wichita, Kansas; and 6-2 forRoberts and 6-0 forward Natalie Baker saw ward Coreen Labish of Spokane,
the most playing time. Roberts was in 26
Washington.
games with Baker in 16 before suffering a
For the players on campus, offseason
season-ending thumb injury on Feb. 4.
workouts will begin April 1. They will be
Roberts had back-to-back games of 10
allowed two hours per week of individual
points (against UNLV) and eight (at Utah
drills with the coaches.
State) late in the schedule to give UW a
Legerski said the later start time to
taste of what the Missoula, Montana,
school this year means more practice time
native might do as Woodward’s replacefor his group.
ment.
“We need that opportunity for our
“She’s going to get an opportunity to
younger kids to get better,” he said.
step in and establish herself,” Legerski
“We’re still going to have to be able to
said. “We told her when we recruiting her make threes. That’s something that all our
that her time would come. What we witperimeter players have to work on this
nessed with (Roberts) down the stretch is
summer because that’s something that
she’s ready to step into that role.”
this program does.”
As for Baker, Legerski noted that she
The Cowgirls will have a solid nonconcan shoot the ball from three-point range
ference home schedule with Montana,
while being able to get to the basket.
Montana State, St. Mary’s, South Dakota
“She just needs court time,” the coach
and Colorado all set for the Arenasaid. “That was the most difficult part of
Auditorium.
her injury - it took her off the court in
Road games include Denver, Gonzaga
games and in practices.”
and Idaho. UW also plans a Thanksgiving
The Cowgirls also will have three incom- tournament as it has in years past.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
OVERTIME: Wall ties up the game
FROM B1
TRACK AND FIELD: The results are in
FROM B1
• Girls 4x400 meter relay
2nd BHHS, time 4:47.45
3rd BHHS 'C,’ time 4:54.98
• Boys 4x400 meter relay
2nd BHHS 'C,' time 4:00.92
3rd SHS, time 4:05.26
• Girls pole vault
2nd Emily Hooge, SHS, 8-00.00
• Boys pole vault
3rd Morgan Blackwell, SHS, 10-06.00
• Girls high jump
3rd Lydia Mayer, BHHS, 4-07.00
• Girls shot put
2nd Ashley Dodge, TRHS, 31-05.50
• Boys shot put
1st Garrett Allen, BHHS, 46-08.00
3rd Joe Klebba, SHS, 43-03.00
• Girls discus throw
3rd Ashley Dodge, TRHS, 90-09
• Boys discus throw
1st Joe Klebba, SHS, 135-00
Fancy
foot
work
Sheridan Bronc Joe
Shassetz moves the
ball against Riverton
during the soccer
game Friday at
Sheridan High School.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
PICKLES
NON SEQUITUR
• Girls long jump
2nd Cassidy Enloe, BHHS, 14-02.00
3rd Morgan Nance, BHHS, 14-00.75
• Boys long jump
2nd Dillon Lyons, TRHS, 18-10.75
3rd Joe Klebba, SHS, 18-08.50
• Girls triple jump
1st Katie Campbell, SHS, 31-06.00
2nd Emily Blainey, BHHS 31-05.25
Girls overall team rankings and
points
1. Sheridan High School, 189
2. Big Horn High School, 117
7. Tongue River High School, 14
9. Normative Services Inc., 2
Boys overall team rankings and
points
1. Sheridan High School, 130.50
3. Big Horn High School, 84.50
7. Tongue River High School, 31.50
9. Arvada-Clearmont High School, 7
B3
FROM B1
“That’s the reason you want to be a
franchise guy,” Wall said. “You want to be
the leader of a team. I know at times I
didn’t get the ball in those situations. ... I
guess now I’m making them and shooting
them with confidence.”
Wall tied the game late in regulation
after Washington lost the six-point lead
they built midway through the fourth.
It was Wall’s second game in a row with
30-plus points, and the Wizards (41-32)
snapped a four-game losing streak two
nights after blowing a 10-point fourth
quarter lead to Indiana.
Washington reserve Drew Gooden finished with 15 points and 17 rebounds.
“You play me a minute, two minutes,
something’s going to happen, whether it’s
going to be a block, a steal, a charge. I’m
going to be active,” Gooden said. “You
play me 39 minutes, a lot of stuff ’s going
to happen.”
The 39 minutes were more than Gooden
played during the entire month of
January.
“Drew was huge and I just rode him,”
Wizards coach Randy Wittman said.
Washington outrebounded Charlotte 7261.
Bradley Beal, questionable after spraining his right ankle Wednesday, added 16
points.
Jefferson scored 31 points and grabbed
10 rebounds for Charlotte. Williams, who
was questionable with a sore left knee,
added 26 points and 10 assists.
“I think this loss is going to haunt us all
summer long, even when we do make the
playoffs.” Jefferson said. “This loss could
probably be the difference between the
eighth seed and the seventh seed.”
Charlotte (30-41), battling for the final
Eastern Conference playoff spot, has lost
eight of 10 and sits in 11th place.
“We put ourselves in a position here
tonight to win a game on the road, we
made a couple of mistakes late on plays
that need to be made and it cost us a
win,” Hornets coach Steve Clifford said.
Wall’s jumper tied it at 96 with 3.3 seconds left in regulation. Wall and
Charlotte’s Kemba Walker both missed
shots in the final seconds of the first
overtime.
Rasual Butler’s 3-pointer with 11.7 seconds left in regulation pulled Washington
within one at 95-94. Charlotte’s Jeffrey
Taylor made one of two free throws
before Wall tied it.
Williams’ 3-point attempt fell short to
end regulation.
Washington opened the fourth quarter
with a 13-3 run and led 88-82 with 7:14 left.
The Wizards then went cold, and
Jefferson’s dunk, the Hornets’ first field
goal of the quarter, tied it at 88 with 3:48
left.
‘That’s the reason you want to
be a franchise guy. You want to be
the leader of a team. I know at times I
didn’t get the ball in those situations. ...
I guess now I’m making them and
shooting them with confidence.’
John Wall
Point guard with the Washington Wizards
Williams’ 3-pointer put Charlotte ahead
91-88. After a turnover by Washington,
Walker’s two free throws put Charlotte up
95-91 with 14 seconds left.
TIP INS
Hornets: Split the season series with
Washington 2-2. ... F Cody Zeller (sore
right shoulder) missed his fourth straight
game.
Wizards: Signed G Will Bynum to a 10day contract and waived F Toure’ Murry.
Bynum was scoreless in three minutes of
action. ... F Kris Humphries (strained left
groin), G Garrett Temple (right hamstring strain) and C-F DeJuan Blair (personal reasons) were out.
WIZARD GRANT A WISH
Washington partnered with Make-AWish Mid-Atlantic to grant the wish of
13-year-old Wizards fan Nitin
Ramachandran of Herndon, Virginia.
Ramachandran, who is battling a form of
brain cancer, was signed to a one-day contract and took part in the team’s shootaround and pregame warmups.
Ramachandran was then introduced as
part of the starting lineup and sat with
Wittman during the coach’s postgame
news conference.
WATCHING WILLIAMS
Clifford said Williams will be monitored closely as he tries to play through
the soreness in his knee. “He’ll have, I
would think, limited practice time and
then we’ll have to gauge it from half to
half on just how his knee is feeling,”
Clifford said before the game. “If he feels
good, and he’s moving the ball, then we’ll
try to play him regular minutes.”
UP NEXT
Hornets: Host Atlanta on Saturday.
Wizards: Host Houston on Sunday.
Bridge
MOVING CARDS
CHANGES CONDITIONS
This week, we have
looked at pairs of deals in
which a minor change in
the cards results in a major
variation in the right
declarer-play or defense.
Here is the last one. What
should happen in four
spades after West leads the
heart ace?
East raises one
heart to four hearts because
he knows that his side has
at least a 10-card fit and
does not have the normal
high-card values for game.
There is a saying
that a pre-emptive fourheart bid by one side is a
transfer to four spades for
the other side -- hence
South's overcall.
Yesterday, the
defenders' clubs were 3-2
and spades 4-1. Then, after
West began with two
rounds of hearts, the only
way home against best
defense was to discard a low
diamond from the South
Phillip Alder
hand, a loser-onloser play. Here,
though, South
must ruff the
second heart,
draw trumps,
and knock out
the club ace. If he makes
the loser-on-loser play,
West can cash his club
ace and give East a club
ruff. But how would West
know to do that?
On the second
heart, East will play his
lowest as a suit-preference signal. (East, with a
desire for a diamond
shift, would play his highest heart. With no preference, he would drop a
middle card.)
East should also
try to steer his partner
that way at trick one,
playing his heart three.
West, if confident that
East has five hearts for
his game-raise, should
realize that playing a second heart cannot help.
Reading the three as a
suit-preference signal, he
will cash the club ace at
trick two and lead another
club. In both of these scenarios, the later defensive
diamond trick defeats the
contract.
0328_A Section Template 3/27/15 5:17 PM Page 1
B4
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BABY BLUES® by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman
COMICS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2015
DRS. OZ & ROIZEN
Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen
MARY WORTH by Karen Moy and Joe Giella
BORN LOSER® by Art and Chip Sansom
GARFIELD by Jim Davis
Proponents of BPA (the
ubiquitous chemical bisphenol-A) are fueling a science
war. To counter the growing
sentiment that BPA is harmful, chemical-industry lobbyists recently launched a
splashy advertising campaign
asking consumers to "listen
to the science" about BPA. We
agree! But why would proponents of something that is
now judged too toxic for pregnant mothers and babies tell
you to look at the science?
Well, let's look at the science.
Where it is found: BPA is
used to make strong, transparent plastics for food storage and packaging. It's in the
thin, slightly powdery coating on the thermal paper
used for most cash-register
receipts. It's used in the
epoxy resins that line most
food cans and in some fire
retardants in electronics.
What the chemical industry
says: The American
Chemistry Council is correct
that the Food and Drug
Administration and the
European Food Safety
Authority say BPA is safe at
the levels most of us are
exposed to.
What we say: The FDA and
EFSA haven't yet taken into
account a growing body of
research suggesting that even
at low levels, repeated exposure to BPA can change your
endocrine functions (BPA is a
hormone disruptor) and have
other long-lasting effects on
developing fetuses and
infants, as well as damaging
sperm quality. Other
research is even more troubling.
What nearly 100 human
studies have found: Everyday
BPA exposure is associated
with troubling and increasingly common health issues
such as behavior and reproductive problems; high blood
pressure; polycystic ovarian
syndrome; and weight-related
problems, such as diabetes.
--A brand-new study from
New Jersey's Rowan
University School of
Osteopathic Medicine has
found an association between
BPA levels in children and
risk for autism spectrum disorder.
--A recent lab study from
the University of Houston
found that exposure to BPA
used as flame-retardants in
computers, cellphones and
other electronics may be
linked to unwanted weight
gain.
--Another new study puts
the health-care cost of obesity related to BPA at more
than $1.5 billion dollars over
several decades.
Those who know agree:
When Newsweek recently
interviewed 20 prominent scientists who research BPA,
the majority said it's likely
the chemical is linked to all
of those health problems and
to several forms of cancer as
well, though more study is
needed. "There's too much
data consistent across studies
... time and time again ... to
ignore it and suggest BPA has
no effect on humans," one
researcher said.
How does BPA cause trouble? When it gets into living
cells, BPA is an endocrine
disruptor. Not only does that
mess with your metabolism
and lead to weight gain, it
also acts like estrogen and
may have a particularly
strong effect on fetal sexual
development. (It feminizes
male infants in many animal
experiments.) It also might
have an effect on brain development given its ability to
change the activation of
genes: Animal studies -- and
some research in children -suggest that it might increase
the risk for aggression and
anxiety.
Here's what YOU can do:
Although BPA is in many
products you're in contact
with every day, and alternative chemicals from the same
bisphenol family (bisphenol
B, C, E, F, G, M, P, PH, S, TMC
and Z) used in many plastics
labeled "BPA-free" may have
similar effects, these strategies can help you reduce your
exposure:
1. Don't heat/microwave
food or drinks in plastic containers. Heat speeds the
transfer of BPA from plastics
into edibles. Store food, especially acidic foods like tomato
sauce, in glass or uncoated
metal containers.
2. Say "no thanks" to
receipts, tickets and anything
else printed on thermal
paper. If you take one, wash
your hands. BPA may be
absorbed through the skin
and can hitchhike from your
fingers into your body when
you eat.
3. Eat fresh instead of
canned fruit. Ditto for veggies. Avoiding plastic food
packaging whenever possible
will reduce your exposure,
too.
Now that you've listened to
the science, do you think
glass will make a comeback?
DEAR ABBY
FRANK & ERNEST® by Bob Thaves
Pauline Phillips and Jeanne Phillips
TEEN'S TROUBLED
FRIEND IS ON PATH TO
SELF-DESTRUCTION
DEAR ABBY: I am a 14year-old girl, and my friend
"Leah" is out of control. She
has been going down the
REX MORGAN, M.D. by Woody Wilson and Tony DiPreta
ZITS® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
DILBERT by S. Adams
ALLEY OOP® by Dave Graue and Jack Bender
wrong path since sixth grade.
She is what people call "emo."
She has attempted to end
her life more than once. She
has sex with lots of boys
older than her and has issues
with drugs and cutting. She
was abused until she was 5
and then adopted. She doesn't
seem to have any morals.
She says she wants to
become a serial killer and a
prostitute when she grows
up. She also wants to have a
baby in the near future. Leah
has borderline personality
disorder and probably some
others. I have tried talking to
her about what she's doing to
herself, but she sees nothing
wrong with her destructive
behavior.
I want Leah to get help
before she winds up raped, in
prison, or on death row, or
becomes a teen mother on
the streets. I don't want her
to become another number,
another statistic. What
should I do? Who do I call -the police, social services, a
hotline? -- SCARED FOR
LEAH
DEAR SCARED: Your
friend appears to be a very
troubled and angry girl. If
she thinks that by becoming
a prostitute or a killer she
will be able to assert control
in her life where she has
none, she's sadly mistaken.
You say she has borderline
personality disorder. If that's
true, it must have been diagnosed by a licensed psychotherapist. Frankly, I don't
think this is anything you
can -- or should -- handle on
your own.
If your mother doesn't
know what's going on, please
tell her so she can alert
Leah's mother and Leah can
return to her therapist.
However, if that's not possible, tell a counselor at school
what you have told me so
Leah can receive more treatment before she hurts herself
or someone else.
DEAR ABBY: My boyfriend
and I have been together for
three years and have planned
our first vacation together.
We decided to split the
expenses 50/50.
Last week, he announced
that he has invited his sister
and her boyfriend to go along
and stay with us in the apartment we rented. Not only
was I shocked that he would
invite them without checking
with me first, I became upset
when he said he wasn't asking them to pitch in any
money. Normally I'm not
stingy when it comes to sharing, but I'm angry and I wonder if I'm overreacting.
AMBER IN TEXAS
CLASSIFIEDS
Phone: (307) 672-2431
SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
Personals
For Lease
I WOULD like to
send out a
heartfelt thank you
for all the
wonderful cards,
donations,
blessings &
prayers
during my stay in
Arizona
undergoing
surgeries. LOVE
from MARCI!!
Household Goods
64 INCH diam. round
Cherrywood dining
table with 6 chairs.
Excellent condition.
$800. 674-7671
USED DRYER. $25.
Call 307-660-4966.
Boats
LARGEST SELECTION
ANYWHERE!!
Surf/Wakeboard boats,
Fishing boats, Family
boats! New and preowned! Warranty and
Free delivery!
lovell.midwayautoandm
arine.com,
307-548-7571
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
BUILDINGS
FOR LEASE
Rail Road Land
& Cattle Co.
Has Shop Space,
Warehouse Space,
Retail Space,
Office Space and
much more
for lease!
673-5555
Rooms for Rent
Adoption
LOVING, SECURE life
awaits
1st
baby.
Expenses pd. Penny &
Kevin. 1-888-772-0068.
Fax: (307) 672-7950
SMOKER FRIENDLY
ROOM for rent.
$250/mo incl wi-fi. $200
dep. ($50 nonrefundable). Avail now.
307-655-5243.
Furnished Apts for Rent
1BR. NO smk/pets.
$575 + elec + dep.
Coin-Op W/D.
307-674-5838.
STAGE STOP MOTEL
CLEAN. Weekly &
Monthly rates. Internet,
cable & utilities incl.
307-672-2477.
WKLY FR $240.
America's Best Value
Inn. 672-9757.
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
Broadway Apts.
2 bdrm, 1 bath
townhouse
Available in
Dayton, WY.
Miscellaneous for Sale
MARY KAY
products for sale.
Call for details.
307-660-4966.
Rent based on
income.
Please call
Musical Instruments
307-751-1752 or
1-888-387-7368
BASIC
TECHNIQUES of
Singing. AMAZE
Your Friends at
Karaoke! SHINE in
Your Church Choir!
ROCK Your Metal
Band! Call Kristi at
307-763-3412.
Toll-Free for application
Equal Housing
Opportunity
RANCHESTER
STUDIO apt.,
$450/mo.+ heat & dep.,
util. pd. No smk. Pets?
Laundry rm. incl.
307-751-4060.
2BR.
WASHER/DRYER.
$600 + Dep + Elec. No
smkg/pets. Lease. Call
for appt. 307-752-4735.
EXTRA LG. 2 BR. Low
utils. $625/mo. + $500
dep. 1 yr. lease. Ref's
req'd. 307-751-2445.
NEWLY REMODELED
1BR. Garage w/
opener. Central A/C.
W/D. Storage area. No
smoking. $600 + util.
307-751-5815.
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
SHERIDAN 2BR house.
Att. garage, patio, nice
yard. W/D. A/C. No
smk/pets. Ref. req.
$800+dep.+util.
655-9350 leave msg.
Duplexes, Unfurn. for
Rent
SPACIOUS
2BR/1.5
Ba. $1045. 752-3665.
Mobile Hm. Space for
Rent
Storage Space
Help Wanted
ELDORADO
STORAGE Helping you
conquer space. 3856
Coffeen. 672-7297.
CALL BAYHORSE
STORAGE 1005 4th
Ave. E. 752-9114.
ELIASON FINANCIAL
ASSOCIATES
is currently searching
for an Administrative
Assistant to join our
team. Successful
candidates must have
exceptional customer
service skills.
Applicants must have
strong computer, data
entry and
communication skills.
Chosen
applicants will perform
administrative duties
and general office
support. Please email
your resume and
cover letter to
[email protected]
eliasonfa.com.
WOODLANDPARK
STORAGE.COM
5211 Coffeen
Call 674-7355
New Spaces
Available!
CIELO STORAGE
307-752-3904
INTERSTATE
STORAGE. Multiple
Sizes avail. No
deposit req'd.
307-752-6111.
Child Care
ENERGETIC AND
OUTGOING NANNY
needed for 3 children
(ages 5, 5 & 8) for
8hr/day M-F for months
of June, July & Aug.
Previous exp. needed
w/references. Must
have own transportation
w/valid DL. CPR cert
preferred. Must pass
background check. $10$12hr depending on
exp. Send reply to Box
225, c/o The Sheridan
Press, PO Box 2006,
Sheridan, WY 82801.
Work Wanted
RV SPACE, Big Horn.
PAINTING,
By day, month or year. HOUSE
general labor, cleaning
674-7718.
& cleanup. New Ref's.
Office Space for Rent
683-7814 (cell).
2500 SQ FT Office Help Wanted
Retail space w/ parking.
EXECUTIVE
1415 N. Main. 752-4662
HOUSEKEEPER. Top
CORNER SUITE w/
Wages. Apply in
MTN VIEWS. 1,000 sq.
person at Hampton
ft. 2 private offices,
Inn,
conference & reception
980 Sibley Circle.
areas. Utilities included.
672-8700.
Storage Space
DOWNER ADDITION
STORAGE 674-1792
MAINTENANCE
PLANNER SUPERVISOR
The position requires a minimum of 5 years’ mining experience in
Maintenance Planning and Scheduling, including major shutdowns
and repairs. Must have supervisory experience.
Compensation and benefits are highly competitive. If you are
enthusiastic, have a strong work ethic and would like to become a
part of our team, we welcome the opportunity to visit with you.
LOOKING FOR a
SUMMER JOB?
Housekeeper,
Gardener, Subway
Sandwich Artist.
Apply in person @
Garryowen, MT
SCSD #1 has the
following extra duty
positions available.
*BHHS Volleyball
Head Coach
*TRHS Volleyball
Head Coach
Please complete the
extra-duty application
(found on district
website) and return it
to Brandi Miller [email protected]
sheridan.k12.wy.us
If you have position
specific questions
please call the
perspective HS
Principal.
www.sheridan.k12.wy.
us. Positions are open
until filled. E.O.E.
THE CITY of
SHERIDAN is actively
recruiting an energetic
and dynamic
individual with
excellent skills in
customer service and
multitasking for the
Full Time position of
Administrative
Assistant for the
Utilities Division.
This position is
responsible for
performing
administrative and
secretarial duties in
support of department
operations, including
but not limited to,
maintaining
department files,
answering phones and
walk-in customer
inquiries, and
preparing
correspondence. This
is a fully benefited
position including
health, dental, vision,
and life insurance,
state pension
retirement, tuition
reimbursement, paid
time off and a
wellness program.
The hiring range is
$17.17- $18.97/hour
DOE. Candidates
must pass a
comprehensive
background check.
Qualified applicants
should submit a
completed City of
Sheridan job
application to City
Hall, 55 Grinnell Plaza
by 4/3/15. Full job
description, required
minimum
qualifications and
application
can be found at
www.sheridanwy.net.
The City of Sheridan
is a drug-free work
place.
Research – Field Interviewer
CONDUCT INTERVIEWS FOR UNITED
STATES GOVERNMENT SPONSORED STUDY
On behalf of the Research Triangle Institute,
Headway Workforce Solutions is currently seeking
Field Interviewers to work on a governmentsponsored research study in the Sheridan-Johnson
County area in Sheridan, WY. This is a part-time
position offering an average of 20-25 hours per week.
Field Interviewers will be responsible for traveling to
participants’ homes in an assigned area and
conducting research interviews with randomlyselected participants. Candidates must be able to
work a flexible schedule including evenings and
weekends and must be willing to travel locally.
• Evening and Weekend hours
• Average 20 to 25 hours per week
• Must attend a 7-day paid training
• Pay range, starting at $11.90
• Dependable transportation required, mileage
reimbursed at $.575 cents per mile
• No solicitation involved, although skills gained
from previous sales work is helpful
• Household interviewing and/or computer
experience preferred
Please fill out an application at:
Wyoming Workforce Services
61 S. Gould
Sheridan, WY 82801
(307)672-9775
Job Order 2580409
Deadline for applications:
04/06/2015
* All interviewers will be employed by Headway Workforce
Solutions, under subcontract to RTI.
* Applicants in all Counties above will be considered for
position. Billinguals welcome to apply also.
Hints from Heloise
heavy snow? Check with
your car-care specialist to
change them to other tires
more suitable for the dry,
hot pavement of summertime. Snow tires typically
are less adept at stopping on
hot, dry (and rainy) roads.
Potholes, which can develop from
the roads freezing and thawing, can
wreak havoc on your car's suspension. You may need your wheels
aligned and rotated. This will help
with tire wear.
Stay on top of your tire pressure.
Learn to check the pressure, and
have a pro help you. Underinflated
tires can be very dangerous in the
heat. -- Heloise
VIDEO VOLUNTEER
Dear Heloise: I am on one of the
popular social-media sites, and I
Heloise
also am a huge animal lover and animal-adoption advocate. Lots of volunteers go into the shelters and
photograph the dogs and cats (and
other animals, like rabbits) that are
available for adoption, and post the
pictures so that they have a better
chance of being adopted.
What if the volunteers made
videos instead of still pictures?
You'd be able to see the animal's
mannerisms, size, activity level,
temperament, etc. Take the animal
outside, away from the cold bars
and the noise of the shelter, and
shoot a short video (about a minute
is enough) and post it on social
media. Let's empty out the shelters
and put these loving animals in
great homes! -- Elizabeth in San Antonio
Help Wanted
Now Hiring
Overnight
Security
Maintenance
*Wage DOE
Apply in person at the
Front Desk.
1809 SUGARLAND DRIVE
SHERIDAN, WY
TAKING
APPLICATIONS for a
Big Horn High School
Principal. Must have a
Master’s in school
administration. Must
have eligibility for a
Standard
Administrative
Certificate with
endorsement of
Principal K-12 as
issued by the WY
Professional Teaching
Standards Board.
Beginning date: 20152016 contract year –
approximately July 30,
2015. Please visit
district website,
www.sheridan.k12.wy.
us for more
information and
application.
Go online today!
www.thesheridanpress.com
Help Wanted, Medical
**LPN
PROFESSIONALS**
Join a team that
supports you –
professionally and
personally
Correctional
Healthcare
Companies is
currently seeking topnotch Healthcare
professionals to join
our team at our
Sheridan County
Detention Facility in
Sheridan, WY
Healthcare
Opportunities Include:
Licensed Practical
Nurse – Full Time
We invite you to take
a look at our career
opportunities and the
benefits of working at
CHC.
Please apply online at
www.correctcaresoluti
ons.com Careers/
current openings/
Correctional
Healthcare openings
(CHC)
or Contact [email protected]
correctcaresolutions.
com. CHC is an EEO
Employer
NURSES NEEDED.
Sheridan Surgical
Center is seeking
Registered Nurses to fill
several
positions. We are a
multi-specialty
outpatient surgery
center located in
Sheridan, WY. OR
experience is preferred.
Requires a valid WY
license. ACLS & PALS
certification is desirable.
Please submit your
resume to 1524 W. 5th
Street, Sheridan, WY
82801. Attention: Lori
Tamburo or email
[email protected]
To Apply, Go To www.headwayinresearch.com/rti
An Equal Opportunity Employer
Time to Talk Tires
Editor's Note: The accompanying photo for this and future Saturday Heloise pet columns will
be available to newspapers that
receive the column through the
website. If you receive the column by APwire or U.S. mail and
would like to receive the photo at
no extra charge, you can download
it. Call Reed Brennan Media Associates Customer Service at (800) 7087311, ext. 236.
Dear Readers: Hopefully by now,
everyone is thawed out and dug out
from this season's heavy snow in
many parts of the country. But
what condition is your CAR in?
Let's get it in good shape for spring
and summer! A good thing to focus
on is the tires.
Did you use snow tires in the
QDOBA NOW HIRING
cooks $11/hr DOE, &
line servers $10/hr
DOE. Apply in person
2112 Coffeen Ave.
Help Wanted
ROOFING LABORERS
NEEDED
Call 307-278-0314
DECKER COAL COMPANY (located 25 miles north of Sheridan,
Wyoming), has an immediate openings.
This person will coordinate all maintenance planning and scheduling
for all mobile and plant equipment. Will also be responsible to
generate short and long term maintenance schedules/reports/KPI
metrics. This position also requires the use of the Maintenance
Management System modules of the Ellipse operating system.
FT CASHIER needed.
$10/ hr. Must be 21.
Opportunity for growth.
Send reply to box 228,
c/o The Sheridan Press,
PO Box 2006,
Sheridan, WY 82801.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
LOCAL SUBWAY NOW
HIRING all shifts &
positions: Management
& Sandwich Artists.
Call 307-217-1998
for interviews.
PERKINS IS
currently accepting
applications for
SUMMER
EMPLOYMENT:
Kitchen Manager,
Dining Room Manager,
& all other positions.
AM & PM shifts avail.
Apply in person at 1373
Coffeen Ave
or online at www.
pleaseapplyonline.com/
sugarlandenterprises.
EOE
SHERIDAN SURGICAL
CENTER, a multispecialty outpatient
surgery center, is
seeking experienced
candidates with a
strong clinical and
management
background to fill the
Director of Nursing
position.
A valid Wyoming
nursing license as well
as ACLS & PALS
certification is required.
For consideration,
please submit your
resume to 1524 W. 5th
Street, Sheridan, WY
82801, Attention: Lori
Tamburo or email
[email protected]
B5
Help Wanted, Medical
The VETERANS’
HOME of WYOMING
is currently taking
applications for a
Registered Nurse. Job
Title: HSNU08-02623Nurse.
Provides nursing
services to the
residents of the facility
and assesses health
problems and needs
amd develops and
implements nursing
care plans. Hiring
Range: $24.19 - $30.24
per hour. For
application information
or to apply online go to
http://
agency.governmentjobs
.com/wyoming/default.c
fm or submit an official
application to A&I
Human Resources
Division, Emerson
Building, 2001 Capitol
Avenue, Cheyenne, WY
82002-0060, (307) 7777188, Fax (307) 7776562 along with any
relevant coursework.
Open until filled. A preemployment drug and
alcohol screening is
required by the
Wyoming Department
of Health. EEO/ADA
Employer.
Help Wanted, Office
THE CITY of
SHERIDAN is actively
recruiting a
personable, energetic
and
dynamic individual
with excellent skills in
customer service for
the position of PartTime Executive
Assistant for the
Mayor’s Office. This
position is responsible
for scheduling the
Mayor, scheduling
meetings and events,
answering and
tracking public
concerns, conducting
research,
obtaining answers to
Council inquiries and
concerns, and various
other duties. This is a
benefited position
including health,
dental, and vision
insurance, tuition
reimbursement, paid
time off, matching
retirement
contributions and a
wellness program.
This position is
expected to average
about 32 hours/week.
The hiring range is
$20.92-$23.11/hour
DOE. Candidates
must pass a
comprehensive
background check.
Qualified applicants
should submit a
completed City of
Sheridan job
application to City
Hall, 55 Grinnell Plaza
by 4/3/15. Full job
description, required
minimum
qualifications and
application can be
found at
www.sheridanwy.net.
The City of Sheridan
is a drug-free work
place.
WATER PRODUCTS,
INC.
is actively seeking an
energetic & dynamic
person with excellent
skills in customer
service & multitasking
for FT position of
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT.
Knowledge of QB
preferred but will train
the right person. Must
be able to lift 50 lbs.
Pre-employment drug
testing & background
check required.
Pick up application @
Water Products, Inc.,
1831 S. Sheridan Ave.
Help Wanted,
Professional
K-8 ELEMENTARY
Teacher at Spring
Creek School in
Decker, MT.
406-757-2215 or email:
[email protected]
CLASSIFIEDS
B6 THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2015
Help Wanted,
Professional
Delivery Problems?
Call The Press at
307-672-2431
SHERIDAN COUNTY
School District #1 is
accepting applications
for
the
following
positions:
·Elementary Music
Teacher (Tongue
River)
·Kindergarten
Teacher (Tongue
River)
·Secondary Physical
Education Teacher
(Tongue River)
The candidate must
be eligible for a
Wyoming Teaching
certificate. Possible
coaching or student
activities may be
available. If interested,
contact Brandi Miller,
[email protected]
sheridan.k12.wy.us or
visit district website,
www.sheridan.k12.wy.
us for more
information and
application.
Position open until
filled. E.O.E.
Antiques
P.O. Box 6308
Sheridan, WY 82801
(307) 674-6421
2015 SHERIDAN RECREATION
DISTRICT SUMMER JOB OPENINGS
# OF
POSITIONS:
POSITION:
Aquatics Director
1
Youth Baseball Umpires
4-6
Little Sluggers Baseball Coaches 2-4
SALARY:
$12.00
FOR SALE: VINTAGE
Tin Turtle Top Trunk
19"Wx34"Lx24"H. $120
OBO. 307-752-5064 Leave msg.
Real Estate
Real Estate
SATURDAY
March 28th
10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Hosted by
Irene Winkler
SUNDAY
March 29th
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
842 Olympus
Drive
$409,000
Something
for the
whole
family
Real Estate
FSBO
1742 Edwards Dr.
Colony South
Subdivision.
2400 Sq. Ft. 4BR/2Ba
Call 307-674-7031.
Photos available on
request.
Hosted by
Matt Westkott
306 N. Main St.
Sheridan, WY
(307) 672-8911
Office Hours
Sat 9am-2pm
$7.65/hr.
6th St & College Concession Mgr
1
$10.65/hr.
Youth Tennis Coaches
2-4
$10.65/hr.
Lifeguards/Swim Instructors
25
$8.45-$9.45/hr.
Park Maintenance Person
2
$9.35/hr
Athletic Field Maintenance
2
$9.35-$12.35 DOQ
Weed & Mosquito Technicians
2
$9.35/hr
FOR SALE:
GRILL GUARD. Fits '97
Ford PU. Never been
in an accident.
Excellent Cond. $900.
307-763-6577.
Motorcycles
Autos-Accessories
'04 LEXUS RX 330.
67K miles. One owner.
Excellent condition.
$14,900. 752-0237.
1995 GMC ALL
WHEEL DRIVE VAN
Non smoker.
Duel A/C and Heat.
Runs great.
200k+ miles.
406-638-2020. $2700.
2002 CHEVY IMPALA.
Runs Great. 35 MPG.
Cruise. A/C. OnStar.
Remote Entry. $4500.
Call 752-3325
Sheridan Recreation District Staff • 1579 Thorne Rider Park
(307) 674-6421 • www.sheridanrecreation.com
Omarr’s Daily Astrological
Forecast
of balls you can handle. An
imprudent need to be the
know-it-all of the business
world, or a focus on material gain, could interfere
with productivity or disturb a usually harmonious
relationship
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Even the most attractive path might have some
pitfalls. Subtle crosscurrents are at play, so pay attention to where you put
your feet. With financial
matters it's best to adopt an
attitude of "when in doubt,
don't."
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Don't go it alone. Share
your ideas, as well as your
passions. If you spend time
in public places you might
gain the attention of an influential stranger or meet
someone who could become
a friend. The more the merrier.
IF MARCH 30 IS YOUR
BIRTHDAY: For the next 4-6
weeks life should treat you
fairly evenly if you're
gullible and willing to believe that what you see is
what you get. Wishful
thinking could lead you
astray, so don't get caught
up in dubious investments
or romantic entanglements
that could needlessly complicate your life. New
friends or vacation plans
can dominate July. Your
shrewdness and business
acumen hit a peak in August that will help you attain your ambitions. Be
willing to accept the guiding hand of powers larger
and wiser than you during
September. Be alert for
valuable help from others
in the form of a job offer or
an opportunity for advance-
2002 DODGE Ram
1500 4Dr Quad Cab
4x4 SLT Plus. Magnum
5.9L. V8. 4 Spd Auto.
Short bed w/ topper.
Trailer tow pkg. New
battery. Loaded. $5600.
307-399-5754
2011 SOFTTAIL
DELUXE
5,800 Miles
Two-Tone Brown
$12,500
307-752-7131
Campers, Trailers
Please contact the Sheridan Recreation District if interested
any of the above positions. Job descriptions are available to
be picked up at our Thorne Rider Park location. Office hours
are from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.
Please have all applications turned in by May 17th at 5:00 p.m.
ness moves. Make no crucial business decisions.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Truth or consequences
could be the game of the
day. Those intriguing ideas
dancing around in the back
of your head are better left
alone. Don't start anything
right now of grave importance that requires shrewd
business skills.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Sugar is sweet and so are
you. This evening might
offer a perfect opportunity
for a reenactment of honeymoon bliss. Put strategic
ideas and business ideas on
the back burner and concentrate on ways to spend
quality time with loved
ones.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Remain content with what
you have. You might wonder if you'd rather be a
small fish in a big pond or
the big fish in the small one.
The good news is, you don't
need to make that decision.
Focus on harmonious relationships
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Listen with your heart
instead of your wallet. You
might attract more than
your fair share of avid admirers under these celestial
conditions. Strut your stuff,
but don't be tempted to dive
into a new business partnership.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): When you're happy
and feel confident in the
way you look, others will
respond in kind. Give in to
the urge to do some frivolous shopping for personal
items rather than making a
risky investment.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Juggle only the number
1965 CHEVY 1/2 TON
PICK UP. $5000.
Standard
transmission.
V-8. 86,000 original
miles. Starts & drives
great. 406-638-2020.
www.eracrc.com
$9.35/hr.
2
Recreational Vehicles
$238,000
$15/$18 per gm
6th Street & College Concession
PRIME RATE
MOTORS is buying
clean, preowned
vehicles of all ages.
We also install B&W
GN hitches, 5th Wheel
Hitches, Pickup
Flatbeds, Krogman
Bale Beds. Stop by
2305 Coffeen Ave. or
call 674-6677.
895 Fleming
Feel free to call for more information about any of the positions
above. All wages are starting rates. (307)674-6421
BIRTHDAY GAL: Actress
Juliet Landau was born in
Los Angeles, Calif., on this
day in 1965. This birthday
gal played the recurring
role of Drusilla on both the
series "Buffy the Vampire
Slayer" and "Angel." She's
also appeared on episodes of
"Criminal Minds" and "Ben
10: Omniverse." Her film
work includes "Where the
Road Runs Out," "Toolbox
Murders" and "Ed Wood."
Juliet is the daughter of actors Martin Landau and
Barbara Bain.
ARIES (March 21-April
19): You cannot be deterred
when you're driven and determined. Security and
comfort can be achieved
through hard work. However, you might be grasping
for straws in an effort to attain a secure position without effort.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Concentrate on pleasurable experiences and romantic moments. Your time
is best spent finding ways to
bring a smile to the face of a
beloved partner. Put business strategies aside until
better conditions prevail.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
The ends might sometimes
justify the means. Perhaps
you're a bit more ambitious
than usual or compelled to
employ cutthroat tactics.
You may be challenged to
take the time to reassess
what constitutes true happiness.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): All the things you
learned by rote in school
might offer little help.
Think from the heart and
don't be sidetracked by
dreams of hitting the jackpot through shrewd busi-
Autos-Accessories
2004 PALAMINO 1500
slide-in pop up pickup
camper w/ bathroom.
Exc. Cond. $5900.
307-752-3065.
Garage Sales
FRI & Sat 8-? 1511
Mydland Rd. #216.
Men's
Carharts
&
Wranglers.
Baby
furniture & clothes and
many misc items.
Jeraldine Saunders
ment.
BIRTHDAY GUY: Actor
Ewan McGregor was born
in Perth, Scotland, today in
1971. This birthday guy has
starred in such films as
"The Impossible," "Angels
and Demonsr" and "Moulin
Rouge!" He also played ObiWan Kenobi in the "Star
Wars" prequel trilogy. He
earned an Emmy nomination for a guest appearance
on "ER" in 1997 and has
starred in London theatrical productions of "Guys
and Dolls" and "Othello."
ARIES (March 21-April
19): "Mind over matter"
means you can conquer material difficulties through
thoughtfulness. Put your
thinking cap on and tackle
intricate problems. Don't
miss an opportunity to confer with others, since two
heads are better than one.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): A change of heart might
be just what the doctor ordered to cure your woes.
Problems in a relationship
or with authority figures
might evaporate if you
change tactics. Careful reflection may clear up a mystery or solve a riddle.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
There is light and laughter
at the end of the tunnel.
Some problems disappear
and a humorous discussion
might help you see another
situation from a different
perspective. You might
need a new outfit, a haircut,
or another personal treat to
lift your spirits.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Roll up your sleeves and
prepare to dig in. Leave romantic banter to the sitcom
characters and maintain a
business-like demeanor.
Consistent efforts will pay
off if you don't become obsessed by something you
can't have.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If
you merely give an inch
you can gain a mile. While
it isn't wise to let your generosity overcome your common sense, you can yield to
reasonable requests. You
may be wiser than usual
and able to gauge future results accurately.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
You're batting a thousand.
Your good taste shows
where money or love is concerned. You have a discriminating eye and may find
the perfect "whatsit" while
shopping or a fascinating
new friend through work.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Float on a cloud of optimism. Remind yourself that
prosperity and contentment
might be just around the
corner. It's important to
keep your eye fixed on longterm goals, even if shortterm objectives seem to
stand in the way.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): An opportunity is only
as good as your willingness
to accept it and make it pay.
Someone must turn the paddle consistently to make ice
cream. The attractive carrot held in front of your
nose may be unattainable
unless you work hard.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Take pride in fulfilling promises. Be a man,
or woman, of your word. It
might require hard work
and diligence to live up to a
pledge or to honor commitments, but in the final
analysis you'll be glad you
did.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Misunderstandings
melt away like snowflakes
on a hot summer day. Unravel the snarled knots that
have created a barrier between you and a significant
other. Your charm and
friendliness are assets to be
used in large doses.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): If no one will pay the
piper, then it's time to
change your tune. Don't exaggerate your abilities or
offer false assurances. You
might be called upon to follow through on a promise
or to study something important.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Share your feelings.
Speak the magic words and
it's likely you will win the
support of a business ally or
the heart of a special someone. You can make a serious commitment to a cause,
a person, or a new project.
IF MARCH 31 IS YOUR
BIRTHDAY: You can take a
lovely vacation or enjoy a
fanciful fling while your romantic side is on display
during the next 4-6 weeks.
Where your finances or career are concerned, you
should tread water, even if
you feel it's time to reach
for your dreams. In July,
new friends and group activities might open some
doors or inspire you to try
bigger and better things. In
August, you might get positive attention, so make an
effort to advertise or to be
in the public eye. From late
September through early
October you're luckier than
usual. This is a fabulous
time to launch plans, start
something new, or embrace
any opportunities that pop
up.
YOUR ELECTED
OFFICIALS |
CITY
John Heath
Mayor
307-675-4223
Public Notices
SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
WHY PUBLIC NOTICES ARE IMPORTANT |
Kristin Kelly
Councilor
307-673-4751
Shelleen
Smith
Councilor
307-461-7082
Thayer
Shafer
Councilor
307-674-4118
Alex Lee
Councilor
307-752-8804
Jesus Rios
Councilor
307-461-9565
Kelly Gooch
Councilor
307-752-7137
COUNTY
Pete Carroll
Treasurer
307-674-2520
Eda
Thompson
Clerk
307-674-2500
Nickie Arney
Clerk of District
Court
307-674-2960
John Fenn
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
William
Edelman
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
Shelley
Cundiff
Sheridan
County Circut
Court Judge
307-674-2940
P.J. Kane
Coroner
307-673-5837
Terry
Cram
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Tom
Ringley
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Mike
Nickel
Chairman
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Steve
Maier
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Dave
Hofmeier
Sheriff
307-672-3455
Bob
Rolston
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Paul
Fall
Assessor
307-674-2535
Matt
Redle
County
Attorney
307-674-2580
STATE
Matt
Mead
Governor
307-777-7434
Rosie
Berger
Representative
House Dist. 51
307-672-7600
Mark
Jennings
Representative
House Dist. 30
307-461-0697
John
Patton
Representative
House Dist. 29
307-672-2776
Mike
Madden
Representative
House Dist. 40
307-684-9356
Dave
Kinskey
Senator
Senate Dist. 22
307-461-4297
307-278-6030
Bruce
Burns
Senator
Senate Dist. 21
307-672-6491
Public notices allow citizens to monitor their government and make sure that it is
working in their best interest. Independent newspapers assist in this cause by
carrying out their partnership with the people’s right to know through public
notices. By offering an independent and archived record of public notices,
newspapers foster a more trusting relationship between government and its
citizens.
Newspapers have the experience and expertise in publishing public notices and
have done so since the Revolutionary War. Today, they remain an established,
trustworthy and neutral source that ably transfers information between
government and the people.
Public notices are the lasting record of how the public’s resources are used and are
presented in the most efficient and effective means possible.
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Groathouse Construction, Inc., The Sheridan on Skates
Board request pre-qualified subcontractor bids for work
on the Whitney Ice Arena at M&Ms Center, Sheridan,
WY. Faxed bids will be accepted at 888-664-8180 until
12 p.m. (Local Time) on April 1, 2015. Sealed bids will be
accepted at Whitney Benefits Building, 145 N. Connor
St., Ste. #1 Board Room, Sheridan, Wyoming until 2 p.m.
(Local Time), on April 1, 2015 at which time all bids will
be publicly opened and read aloud. Five percent
preference is hereby given to subcontractors, supplies,
equipment, machinery, and provisions produced,
manufactured, supplied or grown in Wyoming; quality
being equal to articles offered by competitors outside
the State as provided in W.S. 16-6-101 through 16-6-107.
The Project includes the following Bid Packages for bid:
BP 1 – General Construction, 2A – Earthwork, 3A –
Concrete Slabs, Steps, & Misc., 3C – Concrete
Reinforcing Material, 4 – Masonry, 5 – Structural Steel
Material, 6 – Structural Steel Erection, 7A – Gypsum
Board Assemblies, 7B – Exterior Insulation and Finish
Systems, 8B – Architectural Metal, 8D – Membrane
Roofing, 9 – Doors and Hardware, 10 – Aluminum Doors
and Windows, 11A – Coiling Overhead Doors and Grilles,
12 – Painting, Wall Covering, and Sealants, 13A –
Ceramic Tile Flooring and Ceramic Wall Coverings, 14AArchitectural Casework, 20A – Fences and Gates
All prospective subcontractors must receive notice from
Groathouse Construction, Inc. that they are prequalified. A pre-bid meeting will be held at the project
site, Whitney Benefits Building, 145 N. Connor St., Ste. #1
Board Room, Sheridan, WY on March 18, 2015, 1:00 p.m.
(Local Time). Pre-qualification forms accepted up to 5
days prior to bid. Contract Documents completed by ale
Buckingham Architects, but will be available from
Groathouse Construction, Inc. after March 11, 2015. To
receive a pre-qualification form and bidding
information, call or e-mail request to:
Groathouse Construction, Inc.
Heather Couture| 307-587-6610
Publish: March 21, 28, 2015.
FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE
WHEREAS, default in the payment of
principal and interest has occurred under the terms of a
Promissory Note (the "Note") dated April 24, 2008,
executed and delivered by Mary F. Klier (“Mortgagor”)
to GMAC Mortgage, LLC and a real estate mortgage (the
"Mortgage") of the same date securing the Note, which
Mortgage was executed and delivered by said
Mortgagor, to Mortgage Electronic Registration
Systems, Inc. as nominee for GMAC Mortgage, LLC, its
successors and assigns as Mortgagee, and which
Mortgage was recorded on May 7, 2008, at Reception
No. 608180, in Book 705, at Page 0739 in the public
records in the office of the County Clerk and ex-officio
Register of Deeds in and for Sheridan County, State of
Wyoming; and
WHEREAS, the mortgage was assigned for
value as follows:
Assignee: Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC
Assignment dated: November 10, 2014
Assignment recorded: November 13, 2014
Assignment recording information: at Reception No.
2014-715889, in Book 894, at Page 409
All in the records of the County Clerk and ex-officio
Register of Deeds in and for Sheridan County, Wyoming.
WHEREAS, the Mortgage contains a power
of sale which by reason of said default, the Mortgagee
declares to have become operative, and no suit or
proceeding has been instituted at law to recover the
debt secured by the Mortgage, or any part thereof, nor
has any such suit or proceeding been instituted and the
same discontinued; and
WHEREAS, written notice of intent to
foreclose the Mortgage by advertisement and sale has
been served upon the record owner and the party in
possession of the mortgaged premises at least ten (10)
days prior to the commencement of this publication,
and the amount due upon the Mortgage on the date of
first publication of this notice of sale being the total
sum of $47,329.31 which sum consists of the unpaid
principal balance of $43,896.30 plus interest accrued to
the date of the first publication of this notice in the
amount of $1,991.82, plus attorneys' fees, costs
expended, and accruing interest and late charges after
the date of first publication of this notice of sale;
WHEREAS, the property being foreclosed
upon may be subject to other liens and encumbrances
that will not be extinguished at the sale. Any
prospective purchaser should research the status of
title before submitting a bid;
NOW, THEREFORE Ocwen Loan Servicing,
LLC, as the Mortgagee, will have the Mortgage
foreclosed as by law provided by causing the mortgaged
property to be sold at public venue by the Sheriff or
Deputy Sheriff in and for Sheridan County, Wyoming to
the highest bidder for cash at 10:15 o`clock in the
forenoon on April 24, 2015 at the North door of the
Sheridan County Courthouse in the City of Sheridan,
Sheridan County, State of Wyoming, 224 S. Main Street,
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801, for application on the above
described amounts secured by the Mortgage, said
mortgaged property being described as follows, to-wit:
A Parcel of Land situated in the State of Wyoming,
County of Sheridan, with a Street Location address of
445 Hardin; Ranchester, WY 82839 having a Tax
Identification Number of 0000001923 and further
described as Ranchester addition Block 5 Lot 07 Lot 08.
MORE CORRECTLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
Lots 7 and 8 in Block 5 of the Town of Ranchester,
Sheridan County, Wyoming. Parcel ID # 1923
With an address of 455 Hardin Street, Ranchester, WY
82839 (the undersigned disclaims liability for any error
in the address).
Together with all improvements thereon situate and all
fixtures and appurtenances thereto.
Dated: March 24, 2015
Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC
By: Benjamin J. Mann
Halliday, Watkins & Mann, P.C.
376 East 400 South, Suite 300
Salt Lake City, UT 84111
801-355-2886
HWM File # 42539
Publish: March 28, April 4, 11, 18, 2015.
BUFFALO SENIOR CENTER – NEW BUS SHELTER
PROJECT
BID ADVERTISEMENT
Project Category: Construction
Project Name: Buffalo Senior Center – NEW BUS
SHELTER
County/City/State: Johnson, Buffalo, Wyoming
Directions to Site: The Buffalo Senior Center is located in
Buffalo, WY at 671 W. Fetterman, Buffalo, WY 82834.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B7
GLOSSARY OF TERMS |
Default: Failure to fulfill an obligation, especially the obligation to
make payments when due to a lender.
Encumbrance: A right attached to the property of another that may
lessen its value, such as a lien, mortgage, or easement.
Foreclosure: The legal process of terminating an owner’s interest in
property, usually as the result of a default under a mortgage.
Foreclosure may be accomplished by order of a court or by the
statutory process known as foreclosure by advertisement (also
known as a power of sale foreclosure).
Lien: A legal claim asserted against the property of another, usually
as security for a debt or obligation.
Mortgage: A lien granted by the owner of property to provide
security for a debt or obligation.
Bids Close: March 30, 10:00 AM MDT
Bids Received by: AJ Mock, Buffalo Senior Center, 671 W.
Fetterman St., PO Box 941, Buffalo, WY 82834.
All bids shall be made in accordance with forms
referenced to and/or made a part of the proposed
contract documents. Bids shall be submitted in a sealed
envelope with annotation “Buffalo Senior Center Bus
Shelter”.
Project Completion Date: Substantial Completion – May
15, 2015
Pre-Bid Meeting Information: A RECOMMENDED Pre-Bid
meeting for all Prime Contractors will be conducted at
10:00 a.m. MDT followed by a site tour on March 16,
2015 at the Buffalo Senior Center, 671 W. Fetterman,
Buffalo, WY 82834
Project Description: The project will consist of
constructing a three sided bus shelter. This project will
also include excavation of existing trees, an approach
from the parking lot, and gravel as the surface under the
shelter.
Owner: Buffalo Senior Center, 641 West Fetterman St.
PO Box 941, Buffalo, WY 82834. Phone: 307-684-9551
Soliciting Agent: Buffalo Senior Center, 671 W.
Fetterman, Buffalo, WY 82834. Contact: AJ Mock,
Executive Director. Phone: 307-684-9551
END OF BID ADVERTISEMENT
Publish: February 28, March 7, 14, 21, 28, 2015.
FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE
WHEREAS, default in the payment of
principal and interest has occurred under the terms of a
promissory note (the "Note") dated March 5, 2009,
executed and delivered by Carl Daniel Bradshaw
(“Mortgagor”) to Flagstar Bank, FSB, a federally
chartered savings bank, and a real estate mortgage (the
"Mortgage") of the same date securing the Note, which
Mortgage was executed and delivered by said
Mortgagor, to Mortgage Electronic Registration
Systems, Inc., as nominee for Flagstar Bank, FSB, a
federally chartered savings bank Mortgagee, and which
Mortgage was recorded on March 9, 2009, at Reception
No. 634618, in Book 731, at Page 0098 in the public
records in the office of the County Clerk and ex-officio
Register of Deeds in and for Sheridan County, State of
Wyoming; and
WHEREAS, the mortgage was assigned for
value as follows:
Assignee: Flagstar Bank, FSB
Assignment dated: December 19, 2013
Assignment recorded: December 27, 2013
Assignment recording information: at Reception No.
2013-709744, in Book 876, at Page 494
All in the records of the County Clerk and ex-officio
Register of Deeds in and for Sheridan County, Wyoming.
WHEREAS, the Mortgage contains a power
of sale which by reason of said default, the Mortgagee
declares to have become operative, and no suit or
proceeding has been instituted at law to recover the
debt secured by the Mortgage, or any part thereof, nor
has any such suit or proceeding been instituted and the
same discontinued; and
WHEREAS, written notice of intent to
foreclose the Mortgage by advertisement and sale has
been served upon the record owner and the party in
possession of the mortgaged premises at least ten (10)
days prior to the commencement of this publication,
and the amount due upon the Mortgage on the date of
first publication of this notice of sale being the total
sum of $285,469.55 which sum consists of the unpaid
principal balance of $257,806.07 plus interest accrued
to the date of the first publication of this notice in the
amount of $18,046.42, plus attorneys' fees, costs
expended, and accruing interest and late charges after
the date of first publication of this notice of sale;
WHEREAS, the property being foreclosed
upon may be subject to other liens and encumbrances
that will not be extinguished at the sale. Any
prospective purchaser should research the status of
title before submitting a bid;
NOW, THEREFORE Flagstar Bank, FSB, as
the Mortgagee, will have the Mortgage foreclosed as by
law provided by causing the mortgaged property to be
sold at public venue by the Sheriff or Deputy Sheriff in
and for Sheridan County, Wyoming to the highest bidder
for cash at 10:10 o`clock in the forenoon on April 24,
2015 at the North door of the Sheridan County
Courthouse in the City of Sheridan, Sheridan County,
State of Wyoming, 224 S. Main Street, Sheridan,
Wyoming 82801, for application on the above described
amounts secured by the Mortgage, said mortgaged
property being described as follows, to-wit:
Lots 8, 9, 10, Block 6 of the Original Town of Lodore,
Sheridan County, Wyoming. Parcel ID # APN #10457
With an address of 9 Lodore Ave, Sheridan, WY 82801,
nka Story, WY 82842 (the undersigned disclaims
liability for any error in the address).
Together with all improvements thereon situate and all
fixtures and appurtenances thereto.
Dated: March 24, 2015
Flagstar Bank, FSB
By:Benjamin J. Mann
Halliday, Watkins & Mann, P.C.
376 East 400 South, Suite 300
Salt Lake City, UT 84111
801-355-2886
HWM File # 43729
Publish: March 28, April 4, 11, 18, 2015.
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
The City of Sheridan, Wyoming will receive sealed bids
for the 2015 Rotomill & Overlay Project. The project
includes surfacing improvements to several streets
within the City of Sheridan; this work is generally
described as follows:
The Base Bid includes ± 11,500
Square Yards of asphalt milling, asphalt leveling, ± 12,700 Square
Yards of new asphalt pavement (2”
to 2.5”), and isolated soft spot repair. Work associated with the Base
Bid will occur on N. Linden Ave.
(from Loucks St. to Smith St.), N.
Jefferson St. (from Loucks St. to
Smith St.), W. Brundage St. (from N.
Linden Ave. to N. Thurmond St.) and
S. Thurmond St. (from W. Nebraska
St. to Kilbourne St.).
Bid Alternate 1 includes asphalt
leveling, isolated soft spot repair,
and ± 6,500 Square Yards of new
asphalt pavement (2”). Work associated with Bid Alternate 1 will occur
on the Big Horn Ave. Loop Road,
located east of Wyoming Highway
332 (Big Horn Ave.).
Sealed bids will be received at City Hall, to the Clerk’s
Power of Sale: A clause commonly written into a mortgage
authorizing the mortgagee to advertise and sell the property in the
event of default. The process is governed by statute, but is not
supervised by any court.
Probate: The court procedure in which a decedent’s liabilities are
settled and her assets are distributed to her heirs.
Public Notice: Notice given to the public or persons affected
regarding certain types of legal proceedings, usually by publishing
in a newspaper of general circulation. This notice is usually
required in matters that concern the public.
Disclaimer: The foregoing terms and definitions are provided merely as a guide to the
reader and are not offered as authoritative definitions of legal terms.
office on the 1st floor, until 3:30 p.m. local time on
Thursday April 9, 2015. The bids will then be opened
and read aloud at the Council Chambers on the 3rd floor
of City Hall.
All bids shall be submitted in accordance with and on
the forms included in the Project Manual. Bids shall be
submitted in a sealed envelope addressed to:
City of Sheridan
City Clerk’s Office
Attn: Brenda Williams
2015 Rotomill & Overlay
55 Grinnell Plaza
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
Contract Documents, including proposal Bid Forms,
Construction Drawings and Project Manual, have been
placed online at http://goo.gl/ls7GBl.
Contract Documents may be obtained on or after March
18, 2015 online at http://goo.gl/ls7GBI, at the nonrefundable cost of $10.00 per set.
A PRE-BID CONFERENCE will be held on April 1, 2015 at
11:00 a.m. local time, beginning in the Council Chambers
on the 3rd floor of City Hall, Sheridan, Wyoming.
Contractors, in submitting their respective bids,
acknowledge that such bids conform to all
requirements of Wyoming State Statute. Each bidder
must include a bid security with the bid, payable to the
City of Sheridan, in accordance with the Instruction to
Bidders.
No bidder may withdraw its bid after the scheduled
time of the bid opening. Bids are to remain open for 60
days after the bid opening. The Owner reserves the right
to reject any and all bids or parts thereof, and to waive
any irregularities of any bid. The Owner also reserves
the right to award the contract to such responsible
bidders as may be determined by the Owner.
By: /s/ Nicholas Bateson
Nicholas Bateson, Public Works Director, City of
Sheridan
Publish: March 14, 20. 28, 2015.
LEGAL NOTICE POLICY
The Sheridan Press publishes Legal
Notices under the following schedule:
If we receive the Legal Notice by:
Monday Noon –
It will be published in
Thursday’s paper.
Tuesday Noon –
It will be published in
Friday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Saturday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
CALL FOR BIDS
Buffalo High School
Woodshop Dust Collection System Upgrade
The Board of Trustees, Johnson County School District
No. 1 (the Owner) is receiving lump sum sealed
proposals for Buffalo High School Woodshop Dust
Collection System Upgrade. The work consists of
mechanical, electrical, fire sprinkler and general
construction items associated with the removal and
replacement of the existing woodshop dust collection
system at the Buffalo High School.
First copies of the Contract Documents will be on file
after March 25, 2015 and open to public inspection in
the office of the Owner, Johnson County School District
No. 1, 601 Lott Street, Buffalo, Wyoming and the office
of Associated Construction Engineers, Inc., 19 South
Main, Sheridan, Wyoming 82801 or at the SFD Website
at: sfc.wyoming.gov.
Paper plans and specifications will not be available
from the Engineer or Owner. For electronic plans and
specifications bidders must access the SFD Website at:
sfc.wyoming.gov. Once you have reached the site click
on “Projects”, click on “Project Bid Information” and
click on “Link to Projects and Online Bidding” to learn
more on the project you are interested in, find the
project which may be viewed and downloaded for a fee
of $10.00. Bidders may obtain paper plans and specs by
requesting them from Plan Exchanges.
A Mandatory Pre-bid Conference will be held on March
31, 2015, beginning at 10:00 a.m. Meet at the Buffalo
High School Woodshop, 29891 Old Highway 87 in
Buffalo. The Pre-bid Conference is Mandatory for
bidding Mechanical and Electrical Contractors.
All proposals must be accompanied by a Bid Bond or
Cashier’s Check in the amount of ten percent (10%) of
the maximum amount of the proposal. The successful
bidder shall provide a 100% Performance and Payment
Bond. Preference will be given to Wyoming Contractors
as defined by Wyoming Statutes Section 16-6-101, et
seq. The bidder is required to comply with all applicable
local, state and federal laws.
The Owner reserves the privilege of rejecting any or all
proposals, or waiving any irregularities or formalities in
any proposal in the bidding. Submit written proposals
to: Board of Trustees, Johnson County School District
No. 1, 601 West Lott Street, Buffalo, WY 82834. Sealed
proposals shall be marked ”Buffalo High School
Woodshop Dust Collection System Upgrade” and shall
state the name of the company bidding on the outside
of the envelope. Proposals must be received by April 9,
2015 at 2:00 p.m. Proposals will not be accepted after
this date and time.
Dated: March 25, 2015
Johnson County School District
No. 1
Gerry Chase, Superintendent
Publish: March 25, 28, 2015.
It will be published in
Monday’s paper.
Thursday Noon –
It will be published in
Tuesday’s paper.
Friday Noon –
It will be published in
Wednesday’s paper.
• Complete information, descriptions
and billing information are required
with each legal notice. A PDF is
required if there are any signatures,
with a Word Document attached.
• Failure to include this information
WILL cause delay in publication. All
legal notices must be paid in full
before
an
"AFFIDAVIT
OF
PUBLICATION" will be issued.
• Please contact The Sheridan Press
legal advertising department at
672-2431 if you have questions.
Your Right To Know and be
informed of government
legal proceedings is
embodied in public notices.
This newspaper urges every
citizen to read and study
these notices. We strongly
advise those seeking further
information to exercise their
right of access to public
records and public meetings.
B8 Billings Dodge FULL 0328.qxp_A Section Template 3/27/15 4:59 PM Page 1
B8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2015
C1 Home & Garden 0328.qxp_A Section Template 3/26/15 8:42 AM Page 1
SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2015
Birdhouse
contest
O
ver the summer months starting
in June The Sheridan Press’s
Home and Garden page will be
sponsoring a birdhouse contest.
There will be monthly
winners and an overall
grand prize winner.
Please submit photos of
your birdhouse to
[email protected] or bring a
photo to the office.
Please explain who
built the house and
SUSAN
where it is hanging.
Judging will be done
WOODY
solely by The Sheridan
|
Press. Monthly winners will receive a bag
of bird seed to help with the feeding of
your bird friends. Thanks in advance.
Nesting season tips and tricks
• Secure nest boxes to trees by wrapping bungee cords around the trunks.
This holds the house firmly and
doesn’t cause the damage that nails can
cause. Once nesting season is over,
remove the boxes and store until next
year.
• Use woven baskets mounted on their
sides for robins to build nests in. Turn
the baskets on their sides and attach
them to a wall or tree with a few small
screws. Mount them under an overhang to protect the birds from the elements.
• Save quilt trimmings for spring,
when birds are collecting nesting material. Leave clusters of soft yarn in your
yard. (Use a couple of small grapevines
to form a ball, stuff with nesting materials).
• Plant a variety of flowers, shrubs
and trees and keep your bird bath
clean.
• Set up birdhouses in several spots
throughout your yard. Be sure to vary
the size of the entrance hole so different species of birds can find a suitable
house.
• Hang birdhouses facing east so
storms won’t blow through the birdhouse when they come through.
Put a cork in it
If you are starting an herb garden
anytime soon think about this easy
way to keep track of what you are
planting. Just save your corks to use as
plant markers.
Write the name of the plant on the
cork with a permanent marker, then
stick the cork on a stake or bamboo
skewer. If you don’t have wine corks
you can buy some at a craft store.
I’ll begin soon to open up the flower
beds for the season. Pruning the dead
heads and cutting things back for new
growth to take the lead. This is always
an exciting, hopeful time for gardeners.
A little work has such a great payback.
Choose those plants that worked well
and plant a few more, or take out something that broke your heart and failed
or move it to another spot that may
work out better, mulch a little and have
some fun in the dirt.
SUSAN WOODY has been a home and garden writer for more than
20 years and is a master gardener.
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
C1
Beyond window dressing: Treatment options show versatility
BY ELAINE MARKOUTSAS
UNIVERSAL UCLICK
Cover-up isn't the issue. For
most, windows are welcome — the
more, the merrier. They usher in
natural light, and sunshine is a
surefire pick-me-up. There is that
privacy thing — you don't want to
feel like you're living in a fishbowl.
But equally important, is the matter of decor's finishing touch, the
punctuation and warmth (both
visual and physical) that fabric
adds, in the form of well-chosen
window treatments.
"Draperies are an important
design element," says Marta
Enriquez, director of interior
design for Ethan Allen. "They can
be used to filter light and protect
furniture, to darken a room, and to
keep it cooler or warmer. They can
open up a space or make it appear
cozier — depending on how they
are hung — and can be used to add
color and texture. They are great
for drawing the eye to a beautiful
view or architectural (element)
you want to showcase."
Although some types of
draperies (here's looking at you,
swag) seem fussy or dated, working with an interior style and
architecture for an appropriate
complement will net major design
dividends.
But buying window treatments is
not as easy as snapping up a chair.
Or is it?
That depends on whether or not
your windows themselves are standard issue, meaning their meas-
urements. If the dimensions are
not unusually wide or tall, you're
in luck. Most retailers today carry
ready-made (or off-the-rack, in
fashion parlance) draperies. The
price ranges from just a little bit
more than nice shower curtains
(around $40) to several hundred
dollars and up, depending on fabric (quality and how much of it),
whether or not there's a lining,
complexity of style (rod pocket,
where fabric is folded over and
stitched to allow sliding into the
rod, is the simplest construction),
and trims.
That's not all. There's quite the
range in fabric and pattern styles
— from elegant silks and velvets
to nubby linens and smooth cottons, from opaque to sheer, from
stripes (skinny or fat) and geometrics to ikats and zigzags, from florals to paisleys. The designs can
be screen or digitally printed, even
embroidered.
Another bonus: dressmaker
details. Contrast borders, ribbon
ties, pompon edging, ruching (a
kind of puckering), bands at the
top, bands at the bottom, even nailheads or grommets used to define.
The punctuation also is setting off
top treatments like fixed boxy
headers or loose valances.
"Cool white linen panels," for
example, "can offer simple, sophisticated style on their own," says
Enriquez. "But when you add a
Greek key tape trim, the same panels take on a more classic, elegant
look."
COURTESY PHOTO | UNIVERSAL UCLICK
Belgian linen, a premium linen fabric made from European-grown
flax fibers, hangs in a classic window treatment that complements decor appointed with wide plank pine and iron finishes.
The 50-inch wide panels are available in three lengths, from 84 to
108 inches, and may be hung by pole pocket or clip rings.
Rain gardens clean up surface waters
R
ain gardens are depressions that hold
water for a short period of time and
are increasingly popular with homeowners, municipalities and are
mandatory for many commercial businesses.
They catch storm water runoff from sidewalks, parking lots, roads
and roofs and typically
have some kind of vegetation planted in them.
Not only do rain gardens slow water down to
give it time to soak into
the ground and be used
by plants, but they also
filter out sediment and
chemical pollutants.
SCOTT
Communities are now
HININGER
being more aggressive in
|
using these rain gardens
to catch runoff water
before it enters streams.
This technique has been used in agriculture for many years to help reduce soil
runoff, fertilizer runoff and chemical
runoff from entering water systems. The
main principle is to use vegetation to slow
the water down so the sediment settles
out, allowing the water to infiltrate into
the soil. Once the water enters into the soil
it can be used by plants or to help recharge aquifers which can eventually provide late summer stream flow in some
cases, benefitting the riparian area’s
plants and animals.
One potential opportunity to look at is as
simple as directing the water into these
rain garden areas instead of down the
rain gutters to the streets, sloping the sidewalks toward grass areas. Parking lots can
direct the water toward planting areas,
which can then benefit the plants and
most of the excess water can be allowed to
infiltrate into the ground. Directing water
from the roof to a series of depressions
and planting fruit trees in these depressions results in less household water being
used and the extra water would be appreciated by the fruit trees.
Several things need to be taken into
account when constructing such devices,
such as the soil type and the need to be
permeable. Soil with a high percentage of
clay needs to be amended or replaced to
allow better permeability. Make sure these
rain gardens are not too close to the house
and the slope is away from structures.
There are products that have been developed to help allow water to penetrate into
the ground such as permeable concrete
sidewalks and permeable asphalt. These
specialty products are quite interesting
and sometimes need some additional engineering to stand up to heavy traffic. Pavers
can be used for sidewalks or parking
areas. Another product available is a plastic grate system which can be placed down
and either filled with recycled glass, gravel
or sod (the grate system keeps the material from moving around and offers some
structural support). These sod areas can
be managed just like a lawn, but offer
more uses.
The use of specific plant materials for
these rain garden areas will depend on
your location, climate and personal aesthetics. It does get a little more complicated as far as plant selection and design concerns as to how much potential water the
area will receive and how long water will
stand in the area. These questions will
determine the plant selections needed and
the design of the rain garden area. Most
home rain gardens are only 6 inches deep
and one-third the size of a roof or less.
The other item that is being looked at
from a research standpoint is adding material to the soil which will absorb or hold
chemicals, such as activated charcoal and
a new product called a biochar (which is a
product developed from organic matter
such as poultry wastes and is better at
absorbing chemicals than charcoal). Most
of us that have had aquariums know that
using activated charcoal takes unwanted
chemicals out of the water.
So if you are interested in cleaning up
our surface waters and adding water back
to our dry soils then think about installing
rain gardens or directing rainwater to vegetative areas first before it enters the
storm drains.
SCOTT HININGER is with the Sheridan County Extension office.
C2 Senior 0328.qxp_A Section Template 3/26/15 8:43 AM Page 1
C2
SENIOR
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2015
He lives in the past and present
BY JESSIE HETZLER
SHERIDAN SENIOR CENTER
COURTESY PHOTO |
Dennis Heizer pursues his passion for re-enacting the lives of area
mountain men who came to the Rocky Mountain region. Heizer’s
personal favorite historic person is mountain man, Jim Bridger.
SHERIDAN — Dennis Heizer, a 64-year-old father of two
daughters, two sons and 10 grandchildren, has been in
Sheridan since 1977. He says that fact makes him qualified
to be three-fourths Wyoming citizen.
The contrast between his work at the First Interstate
Bank and his "hobby" is remarkable.
Heizer is an historic re-enactor with his character dating
to the days of his hero, Jim Bridger, of the early 1800s.
Heizer appeared at this interview in full frontiersman
outfit consisting of fringed, one-strap buckskin trousers
that he made himself.
"Absolutely authentic, artificial sinew," Heizer said of
his outfit.
Heizer’s mountain man outfit included a drinking cup
made from a cow horn, a .58-caliber Hawkens percussion
cap rifle and pistol and a necklace made from sea turtle
claws. The cow horn drinking cup had a handle formed by
heating a long strip of horn and bending it into shape.
Upon seeing him in his outfit, Hiezer says many people
will ask if he will make the buckskin trousers for them.
“No, it takes too long and costs too much,” Heizer said.
He pointed out that just about everything needed to put
together a full outfit is available through the many vendors at the Rendezvous held in Riverton, Pinedale and Fort
Bridger.
Heizer’s fascination with the period began when one of
his daughters gave him the book, “I Didn’t Know That
About Wyoming.” Reading that book led Heizer to reading
many others and building an impressive knowledge of the
history of trappers and traders who were the first white
explorers to discover the rivers and trails through the
Rockies and Plains.
Heizer is hooked on the history. He tells of traders hauling keel boats up the river to trade what they considered to
be cheap $.50 knives to local tribesmen for what they (the
tribes people) considered to be worthless beaver pelts; both
parties were convinced that they had gotten the best of the
deal.
Bridger, while having nearly total recall, was illiterate.
The story of Bridger carving his name in Independence
Rock is a very tall tale worthy of Bridger’s time.
Heizer recalls his experiences riding in parades with
friends dressed to remember the cowboys, military men
and others who have played a vital part in Wyoming’s history.
They would ride from one end of the parade to the other
firing their guns. This was brought to an end by the
parade officials who were afraid that they might scare the
horses.
Heizer says that he occasionally erects a teepee in his
backyard and also keeps a target out there for tomahawk
practice. His daughters would take new dates out to throw
tomahawks before the date began.
Heizer gives a yearly presentation at Highland Park
School and is available to do so for other organizations
upon request. Heizer can be reached at
[email protected]
SENIOR CENTER HAPPENINGS |
• The Sheridan Senior Center’s annual
famous cinnamon roll sale is coming! April
3 at two locations: the Senior Center dining
room at 211 Smith St. from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
and the Sheridan County Chamber of
Commerce on Main Street from 9 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. (or while supplies last for both
locations). Soup from the Senior Center
will also be available for sale at the
Chamber location only.
• Learn to craft your own homemade
cards! Sign up for a (handmade) greeting
card class with Heidi Roesler. Classes are
April 6 and 13. The cost is $5 each class per
person for individuals registered with the
Senior Center and $8 each class per person
for those not registered with the Senior
Center. Fee covers cost of materials and
special cutters. Take your creations home
with you to use as soon as you wish! Sign
up in advance by calling 672-2240 or stopping by the front desk. Pay Heidi at the
class.
• Born between 1946 and 1964? Boomers
PLUS unite! The Senior Center is on the
hot pursuit of motorcycle enthusiasts. If
you are interested in a casual riding experience this summer, call the Senior Center
to express your interest. The number is
672-2240. Once a list of interested riders is
developed, you will be called on how you’d
like to see the summer rides organized.
• The Senior Center’s Green Boomerang
Thrift Store hours on Wednesdays have
changed. The new hours are 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. Saturday hours remain unchanged
and are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
• Ridley’s Family Market is paying for
rides on the mini-bus for riders of all ages
to shop for groceries at their store. Call the
Sheridan mini-bus number at 674-9272 to
reserve your ride in advance! The Sheridan
mini-bus is Sheridan’s public transportation service.
CENTER STAGE |
I
The privilege of working with amazing people
have lived in Sheridan 25 years and began volunteering as
a home-delivered meals driver some 17 years ago, eventually working in several positions at the Sheridan Senior
Center. As the volunteer director I have had the privilege
of writing this annual spring article in honor of National
Volunteer Appreciation Week established in 1974 by a program of “Points Of Light” as a way of recognizing volunteers
and all they do in their communities and
ultimately for our nation. This year, April
12-18 has been set aside to nationally celebrate volunteers.
The knowledge of what we have accomplished with the invaluable help of volunteers this past year alone at the Senior
Center and throughout the community is
quite overwhelming. A few examples of
many include: 107,773 meals served to
NANCY
more than 1,500 people, in large part due
MCKENZIE
to home-delivered meal volunteers and
|
those volunteers who assist in the Senior
Center dining room and at our meal sites
throughout Sheridan County. Senior
Companion volunteers have been invaluable for assisting
individuals to stay in their homes and volunteers have
been instrumental in making the dream of the Senior
Center running its own thrift store a reality.
Each time I sit down to write this article, I have struggled to find the words that adequately express my heartfelt
thank you to all those incredible volunteers, throughout
Sheridan County, who help make the human services
offered in our great community possible. This year is of
utmost significance to me as it will be my last as the volunteer director. I am moving to the southern
Wyoming/northern Colorado area to aid my family in caring for my father.
It is with tears of joy that I reflect on nine years of working in the best supportive loving community that I could
have hoped for. I have been blessed by countless moments
spent in awe at the tenacity and hard work of dedicated
volunteers who range in age, skill level, backgrounds and
education but all who come with their own level of desire
to be of service to others. From each, I have learned countless lessons of how to selflessly give of one’s self. I have
learned that there are no barriers to volunteering, if the
desire to give is great enough. I have witnessed volunteers
overcome social, physical, mental and developmental challenges to give of themselves. Despite health issues, time
constraints, bad weather, you name it, loyal volunteers
show up to faithfully fulfill their volunteer commitment,
‘cause that’s what they do!
It is with tears of sadness as I know there will be a huge
whole left in my heart, missing the wonderful people I
have been blessed to work side-by-side with. I appreciate
all you’ve done to make the past nine years the most enjoyable work experiences I have had. The Sheridan community and specifically the Sheridan Senior Center, staff,
clients and volunteers have been like family to me. I relish
laughter, hugs, kind words spoken, moments of awe.
In my travels, wherever life may take, I fear I may never
have the privilege of working with such an amazing group
of individuals. Thank you for blessing my life in so many
ways.
NANCY MCKENZIE has been the director of Volunteer Services at the Sheridan Senior Center for nine
years. Center Stage is written by friends of the Senior Center for the Sheridan Community. It is a
collection of insights and stories related to living well at every age.
Study finds Teton County
healthiest in state
CHEYENNE (AP) — A study ranks Teton County as the
healthiest county in Wyoming and Fremont County as the
least healthiest.
The rankings were compiled by the Robert Wood
Johnson Foundation and the University of Wisconsin
Population Health Institute.
The study ranks counties on 30 factors that influence
health, including education, housing, violent crime, jobs,
diet and exercise.
According to the 2015 rankings, the five healthiest counties in Wyoming are Teton County, followed by Sublette,
Washakie, Johnson and Park counties. The five counties in
the poorest health, starting with least healthy, are
Fremont, Hot Springs, Platte, Weston and Uinta counties.
C3 Youth 0328.qxp_A Section Template 3/26/15 8:44 AM Page 1
YOUTH
SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
C3
Summit Award
Winner:
Asia Robinson
S
heridan High School senior Asia
Robinson is this week’s Summit
Award winner. She is the daughter of
LoriAnn Wilson and Eugene
Robinson.
Throughout high school Robinson has
been involved in many extracurricular
activities including student council,
National Honor Society and W.A.T.C.H.
club. In addition, she began
playing the clarinet in junior
high and has participated in
the SHS band program all
four years of high school.
Robinson has nominated
Diane Knutson, Sheridan
Robinson
High School band instructor
as an outstanding teacher.
Robinson appreciates Knutson’s ability
to teach, love and support her students.
Knutson reciprocates that same appreciation for Robinson stating, “Asia is an
outstanding musician with a great attitude! She is super organized, and I have
come to depend on her to help me in
many ways in the classroom. In fact, she
often knows what needs to be done
before I do! Her positive attitude and
great work ethic make her a pleasure to
have in the classroom, and I know these
same traits will lead her to much success
in her future.”
Robinson has been selected for AllState Band three years in a row. She is
grateful for the recognition of her hard
work and values the unique opportunity
to share her musical passion with others
from across the state. In addition,
Robinson was selected for the Wyoming
All-State marching band which performed at the Macy’s Day Parade in 2012.
She recalls visiting New York City and
has fond memories of the friendships
she established as well as her Black
Friday shopping trip in Times Square.
Robinson’s musicality also extends to
the percussion ensemble, symphony
orchestra and the Sheridan College
band. As a junior she participated in the
school musical, “Grease.” Although she
is committed to pursuing her passion for
music, Robinson also demonstrates an
incredible ability to achieve academically, which is evidenced by the fact she
maintains a 3.89 GPA and has earned an
academic letter for the past three years.
Robison’s academic schedule has included Advance Placement calculus, human
anatomy and physiology, physics, psychology, U.S. history and pre-calculus as
well as a P.A.C.E. Internship.
Nancy Crowe, SHS math teacher, has
taught Robinson for the past two years in
both pre-calculus and AP calculus.
Robinson says that Crowe genuinely
cares about her students’ success. She
appreciates the expectations and daily
challenges presented by her teacher and
describes Crowe as “fun to be around
and easy going.”
Likewise, Crowe says, “Asia is full of
positive energy. She's always smiling,
usually laughing, and just great fun to
teach.”
This past semester Robinson interned
at Wyoming Rehab. She is thankful for
the opportunity to work alongside the
physical therapists and learn about the
career field she intends to pursue. She
credits SHS athletic trainer, Joanne
Brewster, with first igniting her interest
in physical therapy. Robinson was a participant in the student trainer program
directed by Brewster.
Outside of school, Robinson is a sales
associate at the Boot Barn. She has
enjoyed learning about the retail business, the sales incentive program and
meeting new people.
During the week-long spring break for
SHS students Robinson has joined
Spanish teacher Mario Montano and
other SHS students for a trip to Costa
Rica. She has not traveled outside of the
U.S. and is excited to experience another
culture.
Robinson’s strong work ethic, positive
attitude and ability to excel will ensure
her continued success. Following high
school graduation, Robinson plans to
pursue an athletic training associate
degree at Sheridan College.
Summit Award
Academics for All is an all-volunteer
group of individuals and donors who
support academic excellence in
Sheridan County School District 2.
Members of the committee include
Beth Bailey, Mary Brezik-Fisher,
Anne Gunn, Ryan Maddux, Tempe
Murphy, Bill Patton, Doug Raney and
Gina Thoney.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Playing rough
Laramie’s Alec Martinez, right, pushes against Billings’ Jackson Pollock during the club lacrosse exhibition game March 21 at Sheridan High School’s Scott
Field. Laramie lost to Billings 6-9.
SHS students take part in Big Brothers Big Sisters program
BY SAMANTHA HAMILTON
SHERIDAN HIGH SCHOOL
SHERIDAN — For the past two years, students at Sheridan
High School have been part of a growing program in
Sheridan known as Big Brothers Big Sisters. Since being
introduced in the school, the number of students involved has
more than doubled, from six to 15 students.
For some kids, the privilege of having an older brother or
sister to help guide and support them is only a dream, a
thought in passing as a friend tells them about how his sister
took them to get ice cream in the park the other day.
“Everyone needs someone in their lives to help give them a
little more support, a little boost to make their day that much
better,” BBBS director Sandy Thiel said.
For this reason, the mentor program was founded more
than a century ago in 1904.
BBBS has been in Wyoming since the 1970s and in Sheridan
since 2003.
Thiel has been involved since September 2013 and has
helped the program grow even bigger, especially at Sheridan
High School.
Thiel was contacted by Kathleen Pilch, the professional and
community experience coordinator at SHS, to talk to the
Interact Club about the program. Since then, it has received
strong support and assistance from other faculty throughout
the school who help to recruit more mentors.
SHS students participate through two site-based programs
at Sagebrush Elementary and Woodland Park Elementary. A
Big meets with his or her Little for one hour each week, usually during lunch or before school. Mentors can do activities
such as arts and crafts, helping with schoolwork, playing at
recess and even ongoing chess games.
Sophomore Heather Belus joined BBBS in the fall, and she
said it has completely changed her outlook on the program.
“I thought it would look good on college applications, but
actually I really enjoy hanging out with my Little now,” Belus
said. “She is a kindergartener. She gets really excited but
doesn’t talk a lot, and she’s also very independent.”
Becoming a Big takes more than a teacher recommendation.
To be eligible, interested students must be at least a junior in
high school and have a 2.5 grade point average or better.
According to Thiel, additional qualifications include background checks, an interview process where the potential mentors interact with the interviewers and a period of informal
training both online and in person.
Sophomore Anna Crabb recently completed her training
after being referred to the program by a friend.
“She [Thiel] went and found a Little that kind of matched
my interests,” Crabb said. “So far, I’m just keeping her company and being her friend. I just want to make a difference in
her life. It’s the best thing someone can do: make a positive
impact on someone.”
Schwarzenegger pushes Congress to
save after-school funding
LOS ANGELES (AP) —
Former California Gov. Arnold
Schwarzenegger is calling on
Congress to preserve federal
funding for after-school programs in a proposed reauthorization of the 2002 No Child
Left Behind law.
At a national summit in Los
Angeles on Tuesday,
Schwarzenegger will join education, business and law
enforcement leaders in demanding that any bill maintain afterschool funding. A House proposal would eliminate afterschool centers designed to help
children in low-income neighborhoods and 68 other programs in favor of a flexibility
grant that would allow states to
decide how to use funds.
“I’m always worried when
someone says, ‘It will give them
more flexibility,’”
Schwarzenegger said Monday
in an interview with The
Associated Press. “I think afterschool money is for after-school
programs.”
The bill is stalled while
Senate leaders work on a bipartisan draft.
An increasing number of children come from homes where
both parents work, making
after-school care a necessity for
many families. In 1965, four in
10 children had more than one
parent who worked; by 2014,
that number had risen to more
than six in 10.
But skeptics of federally funded after-school initiatives point
to U.S. Department of
Education data showing that
participants do not demonstrate
improved academic outcomes.
The most recent agency
report found that almost none
of the performance targets was
met, with only 38.4 percent of
elementary-school participants
showing improvement in math
grades and 40.2 percent in
English. For middle and high
school students, the numbers
were also bleak: 33.8 percent
had improved grades in math
between fall and spring and 34.6
percent in English.
“The evidence shows they did
not have an impact,” said Mark
Dynarski, a fellow at the
Brookings Institution.
The nonprofit Afterschool
Alliance estimates that more
than 10 million children are
enrolled in after-school programs, the vast majority in private care. Just 1.6 million are in
a federal 21st Century
Community Learning Center,
targeted to children in lowincome neighborhoods — the
same communities where single
parents or both parents are likely to work.
C4
FAITH
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
God’s love and love for God
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SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2015
“
God is love” (1 John 4:8). This is most certainly true.
More needs to be said. “Jesus loves you” is gospel,
good news. “Love the Lord” and “Love your neighbor as yourself ” are commands, law. Note the different directions of the love. Love to you
from God in Christ Jesus is gospel. Love
from you back to God or to another
human being is law.
The order is also important. We love
because God first loved us (1 John 4:19).
God loved us first.
Both law and gospel are necessary, yet
they must be properly distinguished.
Gospel without law has little meaning.
PAUL
Law without gospel leads to hypocrisy
CAIN
and despair.
|
Is it loving toward God or our neighbor to agree with a Bible verse like
“God is love,” yet deny the existence or
truth of other verses? No. “You shall have no other Gods,”
“Honor your father and your mother,” “You shall not
commit adultery,” or Jesus saying, “I am the way and the
truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except
through Me” (John 14:6) are just as true as “God is love.”
In fact, without Christ Jesus, generic love of or for a
generic “god” is meaningless. Don’t just take my word for
it. Hear St. John in 1 John 4:1-12:
Beloved, do not believe every spirit, but test the spirits
to see whether they are from God, for many false
prophets have gone out into the world. By this you know
the Spirit of God: every spirit that confesses that Jesus
Christ has come in the flesh is from God, and every spirit
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that does not confess Jesus is not from God. This is the
spirit of the antichrist, which you heard was coming and
now is in the world already. Little children, you are from
God and have overcome them, for he who is in you is
greater than he who is in the world. They are from the
world; therefore they speak from the world, and the world
listens to them. We are from God. Whoever knows God listens to us; whoever is not from God does not listen to us.
By this we know the Spirit of truth and the spirit of
error.
Beloved, let us love one another, for love is from God,
and whoever loves has been born of God and knows God.
Anyone who does not love does not know God, because
God is love. In this the love of God was made manifest
among us, that God sent his only Son into the world, so
that we might live through him. In this is love, not that
we have loved God but that he loved us and sent his Son
to be the propitiation for our sins. Beloved, if God so
loved us, we also ought to love one another. No one has
ever seen God; if we love one another, God abides in us
and his love is perfected in us.”
It is not hateful for a parent to tell a child to not touch a
hot stove, to not run out in the middle of the street, to
avoid illegal drugs and to come home in time for a curfew.
These are the words and actions of a loving parent.
God the father loves us enough to send His only son to
save us from ourselves and the Holy Spirit to deliver
Jesus’ complete gift of salvation to us in word and sacrament. Seek him next week, Holy Week, and always.
WAREHOUSE MARKET
Management & Employees
WYOMING ELECTRIC INC.
Dave Nelson & Staff
125 N. Sheridan Ave.
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK
46 W. Brundage St.
SHERIDAN COMMUNITY FED. CREDIT
UNION
141 S. Gould 672-3445
COTTONWOOD CENTER, LLC
Sheridan’s foremost office complex
Proudly serving since 1992
THE WOODS
Ron Wood & Staff
CONNIE’S GLASS, INC.
Bill Stanbridge & Staff
ERA CARROLL REALTY, INC.
306 N. Main St. 672-8911
REV. PAUL J. CAIN is pastor of Immanuel Lutheran Church, headmaster of Martin Luther Grammar
School and a member of Pastors United in Christ.
Church Calendar
ARVADA COMMUNITY CHURCH (non-denominational)
223 Main St., Arvada, 758-4353. Pastor Bob
Moore. Sunday: 11 a.m. service, 11:30 a.m. children’s Bible study.
BAHA’I FAITH OF SHERIDAN
673-4778. The Baha'i Faith for Devotional
Programs from the sacred writings of all religions and Study Circles.
BETHESDA WORSHIP CENTER
5135 Coffeen Ave., 673-0023, www.bethesdaworship.com. Pastor Scott Lee. Sunday: 10:30
a.m. service, children’s ministry, nursery.
Wednesday: 6 p.m. service, youth ministry, children’s ministry, nursery.
BIG HORN CHURCH
115 S. Third St., Big Horn, 751-2086 or 655-3036.
Pastor Sherman Weberg. Sunday: 9:15 a.m.
prayer time, 10 a.m. worship service, 5 p.m.
Bible study. Wednesday: 7 p.m. youth and adult
Bible study.
BUDDHIST MEDITATION FELLOWSHIP
1950 E. Brundage Lane. Sunday: 7-8 p.m.
Sessions include discussion of the dharma
reading, sitting and walking meditation. For
information call Victor at 672-3135 or email
[email protected]
CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1660 Big Horn Ave., 672-3149. Pastor Terral
Bearden. Sunday: 9:30 a.m. Sunday school,
10:45 a.m. worship service, 6 p.m. Bible study.
Wednesday: 7 p.m. prayer meeting. Thursday: 6
p.m. youth group.
CALVARY CHAPEL SHERIDAN
606 S. Thurmond, 751-2250,
www.ccsheridan.org, email: [email protected] Pastor Nels Nelson. Sunday: 10 a.m.
non-denominational worship service, teaching
through the Bible verse by verse.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1769 Big Horn Ave., 672-6040. Sundays: Bible
study at 9:30 a.m., worship and communion at
10:30 a.m. Wednesdays: 6:30 p.m. Bible study.
THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER
DAY SAINTS
Ranchester branch, 1066 Big Horn Ave.,
Ranchester, 655-9085. President James
Boulter. Sunday: 10 a.m. Sacrament meeting,
11:20 a.m. Sunday school and primary meetings, 12:10 p.m. Priesthood and Relief Society
meetings.
THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER
DAY SAINTS
Sheridan 1st Ward, 2051 Colonial Dr., 672-2926.
Bishop Kim Anderson. Sunday: 9:30-10:40 a.m.
Sacrament meeting, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Sunday
school meeting, 10:40 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Primary meeting, 11:40 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Priesthood, Relief Society and Young Women’s
meetings.
THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER
DAY SAINTS
Sheridan 2nd Ward, 2051 Colonial Dr., 672-6739.
Bishop David Bailey. Sunday: 1:30-2:40 p.m.
Sacrament meeting, 2:50-4:30 p.m. Primary
meeting, 2:50-3:30 p.m. Sunday school meeting, 3:40-4:30 p.m. Priesthood, Relief Society
and Young Women’s meetings.
THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER
DAY SAINTS
Sheridan 3rd Ward, 2051 Colonial Dr., 673-7368.
Bishop Charles Martineau. Sunday: 9-9:50 a.m.
Priesthood, Relief Society and Young Women’s
meetings, 9-10:40 a.m. Primary meeting, 1010:40 a.m. Sunday school meeting, 10:50 a.m.
to noon, Sacrament meeting.
THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER
DAY SAINTS
Sheridan College Branch, 2051 Colonial Dr., 6739887, Branch President Bradley G. Taylor.
Sunday: 1 p.m. Priesthood meeting and Relief
Society, 2 p.m. Sunday school, 2:50 p.m.
Sacrament meeting.
CHURCH OF THE HOLY TRINITY
2644 Big Horn Ave., 751-5238. Father Lewis
Shepherd. Sunday: 10 a.m. prayer and mass.
CLEARMONT COMMUNITY CHURCH
Across from gymnasium in Clearmont, 758-4597.
Pastor James P. Stark. Sunday: 9 a.m. worship
service, 9:45 a.m. children’s church.
CORNERSTONE CHURCH
4351 Big Horn Ave., 672-8126, www.cornerstoneofsheridan.org, email:
[email protected] Pastor Tony
Forman. Sunday: 8:30 a.m. worship service,
10:30 a.m. worship service with children’s
church. Call the church for youth group, Women
of the Word and B.O.O.M. (for kids grades 1-5)
schedules. Easter Sunrise Service - Sunday,
April 5, 6:30 a.m. Service will be held outdoors
in the amphitheater.
DAYTON COMMUNITY CHURCH
318 Bridge St., Dayton, 655-2504. Pastor Dennis
Goodin. Sunday: 9 a.m. worship service, 10:30
a.m. Sunday school.
FAMILY LIFE CENTER (Foursquare Gospel
Church)
118 W. Fifth St., 674-9588, familylifecenter.biz.
Pastor Scott Orchard. Sunday: 9 a.m. Sunday
school; 10 a.m. worship service. Wednesday: 7
p.m. adult Bible study.
FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
1045 Lewis St., 674-6372, email: [email protected] Pastor Jay Littlefield.
Sunday: 9 a.m. Sunday school, 10 a.m. worship,
6 p.m. evening fellowship.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
3179 Big Horn Ave., 674-6693, www.fbcsheridanwy.org, email: [email protected]
Senior pastor John Craft, Associate Pastor of
Community Life Falk Alicke, Associate Pastor
of Youth Ministries Shane Rosty. Sunday: 9:30
worship service, Sunday school classes for all
ages and nursery; 10:50 a.m. worship service,
adult class, children’s programs and nursery, 6
p.m. senior high youth group. Wednesday: 6
p.m. junior high youth group, children’s program and adult Bible study. Small group Bible
studies meet throughout the week.
FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH (Disciples of
Christ)
102 S. Connor St., 674-6795, www.sheridandisciples.org. Pastor Doug Goodwin. Sunday: 8 a.m.
worship, 9 a.m. Sunday school, 10 a.m. worship.
Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thrift Store open.
Wednesday: 10 a.m. Bible study. Saturday: 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. Thrift Store open.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST
(Christian Science Church)
455 Sumner St., 672-2041. Sunday: 11 a.m. church
and Sunday school (10 a.m. June-Aug).
Wednesday: 7:30 p.m. testimony meeting.
Reading Room: 45 E. Loucks St., Suite 015,
open weekdays except holidays 1:30-4 p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
907 Bellevue Ave., 672-2505, Pastor Jody
Hampton. Sunday: 9:45 a.m. Sunday school for
all ages, 10:45 a.m. worship and children’s
church, 6:30 p.m. praise and Bible study.
Wednesday: 7 p.m. Bible study and prayer
meeting for all ages.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
(UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST)
100 W. Works St., 672-2668, www.sheridanfirstcongregationalucc.wordpress.com, email: [email protected] Sunday: 11 a.m. worship
service. Monday through Friday: noon to 12:45
p.m. Lunch Together.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
2121 Colonial Drive, Sunday - Sunday, 8 am–
Worship, 9:30 am- Easter Egg hunt, 10 am–
Worship, SS 11:30- Bible study. Monday, 7 pmBell practice, choir practice. Wednesday, NoonPW Luncheon. Thursday, 6:30 am- Breakfast
Study, 9:30 am- Women’s study, 6 pm- choir
practice, 7 pm- Maundy Thursday service.
Friday, Noon- Good Friday service @ Trinity
Lutheran, Office closed after noon. Easter
Sunday services: 6:45 am- Sunrise Service 8 &
10 am – Easter Service.
FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
First United Methodist Church for: Sunday: 7:30
a.m. UM Men Host a Pancake Breakfast, 8:15
a.m. Hand Bell Practice & Seeker’s Adult
Sunday School Class, 9:30 a.m. Praise Singing,
9:45 a.m. Worship Service, 10:00 a.m.
Children’s Sunday School, 10:45 a.m. Pancake
Breakfast continues until noon; Tuesday: 9:00
a.m. – 2:00 p.m. The Closet is Open, 10:00 a.m.
Vitality Task Force Mtg., 1:00 p.m. Gateway
Mailing; Wednesday: 12:00 p.m. Lent Lunch &
Study, 1:00 p.m. UMW General Meeting;
Thursday: 7:00 p.m. Maundy Thursday Worship
Service, Choir Practice after the Service, Friday:
12:00 p.m. Community Good Friday Service at
Trinity Lutheran Church, 7:30 p.m. Tenebrae
Service at First UMC; Saturday: 9:00 a.m. –
2:00 p.m. Trinity Circle Easter Bake Sale at
Warehouse Market
GRACE ANGLICAN CHURCH
1992 W. Fifth St., 307-461-0237, email: [email protected], Facebook: Grace Anglican
Church. Pastor Kevin Jones. Sunday: 10 a.m.
church service, 6 p.m. church service at Java
Moon Coffee Shop, 176 N. Main St.
GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH (IndependentFundamental)
1959 E. Brundage Lane (one-fourth mile east of
Interstate 90 on Highway 14), 672-7391,
www.gracebaptistsheridan.org. Pastor
Stephen Anderson. Sunday: 10 a.m. Sunday
school for all ages, 11 a.m. worship service with
children’s church and nursery provided, 6 p.m.
worship service with nursery provided.
Tuesday: 6:30 a.m. men’s Bible study, 9 a.m.
women’s Bible study (every other week).
Wednesday: 7 p.m. Bible study and prayer,
Bible club for children and youth.
GRACE CHAPEL
Story. Pastor William Dill. Sunday: 10 a.m.
Sunday school, 11 a.m. worship.
HOLY NAME CATHOLIC CHURCH
260 E. Loucks St., 672-2848, www.holynamesheridan.org, email: [email protected] Pastor: Father Jim Heiser,
Associate Pastors: Father Brian Hess and
Father Michael Ehiemere. Sunday: 8 a.m.,
Mass; 10 a.m., Mass; 5:30 p.m., Mass. Monday
through Thursday: 7 a.m., Mass. Friday: 8:20
a.m., Mass. Saturday: 8 a.m., Mass; 4-5 p.m. (or
by appointment), Sacrament of Reconciliation;
6 p.m., Vigil Mass.
IMMANUEL LUTHERAN CHURCH (LCMS)
1300 W. Fifth St., 674-6434, email: [email protected] Pastor Paul J. Cain,
email: [email protected] Home of
Martin Luther Grammar School (K-5 Classical
Christian Education,
www.SheridanMLGS.blogspot.com, email:
[email protected], accredited by NLSA
and CCLE). Sunday: 8:05 a.m. The Lutheran
Hour on KWYO 1410 AM, 9:15 a.m. Sunday
school and Bible class, 10:30 a.m. Divine service. Wednesday: 7 p.m. service. Monday-Friday:
9:05 a.m. By the Way on KROE 930 AM.
JOY JUNCTION CHILDREN’S CHURCH
Interdenominational ministry for ages 4 through
high school. Vans are available to pick up and
deliver children. Co-directors and pastors: Karl
Hunt, 672-8145 and David Kaufman, 307-461-
1506, email: [email protected]
Sunday: 10 a.m. to noon, worship service at
YMCA, 417 N. Jefferson St. Wednesday: 5:307:30 p.m. youth meeting for junior high and
high school, First Assembly of God basement,
1045 Lewis St.
LANDMARK INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
CHURCH
Sheridan Holiday Inn, Sheridan Room, 307-4610964, email: [email protected]
Pastor Clayton Maynard. Sunday: 10 a.m.
Sunday school, 11 a.m. worship service.
Wednesday: 6 p.m. Bible study.
MOUNTAIN ALLIANCE CHURCH
54 W. Eighth St., 6732-6400, www.mountainalliance.com. Pastor Ron Maixner. Sunday: 9 a.m.
worship service, 6 p.m. youth group.
MOUNTAINVIEW FELLOWSHIP BAPTIST
CHURCH (SBC)
54 W. Eighth St., 673-4883. Pastor Jim Coonis.
Sunday: 9:45 a.m. Sunday school, 11 a.m. worship service. Call for mid-week Bible study
information.
NEW COVENANT PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
24 Grinnell Ave., 672-5790, www.newcovenantwy.org. Pastor Ron Ellis. Sunday: 10
a.m. worship, 11:30 a.m. Sunday school.
OLD APOSTOLIC LUTHERAN CHURCH
111 Metz Road. Sunday service 11 a.m. Sunday
school follows the morning service. Everyone
welcome.
OUR LADY OF THE PINES CATHOLIC CHURCH
34 Wagon Box Road, Story, 672-2848. Saturday:
5:30 p.m. reconciliation, 6 p.m. mass served by
Holy Name Catholic Church.
PRAIRIE DOG COMMUNITY CHURCH
Prairie Dog Community Clubhouse, southeast of
Sheridan at intersection of Highway 14 East
and Meade Creek Road (County Road 131), 6723983. Pastor Terry Wall. Sunday: 9 a.m. nondenominational worship service.
QUAKER WORSHIP SHARING (Religious
Society of Friends)
Second and fourth Sundays. Call Gary Senier,
683-2139, for time and place.
RANCHESTER COMMUNITY CHURCH
1000 Highway 14, Ranchester, 655-9208. Pastor
Claude Alley. Sunday: 9 a.m. Sunday school, 10
a.m., worship service, 10:15 a.m. children’s
church. Wednesday: 6:30 p.m. Bible study.
Thursday: 9 a.m. to noon, 1-3 p.m. Community
Cupboard and Clothes Closet open.
THE ROCK CHURCH
Non-denominational, contemporary Christian
church. 1100 Big Horn Ave., 673-0939,
www.bighornrock.com. Pastor Michael
Garneau and Pastor Rod Jost. Sunday: 9 and
10:45 a.m. worship.
ST. EDMUND CATHOLIC CHURCH
310 Historic Highway 14, Ranchester, 678-2848.
Mass: Sunday 10 a.m.. Reconciliation: The first
Sunday of the month immediately following
mass. Served by Holy Name Catholic Church.
ST. PETER’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
1 S. Tschirgi St., 674-7655, email: [email protected] Pastor John Inserra — Rector,
Family Minister Dr. John Milliken. Sunday: 7:30
a.m. Quiet Holy Eucharist with traditional language and no music, 10 a.m. choral Holy
Eucharist with hymns and choir. Tuesday: 10
a.m. healing service. Lent Soup Suppers begin
at 6:00 p.m. followed by a study on Prayer.
March 29th - Palm Sunday Service with special
music beginning at 9:00 a.m.(one service
only). April 2nd - Maundy Thursday Service
begins at 6:00 p.m. April 3rd - Good Friday
Service at 6:00 p.m. April 5th - Easter Sunday
with two services at 8:00 a.m and 10:00 a.m.
THE SALVATION ARMY
150 S. Tschirgi St. 672-2444 or 672-2445. Captain
Donald Warriner, Lieutenant Kim Warriner.
Sunday: 10 a.m. Sunday school, 11 a.m.,worship.
SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH
345 S. Main St., 672-5969,
www.sheridan23adventistchurchconnect.org.
Pastor Gary Force, 303-882-7601. Saturday:
9:30 a.m. lesson study, 11:15 a.m. church service. Call for time and location of home prayer.
SHERIDAN WESLEYAN CHURCH
404 W. Brundage Lane, 672-0612, www.sheridanwesleyan.org. Pastor Darrell White. Sunday:
8:30 a.m. worship with children’s church and
nursery available, 9:45 a.m. Connection Hour
for all ages, 11 a.m. worship with children’s
church and nursery available. Wednesday: 6:30
p.m. Splash for children 4-years-old through
5th grade, 6:30 p.m. transFORMED Youth for 612 grades. Call office for weekly connection
groups schedule.
STORY COMMUNITY CHURCH
4 Ponderosa Drive, Story, 683-3018, Facebook:
Story Community Church. Pastor John
Constantine. Sunday: 9:45 a.m. Sunday school,
11 a.m. worship, 5:30 p.m. youth group.
Wednesday: 6:30 p.m. Bible study.
SUNRISE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
570 Marion St., 674-8424. Pastor John Jackson.
Sunday: 10 a.m. Sunday school, 11 a.m. worship,
6 p.m. worship. Wednesday: 7 p.m. worship and
adult Bible study.
THEE CHURCH OF CHRIST
45 E. Loucks St. (Old Post Office Building), Suite
19. 672-2825. Richard Snider 672-2825, Scott
Osborne 672-8347. Sunday: 10 a.m. Bible class,
11 a.m. worship and communion. Wednesday: 7
p.m. Bible study.
TONGUE RIVER BAPTIST CHURCH (Southern
Baptist)
305 Coffeen St., Ranchester, 752-0415, email:
[email protected] Pastor Granger
Logan. Sunday: 9:45 a.m. Sunday school, 11
a.m. worship, 6:30 p.m. worship. Wednesday:
6:30 p.m. prayer service and Bible study.
TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH
135 Crescent Drive, 672-2411, [email protected]
Pastor Phil Wold.
Sunday: 8:30 a.m., Palm Sunday Worship with
Trinity Choir Easter Cantata, “Alive!” 9:45 a.m.,
Coffee Fellowship; 11:00 a.m., Palm Sunday
Worship with Trinity Choir Easter Cantata,
“Alive!” Monday: 7:00 p.m., Scouts and
Webelos. Wednesday: No Soup Supper; No
Mid-Week Worship; 6:00 p.m., BASICS Practice;
7:00 p.m., Trinity Choir Rehearsal. Thursday:
7:30 a.m., Women’s Early AM Study at the
Holiday Inn; 7:00 p.m., Maundy Thursday
Worship with Holy Communion. Friday: 12
Noon, Community Good Friday Worship Service
held at Trinity Lutheran Church; 7:00 p.m.,
Good Friday Worship Service at Trinity.
Saturday: 10:00 a.m., LOGOS Youth and
Helpers Set up for Easter Breakfast; 7:00 p.m.,
Easter Vigil.
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP
1950 E. Brundage Lane, 672-3325, www.sheridanuu.org. President Bill Bradshaw. We are a
welcoming, nondogmatic and spiritually liberal
fellowship. Weekly Sunday service and
Montessori-based religious education for ages
3 years to fifth grade at 10 a.m., followed by a
time for coffee and fellowship. Meditation
pratice every Sunday 7-8 p.m.
VALLEY LUTHERAN CHURCH (WELS)
Meets at 1981 Double Eagle Drive, Suite B, 6727599, www.valleylutheran.com. Pastor Gary
Schult. Sunday: 9 a.m. Bible class, 10:15 a.m.
worship.
WAGON WHEEL BAPTIST CHURCH
Pastor Terry White. 325-207-1407. Meets at the
YMCA in the Whitney Room. Sunday:1:30p.m.
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www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
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Picasso valued at $140M
heading to NYC auction
NEW YORK (AP) — Christie’s auction
house has announced it will offer a 1955
masterpiece by Pablo Picasso for an estimated $140 million.
“Women of Algiers (Version O)” will
hit the auction block on May 11.
The vibrantly colorful work features a
scantily attired female amid smaller
nudes. It is part of a 15-work series
Picasso created between 1954 and 1955.
It’ll be offered with a group of two
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Dan and Patricia Duffey admire an exhibit at the Trail End Museum inside Kendrick Mansion last
fall.
Trail End Museum to open for spring season
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Trail End Museum at
Kendrick Mansion will open April 1 for
the spring season.
The museum will be open from 1-4 p.m.
daily.
Summer hours for the museum will
begin June 1.
The Trail End Museum is located at 400
Clarendon Ave.
For additional information, see
trailend.com or call 674-4589.
USFS to hold open house Thursday
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Employees at the U.S.
Forest Service Tongue Ranger District will
host an open house Thursday from 4-6 p.m.
to welcome District Ranger Amy Ormseth.
The open house will be held at the
Tongue Ranger District office located at
2013 Eastside Second St. in Sheridan.
Ormseth comes to Sheridan most recently as the District Ranger from the Pike and
San Isabel National Forests and
Cimarron/Comanche National Grasslands
in Salida, Colorado. She began her work in
Sheridan earlier this year.
The open house affords an opportunity
for the public to meet Ormseth and district employees one-on-one and learn what
the district has planned for the upcoming
summer season.
For more information about this event,
call 674-2600.
FAB conference tickets on sale
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Tickets are now on sale
for the 2015 FAB (For. About. By.) Women’s
Conference, which is scheduled for April
17 from 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. at Sheridan
College.
Tickets for the conference are $40 per
person, while tickets for the banquet dinner only are $30. Combination tickets for
the conference and dinner cost $65.
Karen McNenny will highlight the event
with three different presentations. Her
keynote, “Wonder Woman Wants a Day
Off !” will explore how you can deal with
difficult situations, cranky people and bad
hair days. McNenny will bring to life the
paradox and struggles of so many women
as they manage work, home and personal
preservation.
Her second presentation of the day will
focus on building community. She contends that no matter what the problem or
what the question, community is the
answer.
Last, she’ll address the crowd at the
Woman of the Year Banquet set to begin
at 6 p.m. April 17 in the Edward A.
Whitney Academic Center atrium.
This year’s conference has been separated into two tracts — personal and professional. Attendees don’t have to stick to one
tract, but can mix and match based on
interest.
Throughout the day, interactive workshops will include instruction on basic doit-yourself projects, journaling, nutrition,
resume building, volunteerism, negotiating, running for office and the need for
networking.
At the end of the conference, attendees
will be introduced to five local nonprofits,
which will then be available during the
cocktail hour to visit with potential new
volunteers and board members.
To wrap up the day, each nominee for
Woman of the Year will be honored and
the 2015 winner will be announced during
a banquet dinner.
For a complete schedule of events and
list of speakers, see
thesheridanpress.com/fab.
Little Bighorn Battlefield
spring hours now in effect
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Effective Wednesday, Little
Bighorn Battlefield National Monument
will be open daily from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
The spring hours will be in effect until
summer hours begin on May 25. This
includes Custer National Cemetery, the
Indian Memorial and Seventh Cavalry
Monument and the visitor center/museum.
The self–guiding Deep Ravine Trail and
tour road to the Reno-Benteen Battlefield
will be open from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m daily.
Entrance fees are $10 per private vehicle or
$5 per person if hiking or traveling by bicy-
cle.
Entrance fees will be waived at Little
Bighorn Battlefield and other National
Park Service sites during the weekend of
April 18-19 to recognize the beginning of
National Park Week.
National Park Week, a program of the
National Park Service, is an opportunity to
engage families and communities in
America’s great outdoors, reconnecting
them with nature and creating close to
home opportunities for people to get outside, be active and have fun.
For additional information, see
nps.gov/npweek or call 406-638-3217.
dozen other major 20th century works in
a stand-alone sale called “Looking
Forward to the Past.”
Christie’s didn’t reveal the seller, but
said the collector acquired the painting
at Christie’s in 1997 for $31.9 million.
The current record for any artwork
sold at auction is held by Francis
Bacon’s triptych “Three Studies of
Lucian Freud.” It sold at Christie’s for
$142.4 million in 2013.
David Crosby repeatedly asks about ambulance after accident
SANTA YNEZ, Calif. (AP) — A recording of an anguished 911 call from David
Crosby shows the Rock and Roll Hall of
Famer repeatedly asking how soon an
ambulance will arrive to help a pedestrian he just hit with his car.
Crosby was driving on a highway near
his Santa Barbara County home on
Sunday when the accident occurred.
He tells a 911 dispatcher the sun was in
his eyes and he couldn’t see 46-year-old
Jose Jimenez jogging.
The recording of the call was released
Wednesday by the California Highway
Patrol.
After a dispatcher tells him an ambulance is on the way, Crosby calls back to
ask how soon it will arrive.
Jimenez was hospitalized with broken
bones.
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C6
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2015
SERVICE BUSINESS
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