Music Chow Screen

March 26–April 1, 2015 | Vol. 21 Issue 13 | www. flaglive.com |
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Music
Leah Nobel
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Chow
Café Daily Fare
FREE
THE ORPHEUM THEATER
| NORTHERN ARIZONA’S PREMIER ENTERTAINMENT VENUE
Greenhouse Productions Presents
Greenhouse Productions
Presents
AN EVENING WITH
Greenhouse Productions
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WITH MARMOZETS
American Standards
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Friday, March 27
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Thursday, April2
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Friday,April3
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Greenhouse
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Saturday,April4
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Wednesday, April8
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4/11- Wild and Scenic Film Fest
4/16 - The Big Lebowski Night
4/26 - Sturgill Simpson
6/10 - King Sunny Ade
4/18 - Built to Spill w/ Braided Waves
4/30 - GRIZ w/ The Floozies, MuzzY
4/21 - Drive-By Truckers
5/3 - NAU Student Film Fest
6/27 - John Butler Trio
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contents
March 26-April 1, 2015 Vol. 21, Issue 13
4
Full Frontal
OUR
MULES
KICK
A$$
Letter from Home
The Mother Load
Hot Picks
Editor’s Head
NewsQuirks
10 Screen
20 Rear View
Hightower
The Clean Palate
The Write Now
On the cover:
The shelves of Starlight Books in downtown
Flagstaff. Photo by Taylor Mahoney
14
Organizers of
downtown Flag’s four
ongoing literary events.
Photo by
Taylor Mahoney
21 Pulse
25 Comics
26 Classifieds
Feature Story
The Venerators of Verse: Four standing literary gatherings
have elevated the celebration of the written arts
By Seth Muller
12
MUSIC
18
Café Daily Fare’s story of success
is the story of America’s success
By Diandra Markgraf
By Willie Cross
TheMoney$hot
Andrew Wisniewski
[email protected]flaglive.com
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Mossman, Adrienne Bischoff,
Jim Hightower, Roland
Sweet, Max Cannon, Jen
Sorensen, Drew Fairweather,
Mary Sojourner
Art Director
BUSINESS
EDITORIAL
Editor
Keith Hickey
Graphic Artists
Jim Johnson
Jeff Randall
Candace Collett
Photographers
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Film Editor
Dan Stoffel
Staff Writer
by Anonymous
General Manager
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Retail Advertising
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Contributors
Pressroom Foreman
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March 26–April 1, 2015 | flaglive.com
3
Letterfromhome
Me and Mama-san
By Laura Kelly
W
hen my father died, I was 27. I went
numb and took a job in Japan as a
group leader for 10 American high
school exchange students. The job required
that I also live with a family. When our bus
pulled into the supermarket parking lot where
we were to meet our host parents, all I knew
about Yuko was that she was in her 40s, she
taught English, and she was recently widowed.
A slight woman with chin-length hair held a
sign bearing my name.
“My American daughter,” she said, as I
extended my hand.
“My Japanese mother,” I replied.
We said nothing as we busied ourselves
with my luggage. I think of us as sad and weary
animals smelling each other’s open wounds.
I was wobbly with my grief but grateful with
recognition. I had found another from the tribe
of the grieving.
Yuko’s two teenage daughters were away
for the summer, and we were alone in her
small house. Call me Mom, she said.
Mom awakened me each morning, calling my name in a feathery voice. She rolled
up my futon, fetched my slippers. She served
me breakfast of cold beans, salty fish bits
and noodles. She praised my dexterity with
chopsticks. She scolded me for my nail biting.
She washed my feet. Whatever she told me to
do, I did. Why not? I felt a grey sort of nothing
about anything.
About a month into my stay, we dressed
to go out for an afternoon of grocery shopping. As I appeared before her, ready to go,
she shook her head. Pointing to my skirt, which
was knee-length, she said, “No so good.” No
explanation from her. No rebuttal from me. I
followed her to the closet. “This OK,” she said,
choosing some pants. “And this shoes good,”
she said, selecting an alternative pair.
As I changed clothes, I felt flutters of
resentment. Emotional gas hissed through a
fissure. “Only one letter separates smothering
from mothering,” I wrote in my journal that
night. Exclamation points adorned my sentence.
About a week before I was to leave, Mom
announced a night out. It was our first; evenings
4
flaglive.com | March 26–April 1, 2015
Singing open my grief
usually passed quietly at home
with both of us asleep by 9 p.m.
She invited two friends. We rendezvoused in a karaoke bar.
The bar had hostesses
heavy on eye makeup and
tarty charm, gaggles of whirly
businessmen in suits and unironic skinny ties. Low lights,
vinyl-covered banquettes,
highballs spangled with neoncolored swizzle sticks.
A tiny stage stood in the
far corner, decorated with silver
bunting. Onstage a mike and
a podium groaning under a
songbook as thick as the Bible.
There was one on every table.
I watched as businessmen
unceremoniously ambled to the
stage, scooped the mike and
belted out a tune. No applause,
no jeering, no nothing. The
singing was sonic wallpaper.
At some point I excused
myself to the loo. When I
emerged an announcement
boomed across the club in English: “Tonight, special American Photo courtesy of the author.
girl to sing on us.” I heard the
I. Hated. Everyone.
canned intro to John Denver’s “Country Roads.”
When the song ended, a tableful of
The moment elasticized like taffy. Everydrunken guys hooted and cheered. Yuko and
one in the room turned toward me. Mom and
her friends were on their feet. One old man
her friends applauded furiously. “Surprise for
stood and bowed toward me and then bowed
you,” she called out, beaming.
himself out of the bar walking backwards.
Yes, it was. A big, fat, no-thank-you-veryI wish I could say I basked in the glow
much surprise. I felt like a wind-up toy. Embarof attention. Or that I deployed my sense of
rassment crimsoned my neck. Resentment
humor. I wish I’d been larger, larkier, someone
burned my gut. And onto the stage I stepped.
who could see in that moment that Yuko was
The lyrics flashed on a small monitor, some kind
doing something she thought would please me.
of gobbledy gook written by blind chickens:
But I can’t say any of those things. My
Country rows/tay me hole/To a space/I will sew.
irritation with being forced to sing boiled into
What?
a lava splooge of fury and confusion about my
I looked up after the first verse. All eyes
father’s death. Yuko saw it and thought it was
were on me. Some people were swaying; Mom
for her. I saw her face droop with confusion
looked like she would split open with happiand then cloud with shame. The two of us
ness. Perspiration dotted my upper lip; blood
were a jumble of radioactive emotions.
surfed in my ears.
After that, things never went back to the
way they were. No more shared market trips.
No more slippers at my morning bedside. Six
days later we endured a final goodbye dinner.
I wrote a thank you note to her on my last day,
but I didn’t mean it.
Today I do.
Laura Kelly is the executive director of the
Flagstaff Arts and Leadership Academy. Kelly
spent 2014 in the tiny, mountainous Central
Asian nation of Kyrgyzstan teaching storytelling at the American University of Central Asia.
Born a flatlander, she has called Flagstaff home
for 11 years. Her book, Dispatches from the
Republic of Otherness, is a collection of nonfiction essays about her experiences living and
teaching overseas.
THEMOTHERLOAD
On pointe
By Kelly Poe Wilson
W
hen my children were younger I often
used to refer to them as “mitten suppliers to the world,” and not because
they produced so many mittens. I wish that
was the case. No, the reason they earned this
particular sobriquet from me was because,
without fail, they would each lose an average
of 20 pairs of gloves or mittens every single
winter. And since, in Flagstaff, we average
about three winters a year, this is a lot. Even
buying the cheapest gloves possible didn’t
really protect me from the financial hit of
buying approximately a gross of mittens
every year.
Of course, eventually we moved past
this phase. It wasn’t that they stopped losing
gloves; it was just that I stopped caring if their
fingers were cold. When your children are in
elementary school the fact that their fingers
are blue reflects poorly on you as a parent.
When the same thing happens to them in high
school, it only reflects poorly on them, or at
least that’s what I tell myself—their teachers
probably still look at their blue fingers and
shake their collective heads at my apparent
inability to keep my offspring alive and intact.
Still, at least I don’t have to make weekly visits
to the dollar store anymore. Unfortunately,
however, that’s because the thing I now
have to replace on a weekly basis is no longer gloves.
It’s shoes. Specifically, ballet shoes.
Playing the role of ballet shoe supplier
Right about now you’re probably thinking, I didn’t even know they carried ballet shoes
at the dollar store. And you’re right to think
that, because they don’t. Not at all. Not ever.
And even if they did—even if, by some overordering catastrophe that meant the New York
City Ballet had somehow managed to misorder
to the point that all of the dollar stores in the
country were somehow flooded with a veritable barge of ballet slippers—it still wouldn’t
do me any good, because unlike gloves, which
come in “one-size-fits-all,” ballet slippers are
more size specific. And the size that is most
specifically likely to not be present is size 12,
which is what my own careless danseur, Clyde,
happens to wear.
That’s right. Size 12 ballet shoes.
You think those suckers are easy to find?
They are not. In fact, they have to be special
ordered, which means that every time he loses
You think those suckers are easy to
�ind? They are not. In fact, they have
to be special ordered, which means
that every time he loses a pair, I
have to go online and order them
again … and again … and again.
a pair, I have to go online and order them again
… and again … and again. And yes, I probably
would get a discount if I ordered a bunch at
once, but there are two problems with that plan.
One, I have no guarantee that Clyde will still be
wearing size 12 ballet shoes when he wakes up
in the morning (at age 13, the chances are actually quite slim), and two, if Clyde even suspects
that there is a spare pair of shoes anywhere to
be found, he will be even more careless with the
pair he has—if that is even possible.
I’ve thought about writing something on
the inside of each shoe along the lines of, “If
found, please return to …” but, again, there are
a couple of things stopping me. First, I’m not
sure I’d want to meet the kind of person who
doesn’t mind getting his face close enough to a
13-year-old boy’s ballet shoes to actually read
a phone number printed there, and second,
I’m afraid that if people find out I have a size
12-wearing ballet dancer in the house, they’ll
be waiting outside the front gate trying to snap
a photo of the giant ballerina.
Either that, or they’ll be trying to film
a video of Bigfoot in a tutu. A tutu, but no
shoes. Of course.
Kelly Poe Wilson has lived in Flagstaff since
1985. She lives with her wonderful husband,
Jim, and her dreadful children, Clementine and
Clyde. More of her work can be found at www.
kellypoewilson.com.
$8
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March 26–April 1, 2015 | flaglive.com
5
HOTPICKS
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6
flaglive.com | March 26–April 1, 2015
FRIDAY | 3.27
NEW CUTS ON THE BLOCK
What’s it like to be good at every musical
thing? Just ask Blockhead. He’s dug his
fingers into hip-hop production backing
Murs, Aesop Rock and so many others. He
emcees and is part of a comedy hip-hop
group. He’s also built up a repertoire of
remixes spanning the likes of Del tha
Funkee Homosapien, Fiona Apple and
Her Space Holiday. But now he’s back to
his solo feats—at least for a New York
minute. The Manhattan-based rapper,
record producer and master of just about
everything in the related universe just
celebrated the release of his latest album,
Bells and Whistles, back in November, and
has pulled out all of the stops with his
thoughtfully-layered live instrumentation
and homespun beats. He’s taken his show
on the road and will make a stop at the
Green Room, 15 N. Agassiz. The show
starts at 8 p.m. Cool Handz Luke will
add to the night alongside Boom Box
Brothers and Arms and Sleepers. Tickets
are $10 in advance and $12 the day of the
show. 226-8669. www.flagstaffgreenroom.
com.
FUNKY JUNK
IN THE TRUNK
The Grateful Dead circa the 1970s. Courtesy photo
T
he surviving members of the Grateful Dead will join Trey Anastasio (who’ll fill the spot of
the legendary Jerry Garcia) for a practice jam session in Heritage Square on Wed, April 1.
They needed a place to play before heading out on their Fare Thee Well Tour and thought,
what the heck, let’s do a free show in downtown Flagstaff. But why Flagstaff? Is it because of
the San Francisco Peaks and the freaks in the streets? Not exactly. Actually, it turns out that
Mayor Jerry “Cherry” Nabours used to play keyboards in the band back in the early ’80s. He
took over when Brent Mydland needed a little break from the road and he turned to the next
best thing. Nabours was known to lay down fresh jams on the ol’ Roland MKS20, whipping the
crowd into a 50-minute noodle-armed dancing frenzy. Nabours is back on keys this time, so don’t
miss his smokin’ solos as he goes toe-to-toe with Anastasio as they rip the Square. It won’t have
a designated start time and it will go on forever. Independent local meteorologist Lee Born has
already issued a special fog advisory for the greater Flagstaff area.
“We won’t stop till we make it” ain’t a
bad choice for a life’s mantra. Yo Mama’s
Big Fat Booty Band highlights the chant
in “Juices and Berries” off their latest
release, Onward! (2013), and prove their
penchant for slathering rock ‘n’ roll with
funky flavor. Decked out in wailing keys
and shredding wah-wah guitar, all five
pieces of the Booty add their own spice
to the recipe with heavy beats, horns, a
dash of rap and a lovely bit of vocal work
from their own “Mama Funk.” For over
a decade, they’ve shared stages with
Parliament Funkadelic, Dumpstaphunk,
Bootsy Collins plus so many more. Nor
have they given up on spreading their
message through soulful jams carefully
crafted to get audiences cutting it up out
there on the dance floor. Strap on the
swanky foxy shazam and get to boogying
at the Orpheum Theater, 15 W. Aspen,
with doors opening at 8 and the show
kicking off at 9 p.m. Tickets to this all-ages
gig are $10 in advance and $12 the day of
the show. 556-1580. www.bootyband.com.
HotPicks
SATURDAY | 3.28‌
THE SUN HAS SO MUCH SOL‌
Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band. Courtesy photo
FRI–SUN | 3.27–4.12‌
A BRIEFCASE OF MISTAKEN IDENTITY‌
Two matching briefcases seal the fate for a particular dinner
party centered around one Henry Perkins’ birthday. British
playwright of the farcical persuasion, Ray Cooney, tosses a
group into the throes of mistaken identity and hilarity with
his 1994 slapstick farce, Funny Money. Perkins is chillin’ on the
subway on his way home, pondering nothing in particular, and
departs with the wrong clutch. Much to his chagrin, and then
elation, he discovers his leftover chutney sandwich has morphed
into a mountain of cash he presumes is illicit drug dough, natch.
But the guy holding the sandwich fails to find the humor, and
“Mr. Big” ventures out into the London landscape to reclaim his
riches. The story devolves into a mad runaround from two cops,
one crooked and another straight, on behalf of birthday excitement and booze. Theatrikos players work their comedic best on
this gut buster at the Doris Harper-White Playhouse, 11 W.
Cherry. Fri and Sat performances are at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday
performances start at 2 p.m. The play runs through April 12.
Tickets are $12–$19. 774-1662. www.theatrikos.com.
A few musicians from the lush land of Eugene, Ore., are on their
way to these parts to drop a bit of lyrical knowledge set to the
tune of their blend of reggae, hip-hop and good, new-fashioned
rock ‘n’ roll. All five dudes of Sol Seed work hard to pile on a
bit of uniqueness to the group’s table from instrumentation
to musical direction as supplied by didgeridoo vibrations and
hard-line keys, thought-provoking lyrics and wailing guitar
all wrapped up in synergistic emotion. Joining the
bill are the four-piece Young Creatures straight
from SXSW via L.A. These wily purveyors of
psych do well to bring a different flavor
to the scene as they combine traditional
elements with ethereal soundscapes
and killer bass riffs. From the coast to
the desert and back again, it’s been a
whirlwind for these tour animals, and
they clearly aren’t down to put a stop
to their grueling schedule yet. There’s
plenty of time for sleep after a night
at the Green Room, 15 N. Agassiz, with
Kill Babylon Coalition cracking open the
jams. The show is free and begins at 8 p.m.
To
226-8669. Visit all of the bands on Facebook.
n
actors work through the overarching themes of love, loss, grief
and hope, they have learned the dangers of domestic violence
knows no limits, whether with age, race, sex, location or otherwise. They’ve trained with Northland Family Help Center, and
are more prepared than ever to deliver a performance, both on
and off stage, worthy of a standing ovation. Two productions
will take place at the Coconino Center for the Arts, 2300 N. Ft.
Valley, at 7 p.m. Sat and 3 p.m. Sun. Post-show discussions with
the students and NFHC coordinators will follow both productions. Tickets are $5 for students and $10 for adults. 779-2300.
www.flagartscouncil.org and www.kathleenbjones.com.
SUNDAY | 3.29‌
THE RECIPE FOR
OBLIVION‌
Another installment of Theatrikos’
first-year run of the Playwright Café
series is about to take shape in our
midst. This round brings all you theatre
lovers with less than average attention
spans three single-act plays by one Will
o
ot Cordeiro. The NAU Honors Program professor
yS
ph
im
y
on ,
s
rte
and Doctor of English has supplied a handful of
ak a
Blockhead. Cou
his short dramas coursing the gamut of emotions and
provisions. Director Emily Vandevier will lead the players’ way
through the single-act dramas, which are three selections from
DRAWING THE LINE‌
Cordeiro’s four-part collection, The Oblivion Suite, and feature
Flagtown is about to experience a world premiere in the theatre
an actor and an actress who will assume different roles and
world. Straight from FALA playwright-in-residence Kathleen
ages throughout the works. Set in the cozy lounge at the Hotel
Jones, Origin of the Seasons casts six FALA Advanced Acting
Weatherford, there will be a little something for everyone at
students in the heavy and hopeful drama. Jones’ newest work
Charly’s Pub & Grill, 23 N. Leroux. The doors open at 5:30 and
traces the relationship between Billy Baxter and Moira River.
the show kicks off at 6:30 p.m. $5 cover at the door. 774-1662.
All seems wonderful at first, but Billy lets his addiction get the
www.theatrikos.com.
better of him at the expense of Moira’s life. As these six young
SAT–SUN | 3.28–3.29‌
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March 26–April 1, 2015 | flaglive.com
7
EDITOR’SHEAD
On the importance of
taking notes
By
Andrew Wisniewski
A
couple Mondays back I was invited to
read at the Narrow Chimney Reading
Series at Uptown Pubhouse. I was honored to be asked, and wanted to make the
best use of my 20-minute time slot. Prior to
sharing my own work, I thought I would take
the opportunity to briefly pass along one of
the best pieces of knowledge about writing
I’d heard in a long time. It came from David
Sedaris, who, back at his November reading
here in Flagstaff, shared an excerpt from Ann
Patchett’s This is the Story of a Happy Marriage. It was exactly what I needed to hear.
Patchett writes about the magic of
inspiration versus actually sitting down and
getting your thoughts and ideas out and onto
the page. She likens writing to learning to
play the cello. When we think of the cello,
we understand that it will require work. One
doesn’t just pick up and play the instrument
to perfection. It requires practice, and more
practice, and more practice. It’s an art. The
same is true of writing. It’s also an art, but
many people like to chalk up a lack of writing
to a lack of inspiration. Inside of the art, is
craft. She says, “Art stands on the shoulders
of craft, which means that to get to the art
you must master the craft. If you want to
write, practice writing.”
For the longest time, I waited for inspiration to strike before putting the proverbial
pen to paper. And as one might easily guess,
I didn’t write as much as I know I should have.
Since hearing and later re-reading her words,
which some part of me knew all along, I’ve
started adopting her approach. And as a
result, I write more, and better.
That night, and in the days following the
reading, I considered more about my approach
to writing, realizing another important part of
me being happy with and getting down what I
want on the page: note taking.
It seems there’s always these fleeting
moments when a brilliant idea fills the brain
and is dismissed with the hopes that it’ll come
back later, when it’s more convenient. It happens all the time. And it can be defeating.
Perhaps the idea was sparked by something seen or experienced, or perhaps it just
materialized. And for some strange reason, we
convince ourselves that we will remember it,
only to sit down and draw a blank. That idea
has left our head before we can write it out.
8
flaglive.com | March 26–April 1, 2015
We find ourselves leaning back in our chair,
staring at the wall or off in the distance,
racking our memory, wishing we had taken
the time to scribble the idea down.
As a writer, something as simple
as jotting down a quick note, no matter
how big or small, can be a huge deal.
Many great ideas are born from random
moments—if we never opened our
notebooks, they might never see the
light of day. And if they somehow do,
the finer details of the moment might be
lost forever.
With the arrival of the notepad app on
smartphones, it’s become much, much easier
to take a quick mental note and turn it into
a lasting thought. It’s clean, organized. And,
yes, while it is more convenient, it doesn’t
compare to or replace a tangible notebook.
There’s something romantic about having
that one go-to book of yellowing pages
full of notes that digital cannot replace.
Notes are circled, crossed out, underlined or
bolded. There are drawings or other random
flattened items inserted. Words are written
in print and cursive (because you wanted to
see if you still could) in an exact or no strict
pattern. The ideas that come from ink on
paper flow in a much different, easy, enjoyable fashion. The trick is always keeping it,
and a pen, by your side.
That used to be the order of things,
but somewhere along the line I stopped. So,
on the heels of my Narrow Chimney reading, as I contemplated my writing and how I
want to approach it going forward, I picked
up a new notebook. The first few pages are
now filled; the rest lay empty, waiting.
Note taking is in no way relative to
only writing, but all creative disciplines.
Life is full of grand ideas that come and
go: some ripe for execution, others destined to be erased. The fortunate possess
the ability to hold onto those moments of
clarity, the next flash of wild brilliance for
later reflection. For the rest of us, there
are notebooks. The holders of the forgotten and remembered.
I’ve got mine. Constantly working on my craft, striving to find the art
within, with a slew of notes—inspired or
not—along the way to aid in the next creative push.
News Quirks
BY ROLAND SWEET
Curses, Foiled Again
Brian J. Byers crashed his car while driving drunk and then poured water on the
road so it would look like black ice caused the crash, according to police in Sparta,
N.J. Byers drove the car home and had a friend drive him back to the scene, where an
officer spotted Byers carrying two 5-gallon buckets back to his friend’s car after emptying them. It’s not clear how many trips back and forth Byers made with the buckets,
but the town’s public works department needed to apply half a ton of salt to make
the road safe for driving. The officer charged the friend, Alexander Zambenedetti, 20,
with drunken driving, too. (NJ.com)
David Fanuelsen, 39, and Dean Brown, 22, stole construction equipment worth
$8,000 from their employer, according to police in Key West, Fla. The boss, Stace
Valenzuela, identified the workers as the thieves because he had overheard them
planning the theft after Fanuelsen unintentionally butt-dialed him. “Talk about bumbling idiots,” Valenzuela said. (Reuters)
Bowling for Hollers
Two people in east Ukraine were injured while bowling after a player rolled a
grenade instead of a ball. The blast occurred at a restaurant that also offers duckpin
bowling, which uses a small ball without holes. Emergency services official Sergei
Ivanushkin cited the incident as the latest in a rash of accidents in the rebel-controlled
area caused by careless use of explosives. (Associated Press)
Smartphones, Dumb People
Ontario researchers announced they’ve found a link between heavy smartphone
use and lowered intelligence. The reason, their survey suggests, is that the devices
encourage lazy thinking by allowing users to solve problems with computers rather
than exercise their brains. “Decades of research has revealed that humans are eager
to avoid expending effort when problem-solving, and it seems likely that people
will increasingly use their smartphones as an extended mind,” said study co-author
Nathaniel Barr of the University of Waterloo. (United Press International)
Sheena Keynna Miller, 27, was injured after she walked in front of a freight train
while texting on her cellphone. Miller told police in Lakeland, Fla., that she didn’t
hear the train horn or see the crossing arms down when she stepped onto the tracks.
Police Sgt. Gary Gross said the locomotive tossed Miller into the air, fracturing her
arm. (Orlando Sentinel)
Homeland Insecurity
A traveler was allowed to use expedited airport security lines, even after a
security officer at the airport recognized the person as a convicted felon and former
member of a domestic terrorist group, according to the Department of Homeland
Security Inspector General’s Office. The official report said the security officer
alerted his supervisor but was told to “take no action” and let the passenger through.
(NBC News)
An investigation of a Federal Air Marshal program specialist uncovered evidence
that she was rearranging the flight schedules of air marshals to coordinate sexual
trysts. The Center for Investigative Reporting said it found that Michelle D’Antonio,
48, had apparently been using access to sensitive government databases to change
flight schedules of air marshals she was interested in dating. Federal air marshals are
assigned to commercial flights deemed “high risk” because they carry heavy fuel loads
or important passengers. More than 60 government workers face scrutiny. (MSNBC)
Quirks News Love Sale!
Come & get your love...
Annual
Irony of the Week
A fire extinguisher factory in Chicago burned down, even after 156 firefighters with 26
pieces of equipment responded to the three-alarm blaze, because they had nothing to put it
out with. Noting that firefighters couldn’t reach the flames with water, First Deputy Fire Commissioner Charles Stewart III explained that firefighters finally “had one engine feed another
engine to another engine until we got water on the fire.” (United Press International)
in store
on sale!
Police charged three suspects with assaulting and robbing a 30-year-old man in WinstonSalem, N.C., by threatening him with a hypodermic needle. (Winston-Salem Journal)
Degrees of Guilt
Police who spotted a pickup truck matching the description of a stolen vehicle in Destin,
Fla., reported that the only occupant, Debra Jean Mason, 58, denied stealing the vehicle. She
did admit knowing it was stolen but said, “I didn’t think it was that stolen.” (Northwest Florida
Daily News)
Post-Posting
Facebook announced that U.S. users can designate a “legacy contact,” who is authorized
to continue posting on their page after they die, respond to new friend requests, and update
their profile picture and cover photo. Users can also ask to have their accounts deleted after
their death, a previously unavailable option. (Associated Press)
Injudicious Behavior
When reporters spotted Flavio Roberto de Souza, the judge presiding over criminal proceedings against Eike Batista, once Brazil’s richest man, driving Batista’s confiscated Porsche,
Souza insisted, “I did not take it to use, just to look after.” He explained the police didn’t have
a safe place to protect it from exposure to sun, rain and possible damage, so he took it to a
covered parking space in the building where he lives in Rio de Janeiro. “I want the car to be
preserved in good condition,” he said. (Reuters)
Thank You for Your Service
Canada’s House of Commons approved a policy change allowing military veterans
who’ve lost limbs to verify their condition every three years, rather than annually. (The Canadian Press)
3rd & 4th
Everything
When Guns Are Outlawed
When a woman pointed a gun at a bartender in La Crosse, Wis., and demanded money,
customer Jeff Steele stopped her with his Taser. The suspect, Heidi Thompson, 24, ran away
but was quickly arrested. Police also charged Steele because he didn’t have a concealed carry
permit for the Taser. “When I bought it off the Internet, it said basically that it’s legal to have
in the state of Wisconsin but didn’t go into any depth on it,” Steele explained, “so I assumed
it was legal to carry around, otherwise why would you buy one to leave it at home?” (La
Crosse’s WKBT-TV)
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Mark Rothwell was awarded the Civilian Medal for Heroism for disarming a would-be
bank robber in Portland, Ore., in 2010. “We make decisions every day,” he said at the presentation ceremony by the Portland Police Bureau. “If you want to see change in the world, you
be that change.” This February, police took Rothwell, 49, into custody for pointing a gun at
bank tellers and demanding “all your cash.” Tracking dogs led officers to an address, where
Rothwell appeared and announced, “It’s me you want. I just robbed the bank.” (Portland’s
The Oregonian)
March 26–April 1, 2015 | flaglive.com
9
Screen
(I can’t get no satis-) faction
Reviewed by Sam Mossman
I
portrayed in the films relatively interesting.
n a dystopian future where individuality has
The faction system of Insurgent might not be
been abandoned in favor of a rigid faction
a realistic imagining of our own future, but it
system, those who don’t conform are more
does make for a solid science fiction backdrop.
than just an anomaly, they are considered danInsurgent does have some darker themes
gerous. Such is the case of Tris Prior (Shailene
than the first film, and has an overall
Woodley), who has aspects of each of
grittier feel. This is a step in the
the factions within her. Part two
right direction for a franchise
of the Divergent series, Insurgent
that needed to up the stakes
picks up with Tris’ tale just after
INSURGENT
a bit to keep a level of tenthe events of the first film, with
Directed by
sion and excitement present.
her and her friends in hiding. It
Robert Schwentke
Unfortunately, not all steps
turns out they’re being blamed
Rated PG-13
lead in the right direction. The
for some pretty heavy stuff—
HARKINS THEATRES
runtime is bloated compared
they are the target of a massive
to the film’s content, and I felt
manhunt—and their problems are
like some details were rushed over
just getting started.
and dismissed so that we could have a
Having not read any of the novels,
brooding lull in the middle of the film that is
I’ve only been introduced to the world of
unnecessary. The characters also don’t seem
Divergent in the cinematic format. That does
completely compelling. Sure, I kind of like
make me ill-equipped to evaluate the transithem, and I want them to succeed, but when
tion from book to screen, so I am not sure
it comes to really putting me in their shoes or
how fans of the books will react. For my part,
making sure that I know how they feel, the film
I must admit I do find the overall premise
C+
falls a bit short.
Like any series, it will be the final installment (conveniently split into two parts, as
expected) that will make or break the series.
Divergent (2014) and Insurgent have been good
Backstory brought forward
Reviewed by Adrienne Bischoff
would have his own TV show was lost on his captors, especially
Iranian election. Three reformist candidates ran against incuma nameless man Bahari referred to as “Mr. Rosewater,” who
bent Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, inspiring many citizens to vote.
used rosewater, a perfume with holy connotations, to mask his
When Ahmadinejad won, Iranians took to the streets, protesting
own stench.
that the elections were rigged.
Bahari was released after a forced confession to 11 counts
Bahari had originally visited Iran just to cover the elecof espionage and soon after formed a friendship with
tion, but he stayed to document the protest, including
Jon Stewart, who, understandably, wanted to share
filming riots that ended in bloodshed and death. Just
Bahari’s story. Stewart took a hiatus from The Daily
before the election, he also appeared on a segShow, cast Gael García Bernal as Bahari and took
ment of The Daily Show in which correspondent
ROSEWATER
to Jordan to direct Rosewater.
Jason Jones pretended to be an American spy
Directed by Jon Stewart
Based on Bahari’s book Then They Came
who wanted to know why Iran was so evil. On
Rated R
for Me, which was renamed Rosewater, the film
the June 17, 2009 episode in which the segNETFLIX DVD
wouldn’t be as remarkable without its incredible
ment aired, host Jon Stewart uncomfortably
backstory. In fact, it might not have been made
joked at the danger of sending Jason Jones to
given the existing amount of press surrounding
Iran, given the outbreak of violence that followed
Bahari’s imprisonment. But it wasn’t until I watched
the elections.
Rosewater that I finally understood the significance of
Jones returned safely home from Iran, but the
the 2009 Iranian election and Bahari’s work. (And I’ve been
same could not be said for Bahari who, four days later on
watching The Daily Show since before Stewart hosted it!) So
June 21, was arrested for espionage and taken to Tehran’s Evin
while Rosewater isn’t cinematically compelling, it tells a compelPrison, where he would remain for four months. The Iranian
ling, necessary story for those who respond better to film than
government was convinced he was a spy for the United States,
other media. For that alone, Jon Stewart has triumphed with his
in part, because of his appearance on The Daily Show, which it
directorial debut.
apparently mistook for serious journalism. Why an American spy
A
I
t’s quite easy to focus on the visual aspects of a film when
judging its merits. But good filmmaking can simply be good
storytelling, particularly if, as a film, that story reaches audiences it otherwise wouldn’t. That’s my long-winded way of saying Rosewater (2014) is a good movie.
To recap: in June 2009, Iranian-Canadian journalist and
filmmaker Maziar Bahari left his home in London to cover the
10
flaglive.com | March 26–April 1, 2015
enough to keep me watching, but I am really
going to need part one and two of Allegiant to
bring it home in a big way if I’m going to wind
up remembering the Divergent franchise more
than a few years from now.
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Red bowtie returns
Pee-wee Herman poised to make a big comeback
T
wo months ago, an interesting generational gap was closed when, out of sheer
curiosity to how they would respond, I
cued up the television show Pee-wee’s Playhouse—released this year on Netflix streaming—for my kids. A show that ran from 1986 to
1990 on CBS Saturday Morning, it premiered
a year after the Tim Burton (yes, that Tim
Burton) directed the film Pee-wee’s
Big Adventure.
As it turns out, my
six-year-old daughter
and four-year-old son
went bonkers for
it. The man-child
who was Peewee Herman
spoke to their
inner silliness. On the
show, they
also loved the
characters
the King of
Cartoons (who
brought cartoons
from the 1930s
and 1940s that
were about as weird
as it gets) and Jambi, a
green-headed genie that lives
in a box and grants wishes. As I
watched the show with them, it all came back
to me. The secret word, the dinosaur family
that lived in the wall and the puppet band
were all there. I also spotted the late Phil Hartman playing Captain Carl and a younger, scrawnier Lawrence Fishburne as Cowboy Curtis.
The Pee-wee legacy was all based on a
character that comedian Paul Reubens made
up back in 1979. He then cultivated Pee-wee
into a stage show and later an HBO special. He
toned down the early version of the character,
who often used adult-themed innuendo that is
By Seth Muller
only scarcely hinted at in his later portrayals—
but who remained clad in white leather shoes,
a half-a-size-too-small gray suit and red bowtie.
For me, Pee-wee became a hit for a
couple of reasons. One was that, even as a
younger teenager, I picked up on his subversion and plain weirdness. The show itself is
kaleidoscopic with brightly colored set designs
and a number of eccentric and sometimes bombastic characters.
Later, in college, one of
my roommates had
the first film on VHS
and our household
took to watching
it for its sheer
campy bravado.
We went
back to the
movie—one of
two, with the
other being
the weaker Big
Top Pee-wee—
even after Reubens’ 1991 arrest
for masturbating
in an adult theater
would come to tarnish
the franchise. He also
was later charged with child
pornography in 2002, though those
charges were later dropped and the nature of
the material challenged.
Flash-forward a dozen years and Peewee is back. Netflix’s big release of the show
and the two films prime the pump for a
Netflix original movie, Pee-wee’s Big Holiday,
which recently started production. Reubens
is in his early 60s now, but he claims that,
once he put back on the suit and made a
certain face, he became the man-boy again. I
only hope he keeps all that subversive weirdness intact.
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MONTHLY HARKINS INDIE SERIES & SEDONA FILMS: www.sedonafilmfestival.org
March 26–April 1, 2015 | flaglive.com
11
MUSIC
BY DIANDRA MARKGRAF
Roots of a desert bloom
Catching up with Austin-based musician and NAU grad Leah Nobel
A
By her sophomore year, she was freeing her emotions
s the world can attest through personal playing experience
on stage at local coffee shops like the former Applesauce
or even as a humble listener and fan, the music industry is
Teahouse on South San Francisco Street, Campus Coffee Bean
a beastly behemoth seemingly doling success as it pleases.
and White Dove.
One former Flagstaffian and Northern Arizona University grad,
After graduating a semester early in December of 2011,
though, is carving a rewarding musical career in Texas by paying
Nobel hit the road to Austin, where she is still soaking up the
attention not just to what listeners crave, but how they choose
sun and exploring her nascent, confident style bridging counto be fed.
try, folk, pop and a hint of alternative rock.
Leah Nobel is fresh off the February release of
Her newest release emphasizes this artthe first of her crowdfunded dual EP campaign
ist’s inherent songwriting ability as she
with a second due to drop in August. Strangexplores deeply personal experiences
ers Again marks a turning point for the
and experiments with fictitious eleyoung singer-songwriter, who is also
ments on songs like “Excuses.”
a model and actress, as she wades
Nobel flexed a different
through lyrical waters both heavy
writing muscle and let
and deep, and balances penthe story of the female
ning music for herself and for
subject living in a
a licensing company that
violent home flow
brought her song, “How to
through her. Though
Behave,” to air on an epishe is not real,
sode of Cinemax’s The Girls
her situation is all
Guide to Depravity.
too intimate to
With gigs at the
many women.
infamous South by SouthOn the EP’s
west music festival and
opener, “Joshua
numerous awards under
Tree,” striking
her belt, the bubbly
chucks of upright
musician works hard to
bass join eerie
bolster savvy in the busisteel guitar
ness and on paper. From
before Nobel’s
her Austin home, Nobel
own guitar and
shares her experiences
vocals that sound more
along her musical path that
like a plea as she chants,
began in this town.
“I fell asleep in something I
In 2007, Nobel gave up
buried/Woke with the taste
the Phoenix desert in favor of
of the dirt in my mouth/I will
earning a degree in broadcast
survive this, however scary/
journalism among Flag’s lofty
The river’s running even if there’s
peaks. She arrived at NAU with her
a drought.”
guitar and the illusive tunes brim“Joshua Tree” charts her emotions
ming in her mind. She guarded her selfLe
since jumping into music’s tumultuous
penned lyrics, and never allowed people—
z
ah
c
wi
No
waters. Nobel’s presence in the industry
even friends—to hear the music breaking like
be l
uto
. Pho
zek
c
z
S
t
a
o by Ann
arises from her talent as a songwriter and vocalwaves within her unless they happened to pass
ist, and her attention to audiences’ tendencies. She
the shuttered dorm room where she’d sing and practice,
explains, that since she’s lived in one of America’s music capiforgetting even those cinderblock walls are paper thin.
tols, listeners’ consumption of music has changed due in part
It took a friend, unbeknownst to Nobel, to sign her up for
to online streaming, both legal and not. She also notes vinyl’s
an open mic gig down in the Valley. She vividly recalls thunderresurgence. Though people would buy her physical records at
ous tremors surging through her fingertips to the point she
shows, people don’t always listen to full records on Spotify
could hardly finger each fret, but that terrifying experience
or iTunes.
cracked open the door to her career.
12
flaglive.com | March 26–April 1, 2015
“In the digital world, I feel like people’s attention span
for music has shrunk significantly,” Nobel says. “They seem to
digest things better in smaller portions, and they also want to
be constantly fed—they want new music all the time.”
The businesswoman in Nobel weighed the challenges
and decided to not risk pouring incredible amounts of energy
and funds into a project that may not take, so she decided to
release two shorter EPs.
“There’s this theory I read about in this music textbook one time: you have to constantly feed your tribe,”
she explains. “I wanted to feed my tribe better, so my idea
was instead of making a 10 or 12-song full-length record, I
would split it in half and release it six months apart, so for
a year people are
getting this constant stream of
new stuff.”
The result also
allowed the songs
to take shape differently. Where
Strangers Again is
melancholy, the
second, currently
untitled project will
adopt pop elements
Nobel says will
allow her to further
expand the concept
and chart new territory in her writing.
“You want to be an artist, but you want to be a smart artist. And that requires you to pay attention,” she adds.
Nobel explains the most powerful tool anyone hoping
to do the same could possess is networking. She’s gathered
a full band behind her, and cleared a path for collaborative
relationships to take root. These experiences would’ve passed
her by had she not scared herself enough to leave her hometown bubble.
With a slight laugh, Nobel recalls moving to Austin
and meeting one person—her real estate agent—and
reminiscing of the terror she felt that first time on stage.
Saying yes before she was ready only became a source of
inspiration.
“So far in my life, every moment like that has proved
to be completely and utterly worth it,” Nobel says. “And the
growth I’ve experienced has been tremendous and I get closer
to the person I would like to be.”
Keep an eye for Nobel’s exploits, and future shows at
www.leahnobel.com.
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14 flaglive.com
flaglive.com || March
14
March 26–April
26–April 1,
1, 2015
2015
From left: Ryan Smalley, John Quinonez,
Davey Latour, Jesse Sensibar, James Jay,
Molly Wood. Photo by Taylor Mahoney
T
he recent Poet’s
Den at the Wine
Loft boasts close to
30 people—a sizable
number on a spring
break Sunday where Flagstaff collectively feels slower
and sleepier. The subtle lighting of the room and the
spotlight accents of the stage and wine rack behind it
give the scene a sense of serenity. As the night unfolds,
it turns into a thoughtful, mindful evening of verse—a
celebration of the sublime power of words.
This particular Poet’s Den celebrates the
work of Mary Oliver, the poet of choice selected
by the host and organizer, Molly Wood. Some of
the poems are heavy. Others are transcendent.
Among the poems read by locals who take to
the stage to share them, a particularly poignant
moment arrives when Janine Kelley read the
Oliver poem “Sunrise.”
As she tells the audience, it was the last
poem she read with her husband before he
passed away—10 days before that evening she
stood at the microphone.
“You can die for it—an idea, or the world,”
Kelley speaks Oliver’s words to the room,
silenced and taking in the profoundness of the
lines. “People have done so, brilliantly, letting
their small bodies be bound to the stake,
creating an unforgettable fury of light.”
Kelley’s reading demonstrates the sheer
power poetry can have on our lives. And poem
after poem, read by each person with heart and
sincerity, carries those potent reminders of how
the right words put together in the right way can
move us.
For this reason, it is not a surprise that
Poet’s Den is another one of Flagstaff’s
successful literary events. It joins three
March
March 26–April
26–April 1,
1, 2015
2015 || flaglive.com
flaglive.com
15
15
Narrow Chimney Reading Series
co-founder James Jay pours a shot of Paddy Irish Whiskey
at the Viola Award-winning literary event, which returns
Mon, March 30 after a two-week hiatus. Courtesy photo.
Molly Wood hosts the Poet’s Den at the Wine
Loft every second and fourth Sunday of the
month. Photo by Taylor Mahoney
others—the long-running and original night of
poetry-as-performance Flagstaff Poetry Slam; the
noncompetitive cousin to the Slam, Barley Rhymes;
and the Narrow Chimney Reading Series. And it’s
the latter that has put an added spotlight onto the
literary event scene, as it won the Viola Award for
Excellence in Storytelling earlier this month.
Barley is growing
The now-award-winning Narrow Chimney
Reading Series started a little less than two years
A Narrow Chimney reader who came in March,
Tara Ison, has three published novels—one a finalist
for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. She also is
a screenwriter. She recently released the memoir
Reeling Through Life: How I learned to Live and Die at
the Movies.
Ison shared part of the essay from that book
titled, How to Be Lolita: The Schoolgirl, the Nymphet,
the Muse, and the Inexorable Ticking Clock. She
related stories of films against dark moments
of her own childhood, such as an uncomfortable
ago and quickly evolved into a Monday night staple
at Uptown Pubhouse. Uptown is no stranger to
mixing literature and libations, as it has hosted
annual Great Gatsby nights and Robert Burns’
encounter with an adult cousin when she was 12.
Jay says that Narrow Chimney is becoming
one part of a bigger movement in Flagstaff to host
top-notch literary evenings in various downtown
being a kind of merry prankster of the evening.
Keirsey helped bring the evening together with
thoughtful toasts and encouraging words.
“My co-founder, Kalif Durham, and I created
created. Ryan has handled that poem and it has
been hilarious … We also want to bring in music. To
us, music is just a form of poetry with instruments,
and we want to give a chance to support different
poetry readings, among other notable salutes.
But Narrow Chimney caught fire as a standing
literary happening (though it takes breaks when the
university is out).
venues. He believes it helps that all of them are
considering the experience of the crowd as much
as the author or reader who gets time in the
spotlight.
Barley Rhymes because the only other poetry
event in the city (at the time) was Flag Slam and
we wanted an event that was a non-competitive
outlet for creative expression,” Keirsey says. “I
artists to come out and show their work.”
Barley Rhymes takes place the first and third
Sunday at 8 p.m. and draws 25 to 35 people on a
typical night. Special events, such as their recent
A typical night pairs a creative writing
student or emerging writer with an established
author. Recently, Narrow Chimney brought Eddie
Chuculate, who is an O. Henry Prize-winning
“The quality of the work that we’re seeing
at these things is really picking up,” Jay says. “And
you have to take good care of the audience and
make sure they get a good show. If the people in
think that collaborating, promoting each other,
and sharing audiences created an exciting
community. Many of our regulars were people
who just happened to be getting a beer while
second anniversary, have pulled in north of 80
attendees. Durham also says he is pursuing a
possible happy-hour version of Barley Rhymes as
well as something he calls “Poet Unplugged,” that
author and the kind of name one associates
with a big book festival appearance or university
lecture hall. Instead, organizers Jesse Sensibar
and James Jay have used their connections
the audience have a good time, they are inclined to
come back and the event grows from there.”
Sensibar adds, “All of these events we have
going now are distinct from each other … I think
Barley Rhymes was happening. Many stated that
they never knew that poetry could be so engaging
and moving.”
Barley Rhymes has since moved to the State
is tentatively slated to happen on the third Tuesday
of every month and will spotlight a local poet.
to help bring out some great names to the
microphone and mix them in with the lineup.
they all feed each other but in some ways they all
have a different feel.”
Bar, a few doors down from Flag Slam’s location at
Firecreek Coffee Co., and is now hosted by Ryan
Poet’s Den is one of the newest literary
events. It featured its first event in December
Chimney is smoking
16
16 flaglive.com | March 26–April 1, 2015
Around the time Narrow Chimney started,
Kalif Durham and Ian Keirsey partnered to
launch Barley Rhymes, initially at Hops on Birch
downtown. Barley Rhymes was designed as a
distinctly different approach from poetry slam’s
judging and competitive nature, but with some of
the fun vibe that comes with that kind of poetic
event.
The two organizers also lent their
personalities to the evening, with Durham
Smalley and Davy Latour, who have been regulars
on the literary scene with their involvement in
Flagstaff Poetry Slam and appearances at Barley
Rhymes. Durham and Keirsey, however, remain
involved behind the scenes.
“Ryan and I both adore the traditions that
have been carried on with Barley Rhymes and we
look to continue those,” Latour says. “We’ll still
have the toast and we have been carrying on what
they called the ‘dada’ poem, where everyone writes
down a word on a piece of paper to have a poem
Den and denizens
Good drinks and good literature
highlight Flagstaff’s bustling literary scene.
Photo by Cameron Clark
Barley Rhymes co-founders Kalif Durham
(left) and Ian Keirsey. Courtesy photo
and has, on the second and fourth Sunday
of every month at 7:30 p.m., hosted a night
that circled around one established or iconic
poet, such as E. E. Cummings, Pablo Neruda,
T.S. Eliot or the aforementioned Oliver. At the
next event, April 12, Wood says it will be all
about the beat poets. The night is also open to
people reading other poems that inspire them
or sharing original work.
“Poet’s Den was a conceptual idea that
came to me,” Wood says. “I was having a mild
alternate with Barley Rhymes’ first and third
Sundays. It gives lit lovers something to do
every Sunday, save months with a fifth Sunday.
Though Barley Rhymes is going to experiment
with a fifth Sunday event this week.
The new event jumps into an arena that
has long hosted and celebrated Flagstaff
Poetry Slam. Now in its 15th season, it is
emceed by John Quinonez, who goes by the
stage name John Q. The slams take place every
Wednesday at 7 p.m. at Firecreek Coffee Co. on
themselves in a form that falls between
literature and performance. Quinonez said
that Slam often becomes an entry point into
literary arts.
Flagstaff Poetry Slam has kept its loyal
following and readers going for a number
of years, variations and venues. What is of
major note is that John Q’s connections in the
Slam world and his campaigning have led to
getting Flagstaff designated as the location
of the 2016 Individual World Poetry Slam.
anyone who is looking for literary news or
happening locally should like it on Facebook.
“I’m spearheading Flagstaff Literary
Mainframe,” Quinonez says. “It’s something
we’ve all talked about directly because want
to support and empower each other … We’ve
been able to come together. We all have our
specific mission statements and they don’t
combat with each other. We’re building this
movement together.”
To check out two of these events this
emotional crisis and I was on a road trip in
Colorado … I was reading these different
poems at the time and my thought was that
everyone should hear them.”
Wood, who attended Northern Arizona
University and who has lived in Flagstaff on
and off for about seven years, learned from
a friend that the Wine Loft was interested in
hosting some kind of poetry event. And from
there, Poet’s Den took off.
“With the first Poet’s Den, I thought
there’d be me and maybe five or six of my
friends,” she says. “But we had a great turnout
… and there are 25 to 30 and as many as 40
people who show up [for the events].”
Although Poet’s Den is the newbie
on the scene, it has been embraced by the
other standing literary events, and is built to
Route 66. It’s the local affiliate of Poetry Slam,
Inc., the national-level nonprofit that supports
live poetry performances.
“I think Slam from the beginning—in
making it competitive and making poetry headto-head and getting the crowd involved—has let
people know that poetry can be fun,” Quinonez
says. “It gets people excited about it.”
Slam poetry functions as a juried kind of
event, where the readers attempt to bring to
life in passionate performances their verse
and are judged on their abilities. The goal is
to work toward each local Slam cultivating
a five-member team to send to a national
competition.
Nationally and internationally, slam
poetry has grown into a major movement that
attracts people by the thousands to express
This major literary event will take place in
October of next year and will involve the 72
best slam poets going head to head. It also
will bring auxiliary events, such as a Nerd Slam
and what’s known as the Haiku Death Match,
according to Quinonez.
Adding to that momentum, Jay is working
to reboot the Northern Arizona Book Festival,
which has been on hiatus. He is hoping to have
it in September or October of this year. Also,
his Narrow Chimney is releasing a published
anthology of presenting authors, Narrow
Chimney Reader: Vol. 1, that brings a tangible
element to the local lit scene.
As all this blows up, Quinonez says he’s
working to build a stronger network with
all things poetic and literary in Flagstaff.
It’s called Flagstaff Literary Mainframe, and
week, Barley Rhymes is hosting a special “fifth
Sunday” event at 8 p.m. on Sun, March 29 at
the State Bar, 10 E. Rte. 66. 266-1282. It’s
free and the theme is comic. The hosts invite
people to share their funny poems or literary
readings. On Mon, March 30, Narrow Chimney
returns after a two-week break to bring Laura
Walker, James Winnett and Shannon Cowell,
who are all emerging writers. The anthology
release party happens afterward. It takes place
at Uptown Pubhouse, 114. N. Leroux. 773-0551.
For more info, check out all of these downtown
literary events on Facebook.
Editor’s note: As a point of disclosure, Seth
Muller has read at three of the four literary events
and has advised and worked on various literary
goings on in town.
March 26–April
26–April 1,
1, 2015
2015 || flaglive.com
flaglive.com
March
17
17
CHOW
BY WILLIE CROSS
Fare and square
Café Daily Fare’s story of success is the story of America’s success
T
he definition of the American dream is changing. What used
to be perceived simply as the land of freedom and opportunity is being revised to include the characterizations of the
21st century. The diversity and difficulties of the first 15 years
of the new century have brought failure and misery to some, but
growth and evolution for others.
We may find the stories of success and failure, both big
and small, on so-called “Main Street USA.” For all intents and
purposes, the success story in this article is just off of Main
Street. Actually, it’s a restaurant on the Eastern edge of the
downtown footprint.
Café Daily Fare, nestled behind the Babbitt pre-owned
vehicles building off of Route 66, has established itself as a
Flagstaff institution through delicious, quality food, and a hardy,
progressive approach to business.
Owners Nancy McCulla and John Duffy are both modestly
spoken, hard working people dedicated to their craft. McCulla
attended school at NAU and decided to set down roots in Flagstaff to grow her prowess in the catering business. As with all
talented cooks and chefs, the time eventually came for McCulla
to open a business on her own terms.
In a recent interview with Flag Live, McCulla and Duffy recall
the experience of finding a place to set up shop. “I had been
spending half of my life in white-walled rooms with fluorescent
lights,” McCulla says. “My two stipulations were that I needed
trees and I need natural light.”
They purchased what was once a foundry and set out to the
daunting task of remodeling the place. They now own a little over
half of the building, providing an ideal base of operations for all
their business endeavors. They even utilize the fauna around their
building. “We harvest the acorns from the trees outside and grind
them into flour for cookies and pie crusts,” Duffy says.
Their business was originally a full-service catering company
called Simply Delicious. Positioned at the boom of the early
2000s, their catering business was a great success. But what
loomed on the horizon was the hardship that would define what
it meant for them to adapt.
In the financial crisis of the later 2000s, Simply Delicious
keenly found ways to adapt and grow. They pared down their
full-service catering to something much more simple and affordable, and called it Daily Fare. Duffy recalls, “We did this around
the time that the crash hit when all the high-end stuff vanished
for everyone.” Instead of all the more luxurious aspects of catering, Daily Fare became a drop-catering service. “We were just
doing the right thing at the right time, and then a year later
everyone with a car is delivering food,” he continues.
When their food began to resonate with everyone that
sought out the Daily Fare catering service, they decided to turn
an underutilized space in their building into a grab-and-go café.
McCulla, the mastermind behind the food at Simply Delicious
18
flaglive.com | March 26–April 1, 2015
Nancy McCulla, Café Daily Fare co-owner and head chef, follows her philosophy “keep it simple, keep it delicious” as she prepares a dish.
Photos by Taylor Mahoney
and Daily Fare, seized the opportunity to let her creativity in the
kitchen run wild.
The result is extraordinary menu items and a range of
daily specials that have modest roots but remarkable flavors
and presentation. McCulla describes her process as a balance of
both method and character. If she considers including fish for a
dish, she’ll immediately also consider whether that fish can be
included sustainably.
“Keep it simple, keep it delicious,” McCulla says. This philosophy carries over into the essential legacy of cooking: comfort. “Our
food evokes the sentiment of a time when food was simple, like
when their grandma or whoever made it for them,” Duffy adds.
McCulla works some of her very own magic on the food, but
she also keeps the tried and true methods of cooking in her back
pocket. She does so by subtly building flavors and textures with
patience and care.
The charming and newly renovated interior of Café Daily Fare.
CHOW
NORTHERN ARIZONA'S
MAGAZINE
The simple exterior of Café Daily Fare and accompanying catering shop, Simply Delicious.
“Our pork butt is a five day process,” she
says. “Trimming it, brining it for three days,
making chili sauce with real chilis.” The result
is a complex but evocative journey through
pork, spiciness and saltiness. They also process
their own foods in order to ensure that their
menu staples are available throughout the
year. “We have chilis until next fall,” McCulla
says, laughing.
To say that Café Daily Fare’s menu
is seasonal is shortchanging the thought
and care that go into writing it. McCulla’s
specials could be better described as
being based on mood. “Around the holidays people have way too much sugar, so
we bring in some Asian flare. Lemongrass,
shrimp, something light.” She embraces
salads and grilled meats in the summer,
and will plan on cooking hearty beef
bourguignon if a snowstorm is approaching in the winter.
Other staples include the incredibly popular Blackberry Duck Tacos. The delicate yet
intense dish is served with a habanero aioli and
Fossil Creek goat cheese to temper the heat.
Daily Fare’s salads also are particularly unique.
The flavors in the black bean salad and the quinoa salad, among others, are unexpected and
entirely welcome.
McCulla and Duffy also adapted their
business to the evolving professional scene in
Flagstaff. They acknowledge that not everyone
coming in for lunch will want to sit and chat for
hours at a time, and are open with call-ahead
orders. They also offer a take out version of
the Daily Fare menu that allows the busiest of
professionals to get in and out.
The hope of any small business is that the
product they’re offering is more than reason
enough to stay open. With the recent financial
crash in the United States, businesses had
to fight even harder to survive. McCulla and
Duffy and the crew at Simply Delicious and
Café Daily Fare saw the opportunity to adapt
and grow their business, and were able to continue offering delicious food to anyone willing
to experience it.
They were even able to grow during the
financial crisis, and recently completed renovations on their dining room. Their space on the
edge of downtown is beautiful and food is wholesome and lovingly crafted. There isn’t much else
that one can ask for in a dining experience.
Café Daily Fare, 408 E. Rte. 66, is open
Mon–Sat from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and is closed
on Sundays. To learn more, call them directly at
774-2855 or visit www.simplydeliciousflagstaff.
com.
NOW AVAILABLE AT
SELECT LOCATIONS
Look for us at:
Bookmans Entertainment Exchange,
Macy’s European Coffee House, Whole Foods,
Beaver Street Brewery, the green racks downtown
and many other convenient spots.
Annual Subscriptions at www.namlm.com
March 26–April 1, 2015 | flaglive.com
19
REARVIEW
Get stoked
with
Indict the system
An exciting democracy
movement arises in Chicago
C
hicago! City of broad shoulders. Plutocratic hog butcher. Tool maker for progressive change. Stacker of the wheat
of grassroots power—wheat separated from
the chaff of corporate politicians. Stormy,
husky, brawling. Planning, building, breaking, rebuilding. Under its wrist is the pulse
and under its ribs is the heart of the people.
Laughing! Proud to be hog butcher, tool
maker, stacker of wheat.
Apologies to Carl Sandburg for my
butchering of his 1914 poetic paean to
the rise of this colossus of a working-class
city—but I see a promising new movement
of broad-shouldered populist change for
all of America arising today from the heart
of Chicago’s workaday people. Under the
banner of “Reclaim Chicago,” a dynamic,
politically-savvy progressive coalition has
emerged, engaging thousands of grassroots
Chicagoans in a people-led democratic movement to reclaim their city from the cabal of
corporate elites and corrupt politicians now
reigning over them.
These are not just mad-as-hell ranters,
but mad-as-hellers with a bold agenda for
moving their city toward fairness and justice
for all. They’re mad-as-hellers who have a
By Jim
Hightower
shared vision; a long term plan; a democratic organizational framework; a range
of trainers to provide movement skills and
tools for all involved; a network for developing, electing and holding accountable
their own office holders; and—most importantly—both a strong sense of purpose
and an energizing sense of fun. After all,
battling the bastards is about as much fun
as you can have with your clothes on!
Reclaim Chicago is not merely an
election apparatus, but a democracy movement—building a permanent progressive
majority that functions year-‘round, year
after year, so the people truly can become
self-governing. Tune in to these democracy
builders at www.reclaimchicago.org.
Jim Hightower is a best-selling author,
radio commentator, nationally syndicated
columnist and editor of The Hightower
Lowdown, a populist political newsletter. He
has spent the past four decades battling the
Powers That Be on behalf of the Powers that
ought-to-be: consumers, working families,
small businesses, environmentalists and justplain-folks. For more of his work, visit www.
jimhightower.com.
FLAGLIVE.COM
I’m finally trading in my supped up ’77 El
Camino with the 350 4-barrel V8 for a
Toyota Prius. It’s a hybrid electric that
also can run on fair-trade quinoa.
Celebrating April Fool’s Day
since 1994. Sorry about that.
20 flaglive.com | March 26–April 1, 2015
REARVIEW
The Clean Palate
By Cameron Gray
W
A pirate’s life
hen I was a kid, I had awful ADD.
I still do, but now I view it as my
superpower. It allows me to do
what I do. I can write this article, talk to
people, juggle three other tasks, and you
would never know if I didn’t tell you. ADD
is awesome, but it’s something that has
taken time to learn to work with. I, like so
many of my colleagues, have something like
this that makes the routine cubicle job near
impossible. Fortunately we have an outlet
that we can work within and still be functioning members of society.
I know now that many of the people
who work in the kitchen will rarely ever
have a desk job. If they do, they probably
didn’t do that great in the kitchen to begin
with. It takes a certain type of individual.
It takes a strong work ethic, attention to
detail, the ability to work as a crew and
be neat and tidy along the way. A cool
and level head through overwhelming
stress, noise and clatter will take you far in
the kitchen.
The professional kitchen is an interesting place. I have always regarded the
kitchen as an unruly pirate ship, and I am
their fierce but loyal pirate captain. The
kitchen is a testosterone pit that never
really seems all that professional. It will
build you up and break you down. We are
a merry crew of criminals and rejects, the
addicted and the lost. Mark, one of my
former chefs told me that “the kitchen is
like the army: you only get what you put
into it.”
Mark is a wise man, Chicago born
and raised. His story is all too common.
Lost and found, burnt down and rebuilt,
with scars and stories from a long road of
debauchery. He was the first chef I ever
worked under. I was young, naive and trusting, but nevertheless, Mark took me under
his wing. We connected over music: the
Spencer Davis Group, Gary Clark Jr., Alison
Krauss and Crash Test Dummies. I remember asking if Mark, who was in his late 30s
at the time, had ever seen the Beatles live.
That became a joke amongst the crew
for a few months. I was so far away from
home with no friends or family, and his
crew took me in and teased me enough
to make me feel like family. It’s hard
when you first start out. You make so
many mistakes and have so much to learn.
The crew is your team and if you let them
down, it feels like heartbreak. Mark was
full of wisdom, he still is.
I was the only intern out of five that
survived that summer. I was the only one
who didn’t come from culinary school or
have experience in a professional kitchen.
I was the only intern that kept their
mouth shut (for the most part). I truly
worked for the first time in my life. I was
terrified of something being thrown at
me, or being screamed at from across the
kitchen. It was work. That summer taught
me some of the most valuable lessons
I would ever learn. I took responsibility
for myself and my actions, attempting to
prove myself. I became part of their team.
That was just the start of my kitchen
career. It was the kick in the butt I
needed, just like boot camp. The kitchen
is like the military in so many regards,
but it’s more like a pirate military. When
you sign up you better be ready to work,
and work you will, or you will walk the
plank! We deal with high staff turnover,
high inventory turnover, managing many
types of personality disorders, low wages,
strung out line cooks, keeping a close
eye on finances for red flags of theft and
nonexistent profit margins. I thank almost
every attribute that I have in my skill set
to my mentors and my chefs. But at the
end of the day, I made the decision to get
out of bed and step back into that fire. I
am a fierce competitor and I will never be
out-worked. “Yo-ho-ho and a kitchen’s life
for me.”
Cameron Gray is a local private chef,
culinary instructor and food entrepreneur.
Northern Arizona’s Daily Event Listings
VARIOUS EVENTS | THU 3.26
Coconino Center for the Arts:
Youth Celebrate Art and Culture Exhibition. Monthlong celebration of youth art in Flag. Second annual
Chairs for Change sale in the Jewel Box Gallery.
Both run through April 4. Gallery hours are Tue-Sat,
11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free to the public. All ages. 2300 N. Ft.
Valley Road. 779-2300
Downtown Flagstaff:
Flagstaff Eats. Walking food tours in downtown Flag.
Two-and-a-half hours of walking and sampling food
from seven different restaurants. Tours offered
every weekend Thursday through Sunday. $40 per
person. Sign up on www.flagstaffeats.com. 213-9233
Flagstaff Federated Community Church:
Continuing Taoist tai chi and beginner class. Every
Thursday. 5:30-7:30p.m. [email protected] 400
W Aspen. 288-2207
Flagstaff Federated Community Church:
Weekly Mindfulness Meditation every Thursday.
Room 24 upstairs. 6:30 p.m. instruction, 7-8:30 p.m.
sitting and walking meditation. 8:30 p.m. discussion.
Come and go anytime. Free and open to all. 400 W.
Aspen. 774-7383
Grand Canyon Dinner Theatre and Steakhouse:
Nightly performances. www.grandcanyondinnertheatre.com. 7 p.m. Tusayan. (928) 638-0333
Human Nature Dance Theatre and Studio:
Individualized kung fu instruction in xingyi, bagua
and taji. Every Thursday. 6-8 p.m. www.flagstaffkungfu.com. 4 W. Phoenix. 777-5858
Joe C Montoya Community and Senior Center:
Hour-long small group guitar classes. Ages 16 and
up. Three sessions every Thursday from 2-5 p.m.
Flexible format, multiple styles. $5 per class or $20
for five classes, and $3 materials. 245 N Thorpe.
(505) 614-6706
Lumberyard Brewing Co.:
Trivia night. Sign up begins at 7 p.m. Seating at 9 p.m.
and the game starts at 9:30 p.m. Grand Prize is $30
off tab. Free. 10 p.m. 5 S. San Francisco. 779-2739
Mary D. Fisher Theatre:
Film screening. Rendezvous with French Cinema:
Hippocrates. 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. $12, $9 for Sedona
Film Fest members. 2030 W. Hwy 89A. Sedona. (928)
282-1177
The Museum Club:
Shadows Benefit Comedy Night. Featuring Mark
Cordes and Boomer Nichols. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.,
show starts at 7 p.m. $10. 3404 E. Rte. 66. 526-9434
The Museum Club:
Line dance lessons. Every Tuesday and Thursday
night from 6-7 p.m. $3. 3404 E. Rte. 66. 526-9434
The Museum Club:
Flagstaff Swing Dance Club presents dance lessons
every Thursday night from 7-8 p.m. Different dance
style taught each month. 3404 E. Rte. 66. 526-9434
Museum of Northern Arizona:
The Slide Fire Story: A Photographic Tribute to Oak
Creek Canyon. Through May 25 in the Donald W.
Waddell Special Exhibits Gallery. Museum hours are
Mon-Sat, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday, noon-5 p.m.
General admission to the Museum is $10 for adults,
$9 for seniors, $7 for students, $6 for youth while
children 10 and under are free. 3101 N. Ft. Valley
Road. 774-5213
Orpheum Theater:
PRISM presents: Drag Me to the Red Carpet. Doors
open at 7 p.m., show starts at 8 p.m. $8 in advance,
$9 the day of the show. All ages. 15 W. Aspen.
556-1580
Porky’s Pub:
Partnered dance night. Featuring salsa, zouk, West
Coast swing, East Coast swing, kizomba, bachata and
more. Hosted by Flagstaff Latin Dance Collective and
Grand Canyon Salsa Festival. Every Thursday. 9 p.m.midnight. Free. 2285 E. Butler. 774-1011
Red Rock State Park:
Guided nature walk at 10 a.m. Guest speaker or a
ranger/naturalist gives a 45-minute talk at 2 p.m.
Park is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. $10 per vehicle. 4050
Lower Red Rock Loop. Sedona. (928) 282-6907
MARCH 26–APRIL 1, 2015
Riles Building:
Culpable. A new installation by Flag artist Shawn
Skabelund. Commissioned by the Martin-Spring
Institute. Runs through the NAU spring semester.
Third floor. Building #15 on the NAU campus.
523-2464
Sedona Arts Center:
60 Years of Chasing Life. Artwork by Adele Seronde.
Runs through March 31. Gallery open 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
daily. 15 Art Barn Road. Sedona. (928) 282-3865
Simply Spiritual Healing:
Thursday night meditation. Every Thursday. 6-7 p.m.
$20. All are invited. 105 E. Birch. 779-6322
State Bar:
Featuring the work of photographer James Kao.
Runs through March 31. 5 p.m. Free. 10 E. Rte. 66.
226-1282
West of the Moon Gallery:
Featuring the work of George Averbeck, Shonto
Begay, Carol Benally, Dave Edwards, Robin Cadigan,
Holly Gramm, Joni Pevarnik and many more. 14 N.
San Francisco. 774-0465
MUSIC EVENTS | THU 3.26
The Green Room:
The Main Squeeze with the Crocodile Brothers and
Just Joe. 7 p.m. Free. 15 N. Agassiz. 226-8669
Hops on Birch:
Marcos Ayala. 9 p.m. Free. 22 E. Birch. 774-4011
Main Stage Theater:
Acoustic Happy Hour with Cheap Sunglasses. 4 p.m.
In House Dart League and Pool Tournament. 6 p.m.
Free. 1 S. Main St. Cottonwood. (928) 202-3460
Mia’s Lounge:
Luke Sweeney and the Wind Burial. Indie. 9 p.m. Free.
26 S. San Francisco. 774-3315
Monte Vista Lounge:
Karaoke with Ricky Bill. 9 p.m. Free. 100 N. San
Francisco. 779-6971
Old Town Center for the Arts:
Live at Studio B. Featuring Gary Simpkins. Doors
open at 6:30 p.m., show starts at 7 p.m. $10 at the
door. Every second and fourth Thursday with a
new artist. 633 N. 5th Street. Cottonwood. (928)
634-0940
Raven Café:
The Fiddle Doctor Medicine Show. 8 p.m. Free. 142 N.
Cortez. Prescott. (928) 717-0009
Sound Bites Grill:
Flor De Bee. Featuring Susannah Martin and Vincent
Z. 6-9 p.m. Free. 101 N. State Rte. 89A. Sedona. (928)
282-2713
State Bar:
Charles Johnson. Blues rock. 7-10 p.m. Free. 10 E.
Rte. 66. 226-1282
Tinderbox Annex:
Raoul Ventura. 7-9 p.m. 34 S. San Francisco. 226-8400
VARIOUS EVENTS | FRI 3.27
Doris Harper-White Community Playhouse:
Theatrikos Theatre Co. presents: Funny Money.
Performances Sat and Sun 7:30 p.m. and 2 p.m.
on Sun. Play runs through April 12. $12-$19. 11 W.
Cherry. www.theatrikos.com. 774-1662
Episcopal Church of the Epiphany:
Taoist tai chi. Every Friday. 9-10:30 a.m. [email protected]
taoist.org. 423 N. Beaver. 774-2911
Flagstaff Elk’s Lodge:
Weekly all-you-can-eat Fish Fry. Fish fry begins at
6 p.m. and bingo starts at 7 p.m. $10. Must be 18 or
older to participate in bingo. All proceeds benefit
Elks Children Charities. Every Friday. 2101 N. San
Francisco. 774-6271
Pulse continued on page 22
March 26–April 1, 2015 | flaglive.com
21
Pulse continued from page 21
VARIOUS EVENTS | FRI 3.27
Heritage Square:
Lights Out Flagstaff Kickoff Party. 7-9:30 p.m. From
8-9 p.m. take a free shuttle from the Square to
Buffalo Park. Along the way Jeff Hall, director of
Lowell Observatory, will point out dark-sky friendly
light fixtures in the Flagstaff community and a
ranger from the National Park Service will provide
a constellation program. Return service back to
Heritage Square provided. Downtown Flagstaff on
Aspen between Leroux and San Francisco.
Mary D. Fisher Theatre:
Film screening: Timbuktu. 4 p.m. Fri and Sat; 7 p.m.
Tue. $12, $9 for Sedona Film Fest members. 2030 W.
Hwy 89A. Sedona. (928) 282-1177
Mary D. Fisher Theatre:
“Around the World in a Bad Mood: Confessions of a
Flight Attendant.” Featuring renowned author and
entertainer Rene Foss. Performances Fri and Sat at
7 p.m. and 2 p.m. on Sun. $15, $13 for Sedona Film
Fest members. All tickets include a meet-and-greet
with Foss after the show. 2030 W. Hwy 89A. Sedona.
(928) 282-1177
MUSIC EVENTS | FRI 3.27
Altitudes Bar and Grill:
Ricky Ray and Mr. Biscuit. 7-10 p.m. 2 S. Beaver.
214-8218
Coconino Center for the Arts:
New West Guitar Group. Acoustic jazz, Americana,
rock and folk from L.A. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.,
show starts at 7:30 p.m. $18. www.flagartscouncil.
org. All ages. 2300 N. Ft. Valley Road. 779-2300
Cuveé 928:
Viola and the Brakemen. Americana from Flag.
8:30 p.m. Free. 6 E. Aspen. 214-9463
The Gopher Hole:
Dark Skies. New wave, post punk, goth, deep disco and
synthescapes. 9:30 p.m. Free. 23 N. Leroux. 774-2731
The Green Room:
Blockhead. Renowned hip-hop producer from New
York City. Opener Arms and Sleepers. 8 p.m. $10
in advance, $12 the day of the show. 15 N. Agassiz.
226-8669
Hops on Birch:
Duane Mark with Reverend Red. 9 p.m. Free. 22 E.
Birch. 774-4011
Main Stage Theater:
Acoustic Happy Hour with Mike Morris. 4-7 p.m. Free.
DJ CleanKut. 9 p.m. Free. 1 S. Main St. Cottonwood.
(928) 202-3460
Mia’s Lounge:
Velovalo. Rock. 9 p.m. Free. 26 S. San Francisco.
774-3315
Monte Vista Lounge:
Moonlight Howlers. Rockabilly from Williams.
9:30 p.m. Free. 100 N. San Francisco. 779-6971
The Museum Club:
Von Cotton. 9 p.m. $5. 3404 E. Rte. 66. 526-9434
Oak Creek Brewing Co.:
The Naughty Bits! 8 p.m. Free. 2050 Yavapai Drive.
Sedona. (928) 204-1300
Orpheum Theater:
Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band. Funk from Asheville,
N.C. Doors open at 8 p.m., show starts at 9 p.m. $10
in advance, $12 the day of the show. All ages. 15 W.
Aspen. 556-1580
Raven Café:
Pat Beary Band. 8 p.m. Free. 142 N. Cortez. Prescott.
(928) 717-0009
State Bar:
Texola. Jazz blues. 8-11 p.m. Free. 10 E. Rte. 66.
226-1282
VARIOUS EVENTS | SAT 3.28
NAU Central Quad:
Lights Out Flagstaff. Earth Hour celebration.
Activities include long exposure photography, live
music and more. 8:30-9:30 p.m. Free. NAU campus.
22
flaglive.com | March 26–April 1, 2015
March 26–aPrIL 1, 2015
Coconino Center for the Arts:
Origin of the Seasons. New play featuring six FALA
Advanced Acting students. Directed by FALA playwright-in-residence Kathleen Jones. Performances
Sat at 7 p.m. and 3 p.m. on Sun. $5 students, $10
adults. All ages. 2300 N. Ft. Valley Road. 779-2300
Doris harper-White community Playhouse:
Theatrikos Theatre Co. presents: Funny Money.
Performances Sat and Sun 7:30 p.m. and 2 p.m.
on Sun. Play runs through April 12. $12-$19. 11 W.
Cherry. www.theatrikos.com. 774-1662
Flagstaff Recreation Center:
Zumba class. Every Saturday at 10:30 a.m. $5. 2403 N.
Izabel. 779-1468
Galaxy Diner:
Swing Dance Club every Saturday. Lessons from
7-10 p.m. Free. 931 E. Historic Rte. 66. 774-2466
James cullen Park:
Continuing Taoist tai chi. Every Saturday 9-10:30 a.m.
[email protected] Bonito/Hopi and Apache.
288-2207
Lowell Observatory:
Lights Out Flagstaff. Free admission. 5-10 p.m. 1400
Mars Hill Road. 774-3358
Main Stage Theater:
Verde Valley Pride Drag Show. 9 p.m. $5. 1 S. Main St.
Cottonwood. (928) 202-3460
Mary D. Fisher Theatre:
Film screening: Timbuktu. 4 p.m. Sat; 7 p.m. Tue. $12,
$9 for Sedona Film Fest members. 2030 W. Hwy 89A.
Sedona. (928) 282-1177
Mary D. Fisher Theatre:
“Around the World in a Bad Mood: Confessions of a
Flight Attendant.” Featuring renowned author and
entertainer Rene Foss. Performances Sat at 7 p.m.
and 2 p.m. on Sun. $15, $13 for Sedona Film Fest
members. All tickets include a meet-and-greet with
Foss after the show. 2030 W. Hwy 89A. Sedona. (928)
282-1177
Murdoch Community Center:
Zumba class. Every Saturday at 9 p.m. $5. 203 E.
Brannen. 226-7566
red rock State Park:
Saturday and Wednesday daily bird walks. 7 a.m. Park
is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. $10 per vehicle. 4050 Lower
Red Rock Loop. Sedona. (928) 282-6907
Shuvani Studio:
Monthly Soundscape Meditation. Crystal and brass
bowls with drums. Safe environment. Doors open
at 6 p.m., meditation runs from 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Donations accepted, but not required. Bring yoga
mat, pillow and blanket for comfort. Next to Mama
Burger, corner of Fort Valley Road and Humphreys
Street. (951) 781-9369
MUSIC EVENTS | SAT 3.28
Altitudes Bar and Grill:
Delta Blues Band. 7-10 p.m. 2 S. Beaver. 214-8218
Episcopal Church of the Epiphany:
The Flagstaff Threshold Choir. 3 p.m. Free. 423 N.
Beaver. 774-2911
Flagstaff Brewing Co.:
The Giving Tree Band. New age outlaw from Illinois.
Opener the Cerny Brothers. 10 p.m. 16 E. Rte. 66.
773-1442
The Gopher Hole:
Great Shapes. Indie dance rock from El Paso, Texas.
Planet Sandwich. ’90s groove rock from Flag.
9:30 p.m. Free. 23 N. Leroux. 774-2731
The Green Room:
Sol Seed with Kill Babylon Coalition and Young
Creatures. 8 p.m. Free. 15 N. Agassiz. 226-8669
Hops on Birch:
The Crocodile Brothers. 9 p.m. Free. 22 E. Birch.
774-4011
Mia’s Lounge:
The Sundowners with B. White. Folk. 9 p.m. Free. 26
S. San Francisco. 774-3315
Monte Vista Lounge:
Hey, Bucko! Country blues from Tucson. 9:30 p.m.
Free. 100 N. San Francisco. 779-6971
REARVIEW
The Write Now
The tight-wire of tension
A
t the beginning of the month we launched 13th call for entries for our monthly Flag
Live writing contest, The Write Now. It’s crazy to think that it’s already been one year
since first offering up this free-write, and in 12 goes of it, we’ve received a ton of
great work. This time, as we move into year two, the talent continues to roll in—we were
even trolled, though it was a weak attempt—and as is always the case, one winner came out
on top.
The contest was once again blind-judged by Flagstaff author Mary Sojourner, who also
gave us this prompt for writers to follow: “Begin with one character and use setting to tell us
something about her/him/yourself. The weather changes and two or more other characters
show up. Opening sentence: S/he/I hadn’t expected to have to wait so long.”
This month’s winner comes in from Bob Malone, to which Sojourner writes: “I was
hooked immediately, then carried along on a tight-wire of strong writing and tension. I won’t
give a spoiler, but there was a moment when I wanted to cheer.”
For newcomers to The Write Now, we’ll have our next prompt next week (the first
issue of every month). Typically, submissions should be received no later than 5 p.m. the
following Friday, but April happens to be a five week month, so we thought it a good idea to
extend the deadline a week (April 17 for our next round). Keep the good words coming. And
good luck!
She hadn’t expected to have to wait
so long. Where are they? She trembles
with fear as much as cold. The longer she
is on the property, the greater the likelihood of being caught. Any moment it will
start snowing, providing some cover, but
slowing the work. She shifts from foot to
foot in a futile effort to warm herself. The
cold penetrates her clothing; she might
have piled on more but chose to be light
and agile. Now standing idle she feels
exposed. She could begin without them,
but that is not in the plan they so painstakingly rehearsed … moreover, she lacks
the courage. Yet, she had confronted her
fear and volunteered as scout, scaling
the fence at dusk to arrive at her present
location, having left behind a trail of white
ribbons to guide the others. But they are
late. And she is out here in the dark …
cold and alone. It begins to snow.
Suddenly there are sounds from not
far away and she drops to the ground.
Her breathing quickens, heart pounding
against the cold, hard earth. Now there
are footsteps. Although chilled, sweat
wells up in her armpits. Struggling to
overcome panic, she reasons that if
caught now she can only be prosecuted
for trespass. She wills her flattened
body to merge with the earth and be
inconspicuous. Snowflakes fall on her
lifted face as she strains to visualize
the approaching figure, then utters an
audible sigh of relief as Anton appears.
She stands. Lauren and Evan emerge.
Barely acknowledging one another, she
leads them single file down the hill.
She stops at the fourth cage,
switches on her headlamp and inserts
the pry bar into the lock clasp. Snowflakes drift across the light beam. The
small animal inside shifts about, black
eyes gleaming. She leverages the bar,
the clasp gives, the door swings open.
She moves aside. The fox pauses at the
open door then leaps down and disappears into the swirling snow. Evan is
already at the next cage and she passes
on to another; afraid still, but elated
as a fox freed by her comrades dashes
away. However this night is to end, she
will have no regrets, and offer no apologies. All that matters now is to move
forward with speed and efficiency.
– Submitted by Bob Malone
Our Round 13 The Write Now Winner
March 26–aPrIL 1, 2015
The Museum Club:
Von Cotton. 9 p.m. $5. 3404 E. Rte. 66. 526-9434
Oak Creek Brewing Co.:
Original Recipe. 3-6 p.m. Free. Open mic with James
Turner at 8 p.m. 2050 Yavapai Drive. Sedona. (928)
204-1300
Old Town Center for the Arts:
Fifth Annual Old Town Blues Fest. Featuring the
Jim Glass Band, Old Town Blues Fest All-Star Band,
Mother Road Trio, JC and the Juke Rockers and
Sweet Baby Ray’s Back Porch Band. $20 in advance,
$25 at the door. 2-10 p.m. 633 N. 5th Street.
Cottonwood. (928) 634-0940
Raven Café:
Fallen Arrows. 8 p.m. Free. 142 N. Cortez. Prescott.
(928) 717-0009
The Spirit Room:
Sir Harrison. 2 p.m. Free. Patrolled by Radar. 9 p.m.
Free. 166 Main St. Jerome. (928) 634-8809
Tinderbox Annex:
Brian White. 7-9 p.m. 34 S. San Francisco. 226-8400
VARIOUS EVENTS | SUN 3.29
charly’s Pub & Grill:
The Playwright Café Series. Featuring Will Cordeiro.
Director Emily Vandevier will lead actors through
selections from Cordeiro’s four-part collection, The
Oblivion Suite. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., plays starts
at 6:30 p.m. $5 at the door. Weatherford Hotel. 23 N.
Leroux. 774-2731
Coconino Center for the Arts:
Origin of the Seasons. New play featuring six FALA
Advanced Acting students. Directed by FALA
playwright-in-residence Kathleen Jones. 3 p.m. $5
students, $10 adults. All ages. 2300 N. Ft. Valley
Road. 779-2300
Doris harper-White community Playhouse:
Theatrikos Theatre Co. presents: Funny Money.
Performances Sat and Sun 7:30 p.m. and 2 p.m.
on Sun. Play runs through April 12. $12-$19. 11 W.
Cherry. www.theatrikos.com. 774-1662
Canyon Dance Academy:
Flag Freemotion. Ballroom dance lessons and dancing every Sunday. Learn social and ballroom dancing.
5-7 p.m. No partner needed. $8, $5 for students.
853-6284. 2812 N. Izabel. 814-0157
Historic Brewing Co.:
Banjos, bikes and beer. Open mic every Sunday from
3-6 p.m. $3 pints for those who participate or ride
in on a bike. Brewery is open from 2-7 p.m. 4366 E.
Huntington Drive. 707-0900
Mary D. Fisher Theatre:
“Around the World in a Bad Mood: Confessions of a
Flight Attendant.” Featuring renowned author and
entertainer Rene Foss. 2 p.m. $15, $13 for Sedona
Film Fest members. All tickets include a meet-andgreet with Foss after the show. 2030 W. Hwy 89A.
Sedona. (928) 282-1177
Mary D. Fisher Theatre:
Film screening: Leviathan. 7 p.m. Sun and Mon; 4 p.m.
Tue. $12, $9 for Sedona Film Fest members. 2030 W.
Hwy 89A. Sedona. (928) 282-1177
Monte Vista Lounge:
Sunday Night Trivia with Savannah and Lindsay. Every
Sunday. 9 p.m. Free. 100 N. San Francisco. 779-6971
Shuvani Studio:
Flag Freemotion. Conscious movement/freestyle
dance. Moving meditation to dance-able music.
No experience required. Every Sunday. 10:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. Next to Mama Burger on the corner of
Fort Valley Road and Humphreys Street. 225-1845
State Bar:
Poetry Night hosted by Barley Rhymes. Every first
and third (and in March, fifth!) Sunday of the month.
8 p.m. signup at 7:30 p.m. Goes until 11 p.m. Free. 10
E. Rte. 66. 226-1282
Tranzend Studio:
Flagstaff Latin Dance Collective. Lessons: beginner
and all level fundamentals, technique and musicality. 7 p.m. Open dancing in main room with salsa,
bachata, merengue and cha cha; side room with zouk
and kizomba until 10 p.m. Every Sunday. $10 drop-in,
$8 for students. 417 W. Santa Fe. 814-2650
MUSIC EVENTS | SUN 3.29
1899 Bar and Grill:
Vincent Z. Acoustic world music. Every Sunday. 6:308:30 p.m. 307 W. Dupont. 523-1899
Flagstaff Brewing Co.:
Sunny and the Sweet B’s. 2-5 p.m. Fallen Arrows.
9 p.m. 16 E. Rte. 66. 773-1442
The Green room:
Karaoke. 8 p.m. Free. 15 N. Agassiz. 226-8669
Oak Creek Brewing Co.:
Alex Ogburn. 3-6 p.m. Free. 2050 Yavapai Drive.
Sedona. (928) 204-1300
The Spirit Room:
Rewired. Classic rock. 2 p.m. Free. 166 Main St.
Jerome. (928) 634-8809
VARIOUS EVENTS | MON 3.30
charly’s Pub & Grill:
Game night. 5-8 p.m. Free. 23 N. Leroux. 774-2731
Episcopal Church of the Epiphany:
Taoist tai chi. Every Monday. 10:30 a.m.-noon. [email protected] 423 N Beaver. 288-2207
Flagstaff Recreation Center:
Zumba class. Every Monday. 6 p.m. $5. 2403 N. Izabel.
779-1468
The Green room:
Weekly trivia night hosted by Martina. Every Monday.
6:30-8 p.m. Free. 15 N. Agassiz. 226-8669
Human Nature Dance Theatre and Studio:
Tango classes. Fundamentals: 6-6:30 p.m. $5. Figures
and Techniques: 6:30-7:30 p.m. $10. (Both classes for
dancers having completed a beginner dance series).
Practica: 7:30-9 p.m. Practica included in price of
class. 4 W. Phoenix. 773-0750
Mary D. Fisher Theatre:
Film screening: Leviathan. 7 p.m. Mon; 4 p.m. Tue.
$12, $9 for Sedona Film Fest members. 2030 W. Hwy
89A. Sedona. (928) 282-1177
Mary D. Fisher Theatre:
“Behind the Beautiful Forevers.” Live on the big
screen from the National Theatre of London. 4 p.m.
$15, $12.50 for Sedona Film Fest members. 2030 W.
Hwy 89A. Sedona. (928) 282-1177
Sacred Mountain Fighting and Healing Arts:
Self defense class. Every Monday. 6-7 p.m. $10. 202
S. San Francisco. 864-8707
The Wine Loft:
Bingo and Bubbles. Every Monday. 8-10:30 p.m. 17 N.
San Francisco. 773-9463
Uptown Pubhouse:
Narrow Chimney Reading Series. Featuring readings
by Laura Walker, James Winnett and Shannon
Cowell. Narrow Chimney will also celebrate the
release of their Narrow Chimney Reader: Vol. 1. For a
complete list of series authors, see Facebook. 7 p.m.
Free. 21 and over. 114 N. Leroux. 773-0551
MUSIC EVENTS | MON 3.30
Ashurst Hall:
Horizons Concert Series Presents: Renowned classical pianist Jeffrey Swann. 7:30 p.m. $20 for adults,
$12.50 for seniors and NAU faculty and staff. Free for
children ages 17 and under and NAU students with
an ID. Bldg 11 on the north NAU campus. Tickets at
www.nau.edu/cto. 523-5661
Campus Coffee Bean:
Open Mic night. Every Monday. 6-8 p.m. [email protected] 1800 S. Milton Road. 556-0660
The Green room:
Karaoke. 8 p.m. Free. 15 N. Agassiz. 226-8669
Hops on Birch:
Open mic night with Eric Hays. Every Monday.
8:30 p.m. sign-up. 9 p.m. start. 22 E. Birch. 774-4011
Main Stage Theater:
Karaoke Service Industry Night. 8 p.m. Free. 1 S. Main
St. Cottonwood. (928) 202-3460
Pulse continued on page 24
March 26–April 1, 2015 | flaglive.com
23
Pulse continued from page 23
MUSIC
‌
EVENTS | MON 3.30
The Museum Club:
Open mic night. Every Monday. 8 p.m. Free. Howlin’
Brothers. Midnight. Free. 3404 E. Rte. 66. 526-9434
Olde Sedona Bar and Grill:
Jam session/open mic every Monday. 9 p.m. 1405 W.
Hwy. 89A. Sedona. (928) 282-5670
The Patio:
Monday Night Blues. Featuring SammyMac, Ron
James, Roger Smith and Rich Bowen. 7 p.m. Free.
Every Monday. 409 S. San Francisco. 779-7033
VARIOUS
‌
EVENTS | TUE 3.31
Cline Library Assembly Hall:
NAU’s College of Arts and Letters Classic Film Series.
“Oscar Winning and Oscar Nominated Original
Screenplays.” Radio Days (1987). Directed by Woody
Allen. 7 p.m. Free. NAU campus. 523-8632
Firecreek Coffee Co.:
Speak Up: Bridging the gap between local people
and local politics. Forum for Flag residents to connect with local politics. 5 p.m. Free. Every Tuesday. 22
E. Rte. 66. 774-2266
Hops on Birch:
Trivia night with Eric Hays. Every Tuesday. 8:30 p.m.
sign-up. 9 p.m. start. 22 E. Birch. 774-4011
Liberal Arts Building:
Speaker: Harold Minuskin. Holocaust survivor and
author of “My Children, My Heroes: Memoirs of a
Holocaust Mother.” 6 p.m. Free and open to the
public. Room 136. North NAU campus. 523-8656
Mary D. Fisher Theatre:
Film screening: Leviathan. 4 p.m. Timbuktu. 7 p.m.
$12, $9 for Sedona Film Fest members. 2030 W. Hwy
89A. Sedona. (928) 282-1177
The Museum Club:
Line dance lessons. Every Tuesday. 6-7 p.m. $3. 3404
E. Rte. 66. 526-9434
Ponderosa High School:
Beginner Taoist tai chi. Every Tuesday 5:30-7 p.m.
Followed by continuing Taoist tai chi. Every Tuesday.
7-8:30 p.m. [email protected] 2384 N. Steves.
288-2207
Taala Hooghan Infoshop:
Dharma Punx meditation group every Tuesday.
8:15 p.m. 1700 N. 2nd St. www.taalahooghan.org
Temple of the Divine Mother:
Unplug and Recharge Meditation: Come join us
to unplug from stress and recharge your being by
learning moving, sound, & guided meditation. Every
2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month. Ongoing from
7-8:30 p.m. by donation.
MUSIC
‌
EVENTS | TUE 3.31
Your free ticket
to flagstaff
Firecreek Coffee Co.:
Open mic night. Every Tuesday. Signup at 6:30 p.m.,
7 p.m. show. All ages. 22 E. Rte. 66. 774-2266
The Green Room:
Honky Tonk Tuesdays. Featuring DJ MJ. Every
Tuesday. 8 p.m. Free. 15 N. Agassiz. 226-8669
Main Stage Theater:
Open mic with D.L. Harrison. 8-11 p.m. Free. 1 S. Main
St. Cottonwood. (928) 202-3460
Mia’s Lounge:
Jazz Jam. 9 p.m. Free. 26 S. San Francisco. 774-3315
Monte Vista Lounge:
Karaoke with Ricky Bill. 9 p.m. Free. 100 N. San
Francisco. 779-6971
Oak Creek Brewing Co.:
Drumz and Dance Party. Free. 6:30 p.m. 2050 Yavapai
Drive. Sedona. (928) 204-1300
The Patio:
Blues Tuesday with Larry Z. 7-10 p.m. Free. Every
Tuesday. 409 S. San Francisco. 779-7033
March 26–APRIL 1, 2015
VARIOUS
‌
EVENTS | WED 4.1
Charly’s Pub & Grill:
Team trivia. 7 p.m. 23 N. Leroux. 774-2731
Firecreek Coffee Co:
Poetry slam. Every Wednesday. Signup at 7 p.m.,
8 p.m. start. 22 E. Rte. 66. 774-2266
Flagstaff Recreation Center:
Zumba class. Every Wednesday. 7 p.m. $5. 2403 N.
Izabel. 779-1468
Jim’s Total Body Fitness:
Flagstaff Latin Dance Collective. Six week salsa
dance fundamentals. 6-7p.m. $15 drop in, $20 for
couples. Every Wednesday. www.latindancecollective.
com. 2150 N. 4th St. 814-2650
Liberal Arts Building:
The NAU International Film Series presents:
“Oppression and Liberation.” Film screening: The
Flat (Israel, 2011). Screening a new film every
Wednesday. 7 p.m. Free. Room 120. North NAU
campus. 523-8656
Lumberyard Brewing Co.:
Extreme Wednesdays. Showing extreme sports
videos. Free. 10 p.m. 5 S. San Francisco. 779-2739
Main Stage Theater:
In House Dart and Pool Leagues. 6 p.m. Free. 1 S.
Main St. Cottonwood. (928) 202-3460
Majerle’s Sports Grill:
Trivia night. Every Wednesday. 7 p.m. 102 W. Rte. 66.
774-6463
Mary D. Fisher Theatre:
“The Phantom of the Opera.” Encore presentation
celebrating the three-year anniversary of the Mary
D. Fisher Theatre. On the big screen from the Royal
Albert Hall in London. 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. $3. 2030 W.
Hwy 89A. Sedona. (928) 282-1177
Murdoch Community Center:
Zumba class. Every Wednesday at 5:30 p.m. $5. 203
E. Brannen. 226-7566
Museum of Northern Arizona:
Hot Topics Café. “The Value of Live Performance.” A
forum for civil discourse about issue of community
concern in conjunction with the SBS Compassion
Project and NAU’s Philosophy in the Public Interest.
6-7:30 p.m. Free. 3101 N. Ft. Valley Road. 774-5213
The Peaks:
Beginning ballroom dance lessons. 7-8:15 p.m. Every
Wednesday. Free. No partner needed. Different
dance starts each month and builds through the
month. Next to the Museum of Northern Arizona.
Held in the activity room. Dance calendar at www.
flagstaffdance.com. 3150 N. Winding Brook Road.
853-6284
Red Rock State Park:
Saturday and Wednesday daily bird walks. 7 a.m. Park
is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. $10 per vehicle. 4050 Lower
Red Rock Loop. Sedona. (928) 282-6907
State Bar:
Study Hall. Featuring a new Arizona wine maker and
brewer, tastings and Q&A every Wednesday. Drink
and learn. 6-8 p.m. 10 E. Rte. 66. 226-1282
MUSIC
‌
EVENTS | WED 4.1
The Green Room:
Soulective. DJs spinning funk, dance, hip-hop and
EDM. Every Wednesday. 8 p.m. Free 15 N. Agassiz.
226-8669
Mia’s Lounge:
Open mic night. 9 p.m. Free. 26 S. San Francisco.
774-3315
Monte Vista Lounge:
Johnny Lee Gowens. 9 p.m. Free. 100 N. San
Francisco. 779-6971
The Wine Loft:
Tony Norris. Singer, songwriter and storyteller from
Flag. 8 p.m. 17 N. San Francisco. 773-9463
To have an event included in the Pulse calendar e-mail [email protected] or mail info to Flagstaff Live, Attn:
Pulse Calendar Submissions, 1751 S. Thompson St., Flagstaff, AZ 86001. The deadline is every Friday by 5 p.m. for
the following week’s issue. All events are subject to change, subject to editing, and may have to be cut entirely due
to limited space in Flag Live. For more info, call 779-1877.
24 flaglive.com | March 26–April 1, 2015
COmICS
they’re bringing back
that weird X-Files show
about the FBI and aliens
and all that. I don’t get it.
And that David Duchovny
seems so weird to me.
Gillian Anderson comes
off a little chilly, too. I’ll
have to stay away
from that one.
Proudly presented by the staff at
May sweet, sweet Carol never
learn of my wild tryst with Gillian Anderson
back in the early ‘90s. We got into a role play
thing with her as Agent Scully. She would pretend that
she was a skeptic, basing her beliefs on scientific and
provable explanations rather than speculation. But as
our relationship progressed, she became more open
I just
to the possibility of paranormal happenings …
read about how
in my pants.
Larry
&Carol
March 26–April 1, 2015 | flaglive.com
25
Classifieds
ADOPTION
HOME IMPROVEMENT
ADOPT: Happily Married, Financially Secure Couple will LOVE & CHERISH your baby. Expenses
paid 1-800-562-8287 Christine & Charles
Huff Construction LLC All home improvement,
repairs, remodeling & additions. ROC #230591
928-242-4994
APPLIANCE REPAIR
HOUSE CLEANING
Appliance Repair in your home. Best in Flagstaff
w/23 yrs Exp & Insured. Call Russ @928-8631416
CHILD CARE
Hassle Free House Cleaning Detailed Reliable
Service. Lic & Ins Laura @ 928-226-0349
Custom to Your Home Cleaning! 16 yrs in Flagstaff. Supplies inc. Lory 928-607-9039
LANDSCAPING
Now Enrolling.Flagstaff Christian Preschool; Daily
Gymnastics, Spanish, Literature, Math; Certified
Teachers. 928-226-0696 Full/Part Time 2-5yrs
www.flagstaffchristianpreschool.com
Summer Camp. Best ever with two gymnastics
classes every day, daily Spanish, swimming, ice
skating, and exciting adventures. Flexible. www.
flagstaffgymnastics.com 928-226-0696
ALL-N-LANDSCAPING, Paver Patios, Walkways, Edgers, Decor. Stones, Planting, Clean-up,
Irrigation Main’t Free Est. Not a licensed
contractor Call Juan & [email protected] 928-526-2928.
Kikos Landscaping Pine Needles, Yard Clean-up
Francisco Valdez 928-221-9877 or 814-4787
message Not a licensed contractor
EQUIPMENT
LAWN CARE
Annual Equipment Service Special Service
most makes of Farm, Construction, & Lawn
Equipment Pick up/Delivery Available 774-1969
www.flagequip.com
Ramirez FIREWOOD FOR SALE Call 928310-0012
Aspen & Juniper Firewood For Sale. Ready to burn.
Call for info: 779-0581
HANDY PERSON
A&V Handyman Bobcat, Plumbing, Framing,
Painting, Electric, Roofing, Tile, Concrete
Driveways, Maintenance, Decks. Adrian 928607-9297 Not a licensed contractor
Father & Son Handyman Window Cleaning, Paint,
Plumbing, Floors, Shingles & Yard Cleaning.
Whatever You Want! 928-380-7021 Not a
Licensed Contractor
All Home Repair & Remodeling. (928)-310-9800.
Rough/finish carpentry, decks, drywall, stone
& tilework, painting, roofing, flooring, chimney
sweeping. Not a licensed contractor.
A1 Handyman! Call Mike’s Tool Box Decks, tile,
doors/windows, paint. Mike, 928-600-6254 Free
Estimates Not a Licensed Contractor
UNCLE AL’S WOODSHOP For all your wood projects, needs & repairs. 40 yrs exp. 928-814-6965
Decks, Spas Set-up, Arbors, Benches, Garages,
Sheds, Room Additions. Re-modeling, Kitchen
Up-Grades. Roc# 230591 928-242-4994
HAULING
Flag Hauling, Yard Clean Up, Haul Off Misc Debris,
Metal, Wood, Batteries, etc. Fast, Reliable &
Reasonable Rates, Lic/Ins 928-606-9000 www.
flagequip.com
MASSAGE
Receive a Massage or Reflexology session in
the comfort of your home. Call Gudi Cheff at
221-7474.
MOVING
Professional Moving Service call Quick Move
Local/long distance or labor only. 928-779-1774
PAINTING
“Nick the Painter”, 25 yrs exp. Top Quality, Low
Prices Small Jobs OK. Ref Avail. Interior
Discount. 928-310-1862. Not a licensed
contractor.
PERSONAL SERVICE
• CANCER • Compensation www.cancerbenefits.
com Or call 800-414-4328
PEST CONTROL
High Country Pest Control LLC Humane Animal
Removal - Skunks, Squirrels etc.; Spraying For
Ants, Spiders, Bed Bugs & other Pests. Lic. &
Ins. #9184. App#110560. Don: 928-221-3324
PET SITTING
Gofer Girl Friday Lic#102201 Pet waste removal,
doggie walks & pet sitting. 928-607-1951
CAREGIVER
Want a rewarding career? How about earning income
while improving the lives of those who cannot do for themselves?
Client needs differ but may include:
PERSONAL CARE
• Bathing, grooming
• Mobility assistance
• Toileting and
incontinence care
CARE SERVICES
• Companionship
• Meal preparation
• Light housekeeping
• Errand services
Comfort Keepers is seeking mature applicants.
Retirees encouraged to apply.
Part time/Full time availability. We operate 24 hours per day,
7 days per week. Currently hiring ALL SHIFTS.
Enjoy going to work by helping others! This is a very rewarding job!
(928) 774-0888
Apply Online - https://ck527.hyrell.com/ or at 214 N. Sitgreaves St.
26 flaglive.com | March 26–April 1, 2015
SEWING
SEWING BY CATHY One Day Service - Dressmaking, Alterations & Repairs. 779-2385
HELP WANTED
Praxair Distribution, Inc., a subsidiary of Praxair, Inc
is seeking Warehouse/Counter Sales person for
our branch in Flagstaff, AZ. Warehouse/Counter
Sales Maintains warehouse in an orderly manner
and condition. Handles and loads compressed
gas cylinders. Provides support to Outside Sales
team and drivers Operates a fork lift. Shipping
and Receiving. Requirements: High School
Diploma/GED required, Basic computer skills,
Good communication skills, Must have a clean
driving record. All qualified applicants will receive
consideration for employment without regard
to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation,
gender identity, national origin, protected veteran
status, or disability status.
Flagstaff Golf Maintenance Coseeks individuals
for F/T general golf course maintenance duties.
Competitive wages & golf privileges. Drug free
workplace. Apply in person, 2461 N. Oakmont
Flagstaff
Full-time Retail Manager: Western National Parks
Association (WNPA), seeks a full-time manager
for Sunset Crater, Walnut Canyon and Wupatki
National Monument retail shops in Flagstaff.
Reqs: HS diploma or GED; prior retail mgmt.
experience; must be able to pass background
ck; current AZ driver’s license. $18.75/hr + full
benefits package. Must submit application for
consideration. Apply on-line at www.wnpa.org.
Application deadline is 4/3/2015. EOE
Pastor, Assistant Pastor: F/T; Nonprofit Christian
church; Conduct pastoral services; Master of Divinity or Related; Resume: Hopi Mission Church
@ 13321 Fallow Deer Rd, Parks, AZ 86018
Drivers: Sign-On Bonus! Great Benefits. Paid
Weekly. Vacation/ Holidays/401K. Doubles, 1yr
exp. CDL-A. 928-526-0509
CEMEX a Construction Company is looking for
a Quality Control Tech. Location: Flagstaff, AZ
(928) 526-5250.
Exp Housekeepers. Hilton Garden Inn, Flagstaff.
MUST APPLY IN PERSON 350 W. Forest
Meadows.
Classifieds
SPORTING GOODS
STORE AND OFFICE RENTALS
Mathews Bow, right handed comes w/ extras,
mens or womens short & compact, ready to go
$650 firm. 928-814-0428
GARAGE SALES EAST
Friday, Saturday, Sunday 8am to 6pm The One
Not to Miss! 2909 N Main Street
Big Moving Sale! Saturday 3/28/15. 7am to 3pm.
25 yrs of household goods, tools, Serger sewing
machine, antique dresser, books, snowblower,
and more. 2242 N Timberline Rd.
Various Retail Store Front Space & Office Space on
4th St & 7th Ave, some w/ utils incl. 526-0300.
Old jewelry store 2300 N. 4th St., 2600 sf, $1,800/
mo., Old barber shop 2300 N. 4th St., Ste A, 630
sf, $714.36/mo., Old medical doctor’s office at
2314 N. 4th St, 1500 sf at $1200//mo. Water &
garbage provided. Call 928-526-0300.
SMALL OFFICE 3-blocks east of downtown: Quiet,
parking, view, $340/month includes utilities. 119
E. Terrace Ave. Check out Suite C upstairs, then
call Rob (928) 856-1100
MFG HOMES SALES
SMALL MACHINERY
Honda Generator Sale Save 20% off select
Honda Generators in stock Flagstaff Equip
928-774-1969
3 bdrm/2bath, Double wide modular home for sale
w/ Lot.. Good investment property. Near Mall.
(928) 853-2582
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
JOB FAIR
ASS
APARTMENTS UNFURNISHED
PINECLIFF VILLAGE APTS 1 month FREE w/12
month lease. Rents start at $950 ALL UTILS
INCL. See us at: www.pinecliffvillageapartments.com CALL TODAY 928-774-5204
$1,299 Special! 3Bedroom/2baths. Move in Immediately.
(928) 522-5660
Special subject to change. www.thesummitatflagstaff.com
2bd, 1ba, trash & water paid, tenant pays gas &
electric. Gas heat & stove. $800/mo. Sec/cleanup
$1200 (pay over 3 mo’s), 1 yr contract. Quiet
area, Sunnyside. Call Clay (928)266-8733
MANUFACTURED HOMES
55+ Senior Community 3bd/2ba 2cgar, W/D
hkups, Amenities: Pool, Clubhouse, Small Pet
OK, $1195/ mo. + dep. West Flagstaff, Route
66, Close to Home Depot. Avail Apr 1, Contact:
928-600-6673
Date: Saturday, March 28, 2015
Time: 9am–1pm
Location: Flagstaff Room
URED
Hiring for positions in the following departments:
• Banquets
• Food & Beverage
Must have 5+ years of Electrical
and Mechanical assembly of
equipment. Ability to work
independently and have a high
aptitude for problem solving.
FOR MORE INFORMATION:
www.machinesolutions.com
• Front Desk
• Laundry
We look forward to meeting you!
Upcoming events
Thanksgiving Day
Champagne Brunch
November 25
10am - 3pm
Holiday Lights Festival
Now On Friday
November 26
3pm - 9pm
Christmas Day
Champagne Brunch
December 25
9am - 2pm
New Years Eve
Celebration
December 31
7:30pm - 12:30am
TOWNHOUSE RENTALS
2515 E. Butler
new Brunch
pricing for 2010
2bdrm in Country Club, W/D, private deck w/ view,
parking at door, $975/mo. Country club privileges.
Avail. Now (602) 432-1837
Adults $29.95
Children 7-11 $14.95
6 and under Free
Equal Opportunity Employer
Winner of Best Hotel by Arizona Daily Sun Readers
2002 • 2003 • 2004 • 2005 • 2006 • 2007 • 2008
Stay in one of our oversized luxury rooms
Shop in the exquisite Gift Shop and Lifestyles Boutique
Dine in the Western Gold Restaurant and Tiffany Tree Lounge
RECEPTIONIST/
SCHEDULER
experience everything that the Little America Hotel has to offer
928.779.7900
ESTATE SALE 2007 Mazda3 99k $7895 1999
Mercury Villager 204k $2750 1988 Chevy
Caprice 208k $1650 1989 Chevy 1/2 ton 4x4
179k $3580 1988 Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4 Plow Truck
$3550 1988 Ford E-150 Conv. Van 280k $3550
1985 30’ Southwind MotorHome 68k $7500
Prices as given, OBO Call 928-699-2277
Electro-Mechanical Assembler
• Housekeeping
• Travel Center
We are hiring for Temporary
Seasonal and Permanent
Positions at our job fair.
MISC FOR SALE
Flagstaff company
specialized in creating
innovation solutions for
medical manufacturing
organizations
HOMES FOR SALE
Live Your Summers in Your Own Backyard This
lovely Bellemont home has 3 bedrooms, 2 baths,
1770 sq. ft. a formal living & family room that
share a double sided gas fireplace. An extra
room could be a formal dining area or an office.
Cathedral ceilings & ceiling fans throughout the
home. The backyard has been fully landscaped
& is designed for enjoyable outdoor living,
complete with patio, natural gas line for the
grill, grass & small planting beds all around.
$272,000. Coldwell Banker Dallas Real Estate
928-526-5309.
Owner/Investor looking for a GREAT HOUSE? 3
bedrooms, 1 1/2 baths, 1234 Sq. Feet. Lot
size 6,970. Built in 1920. Large side Yard
with Detached Garage. Needs Roof work, dry
QUALITY
John Deere Compact Tractor Sale Payments as
low as $229/mo Call for details, + down payment
& tax, OAC Flagstaff Equip 928-774-1969
www.flaglive.com
FIREWOOD
20+yrs Local Lawn Care Exp. Lawn mowing,
thatching, aeration, fertilizing, sprinkler start
ups & repairs, cleanups, rototilling, bobcat &
tractor svc, many other svc avail. Free estimates.
Ask about Early Spring Discounts. Call Andy
928-310-8929
If you need yard cleanup, pruning, leaf and pine
needle removal, or mowing (residential and acreage) in Flagstaff or Doney Park call the Garden of
Bob at 928-600-2850.
OFFER HOUSE & PET SITTING Dogs, cats, birds
etc. Ref. available. Michael. 928-699-9321.
Thank you!
2515 E. Butler Ave, Flagstaff, AZ 86004
wwww.littleamerica.com/flagstaff
4 DIAMOND
AWARD
WINNING!
4 Diamond L’Auberge de Sedona Resort,
located in the Red Rock country of Sedona,
AZ is seeking friendly, guest service driven
individuals with a passion for delivering
exceptional service guests will remember.
CURRENT OPENINGS:
• GuestServiceAgent
• AM&PMCooks
• AMBusser
• RoomAttendants
• Host/Hostess
• Dishwasher
• BanquetServer
• Houseman
Apply in person at Human Resources located at 301
L’Auberge Lane, Sedona, AZ, Email resume to
tina[email protected] or Apply on-line at Lauberge.com
Busy Medical Practice
Full time position: Monday – Friday
JOB REQUIREMENTS:
• Detail-oriented; Team player
• Ability to multi-task
• Create pleasant atmosphere for patients
DUTIES INCLUDE:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Answering telephones
Patient scheduling
Data entry
Filing
Heavy patient contact/reception
Knowledge of managed health care plans a plus
Excellent Benefits Package
No Phone Calls Please
Send/fax resume with
qualifications and experience to:
OfficeManager
1490 N. Turquoise Drive
Flagstaff, AZ 86001
Fax: (928) 779-0884
walls & update the Bathroom. 705 N Kinsley
Avenue Winslow, AZ. Value is $51,000. Sell at
$17,500 Owner will consider carrying a Note or
$15,000 Cash or Best Offer Contact Gerald at
213-819-0254
COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES
8000 sq ft old charter school building, 2301 N.
4th St. Selling for appraisal price of $750K.
928-526-0300
LOTS FOR SALE RESIDENTIAL
Flagstaff, AZ Lake Lot w/ Mtn./Golf Course View.
Is Level, Beautiful Country Club Neighborhood.
Call (928) 300-3182 for pics
MISC AUTO
1976 Ford MHA Motorhome. $1,400. Strong Motor.
As Is. See at 2505 N East Street.
4 WHEEL DRIVE
2000 Dodge Durango SLT 4x4. New tires, shocks,
rear end, brakes & rotors, windshield. 178,000
miles. Runs Great! 5.2 liter-V8. $6500. 928637-2256
RECREATIONAL VEHICLES
99 CLASS A 28ft Motorhome. 1 Owner, VERY
CLEAN. LOW MILEAGE! (928) 300-6779
Classifieds
AUTO PARTS & SERVICE
CHEVY, BUICK, GMC Eligible For FREE Oil
Change/Tire Rotation! Visit www.Shop.BestMark.
com for info or call 800-969-8477.
BARGAIN CORNER
Wood stove $135. Classic snow sled 4ft $25. Kid’s
2seater Corvette car ($350 value) for $135.
(928) 774-7114
GE free standing electric range w/ vent hood,
clean & excellent condition, ivory color, $100.
928-853-4962
Ryobl, Biscuit-Joiner model # JM82 w/ case,
$60. Wishing well planter 14”x14 x25”H, $20.
Southwest style end table, 24 1/4”x21 1/4”x18
1/2”H, $30. 928-526-0698 (1)
Kids Vision snowboarding boots size -1 dark grey,
light gray, w/ red trim $20. Kids Franklin lefty
softball glove size 10-1/2 Black $15. Both in good
condition. 928-853-0165
Bike seat for front handlebars of adult bike, to carry
a young child, $75 obo; 928-814-2615.
G.E. 21.7 cu.ft. top freezer refrigerator, black,
10+ yrs old, excellent condition. 66 7/8”x32
7/8”x31 5/8”, 67 1/2” ht. to top of hinge, $100.
928-221-7450
FLAGSTAFF LIVE GENERAL INFO
Phone: (928) 774-4545 Fax: (928) 773-1934 | Address:
1751 S. Thompson St. , Flagstaff, AZ 86001
Hours of Business: Monday–Friday, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. | On
the Web: www.flaglive.com
Distribution: Hard copies of Flagstaff Live are available free of charge every Thursday morning at more
than 200 Flagstaff, Sedona and northern Arizona locations. Please take only one copy per reader. Feel free
to call or e-mail us with any distribution questions or if
you want to become a distribution point for Flag Live.
Copyright: The contents of Flagstaff Live and its Web
site are copyright ©2015 by Flagstaff Publishing Co.
No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part in
any form without permission.
Disclaimer: Views and opinions expressed within the
One pair const. pump jacks, $45; electric downrigger for fishing boat, complete, $75. 928-607-1701
Whirlpool gas dryer. Super capacity, heavy duty
6 cycle. Seldom used, works great. $90.00
928-863-3818
King size brass headboard with frame and box
springs, $50. Call 928-214-0415
Tires & Rims 235-85-R16, 8 hole fits Dodge, Ford
and Chevy 3/4 ton trucks, 80% tread, $300 obo.
Call 928-699-0949.
30”x48” metal desk w/ wood top & 3 small drawers
$20. 30” double oven glass top elec stove $58.
Lazy boy reclining couch $118 928-814-9128
Lumber Rack for Sale. Fits full size Chevy pick-up
$300.00 OBO 928-221-9362
All in one loft trundle desk dresser and storage unit
$300, Free full size mattress box springs and
frame, Free love seat and couch blue color in
good condition. 928-380-2697
Craftsmen 10” table saw $100. Mk 7-1 tile saw $80.
Delta 6” wood joiner $120. Call 928-853-2966
Toro Power Shovel $25. Bissell Power Steamer
Carpet Cleaner (used twice) $50. Call 928853-6051
pages of Flagstaff Live or its Web site are not necessarily those of Flagstaff Publishing Co. Any reader
feedback can be mailed or e-mailed to the editors.
Freelancers: Flagstaff Live accepts freelance submissions for its pages and Web site. Any story pitches
or unsolicited work can be e-mailed or mailed to the
editors at the above addresses.
Advertising: For the current Flag Live advertising rate
card, see www.flaglive.com, or contact Kim Duncan at
(928) 556-2287 or [email protected]
March 26–April 1, 2015 | flaglive.com
27
THE GREEN ROOM-REDEFINING FLAGSTAFF NIGHT LIFE
04-06-15
ON SALE NOW
JUST ANNOUNCED
KNOWA LUSION/CONSCIOUS KALLING/
PLANEWALKER/KELLY MOUNTAIN BELLY DANCE
RISING APPALACHIA | 18+
04-10-15
5
1
FUNDRAISERS TO DATE
0
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SATURDAY APRIL 4TH
MONDAY APRIL 6TH
THURSDAY APRIL 9TH
3
5
WEEKLY EVENTS
:
SUNDAY
Karaoke
MONDAY: t
Trivia Nigh
Karaoke
Y: Tonk
SDAky
TUEHon
:
DAYtive
WEDNES
Soulec
EVERY DAY!
HAPPIEST
HOUR
5:30PM-7:00PM
$
3 U-CALL-ITS
GAMES
SHUFFLEBOARD
DARTS • PING-PONG
RING TOSS • BAGS
BOARD GAMES
FOOD
NOW SERVING
5PM-2AM
Made
By
UPCOMING SHOWS
03/28 Sol Seed|Kill Babylon
Coalition|Young Creatures
04/04 Boom Box Bros
04/06 Rising Appalachia (18+)
04/09 Mystic Circus
04/10 Deep Desert Bass Tour
PRESENTS $4 90 SCHILLING EVERY DAY!
04/11 Pine Forest Casino Night
04/16 Tribal Theory
04/21 Grouch|Eligh|Zion I
04/23 The Movement (18+)
04/24 The Routine|Moonalice
04/25 Robot Apocalypse Aerial
Circus Arts Show
04/26 A Tribe Called Red
05/02 Super Happy Funtime Burlesque
05/07 Sage Francis
05/08 Desert Dwellers
05/15 Empty Spaces
05/23 Worthy
WWW.FLAGSTAFFGREENROOM.COM | 15 N. AGASSIZ | (928) 226-8669
BEER OF THE WEEK:
WANDERLUST COCONINO COMMON SOUR RYE
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 3PM-2AM
HAPPY HOUR 3PM -8PM
CONTACT US FOR YOUR FUNDRAISER OR PARTY