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TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2015 • TWICE CHOSEN THE NATION’S BEST NONDAILY PAPER • PORTLANDTRIBUNE.COM • PUBLISHED TUESDAY AND THURSDAY
Senate removes HQ hotel hurdle
Bill approved to build
convention center inn
without voter OK
By JIM REDDEN
The Tribune
The saga of the Oregon
Convention Center headquarters hotel moved back
to Salem last Wednesday,
where the state Senate
approved a bill to help it get
built.
The Oregon Legislature had
previously approved $10 million
in state lottery funds for the hotel that Metro wants built across
the street from the center it owns
and operates. But opponents
have kept the $212 million project
tied up in the courts for years by
challenging Metro’s legal ability
to build such a project without
voter approval.
Senate Bill 927 passed by a
vote of 20-10. It confirms Metro’s
authority to build such projects
without asking voters to approve
them. The bill now goes to the
Oregon House, where it will be
referred to a committee for one
or more hearings.
“The Oregon Convention Center hotel project is a fantastic opportunity to create 3,000 jobs,
See HOTEL / Page 2
TRIBUNE FILE PHOTO
Intel’s investment agreements have made Washington County the
largest recipient of state funds under the Gain Share program, which
Oregon lawmakers are reviewing.
Bills put Gain Share
funds in crosshairs
By PETER WONG
Capital Bureau
Legislators are reviewing
whether the state budget
should continue to offset
property tax breaks by
counties for
large-scale investments,
such as Intel
and Genentech in Hillsboro and
wind farms in
Eastern Oregon.
A negotiatBURDICK
e d c o mp r o mise may be
placed this
week in front
of the Senate
Finance and
Revenue Committee, which
last
week
heard three
HASS
bills to scale
back direct
payments to Washington
County.
The county has received 99
percent of the nearly $75 million paid out during the first
three years under Gain Share
— and half of that amount was
paid about a year ago. Washington County signed a new
agreement with Intel, their
fifth, last summer.
One critic says none of the
three bills goes far enough.
“We believe Gain Share was
a mistake,” Jody Wiser of Tax
Fairness Oregon testified
Wednesday to the Senate Finance and Revenue Committee.
“You should end it, and none
of these bills does that. We prefer that it be repealed outright.”
But James McCauley, who
spoke for Washington County,
says all of Oregon benefits
from Gain Share, which couples property tax breaks for
large-scale investment with
state funds that partly offset
those losses to counties.
“It’s something, honestly,
that should be replicated and
looked at for other investment
opportunities that are in place
right now,” McCauley told the
lawmakers.
He says other current economic development incentives,
such as enterprise zones and
urban renewal, involve only reductions or freezes in local
property taxes.
Unless the law is changed,
Washington County stands to
PHOTOS COURTESY OF RICHARD THOMPSON
Portlanders depended on streetcars to get around town a century ago. Then hundreds of people turned
their cars into unregulated taxis, raising cries of unfair competition with the streetcar system.
Jitneys, Uber and deja vu
See FUNDS / Page 3
Today’s cab wars nothing
new: Look what happened
a century ago
head business model. Both flaunted city ordinances, hoping to force their way into the
market by currying public support via lower
wait times and prices.
“You might say history is sort of repeating
itself; now it’s the taxis that are threatened
and in those days it was the streetcar
By STEVE LAW
companies,” says Richard Thompson,
The Tribune
a retired Portlander who has written
four books on the history of local
As Uber tries to bully its way into
streetcars and rail lines.
Portland’s heavily regulated taxi
As Portland city commissioners
market, the $40 billion juggernaut
and
regulators figure out how to deal
FIRST OF
and its fans portray it as the wave of TWO PARTS
with Uber in the coming weeks, and
the future.
perhaps legalize it, the city’s history
That may be, but in many respects
with jitneys offers many parallels and
Uber is more like a blast from the past — eeri- cautionary tales.
ly similar to the jitneys that trolled Portland
One of the lessons from that history is apstreets a century ago.
parent to Thompson: “When it’s survival of
Uber lets people use their private car as a
the fittest, it doesn’t always work.”
taxi, hailed by customers on smartphones fitChallenging status quo
ted with Uber’s app. Exactly 100 years ago,
At the dawn of World War I, the Portland
hundreds of Portlanders bought used cars
Railway, Light and Power Co. was the biggest
and began using them as do-it-yourself taxis,
property owner in town, a monopoly granted
dubbed jitneys.
a city franchise to operate on fixed streetcar
Uber, like jitney drivers long ago, seeks to
disrupt the prevailing transportation system
See JITNEYS / Page 2
with a freewheeling, unregulated, low-over-
Knight Challenge
may cure biotech ills
Genentech to add
100 more jobs at
cancer drug facility
By JOSEPH GALLIVAN
The Tribune
Cancer drug company Genentech’s expansion in Hillsboro should be a boost for
Portland’s biotech sector,
which has seemed to be on life
support since Mayor Vera
Katz’s 2001 promise of 10,000
biotech jobs in South Waterfront.
However, the impending billion-dollar bonus of the OHSU
Knight Cancer Challenge could
be the trigger for more biotech
development, says University of
TRIB
Portland professor John Down.
“Four years ago, putting public resources toward the bioscience sector, as opposed to the
apparel cluster, was hotly debated,” said Down, who is Associate
professor of strategy and entrepreneurship at the University of
Portland’s Pamplin School of
Business.
“We don’t have to have billions
in venture capital” like such places as Boston, Silicon Valley and
Seattle, he said. “But things like
this will set the tone.” Down believes the Knight Challenge can
swing the pendulum toward
making Portland’s bioscience
cluster viable, and the Genentech expansion is more “momentum in that direction.”
Genentech announced last
week it is expanding within the
shell of its Hillsboro facility,
spending $125 million to add to
its sterile production operations
and add up to 100 new skilled
manufacturing jobs over the
SERIES
See GENENTECH / Page 3
Portland Tribune
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Plan could limit
state-financed tax
breaks to counties
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A2 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, March 31, 2015
Hotel: Lodging tax to fund bonds
■ From page 1
boost the state’s tourism economy, and
leverage private investment in the metropolitan region,” said Sen. Chuck Riley (D-Hillsboro), who carried the bill
on the floor. “An independent analysis
cited by Metro shows that this project
will generate $5.6 million in new state
tax revenues and $4.7 million in new local tax revenues annually. These are
revenues that will help support our
schools, our public safety, and future
economic development endeavors.”
Metro, the elected regional government in the Portland area, argues a
600-room hotel with special features to
appeal to convention-goers will increase the number of large conventions held at the center every year. The
current proposal calls for the hotel to
be privately built, owned and operated,
but subsidized with public construction and operating funds. Metro plans
to sell $60 million in revenue bonds to
help pay for the construction, and an
additional $18 million in other public
grants and loans have been identified
for the project. The development team
will put up the rest of the money.
Opponents include several existing
hotel owners in the Portland region.
They argue the project puts the public
at risk financially, but Metro President
Tom Hughes says they simply don’t
want the competition.
The opponents challenged Metro’s
authority to help finance the hotel in
both the Multnomah and Clackamas
county courts. Judges in both counties
ruled in Metro’s favor, but the opponents appealed those decisions to the
Oregon Court of Appeals.
The hotel would be owned and operated by Hyatt Hotels. Once it opens, the
company would be able to use the
Multnomah County transient lodging
taxes generated at the hotel to finance
the bonds.
The Multnomah County Commission has amended its policies governing transient lodging taxes for that to
happen. Opponents tried to refer that
vote to the ballot, but a Multnomah
County judge ruled it was an administrative decision that cannot be referred. Opponents also have appealed
that decision to the Oregon Court of
Appeals.
Before agreeing on the financing
plan, a labor peace agreement was
signed between Hyatt and the union
representing workers. Construction is
planned to begin in fall 2015 and be
complete in early 2018.
Artists
rendering of the
Headquarters
Hotel that Metro
wants built next
to the Oregon
Convention
Center.
COURTESY METRO
Jitneys: Streetcar companies fought back in 1915
■ From page 1
and rail lines.
“They were big and not responsive to public demands,”
Thompson says. “They were demonized like TriMet is today.”
One-fifth of Portland’s breadwinners were out of work. Those
with jobs depended on the
streetcar to get to work.
Henry Ford had just figured
out how to mass-produce cars,
making used vehicles affordable
to the masses for the first time.
One summer day in 1914, an
enterprising Los Angeles man
put a sign on his car and cruised
along streetcar lines, offering to
get people to their destination
sooner for the same nickel fee.
The idea spread rapidly, egged
on by William Randolph Hearst’s
newspaper chain, says St. Louis
transportation historian Carlos
Schwantes. By December, jitneys
started operating in Portland,
home to the nation’s third-largest electric rail system.
Often the jitneurs — jitney
drivers — lacked drivers’ licenses, their vehicles were unsafe,
and they paid no taxes to the city.
The city commissioner in
charge of public utilities, Will
Daly, called them a “fly-by-night”
fad that wouldn’t last, and thus
no city regulations were needed,
according to contemporary accounts in The Oregonian newspaper.
But then the streetcar and
power company president,
Franklin T. Griffith, testified before the Portland City Council at
the end of January 1915. Revenues were down $1,900 a day in
December, much of that caused
by the jitneys, Griffith complained. In two weeks, the number of Portland jitneys grew
from 50 to 125.
Like Uber today, the jitneys
were accused of cherry-picking
the most lucrative customers
without having to serve those
who didn’t earn them a profit.
WHAT’S A JITNEY?
Portland’s
privately owned
streetcar
company had a
franchise to
serve much of
the city. Jitneys
just trolled the
most lucrative
routes.
Jitneys were cars or small buses
driven by enterprising men who
trolled the streetcar lines of
Portland and other World War I-era
cities, offering to pick up waiting
passengers.
Jitney was another term for a U.S.
nickel, the standard fare charged
by the drivers, or jitneurs, and the
streetcars.
VINTAGE TROLLEYS
Richard Thompson’s books:
Portland Streetcars
Willamette Valley Railways
Portland’s Streetcar Lines
Portland’s Interurban Railway
Phone: 503-709-6408
Email: [email protected]
Web: vintagetrolleys.com
“They take the close-in business without which the streetcar company cannot live,”
Griffith testified. “We are
forced by the city to operate
where we lose money.”
Money-losing routes included “stub lines” that dead-ended in Russell and Shaver
streets and Errol Heights,
Thompson says. They were
built by real estate developers
to get people to buy homes in
new subdivisions along the
new streetcar lines.
Days after Griffith’s appearance, all Portland city commissioners agreed jitneys needed
to be regulated.
They wanted to require permits, drivers’ tests, and safety
inspections on the jitneys.
They wanted to assign jitneys
to zones, so they’d cover the
entire city and not just duplicate streetcar service and put
it in a downward spiral.
“The people of Mount Scott
are as much entitled to jitney
service as the people close in,”
Daly declared. The first assigned jitney route, he suggested, should be along Hawthorne Avenue.
Competition works
Regulations thwarted
Faced with new competition,
the streetcar company claimed
on Feb. 5, 1915, that it reduced
passenger wait times.
That’s similar to what’s occurring now at Radio Cab, which recently changed its dispatching
system to reduce customer wait
times. “It’s cut our response
times in half,” says Steven
Entler, general manager. “Our
response times will match Uber
easily.”
And like Uber today, the jitney
drivers fought city regulatory efforts, openly defying the law.
On Feb. 27, 1915, the Portland
police chief reported that automobile accidents were way up
that month, and he traced 14 of
them to reckless driving by jitneurs.
The city traffic engineer reported there were now 337 jitneys operating in the city, based
on manual counts at the bridges.
He predicted jitneys would soon
disappear, though, because unsophisticated drivers were actually losing money if they accounted for depreciation of their
cars, which would need to be replaced every few years.
In April, the City Council approved the first jitney regulations, requiring permits costing
$2 a month, driving tests, vehicle
inspections, night lights, and
weekly fumigation of the cars.
Jitneys were barred from clogging downtown traffic, and required to get franchises to operate on designated routes.
“If they hadn’t regulated the
jitneys, then the trolley companies would have ceased some
lines,” Thompson says, causing a
downward spiral in services and
revenues.
Still, Portland’s regulations
were branded the most lenient of
any big city in the country. There
was no insurance requirement
to cover accidents involving passengers and pedestrians, as in
Washington state and many other cities.
Even so, the regulations never
were fully enforced.
Jitney drivers gathered signatures to force a public vote on
the regulations, potentially delaying them two years. To avoid
that, the City Council retracted
the ordinance and put it on the
June 1915 ballot.
exterior running boards.
The Oregon Supreme Court finally upheld the city ordinance
in January 1916. But eight
months later, The Oregonian reported that many of the regulations, including the required
routes, had never been enforced.
On Nov. 16, 1916, the city arrested 57 jitney drivers who still
refused to follow the city’s franchise and designated route requirements. Then the jitney drivers came up with a new legal
ploy: establishing themselves as
taxi drivers but continuing to operate as jitneys only along the
streetcar lines.
Insurance turns tide
The issue came to a head
when the Progressive Business
There were now 445 jitneys in Men’s Club qualified a June
1917 initiative requiring the jitPortland.
The Oregonian came out in fa- neys to post $2,500 bond, a form
of car insurance. It passed easvor of the regulations, despite
ily. Rather than pay 75 cents a
calling them “weak and timid.”
day in insurance premiums,
Voters approved the regulathe jitneurs dropped out en
tions in June 1915, but jitney
masse.
drivers sued to overOn July 21, 1917, an
turn them. A Circuit
Part two
Oregonian headline
Court judge upheld
On Thursday,
proclaimed: “Portland
the car inspections
we’ll review
jitney becomes history.”
and chauffeur’s exams,
how jitneys
Regulations were the
but put a restraining
were dogged with
order on the rest of the some of the same most significant factor
regulations until they issues facing Uber causing the jitneys’ demise nationally, says
could be heard by the today.
Schwantes, who teaches
Oregon Supreme
transportation history for the
Court.
University of Missouri.
By August 1915, 390 jitneurs
But Portland had more lehad permits after passing driver
tests and vehicle inspections, but nient regulations than other
cities, notes Martha Bianco, a
other regulations weren’t in
former professor who examforce.
ined Portland’s experience
The Jitney Drivers’ Union
with jitneys. She concluded the
kept fighting, and the issue
bounced around from the Circuit improving economy was more
to blame here, as jitneurs shiftCourt to the Oregon Supreme
ed to better-paying jobs.
Court and back to the city. The
And more Portlanders were
strategy of continuing to operate
getting their own cars to drive
while tying up regulations in
to and from work.
court might foreshadow Uber’s
“The automobile, rather
approach a century later.
The jitneurs even opposed the than the jitney, emerged as the
city’s ban on riders sitting on jit- streetcars’ real nemesis,”
ney car doors or standing on the Schwantes says.
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©2015 Portland Tribune
news A3
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, March 31, 2015
Outside help sought to
probe state data breach
Governor’s action
follows third hack
in 13 months
Gov. Brown to
hire independent
expert to review
vulnerabilities at
the state data
center.
By HILLARY BORRUD
Capital Bureau
SALEM — Gov. Kate Brown
announced Thursday she will
hire an independent expert to
review management practices
and vulnerabilities at the state
data center, after hackers
gained access to information
at the center last week.
Brown also directed state
Chief Information Officer Alex
Pettit to take charge of daily operations at the center “for the
foreseeable future.”
The data breach occurred at a
time when two top managers at
the data center — Michael Rodgers, acting director of the data
center, and Technical Engineering Manager Marshall Wells —
are on paid administrative leave
pending a human resources investigation. The two men have
been on leave since February
and remained on leave Thursday,
according to a spokeswoman for
the Department of Administrative Services.
Auditors from the Secretary of
State’s office were already conducting a routine review of security at the data center when the
breach occurred. They had identified vulnerabilities at the data
center in a 2010 audit, but a
Tribune file Photo
March 2012 follow-up audit mostly gave the data center good
marks for security.
Brown revealed the data
breach in a press release Thursday, and said she planned to ask
leaders in the Legislature for
money to pay for the review.
The governor said an “unknown external entity” had accessed limited information at the
data center. Chris Pair, a spokesman for Brown, described it as
information about the location of
data on state computer servers,
but not the actual data. State employees notified the governor of
the breach on March 20, and Pair
said it occurred a few days before
that.
It was the third high-profile
data breach to occur at a state
agency in the past 13 months.
Hackers accessed the Secretary
of State’s business registry and
campaign finance databases in
February, and the Oregon Employment Department revealed a
similar breach in October.
The state data center, which is
housed at the Department of Administrative Services, also came
under scrutiny in February when
a staffer for then-Gov. John
Kitzhaber asked employees at
the center to delete emails from
Kitzhaber’s personal account
that were stored on state computer servers. Employees ultimately refused to delete the
emails, and the U.S. Department
of Justice has since subpoenaed
the emails and other state records for an investigation into
Kitzhaber and his fiancee, former first lady Cylvia Hayes.
Willamette Week reported on
the deletion request, and emails
from Kitzhaber’s personal account were apparently leaked to
the newspaper. Michael Jordan,
who was director of the Department of Administrative Services,
asked the Oregon State Police to
investigate the leak.
Kitzhaber resigned Feb. 18
amid two criminal investigations
into allegations he and Hayes
used their public positions to
benefit Hayes’ consulting business. Jordan submitted his resignation to Brown March 5 without
explanation.
Before Jordan resigned, he
told The Oregonian that Rodgers
and Wells were placed on leave
during an internal investigation
into a dispute over how to handle
computers and phones used by
the Kitzhaber administration.
“Oregonians should not have
to worry that their personal information such as Social Security numbers, home addresses or
health records held by state
agencies could be accessed illegally,” Brown said in a press release Thursday. “Although I have
been assured that no personally
identifying information was compromised, this incident causes
me to have serious concerns
about the integrity of state data.”
Brown said the state will use
an “expedited competitive process” to hire the independent
expert to review management
and vulnerabilities at the data
center.
Ironically, the governor’s office
revealed the data breach the
same day Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum appeared before
a legislative committee to testify
in favor of a bill that would expand protections for consumers’
personal data. The bill would also allow the state Department of
Justice to pursue civil penalties
against individuals and organizations that fail to comply.
With Democrats in majority,
environmental lobby hits hard
Salem lawmakers
throw their weight
behind key issues
By HILLARY BORRUD
Capital Bureau
Environmental lobbyists are
on a roll this year in Oregon.
They notched a big win early in the session when lawmakers passed legislation to
make the state’s low-carbon
fuel standard permanent. Now,
lobbyists for a coalition of
groups have turned their focus
to bills that would require utilities to stop using power from
coal plants by 2025.
That work isn’t cheap.
In 2014, a broad spectrum of
environmental groups spent
nearly $470,000 on lobbying in
Salem, according to EO Media
Group/Pamplin Media Group
Capital Bureau’s analysis of
state lobbying records.
The organizations range
from small groups that promote water quality and wildlife issues, to industry organizations that seek incentives
for renewable energy and efficiency projects.
Still, spending by the environmental lobby is low compared with other industries. A
single energy interest group
— the Western States Petroleum Association, which opposed the low-carbon fuel
standard — spent just under
$360,000 on lobbying in Oregon
last year. All interest groups
reported spending a total of
nearly $27 million on lobbying
in the state last year.
“We definitely don’t spend
nearly as much money on lobbying,” said Christy Splitt, a
registered lobbyist and coordinator for a coalition of environmental groups called the
Oregon Conservation Network. “I’m not going out to
dinner with legislators, or
whatever other people are
able to do, spending money on
lobbying. I think most of what
we spend on lobbying is going
to pay people’s salaries.”
The environmental lobby
does have several advantages,
including strength in numbers
and strong support from Democratic lawmakers this session. At least 55 registered lobbyists represent environmental interests in Oregon, and
most are employees of the
groups they represent and do
other work in addition to lobbying. In addition, Splitt said
there are pro-environment
majorities in both chambers.
Environmentalists did not
always enjoy such a strong position in Oregon. The Oregon
Conservation Network formed
20 years ago at a time when environmentalists spent a lot of
time fighting bills aimed at undermining “good” legislation
passed in the 1970s, Splitt said.
Republicans had control of the
Funds: Washington
County reaps rewards
■ From page 1
get $94.2 million of the projected
$94.9 million in state funds in
the next two-year budget cycle.
The other $700,000 would be
split among Clatsop County —
which has the Wauna paper mill
operated by Georgia-Pacific —
and five Eastern Oregon counties. They are Gilliam, Morrow,
Sherman, Umatilla and Union
counties.
The two-year budget proposed by then-Gov. John Kitzhaber on Dec. 1 would have limited
that amount to about $45 million, and some lawmakers have
talked about taking part or all of
the projected $95 million for the
state school fund.
A long history
Gain Share builds on the
Strategic Investment Program,
which lawmakers created in
1993 to enable counties to approve property tax breaks for 15
years to attract new businesses
or encourage their expansion.
The minimum qualifying
amounts for investment were
$100 million in urban counties,
$25 million in rural counties.
Gain Share started after lawmakers decided in 2007 to allow
the state general fund to help
counties offset part of their
property tax losses. The payments are based on half the
estimated income taxes generated by new employees, as calculated by the Oregon Business Development Department
from information supplied by
the businesses.
Under original projections for
two budget cycles from 2009 to
2013, the program was to cost
the state budget $5.1 million.
The actual amount paid out during that period was $36 million,
all but $500,000 of which went to
Washington County.
“A modest compensation
package has morphed into a
program that hemorrhages millions of dollars from our general
fund and disproportionately
benefits one county while reducing available school funding,” says Sen. Ginny Burdick,
D-Portland, sponsor of one of
the bills proposing changes.
Burdick says she regrets voting for the 2007 bill.
But Inga Deckert, who spoke
for the City of Hillsboro, says,
“It was good policy then, and it
is just as good a policy today.”
What’s next
Senate Bill 129 has the endorsement of the Association
of Oregon Counties, League of
Oregon Cities, and two of the
state’s major business groups
— Associated Oregon Industries and the Oregon Business
Association.
Genentech: Firm
vows well-paying jobs
■ From page 1
next five years.
“Genentech’s expansion in
Greater Portland further solidifies the region’s ability to draw
quality jobs and investment,”
said GPI President/CEO Janet
LaBar. “Hillsboro has done an exHouse from 1990 to 2006, and cellent job in facilitating the
growth of the world’s innovation
the Senate from 1994 to 2002.
“I think folks were feeling leaders.”
The San Francisco-based compretty frustrated with bad bills
passing,” and decided to cre- pany runs a fill/finish operation
ate a coalition to focus on in Oregon. Drugs are manufacshared priorities, Splitt said. tured in bulk abroad and shipped
“The group organized at the in kegs in frozen form to Hillstime pretty much played de- boro. In the fill phase, they are
diluted to the right strength and
fense.”
A decade ago, the coalition put into vials. Then in the finish
decided to stop playing de- phase, they are labeled, packfense and begin proposing aged and ready for use by medimore new legislation. Rhett cal professionals. The work is
Lawrence, conservation direc- highly regulated by the Food
tor for the Oregon chapter of and Drug Administration and
the Sierra Club and a regis- requires skilled labor.
Larry Sanders, Genentech
tered lobbyist for the group,
said coalition members start- general manager and vice presied to come up with annual lists dent, said demand for the firm’s
of bills they could agree on cancer treatment drugs is growcalled “priorities for a healthy ing, hence the expansion.
The firm is known for oncolOregon.”
The environmental lobby’s ogy drugs such as Avastin,
top priorities today are two Rituxan and Herceptin. These
bills they describe as “coal to are not the toxic drugs used in
clean” — Senate Bill 477 and chemotherapy. Rather they are
proteins that affect cancer cells
See LOBBYISTS / Page 4 with fewer side affects. Genen-
tech also makes Activase, a
blood clot busting drug often
administered in ambulances to
heart attack and stroke patients.
These proteins must be carefully handled in terms of temperature and the solution in
which they are stored. This requires workers who know how
to use an isolator, a sterile, boxlike machine with glove-lined
entryways for handling the
drugs.
About a third of those the company will be hiring are “manufacturing technicians” to operate
such isolators. Sanders said they
would have average mechanical
skills but also an appreciation of
sterile, biological drug preparation and highly automated advanced manufacturing.
Sanders added, “Biotech is a
little cleaner (than traditional
manufacturing) and more sustainable. It nicely connects to
the Northwest frame of mind.”
Four years ago, the company
brought many staff members
from California, but now they
source most labor locally.
“For certain skill sets we have
had difficulty finding people
here, such as in the aseptic manufacturing of proteins,” Sanders
said. “But we have found here
other skilled trades such as
maintenance and logistics.”
Back when most
people were worrying
about Y2K, we were
pioneering the field of
green chemistry.
We developed the first
green chemistry lab
curriculum in the nation—
and spawned an entire
field in the process.
Since then, we’ve made
huge strides in reducing
pollution, and over
30,000 students have
joined in our plans for a
sustainable future.
EO/AA/ADA institution
committed to cultural diversity.
504596.021715
BETTER LIVING
THROUGH GREEN
CHEMISTRY
FIND YOUR FUTURE
AT UOREGON.EDU.
A4 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, March 31, 2015
Lobbyists: ‘Coal to clean’ bills are priority
■ From page 3
PUSHING ENVIRONMENTAL AGENDA
House Bill 2729.
Both would require utilities
to stop generating or purchasing electricity from coal power
plants by 2025. The Senate version also would require companies to replace coal power
with electricity from sources
“at least 90 percent cleaner
than coal-derived generating
resources,” according to a legislative summary.
Splitt said other priorities
this year include a bill to require private forestland owners to provide notice to the
state and keep other records of
their use of pesticides; a bill to
appropriate money for the Oregon Department of Fish and
Wildlife to spend on conservation; and legislation that would
allow the state to end a mandate to generate revenue from
timber harvests on some public forests.
Environmental groups also
are pushing for the passage of
legislation that would preserve or create incentives for a
range of solar projects, from
residential to utility scale facilities. Lawrence said solar
energy “still needs a little bit
of a hand in the next step in
putting it on a level playing
field with fossil fuel.”
Splitt said environmental
groups also want money for
public transit to be included in
any funding package for street
maintenance and other transportation projects. The outlook for that package is unclear, since Republicans
stopped participating in talks
after Democrats passed the
low-carbon fuel bill.
Some groups lobbying on
the coal power bills and other
environmental issues are not
The following is a list of registered
lobbyists who work on environmental issues in Salem.
n Angela Crowley-Koch, Casey
Daline, Angela Dilkes Perry, Andrea
Durbin, Jonathan Eames, Jana
Gastellum, Christine Hagerbaumer,
Allison Hensey and Teresa
Huntsinger, Oregon Environmental
Council (Daline, Dilkes Perry and
Eames also lobby for the Wild
Salmon Center)
n Jonathan Manton, WaterWatch
of Oregon, Global Partners, LP,
Central Oregon LandWatch,
Friends of the Metolius, Bicycle
Transportation Alliance
n Meredith Shield, works for
Strategies360 and represents
1000 Friends of Oregon, renewable energy company Ameresco
Inc., Northwest Energy Efficiency
Council, Oregon Solar Energy
Industries Association, Pacific
Ethanol Inc., Sierra Club of
Oregon, The Conservation
Campaign
n Mary Solecki, Natural
Resources Defense Council
n Rhett Lawrence, Sierra Club
Oregon Chapter
n Hillary Barbour, Daniel Bates,
Nicholas Hund, Nels Johnson and
Elizabeth Remley, Renewable
Northwest Project (all except
Barbour also lobby for Clean
Energy Works Oregon)
n Quinn Read, Sean Stevens,
Steve Pedery, Chandra LeGue,
Robert Klavins and Erik
Fernandez, Oregon Wild
n Steve McCoy, Jason Miner, Mary
Kyle McCurdy, Mia Nelson, Andrea
Salinas (also lobbies for
Northwest Energy Efficiency
Council and The Conservation
Campaign), 1000 Friends of
Oregon
n Kimberley Priestley and John
DeVoe, WaterWatch of Oregon
n Jim Myron, the Native Fish
Society
nChris Parta, Climate Solutions
and The Ocean Foundation (The
Oregon Marine Reserves
Partnership)
n Camila Thorndike, Oregon
Climate
n Rikki Seguin, David Rosenfeld,
Charles Fisher and Charlotte
Bromley, Environment Oregon
n Jeff Bissonette, Citizens Utility
Board
n Adam Meyer, Douglas Moore
and Christy Splitt, Oregon League
of Conservation voters (Splitt is
also registered to lobby for the
Oregon Conservation Network)
n Courtney Sipel, Scott
Robertson, Amanda Rich, Gary
Oxley and Evyan Jarvis Andries,
Nature Conservancy of Oregon
n Shawn Miller, Coastal
Conservation Association
n Justin Martin, Defenders of
Wildlife
n Stephen Kafoury, Oregon
Chapter of the Wildlife Society
n Sue Marshall and Michael
Selvaggio, Audobon Society of
Portland (Marshall also lobbies for
Tualatin Riverkeepers)
n Tom Wolf, Oregon Council Trout
Unlimited
n Mark Pengilly, Oregonians for
Renewable Energy Progress
n Joseph Furia, Freshwater Trust
strictly environmental groups.
Bob Jenks, executive director of the Citizens Utility
Board of Oregon, said the
group supports the coal legislation because governments
eventually will regulate carbon emissions and ratepayers
could save money if utilities
begin to more aggressively re-
duce carbon now.
“We’ve got to work hard because we don’t have the money,” said Jenks, who is not the
utility board’s registered lobbyist but was in Salem to testify in favor of the coal bills on
We d n e s d ay. “ B u t we ’ ve
got people. We can organize
people.”
&
Easter Sunday
Bills would lengthen
prosecution time
from six years to 20
By JENNIFER ANDERSON
The Tribune
The Oregon House of Representatives committee this
month may consider two bills
to extend the statute of limitations on rape from six to 20
years.
Two bills have been introduced. Senate Bill 8, sponsored
by Senate President Peter Courtney, extends the statute of limitations for certain sex crimes to
within 20 years after commission
TRIBUNE FILE PHOTO
of the crime.
Danielle
Tudor
(left)
and
Brenda
Tracy
are
speaking
out
to
raise
House Bill 2317 extends the
statute of limitations for another awareness about the rape statute of limitations this month.
purpose, but will be amended to
address rape, advocates say.
the statute of limitations in rape
Advocates say Oregon and In- cases.
diana have two of the shortest
According to a post by Danielle Tudor and Brenda Tracy,
statutes of limitations for rape O’Donnell Clark and Crew LLP, both sexual assault survivors, will
prosecution in the United States: based in Portland, the public has speak out at an open event for the
community on April 2, hosted by
Oregon prosecutors have six a strong interest in bringing vic- the Life Christian Center in
years to bring criminal charges tims justice and holding perpe- Milwaukie.
against suspected rapists, and trators accountable for crimes.
The public is invited to attend. It’s
five years in Indiana.
“This not only protects survi- set for 7-8:30 p.m. at the church,
In Oregon, two local women vors, but society as a whole,” he 5497 S.E. International Way in
are sharing their stories this says. “Extended statutes of limi- Milwaukie.
week at a public event in hopes tation are a critical tool to help
that lawmakers will support the protect these interests.”
legislation on the table. Danielle
Lawmakers in Indiana are con- the identity of a suspect.
Tudor and Brenda Tracy, both of sidering legislation to extend
The law would provide a new
whom are sexual assault survi- their statute. The state Senate five-year window for prosecution
vors, are actively supporting the passed a bill last week called where new evidence emerges in
two Oregon bills.
Jenny’s Law (named for Jenny the form of a confession, DNA
While the two Oregon bills Wendt Ewing, an Indiana rape evidence, or a recording suffiwould extend the statute of limi- survivor), that would extend the cient to support a prosecution.
tations, other states have gone statute of limitations in rape casThe bill now goes to the Indithe other route and eliminated es where new evidence reveals ana House for a vote.
PUBLIC EVENT
Taking a stand against profiling
Holy Week
503937.033115
House may extend rape
statute of limitations
House mulls bill
to halt stopping
people based on traits
Worship
Services
2015
By PETER WONG
Capital Bureau
Public debates about profiling — a practice by police
Lent Service -
of using race or other broad
characteristics to stop and
search people suspected of
crimes — usually divide police from minorities.
But representatives of both
sides say they are working toward a consensus bill that Oregon lawmakers can approve
this year after a debate stretching over two decades.
Wednesday’s Noon and 7pm
Maundy Thursday -
PORTLAND TRIBUNE PUBLIC NOTICE 033115
April 2 Noon and 7pm
View legals online at: http://publicnotices.portlandtribune.com
April 3, 7pm
Pastor David Zemke
Immanuel Lutheran Church
7810 S.E. 15th Avenue in Sellwood • 503-236-7823
Bring the whole family!
River View Cemetery’s
24th Annual
Outdoor Easter Sunrise
Service
Sunday, April 5th at 6:30 a.m.
You are invited
to attend a very special outdoor service held
high atop the majestic west hills.
Join us for a brief service of music and an
inspirational non-denominational message.
503822.033115
0300 SW Taylors Ferry Road, Portland • riverviewcemetery.org
For more information call 503.246.4251
Portland’s
BEST
local
radio!
500450.010715
503975.040115 Bee
Easter Sunday - April 5, 10:30am
Trib Info Box 0813
Good Friday -
PUBLIC AND LEGAL NOTICES
These notices give information concerning actions planned and
implemented by attorneys, financial institutions and government
agencies. They are intended to keep you and every citizen fully informed.
Space-reservation deadline for all legal notices is Thursday 10 am
one week prior to publication. Please call Louise Faxon at (503) 546-0752
or e-mail [email protected] to book your notice.
PUBLIC NOTICE:
AT&T is proposing to remove a portion of existing equipment
and antenna from an existing water tank located on the rooftop of a building and relocate onto the roof-top of the building
located at 1126 NE 28th Street, Portland, Multnomah County,
OR 97232 (45° 31’ 54.4” North and 122° 38’ 4.6” West). The
roof-top water tank with antennas will have an overall structure height of 116-feet above grade surface (AGS). Public
comments regarding potential effects from this site on historic
properties may be submitted within 30-days from the date of
this publication to: Gary Henningsen, Terracon, 4103 SE
International Way, Suite 300, Portland, OR 97222; 503-6593281; [email protected]
Publish 03/31/2015.
PT1353
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
PENINSULA DRAINAGE DISTRICT #1
1880 NE ELROD DRIVE
PORTLAND OR 97211
You are hereby notified that the Board of Supervisors for
Peninsula Drainage District #1 will be meeting on 4/2/15 at
9am, at the District Office, 1880 NE Elrod Drive, Portland, OR
97211. Agenda items include: FY 15-16 budget review and
staff updates. Public members wishing to participate should call
the District Office at 503-281-5675 x 300.
Publish 03/31/2015.
PT1354
The formal lawmaking process began Monday, when the
House Judiciary Committee
considered one of a trio of bills
aimed at profiling.
Its chairman is Rep. Jeff
Barker, D-Aloha, a retired Portland police lieutenant and onetime State Police trooper, who
says he wants to combine elements of all three bills into
House Bill 2002.
Among the nine committee
members are Reps. Andy Olson
of Albany and Wayne Krieger of
Gold Beach, both retired from
the Oregon State Police.
“That has affected the conversation a lot,” says Salome
Chimuku, public-policy director
of the Center for Intercultural
Organizing based in Portland,
and a leader of a coalition effort
to ban profiling.
Eduardo Corona has had personal experience. While driving
a newer car, he says he was
stopped twice within a week,
once by the Washington County
sheriff and once by Hillsboro
police.
“I asked why, and they said
they were just checking,” says
Corona, who lives in the county.
“Maybe the car was too nice,
you can say that. When I was
driving my old junker, I was not
stopped.”
Such bans usually cover race,
ethnicity and skin color. One in
five Oregonians is classified as
a member of a minority in such
groupings.
As written, House Bill 2002
proposes nine other categories:
Age, gender, homelessness, language, mental disability, national origin, political affiliation, religion and sexual orientation.
“We understand profiling
looks different in every community, but it happens,” Chimuku
FIRST
EDITION
TERRY BOYD’S
5am to 9am
Monday-Friday
9am
5am to
to Noon
9am
Monday-Friday
with Tim Hohl and Terry Travis
says. “So we want to make sure
the (legal) standard in Oregon
is that we do not tolerate people
being stopped and questioned
based on a characteristic that in
most cases they are born with.”
According to a national report issued by the NAACP last
fall, Oregon is among 20 states
— five of them in the West —
without a formal ban on profiling.
A profiling ban is one of three
priorities listed by a coalition of
minority groups earlier this
year at a City Club of Portland
forum.
Rep. Lew Frederick, D-Portland, one of two black members
of the current Legislature, is
chief sponsor of HB 2001, 2002
and 2003.
“Profiling goes beyond the
outcome of any one encounter,”
Frederick says. “Over time it
leads to buildup of resentment
based on lack of respect, and
that resentment leads to increased tension carried into the
next interaction with officers,
and that isn’t good for citizens
or officers. Profiling damages
the police due to lost credibility,
and damages the community
due to lost trust.”
Senate Bill 486, sponsored by
Sens. Chris Edwards, D-Eugene,
and Chuck Thomsen, R-Hood
River, also contains elements of
the House bills.
Who handles complaints?
In addition to a state ban on
profiling, other proposals would
require police agencies to set a
procedure for people to file
complaints and have them reviewed, and for an outside agency to analyze complaints and
make recommendations. What
See PROFILING / Page 7
WORLD
3pm to 6pm
Monday-Friday
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, March 31, 2015
Portland
Tribune
Founder
Dr. Robert B. Pamplin, Jr.
PRESIDENT
J. Mark Garber
Managing editor
Vance W. Tong
digital media editor
Kevin Harden
vice president
Brian Monihan
Advertising Director
Christine Moore
CIRCULATION
MANAGER
Kim Stephens
creative
services manager
Cheryl DuVal
PUBLISHING SYSTEMS ManagER/WEBMaster
Alvaro Fontán
News writers
Jennifer Anderson,
Steve Law, Jim Redden,
Joseph Gallivan, Peter
Wong, Shasta Kearns
Moore
{ insight }
insight A5
Police body cameras will help everyone
MyVIEW
By Jeff Dickerson
P
olice officers have been
recording their conversations out in the field
at least since the advent
of the mini-cassette recorder.
Throughout my
26-year career,
law enforcement has used
audio (and later
audiovisual) recordings to regularly document certain
contacts and
dickerson
preserve evidence of
crimes.
Technology has been the
driving force behind innovations in what is recorded and
how it is stored. Law enforcement agencies are wise to
adapt to new technology and to
capitalize on those innovations
that improve officer safety, reduce police liability, and create
better documentation of police
actions.
Body-worn cameras (“body
cams”) provide the latest innovation in audiovisual recording
of police encounters and, while
novel in approach, the philosophy behind their use is not
new. Body cams provide an improved tool in the hands of
prosecutors, law enforcement,
defense attorneys, victims and
the public for getting to the
truth of matters that previously
might have been subject only to
human recall. Body cams —
when functioning and wellplaced on the officer — can provide real-time video footage
with accompanying audio from
the perspective of the officer
engaged in a wide variety of enforcement and/or emergency
calls for service.
Because the body cams are
as mobile as the officers or deputies who are wearing
them, they present a higher
likelihood that a law enforcement encounter will be captured on video, thus providing
a higher likelihood of indisputable documentation of the
events police officers and deputies encounter every day.
But police, the courts, or the
public shouldn’t see body cams
as the panacea that will solve
all of our documentation challenges. Cameras — even when
operating correctly — generally will not capture every image,
sound or other environmental
factor that affects a police officer’s decisions. Camera angles
can block certain views. The
camera can become dislodged
from the officer. Officers will
not always have time to react
fast enough to activate their
cameras before making crucial
decisions (For example, Darren
Wilson in Ferguson, Mo., became engaged in a physical
struggle with Michael Brown
while the officer was still seated in his patrol car).
The media and the public
will need to temper expectations with the understanding
that, while police agencies may
be adopting body-cam policies,
there will be plenty of times
when video of law enforcement
will not be available — not only
due to exceptions that occur
outside the officer’s control, but
also due to policy that properly
provides for officer discretion
(A police officer may appropriately decide not to record certain contacts with victims or
witnesses out of respect for
their privacy, for example).
Still, I believe the use of
body cams to be the next in
line in the long-standing tradition of police using every possible tool to provide the best
documentation of the decisions
they make — from the decision
to make an arrest to the decision to use force in the defense
of an officer or citizen.
There is no way we can
guarantee that every encounter will be recorded, but I
know that we will have access
to considerably more understanding of events that occur
than we do now.
This expands the transparency of police organizations
and increases the likelihood
that encounters between the
public and the police are welldocumented. It has the potential to improve police professionalism and reduce false accusations against officers. It
can make the difference in civil
cases or in creating a safer environment for officers — when
those who might otherwise do
them harm know that everything is being recorded. These
have always been important
goals for police administrators,
and body cams are the latest
tool developed to help meet
those goals.
Jeff Dickerson is the Columbia
County sheriff. Columbia County
sheriff’s deputies recently began
wearing body cameras when dealing
face to face with jail inmates.
FEATURES Writer
Jason Vondersmith
SPORTS EDITOR
Steve Brandon
SPORTS writers
Kerry Eggers,
Jason Vondersmith,
Stephen Alexander
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Editor
Steve Law
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Denise Szott
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insight
page editor
Janie Nafsinger
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Michael Beaird, Valerie
Clarke, Chris Fowler, Gail
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Rob Cullivan
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READERS’LETTERS
Planners need to manage growth better
C
arol McCarthy, I really
like your question: Are
we paying the planners
to manage growth, or
to promote it? (Growth plan
doesn’t foster livability, guest
column, March 10). While I live
in downtown Portland where I
expect construction noise and
welcome at least some of the
growth, I also would like planners to do a better job of managing for that growth.
Would you believe that in the
West Quad Plan, planners had
only one Implementation Action under Environment for
downtown’s major residential
area, the West End, in a plan
that’s to be in effect for the next
20 years? I suggested 12 new environmental Implementation
Actions to the City Council.
After presenting them at the
council hearing, I sent a few
emails to get some attention for
them. But I wish I had taken
your example and gone to the
media for help. Most of my new
actions did not make it into the
plan (none would have if it
weren’t for city Commissioner
Amanda Fritz).
Anyway, thanks for your
work to create a better Portland. I do hope that others will
follow your lead and offer comments on the Comp Plan.
Mary Vogel
Downtown Portland
highlights what’s at stake and
what needs to be done, and now.
Whether one believes global
climate instability is caused exclusively from burning fossil fuels is beside the point. The fact
is, the laws of physics don’t lie,
and the weather is changing,
and it’s affecting us all.
Dana Weintraub
Beaverton
Proposed courthouse
site fraught with
problems
I must say I agree with Dennis King about the botched job
in siting a new courthouse
(There are better sites for new
courthouse, guest column,
March 26). If the judges and
staff insist on a river view, there
appears to be a whole block for
sale at the west end of the Morrison Bridge.
As an additional point, I wonder how they expect to transport
prisoners to the proposed location? Currently Multnomah
County blocks off part of Fifth
Avenue with their transport bus
and moves prisoners in through
the back door of the courthouse.
I wonder if they plan on blocking off First Avenue to unload at
what appears to be the only
street-level access?
Kas Brattin
Northeast Portland
Weather is changing,
Don’t deny employees
whatever the cause
paid sick leave
I just wanted to give a “thank
you” shout-out to Patrick
O’Herron on his commentary
(Support the transition from
coal to clean, guest column,
March 19). It is spot on and
Paid sick time is a major
public health necessity. That is
why I support Senate Bill 454,
which requires employers to
provide paid sick time for their
employees.
Only 29 percent of Oregonians earning less than $20,000
per year have paid sick time
benefits. For a family of three,
this puts them below the poverty line so they already have
little to spare without the added risk of losing work to illness. Because of this, lower-income employees are more likely to attend work while sick
and potentially expose their
colleagues and customers to
contagious diseases.
I understand employer concerns about government-mandated benefits, but there’s inherent risk and liability in not
providing paid sick time. How
great a reputation would a restaurant have if a sick employee
comes to work because they
have no other choice and
spreads their disease to all the
food and people they come in
contact with?
Matt Koehler
Cedar Mill
Schools beyond
PPS have kids with
problems
Portland Public Schools
(PPS’ discipline issues, Tuesday, Feb. 17) are not the only
schools facing high rates of expulsions and suspensions.
School districts across the
nation are facing similar problems, resulting in a breakdown
in educating due to a lack of respect by some pupils who
threaten teachers with
“threats of violence and death
or break up physical fights, only to have the students show up
back in class with no consequences.”
Teachers who I know feel
abandoned by the administration for a lack of solutions and
leadership. We need to restore
discipline and authority in our
school system. Otherwise, we
are set to fail the next generation.
Nationally, districts are looking at the breakdown of the
family, with single parents living in poverty, where there is
no authority or structure, and
how parents are failing their
own kids’ future by not teaching them respect for authority
and respect for others.
Rather than being preoccupied with the results of expulsions and suspensions, maybe
those kids who don’t want to fit
in should be put in schools
with strong structure and discipline, and help them to succeed, and not impact the majority who want to learn, but
can’t.
Louis H. Bowerman
Southeast Portland
The gas tax can be increased
at state, county and city levels
for all vehicles to provide money for bridge and road repairs.
High-mileage hybrid and electric cars might be assessed an
additional mileage fee collected
when vehicles are re-registered
at DMV every two years. The
mileage fee can be trued up
whenever a vehicle changes
owners.
Metro may be influential by
using its lobbying power to double the gas tax in Multnomah
County from 3 cents per gallon
to 6 cents per gallon. Likewise,
it should lobby Salem to double
the Oregon gas tax from 30
cents per gallon to 60 cents. Finally, it should lobby Portland
to create a 5-cent-per-gallon gas
tax by the city of Portland.
All gas tax money needs to
be spent on road and bridge repairs until roads and bridges
are 90 percent in good or better
condition.
Rich Brown
North Portland
Gas taxes, other
ideas could fund
transportation
All cars should be
charged per-mile fees
Regarding the story (Metro
ponders new regional funding
for transportation, March 17):
Metro can lobby for increasing the number of lanes at the
two-lane Interstate 5 bottleneck
at the Broadway/Moda Center
interchange.
Metro might lobby for two
more Columbia River bridges to
be constructed in the Portland
Metro area. Options to cross
the river will lessen traffic on
the existing I-5 and I-205 bridges, and shorten commute times.
Not just electric and hybrid
vehicles should be charged a
per-mile fee (Metro ponders
new regional funding for transportation, March 17). Don’t forget high-mpg cars like Smart
Cars and Civics ... and don’t forget fuel cells, natural gas cars,
etc.
Currently people who need a
pickup, SUV, large car or minivan pay an unfair amount while
these others get off easy, if not
free.
John Smith
Tigard
A6 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, March 31, 2015
Memorial Tributes
Celebrating The Lives
Of Local Residents
Placing an obituary
is a final keepsake
of a loved one and
provides a memorial
tribute to their life.
Edward John Flabetich
December 26, 1924
March 24, 2015
C
ourage, loyalty and honor marked the life
of Edward John “Ed” Flabetich who died
in his home, Tuesday, March 24, 2015. Ed
was born December 26, 1924 in Northwest Portland
in the area known as “slabtown.” He attended St.
Patrick’s Elementary School and graduated from
Benson Polytechnic High School in 1942. In the
winter of 1943, Ed joined the US Army and served,
proudly, with the 10th Mountain Infantry Division.
He participated in campaigns in Rome, Arno,
North Apennines and Po Valley earning numerous
decorations and citations including the Bronze Star
Medal. The 10th Mountain brotherhood would be
an important source of friendship, strength and
story-telling for the rest of his life.
Born in Coquille, Ron was a
violinist in the Oregon Symphony
for 44 years as well as a popular
strolling violinist at numerous venues.
He taught music at Portland and Parkrose
Schools for 27 years and conducted the orchestra
for 20 Parkrose High School musicals. He was a
Naval Lieutenant Commander. In his free time, he
enjoyed bird watching, oil painting, church choir,
tennis, skeet shooting, bowling, beekeeping, flying,
crossword puzzles, and keeping an orchard, but
fishing was his favorite pastime. He had a great sense
of humor and always looked to entertain and make
up puns. He was a Red Cross blood donor (gallons)
and platelet donor.
He is survived by his wife, Phyllis, 6 children, 21
grandchildren, and 7 great-grandchildren. Internment
at Willamette National Cemetery on April 3 at 1:30
pm. Memorial service will be held April 4, 2:00
p.m. Tabor Heights United Methodist Church, 6161
SE Stark Street. Donations may be made to Tabor
Heights United Methodist Church or the American
Red Cross.
October 29, 1926 - March 19, 2015
521539.032715
J
ohn Royal Ferron, 88, passed away on
March 19, 2015, in Gresham, Oregon. John
was born in Anoka, Minnesota, to his parents; George and Anne (Pohlod) Ferron, on October
29, 1926. John attended High School in Minnesota,
and after graduation he served in the Navy from
1944 until 1946, and at that time he was honorably
discharged. After John’s service, he attended the
University of Minnesota, and he received both his
Bachelor’s and Master’s Degree. John worked as a
Chemical Engineer at DuPont, Niagara Falls, New
York, where he met Roberta McCleary, and they
were married on May 12, 1951, in Lancaster. They
resided in Madison, Wisconsin where he received
his PhD in Chemical Engineering at the University
of Wisconsin. John and Roberta then moved to
Newark, Delaware where he became a Professor of
Chemical Engineering at the University of
Delaware. In 1969, they moved to Rochester, New
York where John became the Chairman of the
Chemical Engineering Department at the University
of Rochester. John is remembered as a mentor and
friend to students and fellow professors in the
Department. After John retired in 1998, John and
Roberta moved to Depoe Bay, where, as avid readers themselves, they organized the resident’s
library at Little Whale Cove where a plaque names
it the Roberta and John Ferron Library. John and
Roberta also volunteered at the Oregon Coast
Aquarium and attended the Congregational Church
of Lincoln City, where they sang in the choir.
John was a man with many hobbies: he enjoyed
playing bridge, singing in church choirs, visiting
casinos, gardening, reading, camping, traveling,
and the New York Times crossword puzzle. John
was also a member of the American Chemical
Society, Alpha Chi Sigma, and Phi Lambda
Epsilon.
John was preceded in death by his parents;
George and Anne Ferron; and his wife; Roberta
Ferron. John is survived by his children; John R.
Ferron, Catherine A. (Paul Roberts) Ferron, David
G. (Gina) Ferron, and Robert C. (Cindy) Ferron;
his grandchildren; Angela, Joseph, Alex, Cole,
Thomas, and Paige; as well as his sister, Jeanne
Brandeen. He lived a full life and he will be missed
by many. Memorial Contributions in his honor can
be made to the Oregon Coast Aquarium, 2820 S.E.
Ferry Slip Road, Newport, Oregon 97365.
Arrangements by Bateman Carroll Funeral Home
in Gresham.
Bateman Carroll
Funeral Home
520 W Powell Blvd | Gresham, OR 97030
503-665-2128
BatemanCarrollFunerals.com
Traditional Funeral $$1,975
1,475
500
Immediate Burial $$550
No Hidden Costs, Guaranteed
Privately Owned Cremation Facility
www.ANewTradition.com
In Loving Memory
James Newman
December 19, 1929
- March 15, 2015
Pastor James Newman went to
Glory March 15, 2015 at the age of
85.
He pastored churches in Washington,
Montana and Idaho until he reached the age of
80. He was well-known for his beautiful smile
and singing voice.
He is survived by his wife Ramona, 4 children,
9 grandchildren and 7 great-grandchildren.
He has left a big vacant spot in our lives. He
is safe in the arms of Jesus and he has his smile
and singing voice back.
“Absent from the body, present with the
Lord.”
“For God so loved the world that he gave his
only begotten Son, that whosoever believes in
him should not perish but have eternal life.”
John 3:16
Laura Marie Van Atta
December 19, 1932 to March 22, 2015
Laura Marie Van Atta passed
away on March 22, 2015, in
Portland, Oregon, with her
daughter holding her hand. Laura
was born on December 19, 1932,
to her parents; Ernest and Virginia
(Swafford) Davis, in Portland,
Oregon. Laura attended Grant
High School, and later attended
SMU – Texas. On December 28,
1962, Laura married Donald
Edgar Van Atta. They were
married until Donald’s passing on February 16, 1979.
Laura dedicated her life to her family and to serving
others. She was involved in her children’s daily life and
always enjoyed the time she spent taking them to various
activities and clubs. She was also involved in an
organization that assisted children with disabilities. Laura
was a longtime member of East Minister Presbyterian
Church; she loved God and served him to the best of her
ability. Even in Laura’s final years, she was always
looking for a way to serve those around her. Laura will be
remembered for her unparalleled kindness, spirit of
service, her love for the sunshine, and being an amazing
mother and grandmother.
Laura was preceded in death by her parents; Ernest
and Virginia Davis; and her husband; Donald Van Atta.
Laura is survived by her daughter’s; Carol Van Atta and
Maria Van Atta; and her grandchildren; Jordyn Van Atta
and Jade Van Atta.
A funeral service will be held on Sunday, March 29,
2015 at 2:00 pm at Bateman Carroll Funeral Home in
Gresham. A Committal Service will be held on Monday,
March 30, 2015, at 9:00 am at Willamette National
Cemetery in Portland.
In lieu of flowers, donations to help with bereavement
expenses
can
be
made
to
US
Bank,
# 123000220153667390535.
Bateman Carroll
Funeral Home
520 W Powell Blvd | Gresham, OR 97030
503-665-2128
BatemanCarrollFunerals.com
521540.032715
John Royal Ferron
412210.012413
May 27, 1927 to
March 18, 2015
467734.031814
Ronald L. Williams
521537.032715
521538.032715
495
SIMPLE CREMATION $$545
In Loving Memory
In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the 10th
Mountain Division Scholarship Fund - National
Association of the 10th Mountain Division, Inc. PO
Box 150, Carthage, NY 13619 or to St. John Fisher
Parish.
Kathleen Buczkowski, life-long
resident of Portland, OR and Gleneden
Beach, OR died peacefully in her sleep
on Friday, March 20, 2015 at the age of
84.
Kathleen Jane McGee was born on
October 29, 1930 in Portland, OR to
Norbert and Elizabeth McGee. She had
four siblings: sisters Louanne, Betty,
Mary and brother Norbert. Kathleen
graduated from St. Mary’s Academy in
1948 and attended Northwestern
School of Commerce. She met Florian
“Buzz” Buczkowski on the front steps of church when
Buzz’s mother introduced them in January 1949. They
were married on June 17, 1950. They were blessed with
six children: Debbie Palmer, Mark Buczkowski, Kathleen
Buczkowski, David Buczkowski, Paul Buczkowski and
Gary Buczkowski.
Her first job was as a legal secretary for Prudential in
the real estate department where she worked for two
years until her first child was born. After staying home to
raise her children, Kathleen went to work for the
Centennial School District as a Library Administrator in
1966. She was a hard-working and dedicated employee,
working as a secretary wherever she was needed in the
Centennial School District for 25 years. Kathleen was a
devoted wife, and the marriage she had with her husband
of 64 years was something admired by all. She was proud
of all her children; dedicating immeasurable time helping
them excel in education and extra-curricular activities.
She and the family spent many weekends bonding at the
beach house, taking advantage of all the recreation and
relaxation it offered. She loved playing card or dice
games and always had a mystery novel nearby. She
enjoyed crocheting, crafting and sharing her creations
with family and friends. Kathleen was always willing to
volunteer or take on what needed to be done, no matter
the need. Kathleen and Buzz enjoyed square dancing and
spent most of their retirement together traveling all over
the US and Canada dancing and serving as officers of the
Barn Owls, River City Dancers and Toledo 49ers. They
also enjoyed traveling to Europe, Hawaii, Mexico and
several cruises. Kathleen enjoyed being close to her
family and making new friends wherever they went.
Kathleen is survived by her husband Buzz
Buczkowski, brother Norbert McGee, 6 children, 12
grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren. She is
preceded in death by her parents and sisters. Kathleen
will be deeply missed by her large, loving family.
A funeral Mass will be held for Kathleen on April 1,
2015 at 11:00 am at St. Joseph the Worker Catholic
Church, with a Rosary service beginning at 10:30am.
Arrangements being made through Mt. Scott Funeral
Home.
Milwaukie
17064 SE McLoughlin Blvd.
503-653-7076
Tualatin
Ed was preceded in death by his wife Connie. He
is survived by his sister Mary Maras, his children,
Carol and John, ten grandchildren, three great
grandchildren, three nephews and two nieces. A
funeral mass was held at 11 a.m. on Monday, March
30 at St. John Fisher Catholic Church, 7007 SW 46th
Ave., Portland. There was a reception immediately
following the service with private internment at
Mount Calvary Catholic Cemetery.
October 29, 1930 to March 20, 2015
Portland
832 NE Broadway
503-783-3393
8970 SW Tualatin Sherwood Rd
503-885-7800
Ed worked as a driver-salesman for the Blitz
Weinhard Company until his retirement in 1984.
Throughout his life he was an avid golfer and sports
fan. He followed baseball from the street corners
of NW Portland to the 2013 Red Sox World Series
title. He eagerly anticipated the start of the coming
season.
Kathleen Buczkowski
Service Directory
news A7
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, March 31, 2015
Region’s first Bus Rapid
Transit line moves forward
By JIM REDDEN
The Tribune
PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO
A new light-rail train will be used on the Portland-to-Milwaukie
Orange Line when it opens in September. TriMet says construction is on
time and under budget.
New Orange Line
MAX set to leave
station on time
Portland-Milwaukie
light-rail project
beats budget goals
By RAYMOND RENDLEMAN
Pamplin Media Group
TriMet says the PortlandMilwaukie Light Rail Line
scheduled to open on Sept. 12
will come in millions of dollars under budget.
Although the exact savings
won’t be known until 2019, the
regional transit agency estimates the savings on the $1.49
billion project will be in the $10
million to $40 million range.
“Not only are we improving
our transit system with this project, we’re delivering it on time
and under budget,” TriMet General Manager Neil McFarlane
said when the estimates were
announced Friday, March 27.
According to McFarlane,
much of the savings is due to historical low interest rates, which
allows TriMet to borrow construction funds for less than previous estimates.
Half of the cost of the project
— called the Orange Line — is
being paid by the Federal Transit Administration. It will recover 50 percent of the savings, an
amount somewhere between $5
million and $20 million. The final
figure will not be known until
the federal appropriations conclude, according to TriMet.
With the assistance of U.S.
Sen. Jeff Merkley, the FTA has
granted TriMet permission to
use some of the savings to add
back a number of previously approved project elements that
were eliminated during the final
negotiation in 2011 of the full
funding grant agreement.
The FTA will fund 50 percent
of these items, which TriMet
says will improve winter operations with additional heated
switches and ice caps installed
on top of the overhead power
wire. They also include adding
shelters at MAX stations along
the line. These restorations will
cost about $3.6 million.
TriMet also announced last
week that the project is substantially complete, meaning only
intermittent, short-term construction activities will continue
through the summer.
Regional transit agency officials warned the public not to
touch the wires for the overhead
catenary system being installed
along the light-rail alignment.
No person or equipment should
come within 10 feet of the wires,
and any work planned within
10 feet of the overhead wires
See MAX / Page 8
WHAT IS BRT?
WHAT: Learning session on BRT
Only a few decisions remain WHEN: 6-8 p.m. Thursday, April 2
WHERE: Pizza Baron, 2604 S.E.
to be made about the exact
122nd Ave., Portland
route of the region’s first Bus
RSVP: [email protected]
Rapid Transit line being prooregonmetro.gov
posed between Portland and
WEBSITE: oregonmetro.gov/
Gresham.
powelldivision
“It’s encouraging that we continue to move forward to improve and Development Project being
transit service to this high-rider- studied by Metro is intended to
ship corridor that provides so improve transit and shape develmany important connections to opment between the two cities.
jobs, education and other com- Work could begin in 2018 and
munity services,” says TriMet service could start in 2020. The
General Manager Neil McFar- budget has yet to be determined.
lane, a member of the steering
The committee appointed by
committee appointed by Metro the elected regional government
that is helping to shape the proj- has already made a series of maect.
jor decisions. They include
The remaining decisions are choosing buses with at least
critical to the project, however, some dedicated lanes over light
and may not be made until the rail as the transit option. The
end of this year.
committee also has designated
The Portland-Division Transit Southeast Powell Boulevard as
the route to and from downtown
Portland, and Southeast Division
Street as the route to and from
Gresham.
The committee made another
major decision at its March 16
meeting — to run buses in and
out of downtown Portland over
the Tilikum Crossing bridge that
is part of the Portland-Milwaukie
Light Rail Project. It was chosen
over the Ross Island Bridge,
which was the other option under consideration.
The remaining decisions require more study, however. Perhaps the most important is
where to connect Powell and Division. The majority of the committee clearly supports using
82nd Avenue, which would run
the buses past Portland Community College’s newest campus
and the heart of the emerging
Jade District. But because 82nd
is already so busy, Metro also
will study 50th and 52nd avenues
as alternatives. PCC Southeast
could still be reached from the
intersection of 82nd and Division.
Another decision is the route
buses will take between Powell
and the transit center being built
just east of OMSI, where they
will access the Tilikum Crossing.
More complicated is the route
from the Gresham Transit Center to Mt. Hood Community College, the eastern end of the proposed line. The committee wants
it to serve several large employment centers along the way, including Legacy Mount Hood
Medical Center and Gresham
Vista Business Park, both of
which are on Southeast Stark
Street.
The committee will meet
again June 1 to review the additional information that has been
generated by then.
Profiling: 20 states have no formal ban
■ From page 4
that procedure would be — and
which agency should get that
responsibility — are still subject
to negotiation.
A spokesman for the Oregon
Association Chiefs of Police says
it is too early to determine what
a negotiated bill would contain.
“I can tell you we are working
closely with the proponents of
the bill and legislators to try to
craft something together,” Kevin Campbell, the group’s lobbyist, tells the Portland Tribune.
Proposals would empower
the Oregon Criminal Justice
Commission to set independent
procedures for receiving and
handling complaints, and for
the Criminal Justice Division
within the Oregon Department
of Justice to collect and analyze
them.
“The problem is that some
people do not feel comfortable
going into a precinct or department that is engaged in that
type of behavior, because they
may see the individual (officer)
who did that to them.” Chimuku
says.
According to the NAACP report, 17 states provide for a commission to review and respond
to such complaints.
“In many other states, the attorney general is the one who
looks at patterns or practices,”
Chimuku says. But she also says
both sides agree that decision
should be left to a future work
group.
Unlike similar profiling laws
in 17 states, Chimuku says it is
unlikely that a negotiated bill
would require police agencies in
Oregon to collect information
about police stops and searches,
as has been proposed in HB
2001.
“We believe we are doing
some things very well in Oregon,” Campbell says on behalf of
the police chiefs. “We will work
to ensure that our communities
continue to have confidence in
our police officers and agencies.”
A long history
Some Oregon police agencies
have conducted their own datagathering efforts, going back a
decade or more. The Portland
Police Bureau has collected such
data in some form since 2001.
From Aug. 5 to Dec. 31, 2011,
the bureau reported almost
25,000 stops, which broke down
into these categories: Whites,
71.8 percent; blacks, 11.8 percent; Hispanics, 6.2 percent;
Asians, 4.5 percent.
A state panel appointed by
the governor has reviewed data,
issued annual reports from 2005
to 2012, and focused on improved training of officers at the
state public safety academy in
Salem.
The panel’s 2012 report estimates that almost 2,000 officers
have received special training
since 2008.
However, the panel — known
as the Law Enforcement Contacts Policy and Data Review
Committee, and housed within
the Criminal Justice Policy Research Institute at Portland
State University — suspended
its work after its grant funding
ended in 2013.
The Portland Police Bureau
responded to a 2009 report from
the PSU institute, which remains
active, in February 2014. The bu-
reau changed to a new reporting
system for traffic stops in 2011.
Although he made his comment last week in a different
context — on proposed legislation governing use of body
cameras by police — Portland
Mayor Charlie Hales said the
issue still turns on whether
there is trust between police
and the people they serve.
“The Police Bureau, like
any agency, is continuously
adopting and updating policy
for how their officers do their
work,” Hales says. “We are
doing that with the public’s
direct input and with transparency into what the rules
are for how our officers operate.”
Corona, the Washington
County resident, is working to
set up a communications business to bridge cultural gaps.
Elsewhere in the world, he
says, police often have more
sinister motives for stops.
“Our people get nervous
when they are stopped, even
when they have done nothing,
just because it is something
cultural,” he says.
Oregon’s largest source
of local news.
Keep in touch with your community 24/7, online or on-the-go at
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480047.031814
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directly from your community to you, 24/7.
A8 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, March 31, 2015
Portlanders among Beard finalists
Ox, Castagna chefs
in running; winners
to be named May 4
By JENNIFER ANDERSON
The Tribune
TRIBUNE FILE PHOTO
City Council will vote April 8 to authorize voter-approved bond funds
for parks improvements.
City rolls out parks
bond cash, projects
A baker’s dozen of
items is ready for
the first phase
By JENNIFER ANDERSON
The Tribune
Portland Parks & Recreation is ready to get rolling
with its $68 million in voterapproved bond funds.
The Portland City Council
will consider an ordinance
Wednesday, April 1, to authorize its first issuance of up to
$29 million in general obligation bonds for the first phase of
parks improvement work, to
happen over the next two
years.
The ordinance will also appoint an oversight committee
for the parks bond projects, to
include one appointee from
each commissioner’s office.
“Obviously, voters are aware
Parks will watch their money
carefully,” Commissioner
Amanda Fritz said.
The schedule for the first
phase of work will be fairly
straightforward, Fritz said.
It will include 13 projects —
most being urgent repairs such
as the mechanical systems at
the Grant Pool and the Couch
Park playground, which had to
be closed because of safety issues.
That community has a discussion underway about
whether it would like to fundraise to build more than just a
basic park.
After the first phase, about
$20 million will be left for projects in the second phase, Fritz
said. A public engagement
planning process for that
would begin in fall 2016.
But there’s still a huge gap in
deferred parks maintenance.
“We have a list of $300 million in fixes that need to be
made,” Fritz said. “We definitely want engagement from the
community to help prioritize
what should be done in the second phase. By no means does
this cover all the need.”
Meanwhile, Fritz said she’ll
address the gap in her city budget request.
Fritz said she was grateful to
voters for recognizing the
needs and supporting the
parks whenever asked. “I think
people understand we just
need more funding,” she said.
385253.062311 PT
See
Your Neighborhood Marketplace
503-620-SELL (7355)
online
Fresh new classifieds every day
– all day and night!
www.portlandtribune.com
The food gods have spoken:
Portland will not win a coveted Best New Restaurant
award this year from the
James Beard Foundation.
Nonetheless, Portland still has
three finalists in the competitive
category of Best Chef Northwest.
COURTESY OF OX
Greg Denton and Gabrielle
Quiñónez Denton, co-owners of Greg Denton and Gabrielle Quinonez Denton, chef/owners of Ox, are Beard semifinalists for Best Chef
Ox restaurant in Northeast Port- Northwest for the third year in a row. Justin Castagna of Woodward is a semifinalist for the second year in
land, are up for that distinction, a row, and was a Rising Star Chef of the Year semifinalist in 2013.
along with Justin Woodward of
Now in its 25th year, the
Castagna in Southeast Portland.
Brooks is up for three columns lea of Little T American Baker
The Beard Foundation re- she wrote in 2014, about Bolly- for Outstanding Baker; Clyde James Beard Awards began
vealed its list of finalists Tuesday wood’s opening in Southeast Common for Outstanding Bar four years after the James
evening from the Beard House in Portland, Maurice luncheonette Program; Kristen Murray of Beard Foundation was estabNew York City, named after Port- downtown, and the rise of what Maurice for Outstanding Pastry lished. The foundation holds an
land’s famous foodie godfather.
she calls “unrestaurants” in Chef; and Andy Ricker of Pok online open call for entries in
mid-October each year.
Also representing the Rose Portland.
Pok for Outstanding Chef.
This year 34,000 entries were
City is Portland Monthly food
Brooks is up against Craig LaBoth Kachka and Langbaan
writer Karen Brooks, one of Ban of The Philadelphia Inquirer were semifinalists for Best received.
The panelists vote to deterthree finalists for the Craig Clai- and Ryan Sutton of Eater.
New Restaurant.
borne Distinguished Restaurant
In February, the Best Chef
Now that list is whittled mine the final five nominees in
Review Award.
Northwest semifinalists had in- down to seven, including: each category, and judges vote to
The other nominees for Best cluded five additional Portland Bâtard in New York City; Cen- select the winners.
Winners will be announced at
Chef Northwest are Renee Erick- nominees, including Kevin Gib- tral Provisions, in Portland,
son of The Whale Wins in Seat- son of Davenport; Gregory Gour- Maine; Cosme in New York the Lyric Opera of Chicago on
tle; Rachel Yang and Seif Chirchi det of Departure; Trent Pierce of City; Parachute in Chicago; Pe- May 4, in a program hosted by
of Joule in Seattle; and Blaine Roe; Sarah Pliner of Aviary; and tit Trois in Los Angeles; The Alton Brown.
For more: jamesbeard.org.
Wetzel of The Willows Inn on Ryan Roadhouse of Nodoguro.
Progress in San Francisco; and
Lummi Island, near Bellingham,
Portland also had semifinal- Spoon and Stable in [email protected]
Wash.
ists in other categories: Tim Hea- lis.
MAX: Trains to be tested throughout spring
■ From page 1
requires a permit through TriMet.
Light rail trains are testing
intermittently along the alignment through the spring, and
light rail operator training begins in June.
In Portland, major continuing
activities include construction
of the Rhine-Lafayette pedestrian bridge, the stairs and elevators for the SE Bybee Blvd. Station, and the Park & Ride lot at
the SE Tacoma/Johnson Creek
Station.
The new quiet zone in Portland is now in effect at the rail
crossings at Southeast Eighth,
11th and 12th avenues. In the
quiet zone, light rail and heavy
rail train operators are not required to sound their horns as
they approach a crossing, although they are allowed to use
their horns at their discretion.
In Milwaukie, periodic flagging may occur on Harrison,
Monroe and Washington streets
and on Southeast 21st Avenue
as crews work on pedestrian
crossing improvements, landscaping, roadway striping and
traffic signals.
Crews are also working on
the station area on Lake Road
adjacent to the new Kellogg
Bridge, where city officials are
considering making a financial
commitment to pedestrian approaches in an amount that is
dependent on a Metro grant.
This area is open for local access only until light rail opens in
September.
Also in the Milwaukie area, a
new section of the Trolley Trail
is now open between Park Ave-
nue (at 27th Avenue) and River
Road (at Bluebird Street).
The Milwaukie quiet zone is
scheduled to go into effect May
1 at Southeast Harrison, Monroe and Washington streets,
and at 21st Avenue and Adams
Street, and at Mailwell Drive.
TriMet reminds all motorists,
cyclists and pedestrians to be
alert at the tracks. Always expect a train, even if you don’t
hear a horn. Obey all signs and
signals, and never cross while
gates are lowering or while bells
and lights are on. To learn more
about MAX Orange Line safety,
visit trimet.org/pm/safety.
The 7.3-mile Orange Line is
the region’s sixth MAX construction project. It will run
from southern end of the MAX
Green and Yellow lines at Portland State University in downtown Portland to South Water-
f r o n t , i n n e r S o u t h e a st
Portland,and Milwaukie to
North Clackamas County.
The project includes 10 stations and the Tilikum Crossing,
the first of its kind multi-modal
bridge in the United States that
carries light rail and streetcar
trains, buses, bicyclists and pedestrians, but no private vehicles. When completed, the project will expand the MAX system to 60 miles and 97 stations.
Project partners include: the
FTA; the state of Oregon; Clackamas County; Metro; the city of
Milwaukie; Multnomah County;
the city of Oregon City; the Oregon Department of Transportation; the city of Portland; the
Portland Development Commission; and TriMet.
Jim Redden contributed to this
story.
HOW TO
LIVE UNITED:
JOIN HANDS.
OPEN YOUR HEART.
LEND YOUR MUSCLE.
FIND YOUR VOICE.
GIVE AN HOUR.
GIVE A SATURDAY.
THINK OF WE BEFORE ME.
REACH OUT A HAND TO ONE AND
INFLUENCE
THE CONDITION OF ALL.
GIVE. ADVOCATE. VOLUNTEER.
LIVE UNITED
™
Want to make a difference? Help create opportunities for everyone in your community. United Way
is creating real, lasting change where you live, by focusing on the building blocks of a better life–
education, income and health. That’s what it means to Live United. For more, visit LIVEUNITED.ORG.
NEWS A9
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, March 31, 2015
Memorial set for political leader, activist Kafoury
Housing, health
care, equal rights
key issues for
public servant
By JENNIFER ANDERSON
The Tribune
Flags are flying at half-staff in
Multnomah County this week in
honor of former County Commissioner Gretchen Kafoury,
who died March 13.
COURTESY OF MULTNOMAH COUNTY
Kafoury, 72, served as the Dis- Former Commissioner Gretchen Kafoury stood with her daughter,
trict 2 Commissioner represent- Multnomah County Chair Deborah Kafoury, at the Chair’s June 9, 2014
ing Northeast Portland between swearing-in ceremony at Midland Library.
1985 and 1990.
She is the mother of Chair2 p.m. Saturday, April 4, at the Ave. in Portland.
woman Deborah Kafoury.
A memorial service for First Congregational United
Kafoury was a former threeGretchen Kafoury will be held at Church of Christ, 1126 S.W. Park term legislator and was working
as the human services coordinator for the city of Portland when
she was elected to the Multnomah County Board.
As county commissioner, she
continued her legislative priorities of health care and mental
health care while adding criminal justice, homelessness and
school-based health centers to
the list.
She also was an activist. Nine
days after taking office in January 1985, she marched on the office of the South African consul
in Portland to protest apartheid.
Within three months, she
spearheaded a controversial
resolution to ban discrimination
in county hiring on the basis of
sexual orientation. As someone
who lobbied for gay rights bills
during the 1973 Legislature only
to see them fail by a few votes,
she strategically pursued a
county ban by resolution — in-
stead of by ordinance — in order to ensure the measure survived.
As a Multnomah County commissioner, she championed the
needs of young people, helping
to bring county services for
pregnant and drug- and alcoholaffected teens to east Multnomah County neighborhoods.
She oversaw the opening of a
primary care health center at
Roosevelt High School in 1986,
the first of what would become
13 school-based health clinics.
She also worked to strengthen public safety and prevent
crime.
She advocated for the construction of new dorms at Inverness Jail and additional residential treatment for drug- and
alcohol-addicted inmates, and
was a key supporter of the forest work camp and restitution
center.
She also voted to transform
the private Library Association
of Portland into the Multnomah
County Library system.
As a young woman, Kafoury
had campaigned for Robert F.
Kennedy during the 1968 presidential campaign, “galvanized,’’
she said, by idealism. She became an advocate of gun control
after Kennedy’s assassination.
In March 1990, Commissioner
Kafoury cast the deciding vote
to enact the first local gun control ordinance in Oregon.
By then, she also had announced she would not seek reelection to the board. She was
then elected to the Portland
City Council that May, where
she served from 1991 until 1998.
She went on to teach at Portland State University and serve
as a commissioner for the Housing Authority of Portland, now
Home Forward.
DRAGON BOAT
AWAKENING
S
unny skies and warm temperatures blessed the crowds of
onlookers who attended the traditional awakening of the
dragon boats ceremony on Saturday.
Led by Buddhists from Hui Lin Temple in West Linn, the
ceremony began with a Buddhist prayer followed by a performance
by local lion dancers.
The procession then walked down to the docks where each dragon boat had its eyes painted by several local dignitaries, including
Emma Waibel, the 2014 Rose Festival queen.
From there, dragon boat crews paddled their boats around the
marina while the Portland Fire and Rescue fireboat provided a water cannon salute.
Dragon boat crews are already preparing for the Rose Festival
races that will take place on June 6-7.
TRIBUNE PHOTOS:
JAIME VALDEZ
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Thunder
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imes.com
www.tigardt
k
on trac
Right teams
get off
jewel
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Barlow
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THURSDAY, MARCH
TIN LEADER IN
THE TIGARD/TUALA
26, 2015 •
NEWS FOR 58
E 60, NO.
YEARS • VOLUM
FRIDAY, MARCH
13 • 75 CENTS
27, 2015 • THE
EAST COUNT
Y LEADER IN NEWS
METR OPO
FOR 104 YEARS
of adding back,
■ After a year it may have
district worries
already
to make cuts again
Jefferson Dancers are still
the case
Members of the
public talk with
Multnomah
County Board of
Commissioners
Chair Deborah
Kafoury during a
session of the
Slavic Advisory
Council last
week.
NCE
PAPER • PORTLANDTRIBUNE.C
OM • PUBLISHED TUESDAY
AND
THURSDAY
on homelessness
Forums will work
toward solutions on
long-simmering crisis
By
JENNIFER ANDERSON
The Tribune
On April 1, a few
dozen community leaders will
meet to move forward with an audacious
goal: to
find “A Home for
Everyone,” as
their initiative is
called.
Upon taking office
last summer,
Merger decision
goes to county
for July 1 enac board
tment
Organization
ch
lives in East Coanges
unty
Multnomah County
Chair Deborah Kafoury worked with
Portland Mayor
Charlie Hales to appoint
a coordinating
board and ask them
Coordinating meetings
a
are open to
would it take to reducequestion: “What public. The next
meeting is set for the
the unmet need p.m.
3-5
for housing for all
homeless popula- the Wednesday, April 1, in Room 315 of
Multnomah Building,
tions by half?”
501 S.E.
Hawthorne Blvd.
“The nature of this
charge was so For more: multco.us.
specific, it really
focused the (county)
board, the staff,”
says Marc Jolin,
the
former JOIN executive
director who
was hired to lead
the Home for Every- the first time we’ve looked systemwide
one initiative.
to assess the population,
attach a num“I think we’ve
talked about (the ber to the people and the dollars
problem) in theseBeatriz Rendon
it
Bautista tells
terms before, but
a gathering
it’s
of Metropo
See HOMELESS
litan Family
/ Page 2Service
supporters how
the
By KATY SWORD
The Outlook
A Home for Everyone
PurchaseMoYour
One Year Subscription Today!
tor
TESTING, B
light
TE
ADDRESS ___________________________________________________________________________________________
STING?
Under protest, PPS
voter
■ From SUN
School
agency changed
her life.
s to car loa
law
overcome barrier
NAME _______________________________________________________________________________________________
s of poverty, ns, MFS strives to help peo
gets gree
SUBMITTED PHOTO
ons in Tualatin
marijuana regulati
Some say the
nable.
and unreaso
are too strict
n
STORY BY
TIMES PHOTO:
CONTRIBUTED
inequality and
social
the city
■ On Monday,regulations
MAN
council passed
ties to
CAITLIN FELD
New rule expected on marijuana faciliopposition
to quickly increase much dissent and
ON
voter registration
PHOTOS: METROPOL
ITAN FAMILY SERVICE
ple
isolation
FELDMAN
By CAITLIN
The Times
l acin City Counci
the Tualat
mariBy PETER WONG
For weeks, how best to regulate
d
legal.
Capital Bureau
tively debate es once they become
n,
l made a decisio
juana faciliti
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lors and comThe ranks of voters
On Monda
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will
Depart
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but dissent
Kate standing
rs alike — the night.
Tualati Police
the
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said
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The Smarter Balanced
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School stuwe decided
up and say House Bill 2177 was
den and council
Officer Nick
Wade Brooks bubble
As/ Page A3
signed
Tualatin High on a Thurs- end of is a great reason why many contacts come
Councilors
sessment is a harder,
Monday, March See ZOEY
Beikman and
t’s Zoey!” a
weeks ago.
so
sheets
rings
“This
two
have
16,
bell
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Davis
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dog?” keep the general public that
ern age, calibrated the modsecretary of state priority as
we would have
Frank Bubeni ing votes.
day afterno
if I pet your
to the
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this
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She became governor session.
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pencils
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discussion.
upon the resignatio Feb. 18
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liquor license were nextToday’
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the past five
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wn or anythin
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ter or our downto said Truax.
test-tak
STORY BY
na
ers
bill
sit in
comPortland
is that marijua
pletes the work
approved them,”
legal
launched by
quickly here,
front bit ascompu
Public
Del Riley, the
ing clear very
be be everyof a
ter to Schools’
clerk in Linn
some
listen
are going to
to saudio
County where
, but we for
asfacilitie
clips,
licenseclick
differa liquor
tely incorre
on
sessment ofmail balloting
as having
ct
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a paragr
originated in “There is
unreasonable. marreason
and
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seems to me aph,
Oregon
e Portland Triently, which
the relevan
currently stands, l, recrei n no excuse
ce ofcevarious
bune that
1981.
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website
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be sited
s.
facilities —
around 483 students
Studen
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ons — must
ijuanats
across
, residengrow operati
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mitted opt-out forms have subvision to make for
are
ational and
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parks, schools
evacuation
lo-startbe
from
ncy
ing
must
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year. While a signifi this
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take
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For more inform
GER
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throug
report of
in size.
By GEOFF PURSIN
School and
feet
h
least
the
High
BELOW: Criticsation:
45
at
opt-out
end
accessible
square
Gresham
cated
Tigard
forms — particularof 3,000
of
the school year.
as not being
questions from a
were “evacu
Farmers’ Market:
ted for,A
The Times
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cannot exceed ions are accoun
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reshamf
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’s deputy
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Schoolsmariju
l o t i n t h e vote.”
such as those at
Deputies helped out of the
only light manufa cturing
board
public’s help
— that still By JODI WEINBE
High
Smarter
ed toweek
County Sheriff
y Market:
last
hobble
restrict
locating a
manufa
only represents
RGER Balanced
not been walkhttp://wthis
in
the Tigard
hands of every
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Feb. 17 protest
ed” teacher get medical attenThe Outlook Assessments
ww.gresh
longtime Greshless
back
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l manufacturing
have
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percent of the more than 2
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than
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more interactive
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Rockwood
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25,000 students required
then returne
in
becaus e, “her
nian through
all
Smarter
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business park evening’s vote,
test
Farmers
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every
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’ Market:
day, he was
here to tion, s — each locked hand
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and
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take Smarter Balanced.
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vote by mail,”
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leader,
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since 6:30 p.m.from her home
elylowwalking toward hand — to waiting
worsening,” is
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Phelps
Brown said beom/
be
posed two amendm
the
to a safe
wrong things arket.
powerless
the 3,000-fo
than 5.5 in Sandy, is a farm
he
help,” he said,
Tuesday,
D-Portland
questions. Road
thatit.
to
distance bets who cow- that transported them
stop
ted
March
the
said.
f
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studen
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and
24.
puts too much
Slice of Heaven
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feet as
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miles away. Tifeet, and
FROM
. SMARTER
Diane Holcom
signed the bill.
Ron Holcom
a back wall.
ered to 1,000 s be dropped to 1,000
location a few
stress on schools.
JONATHAN HOUSE
See TEST / Page 2 Though at 17BALANCED
scenar io,
ered near
, 74, was last
TIMES PHOTO:
Gresham residen
seen at her
acres,ASSESSMENT
said TV news
“This bill is
In the mock
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out to
tween facilitie
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can
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the
TRIBUNE
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CONSORTIUM
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PHOTO:
SHASTA
/ Page
vador.
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KEARNS
See MARIJUANA
slice. But heavendescribed as a new As
of her rounds
MOORE
Northw est
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ave
high gym,
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part
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HOLCOM been
nt
shot in the
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loThird
work better,
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leave thetreating
. The event was ent.
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Owned by Brando
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will conduc
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citizens
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ises on foot.
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ieta Easley,
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and
giving
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Twality Middle
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recent transplMar- in May, Salvad season starts
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the service they
spot where they Tigard-T
to Sandy from
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or visited
ualatin
ants of Heave
and
an emerge
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“Pamplin Media the stories of our communi
20, prepari
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the
n
undesignated
said
Louisia
him
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March
Tualati
ects
on Wednesday,
n on Wedne
to
, in case
na, they March
plan to build
rs.”
drill involving
straon Friday,
news that refl
she return stay put
sday,
March
A8 of a disaster
that it was
JR.
s and admini
25.
reading our newspape
The bill provides
able to feed their farm to be
See DRILL / Page
event
the first time 25, friends of Diane’s s. He said
Thank you for — DR. ROBERT B. PAMPLIN
staff, student
Sequoia and
......... B1 for elecThe Easley’
their own family
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Here .............
CONTRIBUTED
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PHOTO:
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such as cia statewide voter maintains
Opinion ............. .......... A7
s at the Gresham Farmer
leave.
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Park along
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they obtain or renew
NorthSee MARKETS
Anyone
/ Page A7 First Bella Vista Drive betwee
license — but DMV a driver’s
and Fifth streets
n asked to with information is
now transcall 503-823
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Entries for
— Jodi Weinbe
the
See MOTOR VOTER / Page
test” are due annual “If I Were Mayor
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Con- sinceri
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Website ............ ............. 503-620-9797
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communities. that reflects the stories of
outlook.com
Thank you for
our
reading
newspap
at Tualatin High
assesses
ents
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School.
na, man
students; some parents
CITY
________________________________________________________________
ZIP ____________________
tion of marijua Tualatin is keeping theirs
opt out
but
With the legaliza
Don Atwell
Attendance
expectations
Tuesday, March
for
24, Troutdale the
City Counci
l meeting —
agenda include
whose
d the future
city’s law enforce
of
ment —
enough to
warrant two were
changes.
location
By the time
the meeting
7:05 p.m., every
started at
seat in the
Cox Buildin
g Great Room Sam K.
with a standin
was filled,
forming as g-room only section
Mayor Doug
opened the
meeting. There Daoust
few items on
were a
the
issue the audiencagenda, but the only
e cared about
the propos
was
ed law-enforceme
tract with
nt conthe
Sheriff’s Offi Multnomah County
ce.
After more
cussion, the than two hours of discouncil voted
prove the estimat
4-3 to aptract. Daoust ed $3.4 million conand Counci
Anderson,
lors
Eric
Larry
Wilson support Morgan and John
ed the contrac
councilors
t, while
David Ripma,
and Glenn
White voted Rich Allen
against it.
Troutdale
Police Chief
derson — who
Scott Anwith the city will keep his position
commander via a newly created
position with
iff’s office
the sher— said the
contract apSee CONTRACT
/ Page A8
eatriz Rendon
Bautista, a
freshman nursing
Linfield College major at
, says she nevSTORY BY
er would
■ First, MFS
is “streng
lege if it hadn’t have made it to colchildhood
development thening early
Family Service been for Metropolitan
youth success
and buildin
and her mentor
g
,” she
Baldizon.
, Ben
■ Second, MFS says.
learned leaders
Details
works
“I am the fi
rst in my family
ing,” she says. hip and public speak- promote community-ba to develop and
ate from high
Metrop olitan
to gradu“He was
sed health
wellness.
school
and
Family Servic
and
tend college,
the first to at- go to.” The family also someone I could
has a budget
■ Lastly, it
e
” she
visited the Reynolds Middle
strives to
Born in Ensenasays.
and employ of about $8 million
School food
s about 200
their food ran
pantry when vidual and family economadvance indida, Mexico,
started school
mostly part-tim
people,
low.
ic well-being.
Under this
in Rockwood Bautista
There are many
e. It fields
almost no English
than 1,900 volunte
speaking
more
programs withumbrella, MFS offers
success stories
Bautista’s, all
.
10
ers.
more than 400
“School was
like MFS
MFS draws
a
result
partners.
its financin
couldn’t help hard for me. My parents social services provideof the 65 years of loans,does everything from
variety of sources
g from a
making
d by Metrop
to
speak English me because they didn’t tan Family Service.
its money, about . The majority of
oli- pointm driving folks to medica car
either.”
ents,
l apAt first glance,
72 percen
to tutoring
A bilingual
from govern
children to
senting healthy
Metropolitan
ment grants t, comes
preFamily busy
she benefited teacher helped her and Service seems like an
cookin
tracts. Donati
and conodd mishma
working familie g classes for
from the SUN
unrelated
ons
and
Uniting Neighb
fundraisers
sh of
bring in about
social service
(Schools
s. MFS is headnonprofit
19 percent.
efforts. The quartered at 1808 S.E.
Davis Elemen orhoods) program
Belmont St.,
land.
at overcom organization “helps
Portpeople
Middle School,tary School. At Reynol
e
ds equality the barriers of poverty
she met Baldizo
cial service
districts in Multno
and social isolatio
, in- Shining light
n a sos worker for
on education
n,” says chief
mah County
Family Service
nial, Gresha
Metropolitan executive officer Judy
One of the most
m-Barlow, Reynol : CentenStrand.
.
But, it’s not
rose and David
“He helped
visible — and
ds, Parksuch a mishma
quential —
Douglas.
conseme academ
Strand says
things MFS
SUN Schools
ically. I
all of MFS’s sh.
County is
does in East
, funded
snugly into
run
work falls
three categor
Schools prograthe SUN Community are full-service neighbby the county,
ies.
m. SUN
striving to
orhood hubs
available at
ensure kids
low-income Schools are
Finance Director OUTLOOK PHOTO: KATY SWORD
and
families
schools in fi
ve
over the contrac Erich Mueller goes
questions the t and answers any
See SUN / Page
council had before
A8
vote during the
March 24 meetingits
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Co Tualatin
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against happenthe economy is recover
Oregon schools
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where
staff. It give in state funding for
r than it was
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-Tualatin lead- it.
counselors
usly cut probut Tigard
be
is slightly more in 2009 or 2011
of the
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lly
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from
was
cbillion origina
grams and
distric t ers
keep them
than the $7.23 Tigard-Tualatin stronge
, from my perspe
year for a
enough to
but
— K-12 budget also look better.”
a banner
138 people making cuts.
proposed,
others
off
ls
many
laid
should
up
and
tin officia
that had
tin makes
billion tive,
leaders —
Tigard -Tuala
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Tigard -Tuala of that budget,
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t
might have
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percen
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have
the
about
than
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Page A7
that
give up some district officials, $250 take for the state’s educa“We made
)
See BUDGET /
eral years
state budget
-Tunext year, say tors don’t in- will system to succeed.
GER
- last year’s
the Tigard
to drop back,”
By GEOFF PURSIN
if state legisla d statew ide tion Tuesday, the Legisla now we’re going
alatin School
THURSDAY, MARCH 19,
BROWN
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planne
subcommitThe Times
crease a
on.
2015 • TWICE CHOSEN
joint budget
District didn’t
for K-12 educati
to ture’s
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15 school year
s. In- budget leaders are poised
The 2014-20 to be the start have
off worker
State
ed
cuts or lay
teachers,
was suppos good.
it added back
ing
of someth first time in sev- stead,
It was the
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■ Annual intergalactic battle helps Red Cross save lives Hales
tiptoes
toward
big ideas
Will mounted
patrol ride off
into the sunset?
Nonprofit group takes to TV to buck
Novick plan to cut police horse unit
One year in office,
mayor puts priority
on revenue, parks
By JIM REDDEN
The Tribune
That’s a real Portland police car behind
“Grimm” actor David Giuntoli. When it
comes time to knock down a door or make
an arrest on the show, Portland police are
often used as consultants. Local cops say
they sometimes watch the show just to
see familiar faces and places, and for an
escape from reality.
COURTESY OF SCOTT GREEN/NBC
WATCHING
THE DETECTIVES
STORY BY
PETER KORN
S
ure, in TV shows like “Law &
Order”, art imitates life. But
Portland police detective Sgt. Joe
Santos says sometimes on the job,
life imitates art.
A while back, a lieutenant was telling
him about a case that immediately brought
to mind a Morgan Freeman/Brad Pitt movie, Santos says.
“A brother killed his sister, and she was
rotting in the bathroom,” Santos says.
“And the brother was basically walking over her
decaying body for two
weeks to go to the bathroom. He was an obese
guy and laying on the
bed, and they went in to
clear the house and he
said, ‘I’m sorry.’
“And I was thinking,
‘Man, that really happened. That’s exactly like
— Brian the movie ‘Se7en.’ ”
Another case two
Schmautz,
ex-Portland weeks ago had Santos
police officer thinking about the popular Showtime series
“Dexter.” He was searching “the nastiest house in North Portland.” Garbage was strewn everywhere,
he says. “I’m walking into the kitchen and
stepping on pizza boxes full of rotting
pizza that’s green and slimy and moldy.
With every step I’m slipping around. I get
to the basement and there’s no power and
we find the bad guy hiding in a closet pretending to be asleep.
“It reminds me of every TV show I’ve
“You get
juries that
think, ‘Why
didn’t they
take DNA
on that car
prowl?’ ”
■ Cops find something to love, hate
in lineup of police TV programs
Mayor Charlie Hales included
the agreement in the 2013-14
budget summary his office reSupporters of the Portland leased after the council apPolice Mounted Patrol are
proved it.
pushing back against two deThe Friends’ group had
velopments that threaten the raised the first $200,000 and was
future of the horse unit.
in the process of transferring it
First, Commissionto the city when
er Steve Novick proNovick made his proposed eliminating the
posal in a Feb. 3 memo
unit in next year’s
to the other council
budget.
members.
Then the Portland
“We didn’t know
Development Comanything about Commission declared the
missioner Novick’s
stable area at Centenproposal and the
nial Mills unsafe, forcproblems with Cening the horses to be
tennial Mills before
relocated to a farm in
they were announced.
Aurora. The unit has
It’s put us in a holding
been housed at the agpattern until we can
ing former flour mill
meet with him and
on Northwest Naito
Mayor Hales and
Parkway and Ninth
learn more about
Avenue since the PDC
what they’re thinkbought it in 2001.
ing,” says Bob Ball, a
The one-two punch
real estate developer
came as a surprise to
— Bob Ball, and reserve Portland
the Friends of the
police officer who
Friends of the
Mounted Patrol, a
serves on the Friends’
Mounted Patrol board
nonprofit organizaboard of directors.
of directors member
tion that thought it
Ball says he was
had struck a deal with
caught off guard by
the City Council that
Novick’s proposal beguaranteed the unit would con- cause of the council agreement.
tinue at least through the next
“I testified before the council
fiscal year.
and thanked them for agreeing
When the council considered to continue the unit for two
eliminating the unit in the cur- years, and nobody said they
rent budget, the Friends’ group weren’t agreeing to anything at
promised to raise $400,000 to that time,” Ball says.
keep it going over the next two
See HORSES / Page 13
years — $200,000 each year.
By STEVE LAW
The Tribune
“The mounted
patrol is very
popular and
versatile.
People love
the horses. ...
Why would the
council want
to get rid of a
program that
connects so
well with the
public?”
Darth Vader and his Imperial Stormtroopers stop holiday shoppers in their tracks outside Macy’s (above).
Jedidiah Maxwell of Canby has his picture taken with Queen Apailana (right).
BEAM ME UP, SCOTTY B
THE FORCE IS
OUT FOR BLOOD
Story by Jim Redden • Photos by Jaime Valdez
ever watched,” Santos says. “If it’s ‘Dexter,’
the crime scene is some beautiful modern
house that’s white with perfect blood
splatter. Our crime scenes are garbagefilled, single-wide trailers that a hoarder
lives in.”
COURTESY OF NBC
“Let’s be careful out there” was Sgt. Phil
Esterhaus’ weekly roll call command on
“Hill Street Blues,” and a memorable one,
according to a number of Portland police
officers. Esterhaus was played by actor
Michael Conrad.
See DETECTIVES / Page 2
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JAIME VALDEZ
Portland Police Officer Benson Weinberger walks Diesel into the safe
portion of the Centennial Mills building where the Mounted Patrol
prepares for their shifts.
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE
Jeff Shang joins fellow neighbors at a volunteer work party for the Sabin Community Orchard last Sunday.
Grant funds paid for the addition of bee-friendly trees, plants and shrubs to the orchard last summer.
Portland Tribune
Next time you’re out and
about in Northeast Portland,
stop and smell the flowers.
That’s what the Sabin Community Association hopes you
will do on their Bee Friendly
Garden Tour, a program heading
into its third season this spring.
“This is about providing forage and native habitat” to bees
and other pollinators, says Diane
Benson, a neighborhood board
member and co-founder of the
project. “Bees need food, and all
of us can do that.”
In three years, the tour has
come to include 41 stops — 40
Murphy shines his flashlight inside and
sees three young black men. They aren’t
wearing gang colors or smoking dope.
On a crisp, clear Thursday evening They’re just sitting, engine off. Dale and
Murphy want to talk to them.
with the temperature outside hoverWith Portland police rolling out the
ing around freezing, Portland Gang
city’s new hot-spot policing
Enforcement Team offiprogram, the unfolding
cers Brian Dale and Patscene involving Dale and
rick Murphy pull their
Murphy and the young
squad car to the curb on
Southeast 119th Avenue. SECOND OF TWO STORIES men they are about to confront is a microcosm of
A black two-door Honda
what criminologists say might be the
Civic is a good four or five feet from
the curb — the result of either a hor- program’s defining moment.
The evidence is clear that done right,
rible parking job or someone intentionally half-blocking the street.
See POLICING / Page 11
As the officers walk toward the car,
residents’ homes plus the pub- do, but it’s not a way to save bees.
licly owned Sabin Community You’ve got to get these flowers
Orchard, at Northeast 18th Ave- out there,” says Mace Vaughan,
another co-founder of the Bee
nue and Mason Street.
Each stop has a “Bee Friendly Friendly Garden Project who is
Garden” sign, funded by the the pollinator program director
neighborhood association. There for Portland’s Xerces Society for
are maps and a telephone hot- Invertebrate Conservation.
Vaughan hapline that provides
pens to live six
information about
blocks from Beneach site. Hundreds
son in the Sabin
of people throughNORTHEAST
neighborhood. The
out the city and subthird co-founder of
urbs have come to
the project is Tim Wessels, a piocheck it out.
Now the Sabin neighborhood neer in the field and a master
would like to inspire other neigh- beekeeping instructor at Oregon
borhoods to create a similar State University, president of the
Portland Urban Beekeepers, and
project of their own.
They’ll hold a public forum founder of Bridgetown Bees, an
March 19 to share their experi- effort to breed a winter-hardy
ences and suggestions for how to Portland queen bee.
Serendipitously, Wessels, too,
start a bee-friendly garden.
They’ll answer questions about lives in Sabin.
The project started, Benson
plant types, outreach, pesticides
and more.
“Beekeeping is a fun thing to
See BUZZ / Page 12
Portland teachers reached a tentative deal Tuesday.
Follow the story at portlandtribune.com.
Tech firms
seek a place
in economy’s
spotlight
Intel is well-known, but other
companies fly under the radar
By JIM REDDEN
The Tribune
TribSeries
TribTown
DEAL MIGHT AVERT A STRIKE
Online
See HALES / Page 9
By PETER KORN
The Tribune
Portland Tribune
Inside
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JAMIE VALDEZ
Gang Enforcement Team officer Patrick Murphy — after asking
permission — pats down a young black man who had been sitting in a
parked car on Southeast 119th Avenue. Officer Brian Dale looks on.
WHAT’S LOCAL FOOD?
SELECTING STALLS FOR THE JAMES BEARD PUBLIC MARKET.
— SEE SUSTAINABLE LIFE SECTION
There are more high-tech companies in the
Portland area than Intel — and many of them
are desperately trying to get that message
out.
“There’s a ton of world-class companies in the
Portland region, but the word hasn’t gotten out
on that,” says Sam Blackman, co-founder and
CEO of Elemental Technologies, a Portland-based
company working on ultra-high definition signal
transmission technology.
According to Blackman, the lack of awareness
See TECH / Page 10
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The Tribune
See BLOOD / Page 2
Police say conversation a priority; others
say random stops are recipe for trouble
It’s the bees’ needs, and Sabin has it
Sabin residents raise
awareness about
pollinators, habitat
Wars’ and ‘Star
Trek’ both have a
lot of fans who turn
out, and we always
have a lot of fun.”
The competition, similar to the Oregon vs. Oregon
State Civil War blood drive, has been
held three times in the past. It has been
won twice by “Star Wars” fans, which
is not surprising, considering the popular franchise has two active fan clubs in
the Portland area, both of which have a
lot of practice supporting charitable
events in authentic-looking, homemade costumes.
Most recently, more than a dozen of
them showed up to support the Salvation Army bell ringers outside of the
Pat downs likely
to increase as cops
take to the street
Shootouts every day?
Everybody likes to look in the mirror at
least a little bit, right? So if you’re a cop,
that means you probably watch some cop
shows on TV, at least a little bit, right?
If nothing else, cops know that what the
rest of us see on TV and in movies influences what we think of them.
Surprisingly, none of the officers we put
the question to admitted to watching real-
lood will
flow when
fans of
“Star
Wars” and “Star
Trek” rally their
supporters later this month.
At least that’s the hope for the upcoming American Red Cross blood
drive that pits supporters of the two
popular entertainment franchises
against each other to see who can turn
out the most donors. The Galaxy Blood
Drive is from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 28, at the donor center at
3131 N. Vancouver Ave.
“This is a great event for us,” says
Red Cross spokeswoman Daphne
Mathew. “Donations normally drop between Thanksgiving and New Year’s
because people are so busy. But ‘Star
Portland Mayor Charlie
Hales pledged Friday to pursue a new tax
measure to
pave city
streets in
2014, as well
as funding to
build out the
city’s parks
system.
Hales also
told the Portland Tribune
“I don’t feel
editorial
a need to
board that
he’s exploring look at a
a major reno- map of the
vation of Veterans Memo- city and
rial Coliseum, come up
hoping to pigwith new
gyback on the
World Indoor visions at
Track & Field the
Championships coming moment.”
— Mayor
to the Oregon
Charlie Hales
Convention
Center in 2016.
(See related
story, Page A8.)
Hales gave himself a “B”
grade for his first year in office,
but said he succeeded in setting
a tone of “collegiality and plainspokenness” at City Hall.
One example: he’s making no
bones about the need for a new
revenue source to pave dozens
of miles of the city’s gravel and
mud streets.
“There’s no point in kidding
you, or kidding ourselves,” he
— DR. ROBERT B. PAMPLIN JR.
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PAGE B1
TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2015
Nomad
‘Zo’ Gee’s
odyssey
continues
with
Blazers
KerryEggers
ON SPORTS
Tales of
Rip City,
past and
present
By KERRY EGGERS
The Tribune
Alonzo Gee made by far the
biggest contribution in his
month-plus as a Trail Blazer
in last week’s 122-108 loss to
Golden State at Moda Center.
The 6-6, 220-pound small forward — starting alongside
Dorell Wright in the absence in
injured regulars LaMarcus
Aldridge and
Nicolas Batum
— scored 10
points on 5-for10 shooting and
had three rebounds and two
assists in 31
GEE
minutes. A
good portion of
Gee’s time was spent following
Stephen Curry around screens
and trying to keep the Warriors’
point guard in check.
Curry collected 33 points and
10 assists, but Gee earned praise
from Portland coach Terry
Stotts for his efforts.
“ ‘Zo’ did a nice job,” Stotts
said. “He was aggressive (going
after) loose balls and made some
hustle plays, which is what we
were looking for.”
At the game-day shootaround,
teammate Damian Lillard said,
“Coach (Stotts) told him, ‘We
need you to wear out ‘Steph’ like
you wore out ‘Dame’ his rookie
year.’”
That was when Gee was a
starter for the Cleveland Cavaliers.
“He picked me up fullcourt
the whole time and made me
work,” Lillard said. Curry “was
tough to handle, but ‘Zo’ was
ready. I thought he played real
well.”
Since being acquired along
with Arron Afflalo in a trade
deadline deal with Denver on
Feb. 19, Gee has scored 22 points
in 73 minutes of nine games,
with nine DNP-CDs (did not
play/coach’s decision). So the
chance to contribute on the
court pleased him.
But this is not a player who
intends to make waves, no matter what his role.
“Coming from where I came
from?” asked Gee, who turns 28
in May. “I’m just glad to be in the
roster. I appreciate being in the
NBA.”
Gee recently had his story
chronicled by Lee Jenkins in the
“Point After” column of Sports
Illustrated. Over the past nine
months, the Florida native has
been with — unofficially, at least
— seven NBA teams. From
Cleveland to Charlotte to New
Orleans to Houston to Sacramento to Denver to Portland, all
in less time than it takes for a
baby to go from conception to
birth.
Gee whiz.
“Kind of hard to believe,” he
said with a smile.
Undrafted out of Alabama in
2009, Gee signed a free-agent
contract with Minnesota but
was waived after a week of training camp. He spent most of the
2009-10 season with the Austin
Toros of the NBA Development
League, earning Rookie of the
Year honors while averaging
21.0 points and 6.6 rebounds in 36
games. He signed a pair of 10day contracts with the Washington Wizards, scoring 19 points in
his first career start on March
26. Two days later, he was waived
and picked up by San Antonio,
but he did not see any action
during the regular season or
playoffs.
Gee played in 56 games, with
34 starts, with San Antonio,
Washington and Cleveland during the 2010-11 season. He began
the season with the Spurs but
was waived on Nov. 16, then
signed by the Wizards a week
later. He was waived on Dec. 20
and signed by the Cavaliers a
week later, finishing the season
and finding a home there for
some time.
Over the next three seasons,
See GEE / Page 3
EVEN UP
By KERRY EGGERS
The Tribune
It was tight, it was physical, it
was a defensive struggle.
When it was over, the Winterhawks had emerged with a 3-0 victory over the Seattle Thunderbirds
Sunday at Moda Center, evening their
Western Hockey League best-of-seven first-round playoff series at 1-1.
After giving up a 3-2 third-period
lead in a 4-3 loss in Saturday night’s
opener, Portland was the more forceful team in Game 2, outshooting the
visitors 39-21 and limiting good scoring opportunities as goaltender Adin
Hill notched his first career playoff
shutout.
“We gave up a little too much last
night, and we learned our lesson,”
said Portland’s first-year coach, Jamie Kompon. “We competed hard
every shift. It was a well-played game
on both sides.
“Last night, we gave up three rush
goals, which is very uncharacteristic
of our team and disappointing in
terms of our puck management
through the neutral zone. We wanted
to tidy that area up, and we did a good
job tonight.”
The final score was misleading.
Portland led 1-0 until the final two
minutes, when Seattle pulled goaltender Taran Kozun and the Hawks
capitalized with a pair of empty-net
goals.
The first was a beauty, by center
Dominic Turgeon on a backhand shot
from mid-ice with 1:58 to play.
“I applaud Dom for hanging onto
the puck there and having the composure to make sure he got to the puck,”
Kompon said. “And he got the emptynet (goal) — that was good, too.”
K
Portland
Winterhawks
center Nicolas
Petan is shoved
by Seattle
Thunderbirds
wing Nolan
Volcan (26) as a
skirmish breaks
out during Game
2 of the Western
Hockey League
series.
COURTESY OF
JOHN LARIVIERE
Turgeon’s score came mere seconds after Kozun had skated off the
ice to give the Thunderbirds an extra
attacker.
“The guys on the bench stood up
when Dom got it,” said Portland center Nic Petan, who got the only goal
in 37 shots against Kozun in the first
period. “It’s a hard shot from there,
but we needed it. Everybody was yelling ‘Shoot.’ We didn’t want to take
any chances icing the puck. It was a
good backhand shot.”
Twelve seconds later, with Kozun
still on the bench, Hawks right wing
Oliver Bjorkstrand got control of the
puck and sent it from just beyond the
blue line into the net.
“I like to score goals,” said Bjorkstrand, who led the WHL with 63 in 59
regular-seasons games. “Even
See HAWKS / Page 3
Jamar Howard
hauls in one of
his three
touchdown
receptions for
the Portland
Thunder in their
42-37 victory
over the Los
Angeles KISS.
Portland returns
to Moda Center
on Friday for a 7
p.m. game
against the
Tampa Bay
Storm.
TRIBUNE PHOTO:
JAIME VALDEZ
Thunder get things started
Rowley, Howard ignite
KO of KISS; first game
a success for new coach
By KERRY EGGERS
The Tribune
There is little reason to think the Portland Thunder will be a participant in
ArenaBowl XXVIII on Aug. 29 after their
season-opening 42-37 victory over the
Los Angeles KISS Friday night at Moda
Center.
On the other hand, the Thunder are 1-0
and unbeaten under first-year coach Mike
Hohensee, who is the Arena Football
League’s answer to George Halas.
Hohensee, 54, didn’t co-found the AFL.
But he threw the league’s first touchdown
pass in 1987 and has been with it since as a
player, assistant coach or head coach.
And when he looked up at a cheering
throng of 7,194 at game’s end, Hohensee
grew nostalgic.
“Are you kidding me?” Hohensee asked.
“From the intro video that (ex-AFL star) Rashad Floyd did, which was tremendous, to
the end when we won that game and you
looked up and everyone was standing on
their feet — that’s what Arena Football has
been for me for almost 30 years.
“It did my heart good to look up and see
them excited about what I’ve been doing for
such a long time.”
The opening-night win wasn’t easy, and at
times it wasn’t pretty against an L.A. team
that went 3-15 a year ago. It wasn’t secure
until the Thunder surrendered a successful
KISS onside kick and got a stop in the closing seconds.
“When they got the onside kick, it was
like, well, we still have some work to do,”
Hohensee said with a smile. “With a basi-
cally first-year team, with so many new
guys and staff, when you make a ton of mistakes like that and you win, that’s a coach’s
dream.”
The Thunder will be back at Moda on Friday for a 7 p.m. kickoff against the Tampa
Bay Storm.
“We have things we can show the players
on (video) that they can get better at, but
you can’t question their attitude or effort,”
Hohensee said after the Thunder’s opening
victory. “These guys have worked extremely hard. We had a little more left in the tank
than (the KISS) did at the end.”
Veteran quarterback Kyle Rowley was effective, completing 19 of 28 passes for 209
yards and five touchdowns with nary an interception. Receiver Jamar Howard was
spectacular, snaring eight passes for 114
yards and three TDs. And in a game that
features offense, Portland’s defense allowed
See THUNDER / Page 3
nocking it about on
a variety of sporting topics ...
■ CJ McCollum is
no longer hosting the weekly
“Year 1” show as he did last
season on SiriusXM radio.
But the second-year Trail
Blazers guard says he has
another one-hour interview
show lined up on an NBA
channel affiliated with SiriusXM.
“I enjoyed
it, and I’m
looking forward to the
next show,”
McCollum
tells me. “It’s
MCCOLLUM
a lot of fun.”
McCollum
isn’t your typical NBA player
moving into uncharted waters. He has a journalistic
pedigree dating from his
years at Lehigh, where he
earned a degree in mass
communications. He worked
three years for the school
newspaper, “Brown and
White,” the last two as
sports editor. He also did
television interviews with
coaches and players for the
school’s athletic department
website through its sports
internship program.
The kid is a good interview — and interviewer.
■ Bill Schonely loves to
tell the story about the origin of his “Rip City!” phrase
that has grown to iconic proportions in this city. How
during the Blazers’ first season, in a game against the
Los Angeles Lakers, guard
Jim Barnett launched a long
jump shot during an important part of the game that
tickled twine, causing the
Schonz to exhort, “Rip City
— all right!”
Barnett was in town this
week, serving his 30th season as the Warriors’ television analyst. He is aware of
his spot in
More online
Blazer lore
and enjoys
Read other
it.
Kerry Eggers
“People
columns during
the week at portland
talk about
tribune.com
that all the
time,” says
Barnett, the
former Oregon standout who
played only one season with
the Blazers in the midst of
an 11-year NBA career. “It’s
a nice thing. It’s something
that will remain in history. I
don’t polish my knuckles
over it, but it’s nice. I’m glad
I was crazy enough to take a
shot I shouldn’t have been
taking at the time.”
Barnett, 70, has been with
the Warriors through 14
coaches (George Karl, Ed
Gregory, Don Nelson, Bob
Lanier, Rick Adelman, P.J.
Carlesimo, Garry St. Jean,
Dave Cowens, Brian Winters,
Eric Musselman, Mike Montgomery, Keith Smart, Mark
Jackson and Steve Kerr), a
few good seasons but a lot of
lean ones. This year’s Warriors already have their
place in history.
“It’s by far the best team
I’ve ever covered,” Barnett
says. “The Warriors were
good during ‘Run TMC’
teams in the early ‘90s (with
Tim Hardaway, Mitch Richmond and Chris Mullin), but
they didn’t have any bigs.
This team has a big (Andrew
Bogut), a powerful forward
(Draymond Green), the best
backcourt in basketball (Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson) and depth, with guys
coming off the bench who
are really good players.
“They’re special at both
See EGGERS / Page 2
B2 SPORTS
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, March 31, 2015
Eggers: What makes
Payton Pritchard so good?
■ From page 1
500324.120214
ends of the floor, and they
have the ability to score
quickly, not only through
shooting by Thompson and
Curry, but with their defense.
They get stops and steals and
all of a sudden, they’re hitting you with a 14-2 run.”
Barnett offers temperance
to those who think the Warriors are a lock to reach the
NBA finals for the first time
since the 1974-75 champions,
led by Rick Barry and Jamaal
Wilkes.
“They’ve proved they’re
special with the great record
this deep into the season, but
they haven’t accomplished
anything until the playoffs,”
Barnett says. “I remember in
2007, the Warriors got into
the playoffs as the eighth
seed on the last day and upset the 67-15 Dallas Mavericks in six games. Things can
happen, and there’s no free
ride in the West.”
While taking his paycheck
from the Warriors, Barnett
has enjoyed the ride.
“I’m having a lot of fun, but
I take it in stride,” he says.
“I’m not going to get too exuberant about anything until
the playoffs. Then I’m going
to start rooting for them.
We’ll do the first round and
then national television takes
over, and if they get that far,
I’ll be watching like everybody else.”
n Also in town was Brent
Barry, Rick’s son and the former Oregon State great now
working for TNT as a game
analyst and for NBA TV as a
studio analyst. The glib Barry
— who played 15 seasons in
the NBA and won a pair of
championship rings with San
Antonio — enjoys both roles,
“because it gives me a great
perspective to do both jobs,”
he says.
Usually, a team needs to
gradually rise through the
ranks in the playoffs to become a legitimate NBA title
contender. The Warriors
haven’t advanced as far as
the conference finals since
1975-76 and lost in the first
round to the Los Angeles
Clippers a year ago.
But Barry thinks the Warriors could have a long run
this spring.
“They lead the league in offensive and defensive efficiency and in point differential,” says Barry, 43. “Every
team that’s done that the past
30 years has gone on to win a
championship. Those are
good indicators of a team being very good.
“Plus, they’ll likely have
the home-court advantage
through the playoffs, so
they’ll be at Oracle Arena for
the games that mean the
most. They have good talent
everywhere. It’s just the
coach who is the problem for
them.”
Barry laughs, knowing that
the superlative job done by
Kerr will almost surely reap
him NBA coach of the year
honors in his first season at
the Golden State helm.
“It’s hard to find cracks in
anything the Warriors have
done this year,” Barry says.
“They’re 44-5 when Bogut is
in the starting lineup. Steve
has done a remarkable job of
limiting his minutes, and in
the last three weeks of the
regular season, because of
the cushion they have, he’ll
find games to keep him in
rhythm and times to make
sure he gets appropriate
rest.”
n There are some serious
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athletic genes behind the excellence of West Linn High’s
Payton Pritchard, the Oklahoma-bound junior point
guard who led the Lions to
their third straight state 6A
championship earlier this
month.
His father, Terry, was a
tight end at Oklahoma in the
mid-1980s. His mother, Melissa, was a gymnast for the
Sooners, winning the Big
Eight championship in floor
exercise twice and balance
beam once during the mid1990s.
Then there is Lisa Griffith,
Melissa’s sister and Payton’s
aunt, a four-year starting
point guard at Arizona from
1997-2000 who held Pac-10 records for 3-point shots made
in a season and career when
she was through.
“You can see the growth
emotionally with Payton
from the time he was a freshman,” says Griffith, who just
completed her second season
as West Linn’s girls coach.
“He has grown into the role
of being the leader of that
team. When they really needed him down the stretch of
games, he took them on his
back and took it home for
them.
“He relishes being in those
pressure situations. We get
more nervous than he does.
We’re all competitors and
want to see him do well. He’s
so calm and cool. I was most
proud of the composure he
shows. At key times, he
wants the ball in his hands.”
Griffith, a first-team allstate tournament selection at
St. Mary’s Academy in 1994,
has worked with Pritchard on
his skills.
“I’ve tried to pass on everything and anything I know
about the game to him,” she
says. “He takes it from a cerebral aspect. He studies the
game. He studies the great
point guards. He tries to emulate those types of traits.
“You see the work he puts
in on his body. He can play
through contact now. He is
strong with the ball. If you
were were to see one of his
morning workouts in his garage, it’s crazy.”
[email protected]
Twitter: @kerryeggers
MainEvents
Tuesday, March 31
Winterhawks: Portland at
Seattle, Game 3, 7 p.m.
College baseball: Portland at
Oregon, 6 p.m. ... Concordia at
Pacific, 6 p.m.
Mariners: Seattle-Cleveland
exhibition, 1 p.m.
Prep baseball: Parkrose at
Franklin, Wilson at North Salem,
Roosevelt-Glencoe at Walker
Stadium, La Salle Prep at McNary,
Gervais at Catlin Gabel, Portland
Lutheran at Gaston, 4:30 p.m. ...
Lincoln at Newberg, Benson at
McKay, 5 p.m.
Prep softball: MadisonCleveland at Woodstock Park,
Gresham-Grant at Wilshire Park,
Roosevelt-Wilson at Rieke
Elementary, Lincoln-Franklin at
Clinton Park, 4 p.m. ... Parkrose at
David Douglas, La Salle Prep at
Hood River Valley, 4:30 p.m.
Prep boys tennis: Central
Catholic at Reynolds, 3:30 p.m. ...
Wilson at Hood River Valley 4 p.m.
Prep girls tennis: Central
Catholic-Reynolds, Parkrose
Middle School, 3:30 p.m.
TV&Radio
Prep girls golf: PIL at Rose City,
3 p.m.
Prep girls lacrosse:
Clackamas-St. Mary’s Academy,
Buckman Field, 6 p.m. ... Grant at
Hood River Valley, 7 p.m. ...
Cleveland at Oregon Episcopal
School, Century at Jesuit, 7:30
p.m. ... Wilson at Westview, 7:45
p.m.
Blazers: Los Angeles Clippers
at Portland, 7 p.m. (KGW 8).
College baseball: OregonSeattle, Ron Tonkin Field,
Hillsboro, 6 p.m.
College softball: Portland State
at Seattle, 3 p.m. doubleheader.
Mariners: Seattle-Chicago
White Sox exhibition, 1 p.m. (Root
Sports).
Prep baseball: Central
Catholic-Westview, Concordia
University, Cleveland-Aloha at
Sckavone Stadium, McKay at
Madison, Southridge at Grant,
David Douglas at Forest Grove,
West Albany at La Salle Prep,
Portland Christian at Regis, 4:30
p.m. ... Lincoln at Wilsonville,
Roosevelt at Century, Franklin at
St. Helens, Centennial at
Parkrose, 5 p.m.
Prep softball: Central CatholicSouthridge, Delta Park, 3:45 p.m.
... Portland Christian at Regis,
4:30 p.m. ... Jesuit at Putnam,
Sherwood at Parkrose, 5 p.m.
Prep track and field: Sunset
at Jesuit, 2:30 p.m. ... St. Mary’s
Academy, Canby, Tualatin at
Marshall, LCL Preview (Riverdale,
De La Salle North Catholic at
Portland Christian, 3:30 p.m. ...
PIL Relays at Cleveland, 3:45
p.m. ... La Salle Prep at St.
Helens, Parkrose at Wilsonville, 4
p.m.
Prep boys tennis: ClevelandLincoln, Washington Park, 4:15
p.m.
Prep girls tennis: St. Mary’s
Academy-Tigard, Willamette Park,
4 p.m. ... Lincoln-Cleveland,
Marshall High, 4:15 p.m.
Prep girls golf: Central
Catholic-Reynolds, Glendoveer, 1
p.m. ... PIL at RedTail, 3 p.m.
Prep boys lacrosse: Grant at
La Salle Prep, 7 p.m. ... JesuitCentral Catholic, Milwaukie High,
7:30 p.m. ... Lakeridge at Lincoln,
Cleveland at Aloha, Tualatin at
Oregon Episcopal School, 8 p.m.
Prep girls lacrosse: Jesuit at
West Linn, 7:30 p.m.
NHL: Vancouver at Nashville, 5
p.m., CSNNW
Birthdays
Wednesday, April 1
Wednesday, April 1
Tuesday, March 31
Winterhawks: Portland at
Seattle, Game 3, 7 p.m., KPAM
(860 AM)
College baseball: Portland at
Oregon, 6 p.m., KUIK (1360 AM)
College men’s volleyball:
Hawaii at UCLA, 7 p.m., Pac-12
Networks
NBA: San Antonio at Miami, 5
p.m., Golden State at Los Angeles
Clippers, 7:30 p.m., TNT
History
March 31-April 1, 1981
The start of a trial in former
Blazer center Bill
Walton’s $5.6
million damage
suit against
team doctor
Robert Cook
and 20 others is
pushed back
from June 1 to
Oct. 12. The suit
charges that
walton
Cook and the
other defendants
March 31, 1969
Blazers: Los Angeles Clippers
at Portland, 7 p.m., KGW (8),
KPOJ (620 AM), KKRZ (102.3 FM)
Mariners: Seattle-Chicago
White Sox exhibition, 1 p.m., Root
Sports
NHL: Philadelphia at Pittsburgh,
5 p.m., Colorado at San Jose,
7:30 p.m., NBC Sports
College sand volleyball: Loyola
Marymount at UCLA, 1 p.m., Pac12 Networks
failed to diagnose the development of and eventual fracture of
Walton’s left foot in 1978.
Blazer guards Jim Paxson and
Billy Ray Bates come up lame on
the eve of Portland’s first-round
playoff opener against the Kansas
City Kings. Paxson has a sore foot,
Bates a swollen knee.
NBA officials are shaking their
heads over third baseman Danny
Ainge’s three-year, $500,000 contract with the Toronto Blue Jays,
saying that the former North
Eugene High multisport athlete
could be a star in pro basketball.
Benson High basketball star
A.C. Green is selected to play in
the Dapper Dan All-Star Game in
Pittsburgh.
Steve Smith (age 46)
A Trail Blazers
guard from
1999-2001,
Smith was born
in Highland
Park, Mich., and
played for
Michigan State,
earning the No.
5 overall pick in
the 1991 NBA
smith
draft. A 2000
Olympic gold medalist, the 6-8
guard scored 14.3 points per
game in the NBA from 19912005.
April 1, 1988
Robin Lopez (age 27)
The Trail
Blazers’ starting
center was born
on this day in
North
Hollywood, Calif.
He and twin
brother Brook
both played for
Stanford before
embarking on
their NBA
careers.
lopez
Whenever. Wherever.
VS.
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portlandthunder.com 503.773.4235
THERE WILL BE HATERS.
sports B3
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, March 31, 2015
Hawks: Portland wins with ‘D’
■ From page 1
though it’s empty net, it’s still nice
to get it.”
The Thunderbirds’ defensive
strategy is to key on Bjorkstrand,
who has had hands, sticks and
bodies on him through the first
two playoff games. The emptynetter was his first goal of the series.
“When you have a player who
scores 63 goals, that would be my
key, too, to make sure he doesn’t
get time in space,” Kompon said.
“It was great to see Ollie get rewarded with the empty-net goal.
“He had a lot of good chances
tonight, but they did a good job
on him. We have to find a way to
make sure he gets free. He’s not
frustrated, which is really important.”
“I have to expect they’re going
to come after me,” Bjorkstrand
said. “I have to not to let it bother
me too much.
“Sometimes it’s hard. I’m going
to to try to calm down as they get
after me and not focus so much
about it. We know they’re going
to come after some of our top
players. I’ll just try to relax and
play my game.”
Hill made his biggest saves in
the second period after a Portland penalty put the Thunderbirds on a power play. That gave
the Winterhawks momentum
through the rest of the period,
and they had some good chances
that Hill knocked away.
“He made the saves he needed
to make,” Kompon said. “He was
big on the penalty kill when we
needed him. He stood tall. I was
happy with the way he played.”
“The defense was really good,”
Hill said. “We have a solid ‘D’
corps that played really well, and
our forwards were helping them
out by back-checking hard. It was
a good defensively played game.”
The Hawks were the No. 2
scoring team in the West during
the regular season, averaging
four goals a game.
“This was a character win tonight,” Petan said. “There aren’t
many games where you score
one goal (not into an empty net)
and win. It goes to show we can
play that kind of style for three
periods.”
Portland went 5-5-0-2 against
Seattle during the regular season. The teams are evenly
matched. Kozun, the first-team
all-Western Conference goalie
during the regular season, is going to be difficult to score goals
against. The Hawks, who have
reached the WHL finals in each
of the last four seasons, will be
hard-pressed to move on from
this series.
“It comes down to a break here
or there,” Kompon said. “Tonight
was an indication of how much
parity there is in the league. On
any given night, anyone can beat
anyone. They’re a well-structured, hard-working team, and
they don’t quit, as you saw (Saturday) night.”
Hill stopped short of saying the
Hawks were in a must-win situation Sunday night.
“But it was really important,”
he said. “Had we gone into Seattle (for Tuesday’s Game 3) down
0-2, that would have been rough.
It’s good to get the split here, and
hopefully we’ll get one up there.
It’s going to be a good series.”
Thunder: Strenuous camp pays off
■ From page 1
just two scores in the second half
— one until the final minute.
The Thunder weathered 10
penalties — five in the game’s
first seven minutes — and stumbled at times throughout the
game, but found a way to win in
the opener. That’s much different
than during their inaugural campaign last year, when they started
0-5 and didn’t win at home until
their 11th contest en route to a
5-13 regular-season record.
“You know in the first game
there are going to be some bumps
in the road, some mishaps,” said
Rowley, the 6-foot, 195-pound former Brown QB who has 12 ArenaBall seasons — six in AF1 — under his belt. “A couple of times on
offense, we were moving backward with penalties.
“But we composed ourselves.
That was my focus. Whatever
happens, whatever learning
curve we have, focus on getting
the ‘W,’ and we can build momentum going into game two.”
If there were a budding star
who emerged, it was Howard, a
6-4, 215-pound Central Missouri
product who caught 44 passes in
11 games for the Thunder last
season. With the team’s top three
receivers of a year ago — Jeff
Solomon, Eric Rogers and Douglas McNeil — departed, Howard
may be the heir apparent.
On Friday night, Howard
hauled in TD receptions of 28, 9
and 23 yards in the second half,
the first one while flipping over
the boards in the end zone in a
SportsCenter “top 10 play” worthy grab.
“It ain’t nothing,” said Howard,
27, who had a cup of coffee with
the Canadian Football League’s
Edmonton Eskimos in 2013,
catching one pass. “The AFL is
not where I really want to be. I’m
going to keep working, keep
grinding until I get to where I
want to go.”
And that is?
“The CFL or NFL,” he said.
“I’m still young. I have a lot of motivation from McNeil and Rogers.
They left me back here. I did my
thing at the end of last season.
“This year, I want to start off
hot. Wherever my next step is going to be, I’m hoping it’s soon. But
coach Hohensee and his staff are
great coaches. They’re teaching
me how to play the game, to be a
complete receiver. If I’m here, I’m
going to love it. If I’m gone, I’ll
love it even more.”
Rowley granted Howard some
early impatience.
“He was a little frustrated in
the first quarter,” Rowley said.
“He expects to get the ball. I told
him, ‘Just stay with me. It’s a
game of waves.’ I knew his wave
was coming.”
Hohensee said Howard has
showed signs of becoming the
team’s No. 1 receiver.
“He has been emerging all
camp,” the veteran coach said.
“He’s a kid who lost 30 pounds
from last year and has re-invented himself.
“He wants to be great. Tonight
was a first step. He made some
mistakes — some that hurt us —
but he did some tremendous
things, too. He’s on his way to being something special.”
Rowley doesn’t have a large
frame or powerful arm, but he
has the savvy of a leader. Is he
still in his prime at 36?
“I think he’s going to get better,” Hohensee said. “He’s a tremendous competitor. With a new
set of receivers and a new offense, he executed extremely well
against a defense (with which) he
had no idea what they were going
to do. He stayed composed and
was great in the huddle with
these guys, especially at the end.”
When the KISS scored to narrow the gap to 42-37 with 51 seconds left, then recovered an onside kick, Rowley began his mental preparation.
“I thought one of two things,”
he said. “I trust my defense, but if
(the KISS) score, as long as we
have 14, 21 seconds left to run two
or three plays, we’re OK. We
were composed on the sidelines,
but the defense came up big, so
we didn’t have to do it.”
Hohensee said the final verdict
didn’t surprise him.
“We said at halftime, after a
few drives, (the KISS) were going
to lose it, that they didn’t have
enough gas left in their tank,” he
said. “Our guys stepped up and
did a super job.”
Rowley, who joined the Thunder at midseason last year, said
the opportunity to start the sea-
Place your ad by calling (503) 620-SELL (7355)
son with the club will help him
from a personal standpoint.
“It’s nice when you can come in
before training camp and build
chemistry with your teammates,
so that during camp, you’re working together already,” he said.
“There’s a difference for me, especially.”
Rowley quarterbacked the
Thunder to a near upset of Arizona in the first round last year,
losing 52-48 in a game in which
the eventual AFL champion Rattlers came up with a game-saving
interception in the final seconds.
“Arizona ran through the playoffs last year,” Howard said. The
Rattlers “ran through everybody,
and they barely beat us. We’re
better this year. We’re young,
we’re talented. We’re striving to
be the best, and Coach Hohensee
is pushing us. Our training camp
was probably harder than anybody’s. We worked three-hour
(practices). We’re hungry and
ready to ball.”
The fans got into it. The Thunder rewarded each of them with a
free “Jumbo Jack” burger from
Jack In The Box for scoring 40
points. Afterward, there was a
large procession of fans on the
Moda Center field to get autographs from the players.
It was a nice scene all around.
“And we’re just getting started,” Hohensee said. “We were so
sloppy. We’re going to get much
better.”
I’ll take his word for it. After all,
the man has been around this
game forever.
Gee: Backup gets
motivation from mom
■ From page 1
body trades you. But I’ve ended
up in a great place now.”
Gee was at least a part-time
Through the past year, Gee
starter and always a rotation has kept a good face about each
member with Cleveland. In 2011- move.
12, he averaged 10.6 points and
“I felt like every team I got
5.1 rebounds, earning a three- traded to would have been a
year, $9.75-million contract. In good situation for me,” he said.
2012-13, he started all 82 games “Charlotte would have been a
for the 24-58 Cavaliers, averaging good spot for me. Houston, I
10.3 points and 3.9 rebounds thought I’d be there, for sure.
while serving as a defensive spe- But then it gets down to the busicialist. His minutes were re- ness side of it.”
duced last season to 15.7 per
Gee’s biggest fan is his mothgame, and he averaged only 4.0 er, Darlene Gee, who raised him
points and 2.3 rebounds.
as the youngest of three siblings
Thus began the odyssey. The in West Palm Beach, Fla., and
Cavaliers were clearing salary serves as a counselor and cheercap space for the return of an- leader.
other small forward of some re“My mom motivates me, she
pute — LeBron James. On draft pushes me, she keeps me going,”
night, Gee’s agent, Happy Wal- Gee said. “Mom tells me that all
ters, informed him they had ar- the time — stay focused and
ranged a trade to Charlotte. Two don’t get down on yourself.
weeks later, with James con“She also says, ‘Don’t get comfirming his intention to come fortable. Don’t get happy with
home, the Cavs modified the your career.’ I’m still going, still
deal, sending Gee instead to pushing to try to stay around for
New Orleans.
a long time. Where I am right
Four days later, the Pelicans now, it’s a blessing. It was tough
sent him to Houston as part of a during the summer not knowing
three-team trade that featured where I’d land, but I’m very hapOmer Asik. Gee worked out with py to be in Portland.”
the Rocket coaches and thought
The journey has been nomadhe was set there, but two weeks ic, from his days as an undrafted
before training
rookie to the Dcamp, he was
League to a threeswapped to Sacmonth stint in Poramento for Jaland during the 2011
son Terry.
lockout to liaisons
Part of all this,
with nine NBA
as Jenkins exteams, all in six short
plains, is Gee is
years.
on the final year
But Gee has kept
of a non-guaranhis head about him,
teed contract,
grateful for a salary
which makes
most 20-somethings
him an attractive
would die for, workpiece in any deal.
ing hard at practice
Walters told the
and attempting to be
Kings that if
useful to his current
they intended to
NBA club in any way
use Gee, great,
possible.
but if not, to
“I know what I can
wa i ve
him.
do,” he said. “I know
That’s what hapwhat I can bring to
pened.
the team. I have to
The day be— Alonzo Gee believe in myself and
fore training
make sure I don’t get
camp,
Gee
down. Even if I’m not
signed a one-year, $1.1-million playing in games, I can help out
with Denver. Gee was with the by pushing the guys at pracNuggets for four months, in and tice.”
out of the rotation, until the
Don’t think his coaches, and
move to Portland.
his teammates, don’t notice.
All of this is enough to bring a
“ ‘Zo is a great player for our
grown man to his knees. But Gee team, but he’s a better person,
is a practical man.
always positive,” Lillard said.
“I know it’s a business,” he “He is ready to do whatever we
said. “I’ve been in situations ask of him.”
where I had to leave teams. EvThere’s a lot to be said for
erybody gets hurt when some- that.
“I know what I
can do. I know
what I can bring
to the team. I
have to believe
in myself and
make sure I
don’t get down.
Even if I’m not
playing in
games, I can
help out by
pushing the guys
at practice.”
www.Community-Classif ieds.com
Your Neighborhood Marketplace
Help
Wanted
H E L P WANTE D
Part time positions available in the Gresham Outlook
mailroom. We are looking to fill two shifts, Monday,
2:30pm-9pm and Wednesdays, 12pm-8pm. The job
would be working on an inserting machine putting together the Portland Tribune for delivery. These positions
require that you be able to lift at least 50lbs, and stand
for long periods of time. More hours could be available
by covering for the graveyard shift throughout the week.
These positions will pay $9.50 per hour, and will require
a background check and drug test. Please send resume
to [email protected] or stop by and fill
out an application.
The Gresham Outlook is located at
1190 NE Division St. Gresham, OR 97030
_________________________________________
Delivery Truck Driver
Pamplin Media Group is searching for a delivery truck
driver. The qualified candidate will have a clean driving
record, and be able to drive a 24-foot box truck. Ability
to use manual pallet jacks, electric pallet jacks, fork lifts
and be able to carry 50 pounds of weight are requirements. The position is full time, with overtime possible
on occasion. Candidates must pass a criminal background check and a pre-employment drug test. CDL is
not required, but the candidate will have to pass a DOT
physical. Salary is dependent on experience. Pamplin
Media Group offers competitive salaries, medical and
dental benefits, and a 401K. Please send resumes to
Don Atwell at 1190 NE
Division, Gresham, OR 97030
PLACEMENT INFORMATION
Oregon’s 2014 Radio Station of the Year, KPAM 860,
and sister station Sunny 1550, are seeking Portland’s
next great radio Account Executive. If you know how to
build long-term relationships with small to mid-size
business owners, care about bringing results to those
businesses, and can do it without ratings, then KPAM
and Sunny could be your next home. The successful
candidate will be motivated with high integrity and a
strong desire to win and make a good living. Extensive
experience in broadcast media sales is necessary.
KPAM and Sunny are two locally-owned radio stations
offering excellent benefits and above average compensation plans in an employee focused environment.
We are an equal opportunity employer.
Please send resume to:
General Sales Manager
Email: [email protected]
No phone calls please
Help
Wanted
NEED HELP
WITH YOUR
CLASSIFIED
AD?
Call Mindy!
503-546-0760
for ad rates, general
information or help
writing your ad in any one
of our
Community Newspaper
Publications
and get the RESULTS
you want!
[email protected]
papers.com
Kiosk & Festival Subscription Sales
Community Newspapers circulation department has
an excellent opportunity to make great money in a
part-time position. As a community outreach salesperson you will sell newspaper subscriptions for our
award-winning publications at kiosk and festivals
throughout the metropolitan area. If you have excellent
communication skills, the drive to succeed and ability
to work independently this could be the perfect
position for you.
Regular part-time (primarily Friday, Saturday & Sunday
but some weekday work is required). Hourly wage plus
excellent commission. Sales experience preferred.
Provide own transportation & ability to lift up to 25lbs.
Background check & drug screen required.
Please submit resume to
[email protected] or fax to
503-620-3433.
FAX
Your classified ad :
(503) 620-3433
24 Hours per day
For personal
assistance, call
(503) 620-SELL(7355)
community-classifieds.com
Prestige Care &
Rehabilitation
Menlo Park
• RCM – FT
• CNA – FT
• RN/LPN - PT
Announcements/
Notices
Vendors Needed!
Tigard Street Fair
Sept. 12, 11-5:00
Start your Healthcare
career today!
To apply, please visit our
website:
www.prestigecare.com/careers
EOE/M/F/Vet/Disability
RN, LPN, and CNAs
Come Work in a fun and
rewarding environment!
Nehalem Valley Care Center. Very Competitive pay.
$500 Sign On Bonus!!!
Apply in person or Call
503-368-5171 for details.
STORAGE
PROBLEMS
???
CALL
Community Classifieds
and place a
Marketplace ad
to sell your
overstock items FAST
-Reasonable Rates
- Quality Readers
-Quick Results
503-620-7355
www.communityclassifieds.com
Street Fair is being held
Downtown on the newly
renovated Main St. There
will be music, demonstrations, children’s activities
and all kinds of family fun!
If you would like to promote your business, sell
your crafts, provide food or
engage your non-profit with
the community, go to
http://tinyurl.com/obhe
or stop by the Tigard
Chamber of Commerce at
12345 SW Main St.
10’ x10’ spaces cost $25
to $50 depending on
your type of enterprise.
Last seen near Tijuana
River in Tijuana, Baja
California in Mexico on
December 9, 1881. If you
have any information
concerning its sighting
please contact Lissette at
(512) 842-4900
Missing Persons
Sheryl Lynn Johnson
Would you please call
Michael or Lori at 509389-6695. If you know her,
please ask to her to call.
Personals
❤ADOPTION: A Loving
Financially Secure
Family, Laughter, Travel,
Beaches, Music awaits
1st baby. Expenses paid
❤ ❤ 1-800-561-9323❤ ❤
______________________________
Fax:
(503) 620-3433
Marketing Consultant
E-Mail:
[email protected]
Address:
6606 SE Lake Road
Portland, OR 97269
Office Hours:
8 am - 5 pm
COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS
LOST SOCK-Grey
Radio Advertising Sales
Portland Tribune Mail Room
Telephone:
(503) 620-SELL (7355)
Lost & Found
✵
The Gresham Outlook, a twice-weekly newspaper, is
seeking a high energy, motivated salesperson to join
our sales team as an outside Marketing Consultant. We
are looking for someone with previous advertising
experience, a proven track record of success, a strong
prospector, organizational and computer skills. An
existing account base will be provided, but our new
team member will be required to contact and create
new accounts. Must have reliable transportation and a
clean driving record. Pre-employment drug screen and
good references required. This is a full time position
with commission on all sales, a base salary, mileage
expenses and full benefits that include health care and
vacation. If you have a passion for sales and are committed to success, send your resume and cover letter to
Cheryl Swart, Advertising Director –
[email protected]
YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MARKETPLACE
✵
Wilsonville Spokesman Community Reporter
The Wilsonville Spokesman, a weekly newspaper, is
seeking a full-time reporter to cover Wilsonville, Ore.,
one of the fastest growing cities in the Portland metro
area. The ideal candidate for this position is a versatile
writer with professional experience in both news and
features. Photography experience is a big plus. While
coverage of city government, community events and local business is a key part of this position, the community reporter should also have the ability to sniff out enlightening, interesting and amusing enterprise stories
that give residents unique insights into their community.
The community reporter is not responsible for covering
education or sports. Send a resume, cover letter and
three clips to Editor Luke Roney via email at
[email protected] File size is limited to 5M.
No phone calls.
503-620-SELL (7355)
✵
8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Lessons/Instructions
Piano Lessons:
All ages, classical &
jazz. 860.716.3103
CLASSIFIEDS
plus business equals
results.
Call 503-620-SELL
(503-620-7355)
✵ WWW .C OMMUNITY -C LASSIFIEDS .COM
B4 SPORTS
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, March 31, 2015
Furniture/
Home Furnishings
MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED!
Train at home to process
Medical Billing & Insurance
Claims! NO EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online training
at Bryan University!! HS
Diploma/GED &
Computer/Internet needed!
1-877-259-3880
DINING TABLE SET:
Drexel Heritage with 4
upholstered chairs. Classic
American style. Cherry
finish, 48’’ round with 24’’
leaf. Like new, $400.
Call 503-263-3412.
Antiques/Collectibles
Garage/Rummage
Sales
PORTLAND SE:
CLOWN COLLECTION &
Southwest pictures &
decorations. 503-902-0349
Appliances
Business
Opportunities
ATTENTION
READERS
Due to the quantity and
variety of business opportunity listings we receive, it is impossible for
us to verify every opportunity
advertisement.
Readers respond to
business opportunity
ads at their own risk. If
in doubt about a particular offer, check with the
Better Business Bureau,
503-226-3981 or the
Consumer Protection
Agency, 503-378-4320,
BEFORE investing any
money.
★ ★ Work @ Home ★ ★
We purchase one gram of
gold monthly (plus) while
building unlimited income.
id#PT. 800-570-3219.
REFRIGERATORS:
Nice condition, work great,
$100 & up.
Call 503-761-0807 or
503-313-8612.
Huge! Community
INDOOR Yard Sale
April 3 & 4
Fri & Sat 9- 2
1000’s OF ITEMS!!
Low prices on everything
you can imagine!
Westmoreland’s
Union Manor
6404 SE 23rd Ave.
Portland, 97202.
Just north of Bybee Bridge.
Parking on street only.
Miscellaneous for
Sale
Baby/Children’s
Items
Moving Sale - Must Sell
Forest Grove
Backyard Outlook
Wooden Play Center
$200. Grand kids grown.
You disassemble and
haul. Also
Grandma’s Jr Baby Crib
$40 includes Jr. size
bedding. Clean and good
shape. (503) 357-9020
Firewood/
Heating Supplies
Maytag stacked washer/
dryer, like new - SOLD!!
Classified Advertising
Works!
Call to place your ad today!
Miscellaneous
Wanted
$10-10,000 A-#1 BUYER $
I want jewelry. Costume
etc, also pre-80’s glassware& misc. 503-869-2802
CASH for DIABETIC
TEST STRIPS
Loans
It is illegal for companies
doing business by phone to
promise you a loan and
ask you to pay for it before
they deliver. For more information, call toll-free
1-877-FTC HELP. A public
service
message
from
Community Classifieds and
the Federal Trade Commission.
$200/trailer. Will deliver
locally. Milwaukie area.
Call for details:
Sheds/Outdoor
Buildings
SOLD!!!
CUSTOM POLE
BUILDINGS &
RIDING ARENAS
Your classified ad :
(503) 620-3433
24 Hours per day
For personal
assistance, call
(503) 546-0759
www.community-classifieds.com
Comforter Set
Bed spread/blanket,
purple, nice design,
3 pillow shams,
2 decorative pillows,
bed skirt. Bought for
$79.99. Asking $55.
503-981-1606/
503-507-5784
60’x120’x14’
Arena, $42,000
36’x84’x14 Vehicle
Storage, $20,000
Barn Metal &
Siding
Replacement
Call Fred
503.320.3085
A P P L IAN C E S
or visit
barnsrusonline.com
EXTRA 15% OFF
Almost Everything! April 2 - 5, 2015
LOCAL GRASS HAY,
GOOD QUALITY,
NO RAIN, $4.50/BAIL
503-651-2973
Pets & Supplies
BELLA
Bella is a sassy and loving
11-12 year old spayed female indoor kitty! She
loves the finer things in life
like sleeping on the couch
(or anywhere comfortable
like a bed or padded chair)
and spying out the window.
Occasionally she likes going out on the patio but ultimately prefers the indoors.
She does best being the
only pet in the house and
prefers adults. She has
only scratched her carpeted post and not the furniture and she always uses
her litter box! Bella’s comes with supplies of toys
and food and other things
to make her comfortable!
Contact Cat’s Cradle Rescue at 503-620-6079.
BETA (Somali) and
GRACIE (Siamese)
Beta & Gracie are best
friends & will be adopted
together only. Gracie, 12, &
Beta, 7, are both wonderful
cats, but need a home
without dogs. Gracie is a
short-haired Siamese mix.
Beta is a Somali pure-bred
(I have her papers). Both
cats are in excellent health
and up-to-date on their
shots. Contact Cat’s Cradle Rescue at
503.312.4296 for further information or go to our
website at
catscradlerescue.com/ADOPT
to put in an application to adopt. CCR is a
501(c)(3) no-kill, non-profit
cat rescue.
B A ZA AR B O UTI Q U E
Costa Rica Eco-Tours
Since 2004, we’ve been
outfitting eco-tours in
Costa Rica, Nicaragua,
Panama and Colombia.
Tours include hotels,
guided activities, and all
in-country transport.
Call Scott at
866-284-2832, or
360-702-6698
packagecostarica.com
Spring in the
Country!
BAZAAR
April 6th - 11th, 2015
Mon- Fri: 9am-8pm
Saturday: 9am-5pm
Keiko is one cool cat. He
has it all: looks, brains, disposition. He’s a big guy but
he’s a lover not a fighter.
Gets along with other cats
(don’t know about dogs).
Usually hides out when
kids come around. Keiko
has been indoors only for
past three years, he is
quite adaptable. Keiko is
about 10 years old and he
passed his annual check
up with flying colors and
had rabies vaccine so
good to go. Keiko’s family
can’t take him with them to
their
new home.....how
about taking him into
yours? Call Cat’s Cradle
Rescue at 503.320.6079
for further information.
Clackamas County Fairgrounds, Canby
28922.033115C
FREE ADMISSION
You can find just about
anything in the
Classifieds.
Call 503-620-SELL
(503-620-9797)
B U I L D I N G AN D R E M O D E L I N G
CHESTER:
You can call me Chester
the charmer. I’m the tuxedo cat you definitely want
to meet! I love a good cuddle and I love to chat but
play time rocks! Ever hear
of air guitar? Well, I make
air biscuits and they are
awesome. Want to see for
yourself? Come in and
meet me at Animal Aid’s
Show & Tell Saturday or
call 503-292-6628 option 3
or visit our website:
www.animalaidpdx.org for
more information! I’m sure
we’d be great friends!
Gladys is a great lap cat.
She likes to talk, regardless of whether or not anyone is listening, and she’s
always happy with the occasional pet. You can visit
the humorous Gladys at
Cat Adoption Team’s Sherwood shelter: 14175 SW
Galbreath Drive.
503-925-8903
catadoptionteam.org
Tuesday-Friday, 12-7 pm;
Saturday-Sunday, 12-6
pm; Closed Monday
LABRADOODLE
PUPPIES for Sale!
Nice,
low-to-no-shedding
labradoodles ready to go to
new homes.Three males &
two females still available.
Check out their puppy blog
http://labradoodlesoregon.blogspot
.com/
for
pictures
& descriptions of each
puppy. All puppies are
black & have wavy to curly
coats.
Call
Dan
at
503-927-2210 to schedule
to see them or questions.
Leo:
Are you looking for a kitty
who will be your new best
friend? Then look no further! This gorgeous boy is
a great companion – he
loves playtime, snuggles
and conversations. One
look into Leo’s eyes and
you’ll know you have found
your soul mate. Come visit
Leo at Animal Aid’s Show
& Tell Saturday or call
503-292-6628 for more information.
I’m a spry little lady and
love to go for walks. I understand some commands
and would love to show
you what I know. I’m Lexie,
a petite 15 pound Sheltie
Pomeranian mix. I am a
senior so you don’t have to
worry about chewed shoes
If you can foster or adopt
me please contact Animal
Aid, 503-292-6628 option 3
or
visit
our
website:
www.animalaidpdx.org for
more information. I’m waiting for you!
As soon as you meet Harry
Belafonte, you’ll see how
friendly and affectionate he
is. Harry has experience
getting along with dogs,
but he’d prefer not to live
with any other cats. Harry
Belafonte is waiting at Cat
Adoption Team’s Sherwood shelter: 14175 SW
Galbreath Dr.,
503-925-8903.
catadoptionteam.org
Tuesday-Friday, 12-7 pm;
Saturday-Sunday, 12-6
pm; Closed Monday
COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS
✵
YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MARKETPLACE
✵
Need homes: 3 Mastiffs,
10 mos old. 2 females, 1
male.Derrick 503-550-2165
PUBLISHER’S
NOTICE
I’m a stunning cat from the
white tip of my tail to my little white mustache! I’m a
kitty that’s always dressed
up in a tux although I’m far
from a formal guy! I love to
play, I love to snuggle, I
love people! I’m not shy,
and I quickly warm up to
new people and cats.
Come hang out with me
and you’ll agree. Why don’t
you come visit me, Winston, so you can see my
great personality firsthand?
C’mon, let’s play at Animal
Aid’s Show & Tell Saturday
from 12PM to 4PM. Please
call 503-292-6628 option 3
or
visit
our
website:
www.animalaidpdx.org for
more information.
Yellow Lab
NORA
4 month old female, micro
chipped, up to date shots.
Housetrained. $400, price
negotiable. 503-912-1943
Quiet and soft-spoken
sweetheart of a kitty. Prefers to be the only cat but a
gentle and non-invasive
dog is OK. No toddler experience. Indoor only.
Needs special diet (no
chicken) to keep her
healthy. Not active with
toys (think: couch potato)
but misses you when you
are gone and welcomes
you when you return.
Looking for her Special
Person, Nora is a great
companion for an adult or
senior home. Call Marilyn
for info on her and to
schedule a meeting ~
503-312-4296 ~ or apply
on our website at
Hi, I’m Zeus! I’m a big Siamese Seal Point mix. I’m
about 15 pounds of mellow
cat man! I do well with
other kitties and I’m a quiet
guy, unlike some of my
other Siamese pals. If
you’re looking for someone
to greet and welcome you
when you come home, I’m
your man! Come in and
meet me at Animal Aid’s
Show & Tell Saturday or
call 503-292-6628 option 3
or
visit
our
website:
www.animalaidpdx.org for
more information!
All real estate advertised
herein is subject to the
Federal Fair Housing
Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status
or national origin, or intention to make any
such preferences, limitations or discrimination.
State law forbids discrimination in the sale,
rental or advertising of
real estate based on
factors in addition to
those protected under
federal law. Oregon
State law forbids discrimination based on
marital status. We will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for real
estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings
advertised are available
on an equal opportunity
basis.
PRINEVILLE
1 acre building sites, public
water, power, privacy, secure area. Ideal for retirement or snowbirds. 6 miles
from new hospital & shopping. $29,900, some terms.
Dave 503-804-2652
PLEASE NOTE:
ABBREVIATIONS destroy the
intent of your ad. Your ad
should be attractive and easy
to read. Let us help you put together your ad. Call us today at
(503) 503-620-SELL
H O M E S F O R S AL E
catscradlerescue.com/ADOPT
11611 SE Adoline Ave Happy Valley Or 97086
PEPAI
Little boy waiting
Pepai is a joyful 1 and 1/2
year old white and pale tan
neutered male American
pit bull, current on vaccines. He has been patiently waiting for a home
of his own since December
when he left pound life behind him. He loves people,
playing, lots of exercise,
balls and his favorite rubber bone. Easily trainable,
he longs for a family where
for the first time he can
stay and be somebody’s
dog. Foster or foster to
adopt; Training is part of
foster/adoption . For info:
503.625.4563;
E-mail
[email protected]
Philip:
$779,000 • MASTER ON THE MAIN
3 BEDROOM 2 1/2 BATH • 3 CAR GARAGE
3637 Sq ft • .49 of an Acre • RMLS # 15493418
This outstanding Pacific Northwest custom home is the
quintessential Craftsman & still featured w/ Mascord today! Top notch materials and naturescape have created
a very liveable but resort, retreat like feel. The open floor
plan is handcrafted with impressive timbers, stone, granite and Crate & Barrel fixtures. 4th bedroom option and
RV parking potential! No HOA w/ plenty of room for a
shop! ALL this situated on .49 of an acre on a private
cul-de-sac w/ walking trails and minutes to an abundance of neighborhood parks, schools and more trails!
Contact: Brandi Erskine for more info. 503-515-9972
BHG Realty Partners
M AN U FA CTU R E D H O M E S F O R S AL E
SPRING INTO SAVINGS
BRAND NEW 3 BR/ 2BR
STARTING AT $68,999 AND UP
LILA ROSE:
Now that I’m here at Animal Aid, I can love and
play freely and my charismatic personality shines
through. I love everyone I
meet — fur or no fur, I don’t
discriminate. I give friendly
head butts to say hello,
and I just can’t get enough
pets and ear scratches.
Come visit me, Philip, at
Animal Aid’s Show & Tell
Saturday
or
call
503-292-6628 option 3 or
visit
our
website:
www.animalaidpdx.org for
more information.
Lila Rose loves to be held
and snuggled. Lila doesn’t
much like other cats, but
she is a fan of dogs and
treats. You can meet Lila
Rose at Cat Adoption
Team’s Sherwood shelter:
14175 SW Galbreath
Drive. 503-925-8903
catadoptionteam.org
Tuesday-Friday, 12-7 pm;
Saturday-Sunday, 12-6
pm; Closed Monday.
OPEN HOUSE EVERY FRIDAY IN MARCH
1PM-3PM
Over 1344 SQ. FT. All Appliances/Open Concept
Living Area/Great Living Space.
CAL-AM HOMES AT
HERITAGE VILLAGE
123 SW Heritage Parkway
Beaverton, OR 97006
503-645-6312
www. Cal-Am.com
SHADOW
MALONE:
HARRY:
FOB Hubbard, Or. Subject to code requirements.
Price subject to change without notice.
PO Box 407, Hubbard, OR. 97032
OR CCB#86204 WA CCB# PARKEB1071D6
10 year old sweetheart. He
is a sweet guy who will
climb into your lap or cuddle in bed or on the couch.
He is declawed and an indoor cat only. He is litter
box trained and very well
behaved. I love when I’m
pet under my chin! I love
exploring new places such
as closets and cubbies. I
am considered a senior
kitty, but don’t tell me. I can
still run and jump with the
best! I have excellent litter
box and scratching post
manners.
Contact Cat’s
Cradle
Rescue
at
503.320.6079 for info.
ZEUS:
GLADYS:
More than 100 Vendors
will be selling handcrafted items
at our 23rd Annual Spring Event!
WINSTON:
LEXIE:
ccb# 117653
Travel & Tickets
Mister Kitty
Acreage/Lots
Why buy used, when you can buy from
4500 NE 122nd Ave. Portland 97230 503-257-4732
10176 SE 82nd Ave. Clackamas 97015 503-774-1045
Pets & Supplies
KEIKO
5 0 3. 6 7 9. 3 6 0 5
FIREWOOD:
Pets & Supplies
Pets & Supplies
Help those in need.
Paying up to $30 per
box. Free pickup.
Call Sharon:
Furniture/
Home Furnishings
FAX
Hay/Straw/Feed
Malone is a big bundle of
energy
and
movement
wrapped in a tiny cat package. Malone is playful and
tolerant with children over
the age of ten; however, he
doesn’t much like other animals (especially cats) and
would be best as the only
pet in the home. Malone
can’t wait to meet you at
Cat Adoption Team’s Sherwood shelter: 14175 SW
Galbreath Drive.
503-925-8903
catadoptionteam.org
Tuesday-Friday, 12-7 pm;
Saturday-Sunday, 12-6
pm; Closed Monday
Hi, my name is Shadow
aka Kiki. I am a 13 year old
altered female kitty who is
looking for a nice family
that will let me be an indoor kitty. I currently live
with a family consisting of
one large dog, who leaves
me alone, and two sister
cats who leave me alone
as well. I am super chill, independent and a bit lazy.
The days of my youth are
over but I still get motivated by playing laser tag.
As far as affection goes I’ll
let you know when I need
love. Although I am older
I’m still really healthy and
haven’t had any cause to
go to the doctor in my life.
To learn more about
Shadow please contact
Cat’s Cradle Rescue at
503.312.4296 or apply
online at catscradlerescue.
com/adopt.
24x36
30x36
30x48
36x36
36x48
40x48
40x60
10’ EAVE
$4,765
$5,513
$6,575
$6,219
$7,399
$8,313
$9,644
12’ EAVE
$5,201
$5,978
$7,140
$6,709
$7,998
$8,889
$10,255
14’ EAVE
$5,636
$6,476
$7,644
$7,191
$8,536
$9,556
$10,951
16’ EAVE
$6,060
$6,967
$8,390
$7,834
$9,396
$10,434
$11,985
24x36
30x36
30x48
36x36
36x48
40x48
40x60
60x120
10’ EAVE
$2,279
$2,770
$3,457
$3,266
$4,191
$4,934
$5,992
$17,848
12’ EAVE
$2,333
$2,830
$3,539
$3,338
$4,261
$4,995
$6,099
$18,065
14’ EAVE
$2,394
$2,916
$3,635
$3,426
$4,357
$5,142
$6,241
$18,516
16’ EAVE
$2,564
$3,118
$3,747
$3,776
$4,617
$5,599
$6,793
$18,927
503-620-SELL (7355)
✵
8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
The LATCH system makes it easier to be sure your
child’s car seat is installed correctly every time. Just
clip it to the lower anchors, attach the top tether, and pull
the straps tight. To find out more, visit safercar.gov.
26348.062014c
Schools/Training
✵ WWW .C OMMUNITY -C LASSIFIEDS .COM
sports B5
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, March 31, 2015
Acreage/Lots
PRINEVILLE
5 acres on new paved
dead end road. Well,
power, view, privacy. 6 miles to town. New hospital,
school, shopping. Close to
mtn & lake recreation
areas.
$69,000,
some
terms. Dave 503-804-2652
Homes for Sale
LAKE OSWEGO:
Build your dream home
in Lake Oswego steps
away from the lake.
Exceptional
proposed
homes by BC Custom
Construction.
Beautiful
Mascord designed floor
plans with 2,300 square
feet. 3 bedroom + Den, 3.1
baths. Luxury amenities include hardwood floors,
granite counters, alder
cabinetry, cultured stone
front and more. Large
10,000 square foot lots. 3
Lake easements available.
Cindy Sehorn
Singh-Soldera
Properties
503-307-4100
ST HELENS/WARREN
Apartments for Rent
Manufactured
Homes/Lots
BEAVERTON
New Heritage Village
Home & Professional Services
HILLSBORO:
Modern Downtown
Hillsboro Apartment.
W/D in unit. Free
Water/Sewer/Garbage,
across from MAX. *Income
Restrictions Apply.
City Center Apts,
160 SE Washington St.
503.693.9095
Gslcitycenter.com
PORTLAND NW:
1 Bed: $767, 2 Bed: $913!
Free Water/Sewer/Garb!
Spacious open floor plans
include full size W/D. Professional on-site mgmt.
Lush landscaping, Outdoor
Pool, Year round spa,
LARGE Patio w/storage.
*Income and Student
Restriction Apply.
*Pets Welcome!
Westridge Meadows
18476 NW Chemeketa Ln
503-439-9098
www.gslwestridgemeadows.com
PORTLAND NW:
Located near MAX,
Portland Streetcar & Bus.
Beautiful courtyards,
downtown view,
close to Waterfront Park
and the Pearl District.
Great amenities!
The Yards at
Union Station
815 NW Naito Pkwy
503-478-1695
gsltheyards.com
TUALATIN:
.92 Acres On Bachelor
Flat Rd. 3 bdrm, 2 ba,
mobile home, fenced for
horse or ???. Barn, oversized single garage for
shop, RV plug in, covered
patio, Clean, move in
ready. $228,000. FSBO,
no agents please.
OPEN HOUSE!
12pm to 3pm:
SUN 3/22, SAT 3/28,
SUN 4/5, & SAT 4/11
Sissy 503-970-2669
Service Directory
1 bdrm/1ba: $767
2 bdrm/2ba: $913
3 bdrm/2ba: $1051
Water, sewer, garbage
paid. Full size W/D in
every apt. Pool, hot tub,
fitness center & clubhouse.
Professional on-site mgmt.
Beautiful, quiet, residential
neighborhood. $35 App
Fee. Call Today!!!
Wood Ridge Apartments
11999 SW Tualatin Rd
503-691-9085
www.gslwoodridge.com
Houses for Rent
Located in Tigard
RV Northwest rents,
sells, buys and consigns
RVs and travel trailers.
We have been in
business since 2004
and have a 5 star rating
with the
Better Business Bureau.
We have a full service
department and a new
parts department and
have recently added a
sales department. We
also provide temporary
housing if you are
remodeling your home,
are between residences,
or have suffered some
sort of natural disaster
(often with your
insurance company
covering the costs).
We also rent for remote
job sites, events etc.
Check out our website:
rvnorthwest.com
for more details or call
us at 503-641-9140.
Concrete/Paving
Handyman/
Handywoman
-DPHV.UDPHU
&RQVWUXFWLRQ
Concrete services, decorative concrete, stamped
concrete, stained concrete,
retaining walls, pavers,
foundation, slabs, driveways. 503.303.8437
allyeararoundconcrete.com
Concrete Contractor
HANDYMAN SERVICES
Local, reliable and experienced. Pressure washing,
deck treating, painting, carpentry, plumbing, gutter
cleaning, light remodels
and much more. Free,
no-obligation estimates.
Satisfaction Guaranteed
Call Mark at:
Certified Services
CCB#184080
503-313-7963
Locally since 1974!
Kitchen, bath, walls,
ceilings, additions,
counters, cabinets,
decks, drywall, tile,
granite, windows and
doors, etc.
Reasonable.
CCB#11518. Jim
503-201-0969,
503-625-5092.
Automotive Services
59
1257+:(67
Building &
Remodeling
MDPHVNUDPHUFRQVWUXFWLRQFRP
Carpet Cleaning
CONCRETE: Paver
patios, concrete, asphalt &
dirt removal, concrete
cutting & pressure
washing.
CCB# 118609.
503-734-7172.
Powerful truck-mounted
steam cleaning, repairs
and re stretching.
Owner/operator with 29
years exp. Satisfaction
guaranteed. $25 PER
ROOM. Call Mark at:
Certified Carpet Care.
CCB#184070
Cell 503-313-7963
Chimney Services
HANDYMAN MATTERS
Locally owned, nationally
recognized. Specializing in
small to medium jobs
#191473
WestPortland.HandymanMatters.com
503-621-0700
James F Wiedemann
Construction
Sherwood & Surrounding
areas. #102031.
503-784-6691
CLASSIFIEDS CAN help you
with all your advertising needs.
Whether it is hiring, selling,
buying or trading, call us today!
Call 503-620-SELL.
Business Directory ads
work! Call today!
Debi’s PROFESSIONAL
HOUSECLEANING
Non-Toxic!!!
Tailored for your Needs!
Reasonable • Exper
503.590.2467
MOW •CUT •EDGE
•LEAF CLEANUP •MORE!
Average Price, $30. (503)
550-8871 / 503-708-8770.
Call 503-620-SELL
(Call 503-620-7355)
Truong’s Landscape
Maintenance
•Mowing/Edging •Weeding
•Blackberry Removal
•YardCleanup
•Trim/Pruning •Haul Away
•Barkdust •Rock •Chips
FREE ESTIMATES
503-760-2199
YARD DEBRIS HAULING
•Rototilling •Trimming
•Bark Dust •Gravel •Yard
Maintenance. Free est,
7 days. (503) 626-9806.
To place your
Classified advertisement,
call 503-620-SELL(7355)
community-classifieds.com
C L EAN I N G & O RGAN I Z I N G
CHECK US OUT!
Call Mindy Johnson
at 503-546-0760
for information, rates, special promotions or for help in
writing an ad (from 3 lines to a display ad).
I can help!
[email protected]
Boats/Motors/
Supplies
ESTACADA
!~VIDEO’S~!
Pictures & details
Oregon’s friendliest and
Most informative website
Huge selection of
MANUFACTURED &
MOBILE HOMES.
Family Owned Since 1992
ZULJKWFKRLFHKRPHVFRP
Beautiful 1, 2 & 3 bdrm,
laundry hook-up, kitchen
applces. Storage shed.
Includes water & sewer!
6HF2.
Real Estate Wanted
Lady Wants Small Plex
for Purchase
Manufactured
Homes/Lots for Rent
HUBBARD
Vacation
Property
FISH HAWK LAKE
Water Front Cabin
Comfortable
furnished
water front cabin—move in
ready. Outstanding view,
large covered deck, one
level, sunny side of the
lake, natural light and sky
lights, vaulted exposed cedar ceiling, wood stove
with electric heat option,
floating dock, boats, bathroom w/shower/tub, w/d, 2
bdrm., open living and
kitchen area, paved parking area. Only 75 miles
from Portland in NW
Oregon $262,500.
Phone (503) 659-0766
Beautiful lot with delightful
views of Mount Hood in the
Hoodview Senior Estates
Mobile Home Park. This is
a senior 55+ community
with a community center
and
ongoing
activities
every month.
The park features upgraded roads, water system, street lighting, and
landscape. The lot comes
with a carport and storage
area and is suitable for up
to a 44 x 24 mobile home
or there-abouts.
Monthly lot rent is $440.00
and includes water and
sewer. 503-981-5266 or
503-706-9204
GET
FAST
RESULTS
THROUGH
THE CLASSIFIEDS
CALL NOW!
CALL
503-620-SELL
0(5&('(6
Model C, New tires,
Battery, Fresh Paint, PTO,
Belt Pulley, Hydrolics,
Electric Start,
74 Years Old, but Runs &
Looks Like NEW! Additional pictures available
upon request. $3,450.
503-819-5126
Autos Wanted
17’ 2”, Newer Full Canvas
Top & Interior & 120 Merc
Cruiser. Set up for fishing
or water skiing. These
boats are very, very rare.
Many extras-fishing related
gear. Has trolling motor
with it, if you wish. Cheaper
if you don’t. Nice trailer.
Health forces sale. PRICE
HAS BEEN
REDUCED TO $2500!
503-538-6884
Title matches frame number, $6,000 or best offer.
Old Ford Parts
and 1955 Chevy
Pickup Parts
ZZZOLWNLHFRP
Attorneys/Legal
Services
',925&(
Complete preparation.
Includes children, custody,
support, property and
bills division. No court
appearances. Divorced in
1-5 weeks possible.
503-772-5295
ZZZSDUDOHJDODOWHUQDWLYHVFRP
OHJDODOW#PVQFRP
• Siding
• Windows
• Gutters
• Skylights
• Pressure Wash
Russ Manning
503-653-1481 • 32 years exp.
Owner Operated • CCB# 148135 • Free estimates
We have an
outstanding
reputation for
being
Northwest RV
offers one of the
best consignment
programs
around.
+RW5RG6KRS
6KHHW0HWDO:RUN
LQJ(TXLSPHQW
Call 208-212-0897
2005 DODGE
WHEELCHAIR VAN
Excellent condition. 74k mi.
Automatic ramp. $14,000
obo. 503-668-2487
µ)25')
116K miles, red, $4000,
2011 Mini Cooper S,
4K miles, British green,
$19,000. Both have good
tags. (503) 786-2943
2009 KAWASAKI Ninja
250r: with 16,757 miles on
it. I am the second owner,
well maintained and runs
great. This is a great
starter bike and allows you
to learn at your own speed
while getting use to the
mechanics of a motorcycle.
Call or text 503-419-8478.
West Linn. Price: $2,800.
1991 560 SEC Coupe. V8
5.6 liter. 198 K miles on
car, but newer Metric Engine, automatic transmission, ABS, air conditioning,
power controls, heated
seats, sun roof, leather interior, 10 disc cd-changer
and new Michelin tires.
Like new condition! Always maintained by MBI
Motors. $9800/OBO. Call
Doug at 503-936-3725.
Like new, 3 wheel,
separates into 4 easy
pieces. Originally $1200.
$450 cash. Call Howard
503-620-7474
Because
We Get
Results!
FULL PARTS,
SERVICE & DETAIL
DEPARTMENTS
no hassle
consignment program.
We will get
you the most
for your RV!
Here at Northwest RV we have a large budget for
advertising that targets buyers of all ages!
Call Jasmine at
503-269-2983 or 503-393-3663
Email: [email protected]
6492 Portland Road NE Salem, OR 97305
www.northwestrvsales.com
Pickups
1970 Chevy 4x4
w/ 2007 Lance Camper
$6,000 OBO 509-427-7569
RVs & Travel
Trailers
28390.012315
Our specialty is
- Selling your RV!
We sell all types of RV’S.
Call about our
at customer
service.
We advertise not just locally but Nationwide and throughout Canada!
PACE SAVER
SCOOTER
Wanted:
1
#
Why Consign?
Motorcycles
Scooters/ATVs
Cars For Sale
EXCELLENT
Mercedes Benz
Looking to buy any & all
WWII (1941-1945) era
Jeeps or trailers. I pay
cash for Ford GPWs,
Willys MB & Bantam T3
or M100 Trailers.
Any condition, running
or not, or just a load of
spare parts.
No title, no problem!
I’ll come & haul it out &
leave CASH in your
hands. See website for
all the details:
www.ibuyoldjeeps.com
or call 503-631-8949
(503) 668-8000
Member BBB -CCB#54535
Let Us Turn Your RV into $$$
&RUYHWWH
%XLOGHU&DU
Antique & Classic
Autos
1941 ALLIS-CHALMERS
TRACTOR
Painting Finer Homes for 40 yrs
RV AN D T R AVE L T R AI L E R S
C-230 Excellent
condition, black.
[email protected]
Refresh your cabinets!
Cars For Sale
1969 WINNER BOAT
$6.$%287285
12'(326,7
237,21
(PDLOIRU
GHWDLOV
Portland Metro area.
503-636-8635
• New roofs
• Reroofs
• Tearoffs
• Roof Cleaning
• Leak repairs
Bring Quick Results!!!
Whatever service you offer, I have the
readers to call you.
WrightChoiceHomes.com
ExteriorsFlawless Interiors
LARIAT ROOFING
& CONSTRUCTION
Community Classifieds
29032.031715c
MOTIVATED SELLER
REDUCED PRICE
$104,999 includes land
with HOA $220.
3 Bed, 2 Ba, Dbl. Carport,
J & M HOMES
Alice 503-970-2669
Award Winning
RO O F I N G
24006.072110c
3 Bdrm, 2.5 Bath
1,500 sq. ft. house, newly
remodeled, built in 2000.
Includes
refrigerator,
range, microwave, propane
fireplace. W/D hookup in
nice utility room. $1,800
per mo., $1,100 deposit,
$600 pet deposit. Call
503-630-6982,
evenings
best.
Painting & Papering
Complete care of your
yard! Mow, edge, trim,
prune; shrubs, trees, and
hedges. Thatch, aerate,
fertilize, bed work, bark
and weed control. Monthly
or year round Maintenance
Programs available.
Call Dave (503) 753-1838
✔✔✔
ESTACADA
Lawn maintenance,
concrete walls, terraces,
pavers, blackberry removal, tree pruning, water
features. Senior Discount!
503-201-1199 ccb#8383
3UHSDUHIRU6SULQJ
COMPLETE YARD
SERVICE BY
STEPHEN SECOR
Senior Discounts
We do it all!
Trimming, hedges &
shrubs, pruning, bark
dust. Gutter cleaning,
leaf/debris cleaning,
weeding, blackberries,
staining & pressure
washing & water sealing
(503) 235-0491
(503) 853-0480
Handyman/
Handywoman
BIRDS CHIMNEY
SERVICE
1-800-CHIMNEY
Cleaning & Repairs
503-653-4999
CCB# 155449
Landscape
Maintenance
FENCES: New install, old
repair & removal, Chain
link, Pressure washing.
CCB# 118609
503-734-7172
Complete Land Care
Owner-operated. 13-yrs
exper. Call Laura,
*HUU\'HDQ¶V
&OHDQXS
Fences
*$5&,$
,FDQKHOSZLWKDOO
RI\RXU\DUGFDUH
QHHGV
*XWWHU&OHDQLQJ
Hauling
DECKS: New install, deck
repair & removal, pressure
washing & staining.
CCB# 118609,
503-734-7172
Landscaping
MAINTENANCE, LLC
Mowing, weeding, trimming, blackberries, hauling, year-round maintenance.
One-time cleanups for all seasons. E-mail:
[email protected]
503-774-2237
Handyman Services,
Roof & Gutter Cleaning
Debris Removal, Pressure
Washing & more!
CCB# 118609
503-734-7172
Decks
Cleaning/Organizing
Building &
Remodeling
CCB#197581
Landscape
Maintenance
Travel Trailers,
Toy Haulers,
Motorhomes,
Fifth Wheels
To Purchase or consign
Call Mike at
503-381-4772 for a
purchase or
consignment value.
Read our customer’s
testimonials at:
AdventureTradingRV
.com
Located in Tigard &
Milwaukie By Appt.
START TALKING BEFORE
THEY START DRINKING
Kids who drink before age15 are 5 times more
likely to have alcohol problems when they’re adults.
To learn more, go to www.stopalcoholabuse.gov
or call 1.800.729.6686
Sport Utility
Vehicles
MERCURY
Mountaineer, 2001:
AWD, like new, inside &
out, V8, AT, moonroof,
great tires, Lots More!
Loaded! $4,800.
503-387-3234
COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS
✵
YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MARKETPLACE
✵
503-620-SELL (7355)
✵
8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
✵ WWW .C OMMUNITY -C LASSIFIEDS .COM
B6 SPORTS
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, March 31, 2015
TribunePuzzles
The Crossword Puzzle
SOLUTIONS
“FORESEES” By C.C. Burnikel Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
section
80 With 102-Across,
Japanese golfer
81 Cascades peak
83 Bug-__: Ortho
garden product
85 Glorifying poems
88 Boy with a bow
90 Quick ride
91 Guinness serving
93 Proof of payment
97 Sam’s rival
100 Morro Castle site
101 “Over the
Rainbow”
composer
102 See 80-Across
103 Picasso’s aunt
105 Some Bronx
trains
107 Palm Pre
predecessor
108 Tiny songbird
111 It’s barely legible
115 Call-to-action
response to
one’s own
rhetorical
question
117 Merged Dutch
carrier
118 Daisylike flower
119 Et __
121 Wear down
12 Computer
122 East
problem
Texas university
13 Download option
124 Current path
14 Well-organized
128 Put in
129 Drink from a bowl 15 Its southern
shore is on
130 Pod veggie
Nantucket Sound
131 Other, in a
16 Budget overhauls
bodega
18 Diamond thieves’
132 Pops, to tots
undoings?
133 Intricate patterns
21 Hanger-on
134 Caught, as a
24 Like Louis XV
show
chairs
135 Occurrence
25 Private beds?
30 Immune system
DOWN
defender
1 Fills vacancies in
2 Mexico’s second- 33 D’Urberville who
seduced Tess
largest state
35 Cornucopia
3 Warning sign
shape
4 Discreetly send a
36 Not neat
dupe email to
37 Me.-to-Fla. route
5 Campus military
40 Condition that
gp.
affects focusing,
6 Folly
briefly
7 Muslim holy city
45 ‘’Zip-__-Doo8 Troy, N.Y., tech
Dah’’
sch.
47 C-SPAN figure
9 Bungle
10 Tattoo alternative 49 Bebe’s “Cheers”
role
for the
50 Sing like Michael
squeamish
Bublé
11 “No more
guesses, just tell 51 Noisy
disturbance
me”
52 Grunted, in a
way
53 Group sharing a
crest
54 French Open
winner before
Björn
55 Alleviate
59 “Chill out!”
61 Squandered
early years
62 Reception
disruption
64 Like California’s
17-Mile-Drive
65 Picasso’s sun
67 Memo opener
69 Brief reply?
71 Posh
74 Thicken, as
cream
75 “Gimme __”
76 Feel concern
82 “I don’t want to
be remembered
for my tennis
accomplishments” speaker
84 __ nerve
86 Old French coin
87 Civil War weapon
89 Slightly burn
92 Jots down
94 Simba’s love
95 A third of neun
96 Dennis
Eckersley, e.g.
97 Laughed
demonically
98 “Très chic!”
99 Went over
cursorily
100 Source of legal
precedents
104 Inside company?
106 Headliner
107 “Blurred Lines”
singer Robin
109 Former Indian
prime minister
Gandhi
110 Dance click
112 Mini racers
113 Breakfast treat
114 Advertising
awards
116 Gas acronym
120 Corn maze
measure
123 Picasso’s here
125 Young lion
126 Decorates with
Angel Soft, briefly
127 Actor Holm
Sudoku
Answers
Puzzle 1
Puzzle 1
Sudoku
Puzzles
Puzzle 2
Crossword
Answers
3/31/15
[email protected]
Puzzle 2
YOUR ADVERTISEMENT HERE
Family Style Customer Service
Delivery Service • Custom Cutting • Special Orders
484921.070814
Keeping minds
& bodies ACTIVE
for 47 years!
1400 NE Second Ave.
Portland, OR
503.736.3642 | www.pacificacalaroga.com
©2015 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
480263.030414
ACROSS
1 Data theft target:
Abbr.
4 Bowler feature
8 Instant, in
product names
12 Brightly colored
foam shoes
17 Traffic noise
19 It may be
cracked
20 Green shampoo
22 Like most of
western China
23 South Temperate
Zone border
26 Ma-__ store
27 Do without
28 Outfielder Crisp
29 Helps with a job
31 Some Caltech
grads
32 Sprite Zero
alternative
34 Pope’s realm
38 Airline that
co-founded Star
Alliance
39 Maker of Total
Effects skin care
products
41 Colin Hanks, to
Tom
42 Common article
43 Gin fizz fruit
44 Wore out the
carpet
46 Ready to eat
48 Company that
insured Bruce
Springsteen’s
voice
50 NFL wide
receiver who
once changed
his name to
match his
uniform number
55 Tiger’s 2004
bride
56 Sly tactic
57 Pickle pick
58 Island near
Corsica
60 NASA moon
landers
63 Haunt
66 Gullible one
68 Actor Morales
70 “__ open!”
72 Asian sash
73 Challenge for
Henry Higgins
77 Wood cutter
78 Sister
79 Online magazine
with a “Runway”
7609 SE Stark St.
(503) 254-7387
Mrplywoodinc.com
CROSSWORD
by Eugene Shaffer
SOLUTIONS
Answer
3/31
©2015 King Features, Inc.
3/31
CRYPTOQUIP
3/31
3/31
GROUP HELPING
HABITUAL
PUSHOVERS TO
BECOME MUCH MORE
ASSERTIVE: THE
BETTER BOSSINESS
BUREAU.
Published every Tuesday and Thursday
www.portlandtribune.com | 503.684.0360
447603.051314 Mkt
Cryptoquip solution:
LOOK NO FURTHER
sports B7
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, March 31, 2015
Ballard Street
Scary Gary
Free Range
Dog Eat Doug
Strange Brew
Dogs of C Kennel
501928.020315
Nest Heads
B8 Life
TribuneHealth
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, March 31, 2015
Fasting and gorging Firefighters know benefits of exercise
for weight loss
T
he secret to a long and
healthy life may not be
skipping the occasional meal. Rather, it may
be skipping a day of them and
then gorging the next.
Researchers at the University of Florida College of Medicine recently published a paper
that showed that participants
who cut their calorie intake by
75 percent one day and then
ate 175 percent the next scored
better on a variety of biochemical health markers.
The participants alternated
days of undereating and overeating for three weeks. For the
average male, that meant consuming 650 calories on fasting
days and 4,550 calories on
feasting days. Some participants also took antioxidant
supplements, such as vitamins
C and E.
At the end of the three
weeks, the researchers found
that beneficial blood markers
tended to be higher in the
feast/famine folks. Interestingly, those who took the antioxidant supplements showed lesser benefit.
The scientists speculate that
the fasting days kicked up the
body’s immune system, applying a little oxidative stress,
which prompted enhanced regeneration and repair of cells.
Intermittent fasting also decreased insulin levels, indicating it may have an antidiabetic
effect, as well.
More research is required, of
course. The study was small,
with just 24 participants. But
it’s something to chew on — assuming it’s not a fasting day.
Body of knowledge
Gums are renewed every
one to two weeks.
Number cruncher
A serving of Alice Springs
chicken from Outback Steakhouse contains 759 calories, 423
from fat. It has 47 grams of total fat, or 72 percent of the recommended total fat intake for
a 2,000-calorie daily diet, according to the Calorie Count
database.
It also contains 205 milligrams of cholesterol (68 percent), 1,626 milligrams of sodium (68 percent), 13 grams of total carbohydrates (4 percent), 1
gram of dietary fiber, 10 grams
of sugar and 74 grams of protein.
Counts
15.6: percentage of American children ages 6-19 with untreated dental caries (cavities).
A
ScottLafee
Wellnews
23.7: percentage of American adults ages 20-64 with untreated dental caries.
Source: Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention
Doc talk
Frenulum: a fold of skin or
mucous membrane that limits
movement of a body part. For
example, the midline fold under the tongue that attaches it
to the floor of the mouth is
called the frenulum linguae.
Mania of the week
Phaneromania: an obsessive
habit of biting one’s nails.
Never say diet
The speed-eating record for
Spam from the can is 6 pounds
in 12 minutes, held by Richard
LeFevre.
Warning: Most of these records are held by professional
eaters; the rest are held by
people who really should find
something better to do.
Medical history
This week in 1867, The Lancet published a paper by Joseph Lister, the first of a series
of articles on his discovery of
antiseptic surgery. Lister had
applied Louis Pasteur’s idea
that the microorganisms causing gangrene might be controlled with chemical solutions. Because the use of carbolic acid (phenol) was known
as a means of deodorizing
sewage, Lister tested the results of using a solution of it
for spraying instruments, surgical incisions and dressings.
The result was a dramatic reduction in the gangrene.
Last words
“Milan, what a beautiful
place to die.”
— American actor John
Carradine (1906-88), who died
from multiple organ failure at
Fatebenefratelli Hospital in
Milan. Just hours before he
was stricken, he had climbed
the 328 steep steps of Milan’s
Gothic cathedral, the Duomo.
COPYRIGHT 2015 CREATORS.COM
dopting an active
lifestyle that includes carving out
time to exercise has
been shown to increase your
energy level, reduce health
risks and lower stress. Exercise also improves your mood
and boosts your productivity.
For Tualatin Valley Fire &
Rescue crews, a commitment
to physical fitness has the added benefit of ensuring firefighters can carry out the
physical demands of their job
while responding to emergency calls in the district’s
210-square-mile service area.
“Working out is an essential
job requirement,” says Justin
Speasl, a firefighter assigned
to Station 56 in Wilsonville
and a reservist in the Marine
Corps. “If someone on your
crew needs to be carried out of
a structure fire, you have to
have the strength and endurCOURTESY: TVF&R
ance to be able to do what’s
needed to make sure that at TVF&R Firefighter Kyle Leonard and Lt. Rich Stamps take a photo following a search and rescue exercise.
the end of the day everyone The two meet in the morning before their shifts to train for athletic events. Leonard is preparing for a 100mile trail run, and Stamps is gearing up for a Half Ironman.
goes home.”
“Our crew relies on us, and
the people we serve in the com- experience day in and day
munity depend on us to answer out,” he says. “It keeps me
the call when they need our healthy for my family.”
Here are a few ways you can get
help,” adds Lt. Rich Stamps of
“For firefighters, with what
on a path to a healthier you:
Station 33 in Sherwood.
we see and do and the stress of
n Start small. Ease into an exerAs part of their 24-hour the job, exercise is a great
cise routine.
shifts, TVF&R crews make stress-reliever,” adds Lt. Geoff
n Keep with it. Once you establish
a routine, stay active.
time to work out in between Goodman of Station 66 in
n Find ways to incorporate exercalls, training exercises and South Beaverton. “Exercise
cise into your daily life.
other station activities. Some helps me process the things I
n Set a goal. Give yourself somecrews exercise together as a see on calls and during my
thing to work toward.
form of team building, others shift so that I can be a better
n Sign up to participate in events
take turns fitting in individual father and husband when I get
throughout the year to keep you
cardio and weight-training home.”
motivated.
sessions to meet personal fitGoodman, who has particiCOURTESY: TVF&R n Celebrate your hard work.
ness goals.
pated in four marathons, reTVF&R Lt. Rich Stamps runs in the Finishing that first 5K, 10K, maraStamps, who has completed cently led the TVF&R team in
thon, triathlon, etc., is your reward
14 marathons including the racing to the top of 69 flights of 2014 Boston Marathon. He has
for your preparation.
participated
in
14
marathons
and
Boston Marathon in 2013 and stairs in 13 minutes and 3 secn Encourage those around you to
join you in physical activities.
2014, is currently training for a onds on March 8 during the is currently training for a Half
Half Ironman this June in Boi- 24th annual Scott Firefighter Ironman.
se. As part of his six-day fit- Stairclimb fundraiser for the
ness regimen, Stamps trains Leukemia & Lymphoma Soci- I kept at it and gradually the “That’s been a progressive
every morning before his shift ety.
miles increased, but I didn’t workout because I’ve been
with Firefighter Kyle Leonard
He says the key to a healthy see big changes until I also pushing them since they were
of Station 51 in Tigard, who is lifestyle is to make physical ac- changed my diet and started three months old, and now
preparing for a 100-mile trail tivity part of your daily life by eating better. Nutrition is they’re 3 and a half (years).
run.
starting slow and easing into equally important.”
They aren’t getting any lightFor Stamps, running is a it.
Now that Goodman is a fa- er.
way to relieve the stress that
“I started running after col- ther of twins, he makes time to
“My wife is a runner too, so
comes with responding to dif- lege,” Goodman recalls. “I was run and bike. He also includes we’ll run to the park, let the
ficult calls on the job. “Work- not healthy, and the first time I his family in his workouts.
kids play, and then run home.
ing out helps me metabolize tried to run with a friend, I
“I put the kids in the stroller It gets the kids out and keeps
some of the things we feel and couldn’t run a mile. Over time, and run,” Goodman says. us active as a family.”
HOW DO I GET ACTIVE?
Reuler to receive community service award
L
ongtime medical educator and homeless advocate Dr. Jim Reuler
will receive the 2015
Rob Delf Honorarium Award
from the Medical Society of
Metropolitan Portland and the
Metropolitan Medical Founda-
No Cost STI Screening
Molecular Testing Labs is developing and validating
a self-collection kit for screening sexually transmitted
infections (STIs). All participants will receive a
comprehensive STI panel which includes:
Chlamydia
x Gonorrhea
x Syphilis
x
Results confidentially provided approximately 72
hours after collection, at no cost to the participant.
Participants will be tested for the above
STIs, plus Human Papilloma Virus
(HPV), Trichomonas, bacterial vaginosis
(BV) and Candida Vaginitis (CV). All
tests will be performed on two sets of
specimens, one collected by the participant and the other by a physician.
Specimen collections will be done at
the Any Lab Test Now® facility at 5201
East Fourth Plain Blvd in Vancouver,
WA. Appointments will be available
March 24th through April 24th, hours
vary.
Schedule an appointment by visiting:
MTLResearch.acuityscheduling.com
504779.032615
HIV
x Hepatitis B and C
x Herpes virus (HSV)
x
Individuals who provide documented evidence of a
previous infection with HIV, HSV2, Hepatitis B,
Hepatitis C, or Syphilis will receive $150 for participation in the study at the time of the specimen collection. Individuals found on testing to be or have been
infected with any of the tested infections will be
notified and asked to return for a confirmatory second
test, at which time they will be compensated and
receive $150. All payments are made by an unrestricted prepaid debit card.
tion of Oregon.
Reuler is the founder of The
Wallace Medical Concern, the
nonprofit that provides affordable primary and urgent medical services to thousands in
Portland and Gresham who
have no insurance or face other
barriers to care.
Reuler, a general internist
who had a 36-year career with
the Portland Veterans Affairs
Medical Center and is an emeritus professor at Oregon Health
& Science University, started
Wallace in 1984, working days
at the VA and OHSU and at
night carrying medical supplies in a tackle box while providing volunteer care to homeless patients in Portland. Since
then, Wallace has grown into
an organization with 325 volunteers that serves youth and
families via a primary care
clinic, specialty care services
and a mobile medical clinic,
and provided an avenue for
medical professionals to give
back and helped train a generation of medical students.
Reuler said he’s humbled to
receive the Rob Delf award,
noting that it recognizes not
just medical service but, more
broadly, community service to
underserved and disadvantaged individuals and families.
His work with homeless peo-
Jim Reuler
ple, he added, has been a conduit to his own greater understanding of their myriad challenges — from hunger to barriers to education — and expanded his outreach efforts.
“It’s been an absolutely incredible transformative experience for me, and it’s had a huge
impact on my own family,” Reuler said. “We’ve learned so
much through the people we’ve
met through Wallace about
what low-income and homeless
families face on a daily basis,
and it’s given us a greater understanding of how privileged
we are and how important it is
to give back.”
The medical society and the
Metropolitan Medical Foundation of Oregon created the Rob
Delf award in 2013 to honor its
namesake’s long service. Recipients receive a $1,000 honorarium. Reuler will receive the
award at the medical society’s
Annual Meeting May 5 in Portland.
Reuler, who has long mentored medical students and
those contemplating a health
care career, will donate the
honorarium to the nonprofit
Black United Fund of Oregon,
for which he volunteers. The
funds will create one or more
college scholarships for high
school students eyeing medical
careers.
We want your feedback!
TriMet is considering
a 25-cent increase to the
Honored Citizen fare
the doctor will
hear you now
want better health care? start asking more questions. to your doctor. to your pharmacist.
to your nurse. what are the test results? what about side effects? don’t fully understand your
prescriptions? don’t leave confused. because the most important question is the one you should
have asked. go to www.ahrq.gov/questionsaretheanswer or call 1-800-931-AHRQ (2477)
for the 10 questions every patient should ask. questions are the answer.
Please join us for a discussion:
Wednesday, April 8
Urban League Senior Center
5325 NE MLK, Portland
1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.
Served by Lines 6 and 72
Alternative formats, sign language interpretation and communication aids are available.
Call 503-962-2455 (7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., weekdays) or TTY 7-1-1 at least 48 hours before
the meeting.
To learn more about the proposal and submit your feedback, visit trimet.org/hcfare.
512512.040215
Portland!Life
By JASON VONDERSMITH
The Tribune
Belting them out
The big screen
Last week, March 27
“Home”; “Get Hard”; “Merchants of Doubt”; “Seymour:
An Introduction”; “It Follows”
This week
April 1
“Woman in Gold” (Weinstein), PG-13, 110 minutes
About — An elderly Jewish
refugee battles the government for her family’s artwork;
Stars — Helen Mirren, Ryan
Reynolds, Daniel Bruhl, Katie
Holmes; Director — Simon
Curtis
April 3
“Furious 7” (Universal), PG13, 137 minutes
About — The latest in the
series, the speedsters (including the late Paul Walker, sort
of) are back at it, as Dominic
Torretta and his family are
chased by a nemesis; Stars —
Vin Diesel, Paul Walker,
Dwayne Johnson, Jason Statham; Director — James Wan
Next week, April 10
“The Longest Ride”; “While
We’re Young”
Home rentals
The latest top 10 digital movie purchases based on transaction rate, by Rentrak:
1. “The Hunger Games:
Mockingjay — Part 1”
2. “The Hobbit: Battle of the
Five Armies”
3. “Big Hero 6”
4. “Horrible Bosses 2”
5. “Foxcatcher”
6. “Whiplash”
7. “Birdman”
8. “Exodus: Gods and Kings”
9. “Tinker Bell and the Legend of the Neverbeast”
10. “Gone Girl”
Other favorites recently:
“John Wick”; “Fury”; “Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible,
No Good, Very Bad Day”; “Boyhood”; “Penguins of Madagascar”
Doc spotlight
■ “The Hunting Ground”
Opening in theaters this
week, it’s a PG-13 exposé of
rape crimes on U.S. college
campuses, their cover-ups
and the toll they take on students and families. It’s written and directed by Kirby
Dick, who appears in the
movie along with Amy Ziering and Amy Herdy. Check
the theater listings.
Upcoming events
Tribune
MARCH 18, 2014
Business
■ Filmmakers dig deeper
into Vincent Van Gogh and
his distinctive style of painting and drawing with “Vincent Van Gogh — A New Way
of Seeing from the Van Gogh
Museum in Amsterdam,”
which hits major movie theaters Tuesday, April 14,
thanks to Fathom Events.
It’s presented as a narrative and offers insight from
Van Gogh Museum curators,
conservators and senior researchers.
Actor Jamie de Courcey
plays Van Gogh, and a relative reads excerpts from Van
Gogh’s letters. To find a local
screening, go to the Vincent
Van Gogh page on fathomevents.com. To learn more
about the Van Gogh Museum:
vangoghmuseum.nl/en.
■ The Northwest Film Center screens “A Year in Champagne,” as wine importer
Martine Saunier leads viewers on a tour of six producers
in Champagne, France.
Screening info: 7 p.m. Friday,
April 3; 5 p.m. Saturday, April
4; 3 and 5 p.m. Sunday, April 5;
at Portland Art Museum/
Whitsell Auditorium, 1219
S.W. Park Ave. ($9, $8 student/
senior, $6 child, nwfilm.org).
Louie: Umbrella Fest
performer, co-director
■ From page 10
traveling, but I don’t always love
the marketing aspects — the day
job.”
Lichtenstein performs shows
in English, French, Spanish, Italian, Dutch, German, Portuguese
and Japanese. “I speak French
and Spanish fluently,” he says.
He has a master’s degree in education, and takes his craft seriously, training in physical theater in France and Mexico and at
Dell’Arte International School in
California.
“Roping’s still my calling
card,” he says. One gag has him
twirling a rope of PBR cans, and
he quickly adds, “the family
Bits &
Pieces:
PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP PHOTOS: CHASE ALLGOOD
At the recent 69th annual All
Northwest Original Barbershop
Ballad Contest in Forest Grove, the
Half Nutz! crew (above) took first
place — as the first mixed-group
winner in event history — and In
Sequins from Portland (right)
included Teri Parente, Camille Lunt,
Nancy Kurth and Von Roberts.
■ From page 10
Local fiction writers vie
for Ken Kesey Award
Literary Arts will
presents the five
nominees April 13
By STEPHEN ALEXANDER
The Tribune
Ken Kesey is a giant in the
world of literature and a god
in the mythology of Oregon.
The late author will long be
remembered for beginning a
cultural revolution by championing the
psychedelic
drug movement in the
1960s.
But there
are plenty of
people who have smoked pot
and dropped acid. What made
Kesey different from the rest
was his genius with the pen.
I have read every published
word of Kesey’s. His most popular work will always be “One
Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.”
His first novel was brilliant, but
I do not think it compares to
Kesey’s second novel, “Sometimes a Great Notion.” I would
put that book about an Oregon
logging family up as the best
written in the last half of the
20th century.
Literary Arts has honored
Kesey by naming the Oregon
Book Award for best fiction after him. The Oregon Book
Awards will take place April 13
at Portland Center Stage’s
Gerding Theatre (literary-arts.
org). Here is a rundown of the
five books that will compete to
take home the Ken Kesey
Award for Fiction:
■ Portland’s Smith Henderson received the 2011 Pen
Emerging Writers Award in
Fiction. His debut novel,
“Fourth of July Creek” ($15.99,
Ecco, 485 pages), is the story of
Pete Snow, a social worker who
tries to help an 11-year-old boy
named Benjamin Pearl. Snow
comes to meet Jeremiah, the
boy’s disturbed father. As
Book
Report
Snow’s own family begins to spin out of control, the FBI takes interest in Pearl, and Snow
is thrust into a manhunt.
■ Lindsay Hill is a
longtime poet living in
Portland. He spent 20
years writing “Sea of
Hooks” ($25, McPherson
and Co., 349 pages). The
protagonist in “Hooks,”
Christopher Westall,
was an awkward and
misunderstood child
who rarely made
friends. His childhood
was littered by tragedies. Now that he is a
young man, Westall is
traveling to Bhutan to
seek some sort of solace
or new beginning following his mother’s
suicide.
The story is told
through a collection of
thoughts, flashbacks
and current narratives,
many no more than a
paragraph long.
■ Cari Luna graduated from the MFA fiction
program at Brooklyn
College. The Portlander
has seen her writing appear in various literary
journals. “The Revolution of Every Day”
($15.95, Tin House
Books, 395 pages) is her
debut novel.
“Revolution” tells of
how on May 30, 1995,
the NYPD took an armored tank down East
Thirteenth Street with
hundreds of cops in riot gear to
evict a few dozen squatters
from two buildings. The novel
imagines the lives of five of
those squatters in New York’s
Lower East Side.
■ Amy Schutzer of Portland
has worked as a U.S. postal carrier, a cashier, a bookkeeper, a
legal assistant and a Nabisco
factory worker. She also is a
highly acclaimed writer. Her
debut novel, “Undertow,” re-
THE
ECONOMICS
OF FILM
THE DOWN AND DIRTY
ON PORTLAND’S BURGEONING
FILM BUSINESS
BY KENDRA HOUGE
ceived numerous
awards and praise. She
received the Kesey
Award nomination for
her third book,
“Spheres of Disturbance” ($15.95, Arktoi
Books, 280 pages).
“Spheres” is the story of Helen, a woman
choosing to die. The
novel is told with nine
revolving viewpoints
during one day in 1985,
and those who surround her (Helen’s
daughter, a high-strung
housewife and crochet
artist, a lesbian poet,
and a pregnant Vietnamese pot-bellied pig)
struggle with Helen’s
imminent end.
■ Willy Vlautin of
Scappoose is the singer
and songwriter for the
band Richmond Fontaine. His novel “Lean
on Pete” won both the
Kesey Award and the
Reader’s Choice Award
back in 2011. He is back
at the Oregon Book
Awards this year for
his fourth novel, “The
Free” ($14.99, Harper
Perennial, 320 pages).
“Free” focuses on
the issues that transform ordinary people’s
lives such as the cost
of health care, the lack
of economic opportunity and the scars of war.
The novel follows Leroy Kervin, Freddie
McCall and Pauline
Hawkins. Kervin is a
man severely wounded in the
Iraq war who has lived in a
group home for eight years.
McCall is the night man at
Kervin’s group home. Despite
working two jobs, he already
has lost his wife and children
and is about to lose his house.
Hawkins is a nurse who remains emotionally removed
while she cares for people in
the group home as well as her
mentally ill elderly father.
There’ll be nearly 100 businesses and organizations, a
kid’s village with entertainment
by Circus Cascadia, live music
produced by Abstract Earth
Project, a speakers’ series,
placemaking through The City
Repair Project, bicycle parking,
and an attempt to recycle all
materials from the event by
Master Recycler Program. The
event also offers volunteer opportunities throughout the day.
Earth Day is officially April
22.
For more, see the Portland
shows, I do pop cans, although I
don’t want to push Coca-Cola
any more than PBR.
“It takes 35 cans to make that
lasso. I made a big one with 55
cans for the ‘White Album
Christmas’ show.”
He has made quite a career for
himself, but Lichtenstein does
admit that he once tried out for
Cirque du Soleil. “It didn’t go
anywhere,” he says. And, his audition for Season 4 of “America’s
Got Talent” didn’t go well, either.
But, nobody can argue with the
impact he has had, and the career he has built.
“He has parlayed it into a
groovy, comfortable family life
with a wife and kids and a beautiful house,” Mickens says.
Earth Day Coalition website,
earthdaypdx.com.
Pickathon
Tickets for the popular summer music festival at Pendarvis
Farm go on sale at 8 a.m. Tuesday, April 7 (pickathon.com).
The lineup announcements also
will start April 7.
Van Halen coming
What a big addition to the
concert lineup: Van Halen, with
David Lee Roth as lead singer,
will play the Amphitheater
Northwest in Ridgefield, Wash.,
on July 7 (the tour’s second stop
after Seattle). Tickets go on sale
at 10 a.m. April 4 (LiveNation.
com, Ticketmaster outlets,
1-800-745-3000). A special Van
Halen concert will be broadcast
on “Jimmy Kimmel Live” on
March 30 and 31.
Over the river
and through
the woods…
The city is nice. If that’s your thing, of
course. But you’re thinking you’re happier
living in a place with trees. Lots and lots of
trees. In an established neighborhood—
maybe even with a golf course.
Then SpringRidge at Charbonneau might
just be your cup of tea. It’s only a hop, a skip,
and a jump from Portland, but seemingly a
world away. Find your own happy place.
Your complimentary lunch and tour awaits.
Please call to schedule.
507591.040115
MovieTime
LIFE B9
I n de p e n de n t & A s s i s t e d L i v i ng
M e mor y C a r e
32200 SW French Prairie Road • Wilsonville, OR
503.388.4152 • SRGseniorliving.com
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Whether in the office or at home, you now have another way
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The Portland Tribune Tuesday, March 31, 2015
Portland!
Portland!Life
L
Tribune
PAGE B10 PortlandTribune
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Bits&Pieces
By JASON VONDERSMITH
The Tribune
Watch for them!
The popular NBC series
“Grimm” has brought out the
best in Portland in many ways,
and we’re not talking about
the grisly looking creatures —
wesen — walking around
disguised as people.
The production company that
puts on “Grimm,” Hazy Mills,
has tried to incorporate Portland businesses and products.
In the 8 p.m. April 3 episode,
“Heartbreaker,” some Portland
bicycle companies will get air
time, otherwise known as very
beneficial product placement. A
new Portland bicycle manufacturing company, Circa Cycles,
gets some publicity, as does
Breadwinner and Tonic.
Apparently nonlocal builders
with bikes in the show have
their logos blacked out.
The episode is very bike-focused with road-riding, mountain-biking and scenes taking
place in a Portland bike shop.
The folks at Circa Cycles will
put on a viewing party at The
Station, 2703 N.E. Alberta St.
Kid filmmakers
C-SPAN plans to honor local
winners of StudentCam, the annual student video documentary
competition, when its 45-foot
customized bus visits Beverly
Cleary Middle School, 1915 N.E.
33rd Ave., from 9 to 11 a.m. Tuesday, March 31.
A C-SPAN representative will
give a StudentCam certificate of
merit to 12 students during a
school ceremony. Students were
asked to make a documentary
with the topic “The Three
Branches and You,” telling a story about how the executive, legislative and judicial branches
have affected them.
Visit studentcam.org to watch
the winning videos.
The local winners: Ally Lee,
Haley Leavens, Claire Ben, second place, “Same Sex Marriage”; Ian Hernandez, Connor
Kolze, Noah Anderson, honorable mention, “Genetically Modified Dinner”; Ella Hirata, Toli
Tate, honorable mention, “Immigration in the United States”;
Oliver Kline, honorable men-
tion, “The Patent System”; Braedyn Weaver, Harrison Wells,
Brayden Dunca, honorable mention, “Militarization of Police.”
Earth Day
The big local celebration,
EarthDay PDX, moves back to
Normandale Park at Northeast
57th Avenue and Halsey Street,
April 25.
See BITS&PIECES / Page 9
Bicycles are part
of the plot in the
April 3 episode
of “Grimm,”
including Circa
Cycles road bike
(far left).
Company
founder is Rich
Fox (left).
PHOTOS COURTESY OF
CIRCA CYCLES