Staying in school - Mountain View Voice

Eclectic but
not eccentric
WEEKEND | 18
MARCH 20, 2015 VOLUME 23, NO. 8
www.MountainViewOnline.com
650.964.6300
MOVIES | 21
Trustee comes under fire as
parents grill school board
SUPERINTENDENT PAYOUT RAISES QUESTIONS
By Kevin Forestieri
C
MICHELLE LE
Arnel Pajarillo, right, helps students with application forms for the city’s Leadership-In-Training
program at the after-school program at Graham Middle School on Mar. 17.
Staying in school
FORMER STUDENTS RETURN TO WORK AT CITY-RUN RECREATION PROGRAMS
By Kevin Forestieri
T
alking to middle school
kids can be tough, but
not for Arnel Pajarillo.
At “The Beat” after-school
program at Graham Middle
School, Pajarillo went around
the room Tuesday afternoon
talking to students about how
they spent their three-day
weekend.
As a leader of the program
and member of Mountain View
Recreation Department team,
he said it’s easy enough to relate
to them once they get to know
you.
Leading students through
after-school and summer activities is, in some ways, Pajarillo’s
chance to pay it forward after
getting years of support when
he was a kid. He said he was in
all sorts of city-run programs
including the “Busy Bees” preschool summer camp, Summer
Safari, and after-school programs at Theuerkauf Elementary and Crittenden Middle
School.
Pajarillo, 25, said he and his
friends used to look up to the
camp leaders and talk about
See REC LEADERS, page 6
Push made for Mountain View
to become a ‘human rights city’
By Daniel DeBolt
S
ometime this year, the City
Council is expected to discuss the possibility of pursuing a “human rights city”
designation, indicating that city
officials are expected to consider
the impact on human rights in
all decisions.
Local advocates include council member Ken Rosenberg and
INSIDE
Human Relations Commission member
Lucas Ramirez,
who say focusing on human
rights
isn’t
much different Ken Rosenberg
from what city
staff does on a daily basis.
“If you are placing human
rights at the front of your decision making, you may make different decisions,” said Rosenberg,
who last month asked his council
colleagues to make it a top goal.
“It’s a recognition of ‘What are
we doing? What are we trying to
accomplish?’”
If council members decide to
See HUMAN RIGHTS, page 7
VIEWPOINT 14 | GOINGS ON 22 | MARKETPLACE 23 | REAL ESTATE 25
ontroversy over former
superintendent Craig
Goldman’s $231,567
severance agreement with the
Mountain View Whisman school
board bubbled over last week as
members of the public — and
even board members — spoke of
dysfunctional governance and a
hostile work environment that
led to the settlement.
Parents and teachers packed
the room on Thursday, March
12, to grill the
board on why
it decided, in
closed session,
to pay Goldman nearly a
quarter-million
dollars to sign
a resignation
Chris Chiang
agreement,
which board
members are now referring to as
a “settlement agreement.”
Goldman announced last
November that he would step
down the following month, and
the move was called a resignation
by both him and the board. But
the severance agreement that was
drafted, discussed and signed
behind closed doors awarded
Goldman nearly a quarter-million dollars in exchange for his
agreeing to the terms, according
to board President Chris Chiang.
Those terms included Goldman’s
waiving his legal right to sue the
district.
The settlement raised a lot of
questions for Huff parent Brett
Pauly, who along with PTA
Council President Hafsa Mirza
criticized the board for its decision and handling of Goldman’s
resignation during the March 12
special meeting.
“What kind of grievance would
Mr. Goldman have that he would
be settling?” Pauly asked. “What
could give him the leverage to
extract a quarter-million dollars
on his way out?”
Pauly indicated he could think
of one reason: the conduct of
board member Steve Nelson,
who in late 2013 was censured
by his board colleagues for his
actions on the board and his
interaction with district staff,
including Goldman. Nelson had
yelled profanities at Goldman
and verbally disrespected, threatened and intimidated district
staff members, according to the
resolution to censure Nelson.
Nelson was not at the March 12
meeting.
If this led to the settlement,
Pauly said, this all needed to be
done in the open. He said the
public needs to know if Nelson
created a “quarter-million dollar liability” for the district, and
the public needs to know if the
payout is something Goldman
required to agree to a release of
claims.
“If Goldman felt like he needed
a quarter-million dollars worth
of money from our kids to soothe
himself because he was mistreated by Mr. Nelson, then the public
needs to know that,” Pauly said.
Chiang stood by his support
of the settlement, and said he
would have voted for it even if
the action had been taken in
an open-session meeting with a
crowd of people opposed to the
payout. He said it was important
that Goldman waive his right to
sue the district.
Chiang said that had Goldman been fired, as some people
suspect, he would have retained
his right to sue, and would still
be entitled to a lump-sum payment of 12 months’ salary — as
stipulated in his contract.
Chiang said the community
has a right to be upset about NelSee PAYOUT, page 8
Alain Pinel Realtors
COME ON IN
SA RATOGA
$2,950,000
LOS ALTOS
14528 Chester Avenue | 4bd/3ba + 2 half ba
Kristi Foxgrover | 650.941.1111
P O RTOL A VA L L EY
$1,695,000
$898,000
See it all at
APR.COM
2
CUPERT INO
LOS GATOS
$1,688,000
$598,000
1730 Catherine Street | 2bd/1ba
Jim & Jimmy Nappo | 650.941.1111
/alainpinelrealtors
@alainpinelrealtors
Los Altos Office 650.941.1111
Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q March 20, 2015
$2,195,000
1208 Awalt Drive | 3bd/2ba
Dottie Monroe | 650.941.1111
SA NTA CLARA
551 Morse Avenue | 4bd/2.5ba
Michael Galli | 650.941.1111
MOUNTAIN VIEW
74 Bay Tree Lane | 2bd/2ba
Kristi Foxgrover | 650.941.1111
22365 Rancho Deep Cliff Drive | 2bd/2ba
Patti Robison & Ursula Cremona 650.941.1111
56 El Rey Road | 3bd/2ba
Jim & Jimmy Nappo | 650.941.1111
SUNNYVA LE
$2,400,000
$1,225,000
200 Highland Oaks Drive | 4bd/2ba
Jane Scully | 650.941.1111
MOSS BEACH
$130,000
0 Marine Boulevard | 3800+/- sf lot
Dennis Bower | 650941.1111
Voices
A R O U N D
T O W N
Asked in downtown Mountain View. Photos and interviews by Rachel Lee.
How well would your
hometown survive a big quake?
“I think we’ll do okay, but I think
a lot of people will be surprised
if they haven’t gotten everything
tied down. Generally I think
we’re all aware of the earthquake
risk, but it’s one thing to be aware
and another thing to take all the
necessary precautions.”
Brad Ashmore, Mountain View
“Now our buildings have better
standards, so I think we should
be somewhat prepared, but not
fully.”
Ryan Vista, San Jose
“I know that the San Andreas fault
is unstable and is expected to have a
really gigantic earthquake anytime
now. Even though we know it’s
coming, I think a lot of people are
extremely under-prepared. You
should have food rations in your
home and water stocked up because
it’s going to be horrible if it happens.”
Felicia Hoehnle, San Jose
“Mountain View seems to be
mostly one-story structures,
so I think the damage would
be limited. There’s still a lot
of wood structures too, which
could survive an earthquake
better.”
Rachel Becket, Mountain View
Have Chipped
or Broken
Crowns?
Replace your old metal crowns
with crowns that look and feel
completely natural!
Free
Consultation!
(A $100 Value!)
Offer valid for new patients only. Second
opinions welcome. Call for details. Some
restrictions may apply.
3 Main Benefits of Porcelain Crowns
Restore Functionality – Many
cases in which a crown is
needed, the tooth is too sensitive
or worn for proper functionality.
A crown allows for functionality
of the tooth to be restored and a
natural bite and smile reinforced.
Look Natural – Porcelain dental
crowns are the perfect solution for
bringing out your brightest smile.
The material is designed to match
the shape, color, and durability
of your teeth, making your smile
bright and natural.
Feel Natural – Not only will
your friends be unable to tell it is
porcelain, you won’t either. The
procedure will match the contours
of your mouth & your other teeth,
adjusting the crown to your
mouth’s particular specifications.
Dr. William Hall • Dr. Tiffany Chan • Dr. J. Janice Chou • Dr. Rob van den Berg
100 W. El Camino Real, Suite 63A | Mountain View, CA 94040 (Corner of El Camino & Calderon)
www.SmilesDental.com | 650.564.3333
Larry’s knows Toyotas.
(& other
th JJapanese V
Vehicles)
hi l )
You kno
k ow you are dealing
with exp
perts when …
࠮ ;LJOUPJPHUZHYL5H[PVUHSS`*LY[PÄLK4HZ[LYZ
࠮ Technicians receive over 4o hours
VMZWLJPHSPaL
LK[YHPUPUNL]LY``LHY
࠮ ;OL`HYLJLYY[PÄLKLU]PYVUTLU[HSS`
MYPLUKS`
࠮ (SSYLWHPYZHYYLN\HYHU[LLKPU^YP[PUN
for 3 years/ 36,000 miles —
UVV[OLYZOVWKVLZ[OPZ
࠮ Ea
ach technician is a specialist
on
n the vehicle they service.
“The folks at Larry’s Autoworks really take
care of you. It’s clear they appreciate your
I\ZPULZZHUK[OL`KV[OLQVIYPNO[¹
2014
“Y
Your are the
th best
b t auto
t shop
h I have
h
EVER
MV\UK*VTWSL[LS`OVULZ[[OVYV\NOHUK
RUV^[email protected]\HYLMHI\SV\Z¹
– Carolyn W., Los Altos
Fabian
– Darin M., Mountain View
w
2014
Eugene Offo, San Mateo
Mi
Hours: Mon – Fri 7:30 am - 12:30 pm, 1:30 pm - 5:30 pm
2526 Leghorn Street, Mountain View
650-968-5202 | Autoworks.com
dd
lefi
S an
Anton
io
Charleston
e ld
Leghorn St
Old Middlefi eld
Rengstorff
“I think my hometown would
survive an earthquake well
because it’s in the Bay Area and
they’ve been thinking about it
for a long time.”
Approved
Auto Repair
Have
H
Have aa question
question
ti for
fforV
Voices
Voices
i A
Around
AroundTown?
Town? E-mail
Email itit to
to [email protected]
[email protected]
March 20, 2015 Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q
3
LocalNews
www.demartiniorchard.com
66 N. San Antonio Rd., Los Altos
Open Daily
8am-7pm
Prices Effective
03/18 thru 03/24
LOCALLY GROWN
STRAWBERRIES
SWEET
AND
TASTY
25
1#
PKG.
FOR
$ 00
TASTE
THE
Farm Fresh and
Always the Best
DIFFERENCE
LOCALLY GROWN
WE LET YOU SAMPLE ALL
OF OUR FRUIT EVERY DAY
SO YOU CAN TELL THE
DE MARTINI DIFFERENCE
NOW
IN
SEASON
ASPARAGUS
KG
M
4 $300
ORGANIC LOCAL
B
1
$ 99
LARGE
ALL GREEN
SPEARS
SHORT
BLOOD ORANGE JUICE
CUT
SPRING GARLIC
$ 99
$ 99
L .
1 P .
2
HALF MOON BAY PEAS
CHAMPION
PIXIE MANDARINS
ANGOES GOLD NUGGET MANDARINS
SWEET
CHERIMOYA - STAR FRUIT YELLOW
F
ORANGE
AND
O
PADRON PEPPERS
R
OR RED
CREAMY
BLACK
BERRIES
QCRIMEBRIEFS
650-948-0881
LB.
SWEET PEPPERS
1
$ 49
L .
ORGANIC LOCAL
ORGANIC LOCAL
B
S
WISS CHARD STRAWBERRIES LEEKS
G
S
J
REEN
OR RED
RAINBOW
$149
99
4
Your Everyday Farmers Market
¢
WEET
AND
BUN. TASTY
$
99
1# P
UMBO
SIZE
KG. MEATY
LB.
Online at www.DeMartiniOrchard.com
CALTRAIN FATALITY
Trains were delayed for hours Tuesday after a man was struck
and killed by a Caltrain going northbound through Mountain
View.
The Caltrain hit the pedestrian at around 4:40 p.m. on March
17 near the San Antonio station, where it was not scheduled to
stop, according to Caltrain spokeswoman Christine Dunn. Witnesses told Caltrain employees that the man had jumped off the
station’s platform into the path of the oncoming train, Dunn said.
The man was identified as 38-year-old Daneesh Naidu of
Redwood City, according to the Santa Clara County Medical
Examiner-Coroner’s Office
The northbound train tracks were closed and trains were
single-tracking through the area at reduced speeds using the
southbound track, causing delays of up to one hour and 45 minutes in both directions. Tracks were re-opened at about 8:50 p.m.,
Dunn said.
This is the ninth Caltrain fatality this year, of which only one
of them was accidental, Dunn said. By comparison, there were 10
fatalities in all of 2014.
Any person who is feeling depressed, troubled or suicidal is
urged to call 1-800-784-2433 to speak with a crisis counselor.
People in Santa Clara County can also call 1-855-278-4204.
—Kevin Forestieri and Bay City News Service
CAR THEFT SUSPECT ARRESTED
Police arrested a Gilroy man this week after he was seen in
Mountain View pushing a broken-down vehicle that had been
reported stolen.
See CRIME BRIEFS, page 11
QPOLICELOG
AUTO BURGLARY
RESIDENTIAL BURGLARY
100 block E. El Camino Real, 3/11
1000 block Grant Rd., 3/11
1900 block Rock St., 3/12
700 block Continental Cir., 3/12
1 block Paul Av., 3/12
700 block Continental Cir., 3/16
600 block Victor Way, 3/12
BATTERY
200 block Castro St., 3/11
400 block N. Rengstorff Av., 3/13
GRAND THEFT
100 block N. Whisman Rd., 3/16
STOLEN VEHICLE
800 block Heatherstone Way, 3/11
2500 block Wyandotte St., 3/13
700 block El Camino Real, 3/17
TERRORIST THREATS
700 block Continental Cir., 3/14
VANDALISM
100 block Dalma Dr., 3/13
1000 block Wright Av., 3/16
700 block Continental Cir., 3/16
QCOMMUNITYBRIEFS
PRINCIPAL ANNOUNCES RETIREMENT
Connie Sawdey, the principal of Theuerkauf Elementary
School, announced her retirement this week, effective June 30.
She’s led the school for the past 11 years.
Sawdey, who has worked in education for over 40 years, came
to Mountain View after serving as principal and vice principal at
schools in Santa Maria-Bonita and Lodi unified school districts,
according to a Mountain View Whisman district press release.
She also served as a bilingual trainer for two education companies, and as a “master teacher” at a Model Education Center in
San Diego County.
Since Sawdey joined Theuerkauf, the school established its first
Parent-Teacher Association, started after-school clubs and kicked
off software program integration in the classroom 10 years before
it got the name “blended learning,” Sawdey said in a statement.
See COMMUNITY BRIEFS, page 7
The Mountain View Voice (USPS 2560) is published every Friday by
Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto CA 94306 (650) 964-6300.
Periodicals Postage Paid at Palo Alto CA and additional mailing offices. The
Mountain View Voice is mailed free upon request to homes and apartments in
Mountain View. Subscription rate of $60 per year. POSTMASTER: Send address
changes to Mountain View Voice, 450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94306.
4
Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q March 20, 2015
LocalNews
MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE
El Camino says goodbye
to paper medical records
TESTING ABOUT TO START FOR NEW ELECTRONIC
HEALTH RECORDS SYSTEM
By Kevin Forestieri
P
atients at El Camino Hospital can expect easy-toaccess medical health
records and online hospital test
results — some of the perks of
the hospital’s new online medical
record system that’s under way.
El Camino, working with
medical software company Epic
Systems, is working to set up
an online medical records database that will link the hospital’s
patients with millions of others
in the Bay Area. The link-up will
make it easier for neighboring
hospital networks — like Stanford and the Palo Alto Medical Foundation — to tap into
records from El Camino, including information on medications,
allergies and health problems.
And amid recent controversies
over hospitals’ cyber-security
and the major breach at Anthem
Blue Cross earlier this year,
El Camino Hospital officials
say the move towards a digital
system will be safe and secure,
and patients won’t have to worry
about their personal information
being compromised by identity
thieves.
The new system, called iCare,
will give patients the ability to
look up their medical test results,
schedule appointments, refill
prescriptions and even fill out
the lengthy pre-visit question-
naires, according to Deborah
Muro, the iCare project director.
It also means physicians outside
of El Camino Hospital and the
Epic system can access a readonly version of patient records,
removing a long-standing communication barrier.
“It (meets) the challenges
health care has moving from silo
to silo, both within organizations
and between organizations,” said
Greg Walton, chief information
officer at El Camino Hospital.
The price tag of the project,
expected to be $125 million, will
in some ways bring the hospital
up to speed with other hospitals
in the area, according to Walton.
He said Northern California has
most of its major health care
systems already hooked up to
the Epic network with programs
similar to iCare, which includes
patient records for millions of
Bay Area residents. About half of
patients in the United States have
an electronic record with Epic,
according to the company’s own
statistics.
A big part of the cost of iCare
comes from from paying the
salaries of some 100 hospital
employees that were pulled from
their posts, either as physicians,
nurses or pharmacists, to come
work full-time on getting the
medical record system up and
running. Working out of the old
main hospital building, they’ve
been developing and designing
the new system for almost a year.
The system is expected to be 100
percent “built” and go into the
testing phase this month, with
Nov. 7 as the tentative date for
going live, Muro said.
Hospital board member David
Reeder called iCare a big commitment on the part of El
Camino, involving all aspects of
the hospital. He said staff can’t
be expected to do their normal
jobs on top of working on iCare.
Money spent on salaries for people working on the project have
been rolled into the $125 million
budget.
Reeder, who is one of two
board members overseeing the
iCare project, said the hospital
will be heading into the “testing”
phase next, which will include
a rigorous process of testing
and validation to make sure the
system doesn’t have any glitches
when it goes online. Medications
or mixed-up information about
the patients, Reeder said, are a
serious concern.
“We don’t want to go online
and get the wrong results,” he
said.
Threats to medical
records
El Camino Hospital will be
firing up its new medical records
network and hook up to Epic’s
database at a time when hackers
appear to have their crosshairs
set squarely on hospitals —
institutions notorious for being
vulnerable to cyber attacks.
Earlier this year, it was
revealed that Anthem Blue
Cross was hit by a “very sophis-
Q CITY COUNCIL UPDATES
Q COMMUNITY
Q FEATURES
COURTESY OF THE MOUNTAIN VIEW MARAUDERS
Janessa Ibarra, RaAnee Bey (center) and Jade Alexander perform
toe touches at the Pop Warner National Cheer Championships.
MV cheerleaders soar to victory
The Mountain View City
Council will be recognizing
the Mountain View Marauders Jr. Pee Wee Cheerleaders
for their national victory at
the March 24 council meeting. The team, composed
of girls ages 8 to 11, beat 16
other teams from all over
the country to win first place
at the Pop Warner National
Cheer Championships at the
ESPN Wide World of Sports
Complex in Disney World in
Florida.
According to a press release
from the team, most of the
See CHEERLEADERS, page 8
See EL CAMINO, page 9
Jim Hartnett makes a return trip to Caltrain — now as CEO
AFTER A STINT WITH HIGH-SPEED RAIL, REDWOOD CITY POLITICIAN HIRED TO LEAD CALTRAIN
By Gennady Sheyner
W
hen Jim Hartnett
joined the effort four
years ago to bring
high-speed rail to California, the
project was in danger of going off
the rails, with intense opposition
mounting in Sacramento and on
the Peninsula.
The rail project’s price tag had
more than doubled from what
it was in 2008, when the voters
passed a bond to fund the highspeed rail system, and the San
Francisco-to-Los Angeles line
was facing lawsuits from numer-
ous Peninsula communities and
citizen coalitions.
Hartnett, who this week was
selected as the new CEO of Caltrain, had been a fixture in the
Peninsula politics for well over
a decade, having served on the
Redwood City City Council for
14 years. But as one of the new
faces on the California High
Speed Rail Authority, he was
charged with turning the project
around and bringing the Peninsula on board.
So when high-speed rail officials attended a meeting in
Mountain View in November
2011 to discuss their new
vision for the
rail line, it fell
to Hartnett
to make the
case for what
is now known
Jim Hartnett
as a “blended
system.” Under
this design, the high-speed rail
would share a single set of tracks
with Caltrain on the Peninsula
segment of the line, rather than
have its own set. Hartnett called
the new approach a “rethinking of the whole high-speed rail
approach.”
In some ways, Caltrain’s choice
of Hartnett to replace its recently
retired CEO Michael Scanlon,
reflects the growing interdependent of the two train systems.
While high-speed rail is leaning
on Caltrain for its right-of-way
and political capital on the Peninsula, Caltrain is depending on
$705 million from high-speed
rail funds to pay for the longawaited electrification of the
train tracks, a project with a $1.7
million price tag.
Hartnett has plenty of history
with Caltrain, having served on
and chaired its board of directors before being appointed by
the state Senate to join the highspeed rail authority.
In some ways, he has long
bridged the two agencies. In
2009, as a Caltrain board member he spearheaded a memorandum of agreement between
Caltrain and high-speed rail.
The document specified that the
high-speed rail system must be
“designed, constructed and operated in a manner fully consistent
with the operational requireSee HARTNETT, page 13
March 20, 2015 Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q
5
LocalNews
Please
don’t litter...
spay and neuter your critter (cat)
Many homeless cats and kittens end up in
shelters or are euthanized because there are not
enough suitable homes. We believe that all cats
should be spayed or neutered, even those cats
who are indoor only.
Can’t afford the cost to spay/neuter your cat?
We can help.
Contact Peninsula CatWorks at:
[email protected]
or (650) 329-9570
www.peninsulacatworks.org
MAGALI GAUTHIER
LAST STOP FOR EVELYN STATION
Mountain View’s Evelyn light rail station is officially closed, as of Monday, March 16. The lightly-used
station is set to be demolished to make way for a second set of tracks through the area.
REC LEADERS
Continued from page 1
what it would be like to do the
same job once they got older.
“I still remember our leaders,
NEW AMERICAN COOKING!
A
MOUNTAIN VIEW’S
Restaurant
NEWEST DINING SPOT AND AFTER WORK BAR SCENE!
they were so cool,” Pajarillo said.
Pajarillo is not alone, according to Maureen Grzan-Pieracci,
the city’s recreation coordinator. She said many of the recreational leaders who help out
at schools across the city were
once students who benefited
from the very same programs.
She counted 26 recreation staff
members who were in things
like the city’s preschool program or the Beyond the Bell
program — at the time called
the All Stars program, which
offers after-school homework
help, academic enrichment and
recreation activities.
‘I love it, it keeps
me going.’
ARNEL PAJARILLO
eSMALL PLATES FOR SHARING eHEARTY ENTRÉES
eINTIMATE DINING eBARREL AGED SPIRITS eARTISAN COCKTAILS
eSEPARATE BAR AND GAME LOUNGE
Mon - Thu 11:30 - 10 · Fri 11:30 - 11 · Sat 4 - 11 · Sun 4 - 9
4 2 0 C a s t r o S t . , M t n V i e w, 6 5 0 . 9 6 6 . 8 1 2 4
open table reservations
M i x x M V. c o m
6
Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q March 20, 2015
When people like Pajarillo
apply for a job with the city’s
recreation department, GrzanPieracci said, they always refer
to those childhood experiences
as a motive for joining up.
She said they talk about how
they needed the after-school
program as an incentive to
go to school, and as a way to
avoid activities after school that
“weren’t very positive.”
“These are people who applied
to work in the program and give
back to the community. They
just love the positive environment,” Grzan-Pieracci said.
“It gave them a place to go, get
outside and be active.”
But the work doesn’t feel like
any sort of debt-paying chore,
Pajarillo said. His four years
as recreation leader have been
rewarding work. He said after
figuring out his strengths as a
leader, he does a pretty good job
of keeping a natural, free-flow
environment where kids can feel
comfortable hanging out.
“I love it, it keeps me going.
All my jobs here have to do with
kids,” he said.
Many of the staff now running
after-school programs cut their
teeth on leading youth activities
through the city’s Leadership-inTraining program, which gives
kids between 13 and 17 years old
a chance to volunteer and help
run summer camps, Grzan-Pieracci. There, they help with nearly
everything short of actually
supervising the kids themselves.
The Beat, where Pajarillo
currently works with kids at
the after-school program, is a
three-hour drop-in program
that gives students a place to
talk, do homework and participate in activities. The room
itself has table soccer, inspirational quotes on the whiteboard
and an ancient relic of the past
— a Backstreet Boys poster —
on the wall.
Pajarillo said it’s a good place
for kids to hang out and get
homework done, particularly for
kids who don’t necessarily have
that kind of helpful environment at home. He said it’s also a
place where kids can feel free to
talk to him and other recreation
staff about any problems they’re
having.
“They can talk to us about
issues that they might not have
an older brother or sister to ask
(about),” Pajarillo said.
Email Kevin Forestieri at
[email protected]
V
LocalNews
HUMAN RIGHTS
Continued from page 1
pursue the designation, it could
mean making the United Nation’s
1948 Universal Declaration of
Human Rights a guiding document for the city, with some language changed to promote gender
inclusiveness. The Human Relations Commission voted in support of that in February, drafting a
resolution similar to one approved
by the city council of Richmond,
one of several American cities to
take on the designation. The resolution says the city would aspire
to be a global leader in advancing
human rights, “explicitly embracing the principles of equality,
inclusion, social pluralism, and
the recognition of human dignity.”
Rosenberg, who was a member
of the commission for years,
also wants to rename Mountain View’s Human Relations
Commission the Human Rights
Commission.
When human rights and
human dignity come up in the
context of local government, it is
often during discussions about
the need to house the homeless,
institute rent control, or the need
for people to be treated justly and
without unnecessary violence by
law enforcement. Housing the
homeless and training police to
avoid racial profiling and excessive force have been key efforts
for human rights cities, but
advocates say many other things
can be done, including making
budget and land-use decisions
with human rights as a priority,
making sure minorities feel welcome in city buildings, providing translations for those who
can’t speak English, and making
sure that those with no address
can still receive services, such as
library cards.
While some cities have taken
on the designation as a largely symbolic effort, in Eugene,
Ore., city officials have really
embraced the human rights city
approach, says Ken Neubeck,
a member of Eugene’s Human
Rights Commission, which has
been allowed to take the lead
in Eugene’s transformation. He
recently spoke on the topic to
Ramirez and other members of
Mountain View’s Human Relations Commission.
Neubeck, a soft-spoken former
sociology professor, says he had
brown bag lunches with Eugene
city staff where he told them that
they are “already doing human
rights work,” though they may
not realize it.
Eugene, home to 160,000 people and the University of Oregon,
is a city surrounded by forests.
Neubeck says the city has been
able to house 65 percent of its
2,000 homeless people in designated tent camps and villages
of tiny homes, created by local
nonprofits; these include one
called the “Opportunity Village”
and another being built called
the “Emerald Village.” About
80 people live in their cars in
designated car-camping areas,
supervised by police — an idea
that has also been discussed by
advocates for the homeless in
Mountain View after people had
their cars towed and were unable
to pay fines to retrieve them.
“Just to have a safe and legal
place to be, people are feeling so
much better,” Neubeck said of
efforts in Eugene. “Some of them
are beginning to find jobs — it
stabilizes their life.”
Mountain View’s skyrocketing rents have meant growing
numbers of homeless individuals
and families in the city, many
living in motor homes, camped
along creeks, and in cars. A 2013
count found 139 homeless people
in Mountain View, nearly four
times higher than in 2011.
“You can choose to look at it
or you can choose to ignore it,”
Rosenberg said of the city’s housing problems. “If the solution to
housing more people is (more
housing) development, then you
are not really impacting the
people who need it right now.”
Rosenberg said the tendency
for some in Silicon Valley to want
government to emulate corporate
practices is wrong-headed — an
unusual statement for a Morgan
Stanley financial adviser who was
solidly backed by business interests in the November election.
“They are not the same, not the
same at all. Corporations are not
designed to solve the problems
of poverty or water desalination
— that’s what governments are
supposed to do,” Rosenberg said.
“When governments are reduced
to number-crunching, then that’s
government gone wrong.”
The city’s government needs
Avenidas presents
to make sure “we are not going
down the path of net-present
value over the dignity of our
residents,” he said.
Neubeck describes the human
rights city effort as confronting entrenched perceptions. He
encourages people to stop and
talk to the homeless, to listen to
their stories.
“The city manger really bought
into this idea, and that was
really helpful,” Neubeck said
of Eugene’s human rights city
efforts that began in 2007. “The
city manager invited in some
trainers to give training in implementing human rights to managers and supervisors. We’re asking
people to work in a different way,
to put on a different lens. It’s been
successful, but there’s much,
much more work to do.
“Our police officers take
mandatory training to avoid
racial profiling. I tell them that’s
human rights work. They take
training on how to respond to
people out on the streets who
are autistic — their behavior is
different than one would expect.
We want people like that treated
with care and respect. The public
library figured out how to give
library cards to people who are
homeless; that’s doing human
rights work because you are
extending to people the human
right of education, and giving
people equal access. Everybody
has some role to play in protecting the human rights of people.”
Eugene city officials also now
use something called a “triple bottom line tool” in decision making,
which makes social equity a top
priority, followed by economic
development, and finally, environmental sustainability.
“It doesn’t make a decision for
people but it prompts them to
think about the implication of
the decisions they are going to
make,” Neubeck said. The tool
has helped as the city considers
potential development outside of
its designated urban limit line,
set up to preserve the wilderness
outside the city.
Human rights don’t necessarily cost a lot of money, Neubeck
said. “This is in hard budget
times. It doesn’t seem to cost
more to do this.”
More information on the
efforts in Eugene can be found at
humanrightscity.com.
During the Hour of Code
event late last year, Sawdey
pushed Theuerkauf to be one
of the few elementary schools
in the area to participate in the
program, giving students as
young as first grade exposure
to programming. She said
she was ready for some initial
hesitance and push-back from
the teaching staff, and that
they eventually came around
to the idea.
“I am most proud of your
children’s adaptability to the
rigors of learning,” Sawdey
said. “Your children are not
only eager learners, but they
are also kind and compas-
Co-Sponsored by the City of Palo Alto, with thanks to Platinum Sponsor
Nancy Goldcamp, Seniors Real Estate Specialist, Coldwell Banker
Saturday, March 21, 2015, 9:30 am - 4 pm
Mitchell Park Community Center, 3700 Middlefield Road
• Learn how to live better in your home as you age
• Get tips for downsizing, decluttering and moving
• Discover resources for aging-in-place
• Find out ways to repurpose your home
• See how technology can help you live independently
$40 early bird price before 3/14.
To register, visit Avenidas.org
or call (650) 289-545.
TOOLS FOR POSITIVE AGING
With your kids in college or pursuing lives of
their own, have you considered helping another
young person along the way to a brighter
future? Become a mentor or tutor today and
make a difference in someone’s life.
JOIN US
AND BRING A FRIEND
V
OPEN HOUSE
April 2 • 12:00-1:00 pm
QCOMMUNITYBRIEFS
Continued from page 4
“A Home for All Ages”
Housing Conference
sionate citizens who care
about others and the world we
live in.”
The district will begin the
process of finding a replacement this spring, which will
involve input from teachers,
parents and the community,
according to the press release.
—Kevin Forestieri
MVLA District Office
1299 Bryant Avenue, Mountain View
RSVP to Audrey: 650-641-2821 or
[email protected]
MentorTutorConnection.org
March 20, 2015 Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q
7
Inspirations
a guide to the spiritual community
LOS ALTOS LUTHERAN
Bringing God’s Love and Hope to All
Children’s Nursery
10:00 a.m. Worship
10:10 Sunday School
11:15 a.m. Fellowship
Pastor David K. Bonde
Outreach Pastor Gary Berkland
460 South El Monte (at Cuesta)
650-948-3012
www.losaltoslutheran.org
To include your
Church in
Inspirations
Please call
Blanca Yoc
at 650-223-6596
or email
[email protected]
MOUNTAIN VIEW CENTRAL SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH
Sabbath School: 9:30 a.m.
Saturday Services: Worship 10:45 a.m.
Wednesday Study Groups: 10-11 a.m.
Pastor Kenny Fraser, B.A.M. DIV
1425 Springer Rd., Mtn. View - Office Hrs. M-F 9am-1pm
www.mtviewda.adventistfaith.org Phone: 650-967-2189
CALL FOR
NOMINATIONS
THE EL CAMINO HOSPITAL BOARD
OF DIRECTORS is seeking individuals
interested in serving as a member of its
Investment Committee. Candidates will
have demonstrated strategic, financial
effectiveness in a challenging environment
as a financial officer or investment professional and bring expertise from asset
management, banking, corporate finance,
risk analysis or other complex financial
environments. Experience with complex
financial instruments and a strong
grounding in technology and financial
metrics are desired.
To inquire about the open position or to
nominate someone you know, please email
[email protected]
Submissions due by
MARCH 31, 2015
LocalNews
PAYOUT
Continued from page 1
son and his actions on the board,
and that he is also upset and
angry to see the harm the board,
because of Nelson’s actions, has
caused the kids in the district.
He said it reached a point
where he felt concerned enough
about the legal liability of the
district and the hostile work
environment created for Goldman and others to vote for the
agreement and the payout.
“You cannot understand how
much pain staff in the district have
faced,” Chiang said. “The damage
is still happening, and there’s still
people we may be losing — good
people — because of (it).”
Chiang encouraged the community to hold the school board
accountable, watch past meetings
online and see the behavior of the
board over the last two years.
“I really wish Trustee Nelson
was here because I would say
all this if he was here,” Chiang
said. “It’s unacceptable, and
I’m glad people in the room are
hearing this and I wish more
people would hear and notice.”
Board member Bill Lambert,
who spoke after a member of
the public requested that all the
board trustees comment on the
issue, said it was a very difficult
decision and that almost everything that was brought up by parents that night had been brought
up in drafting the agreement.
Still, Lambert said, he felt he
and the rest of the board made
the right decision.
Board member Ellen Wheeler
also said the board discussed the
issue thoroughly, and that she
believes it was appropriate to do
so in closed session. She remains
behind her decision “100 percent,” she said.
Robin Iwai, a parent of kids
who graduated from Huff and
Graham, said she has seen a
series of program cuts since she
was a parent in the district, and
that she and her husband have
given thousands of dollars in
support of the district’s foundation and worked hard on two
parcel tax campaigns to get more
funding for the schools.
To see the board give Goldman a quarter-million-dollar
payout after he resigned, she said,
made her “furious.” That money
amounts to about one-third of
what the foundation raises each
year, Iwai said.
CHEERLEADERS
Continued from page 5
of the members were first-time
cheerleaders and had never
competed on a national level
before. This marks the second
national title for the Mountain
View Marauders; their first
8
Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q March 20, 2015
“What you guys just did to the
foundation is just totally undercutting them,” she said. “How are
they supposed to tell people ‘we
need your money’ ... when you
gave away more than one-third
of what the annual goal is for the
foundation for the entire district.
That is so wrong.”
A four-page document by
Greg Dannis, the lawyer who
guided the district through the
settlement process, defended the
board’s meeting in closed session to discuss and vote on the
agreement; he claims the board
did not violate the state’s open
meeting law, the Brown Act.
But board member Greg Coladonato, who was not on the
board at the time, said he wasn’t
wholly convinced they did everything right. He said he didn’t
find the attorney’s argument
very persuasive, and that there
is a clearly defined protocol for
anticipated litigation if the board
ever acknowledged it as such.
The Brown Act requires that
if a public board meets in closed
session to discuss anticipated or
potential litigation, the agenda
must specify litigation concerns
as the reason for the closed session, according to Nikki Moore,
an attorney for the California
Newspaper Publishers Association. No closed session agenda
leading up to the resignation
mentions litigation.
Huff parent Magda Wilkinson
told board members that they
should look beyond whether
they technically complied with
the Brown Act, and that there’s
a “bigger picture” issue at stake.
She said the district has to
manage the “most precious of
scarce resources” for kids in the
district, and that if the looming threat of litigation has to
be resolved with a large payout,
then it’s possible it could happen
again.
“How can we, as district stakeholders, protect ourselves from
this happening again in the
future?” Wilkinson asked.
Huff parent Sanjay Dave, in
an emailed comment, wrote that
the board owed the public greater
transparency on Goldman’s resignation agreement and large
severance payment, particularly
in light of the events leading up
to his resignation.
Goldman grappled with the
teachers’ union over salaries
throughout the month of September; the two parties ulti-
mately reached an impasse in
negotiations.
Pauly said the money the
board gave to Goldman could
have been used to give a 1
percent raise to every teacher
in the district. The money, he
said, was enough to pay for
three new teachers, give a laptop computer to every middle
school student in the district, or
make a $1,000 upgrade to every
classroom.
The board briefly discussed
ways the new superintendent contract could be written to accommodate the feedback of parents
and community members, but
didn’t come to any consensus on
what to change. Pauly advocated
a maximum of 90 days’ severance
pay, and a mandatory 90-day
notice for resigning.
There was also some discussion on disclosing large expenditures prior to a vote by the board,
but Lambert opposed the idea,
saying that teacher contracts
and other settlements are not
disclosed in advance, and “need
to be kept that way.”
Iwai said she still has concerns
over the district’s “revolving
door” of superintendents who
come and go with a great deal
of controversy. The meeting
that night didn’t give her much
confidence that it’s not going to
happen again, she said.
She said the problem has
been going on since she joined
the district in 2000, when
then-superintendent Trish
Bubenik was booted from her
post. At the time, she said,
teachers were outside with
candles protesting and threatening to strike.
“Then we had Jim Negri,
who was great but — surprise
— left after a year and a half.
We had Elanor (Yick) who was
an excellent administrator but
wasn’t visionary enough, then
we had a visionary (Maurice
Ghysels) who was sleeping
with his girlfriend instead of
his wife.
“Then we appointed a superintendent (Goldman) instead of
hiring a search firm, and now
that superintendent we have to
pay a quarter of a million dollars
to resign,” she said.
“Let’s just make this really
simple. Let’s just think of what’s
best for the kids and follow your
own strategic plan.”
Email Kevin Forestieri at
[email protected]
national championship win
was in 2006.
The Mountain View Marauders is the local extension of the
Pop Warner Little Scholars
Football and Cheerleading
organization. The Marauders
have had youth participants
from Mountain View, Los
Altos, Los Altos Hills, Palo
Alto and the surrounding
communities since 1966.
Information about the Mountain View Marauder Cheer
or Football is online at www.
mvmarauders.com or via email
at [email protected]
—Rachel Lee
V
LocalNews
City of Mountain View
EL CAMINO
Continued from page 5
ticated external cyber-attack,”
according to a message to customers from Joseph Swedish,
Anthem Blue Cross’ president
and CEO. The attack involved
a breach of a database containing the personal information
of about 80 million Anthem
customers and employees.
Some of the attacks in recent
years haven’t been so sophisticated. In November 2011, for
example, Sutter Health had a
security breach when a password-protected, unencrypted
desktop computer was stolen
from one of its Sacramento
offices, containing data on some
3.3 million patients, according
to a Sutter Health press release.
The database included personal
information including medical record number and email
address, but did not include
Social Security numbers.
The FBI released a notification
in April last year to health care
providers warning that “cyber
intrusions” are likely to increase
as health records continue to
transition from paper to digital.
What’s more, the notification
goes on to say that hospitals have
lax cyber-security standards,
and there’s a higher financial
payout for hackers looking to sell
medical information on the black
market.
Candid Wueest, a software
engineer for Symantec’s security response team, said there’s
a definite and eminent problem
with security among electronic
medical record systems, and
that unlike financial institutions — which have had so many
security breaches that they have
now steeled themselves against
attackers — hospitals have yet to
catch up with the higher security
standards.
“Attackers are moving to the
low-hanging fruit,” Wueest said.
The problem is that hospitals
store much of the same information as banks do, like credit
‘It’s a constant
exercise in making
sure we keep up
with all the newest
threats.’
DAVID REEDER,
EL CAMINO BOARD MEMBER
card information, as well as the
added information from medical
insurance and medical records,
Wueest said. That means identity
theft can come with requests for
medical benefits, pills and even
medical equipment, he said,
and it takes a whole lot longer to
detect it.
“Usually if your credit card is
billed for something you haven’t
bought you can find out pretty
quick,” Wueest said. “I’m not
sure if it’s that easy to prove you
didn’t get those prescription
glasses.”
As a result, it’s far more lucrative for hackers to steal medical
records, which are going for
anywhere from $20 to $50 a piece
on the black market — about
ten times more than credit card
information, Wueest said.
“Medical records for identity
theft can be useful possibly for
months, rather than financial
(information) which gets locked
out pretty quickly,” Wueest said.
Solutions for increased security
include two-factor authentication, where users have to log in
using a password in addition to
an authentication code that is
only valid for about 30 seconds.
Wueest said encrypting connections and even encrypting the
database itself can also be useful
tools for keeping information
secure. But even with encryption,
he said, it’s possible for hackers
to bypass these measures if hospitals don’t stay up-to-date and
prevent the use of known bugs,
like the Heartbleed security bug
that was discovered last year.
“With the right program you
could open (the database) and
read it like an Excel spreadsheet,”
Wueest said.
Walton said El Camino Hospital is rolling out iCare with
security and privacy as a “top
priority,” using specific security
standards called the HITRUST
Common Security Framework,
which helps the hospital bring its
security level up to government
regulations and standards. He
said the system has been audited,
and the hospital has an in-house
security team to monitor and
update the system.
Reeder said he is comfortable
with the level of security iCare
has, but emphasized that the
hospital has to keep up the pace.
“It’s a constant exercise in making sure we keep up with all the
newest threats,” Reeder said.
Email Kevin Forestieri at
[email protected]
V
The Draft 2015-20 Consolidated Plan is currently available for
public comment through April 13, 2015. The Consolidated Plan
contains policies and goals for using federal Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) and Home Investment Partnership
Program (HOME) funds to address the needs of lower-income
households. The Draft Consolidated Plan also includes a one
year Action Plan, which summarizes activities the City will fund
in Fiscal Year 2015-16 toward meeting the goals.
To request a copy of the Draft 2015-20 Consolidated Plan or submit written comments, contact the Neighborhoods and Housing
Division at [email protected] or 650-903-6379,
prior to April 13, 2015.
The Council will consider adoption of the Draft 2015-20 Consolidated Plan at the following hearing:
City Council Public Hearing
Tuesday, April 21, 2015 at 6:30 p.m.
City Hall Council Chambers
500 Castro Street
Mountain View, CA 94041
For more information, visit the Announcements section at
www.mountainview.gov/depts/comdev/preservation.
Mountain View Veterans Memorial
Engraving Applications Due May 1, 2015
Dedication Ceremony November 11, 2015
HONOR A VETERAN, THANK A VETERAN
(U`PUKP]PK\HSZJOVVSVYUVUWYVÄ[VYNHUPaH[PVU may buy
H^HSSLUNYH]PUNMVY[H_KLK\J[PISL[VOVUVY
or thank a U.S. Veteran connected to Mountain View or other community.
New to the areadance?
or new to
Silicon Valley’s dance leader will be
accepting registration for the 2015-2016
dance season begining in April.
=L[LYHUZHYL[OVZL^OVZLY]LKVYHYLZ[PSSZLY]PUNOVUVYHIS`
KVTLZ[PJHSS`VYV]LYZLHZPUWLHJLVYJVTIH[YLNHYKSLZZVMSLUN[O
VMZLY]PJL^OL[OLYSP]PUNVYKLJYLHZLK
+VUH[PVUZHYLHSZVHJJLW[LKMYVTPUKP]PK\HSZHUKI\ZPULZZLZ
MVYLUNYH]LKILUJOLZPU[LYWYL[P]LZPNUHUKSPZ[PUNVUHKVUVYZWSHX\L
;OLTLTVYPHSPZH[,HNSL7HYR-YHURSPU:[PU[OL+V^U[V^U.
Call today to make sure you are
on our New Student Mailing List.
408-257-3211
PGmDFUFBN!EBODFBDBEFNZVTBDPN
www.danceacademyusa.com
MVVeteransMemorial.org (650) 216-1041
(J5VU7YVÄ[6YNHUPaH[PVU)LUL]P[`*OHYP[`
4UFWFOT$SFFL#MWE4VJUFt$VQFSUJOP
March 20, 2015 Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q
9
LATEST ADVANCES
Screening and Treatment
of Colorectal Cancer
Stanford Health Care invites you to a community talk
SPE AKERS
May Chen, MD
Medical Oncology
George A. Fisher, MD, PhD
about colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer is one of the
most common cancers in the United States. Thanks to an
increased number of medical advancements, there are
Medical Oncology
more survivors than ever before. Join Stanford Medicine
Cindy Kin, MD
physicians as they discuss the latest screening, diagnostic
Colorectal Surgery
tools and treatment options.
Uri Ladabaum, MD, MS
Genetics, Gastroenterology
Patrick Swift, MD
Radiation Oncology
JOIN US ON THURSDAY, MARCH 26 • 6:30PM – 8:00PM
Villa Ragusa • 35 South Second Street • Campbell, CA
Free parking
RSVP at: stanfordhealthcare.org/events or call
650.736.6555. This event is free and open to the public.
Please register, seating is limited.
10
Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q March 20, 2015
LocalNews
Questions raised over Foothill project
COLLEGE DISTRICT REROUTES $18 MILLION IN BOND
MONEY FOR NEW ADMINISTRATIVE BUILDING
By Kevin Forestieri
P
lans are underway at the
Foothill-De Anza Community College District
to construct a new $18 million
administrative building on the
Foothill campus in Los Altos
Hills. The project is a reversal
of earlier plans and has raised
questions about whether it’s an
appropriate use of bond money.
District officials, using money
from the $490 million Measure
C bond that passed in 2006,
are considering spending about
$18.5 million to construct the
20,000-square-foot office building to house administrative services, the chancellor’s office and
a new board room, according to
Kevin McElroy, the district’s vice
chancellor of business services.
The original plan was to build
a new data center to house technology services for the district, as
well as renovate the district office
building — both long overdue,
say district officials. For years,
the technology services for the
district and the Foothill College
have been scattered all over the
campus and are badly in need of
a centralized building, McElroy
said. The district office, likewise,
needed substantial work on the
roof, new support beams and had
problems with dry rot.
But technology changes over
time, and McElroy said it became
clear to district officials that
they didn’t need a “full-on data
center” with redundant power
sources, so they have redistributed that money towards building
a new administrative building
and moving education technology services to the renovated old
district office.
“It’s making adjustments
according to operations, and
meeting the needs of the district
in a changing environment with
technology and construction
CRIME BRIEFS
Continued from page 11
Officers spotted the man,
24-year-old Jesus Ayala, pushing the vehicle at around 1:15
a.m. on March 17 near The
Americana on El Camino
Real, according to Sgt. Saul
Jaeger of the Mountain View
Police Department. Jaeger said
a check of the license plate
revealed that the vehicle was
reportedly stolen out of San
Martin.
Police arrested Ayala on
charges of possession of a stolen
vehicle, possession of burglary
tools and possession of drug
costs,” McElroy said.
But to Foothill teacher Ken
Horowitz, the change did not
seem like an appropriate use of
the bond money. Horowitz said
he believes the original bond
measure didn’t call for a new
administrative building, that the
proposed project was not clearly
listed when it was approved by
voters, and that it wasn’t appropriate for the district to redistribute project costs in a way that
does not benefit students.
“If they wanted a new computer lab or a gymnasium or
a swimming pool or anything
that would benefit students, I
wouldn’t have a problem with it,”
Horowitz said. “(The district) is
redirecting our money to serve
their individual purpose.”
The bond language states that
the district will “build (a) data
center to support new Districtwide computer and technology systems and integrate with
renovated central office facility.”
The original intent was to create
a new building and combine it
with the renovated district office,
but that proved “impractical”
for the district, according to a
document by Art Heinrich, the
bond program director. After
also learning that a data center
building was both overkill and
too expensive, district planners
dropped the plans in favor of the
new administrative building.
McElroy said he and district
staff verified with the district’s
legal counsel that the newly proposed project does not violate
requirements under Proposition 39, which requires school
districts to adhere to a project
list that appears in the bond
language prior to voter approval.
The new building is an appropriate use of funds, he said, and the
building itself will be fairly modest, economical and functional.
The new plans also came
paraphernalia. He was booked
into San Jose Main Jail with a
$14,000 bail.
—Kevin Forestieri
CAR CRASH AFTER HIGHSPEED CHASE
A speeding driver led California Highway Patrol officers from Solano County
through three more Bay Area
counties before crashing on
the edge of Los Altos Hills
Tuesday afternoon, according
to the CHP.
The chase started in the
Solano County area and the
driver fled, speeding south on
before the district’s board late last
year and received a unanimous
vote, and were later approved on
a 5-0 vote by the Citizens Bond
Oversight Committee earlier this
month, McElroy said.
Susan Silver, vice chair of
the Citizens’ Bond Oversight
Committee, said the district
has been diligently following its
fiduciary duty to spend the bond
money the way it’s supposed to be
spent, and that the administrative building plans fit the intent
of the bond. The change didn’t
come as a surprise to her or the
rest of the committee when it
came to a vote, she said.
“The district has been very
careful to stay within the legal
guidelines and within the spirit
of it,” Silver said. “The money is
supposed to be used to benefit the
school community, and that is the
intent of the people doing it.”
The new building will be on the
southwest edge of the campus on
one of the parking lots, taking up
about 140 parking spaces, according to district spokesperson Becky
Bartindale. But the building will
free up space in another parking
lot where a number of portables
currently house district services,
which staff calls the “temporary
village,” while the old administrative building is being renovated,
Bartindale said. The school will
have a net increase of about 20
parking spots.
Concerns over Prop. 39
Measure C is subject to greater
legal requirements and scrutiny
because it was approved by voters
under the framework of Proposition 39, which allows school
districts to pass bonds with only
55 percent of the vote — rather
than two-thirds majority — if the
bond is more limited in scope.
Bonds passed by community
college districts under Proposition
39 cannot tax property owners
for more than $25 per $100,000
of assessed value, and require the
district to make a specific list of
Interstate 680 through Contra
Costa and Alameda counties,
according to the CHP.
The driver continued into
San Jose and onto Highway 280
until reaching Magdalena Avenue near Los Altos Hills, where
the car crashed and flipped just
after 3 p.m. on March 17, CHP
Officer Ross Lee said.
The driver, whose name was
not immediately released, was
taken into custody after the
crash. Lee did not immediately
know the extent of any injuries
the driver suffered in the crash,
but said an ambulance was
called to the scene.
—Bay City News Service
COURTESY OF THE FOOTHILL-DE ANZA COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT
A conceptual rendering shows plans for a new administrative building
and board room on the Foothill College campus.
projects funded by the bond.
Horowitz claimed that districts
are using the proposition to pass
bonds more easily, but are skirting around the requirements for
a list of district projects by making it as vague as possible. In this
case, he said, the district is able to
legally move millions of dollars in
construction away from studentrelated services and toward benefiting administrators.
“Districts can make the language vague and flexible enough
that they can do what they want
to do anyway,” Horowitz said.
A similar controversy hit the
Los Altos School District last
November, when voters were
asked to approve a $150 million
school bond. Opponents of the
bond contested that the bond
project list was too vague and
allowed district staff and the
school board to decide how to
spend the money, giving people
little idea of what improvements
they were voting for. The bond
passed by a slim margin of 57.4
percent of the vote.
Measure C passed an extra level of scrutiny when it faced a lawsuit during a validation action —
where the district essentially says
anyone seeking litigation against
the bond should come forward
and fight its legality by a certain
date. After Saratoga attorney
and local landlord Aaron Katz
answered the call and sued the
district claiming that the bond
was not in compliance with
Proposition 39, but ultimately
lost following 19 months of court
appeals.
A long time coming
The district has been badly in
need of a new or renovated district office since the 1990s, when
the district originally tried to
secure bond money to renovate
the current administrative office
building. McElroy said Measure
E, a bond passed by the district in
1999, was supposed to renovate
the old office building, which was
built 50 years ago and, while functional, needed to be refurbished.
But funds for Measure E projects ran out before the district
was able to renovate the building, and the plans were pushed
back until the next bond made
its way to the ballot. In a complicated series of bond fund
transfers from one project to
another, money from Measure
E is now funding the renovation
costs, and Measure C is funding
the new district office building,
according to Heinrich’s report.
The renovation costs are expected to be $3.9 million.
The tentative schedule for the
project is for a conceptual design
of the new building to come
before the board in either April
or May, with construction
expected to begin in the summer
of 2016, according to Bartindale.
The building is slated to be ready
for use by either spring or fall of
2017.
V
CITY OF MOUNTAIN VIEW
CITY OF MOUNTAIN VIEW
SEEKING PARK SITES
The City of Mountain View is seeking properties
in residential neighborhoods, primarily north of El
Camino Real, for possible acquisition and development of neighborhood parks. The ideal site is one
or more properties totalling greater than 17,500 s.f.
of land area. For more information, please contact
Dennis Drennan at (650) 903-6633, or by e-mail at
[email protected]
March 20, 2015 Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q
11
G U I D E TO 2015 S U M M E R C A M P S F O R K I D S
For more information about these camps, see our online
directory of camps at www.paloaltoonline.com/biz/summercamps/
To advertise in this weekly directory, call: 650-326-8210
Arts, Culture, Other Camps
Community School of Music
and Arts (CSMA)
Athletics
Camp Campbell
Mountain View
50+ creative camps for Gr. K-8! Drawing, Painting, Ceramics, Sculpture,
Musical Theater, School of Rock, Digital Arts, more! One- and two-week
sessions; full and half-day enrollment. Extended care available. Financial
aid offered.
www.arts4all.org
650.917.6800 ext.0
Environmental Volunteers Summer Camp
Palo Alto
Explore nature this summer from your own backyard. Environmental
Volunteer summer camps return with a new series of programs. Handson activities, field trips and creative fun make science accessible to kids
ages 6-11.
www.Evols.com/Explore
650.493.8000
Foothills Summer Camps
Palo Alto
In this historic, popular, traditional day camp your child will play on
miles of trails, woodlands, fields, streams, Boronda Lake, and enjoy
spectacular views of the bay area. Transportation to and from Foothills
Park is provided each day. www.cityofpaloalto.org/foothillscamps
J-Camp Oshman Family JCC
Palo Alto
Exciting activities for kindergarteners through teens include swimming,
field trips, sports and more. Enroll your child in traditional or special
focus camps like Studio TV Production, Jr. Masterchef, Elsa and Anna’s
Dance Camp, Beach Bonanza and many others!
www.paloaltojcc.org/summercamp
650.223.8622
Palo Alto Community Child Care (PACCC)
Palo Alto
PACCC summer camps offer campers, grades 1st to 6th, a wide variety
of fun opportunities! Neighborhood Adventure Fun and Junior Varsity
Sports Adventure Camp are for the more active and on-the-go campers!
New this year: E.P.I.C. Camp – Energetic, Peers, Independence &
Community for the older kids! Returning are FAME - Fine arts, Music and
Entertainment and Operation Chef for out of this world cooking fun!
Swimming twice per week, periodic field trips, special visitors and many
engaging camp activities, songs and skits round out the fun offerings of
PACCC Summer Camps! Open to campers from all communities! Come
join the fun in Palo Alto! Register online.
www.paccc.org
650.493.2361
STANFORD EXPLORE
Stanford
A Lecture Series on Biomedical Research
EXPLORE biomedical science at Stanford! Stanford EXPLORE offers
high school students the unique opportunity to learn from Stanford
professors and graduate students about diverse topics in biomedical
science, including bioengineering, neurobiology, immunology and
many others. explore.stanford.edu
[email protected]
Santa Cruz Mountains
Hi Five Sport
iD Game Design and
Development Academy
Atherton
Hi Five Sports is thrilled to present our fourth multi-sport competitive
summer camp to the San Francisco Bay Area! Through experienced,
passionate and patient coaching, we believe the timeless lessons that
only sports can teach will stay with the kids for the rest of their lives.
www.hifivesportsclub.com
650.362.4975
Menlo School Sports Camps
Atherton
Menlo camps are designed for boys and girls grades 4-12 to learn from
Knights coaches and staff -whether it’s preparation for an upcoming
season or simply for fun and to stay in shape in a high energy, positive
setting. Join us this summer to develop skills, foster athleticism and
promote sportsmanship in camps covering a range of sports - baseball,
basketball, football (skills, lineman, and safe tackling camps) lacrosse,
soccer, tennis, track & field, volleyball, water polo.
www.menloschool.org
650.330.2001 ext. 2758
Nike Tennis Camps
Stanford University
Junior Overnight and Day Camps for boys & girls, ages 9-18 offered
throughout June, July and August. Adult Weekend Clinics (June & Aug). Camps directed by Head Men’s Coach, Paul Goldstein, Head Women’s
Coach, Lele Forood, and Associate Men’s and Women’s Coaches,
Brandon Coupe and Frankie Brennan. Come join the fun and get better
this summer!
www.USSportsCamps.com
1.800.NIKE.CAMP (645.3226)
Stanford Baseball Camps
Stanford Campus
Stanford Baseball Camps have gained national recognition as the some
of the finest in the country. These camps are designed to be valuable
and beneficial for a wide range of age groups and skill sets. From the
novice 7 year-old, to the Division 1, professionally skilled high school
player, you will find a camp that fulfills your needs.
www.Stanfordbaseballcamp.com
650.723.4528
Stanford Water Polo
Stanford
Ages 7 and up. New to sport or have experience, we have a camp for
you. Half day or fully day option for boys and girls. All the camps offer
fundamental skill work, scrimmages and games.
www.stanfordwaterpolocamps.com
650.725.9016
Summer at Saint Francis
Mountain View
TechKnowHow® LEGO®
Palo Alto
and Technology Summer Camp Menlo Park/Sunnyvale
Summer [email protected]
(Powered by Skyhawks)
Fun and enriching technology classes for students, ages 5-16. Courses
include LEGO® projects with motors, MINDSTORMS® EV3® & NXT®
Robotics, Computer Game Design, Arduino™ Electronics, iPad® Movie
Making, and a Tech Camp for girls. Classes feature high-interest, ageappropriate projects based on the S.T.E.M. curriculum. Half and Full day
options. Early bird and multiple week discounts are available.
www.techknowhowkids.com
650.638.0500
June 15-August 14. Weekly indoor sports day camp for kids 6-13 years
old. Fun filled sports and games directed by Skyhawks. Full day 9am4pm camp includes lunch and optional after camp care.
www.sportshouseonline.com
650.362.4100
TheatreWorks Summer Camps
Alexa Café
Palo Alto
In these entertaining camps for grades K-5, students enjoy juggling,
clowning, puppetry, playwriting, acting, improvisation, music, dance and present their own original pieces at the end of each session.
www.theatreworks.org/learn/youth/summercamps
YMCA Summer Camps
Throughout Silicon Valley
At the Y, youth of all ages make new friends, build character and
learn new skills. With hundreds of unique camps and 30+ convenient
locations, you’ll find a camp that’s right for your family. Financial
assistance is available. www.ymcasv.org/summer
408.351.6473
San Jose
K-12 offerings taught by exceptional, experienced faculty and staff. K-6
morning academics – focusing on math, language arts and science –
and full spectrum of afternoon recreation. Grades 6-12 for credit courses
and non-credit enrichment opportunities. Sports programs also offered.
www.summer.harker.org
408.553.0537
Week-long jazz immersion programs for young musicians in middle
school (starts July 13), high school (July 19 and July 26), and college, as
well as adults (August 2). All instruments and vocals.
stanfordjazz.org
Stanford University Campus
Harker Summer Programs
For close to 80 years, Bay Area youth have forged life-long friendships
and benefited from character-defining experiences at Camp Campbell
through nature hikes, campfires, archery and many other fun outdoor
activities. Financial assistance is available.
http://www.ymcacampcampbell.org/
831.338.2128
Sports & Activity Camp (ages 6-12): This all-sports camp provides
group instruction in a variety of fields, indoor & outdoor court games
and activities. Saint Francis faculty and students staff the camp, and the
focus is always on fun. The program is dedicated to teaching teamwork,
sportsmanship and positive self-esteem. After camp care is available. www.sfhs.com/summer
650.968.1213 x650
Stanford Jazz Workshop
12
Academics
Redwood City
Academics
Palo Alto
Casti Camp offers girls a range of age-appropriate activities including
athletics, art, science, computers, writing, crafts, cooking, drama and
music classes each day along with weekly field trips.
www.castilleja.org/summercamp
650.328.3160
Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q March 20, 2015
Get immersed in game design at this 2-week, pre-college summer
academy! Teens ages 13-18 design video games, develop apps, model
3D characters, mod with Minecraft, and more. Tour a development
studio and create a portfolio.
www.iDTech.com
1.888.709.8324
iD Programming Academy
Stanford
Get immersed in technology at this 2-week, pre-college summer
academy. Teens ages 13-18 code apps, program with C++ and Java,
mod with Minecraft, engineer robots, and program websites. Tour a
development studio and create a portfolio.
www.iDTech.com
1.888.709.8324
iD Tech Mini
Palo Alto High School
Kids ages 6-9 will have a blast at iD Tech Mini, where half day options let
aspiring innovators discover a love for tech. Campers make new friends
and learn hands-on STEM skills in a kid-friendly environment.
www.iDTech.com
1.888.709.8324
iD Tech Camps
Stanford
Code, game, create! At iD Tech Camps, students ages 7-17 code apps,
design video games, mod with Minecraft, engineer robots, build
websites, produce movies, and more. Kids meet new friends and gain
a competitive edge.
www.iDTech.com
1.888.709.8324
Mid-Peninsula High School
Menlo Park
Mid-Pen offers summer courses designed to help students make up
high school credits and a diverse range of enriching courses that go
beyond traditional curriculum. In addition to courses in math, science,
English, Spanish, and SAT/ACT prep, we invite students to enhance
their skills in innovative classes that include: College Essay Workshop,
Research Writing Workshop, Drama, Music Video Production, and Fine
Arts courses in Surface Design and Mixed Media. We also hold basketball
and volleyball clinics suitable for beginning to advanced players. All
high school students are welcome to attend. Summer session runs from
June 22 to July 23, 2015.
www.mid-pen.com
650.321.1991
One Me
Palo Alto
Westin Hotel
Students aged 12-16 will find direction and inspiration through
introspection and self-awareness, discovering how they learn and
are motivated, addressing and understanding habits, improving
communication skills, understanding the brain, understanding personality
and ego states, emotional regulation, and welcoming challenge.
www.oneyou.education
408.839.6965
Purposeful You
Palo Alto
Westin Hotel
Students aged 12-16 will learn best practices in organization and goal
setting; study techniques; communication with administration and
teachers; strengthening memory; answering to the question; outlining,
writing, and citing resources; emotional regulation; stress and test
anxiety management, attention and motivation.
www.oneyou.education
408.839.6965
Summer at Saint Francis
Palo Alto High School
At Alexa Café, girls ages 10-15 collaborate around café tables and
learn to code apps, produce films, design websites, develop wearable
electronics, and more. Discover a passion for technology in this unique
environment that emphasizes leadership, philanthropy, and more.
www.iDTech.com
1.888.709.8324
Castilleja Summer Camp for Girls
Stanford
Mountain View
Summer at Saint Francis provides a broad range of academic and athletic
programs for elementary through high school students. It is the goal of
every program to make summer vacation enriching and enjoyable!
www.sfhs.com/summer
650.968.1213 x446
Write Now! Summer Writing Camps
Palo Alto /
Pleasanton
Improve your student’s writing skills this summer at Emerson School
of Palo Alto and Hacienda School of Pleasanton. Courses this year are
Expository Writing, Creative Writing, and Presentation Techniques. Visit
our website for more information.
www.headsup.org
Emerson: 650.424.1267
Hacienda: 925.485.5750
LocalNews
Racing to help
ANNUAL RUN FOR ZIMBABWE BRINGS AFRICAN CULTURE TO MV
By Rachel Lee
those in Zimbabwe, but to also
celebrate their culture in a festive
manner, organizers said.
“In these runs, we are targeting
children who are in elementary
school, middle school, and high
school because that’s where we
have to start,” said Tegama.
This year’s race is dedicated
to the welfare of 100 orphans at
Makumbi Children’s Home, a
Zimbabwe orphanage that has
existed since 1936; funds raised
will go toward termite repair.
Those at Makumbi Children’s
Home “identify their biggest
need and tell us, and we focus
on raising the funds so that they
can accomplish taking care of
that particular need,” said Ellen
Clark, director of the event. “And
that way it’s not our foundation
telling them what they need,
because how are we to know?
They are capable, smart people
who know more than us.”
The philanthropic event was
inspired by the work of her son,
Will Clark. In 1997, he graduated from Notre Dame with his
teaching credentials and pursued
an individual volunteer project
in South Africa. While her son
tutored and taught in a small
village in Zimbabwe, Clark said
she visited and saw Africa “at its
saddest and at its happiest.”
She said she “fell in love”
with Africa, but also witnessed
devastation in the wake of the
AIDS pandemic. After returning home, Clark and her family
wanted to work toward easing
some of the problems facing
people in Africa. The family
created the Sustainable Living
Foundation and decided to host
an annual fundraiser that contributes all of its proceeds to the
orphanage.
“Every single cent we raise goes
directly over to Makumbi Children’s Home and it’s just a real
feel-good event that gives people
the opportunity to be fit, create art
and help others,” Ellen Clark said.
The event is now in its 16th year.
Information and race registration forms are online at
zimbabweparaguay.net or by
calling (650) 941-9206. St.
Joseph School is located at 1120
Miramonte Ave., Mountain
View.
SamTrans and the San Mateo
County Transit Authority. In a
statement, Hartnett touted his
experience with high-speed rail
as an asset in his new position.
“I will be a strong advocate
for Caltrain,” Hartnett said in
a statement. “I know the High
Speed Rail organization well and
understand the issues. I always
looked upon my role on the High
Speed Rail board as ensuring that
organization was responsive to
Peninsula issues.”
According to Caltrain, Hartnett will receive a total annual
compensation of $434,661, which
includes salary and benefits.
This consists of a base salary of
$263,000 and additional compensation of $75,000 for managing
Caltrain; $25,000 for managing
the Transit Authority and $71,661
as an “additional cost of the benefits associated with the position.”
Hartnett’s contract is for a fiveyear term, and he will start his
new position on March 30.
In discussing Hartnett’s compensation, Jeff Gee, a member of
the Caltrain board of directors,
said the agency “deserves the
best talent that we can afford,
attract and retain.”
“The person in this job must
be compensated in a manner
that reflects the challenges and
responsibilities of the position,
as well as the expectations of
our community and region
that this work be performed at
the highest level and with the
greatest skill,” Gee said in a
statement. “In today’s employment market, we are competing not only with other transit
agencies in the United States,
but also with transit agencies
internationally, as well as the
private sector.
“We are fortunate that Jim is
willing to take on this daunting
task, and leave behind a highly
regarded and extraordinarily successful legal practice,” Gee said.
In announcing the appointment, Caltrain called Hartnett a
“key figure in the reorientation of
High Speed Rail to a more collaborative partnership on the
Peninsula” and credited him
with helping to win “legislative
support and funding for the program, specifically working with
the Legislature to ensure High
Speed Rail’s early investment
funds include the Caltrain Modernization Program.”
“B
e fit. Create art. Help
others.” That’s the
motto for this year’s
16th Annual Run for Zimbabwe
Orphans and Fair.
The colorful culture of Zimbabwe comes to Mountain View
cross-country races, an art competition, and a collection of
festive booths from noon to 4
p.m. on Sunday, March 22, at St.
Joseph School.
The event includes 11 races to
cater to age groups ranging from
preschool to adult. An eclectic
collection of booths will be peppered along the perimeter of the
race course, offering educational
and creative ways for youth to
become immersed in African
traditions. And the local art competition offers another way for
younger generations to connect
with Zimbabwe history and culture, according to race organizers.
By holding activities other
than foot races, event organizers seek to be inclusive and
offer alternatives for kids with
disabilities or who are unable to
participate in the race, said event
spokeswoman Girley Tegama.
People who cannot afford the
$5 fee to run but would still like
to participate are invited to join
in the activities as well.
The event seeks to promote
awareness of the struggles of
HARTNETT
Continued from page 5
ments of the Caltrain commuter
rail rapid transit service and with
consideration of the cities on the
Peninsula through which the
high-speed rail system will be
constructed and operated.”
The document, he said at the
time, “not only puts us at the
table, it gives us a position at the
table that is unprecedented.”
During Hartnett’s time on the
board, the rail authority made a
decision to launch the project in
the Central Valley and only later
connect it to San Francisco and
Los Angeles.
With the focus shifting to
Bakersfield, Fresno and Merced,
angst about high-speed rail has
dropped by several notches in
Palo Alto and neighboring cities.
Caltrain, meanwhile, is speeding
toward the electrification project,
which will replace diesel trains
with electric ones, and allow the
commuter service to increase the
number of trains and accommodate more riders.
Now, having resigned from the
high-speed rail board, Hartnett
will take the helm at Caltrain,
COURTESY ELLEN CLARK
Liza (left) and Esthern are two of
three girls who attended college
thanks to funds raised at last
year’s Run for Zimbabwe.
V
V
March 20, 2015 Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q
13
Viewpoint
QEDITORIAL
QYOUR LETTERS
QGUEST OPINIONS
QEDITORIAL
THE OPINION OF THE VOICE
Founding Editor, Kate Wakerly
Q S TA F F
EDITOR
Andrea Gemmet (223-6537)
EDITORIAL
Associate Editor
Renee Batti (223-6528)
Staff Writers
Daniel DeBolt (223-6536)
Kevin Forestieri (223-6535)
Intern
Rachel Lee
Photographer
Michelle Le (223-6530)
Photo Intern
Magali Gauthier
Contributors Dale Bentson, Angela Hey,
Sheila Himmel, Ruth Schecter
DESIGN & PRODUCTION
Marketing and Creative Director
Shannon Corey (223-6560)
Design and Production Manager
Lili Cao (223-6562)
Designers Linda Atilano, Kristin Brown,
Diane Haas, Rosanna Leung, Paul Llewellyn
ADVERTISING
Vice President Sales and Marketing
Tom Zahiralis (223-6570)
Advertising Representative
Adam Carter (223-6573)
Real Estate Account Executive
Rosemary Lewkowitz (223-6585)
Published every Friday at
450 Cambridge Avenue
Palo Alto, CA 94306
(650) 964-6300 fax (650) 964-0294
Email news and photos to:
[email protected]
Email letters to: [email protected]
News/Editorial Department
(650) 964-6300 fax (650) 964-0294
Display Advertising Sales
(650) 964-6300
Classified Advertising Sales
(650) 964-6490 • (650) 326-8286
fax (650) 326-0155
A positive step toward transparency
M
embers of the Mountain View Whisman school district board did the right thing last week in scheduling a public discussion of the costly severance agreement between the district and former superintendent Craig
Goldman. Although questions remain about the board’s decision to pay Goldman $231,567 to resign late last year, the meeting was a good-faith attempt on the part of board members
to explain as much as they could without violating employee
confidentiality laws, and to allow members of the school community who are unhappy with the settlement to have their say.
What board members had to say is troubling, to say the least.
The agreement and payout was necessary, board President
Chris Chiang said, to allow Goldman to quit before his contract expired while protecting the district from a lawsuit.
The board feared being sued by Goldman, Chiang said,
because of a hostile work environment created in large part by
one board member, Steve Nelson — a revelation that probably
surprised no one. In 2013, the board took the unusual step of
censuring Nelson for violating the board’s code of conduct,
citing incidents that included sending inappropriate, insulting
emails to district staff, shouting at them in the district office,
and even reportedly angrily telling Goldman that he was “full
of sh-t” in front of other staff members.
Nelson didn’t attend last week’s meeting, held in a room
packed with parents and teachers who wanted answers, and
a chance to be heard. In addition to lamenting the size of the
payout — nearly a quarter-million dollars in funds that might
otherwise be spent on kids in the classroom — some parents
also criticized the process the board used to discuss the settlement agreement as lacking transparency. Did the board violate
the Brown Act, the state’s open-meeting law, when it met in
closed session over the matter? Did the closed-session agenda
Email Classified [email protected]
Email Circulation
[email protected]
The Voice is published weekly by Embarcadero Media Co. and distributed free to
residences and businesses in Mountain
View. If you are not currently receiving the
paper, you may request free delivery by
calling 964-6300. Subscriptions for $60 per
year, $100 per 2 years are welcome.
©2015 by Embarcadero Media Company.
All rights reserved.
Member, Mountain View
Chamber of Commerce
QWHAT’S YOUR VIEW?
All views must include a home address
and contact phone number. Published letters
will also appear on the web site,
www.MountainViewOnline.com, and occasionally on the Town Square forum.
Town Square forum
Post your views on Town Square at
MountainViewOnline.com
Email
your views to
[email protected] Indicate if
letter is to be published.
Mail
to: Editor
Mountain View Voice,
P.O. Box 405
Mountain View, CA 94042-0405
Call
the Viewpoint desk at 223-6528
14
QLETTERS
VOICES FROM THE COMMUNITY
STUDENT SIT-OUT
IS CALLED FOR
When I was a senior in high
school in 1967 during the Cretaceous Period, the dictatorial
principal told all the boys we
could not grow mustaches or
beards nor have long hair. Obviously he was totally out of touch
with the rapidly evolving times.
He had no idea about the growing force of the Woodstock
Generation. He had no idea how
much my generation had had it
with being dictated to by a bunch
of uptight adults.
So one day more than 90 percent of the entire student body of
my high school went on strike. We
refused to go to classes and we just
occupied the student union for
Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q March 20, 2015
day after day, over 4,000 of us. We
broke the principal’s resolve and
we won the right to grow our hair
and grow mustaches and beards,
albeit not many of us could. The
victory extended to the girls, as
they too no longer had to adhere
to a bunch of inane puritanical
dress codes.
I suggest that the student body
of Mountain View High School go
on a mass sit-out of classes as long
as it takes to break the will of the
school board that has terminated
the contract of a much-loved
drama teacher without giving any
of the students or their parents
any reasons for their decision. The
MV-LA school board is treating
the parents and students like little
children, and this is an insulting
outrage. Furthermore, I hope the
properly describe what the board was up to?
The attorney who represented the district during the process
says no Brown Act violation occurred. The agenda description
of the topic, “Public employee discipline/dismissal/release,”
properly notices closed-session actions that “accept the resignation of, or otherwise affect the employment status” of a
superintendent, attorney Gregory Dannis said in a report to the
board requested by the board’s president.
Regarding the charge by some that the agenda should also have
included the discussion of pending litigation, Dannis wrote that
the district could have included both the “pending litigation”
and the “personnel” topic descriptions on the agenda, but was
not required to do so. “It has been argued by some, however, that
since a release of claims is based on a real or perceived exposure
to liability from potential litigation related to a resignation, the
‘pending litigation’ item should be used,” he added.
Attorney Nikki Moore of the California Newspaper Publishers Association told the Voice that the district was indeed
required to use the “pending litigation” designation, and we
agree. But even leaving aside the legal question, which the
courts have yet to adjudicate, the district had the option of
including both descriptions on the agenda, but did not. And
a public agency’s decision to opt for providing the public with
less information than what can be provided inevitably leads to
suspicions of bad faith and intentional lack of transparency.
Those parents who pressed the board for a public meeting to
try to clear the air and possibly curtail growing anger over the
settlement agreement should be commended, as should the four
members of the board who faced the public last week. We hope
this episode helps board members understand that the more light
they can shine on controversial actions, the better — including
providing as much information as possible on agenda notices.
V
Viewpoint
parents vote out every member
of the school board next time
around. Wipe the slate clean and
get people on the board who are
maturely responsive to parents,
students, and teachers.
Jeffrey Van Middlebrook
Easy Street
UNSAFE CROSSINGS
My sympathy to the family of
the late Robert Schwehr, who
died after being struck by a car
at Charleston and Independence.
Having crossed the street at
that spot, I must say, sadly, that
I’m not surprised there’s been
a death. Some drivers appear
determined to ignore the “Yield
on Green” sign that’s supposed to
protect pedestrians. Once when
I crossed, the driver of the huge
pickup behind the car that yielded to me was honking like mad
and started to pass the stopped
car. Since “Yield on Green” in
that spot appears dicey, the traffic PTB might consider leaving
the light red so pedestrians have
a better chance of crossing safely.
Another close-by danger spot
is the corner of Rengstorff and
Leghorn. Drivers making that
ST. MARK’S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
PALO ALTO
Maundy Thursday— April 2
Y6:15pm
Monastic Supper & Liturgy of the Word followed
by Holy Eucharist & Stripping of the Altar
Good Friday — April 3
Y Noon to 2:00pm A service focused on "The Adversaries and
Companions of Jesus"
Y 2:00 to 3:00pm Devotional Labyrinth Meditation
Y 7:30 to 8:30pm Tenebrae: The Office of Shadows
Easter — April 5
Y 5:30am
Y 8:00 to 9:30am
Y 10:00am
Easter Vigil, Eucharist & Baptism
Festive Breakfast & Family Easter Activities
Festive Holy Eucharist
right on red appear more focused
on their upcoming burger than
on the pedestrians or bikers in
the crosswalk.
I hope that we can find ways
to make those crossings safer for
pedestrians and bikers — soon.
Esther Erman
Calderon Avenue
HOLDING HIS NOSE
OVER ‘GENTRIFICATION’
It certainly appears that gentrification gets a big boost with the
new members of the Mountain
View City Council. The three
new members were voted in by
about 7 percent of the residents
(counting non-voters) and hundreds of thousands of dollars
of developer and expansionist
money backing them.
Money can certainly buy
gentrification and government
action, and it’s a shame for the
non-high-tech workers, retired
people (like me) and long-term
property owners to be forced out
— as well as blue-collar workers
who rent older and more affordable units, like the ones a 333
North Rengstorff Ave. who will
be forced out by the new coun-
cil’s decisions to make room for
“new” more affluent people.
Out with the long-term population and in with higher-paid
high-tech workers — it stinks.
Donald Letcher
North Rengstorff Avenue
Editor’s note: Mr. Letcher’s reference to “hundreds of thousands of
dollars” in campaign spending in
the November 2014 election is not
supported by the facts. A landlord
advocacy group spent $114,000 on
mailers for three council candidates, two of whom were elected,
but the candidates had no control
over that spending.
Peninsula
Easter Services
600 Colorado Ave, P.A. (650) 326-3800
www.saint-marks.com
Immanuel Lutheran Church
1715 Grant Road | Los Altos
650.967.4906 | www.ilclosaltos.com
Los Altos Lutheran Church
Palm Sunday: March 29, 10:00 AM
]WT;@>;??A:?-:0/;Ŋ11
Maundy Thursday: April 2, 7:00 PM
Good Friday: April 3, 2:00 PM
Good Friday: April 3, 7:00 PM
I&1:1.>-1&41%1>B5/1;2%4-0;C?J
Saturday, April 4, 6:30 PM
I&[email protected]>(5358%1>B5/1J
Easter Sunday Celebration: April 5
]TT
UTTT
UUUY
>[email protected]
[email protected]>%1>B5/1
4580>1:p?1334A:@
460 South El Monte at Cuesta
650-948-3012 – www.losaltoslutheran.org
Come Join Us for Holy Week Services!
Palm Sunday, March 29 at 10 am
Procession with Palms
Maundy Thursday, April 2 at 7 pm
Holy Communion
Good Friday, April 3 at 6 pm
“Stations of the Cross”
Interactive meditation and prayer
A truly moving experience for all ages!
Easter Sunday, April 5 at 9 & 11 am
Festive celebration for the whole family!
March 20, 2015 Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q
15
Get to Know the D
Listing Team
Design
DeLeon Realty is not made up of one person. We are a team
of experts who excel in our fields and strive together to ensure
you receive the best possible service and results. With your
satisfaction as our motivation, our listing team will negotiate
until we secure the highest possible price for your home.
An expert in maximizing yo
coordinator will collaborate wit
designers to make your property
directly with vendors on cost-effe
the work is done beautifully,
650.543.8500 | www.deleonrealty.com
16
Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q March 20, 2015
DeLeon Difference
Marketing Team
n Team
our home’s value, our listing
th one of our in-house interior
y shine. Our designer will work
ective improvements, confirming
within budget, and on time.
Our marketing team partners with a professional videographer
and a photographer to ensure your home receives the recognition
it deserves. In addition to extensive media advertising, our team
will also create a custom website for your property, which will
include a photo gallery and a video tour.
®
m | DeLeon Realty CalBRE #01903224
March 20, 2015 Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q
17
BUT NOT ECCENTRIC
Q RESTAURANT REVIEW
Q MOVIE TIMES
Q BEST BETS FOR ENTERTAINMENT
Mixx fuses popular
cuisines with
inconsistent results
Review by DALE F. BENTSON
Photos by VERONICA WEBER
M
ixx, the newish
restaurant next to überpopular Cascal on Castro
Street in downtown Mountain View,
is just what its name implies: a grab
bag, a hodgepodge, a crazy quilt of
casual fusion dishes from around the
world, or, “new American cooking,”
as owner Bill Berkowitz put it.
The menu includes Italian, Thai,
soul food, Mediterranean, American
comfort, Chinese, West Coast, the
Bronx, Japanese, New Orleans and
even a “Mt. View” chicken melt.
The wine list matches with selections
from four continents. Does such
an eclectic assortment work? It’s a
mixed bag.
The crispy calamari slaw appetizer is big enough to share at
the Mixx in Mountain View.
18
Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q March 20, 2015
Q R E S TA U R A N T R E V I E W
Weekend
Eclectic
MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE
Weekend
Berkowitz, owner of Max’s
Opera Cafe at Stanford Shopping
Center and other locations, said
the idea behind Mixx is to reflect
the international flavor of a
tech-driven area where there are
“people from all over the globe
working here.” Berkowitz partnered with Steve Mayer, owner
of Scott’s Seafood, the previous
tenant at 420 Castro, to reinvent
the space.
The interior has changed from
Scott’s modern industrial design.
Now there is a lot of wood
with leather upholstered booths,
chairs and tables, plus an elegant
bar area partitioned off from the
dining room. Behind the bar is
the spacious “game lounge,” an
area separated from the dining
room complete with a giant TV
and a young vibe.
Mixx has a major bar presence
on Castro Street. Besides craft
cocktails, there is an attentiongrabbing oak barrel aging program where various concoctions
are poured into 5-liter casks and
mellowed for three weeks with
delicious results, according to
Berkowitz.
The kitchen has undergone
some recent changes with longtime Max’s in-house chefs Carlos
Salcedo and Jose Perez now managing the food.
Mixx’s lunch menu differs
QDININGNOTES
Mixx
420 Castro St., Mountain View
650-966-8214
mixxmv.com
Hours:
Lunch: Monday-Friday
11:30 a.m.-3 p.m.
Happy Hour: 3:30-6:30 p.m. daily
Dinner: Monday-Thursday,
3-10 p.m.; Friday-Saturday
4-11 p.m.; Sunday 4-9 p.m.
Reservations
Credit cards
Happy hour
Children
Mixx’s game room is stocked with board games, a shuffleboard table and TVs for watching sports.
slightly from the dinner menu
and both change frequently. Since
I was at Mixx for both lunches
and dinners, I will quote the price
I was charged in this review.
The crispy calamari slaw ($12)
was fun, colorful and delicious
with plenty to share. The perfectly fried squid was tossed with
sweet chilies, peanuts, cilantro
and red cabbage.
Another tasty and shareable
dish was the crisp, fried Brussels
sprouts ($9) mixed with toasted
pecans and drizzled with an
apple-maple glaze. Order both
dishes together and it’s enough
appetizer for four people.
The Thai fish taco trio ($9)
was a hit with coconut, jalapeño,
peanut and cilantro. The cod was
fresh-tasting and juicy and the
other ingredients made the dish
undeniably mouthwatering. The
DINNER BY THE MOVIES AT SHORELINE’S
Cucina Venti
ER
T
S
A
E
Y
HAPP
jalapeño added zing.
The panko-crusted crab cakes
($16) with salad greens and tartar
sauce were delectable. Exceptionally light, golden, and expertly
cooked, the cakes were loaded
with crab flavor and the crunch
of greens balanced the dish
beautifully. This was my favorite
Mixx dish.
Takeout
Outdoor dining
Private parties
Alcohol
Corkage
Parking
Continued on next page
full bar
$10
street
Noise level
moderate
Bathroom
cleanliness
excellent
Celebrate
Easter
at Cucina Venti
Come Enjoy
Easter Sunday
with us
X
,,INDO
OOR/OUTDOOR SEATING AVAILABLE,,
1390 Pear Ave., Mountain View
(650) 254-1120
www.cucinaventi.com
Hours:
9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday
9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday through Saturday
9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday
RSVP on Opentable.com
1390 Pear Ave, Mountain View, CA 94043
(650) 254-1120
www.cucinaventi.com
March 20, 2015 Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q
19
Weekend
Continued from previous page
I loved everything about the
chicken pot pie ($14) — except
the chicken, which came as
gristly bites of flavorless and
altogether unpleasant bird. The
kitchen must do better. Otherwise, the crust was golden, flaky
and not too thick. Besides the
foul fowl, there were potatoes,
peas, carrots, celery and onion in
a piping hot cream sauce. It could
have been enjoyable.
The linguini (misspelled on the
menu) alla carbonara ($12) came
with Reggiano Parmesan cheese,
egg yolk and guanciale. Guanciale, a cured meat, is generally
richer and less salty than pancetta. The fat renders differently
which allows it to plump more
than pancetta when cooked.
The carbonara sounded delicious, but unfortunately, the dish
was dense and leaden — so oversauced and over-cheesed, I feared
I would need triple bypass had I
Desserts at the Mixx are a hit, especially the burnt almond and vanilla bean ice cream sandwiches that come
with a warm ganache fondue for dipping.
eaten half of it. I picked out pieces
of the guanciale, which had great
flavor.
One lunch, I had no sooner
started my first course when
the entree arrived. The waiter
looked sheepish but didn’t offer
to take it back until I was ready.
Instead, he plunked it down and
walked away. Proper pacing is
the responsibility of both the
wait staff and the kitchen.
I loved the idea of fried chicken
and waffles ($23) with juicy free
range, air-chilled chicken breast
(from 38 North, named because
the bids are raised 38 miles north
of the Golden Gate Bridge),
peppercorn (misspelled) gravy,
apple-maple glaze and charred
greens. The presentation was
bold with a knife impaled, a la
Excalibur, atop the waffle and
chicken to hold them together.
Alas, the waffles were soggy and
not worth eating.
The pan crisp branzino filet
($18) needed something to
brighten the dish, like a healthy
squeeze of lemon. There was a
small wedge of lime on the plate
but it wasn’t enough. Thai green
curry sauce, pearl couscous,
sweet potato, snap peas and caramelized onion made the plate
prettier than it tasted.
Excellent desserts though.
Don’t miss the toothsome bananas Mixx ($10) with caramelized
and braised banana, salted caramel ice cream and fresh whipped
cream. It came to the table flambéed, a variation on the famous
Bananas Foster from Brennan’s
of New Orleans.
The ice cream sandwiches ($10)
were two each of chocolate chip
cookie and vanilla (misspelled)
bean ice cream, and sea salt chocolate cookie with burnt almond
ice cream. Luscious themselves,
there was a side of warm ganache
fondue for making your own
mini It’s-It.
Mixx has elements that don’t
quite mesh, while the menu is
eclectic and promising, the execution is often lackluster. More
attention to detail in the kitchen
is needed if Mixx is to distinguish itself.
V
Happy Hour
2014
4pm-9pm Sun-Thurs
Œ+TIZSM¼[*]ZOMZ[̆WЄ
Œ
+TIZSM¼[
+T S ¼ *
*]ZOMZ[
O
WЄ
Є
Œ.ZMVKP.ZQM[̆WЄ
ŒWЄIVaLQVVMZ
• Kids 12 & under - buy 1 get 1 free*
*item from
m kids menu
nu of eq
equal or lesser value
yea
ye
ear
ar
70 thh year
ANNIVERSARY
ARY
RY!
Clarkes.com
Open 7 days
O
Lunch & Dinner 11am-9pm; Fri ‘til 10 pm
L
Breakfast on Weekends 8am-2pm
Mountain View • 61
615 W. El Camino Real • (650) 967-0851
We’re looking
for a great CFO
Our CFO of 20 years is retiring and he will be
really hard to replace.
Help us find a person with solid financial skills,
a passion for local journalism, prior experience
with digital media and a personality that fits well
with our amazingly talented and diverse staff.
For a complete job description,
go to embarcaderomediagroup.com
4 5 0 C A M B R I D G E AV E N U E | PA L O A LT O
20
Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q March 20, 2015
Weekend
QMOVIEOPENINGS
QMOVIETIMES
‘71 (R) +++ Aquarius Theatre: 2, 4:30, 7:30 & 9:55 p.m.
A la Mala (PG-13)
Century 20: 10:40 p.m., Fri & Sun 10:40 a.m., Sat & Sun 4:45 p.m.
American Sniper (R) ++
Century 20: Fri 12:35 & 6:40 p.m., Sat 6:55 p.m., Sun 10:45 a.m.
Born to be Bad (1934) (Not Rated)
Stanford Theatre: 6:20 & 8:45 p.m.
Chappie (R) Century 16: 10:30 a.m. & 10:30 p.m., Fri & Sat 1:35, 4:35
& 7:35 p.m. Century 20: 11:10 a.m., 2, 4:50, 7:40 & 10:35 p.m.
Cinderella (PG) ++1/2 Century 16: 10:35 a.m., 12:35, 1:25, 2:25,
3:20, 4:15, 5:15, 6:10, 7;05, 8:05, 9 & 9:55 p.m., Fri & Sat 11:35 a.m., Sun
11:15 a.m. Century 20: 10:30 & 11:20 a.m., noon, 12:40, 1:25, 2:10,
2:50, 3:35, 4:10, 5:05, 5:35, 6:20, 7, 7:50, 8:30, 9:10, 9:50 & 10:40 p.m.
The DUFF (PG-13) ++1/2
Century 20: 11:50 a.m., 2:30, 5:20, 7:55 & 10:30 p.m.
Fifty Shades of Grey (R) ++ Century 20: 1:45 & 7:45 p.m.
JUAN SALVARREDY/SONY PICTURES CLASSICS
Érica Rivas plays newlywed Romina; Diego Gentile plays her philandering groom Ariel in “Til Death Do
Us Part,” one of the six short films that make up “Wild Tales.”
Life in the fun-house mirror
‘WILD TALES’ DELIVERS ON ITS TITULAR PROMISE
0001/2 (Palo Alto Square)
Quentin Tarantino, move
over. Argentinian writerdirector Damián Szifron has
his own “Wild Tales” to tell
— six of them, in fact — in
the take-no-prisoners blackcomedic anthology film that
rocked last year’s Cannes Film
Festival, became Argentina’s
most-watched film of 2014 and
scored an Oscar nomination for
Best Foreign Language Film.
Like Tarantino, Szifron takes
an obvious relish in man’s
inhumanity to man, man’s
inhumanity to woman and
woman’s inhumanity to man,
all of which are merely preludes
to nasty and at times wickedly
over-the-top violence. Vengeance, then, is a primary motif
in Szifron’s chaotic universe: a
fun-house mirror image that,
despite its hyperbole, remains
a recognizable reflection of our
own.
Aside from the wildly creative
opening segment (“Pasternak”)
and the post-credits chaser
(“The Rats”) which are nasty,
brutish and short, Szifron establishes a more leisurely pace with
the remaining four short stories
clocking in at roughly twenty
minutes each. “Pasternak” and
“The Rats” both feature revenge
fantasies, one that we’re traumatically rooting against (even
as we admire its ingenuity) and
another we may find ourselves
rooting for, though less so the
more distressingly messy it
gets. Szifron’s skills at playing
with the audience’s own desire
for bloodlust — only from the
safety of theater seats, of course
— and plying his cinematic
trade with stylish precision put
him in good company with
“Master of Suspense” Alfred
Hitchcock. Tools of the trade?
A jumbo jet, rat poison and a
sizable kitchen knife.
And cars, as per the segments
“Road to Hell” and “The Deal,”
in which chance vehicular
encounters turn deadly. The
wan “The Deal” proves to be
“Wild Tales”’ weakest (though
hardly worthless) effort, spinning the domestic horror of
dealing with a hit-and-run into
a hit-and-miss satire on people’s
shameless capacities for greed
(lazily punctuated with an
obvious “twist”). Szifron’s specialty is stoking a laugh that,
interrupted by a gasp, catches
in the throat. “Road to Hell”
gets there with a disproportionate bout of road rage of the
“that escalated quickly” variety,
while the “Bombita” segment
(with Argentinian star player
Ricardo Darín of “The Secret
in Their Eyes” as an everymanpushed-too-far) employs a ballooning pressure that you know
just has to pop.
“Bombita” and the film’s closing chapter, “Til Death Do Us
Part,” have the deepest impacts
by being the most relatable and
credible of the wild tales. The
former makes hay of everyday
institutional injustices (like
maddening parking tickets and
governmental bureaucracies)
while the latter gets more personal: a groom’s philandering
irradiates his new bride (Érica
Rivas) into a Bridezilla. Darín’s
controlled slow burn and Rivas’
understandably crazed, avenging-angelic hurt are sure to get
audiences where they live. Like
Tarantino’s films, “Wild Tales”
will rub some the wrong way by
taking glee in the violence that
comes from our worst selves,
but the catharses have a positive
social function: In the end (in
all six ends, that is), there’s no
doubt Szifron intends cautionary “Tales.”
Rated R for violence, language
and brief sexuality. Two hours,
2 minutes.
— Peter Canavese
Focus (R) Century 16: 10:40 p.m.
Century 20: 12:10, 2:45, 5:25, 8:10 & 10:45 p.m.
The Gunman (R) Century 20: 10:50 a.m., 1:50, 4:35, 7:25 & 10:10
p.m., Sat & Sun 3:15, 6 & 8:50 p.m.
The Imitation Game (PG-13) +++
Century 20: 10:45 a.m., 1:30, 4:55, 7:35 & 10:15 p.m.
Insurgent (PG-13) Century 16: 10:30 a.m., 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 7:30
& 9:30 p.m. In 3-D at 11:30 a.m., 1:30, 2:30, 4:30, 5:30, 8:30 & 10:25
p.m. Century 20: 10:15 a.m., 1:15, 4:20, 7:15, 9:30 & 10:15 p.m. In
3-D at 11:45 a.m., 12:30, 2:45, 3:30, 5:45, 6:30 & 8:45 p.m. In X-D 3-D at
11 a.m., 2, 5, 8 & 11 p.m. In D-BOX at 10:15 a.m., 1:15, 4:20, 7:15 & 10:15
p.m. In 3-D D-BOX at 11:45 a.m., 2:45, 5:45 & 8:45 p.m.
Kingsman: The Secret Service (R) ++1/2
Century 16: 10:45 a.m., 1:45, 4:45, 7:45 & 10:45 p.m.
Century 20: 10:20 a.m., 1:20, 4:20, 7:20 & 10:30 p.m.
Leviathan (R) +++1/2
Aquarius Theatre: 12:30, 3:45, 7:05 & 10:10 p.m.
McFarland, USA (PG) ++ Century 16: 10:40 a.m., 1:40, 4:40 &
7:40 p.m. Century 20: 12:15, 3:20, 6:50 & 10 p.m.
Merchants of Doubt (PG-13)
Century 16: 11:15 a.m., 1:50, 4:20, 7 & 9:25 p.m.
National Theatre: John (Not Rated)
Aquarius Theatre: Sun 11 a.m.
Rear Window (1954) (Not Rated)
Century 16: Sun 2 & 7 p.m. Century 20: Sun 2 & 7 p.m.
Run All Night (R) Century 16: 10:50 a.m., 1:55, 4:50, 7:50 & 10:35
p.m. Century 20: 11:35 a.m., 2:20, 5:10, 8 & 10:45 p.m., Fri 3:50 p.m.,
Fri & Sun 9:40 p.m., Sat 9:55 p.m.
The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (PG) ++1/2
Century 20: 10:35 a.m., 1:55, 4:40, 7:30 & 10:25 p.m.
Palo Alto Square: 1, 4 & 7 p.m., Fri & Sat 9:55 p.m.
She Done Him Wrong (1933) (Not Rated)
Stanford Theatre: 7:30 p.m., Sat & Sun 5:05 p.m.
The SpongeBob Movie: Sponge Out of Water (G) ++
Century 20: Fri & Sun 10:25 a.m. & 12:50 p.m.
What We Do in the Shadows (Not Rated) +++1/2
Guild Theatre: 2:30, 4:40, 7:15 & 9:40 p.m.
Wild Tales (R) +++1/2
Palo Alto Square: 1:15, 4:15 & 7:15 p.m., Fri & Sat 10:05 p.m.
AQUARIUS: 430 Emerson St., Palo Alto (266-9260)
CENTURY CINEMA 16: 1500 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View (800-326-3264)
CENTURY 20 DOWNTOWN: 825 Middlefield Road, Redwood City (800-326-3264)
CINEARTS AT PALO ALTO SQUARE: 3000 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (493-3456)
STANFORD THEATRE: 221 University Ave., Palo Alto (324-3700)
For show times, plot synopses and more information about any films playing
at the Aquarius, visit www.LandmarkTheatres.com
JUAN SALVARREDY/SONY PICTURES CLASSICS
Mario (Walter Donado) lets his road rage gets out of hand in
“Road to Hell,” one of the six short films that make up “Wild Tales.”
0Skip it
00Some redeeming qualities
000A good bet
0000Outstanding
For show times, plot synopses,
trailers and more movie
info, visit www.mv-voice.com
and click on movies.
March 20, 2015 Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q
21
M O U N TA I N V I E W V O I C E
QHIGHLIGHT
SMUIN BALLET: ‘UNTAMED’
In “Untamed,” Smuin Ballet will present performances of three pieces: a take on
Tchaikovsky’s concerto “Serenade for Strings,” a tribute to Gene Kelly called “Frankie
& Johnny,” and an examination of desire and restraint entitled “Objects of Curiosity.”
March 19-21, Thursday and Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 2 and 8 p.m.; Sunday, 2 p.m.
$52-$71 adult; $23 student. Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts,
500 Castro St., Mountain View. smuinballet.org/?page_id=4192
ART GALLERIES
‘Along Highway 1’ Viewpoints Gallery will
have on display “Along Highway 1,” watercolor
paintings by plein air artist Veronica Gross that are
inspired by vistas along the famed highway from
Big Sur to the Oregon coast. On Friday, April 3,
from 5 to 8 p.m., there will be a reception for the
artist. March 31-April 25, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday
only until 3 p.m. Free. Viewpoints Gallery, 315
State St., Los Altos. www.viewpointsgallery.com
‘Earth Poems’ by Kathleen Mitchell
Viewpoints Gallery will have on display a group
of contemporary acrylic paintings by Kathleen
Mitchell that abstract California landscapes and
celebrate the colors and textures of the earth.
March 3-28, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday only until 3
p.m. Free. Viewpoints Gallery, 315 State St., Los
Altos. www.viewpointsgallery.com
‘H2O — Water’ A Gallery 9 exhibit called
“H20 — Water” of black and white photography
by Bay Area artist Roy V. Harrington will include
images capturing forms of water, including clouds,
lakes and streams, and ice. March 2-29, TuesdaySaturday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday, noon-4 p.m.
Free. Gallery 9, 143 Main St., Los Altos. www.
gallery9losaltos.com
BENEFITS/FUNDRAISERS
‘Hard Worker’ Wednesdays Estrellita
Restaurant in Los Altos will host weekly fundraisers
for the Day Worker Center of Mountain View.
Visitors enjoying the Mexican fare should make
sure to bring the fundraising flier with them (see
website). Wednesdays, year-round, dinner hours.
Prices vary. Estrellita Mexican Bistro and Cantina,
971 N. San Antonio Road, Los Altos. Call 650903-4102. www.dayworkercentermv.org
Annual Run for Zimbabwe Orphans &
Fair As part of this 16th annual event organized
by the Sustainable Living Foundation, community
members can run in a race, donate, volunteer or
enter their artwork into an exhibit. There will also
be Zimbabwean music and T-shirts and crafts
for sale. 100 percent of proceeds will benefit the
Makumbi Children’s Home in Zimbabwe. March
22, noon. $5 run entry fee. St. Joseph School, 1120
Miramonte Ave., Mountain View. Call 650-9419206. www.zimbabweparaguay.net
Object:Art fundraiser for Art in Action
This fundraising event called Object:Art will
include a silent auction of original artwork, unique
art-themed experiences and the presentation
of the Art Visionary Award to Dennis Hwang,
Google’s founding doodler. Proceeds from the
event will support Art in Action’s efforts to provide
comprehensive visual arts education to students.
March 27, 6-9 p.m. $100. Computer History
Museum, 1401 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View.
Call 650-566-8339, ext. 210. artinaction.org
CLASSES/WORKSHOPS
Danceation fitness classes European pop
star Heath Hunter and international fitness guru
Kirsten Johnson will lead participants in highenergy dance and fitness workouts for all skill levels.
March 16-June 17, Monday, 11:30 a.m.; Tuesday,
6 p.m.; Wednesday, 9, 10 and 11 a.m. $20 single
class; $150 10-class pass. American Legion, 347 1st
St., Los Altos. www.danceation.com
Fake Food Fest: Easter basket For this
Mountain View Public Library craft activity,
community members can sculpt a tiny Easter
basket filled with spring treats out of Fimo, a
synthetic clay. All materials will be provided, and
beginners are welcome. Participants must be age
16 or older. March 25, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Mountain
View Public Library, 585 Franklin St., Mountain
View. Call 650-903-6877. www.mountainview.
gov/library
Foothill College Spring Registration
Registration for spring classes at Foothill College
— through which students can improve current
job skills or earn a specialized career certificate or
associate degree — begins on March 6. Classes
last from April through June. Contact the school’s
admissions office for more info. March 6-April 5.
$31 per unit for California residents, plus basic
22
fees. Foothill College, 12345 El Monte Road, Los
Altos Hills. Call 650-949-7325. www.foothill.edu
Simple Sewing: Felt baskets This Simple
Sewing workshop — appropriate for sewers of
all levels — will repeat a popular earlier event on
making felt baskets. No registration is required, but
space is limited. Sign-up sheet will open at 6:30
p.m. March 23, 7-8 p.m. Free. Mountain View
Public Library, 585 Franklin St., Mountain View.
Call 650-526-7020. goo.gl/wrOvxP
Veterinary Programs Information
Night This information night will highlight the
career-training options in the veterinary assisting
and technology programs at Foothill College.
Attendees can meet program faculty and tour the
on-campus facilities. March 25, 5-6:30 p.m. Free;
$3 parking. Foothill College, Room 8507, 12345 El
Monte Road, Los Altos Hills. Call 650-949-7538.
www.foothill.edu/bio/programs/vettech/
CLUBS/MEETINGS
Author Book Club: Toni Morrison
BookBuyers Mountain View will hold its monthly
Author Book Club meeting, this time to discuss the
writing of Toni Morrison. In preparation, attendees
can read any of the author’s published works.
March 26, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Free. BookBuyers, 317
Castro St., Mountain View. Call 650-968-7323.
bookbuyers.com/event/author-book-club-tonimorrison/
ESL Conversation Club The Los Altos Library
will host a weekly ESL Conversation Club, where
those new to speaking English can practice
their conversational skills. Basic English skills are
needed; no registration is required. The library is
also looking for volunteer facilitators for the club.
Thursdays, March 12-June 4, 2-3:30 p.m. Free. Los
Altos Library, 13 S. San Antonio Road, Los Altos.
Call 650-948-7683, ext. 3516. www.sccl.org/
Services/ESL-Resources
Lunch with the League At the League
of Women Voters of Los Altos and Mountain
View’s March luncheon, Marc Sidel, Hidden Villa’s
deputy director of development, will discuss the
importance of the nonprofit’s efforts to share
humanity’s rural past with all generations. March
20, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. $27. Ristorante Bella Vita,
376 First St., Los Altos. Call 650-559-1828. www.
lwvlamv.org
Peninsula Gem & Geology Society
meeting At this club meeting, President Stan
Bogosian will give a presentation on Miocene
petrified woods that he has collected for years
in Washington state. There will also be petrified
wood displays, a silent auction and a door prize
drawing. March 25, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Shoup Park
Garden House, 400 University Ave., Los Altos.
www.pggs.org
Sons in Retirement monthly meeting
Sons in Retirement’s monthly meetings offer
quality lunches and interesting speakers. The
March 25 meeting will welcome Jack Boyd from
NASA. The club for retired men also organizes
other activities, including golf, biking, bowling and
travel. Fourth Wednesday of the month, 11:30
a.m.-1:30 p.m. $22 lunch. Michael’s at Shoreline,
2960 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View. Call 650299-9479. www.sir5.org
COMMUNITY EVENTS
CSA Homeless Outreach Twice monthly a
Community Services Agency social worker will
come to the Mountain View Public Library to
offer assistance to low-income and homeless
individuals, including information and referrals
to community resources. Second and fourth
Tuesday of the month, year-round, 9-11 a.m.
Free. Mountain View Public Library, 585 Franklin
St., Mountain View. Call 650-526-7020. www.
mountainview.gov/library
Drop-in Bike Clinic The Mountain View Public
Library will hold its monthly bike repair clinic, where
community members can use the library’s tools and
receive assistance from professional bike mechanic
Ryan Murphy. Tasks he can help with include
changing a tire, adjusting brakes and shifting,
identifying noises and more. No registration is
required. Third Saturday of the month, 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. Free. Mountain View Public Library, 585
Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q March 20, 2015
Franklin St., Mountain View. Call 650-526-7020.
www.mountainview.gov/library
Game Night BookBuyers Mountain View
will host a game night in its new seating area.
Attendees are encouraged to bring their favorite
games to play. March 23, 8-10 p.m. Free.
BookBuyers, 317 Castro St., Mountain View. Call
650-968-7323. bookbuyers.com
CONCERTS
Master Sinfonia Concert 3 in Los Altos
Master Sinfonia Chamber Orchestra will perform
the third concert of its 2014-15 season, offering a
program with arias by Mozart and his overture to
“Don Giovanni,” as well as Mahler’s Symphony
No. 4 in G major. David Ramadanoff will conduct,
and Amina Edris, soprano, will be the featured
soloist. A free reception with the artists will be
held during the intermission. March 22, 2:30-5:30
p.m. $15-$25; free for youth under age 18. Los
Altos United Methodist Church, 655 Magdalena
Ave., Los Altos. www.mastersinfonia.org/season.
aspx?c=Concert3
Viva Brasil The Community School of Music
and Arts will host the group Viva Brasil — which
includes Claudio Amaral (guitar and vocals), Jeff
Buenz (bass, guitar), Jim Schneider (piano, flute,
saxophone) and Celso Alberti (drums) — for a
concert of samba, jazz, bossa nova and rock.
March 21, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Community School
of Music and Arts, Tateuchi Hall, 230 San Antonio
Circle, Mountain View. Call 650-917-6800, ext. 0.
www.arts4all.org
EXHIBITS
‘Watercolors’ by Maria Klawe The
Community School for Music and the Arts will
host an exhibit of watercolor paintings by Maria
Klawe — a mathematician, computer scientist
and president of Harvey Mudd College. Feb.
6-March 29, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-7 p.m.;
Saturday, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Community School
of Music and Arts, Finn Center, 230 San Antonio
Circle, Mountain View. www.arts4all.org/attend/
mohrgallery.htm
FAMILY AND KIDS
‘The Magic Flute For Families’
screening The San Francisco Opera will hold
offer a 60-minute screening of its family-friendly
production in 2007 of Mozart’s “The Magic Flute.”
March 22, 4-5:15 p.m. Free. Oshman Family JCC,
3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto. Call 415-565-3274.
sfopera.com/Learn/Family-Programs/Free-FamilyMovie-Screenings.aspx
Author Jean Reagan on ‘How to
Surprise a Dad’ Children’s book author Jean
Reagan will make an appearance at Linden Tree
Books for a story time and signing of her new
book “How to Surprise a Dad.” This event is
recommended for ages 4 to 7. March 26, 4-5 p.m.
Free. Linden Tree Books, 265 State St., Los Altos.
Call 650-949-3390. www.lindentreebooks.com
DezignKidz craft activity DezignKidz
will hold an event at Linden Tree books with art
activities for ages 6 and up and information about
its various fashion, toy and interior design summer
camps. Those interested should call to RSVP.
March 21, 2-4 p.m. Free. Linden Tree Books, 265
State St., Los Altos. Call 650-949-3390. www.
lindentreebooks.com
FILM
‘The Price of Kings: Shimon Peres’ The
Oshman Family JCC will hold a screening of the
documentary “The Price of Kings: Shimon Peres,”
which explores the long career of former Israeli
president Shimon Peres through interviews with
him, family and friends, colleagues and opponents.
March 26, 7:30-9 p.m. $10 member; $13 general;
$15 at the door. Schultz Cultural Arts Hall, 3921
Fabian Way, Palo Alto. Call 650-223-8664.
paloaltojcc.org/Cultural-Arts/Film
HEALTH
Jacki’s Aerobic Dancing Jacki’s Aerobic
Dancing classes guide participants in abdominal
work, strength training and aerobic routines.
Complimentary childcare is provided by staff.
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, March 9-Dec.
18, 9 a.m. $36 month; $6 single class. Mountain
View Masonic Lodge, 890 Church St., Mountain
View. www.jackis.com
ON STAGE
‘Orchards’ For one week only, the Foothill
College Theatre Arts Program will present a
production called “Orchards,” composed of six
one-act plays inspired by Anton Chekhov short
stories. March 19, 7:30 p.m.; March 20 and 21,
8 p.m.; March 22, 2 p.m. $14 adult; $12 student,
senior; $3 parking. Foothill College, Lohman
Theatre, 12345 El Monte Road, Los Altos Hills.
www.foothill.edu/theatre/tickets.php
‘The Lake Effect’ TheatreWorks will put on
a production of “The Lake Effect,” a new drama
written by Rajiv Joseph and directed by Giovanna
Sardelli in which the grown-up children of an
Indian restaurant owner consider the legacy of
the now-closed family business. See website for
specific times and dates. March 4-29. $19-$74.
Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305 Middlefield Road, Palo
Alto. Call 650-463-1960. www.theatreworks.org
Firebird Dance Theatre benefit
performance The Firebird Dance Theatre, an
award-winning dance company based in Mountain
View, will perform its annual show sharing a
mixture of modern, folk, lyrical, ballet and ballroom
dance styles. March 29, 5-6 p.m. $15 member;
$20 general; $25 at the door. Schultz Cultural Arts
Hall, 3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto. Call 650-2238664. paloaltojcc.org/Cultural-Arts/Dance
Pear Slices 2015 The Pear Avenue Theatre
will offer its annual Pear Slices production, which
showcases an eclectic variety of original short
plays written by members of the Pear Playwrights
Guild. March 12-April 5, Thursday-Saturday, 8
p.m.; Sunday, 2 p.m. $25/$20 Thursday, Sunday;
$30/$25 Friday, Saturday. The Pear Avenue
Theatre, 1220 Pear Ave., Unit K, Mountain View.
www.thepear.org/slices15.html
SENIORS
EMT Speaker Series: Disaster alert
Emergency medical technicians will give
a presentation on the Santa Clara County
Emergency Alert System, through which residents
can receive info about emergencies by cellphone,
email or landline. March 26, 1-2 p.m. Free.
Mountain View Senior Center, 266 Escuela Ave.,
Mountain View. Call 650-903-6330. www.
mountainview.gov/seniors
Senior Center Talent Show The fourth
annual talent show at the Mountain View Senior
Center, called “Hot Cup of Talent Joe,” will
showcase the various abilities of local seniors.
March 24, 2:30 p.m. Free. Mountain View Senior
Center, 266 Escuela Ave., Mountain View. Call
650-903-6330. www.mountainview.gov/seniors
Violin for Vitality music therapy During
four events at the Mountain View Senior Center,
high school senior Steven Cui will play an evening
of violin and offer his thoughts on the role of music
in each individual’s health. Wednesdays, March
11-April 1, 7-8 p.m. Free. Mountain View Senior
Center, 266 Escuela Ave., Mountain View. Call
650-903-6330. www.mountainview.gov/seniors
SPORTS
Mountain View Tennis Club General
Meeting The Mountain View Tennis Club will
hold a dinner meeting free to general membership,
where there will be dinner, prizes and speakers,
including Mountain View Mayor John McAlister.
Attendees can join the club at the event. March
25, 6-9 p.m. Free for members. Mountain View
Senior Center, 266 Escuela Ave., Mountain View.
www.mvtc.net
Mountain View Tennis Club
membership special Mountain View Tennis
Club is offering discounted membership rates until
the end of March. Mountain View residents new
to the club can sign up for a 2015 membership for
$10. City residents renewing their membership
can get a rate of $20, as well as add a new adult
family member for free. All applicants must fill out
a membership form online. Through March 31. $10
new member; $20 renewing member. Mountain
View Tennis Club, P.O. Box 336, Mountain View.
Call 408-221-2659. www.mvtc.net
Mountain View Tennis Club tournament
The Mountain View Tennis Club will hold its
March Team Tennis Tournament, which is open
to both members and nonmembers of all skill
levels. Sessions are available in the morning and
afternoon. Prizes will be awarded, and entry
includes a lunch and light breakfast. March 21,
8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. $10 member; $12 nonmember.
Rengstorff Park, 201 S. Rengstorff Ave., Mountain
View. www.mvtc.net
LECTURES & TALKS
‘How Depression Manifests in Children
and Teens’ In this talk and workshop for
parents and educators, Dr. Ayelet Hirschfeld will
discuss how to identify early signs of depression;
its characteristics among infants, toddlers,
children and teens; and how boys and girls may
present those differently. The event will also cover
predisposing factors and treatment implications.
March 26, 7-9 p.m. Free. Oshman Family JCC,
Room E-104, 3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto. Call
650-223-8631. paloaltojcc.org/parenteducation
‘Successful Seed Starting’ UC Master
Gardener Heather Dooley will provide information
and tips on planting seeds for warm season
vegetables, including tomatoes, peppers,
eggplant, squash, corn and other crops. March
25, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Los Altos Library, 13 S.
San Antonio Road, Los Altos. Call 408-282-3105.
mastergardeners.org/scc.html
An Evening with Michael Chabon and
Ayelet Waldman The Oshman Family JCC will
host novelist Ayelet Waldman, author of “Love and
Other Impossible Pursuits,” and her Pulitzer Prizewinning husband Michael Chabon, author most
recently of “Telegraph Avenue,” to discuss their
work. March 22, 7:30-9 p.m. $25 member; $30
general; $35 at the door. Schultz Cultural Arts Hall,
3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto. Call 650-223-8664.
paloaltojcc.org/dialogues
Author Elle Luna on ‘The Crossroads
of Should and Must’ Elle Luna — a San
Francisco-based designer, painter, writer and
creator of the Bulan Project, a collaboration
between designers and artists in Bali — will
discuss her new book “The Crossroads of Should
and Must: Find and Follow Your Passion.”
March 23, 7 p.m. Free. Books Inc., 301 Castro
St., Mountain View. Call 650-428-1234. www.
booksinc.net/event/artist-elle-luna-books-incmountain-view
Author Peter Heller on ‘The Painter’ Peter
Heller, author of the bestseller “The Dog Stars,”
will visit Books Inc. in Mountain View to mark the
paperback release of his second work of fiction
“The Painter,” a novel about art, violence, love and
grief. April 2, 7-9 p.m. Free. Books Inc., 301 Castro
St., Mountain View. Call 650-428-1234. www.
booksinc.net
Author Sharma Shields on ‘The
Sasquatch Hunter’s Almanac’ Sharma
Shields, an award-winning short story writer and
literary journal contributor, will share her debut
novel, “The Sasquatch Hunter’s Almanac,” a dark
tale about a family patriarch who is in search of a
sasquatch he saw in his youth. March 26, 7 p.m.
Free. Books Inc., 301 Castro St., Mountain View.
Call 650-428-1234. www.booksinc.net/event/
sharma-shields-books-inc-mountain-view
Credit score talk This event at the Mountain
View Public Library will educate community
members on credit scores, including how to
improve scores and avoid scams. Registration is
optional. March 24, 7-8 p.m. Free. Mountain View
Public Library, 585 Franklin St., Mountain View.
Call 650-526-7020. goo.gl/wm9MGB
Techonomy Bio 2015 Techonomy Bio will
bring together leaders from biotechnology,
information technology, science, health care,
pharmaceuticals, agriculture, academia, finance
and other industries to discuss ways to strengthen
relationships between technology, biology and
business. March 25, 8:45 a.m.-5:30 p.m. $395
general. Computer History Museum, 1401 N.
Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View. Call 212-4887600. techonomy.com/conf/bio15/
Marketplace
PLACE AN AD
ONLINE
fogster.com
E-MAIL
[email protected]
PHONE
650.326.8216
Now you can log on to
fogster.com, day or
night and get your ad
started immediately online.
Most listings are free and
include a one-line free
print ad in our Peninsula
newspapers with the
option of photos and
additional lines. Exempt
are employment ads,
which include a web
listing charge. Home
Services and Mind & Body
Services require contact
with a Customer Sales
Representative.
INDEX
QBULLETIN
BOARD
100-199
QFOR SALE
200-299
QKIDS STUFF
330-399
QMIND & BODY
400-499
QJ
OBS
500-599
QB
USINESS
SERVICES
600-699
QH
OME
SERVICES
700-799
QFOR RENT/
FOR SALE
REAL ESTATE
800-899
QP
UBLIC/LEGAL
NOTICES
995-997
The publisher waives any and all claims or
consequential damages due to errors. Embarcadero
Media cannot assume responsibility for the claims or
performance of its advertisers. Embarcadero Media
has the right to refuse, edit or reclassify any ad
solely at its discretion without prior notice.
THE PENINSULA’S
FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEBSITE
Combining the reach of the Web with
print ads reaching over 150,000 readers!
fogster.com is a unique website offering FREE postings from communities throughout the Bay Area and
an opportunity for your ad to appear in the Palo Alto Weekly, The Almanac and the Mountain View Voice.
Bulletin
Board
Stanford Museums Volunteer
230 Freebies
150 Volunteers
Bed frame - FREE
Fosterers Needed for Moffet Cats
235 Wanted to Buy
FRIENDS BOOKSTORE MITCHELL PARK FRIENDS OF THE PALO ALTO LIBRARY
JOIN OUR ONLINE STOREFRONT TEAM
115 Announcements
155 Pets
Pregnant?
Thinking of adoption? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching
Birthmothers with Families Nationwide.
LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s
One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293.
Void in Illinois/ New Mexico/Indiana
(AAN CAN)
Dog walking Offered
Pregnant?
Considering adoption? Call us first.
Living expenses, housing, medical, and
continued support afterwards. Choose
adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7.
1-877-879-4709 (CalSCAN)
For Sale
201 Autos/Trucks/
Parts
Foothill College Plant Sale
FREE BOOK GIVEAWAY
HUGE USED BOOK SALE
Meet & Move for Family Caregiver
Siberian Husky Puppies for Rehom
130 Classes &
Instruction
Aviation Grads
work with JetBlue, Boeing, NASA and
others- start here with hands on training for FAA certification. Financial aid
if qualified. Call Aviation Institute of
Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)
German Language Classes
133 Music Lessons
Christina Conti Private Piano
Instruction
(650) 493-6950
Hope Street Music Studios
In downtown Mtn.View.
Most Instruments voice.
All ages & levels 650-961-2192
www.HopeStreetMusicStudios.com Chevrolet 2003 Corvette
50th Anniversary Edition Convertible.
Excellent original condition. 61,000
miles.
Kubota 2007 Bx24
Tractor is eqquiped with, Diesel engine,
Glow plugs, 4 wheel drive
Please email at for more details : david.
[email protected]
202 Vehicles Wanted
Cash for Cars
CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck.
Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We
Come To You! Call For Instant Offer:
1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com
(AAN CAN)
Donate Your Car, Truck, Boat
to Heritage for the Blind. Free 3 Day
Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing,
All Paperwork Taken Care of.
800-731-5042 (Cal-SCAN)
I Buy Old Porsches
911, 356. 1948-1973 only. Any condition.
Top $$ paid. Finders Fee.
Call 707-965-9546 or
email [email protected]
(Cal-SCAN)
Toyota 2004 Plus truck
Piano lessons in Menlo Park
For children and adults.
Convenient location. Easy Parking.
Contact Alita (650)838-9772
135 Group Activities
Thanks St Jude
140 Lost & Found
Stolen Blue backpack
Our car was broken in to last night(3.3)
at Florence and Lytton in north downtown Palo Alto and our backpack stolen.
The backpack had a surface tablet, dvds,
and sentimental items.
We know the tablet/dvds is probably
gone, but we’re hoping that rest of the
backpack’s contents were dumped nearby. If any one has come across a blue
backpack with faded orange pulls in the
area, we’d really appreciate it.
145 Non-Profits
Needs
Did You Know
that not only does newspaper media
reach a HUGE Audience, they also reach
an ENGAGED AUDIENCE. Discover the
Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a
free brochure call 916-288-6011 or email
[email protected] (Cal-SCAN)
DONATE BOOKS/HELP PA LIBRARIES
240 Furnishings/
Household items
210 Garage/Estate
Sales
Menlo Park, 1334 Carlton Avenue,
3/21/2015 9:30 am do not come early
Mountain View, 1857 Villa St., March
22 9:00 AM
Moving sale: Clavinova CLP-360 piano,
bookshelves, floor lamp, office desks,
canning supplies, kitchenware, filing
cabinet, drawers on wheeled base,
knick-knacks.
RWC: 1228 Douglas Ave. Fri. 3/20,
11am-2pm; Sat. 3/21, 9am-1pm
BIG RUMMAGE SAL benefits Lucile
Packard Children’s Hospital, Stanford.
(Just south of Woodside Rd., bet.
Broadway and Bayshore Fwy.) CASH
ONLY. (650)497-8332 or during sale
(650)568-9840
220 Computers/
Electronics
10115 gleam technologies neyveli $2560
To place a Classified ad in
The Almanac, The Palo Alto Weekly
or The Mountain View Voice
call 326-8216
or visit us at fogster.com
Mind
& Body
415 Classes
Rocking Chair - $150.00
DireTV Switch and Save
Packages starting at $19.99/mo. Free
3-Months of HBO, Starz, SHOWTIME and
CINEMAX FREE GENIE HD/DVR Upgrade!
2015 NFL Sunday Ticket. Included with
Select Packages. New Customers Only
IV Support Holdings LLC- An authorized
DirecTV Dealer. Some exclusions apply Call for details
1-800-385-9017 (CalSCAN)
DISH TV
Packages for $19.99/mo & $14.95/mo
for Internet + $25 Visa Gift Card (with
Activation). Call NOW and Save:
844-589-9575. Conditions apply.
(Cal-SCAN)
Cute Siberian Husky Puppies USED BOOKSHOP AT MITCHELL PARK
Wanted Disneyland Items
245 Miscellaneous
BOOK SALE - MPL Friends
Silicon Valley Basketball
Wanted 1960’s Slot Cars, Items
Sofa - $300.00-
Adorable Siberian Husky Puppies Stanford music tutoring
So, the next time you have
an item to sell, barter, give
away or buy, get the perfect
combination: print ads in
your local newspapers,
reaching more than 150,000
readers, and unlimited free
web postings reaching
hundreds of thousands
additional people!!
fogster.com
DISH TV Retailer
Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) &
High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/
month (where available.) SAVE! Ask
About SAME DAY Installation! CALL
Now! 1-800-357-0810. (Cal-SCAN)
Kill Roaches!
Buy Harris Roach Tablets. No Mess,
Odorless, Long Lasting. Available at ACE
Hardware, The Home Depot (AAN CAN)
2007 Kubota BX24
2007 Kubota BX24 TLB with a 54”
mower. It has 292.2 hours since new.
Please email at for more details :
[email protected]
Did You Know
Newspaper-generated content is
so valuable it’s taken and repeated,
condensed, broadcast, tweeted, discussed, posted, copied, edited, and
emailed countless times throughout
the day by others? Discover the Power
of Newspaper Advertising. For a free
brochure call 916-288-6011 or email
[email protected] (Cal-SCAN)
425 Health Services
Hot Flashes?
Women 40-65 with frequent hot flashes,
may qualify for the REPLENISH Trial - a
free medical research study for postmenopausal women. Call 855-781-1851.
(Cal-SCAN)
Safe Step Walk-in Tub
Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be
fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation.
Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step-In.
Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American
Made. Installation Included.
Call 800-799-4811 for $750 Off. (Cal-SCAN)
455 Personal Training
Did You Know
7 IN 10 Americans or 158 million U.S.
Adults read content from newspaper
media each week? Discover the Power
of Newspaper Advertising. For a free
brochure call 916-288-6011 or email
[email protected] (Cal-SCAN)
Over 50’s outdoor exercise group
Garden Pots For Sale - $ Various
260 Sports &
Exercise Equipment
Shoreline Lake Used Gear Sale
Jobs
500 Help Wanted
Kid’s
Stuff
Administrative Assistant
We are seeking an Administrative
Assistant for general support for the
office staff. The Administrative Assistant
will be required to file documents, run
errands, create spreadsheets, scan,
organize etc.
340 Child Care
Wanted
Childcare
Nanny is needed who will works monday through friday 4-5 days a week 9-10
hours a day
email [email protected]m
350 Preschools/
Schools/Camps
Acorn Chinese Learning Center
Children Mandarin & Cantonese
Program. www.acornchinese.com
Attorney, Biopharmaceutical
(Redwood City) Draft, negotiate and
manage transactional documents
and biopharm agreements for public
biopharm co. Advise on corp. govern., reg and securities compliance,
risk management, and IP. Req. JD, Cal
Bar, 2 yrs exp or 2 yrs alt occup. exp
in biotech transactional legal duties.
Email resume/ref.s to
[email protected]
OncoMed Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Customer service
Co-op Preschool-Schedule a tour!
355 Items for Sale
Did
144 million U.S. Adults read a
Newspaper print copy each week?
Discover the Power of Newspaper
Advertising. For a free brochure
call 916-288-6011 or
email [email protected] (Cal-SCAN)
3DVDsLittlePeople,PlanetHeroes,T
3T KRU RainJacket $5
FranklinBaseballGlove$8
LearningLaptop/pads age3-7years - $5
Newspaper Delivery Route
Immediate Opening.
Route available to deliver the Palo
Alto Weekly, an award-winning community newspaper, to homes in Palo
Alto on Fridays. Approx. 1,070 papers,
8.25 cents per paper (plus bonus
for extra-large editions). Additional
bonus following successful 13 week
introductory period. Must be at least
18 y/o. Valid CDL, reliable vehicle and
current auto insurance req’d. Please
email your experience and qualifications to [email protected] Or
(best) call Jon Silver, 650-868-4310
Mega Bloks 8134 $14
Nike ShinpadsAge4-7y$4
PoohDuvetCoverPillowCase
SoccerCleatsSize2Diadora$7
TopGunPilotJacket4T
PLACE AN AD by E-MAIL at
[email protected]
525 Adult Care
Wanted
Caregiver wanted
Elderly man 90+in good health needs
help 5 days a week
Cooking, light cleaning, shopping and
short personal trips
650-862-0753
550 Business
Opportunities
NEW Biz Opportunity
but only the adventurous need apply.
New Free report reveals the secrets to
success in today’s hottest growth industry. www.moneyop.com (800) 679-1959
(AAN CAN)
560 Employment
Information
Drivers: Attn: Drivers
$2K Sign-On Bonus! $$ Make $55,000
your first year! $$ Quality Equipment
w/APU’s. Pet/ Rider Program. CDL-A
Required. 888-293-9337
www.drive4melton.mobi (Cal-SCAN)
Drivers: No Experience?
Some or LOTS of experience? Let’s
Talk! No matter what stage in
your career, it’s time, call Central
Refrigerated Home. 888-891-2195 www.
CentralTruckDrivingjobs.com (CalSCAN)
Humanitarian Career!
Start your humanitarian career! Change
the lives of others while creating a
sustainable future. 1, 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today!
www.OneWorldCenter.org
269-591-0518 [email protected] Make $1,000 Weekly!
Mailing Brochures From Home. Helping
home workers since 2001. Genuine
Opportunity. No Experience Required.
Start Immediately.
www.theworkingcorner.com (AAN CAN)
Obtain Class A CDL
in 2 ½ weeks. Company Sponsored
Training. Also Hiring Recent Truck
School Graduates, Experienced Drivers.
Must be 21 or Older.
Call: (866) 275-2349. (Cal-SCAN)
Business
Services
624 Financial
Big Trouble with IRS?
Are you in BIG trouble with the IRS?
Stop wage and bank levies, liens &
audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues,
and resolve tax debt FAST. Seen on CNN.
A BBB. Call 1-800-761-5395. (Cal-SCAN)
Reduce Your Past Tax Bill
by as much as 75 Percent. Stop Levies,
Liens and Wage Garnishments.
Call The Tax DR Now to see if you Qualify
1-800-498-1067. (Cal-SCAN)
Social Secuity Disability
Benefits. Unable to work? Denied benefits? We Can Help! WIN or Pay Nothing!
Contact Bill Gordon & Associates at
1-800-966-1904 to start your application
today! (Cal-SCAN)
636 Insurance
Auto Insurance
starting at $25/month!
Call 855-977-9537 Compare Medicare
Supplement Plans and Save! Call NOW
during Open Enrollment to receive
Free Medicare Quotes from Trusted,
Affordable Companies! Get covered and
Save! Call 844-277-0253. (Cal-SCAN) Lowest Prices
on Health and Dental Insurance. We
have the best rates from top companies!
Call Now! 888-989-4807. (CalSCAN)
GO TO FOGSTER.COM TO RESPOND TO ADS WITHOUT PHONE NUMBERS
March 20, 2015 Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q
23
MARKETPLACE the printed version of
fogster.com
TM
Home
Services
715 Cleaning
Services
Delma’s House Cleaning
748 Gardening/
Landscaping
D. Brent Landscape Maintenance
*Bi-monthly or weekly
*Reliable, attentive
*Contact Dan, 650/288-8663
*[email protected]
*Lic C-27 959138
J. Garcia Garden Maintenance
Service
Free est. 21 years exp.
650/366-4301 or 650/346-6781
To place a Classified ad in The Mountain View
Voice call 326-8216 or visit us at fogster.com
LANDA’S GARDENING &
LANDSCAPING
*Yard Maint. *New Lawns. *Rototil
*Clean Ups *Tree Trim *Power Wash
*Irrigation timer programming.
19 yrs exp. Ramon, 650/576-6242
[email protected]
Italian Painter
Residential/Commercial, interior /exterior. 30 years exp. Excel. refs. No job too
small. AFFORDABLE RATES. Free est.
Call Domenico, 650/421-6879
759 Hauling
J & G HAULING SERVICE
Misc. junk, office, gar., furn.,
mattresses, green waste, more.
Lic./ins. Free est. 650/743-8852
(see my Yelp reviews)
STYLE PAINTING
Full service painting. Insured. Lic.
903303. 650/388-8577
767 Movers
R.G. Landscape
Yard Clean-ups, debris removal,
maintenance, installations. Free est.
650/468-8859
Scott Haber Landsaping
751 General
Contracting
A NOTICE TO READERS:
It is illegal for an unlicensed person
to perform contracting work on any
project valued at $500.00 or more in
labor and materials. State law also
requires that contractors include
their license numbers on all advertising. Check your contractor’s status
at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-321-CSLB
(2752). Unlicensed persons taking
jobs that total less than $500.00
must state in their advertisements
that they are not licensed by the
Contractors State License Board.
THE PENINSULA’S FREE
CLASSIFIEDS WEBSITE
Fogster.com is a unique website
offering FREE postings
from communities throughout
the Bay Area and an opportunity
for your ad to appear in
the Mountain View Voice,
The Almanac and
the Palo Alto Weekly.
To respond to ads without
phone numbers
Go to www.Fogster.Com
24
Real
Estate
805 Homes for Rent
Sunny Express Moving Co.
Afforable, Reliable, Refs. CalT #191198.
650/722-6586 or 408/904-9688
775 Asphalt/
Concrete
771 Painting/
Wallpaper
DAVID AND MARTIN
PAINTING
LOW PRICE CONCRETE INC
25 years experience landscaping/concrete. Call for a free estimate
650-771-1287.
809 Shared Housing/
Rooms
Roe General Engineering
Asphalt, concrete, pavers, tiles, sealing,
artificial turf. 36 yrs exp. No job too
small. Lic #663703. 650/814-5572
All Areas: Roommates.com
Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect
roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com!
(AAN CAN)
Quality work
Good references
Low price
Lic. #52643
(650) 575-2022
Glen Hodges Painting
Call me first! Senior discount. 45 yrs.
#351738. 650/322-8325
779 Organizing
Services
End the Clutter & Get Organized
Residential Organizing
by Debra Robinson
(650)390-0125
Emerald Hills (woodside Adjacent),
3 BR/2.5 BA - $6800
815 Rentals Wanted
Midpeninsula: Room/Guesthouse
Mature, prof. woman returning home
seeks housing in pvt. home: quiet,
respectful, clean, caring w/excel. refs.
N/S. Will do errands. 716/626-1667 ET. 825 Homes/Condos
for Sale
Menlo Park, 3 BR/2 BA - $899000
Palo Alto, 3 BR/2 BA - $1099000
E.palo Alto, 1 BR/1 BA - $1100
Los Altos Hills, 1 BR/1 BA - $975
Redwood City, 1 BR/2 BA - $850/month
To place a Classified ad in The Almanac, The
Palo Alto Weekly or The Mountain View Voice
call 326-8216 or visit us at fogster.com
San Carlos, 1 BR/1 BA
Luxury Condo Available in the
Prestigious Pacific Hacienda
Open House Sunday 3/15 1-3pm
Call: 415-314-0552 for more info
Sunnyvale, 3 BR/2 BA - $899000
Public Notices
995 Fictitious Name
Statement
THINK GLOBALLY
POST LOCALLY
THE PENINSULA’S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEBSITE
TO RESPOND TO ADS WITHOUT PHONE NUMBERS
GO TO WWW.FOGSTER.COM
MCLOUGHLIN CONSTRUCTION
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT
File No.: 601009
The following person (persons) is (are)
doing business as:
McLoughlin Construction, located at
1131 Judson Drive, Mountain View, CA
94040, Santa Clara County.
This business is owned by: An
Individual.
The name and residence address of the
owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are):
DAVID MCLOUGHLIN
1131 Judson Drive
Mountain View, CA 94040
Registrant/Owner began transacting
business under the fictitious business
name(s) listed above on N/A.
This statement was filed with the
County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara
County on February 4, 2015.
(MVV Feb. 27, Mar. 6, 13, 20, 2015)
AQUA BLUE SWIMMING POOLS
CONSTRUCTION
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT
File No.: 601541
The following person (persons) is (are)
doing business as:
Aqua Blue Swimming Pools
Construction, located at 905 N. 8th.
Street, San Jose, CA 95112, Santa Clara
County.
This business is owned by: A
Corporation.
The name and residence address of the
owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are):
AQUA BLUE SWIMMING POOLS
CONSTRUCTION INC.
905 North 8th. St.
San Jose, CA 95112
Registrant/Owner began transacting
business under the fictitious business
name(s) listed above on 5/2007.
This statement was filed with the
County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara
County on February 18, 2015.
(MVV Feb. 27, Mar. 6, 13, 20, 2015)
EASY FOODS COMPANY
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT
File No.: 601237
The following person (persons) is (are)
doing business as:
Easy Foods Company, located at 299
Castro St., Mountain View, CA 94041,
Santa Clara County.
This business is owned by: Married
Couple.
The name and residence address of the
owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are):
SIU NIN WONG
160 Holly Ct.
Mountain View, CA 94043
WEI LAN WONG
160 Holly Ct.
Mountain View, CA 94043
Registrant/Owner began transacting
business under the fictitious business
name(s) listed above on 04/24/2000.
This statement was filed with the
County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara
County on February 10, 2015.
(MVV Feb. 27, Mar. 6, 13, 20, 2015)
WE HANDLE ALL YOUR LEGAL PUBLISHING NEEDS ࠮ 7\ISPJ /LHYPUN 5V[PJL
࠮ 9LZVS\[PVUZ ࠮ )PK 5V[PJLZ ࠮ 5V[PJLZ VM
7L[P[PVU [V (KTPUPZ[LY ,Z[H[L ࠮ 3PLU :HSL ࠮
;Y\Z[LL»Z:HSLCALL 223-6578
Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q March 20, 2015
MISH MOSH MEDLEY
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT
File No.: 601538
The following person (persons) is (are)
doing business as:
Mish Mosh Medley, located at 1208
Phillips Ct., Santa Clara, CA 95051, Santa
Clara County.
This business is owned by: A Limited
Liability Company.
The name and residence address of the
owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are):
KHINE-HEARTED, LLC
1208 Phillips Ct.
Santa Clara, CA 95051
Registrant/Owner began transacting
business under the fictitious business
name(s) listed above on N/A.
This statement was filed with the
County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara
County on February 18, 2015.
(MVV Feb. 27, Mar. 6, 13, 20, 2015)
The following person (persons) is (are)
doing business as:
The Peninsulaires, 2.) Silicon Valley
Barbershop Chorus, 3.) The Silicon Valley
Barbershop Chorus, located at 19021
Portos Drive, Saratoga, CA 95070, Santa
Clara County.
This business is owned by: A
Corporation.
The name and residence address of the
owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are):
PALO ALTO MOUNTAIN VIEW CHAPTER
SPEBSQSA INC.
19021 Portos Drive
Saratoga, CA 95070
Registrant/Owner began transacting
business under the fictitious business
name(s) listed above on N/A.
This statement was filed with the
County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara
County on February 20, 2015.
(MVV Mar. 6, 13, 20, 27, 2015)
AUTHENTIC MOVEMENT COACHING
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT
File No.: 601585
The following person (persons) is (are)
doing business as:
Authentic Movement Coaching, located
at 2044 Old Middlefield Way, Mountain
View, CA 94043, Santa Clara County.
This business is owned by: An
Individual.
The name and residence address of the
owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are):
ROSE CALUCCHIA
752 Nobel Drive, Unit A
Santa Cruz, CA 95060
Registrant/Owner began transacting
business under the fictitious business
name(s) listed above on 12/1/14.
This statement was filed with the
County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara
County on February 19, 2015.
(MVV Feb. 27, Mar. 6, 13, 20, 2015)
SKYLIT SIGNS
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT
File No.: 602151
The following person (persons) is (are)
doing business as:
Skylit Signs, located at 933 Neptune Ct.
Apt. C, Mountain View, CA 94043, Santa
Clara County.
This business is owned by: An
Individual.
The name and residence address of the
owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are):
DESEAN G. CASTANEDA
933 Neptune Ct. Apt. C
Mountain View, CA 94043
Registrant/Owner began transacting
business under the fictitious business
name(s) listed above on N/A.
This statement was filed with the
County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara
County on March 2, 2015.
(MVV Mar. 6, 13, 20, 27, 2015)
THE PENINSULAIRES
SILICON VALLEY BARBERSHOP CHORUS
THE SILICON VALLEY BARBERSHOP
CHORUS
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT
File No.: 601639
RONALD G. SEGER, O.D. and JENIFER E.L.
WEBB, O.D.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT
File No.: 602590
The following person (persons) is (are)
doing business as:
Ronald G. Seger, O.D. and Jenifer E.L.
Webb, O.D., located at 1150 W. El
Camino Real, Mountain View, CA 94040,
Santa Clara County.
This business is owned by: A General
Partnership.
The name and residence address of the
owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are):
RONALG G. SEGER
715 Glenborough Drive
Mountain View, CA 94041
JENIFER E.L. WEBB
1309 Bronwen Way
Campbell, CA 95008
Registrant/Owner began transacting
business under the fictitious business
name(s) listed above on 1/1/2008.
This statement was filed with the
County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara
County on March 12, 2015.
(MVV Mar. 20, 27, Apr. 3, 10, 2015)
SHORELINE OPTOMETRY
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT
File No.: 602591
The following person (persons) is (are)
doing business as:
Shoreline Optometry, located at 1150
W. El Camino Real, Mountain View, CA
94040, Santa Clara County.
This business is owned by: A General
Partnership.
The name and residence address of the
owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are):
RONALD G. SEGER
715 Glenborough Drive
Mountain View, CA 94041
JENIFER E.L. WEBB
1309 Bronwen Way
Campbell, CA 95008
Registrant/Owner began transacting
business under the fictitious business
name(s) listed above on 1/1/2008.
This statement was filed with the
County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara
County on March 12, 2015.
(MVV Mar. 20, 27, Apr. 3, 10, 2015)
FILING YOUR FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT? We Offer Professional Help.
MTN. VIEW VOICE • 223-6578.
“Is Quality Important to You? We M easure Quality by Results”
Yvonne Heyl
o
w
T
f
o
ˆÀiVÌÊ­Èxä®Ê™{LJ{ș{
r
e
w
Po
iÊ­Èxä®ÊÎäӇ{äxx
,›Êä£ÓxxÈÈ£
ޅiޏJˆ˜ÌiÀœÀi>iÃÌ>Ìi°Vœ“
Jeff Gonzalez
ˆÀiVÌÊ­Èxä®Ê™{LJ{șn
iÊ­{än®Ênnn‡ÇÇ{n
,›Êää™ÇnǙÎ
}œ˜â>iâJˆ˜ÌiÀœÀi>iÃÌ>Ìi°Vœ“
Team BRE# 70000637
Þۜ˜˜i>˜`ivvJˆ˜ÌiÀœÀi>iÃÌ>Ìi°Vœ“
{™ÈʈÀÃÌÊ-Ì°Ê-ՈÌiÊÓääÊUʜÃʏ̜Ãʙ{äÓÓ ÜÜÜ°Þۜ˜˜i>˜`ivv°Vœ“
March 20, 2015 Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q
25
JUDY
SHERI
CINDY
650. 207.2111
[email protected]
CalBRE# 00298975
CalBRE# 01060012
CalBRE# 01918407
BOGARD-TANIGAMI
BOGARD-HUGHES
650. 279.4003
[email protected]
BOGARD-O’GORMAN
650.924.8365
[email protected]
ConsultantsInRealEstate.com
10590 Chardonnay Lane, Los Altos Hills
!
SOLD
Stunning Home with Sweeping Views
Presenting contemporary and traditional appeal, this spacious home is
beautifully appointed, freshly finished, and filled with natural light. Secluded
at the end of a private lane, the home benefits from sweeping views of San
Francisco Bay and Silicon Valley. Towering cathedral ceilings, expansive
windows topped with angled transoms, and an open flow of rooms combine
for a sense of volume and a seamless connection with the views – dazzling
by day and by night. Adding to the appeal are Santos Mahogany floors, all
remodeled bathrooms, a recently updated chef’s kitchen, and a tremendous
wrap-around deck overlooking the views. With 5 bedrooms plus a large
family room, this home offers ample space for a variety of lifestyle needs, all
at a location that puts Silicon Valley within easy reach.
• Spacious and updated with contemporary and traditional appeal
• Recently renovated kitchen, open to family room
• Complete privacy at the end of the lane
• Sweeping views of the Bay and Silicon Valley
• Two-level home with 5 bedrooms and 3.5 bathrooms
• Approximately one acre* private lot
• 2-car attached garage
• Ideally located within minutes to Rancho San Antonio Park, minutes to
Loyola Corners/Rancho Shopping Center and 280 freeway access
• Top-rated Los Altos schools: Loyola, Blach, and Mountain View High
*buyer to verify
• Approximately 4,400* square feet of living space
• Towering cathedral ceilings and walls of view windows
Offered at $2,995,000
• Wrap-around rear deck with peaceful views
NEW LISTING:
940 BLACK MOUNTAIN CT.
LOS ALTOS
OPEN: SAT & SUN 1:00-4:00
LISTED AT $ 2,350,000
Exuding classic California Style with timeless
appeal, this beautifully appointed home has
it all – a desirable one-level floor plan with 3
bedrooms, 2.5 baths and more than 1820 sqft,
with an exceptional gourmet kitchen, top-of-theline appliances leading to separate family room
with an oversized old world fireplace, beautiful
hardwood floors, and so much more. The Los
Altos is home situated on approximately 11,800
square feet, has mature grounds, large lawn area
for play-time, and a back yard with a covered
patio for California outdoor entertaining. Just a
short walk to awarded Blach Junior High School,
this desirable home remains within easy reach of
shops and restaurants, and major thoroughfares
that make Bay Area commuting convenient.
26
Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q March 20, 2015
ED GRAZIANI
(650) 947-2992
JEN PAULSON
(650) 996-7147
[email protected]
www.EdGraziani.com
CalBRE # 01081556
[email protected]
CalBRE # 01221390
GALLI
604 MARIPOSA AVENUE, MOUNTAIN VIEW
Charming home only a few blocks from downtown!
3 bedrooms/2 bathrooms | Beautiful open layout | Gorgeous high-end kitchen with Sub-Zero
French doors off of kitchen & master bedroom | Updated baths with calcutta marble
Large yard | Excellent schools | Walk to shops and restaurants Near the Steven’s Creek Trail | Close to Castro Street & Parks
Visit DowntownMountainView.com for more photos!
Offered at $1,395,000
MICHAEL GALLI
President’s Club
650.248.3076 | MichaelGalli.com | [email protected]
BRE# 01852633
Give me a call with any Real Estate
questions you may have!
Named one of the best Realtors
in the United States in 2013
March 20, 2015 Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q
27
When you want
the best price
with specific terms,
and fast – call me!
DELEON REALTY
MOUNTAIN VIEW
SPECIALIST
Serving Mountain View & surrounding
communities for over twenty years.
Home of the most innovative companies,
Mountain View has a small-town feel with an
international flare. From the modernized cultural
center of Downtown to the suburban haven of Waverly
Park, let our specialist at DeLeon Realty show you all
that Mountain View has to offer.
®
Mountain View
Neighborhood Specialist
650.575.8300
email: [email protected]
web: www.nancystuhr.com
650.600.3848 | [email protected]
www.deleonrealty.com | CalBRE #01903224
Calif. BRE 00963170
MOUNTAIN VIEW
JUST [email protected]<;
OPEN SAT & SUN | 1:00 - 4:00 pm
192 Escuela Avenue
ÝÛKglYddqÛmh\Yl]\ÛÛZ]\jgge•Û~ÛZYl`ÛZmf_YdgoÛZmadlÛafÛ
~††Û[gehd]l]Ûoal`Û^jgflÛhgj[`Û¬Ûo`al]Ûha[c]lÛ^]f[]
ÝÛI]eg\]d]\Ûcal[`]fÛoal`ÛZ]Ymla^mdÛ[YZaf]ljq•Û_jYfal]Û
[gmfl]jlghk•Ûf]o]jÛYhhdaYf[]k
ÝÛ=afak`]\Û~Û[YjÛ_YjY_]Ûoal`ÛnYmdl]\Û[]adaf_Û¬ÛZYk]e]flÛÛ
[gehd]l]Ûoal`Ûkgmf\Ûklm\ag•ÛdYmf\jqÛYj]YÛ¬ÛklgjY_]
ÝÛCYj_]ÛZY[cqYj\Ûoal`Û[mklgeÛhYn]jk•ÛyY_klgf]Û
hYl`oYq•Û\afaf_Ûh]j_gdY•ÛKm^^ÛJ`]\•ÛeYlmj]Û^jmalÛlj]]k
ÝÛ:dgk]ÛhjgpaealqÛlgÛ\goflgofÛDgmflYafÛMa]o•ÛhYjckÛ¬Û
l`]Û`]YjlÛg^ÛJada[gfÛMYdd]q
Offered at $850,000
650.947.4780
[email protected]
www.HowardBloom.com
28
Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q March 20, 2015
A Berkshire Hathaway Affiliate
CalBRE# 00893793
803 EMILY DRIVE
MOUNTAIN VIEW
3 BEDS
2 BATHS
EXTENDED HOURS: FRIDAY, 9:30 AM–5:00 PM
SATURDAY & SUNDAY, 1:00–5:00 PM
www.803Emily.com
$835,000
OPEN FLOOR PLAN
BEAUTIFUL REAR YARD WITH GARDEN
REMODELED KITCHEN
MINUTES TO TECH CENTERS
Information deemed reliable, but not guaranteed.
THE
TROYER
CalBRE# 01234450
GROUP
650 • 440 • 5076
[email protected]
davidtroyer.com
A Berkshire Hathaway Affiliate
March 20, 2015 Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q
29
What will your reason be to
PAM BLACKMAN Buy or Sell a home this year?
CERTIFIED RESIDENTIAL SPECIALIS T®
SENIORS REAL ES TATE SPECIALIS T®
‰ Diversifying your portfolio
‰ Combining households
SOLD by
Pam Blackman
‰ Time for retirement living
(partial list)
‰ Ready to upsize or downsize
‰ Simplifying life
I have had clients in each of these categories… and more.
What lifestyle can I help you with this year?
650.823.0308
[email protected]
www.PamBlackman.com
CalBRE# 00584333
DELEON REALTY
CONDO
SPECIALIST
&RQGRPLQLXPVDQGWRZQKRPHVDUHWHUULÀF
options for people looking to move into an area where
single family homes are cost-prohibitive. In addition to
the advantages of shared communal areas and considerable
amenities, let our specialist at DeLeon Realty show you
what other great features condominium living has to offer.
MAKE THE RIGHT CHOICE
®
650.600.3889 | [email protected]
www.deleonrealty.com | CalBRE #01903224
Experience the difference —
Visit my website for information
on property listings, virtual tours,
buying, selling and much more.
JERYLANN MATEO
Broker Associate
Realtor
Direct: 650.209.1601 | Cell: 650.743.7895
[email protected] | www.jmateo.com
BRE# 01362250
apr.com | LOS ALTOS 167 S. San Antonio Road | 650.941.1111
2747 St. Giles Lane, Mountain View
Desirable Waverly Park Neighborhood
Op
-22 &
n 3/21 0
u
S
&
3
:
t
en S a
1:30 - 4
3/28 -2
•
•
•
9
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
&IEYXMJYPVIQSHIPSTIR¾SSVTPER
4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms
Formal dining room and living room
with vaulted ceiling
Chef’s kitchen with island, granite
counters, gas range
Open family room/great room with
½VITPEGI
Master suite with walk-in closet
,EVH[SSH¾SSVWHSYFPITERIH
windows, fresh paint, new roof
High ceilings, skylights, inside laundry,
extra storage
Gorgeous landscaped backyard and
much more…
Top Mountain View schools: Huff
Elementary, Graham Middle School,
Mountain View High School (buyer to
verify eligibility)
Approximately 2,008 sq. ft. on an
approx. 8,276 sq. ft. lot
Offered at $1,849,000
Vicki Geers
BRE#01191911 | www.VickiGeers.com | [email protected] | 650.917.7983
30
Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q March 20, 2015
/RV$OWRV&ROGZHOO%DQNHU&RQJUDWXODWHV
Shelly Potvin
2014
Top Listing Agent
And #2 for Buyer Representation
<RXWRRFDQEHQH¼WIURP6KHOO\³VVWHOODUPDUNHWLQJ
QHJRWLDWLQJH[SHUWLVHDQGXQSDUDOOHOHGVHUYLFH
‡VSRWYLQ#FEQRUFDOFRP
ZZZ6KHOO\3RWYLQFRP‡&DO%5(
March 20, 2015 Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q
31
Coldwell Banker
#1 IN CALIFORNIA
PALO ALTO
$11,888,000
www.4103OldTraceRoad.com Palo Alto rare Zoned R-E Density
Residential. New Price.
Jan Strohecker
CalBRE #00620365
650.325.6161
PALO ALTO
Sat/Sun 1:30 - 4:30
$5,980,000
1266 Hamilton Av 4 BR 4 full BA + 2 half Built in the 1930’s.
Beautifully renovated gardens, walking distance to Downtown.
Denis Morrissey
CalBRE #00862018
650.325.6161
PALO ALTO
Sat/Sun 1:30 - 4:30
$3,498,000
2615 Cowper 4 BR 3.5 BA 4 yrs new, 4 BR + office, within walking
distance to all Midtown facilities.
Judy Shen
CalBRE #01272874
650.325.6161
PALO ALTO
Sat/Sun 1:30 - 4:30
$3,800,000
1766 Fulton St. 4 BR 3 BA Christmas Tree Lane house features a large
LR, spacious DR and eat-in kitchen.
Alan & Nicki Loveless CalBRE #00444835 & 00924021 650.325.6161
LOS ALTOS
Sat/Sun 1 - 4
$2,498,000
454 Orange Ave 3 BR 2 BA Approx 1160sf on an approx 6850sf
lot•Expaned&remod thru-out•Frml LR&DR•Kit w/Viking appl
Terri Couture/Trish Eby CalBRE #01090940, 01920615 650.941.7040
LOS ALTOS
Sat/Sun 1:30 - 4:30
$1,995,000
1200 Windimer Dr 5 BR 3 BA Traditional Highlands home in a parklike setting with 5 bedrooms, gorgeous pool, more!
Ellie Zias
CalBRE #00604545
650.941.7040
MOUNTAIN VIEW
Sat/Sun 1:30 - 4:30
$1,849,000
2747 St. Giles Lane 4 BR 3 BA Beautiful Remodel in Desirable Waverly
Park w/ chef ’s kitchen, great room, gorgeous yard
Vicki Geers
CalBRE #01191911
650.941.7040
MENLO PARK
Sat/Sun 1:30 - 4:30
$1,398,000
2101 Harkins Ave 3 BR 2 BA Mid-century modern; Lot
size=6784sf;Living area=1470sf;Garage=440sf;MFA=3264sf; Charming!
Margaret Williams
CalBRE #00554210
650.941.7040
PALO ALTO
Sat/Sun 1:30 - 4:30
$1,798,000
2077 Williams 3 BR 1.5 BA Light and bright College Terrace home
close to Stanford University and California Ave.
Sharon Witte
CalBRE #00842833
650.325.6161
SUNNYVALE
Sat/Sun 1:30 - 4
$1,198,000
891 Mango Ave 3 BR 2 BA Inviting expanded & remodeled Cherry
Chase home! Master Ste retreat w/vaulted ceiling
Diyar Essaid
CalBRE #01335648
650.941.7040
EAST PALO ALTO
$985,000
2881 Drew Ct 3 BR 1 BA This unique lot meets the City’s
requirements for a detached 2nd dwelling unit.
Jane Jones
CalBRE #01847801
650.325.6161
SAN FRANCISCO (NOB HILL) Sun 1 - 4:30
$958,000
1635 California St 2 BR 2 BA A Nob Hill Condo, Secured building,
Secured deed parking, In unit laundry, Fire Place.
Zahra Miller
CalBRE #01235386
650.941.7040
EAST PALO ALTO
Sun 1:30 - 4:30
$947,888
136 Jasmine Way 6 BR 3.5 BA 2 story home with plenty of room.
Over 2700 sf. Beautiful remodel.
Shawnna Sullivan
CalBRE #00856563
650.325.6161
SAN JOSE (BLOSSOM VALLEY)Sat/Sun 1 - 4:30
$668,000
5890 Chris Dr 4 BR 2 BA Charming SFR home in Blossom Valley
Neighborhood! Remod baths, dbl pane windows.
Zahra Miller
CalBRE #01235386
650.941.7040
FREMONT
Sun 1 - 4
$499,888
37181 Dondero Way 3 BR 1 BA Best value! Ideal location, popular
neighborhood, convenient to BART, easy commute access.
Melanie Johnson
CalBRE #01040928
650.941.7040
Los Altos | Palo Alto
CaliforniaMoves.com |
californiahome.me |
/cbcalifornia |
/cb_california |
/cbcalifornia |
/coldwellbanker
©2015 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Office is Owned by a Subsidiary of NRT LLC.
Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC, Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage or NRT LLC. CalBRE License #01908304.
32
Q Mountain View Voice Q MountainViewOnline.com Q March 20, 2015