SAVOR THIS

SAVOR THIS
September 2009 • Volume 1 • Issue 1 • A monthly publication of The American Institute of Wine & Food
TYLER FLORENCE
A new face of The AIWF
CHAPTER SPOTLIGHT
Dallas/Ft. Worth
AIWF MEMBER
BENEFITS
AIWF NATIONAL PARTNER – LE CORDON BLEU
CONTENTS
NEWS
3 The AIWF Organization
4 Chef’s Corner featuring Tyler Florence
5 Recipes by Tyler Florence
6 Harvest in Saint-Emilion
10 Chapter Spotlight
12 Days of Taste
13 Chapter Events
14 Beer/Food Pairing: A Primer
15 AIWF Member Benefits
The American Institute of Wine & Food
would like to welcome you all to the first
issue of Savor This, which has been
designed to update you on exciting new
developments we are working on and
implementing to enhance the value of
The AIWF membership. Issues will also
highlight upcoming events from local
AIWF chapters, new AIWF member
exclusive benefits, AIWF educational
programs, the latest trends in the food
and wine industry and much more.
®
SAVOR THIS Is a publication in association with
The American Institute of Wine & Food
Editors
Beth Lane
Amy J. Williams
Please email or call The AIWF National
office if you have any comments,
questions or would like to join. We look
forward to hearing from you.
Thank you,
AIWF National
Art Direction & Design
Iatesta Design / Chris Iatesta
Contributing Writers
David A. Bernahl II
Rebecca Chapa, CWE, DSW
Draft Magazine
Beth Lane
Deborah McKeever
Robin Plotkin
Amy Williams
The AIWF National Board
Lisa A. Lipton, National Chair – San Diego
Mary J. Chamberlin, Vice Chair – Monterey Bay
Andre R. Jaglom, Esq., Secretary – New York
George Linn, Treasurer – NorCal
Frank Giaimo, Chapter Council Chair – NorCal
Gary Martin, Chapter Council Vice Chair – Dayton
Scott J. Hunt, Chapter Council Representative – New York
Carolyn J. Margolis, Chapter Council Representative – National Capital
D. E. FitzGerald, Chapter Council Representative – Orange County
M. Jean Schultz, Chapter Council Representative – Santa Barbara
Riva Eichner Kahn, Days of Taste® Chair – Baltimore
Deborah McKeever, Membership Chair – Dallas/Ft. Worth
Michael Green – New York
Allen Susser – South Florida
George Temel – South Florida
THE AIWF National Office
Amy J. Williams, Executive Director
Beth Lane, Chapter & Member Administrator
David A. Bernahl II, Co-Founder Coastal Luxury Management
Robert Weakley, Co-Founder Coastal Luxury Management
(831) 250-7739 • (800) 274-2493 toll-free • [email protected]
26364 Carmel Rancho Lane, Suite 201, Carmel, CA 93923
AIWF.ORG
PAYING TRIBUTE TO JULIA
Many of our AIWF Chapters hosted
celebrations to pay tribute to Julia
Child, one of
AIWF’s
Founding
Members, in
conjunction
with the
release of the
movie Julie &
Julia this
summer. It’s
clear that there’s a lot of excitement
about the movie and we want to
acknowledge and express our
appreciation to all of the venues, event
coordinators and attendees of our AIWF
Chapter events honoring Julia.
SAVOR THIS • SEPTEMBER 2009
1
AIWF NATIONAL PARTNER – COASTAL LUXURY MANAGEMENT
SEPTEMBER 26-27, 2009
A 2 - D AY E V E N T C E L E B R AT I N G A G R I C U LT U R E ,
V I T I C U LT U R E , C H E E S E A N D G O O D T I M E S
50 CHEFS • MORE THAN 100 WINERIES
ORGANIC GARDENING SEMINARS • BBQ SEMINARS
W I N E TA S T I N G S • C H E E S E TA S T I N G S
KID’S INTERACTIVE KITCHEN • DJ MUSIC
AND MUCH MORE!
W W W. H A R V E S T C A R M E L . C O M
RESORT & GOLF CLUB
For AIWF Member Discounts
login to AIWF Member Home
Page or contact Beth Lane at
(831) 250-7739 or [email protected]
2
SAVOR THIS • SEPTEMBER 2009
AIWF.ORG
THE AIWF ORGANIZATION
Founding Members
Julia Child
Richard H. Graff
Robert Mondavi
Chapters
Atlanta, GA
Baltimore, MD
Boston, MA
Chicago, IL
Connecticut
Dallas/Ft. Worth, TX
Dayton, OH
Denver, CO
Hilton Head, SC
Kansas City, KS
Louisville, KY
Milwaukee, WI
Monterey Bay, CA
National Capital Area
New Orleans, LA
New York
Northern California
Orange County, CA
Pacific Northwest, WA
Rhode Island
San Diego, CA
Santa Barbara, CA
San Luis Obispo, CA
Sonoran Desert, AZ
South Florida, FL
Vermont
Wichita, KS
AIWF.ORG
The AIWF Management Team
Fellow Friends, Foodies, and Culinary
Enthusiasts:
Recently our company, Coastal Luxury
Management, was honored to take on
the role of the National Office for The
AIWF. Our new role as a strategic partner
and director of The AIWF came out of a
unified excitement and passion for the
organization’s
history,
and
most
Rob Weakley, Beth Lane,
Amy Williams, David Alan Bernahl II
importantly, its future potential. We have
a shared vision for the opportunity that exists within The AIWF, to once
again become one of the most recognized and respected culinary
organizations in the country. Utilizing the tremendously rich history of
The AIWF, hard work, and a national effort from our robust and diverse
mix of chapters and members, we should accomplish our goals.
As the year goes on, we look forward to sharing with you our ideas
for the organization. We also look forward to hearing your ideas on
how we can work together to strengthen the brand of The AIWF,
increase membership values and benefits, increase member loyalty,
create new national campaigns and initiatives, and refocus the
organization and brand as whole. Your partnership and input is
critical to the long-term success of this organization.
We are humbled and honored to be working with such a storied
group of food and wine enthusiasts and culinary professionals from
around the country. We too, hope to bring new relationships and
assets to our partnership that will only advance the enjoyment of our
memberships and our charitable impact in our communities and
nationwide.
There should be a tremendous amount of pride for what each of you
have accomplished over the years. We find ourselves in a time where
our creativity and hard work will be imperative to growing this great
organization to the next level. We look forward to being a part of this
journey with each of you, as your partner.
Very Truly Yours,
Coastal Luxury Management (CLM) Team
www.CoastalLuxuryManagement.com
SAVOR THIS • SEPTEMBER 2009
3
CHEF’S CORNER
moving on to become executive chef at
Cafeteria.
As the buzz about the charismatic young chef’s
food picked up steam, a fresh new television
network took notice and the rest, as they say, is
history. After 12 plus years as a franchise star of
the Food Network, Florence has taken his food
and his wit across the globe, finely tuning what is
regarded as one of America’s most important
culinary voices. He has starred in such series as
How to Boil Water, a cooking show for novices,
Food 911, his hugely popular “recipe rescue”
show, as well as his signature series, Tyler’s
Ultimate. Florence has also hosted numerous
other Food Network shows and specials,
including Planet Food, All American Festivals and
My Country, My Kitchen. Not to be limited to
Food Network, Tyler is a regular guest on the
TODAY Show, CNN, The View, The Tonight Show,
Oprah, Access Hollywood, Extra, Good Morning
America and more.
The American Institute of Wine & Food
is pleased to announce and welcome
Tyler Florence as one of the new
Ambassadors of The AIWF.
For the past fifteen years, Chef Tyler Florence
(www.tylerflorence.com) has delighted the masses
by sharing the sights, sounds and flavors of his
unique culinary vision to fans around the world.
After graduating from the prestigious culinary
program at Johnson and Wales University,
Florence tackled the Big Apple where he helmed
multiple acclaimed restaurants and established
himself as a one of New York City’s finest young
stars. In New York, he honed his culinary skills
under the tutelage of some of the city's premier
chefs, including Charlie Palmer at Aureole, Marta
Pulini at Mad 61 and Rick Laakonen, ultimately
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SAVOR THIS • SEPTEMBER 2009
Tyler recently released two new top-selling
cookbooks – Stirring The Pot, and Dinner at my
Place (Meredith Books) in addition to his three
previous books- Tyler’s Ultimate, Eat This Book,
and Real Kitchen (Clarkson Potter). In 2009, Tyler
launched his signature lines of steel-clad
cookware and titanium cutlery on Home
Shopping Network and at major retailers across
the United States, including Macy’s, for whom
Tyler is a member of the prestigious Macy’s
Culinary Council.
In July of 2008, Tyler opened his first kitchen retail
shop, The Tyler Florence Shop, in Mill Valley, just
outside of San Francisco, California.
Tyler lives in Mill Valley, California with his wife
Tolan, and has two sons Miles, age 13, Hayden,
2, and a little girl, Dorothy, 1.
AIWF.ORG
AMERICAN PROVENCE CHICKEN WITH
LEMON, GARLIC AND FRESH BAY LEAVES
LEMON ROASTED FINGERLING POTATOES
Recipe courtesy of Tyler Florence
Yield: serves 4-6; Time: 30 minutes
Yield: serves 4-6; Time: 45 minutes
2 lb fingerling potatoes
1/2 Meyer lemons, cut into quarter wedges
1 sprig of rosemary, leaves only
2 sprigs of thyme, leaves only
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper extra-virgin
olive oil
1 large free range, organic chicken
1 lemon, cut in half
1 head of garlic, cut through the equator
1 branches of fresh bay leaves
1/2 bunch of fresh thyme
Recipe courtesy Tyler Florence
American Provence Spice Mix:
2 teaspoons smoked salt
1/2 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon cracked toasted fennel seed
1/2 teaspoon cracked toasted coriander seed
2 tablespoons onion powder
2 tablespoons garlic powder
2 teaspoons sugar
1 tablepoon herbs de provence mix (lavender, savory,
toasted fennel, dried rosemary, thyme)
Wash and split finger potatoes lengthwise. Toss in olive
oil together with rosemary, thyme and lemon wedges in
a flat roasting tray. Season with salt and freshly ground
pepper then roast under the rotisserie chicken for 25-30
minutes until golden brown. Stir occasionally to coat in
chicken drippings and cook evenly. Season one more
time with salt and pepper before serving.
Begin by making the spice mix. Toast peppercorns,
coriander seeds and fennel seeds in a pan over mediumhigh heat until fragrant about 4-5 minutes. Crush
peppercorns, fennel seeds and coriander seeds in a
mortar and pestle until you have a fine but still slightly
textured mixture. Add smoked salt, herbs de provence,
sugar, onion and garlic powder and crush once more
until fully combined.
Recipe courtesy Tyler Florence
Clean chicken and season cavity well with plenty of the
spice mix. Stuff cavity with lemon, garlic, thyme and bay
leaf then tie bird up with kitchen twine and skewer on
the rotisserie rod. Rub outside with olive oil and season
with more of the spice mix. Wrap in plastic and marinate
overnight.
Roast on a rotisserie for 45 minutes until golden brown
and juices run clear. Cook lemon roasted potatoes under
the chicken in a roasting pan - placed so it can catch the
chicken drippings as it cooks (recipe follows).
WILTED BUTTER LETTUCE, FRESH
GARDEN PEAS, AND BUERRE BLANC
Yield: serves 4; Time: 25 minutes
Buerre blanc:
1 cup dry white wine
1 shallot, finely chopped
6 whole black peppercorns
1 bay leaf
1 stick cold unsalted butter, cut up into cubes
Kosher salt
Make buerre blanc: add white wine, shallot, bay leaf,
peppercorns, and salt to a saucepan and simmer until it
is syrupy and just coats the bottom of the pan. Add
butter cubes, a little at a time whilst stirring with a whisk
to thicken the sauce and give it a shine. Give it a final
season with salt and pepper to taste.
1 large head of butter lettuce
1 cup fresh garden peas, blanched in salted water
Cut off the root of the butter lettuce and separate the
leaves. Place the leaves in a large mixing bowl with
blanched peas then dress with warm buerre blanc and
toss so the leaves wilt a little.
To serve the complete dish, break down the chicken into
10 pieces. Add chicken and potatoes to the bibb lettuce
salad gently toss to toss together to combine. Finish with
a drizzle of buerre blanc.
AIWF.ORG
SAVOR THIS • SEPTEMBER 2009
5
HARVEST IN SAINT-EMILION
By Rebecca Chapa, CWE, DWS
Wine and. Spirits Educator, Writer, Diploma Wine and Spirits, Certified Sommelier, Certified Wine Educator
Harvest celebrations abound in wine regions around the world, but no where are they full of as much
history and pomp as in France. In 2008 I had the ability to visit one personally, the 60th Jurade de
Saint-Emilion and Ban des Vendanges or Harvest Proclamation in Bordeaux.
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SAVOR THIS • SEPTEMBER 2009
AIWF.ORG
While California wine regions normally enjoy warm
and sunny harvests, Bordeaux doesn’t have the
benefit of consistently temperate harvests, so
harvest anticipation creates excitement and at
times angst. Maybe that is why the celebration
and ritual is taken so seriously. From the creation
of the berries ceremonies follow the entire grape
growing cycle are omnipresent throughout France
due to the incredible history of grape growing.
The area of Saint-Emilion and its neighboring
communes of Pomerol and Fronsac are located in
France’s southwest in the Bordeaux region.
These communes, or villages, on the right bank
of the Gironde estuary are not as well known to
most as those on the left bank and herein lies
some of the charm of the area. This wine region
is known for the incredible quality of its wines but
also for the amazing scenery, culture and cuisine.
The vineyard area was certified in 1999 by
UNESCO as a world heritage site due to the
incredible history of winemaking and grape
growing that dates back to Roman times and
grew to dominate the landscape in the Middle
Ages. Many of the buildings in the area date to
the 11th century.
The history of the Jurade itself, initially a
governing body for the region, dates back to July
1199. I will spare you the tedious details, but the
present tradition of the Jurade dates to 1948.
Today the group is made up of 49 “Jurats” from
Saint-Emilion and 12 “Jurats” from Lussac SaintEmilion and Puisseguin Saint-Emilion, satellite
appellations. The group promotes the region and
its wines throughout the world. Each year at the
ceremony in September the group inducts new
honorary members as ambassadors of the region
and blesses the harvest. The small town fills with
visitors on hand to share the festivities. Events
include celebratory dinners, parties and an
incredible fireworks show that included streams of
fire and light pouring down the town’s ramparts.
AIWF.ORG
The wines of Saint-Emilion and its neighboring
villages are distinctly different than those in the
rest of Bordeaux. Here on the right bank the soils
are heavier and less rocky made up
predominantly of clays and limestone. Merlot
finds a comfortable home here due to the higher
water holding capacity of the soils. Typically the
wines of Bordeaux have been blends, a great way
for growers to hedge their bets at harvest and
ensure that they have some grapes to harvest at
all. The climate can be fickle, for example spring
frosts or rain during harvest, and having multiple
cultivars helps. Cabernet Sauvignon prefers the
more gravelly soils of the left bank, as a later
ripening grape it needs the additional heat from
the rocky soils and prefers the well-drained sites.
As a result of these small but important
differences the wines of the left bank are usually
Cabernet Sauvignon dominated while those from
Saint-Emilion focus on higher proportions of
Merlot and Cabernet Franc. Despite this fact, the
wines can be incredibly concentrated, densely
colored, complex and interesting.
If given the chance, Saint-Emilion is a great wine
region to visit due to the plethora of other cultural
opportunities that abound.
The medieval
architecture and stone buildings make you feel
like you have stepped into another time. Many of
the original structures are still standing like the
massive monolithic church carved out of one huge
limestone boulder and underground catacombs
are worth a visit. Caves carved into (or out of) the
limestone plateau stretch for miles. These historic
cellars twist and turn and many lead all the way
into the town from neighboring vineyards.
Although it is too dangerous to walk into town this
way, many vineyard visits include tours of their
underground passages where wines can be stored
in ideal conditions, cool temperature and high
humidity. Navigating the city’s above ground
passages by foot takes care, especially if you have
had a few glasses of wine with lunch. It is amazing
SAVOR THIS • SEPTEMBER 2009
7
to see the town’s older generation expertly
ramble through the treacherous routes. The
cobbles are ancient and weathered smooth and
slick, and the streets in places so steep that I
found myself removing my shoes and going
barefoot while clinging to guiderails.
While you may see some impressive Chateaux or
Estates, one of the most exciting things about
Saint-Emilion is the small producers. With over
800 winegrowers there are many boutique producers making great wines at reasonable prices.
the left bank of Bordeaux you may be familiar
with premier cru, deuxieme cru and so on,
resulting from a classification of vineyards
conducted in 1855. That particular classification
has not changed since! In Saint-Emilion they
classify the producers, or chateaux, every ten
years. Their system is currently undergoing some
revisions, but the idea is to provide a reputable
system that takes into account changes over time
to the quality of wines produced. On the wine
label you may see Grand Crus Classe or Premier
Grand Cru Classe, the top echelon which is
further divided into A and B levels. Until they get
their latest revision sorted out the important thing
to note is that if you see something like Grand
Cru on a label of wine from Saint-Emilion that
means it is a better than average. Do not
overlook some of the smaller producers though,
your best bet is to ask your local retailer or
sommelier for guidance.
What to look for on the label:
The appellations: Saint-Emilion and SaintEmilion Grand Cru, Montagne Saint-Emilion,
Lussac Saint-Emilion, Puisseguin Saint-Emilion,
Saint-Georges Saint-Emilion, Pomerol, Lalande
de Pomerol, Fronsac, Canon Fronsac
Producers to look for:
Chateau Junayme (Fronsac)
www.vignoblesdeconinck.fr
And if you can’t make it in person you can toast
the harvest just the same. Wines from SaintEmilion are widely available and are really at
home with food. Ideal for rich dishes, but not
overpowering or overly flashy they can meld with
a wide gamut of cuisine. Their inviting flavors of
red and black fruits matches perfectly a day with
a bit of chill in the air. One thing to note about
wines from Saint-Emilion is the classification
system. If you have heard of the system used on
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SAVOR THIS • SEPTEMBER 2009
Chateau Tournefeuille (Lalande de Pomerol)
www.chateau-tournefeuille.com
Chateau de Bel Air (Lalande de Pomerol)
Chateau Cheval Blanc (Saint-Emilion)
www.chateau-chevalblanc.com
Chateau Ripeau (Saint-Emilion)
www.chateauripeau.com
Chateau Franc Mayne
www.relaisfrancmayne.com
AIWF.ORG
Chateau Lyonnat (Lussac Saint-Emilion)
www.chateaulyonnat.com
and Macarons, two delicious local treats.
Clos Fourtet (Saint-Emilion)
www.closfourtet.com
place du Marche du Bois 33330 Saint Emilion
Chateau Haut-Bonneau (Montagne SaintEmilion) www.chateau-haut-bonneau.com
[email protected]
Restaurant: Logis de La Cadene Restaurant 3,
05 57 24 71 40
www.logisdelacadene.com
Chateau Guibot la Fourvieille (Puisseguin
Saint-Emilion) www.vignobleshenribourlon.com
Guest House: Le Relais de Franc Mayne
Chateau Canon (Chateau Canon)
www.chateaucanon.com
Swimming Pool, 9 Rooms, Underground Quarries
If you visit:
Consider transportation in advance, there is only
ONE taxi in the entire area. Seriously, I know
from experience! He does like to sleep at night
if he has an airport pickup the next morning so
keep that in mind! www.taxi-st-emilion.com
Robert Faustin Taxi No 1
[email protected]; Natural water,
www.relaisfrancmayne.com
Resources:
Tourist Office of Saint-Emilion Jurisdiction
33 (0)5 57 55 28 28
www.saint-emilion-tourisme.com
www.bordeaux-tourisme.com
www.franceguide.com
Be sure to pick up some Caneles de Bordeaux
AIWF.ORG
SAVOR THIS • SEPTEMBER 2009
9
CHAPTER SPOTLIGHT
Dallas/Fort Worth
The First Place team! Michael Flynn (left) and Eric Brandt at the
AIWF D/FW Chapter Wine and Food Pairing contest in
conjunction with KRLD Restaurant Week.
The Dallas/Ft. Worth Chapter has over 177
memberships and over 300 members. They have
found success by having 3-4 events a month, 4
sessions of 5 weekly cooking classes per year, a
Caesar Salad fundraiser which draws near 1000
people, and their Days of Taste® program that
runs twice per year totaling 16 days. They have a
great scholarship committee and will fund two
scholarships this year at $2,500 each to the Wine
Professional and Executive Chef of the restaurant
that wins the contest for “Best Wine and Food
Pairing” of KRLD Restaurant Week.
Why do they work so hard for this organization?
Because this is their hobby! That is what they love
to do. They continually contribute their time and
talents towards keeping the Chapter strong and
alive. It may sound like they have a smooth
running machine but all this hard work and energy
took years to create. They searched in their local
communities for members that had a desire and
interest in AIWF and they looked for people that
would positively contribute to the organization.
This is valuable information if any of your chapters
that are having a hard time finding dedicated
members or having a hard time planning events.
People are always interested in helping out
organizations, it’s just your job to go out and find
them.
Debbie McKeever, Chapter Chairman of
Dallas/Ft. Worth said, “We consider our chapter a
community within a community and as far as we
are concerned, there can’t be enough of us.” If
you are ever in Dallas, look them up and watch
out! They might just convince you to stay and be
a member.
As all of this may sound really exciting you may
wonder, how does all of this happen? It is
currently taking a Chapter Board of 23 members
that are great at organization and planning. They
have timelines and processes for most everything.
It takes a great team of people including a full
program committee of approximately 20 people
and many more wonderful dedicated volunteers
that love AIWF and believe in its mission.
The AIWF D/FW Chapter Annual Caesar Salad Competition.
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SAVOR THIS • SEPTEMBER 2009
AIWF.ORG
DAYS OF TASTE®
In this age of fast and frozen foods, we want to
teach school children about real food-where it is
grown and how it is produced-so they can
develop an understanding and appreciation of
how good, fresh food is supposed to taste.
—Julia Child
In a society where more than twenty percent of
the population is officially classified: “obese”, a
program designed to teach school children the
values of good nutrition and about the sources of
the foods they eat should seem to be a logical
part of our public education curriculum. But aside
from loosely coordinated courses such as Home
Economics and cooking classes in the public
schools of many states, The American Institute of
Wine & Food is one of a few conducting such a
program on a national level. The AIWF program is
aptly named Days of Taste®.
Sponsored by The AIWF since 1994, local
chapters across the U.S. join with chefs, farmers,
teachers and parents to collaborate in bringing
food exploration to elementary school classrooms
in communities across the nation. The discoverybased program teaches children where produce
is grown, offers the opportunity to compare
various taste sensations and flavors through
sampling, and allows the children to create a
healthy and tasty dish with the guidance of chefs
and food professionals. Our focus and main
objectives are to build a food and nutrition
vocabulary, understand that locally grown
ingredients are the freshest, and gain the
experience to contrast flavors and develop taste
memories.
Each chapter develops its own unique program,
but they all share the common thread of
encouraging children to appreciate the taste of
good, fresh, local food. The education and
AIWF.ORG
experiences gained from this program will remain
with them into adulthood. This is vital for the
future of our nation’s children, for our
organization, and for preparing better adult
consumers. We’re not just nourishing our youth –
we’re nurturing The AIWF members and leaders
of tomorrow. For more information or to donate
to The AIWF’s Days of Taste® programs, please
contact the National Days of Taste® Chair Riva
Eichner Kahn at [email protected]
Days of Taste® Dallas
By Robin Plotkin,
D/FW Chapter Days of Taste® Chair
To think that the same exact recipe-created 4
times a week, 4 weeks out the year for over 10
years-would yield such tremendously different
results every single time is baffling to some. To the
volunteers who spend their time with the Days of
Taste® program of the Dallas/Ft. Worth chapter of
AIWF, its what the kids sign up for-year after year
after year. To the kids who participate in the
Dallas/Ft.
Worth
chapter of Days of
Taste®, it’s all in a
morning’s work. And,
like
any
good
culinarian, the kids
want to offer you
their best product.
SAVOR THIS • SEPTEMBER 2009
11
The recipe is a part of the Dallas Days of Taste®
Program. Kids made Harvest Salad with whole
wheat pasta with farmer’s market fresh veggies
and a low fat buttermilk salad dressing, fruit
salads, green salads, homemade bread and skim
milk. Because they are allowed to self select the
ingredients that go into the salads, they come out
tasting different each and every time. This is
something that the program encourages, says
Robin Plotkin, a registered dietitian and the
Dallas/Ft. Worth Days of Taste® Program Director.
“The more the kids have the chance to create
their own food, the more enthusiasm and sense
of pride they have for what they have created. We
literally see their self esteem rise from the time
they walk in the door to the time they leave.”
partner with the program, consistently provides
her services, along with 10-20 staff members from
the Gaylord to act as volunteers for the day at the
market. She leads them through an investigation
of the taste buds using her experiences as a chef
and as someone who respects food. Teaching the
kids to look, listen, smell and taste the food is a
unique experience for the majority of these kids.
Bondy says “Seeing the light bulb go off when
they actually ‘taste’ salty, sweet, bitter and sour
is reason enough to work with this program”. Ms.
Maner is one of those volunteers and she
provides a unique perspective on flavor and taste
to the children by providing them with their own
basil plants to plant and bring home for their
families to enjoy. Because fresh herbs are an
ingredient in the Harvest Salad that the children
make at the market, the take home message is
loud and clear. Fat, salt and sugar are not needed
to create flavor. Think about using fresh basil to
create flavor and wake up the taste buds!
The Dallas/Ft. Worth program runs for 8 days in
the spring and the fall. Over 250 volunteers are
utilized throughout the program. For more
information about the program, please contact
Robin Plotkin at [email protected] or go to
www.aiwf.org/dallasftworth.
The chefs. The growers. The producers. The
dietitians. The teachers. The sponsors and
supporters. The school officials and last but not
least, the kids are the components that create the
Days of Taste® program. Held at the Dallas
Farmer’s Market, the Dallas program teaches 800
Dallas Independent School District kids per year
about how food gets from the farm to the table.
Chef Joanne Bondy of the Gaylord Texan Resort
and Hotel partnered with Ann Maner, a
horticulturist also from the Gaylord Texan to teach
the 4th and 5th graders about taste buds, flavor,
cooking, and more. Chef Bondy, a long time
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SAVOR THIS • SEPTEMBER 2009
AIWF.ORG
CHAPTER EVENTS
SEPTEMBER
12
For more information on chapter events, please click “Local Chapters” at www.aiwf.org.
Baltimore – Black Ankle Winery
Kansas City – Pinot Wine Dinner at Café
Sebastienne
16 San Diego – An Evening with Frank Bruni,
Restaurant Critic , New York TImes
Santa Barbara – Annual Picnic 5-8pm,
(members & guests)
21 Baltimore – Meet Cheftestant Jesse Sandlin,
(members & guests)
Dallas/Ft. Worth – Reception & Days of Taste®
Fundraiser Dinner at Local, 6:30pm
Wichita – Zoobilee
13
Orange County – Sol Cucina, 6pm,
(members & guests)
25
Northern California – 8th Annual Slurp n’Burp
Oysters, 4pm, (members & guests)
Wichita – Old Cowtown Wine Mosey
14
15
Atlanta – French Wine Seminar & Tasting
Tutorial, 6:30pm
San Diego – Exploring Noble Red Varietals
26
Northern California – Dinner with authorFrank Bruni, 6:30pm, (members & guests)
Chicago – Tour of Rick Bayless’ Garden &
Lunch at Frontera Grill
New York – Hidden and Cheap Eating in
Manhattan
Colorado – A late Summer Evening at the
Squeaky Bean
27
New York – Got Cognac? An Evening with
Pierre Ferrand Artisanal Cognac
Kansas City – Greater Kansas City Chefs Assn.
Culinary Benefit Dinner
28
Milwaukee – Chez Jacques, 6-9:30pm
SAN DIEGO BAY WINE & FOOD FESTIVAL
November 18 - 22, 2009
An action packed week of festivities for your inner foodie and wine lover!
AIWF Members receive a 15% discount on tickets to Reserve & New
Release Tasting, Grand Event VIP, Grand Event General Admission, Grand
Event Early Entry, All Classes and Wine Rave.
You won't want to miss the five-day wine and food extravaganza in sunny
California featuring 170 world-class wineries and spirit producers, 70 of
San Diego’s award-winning fine dining restaurants, gourmet foods,
celebrity chefs, wine dinners, cooking classes, wine tasting classes, reserve
tasting with silent auction to benefit AIWF culinary and enology
scholarships, Grand Tasting, and The AIWF Celebrity Chef Scholarship
Luncheon and Live Auction. See you in sunny California! Visit the festival
website at www.worldofwineevenfts.com for full event details!
Log onto The AIWF Member Home page for your AIWF discount code. Please enter this code on the
“Buy Tickets” page where it says Passcode/Promotional Code when ordering tickets at
www.worldofwineevents.com.
San Diego AIWF also wants to assist and welcome you.
Let us know if you are coming by emailing
[email protected] or call 619 297-0951.
AIWF.ORG
SAVOR THIS • SEPTEMBER 2009
13
BEER/FOOD PAIRING: A PRIMER
By Christopher Staten, DRAFT Magazine
Chef Todd Ginsberg, formerly of TAP, an
Atlanta gastropub, and current executive chef
at sister restaurant TROIS, has been pairing
beer with food professionally since 2003. No
stranger to a gastropub kitchen – he still helps
TAP’s team of chefs devise beer pairings –
Chef Ginsberg lays down the basics of how to
pair your favorite drink and entrée.
Most difficult to pair?
When dining out, do you pick the beer or
entrée first?
I’d probably choose the beer first, because
that’s a variable that you can take out of the
equation. You’ll know the beer, whereas
maybe you don’t know a certain dish or the
spice level of it. There are a lot of variables you
don’t know about what you’re going to eat.
The best way to approach a pairing?
I want fatty foods with beer, I want spicy foods
with beer, and I want salty foods with beer.
A lot of this leans toward a clean, crisp beer
for me.
Your favorite pairing?
I take these Georgia fresh peaches that are
really, really ripe and roll them in a countrycured ham. Hitachino’s Nest White Ale has a
lot of acidity to it and a lot of lemon notes that
really complement the peaches, and the
smokiness of the ham really brings everything
together.
Most versatile beer?
Light, crisp, clean beers along the line of
pilsners. You can go in almost any direction,
whether it be Thai food, Indian, Chinese, or a
pancake with applesauce and sour cream.
14
SAVOR THIS • SEPTEMBER 2009
I have a hard time pairing porters that are
bitter. There’re just not a whole lot of things
you can do with that except try to kind of
overpower the beer with the food.
Is there a wrong way to do it?
The only wrong thing you can do is to not try
it. You’ve got to give it a shot; try an off-thewall pairing with a certain beer you want to try
-- you have to do it at least once. Wine can be
a bit pretentious, whereas beer... it’s beer. It’s
something the common person can relate to
and feel at home with. And if you screw up a
dinner, it only costs you a few bucks as
opposed to 40 or 50 dollars. It’s a lot more
approachable.
DRAFT Magazine is the foremost authority in
the world of craft beer and we bring you the
best in beer. Exploring the Top Beers with
Reviews, Food Pairings, 200 Best Bars, Travel to
Beer Towns, Gear, Sports, the Beer Drinker's
Lifestyle, and more!!!
Draft Magazine is extending AIWF Members an
exclusive offer of 58% off newsstand price for a
one year subscription. To take advantage of this
offer and other AIWF member benefits,
members can login at www.aiwf.org.
AIWF.ORG
AIWF MEMBER BENEFITS
Here you will find information on special benefits you receive for being a member of AIWF. An
overview listing of all our benefits with links to description pages can be found on The AIWF
Member Home page by logging in at www.aiwf.org. For assistance with member login, please
contact AIWF National at (800) 274-2493 or email: [email protected] The following are structured
for The AIWF Member, and can only be obtained by a person with a current membership.
Some of the philanthropic benefits:
• Days of Taste® – The benefit of being part of a National Institute whose mission is to reach out to
thousands of children each year. Our focus and main objectives are to build a food and nutrition
vocabulary, understand that locally grown ingredients are the freshest, and gain the experience to
contrast flavors and develop taste memories.
• Scholarships – AIWF awarded more than $110,000 in culinary and enology scholarships in 2008 to
students in full-time or continuing education accredited programs.
Additionally, AIWF members will receive discounts on the following products and services:
• Magazine Subscriptions: Save up to 50% on subscriptions to the following publications by using the
subscription order form: Appellation, Architectural Digest, Bon Appétit, Condé Nast Traveler, Cook's Illustrated, Draft Magazine,
Gourmet, Home, Petit Propos Culinaires, Restaurant Wine, Santé, Saveur, Shields Hood's Wine Notes, Travel & Leisure, Guide to Cooking
Schools, The Wine Advocate, Wine Spectator, Gastronomica and Santé, The Magazine for Restaurant Professionals.
• Avis Rental Car Discount
• Open or renew an AIWF MasterCard account and MBNA will make a donation The AIWF!
• Event discounts on Harvest: Farm-to-Table (Carmel, CA) and San Diego Wine & Food Festival
• KitchenAid’s VIP Program for AIWF Membership – The program offers special pricing on an
unprecedented selection of KitchenAid products. You may choose from a variety of KitchenAid
countertop appliances, cookware, bakeware, culinary tools and gadgets at a significant savings year
round. Shopping is easy through our on-line password protected AIWF VIP on-line store.
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AIWF.ORG
SAVOR THIS • SEPTEMBER 2009
15
To learn more about The American Institute of Wine & Food
or to join our Organization, please visit www.aiwf.org
(831) 250-7739 • (800) 274-2493 toll-free • [email protected]
26364 Carmel Rancho Lane, Suite 201, Carmel, CA 93923