unit outline - Melbourne High School

Year 10 English: Context / Theme Study
BANNED BOOKS
In this unit, students’ reading, viewing, writing, language and literacy skills are informed by their study of the
Context. They are required to study at least one film and to read widely – print, non-print and multimodal texts –
that explore ideas and arguments associated with the selected Context.
Through their reading and exploration of the Context, students will continue to develop and consolidate their
learning in English: (1) knowing about English language; (2) understanding, appreciating, responding to, analysing
and creating literature; (3) expanding their repertoire of literacy in English usage. These are undertaken through the
processes of listening, speaking, reading, viewing and writing.
Students will read and view the selected film and other texts in order to identify, discuss and analyse ideas and
arguments associated with the selected Context. They will reflect on the ideas and arguments suggested by these
texts and explore the relationship between purpose, form, audience and language, and examine the choices made
by authors in order to construct meaning.
Through their examination of the effects of form, purpose, audience and context on the authors’ choice of structure
and language, students will draw on the knowledge gained from this study to create their own imaginative narrative
and a comparative essay in a process which includes planning, reviewing and editing.
Students will write for specified audiences and purposes and draw on their experience of exploring texts to explain
their own decisions about form, purpose, language, audience and context.
For authentication purposes, planning, drafting and re-writing are mainly undertaken mainly in class time and
developed throughout the semester.
Assessment Task: Writing – Creating and Presenting
From the list of prompts, students are to choose two for the creation of two original texts with an approximate
length of 800 words per piece of writing:
1. One imaginative narrative created in an appropriate form for a specific purpose and audience.
2. One comparative essay that argues through a position, drawing appropriately on the set film text and one or
more other texts to illustrate and support the developing point of view through comparative analysis of the texts.
For each text, students are required to compose a written explanation of decisions made in the writing process
and how these demonstrate understanding of the Context and the text(s). Approximate length per written
explanation is 150 – 200 words.
Prompts for Comparative Essay and Creative Narrative Writing
1.
Censorship is always wrong.
2.
There are times where it’s not in the public interest to know everything.
3.
Governments should never seek to control our consumption of art.
4.
It is the role of literature to expose the forces behind our society.
5.
Who should assume responsibility for protecting us from undesirable material?
6.
There will always be cultural justifications for censorship.
7.
Censorship is a necessary evil.
8.
Art is always dangerous.
9.
Censorship reveals a lot about a society’s values and morals.
10. Everything in life in censored in some way, by someone.
11. There is a difference between what we can see and what we can read.
12. We should respect the right of each nation to determine their artistic freedoms.
(Year 10 English Context Electives. © 2014 English Faculty Melbourne High School. Up-dated 2015)
1
READING AND VIEWING
Content Descriptions
Language
Text structure and organisation
Compare the purposes, text structures
and language features of traditional and
contemporary texts in different media
Text structure and organisation
Evaluate the impact on audiences of
different choices in the representation of
still and moving images
Language for interaction
Understand that people’s evaluations of
texts are influenced by their value
systems, the context and the purpose and
mode of communication
Literature
Literature and context
Compare and evaluate a range of
representations of individuals and groups
in different historical, social and cultural
contexts
Responding to literature
Analyse and explain how text structures,
language features and visual features of
texts and the context in which texts are
experienced may influence audience
response
Examining literature
Identify, explain and discuss how narrative
viewpoint, structure, characterisation and
devices including analogy and satire
shape different interpretations and
responses to a text
Examining literature
Analyse and evaluate text structures and
language features of literary texts and
make relevant thematic and intertextual
connections with other texts
Examining literature
Compare and evaluate how ‘voice’ as a
literary device can be used in a range of
different types of texts such as poetry to
evoke particular emotional responses
Responding to literature
Evaluate the social, moral and ethical
positions represented in texts
Literacy
Texts in context
Analyse and evaluate how people,
cultures, places, events, objects and
concepts are represented in texts,
including media texts, through language,
structural and/or visual choices
Interpreting, analysing, evaluating
Identify and analyse implicit or explicit
values, beliefs and assumptions in texts
and how these are influenced by purposes
and likely audiences
Interpreting, analysing, evaluating
Choose a reading technique and reading
path appropriate for the type of text, to
retrieve and connect ideas within and
between texts
Interpreting, analysing, evaluating
Use comprehension strategies to compare
and contrast information within and
between texts, identifying and analysing
embedded perspectives, and evaluating
supporting evidence
WRITING
Content Descriptions
Language
Text structure and organisation
Understand how paragraphs and images
can be arranged for different purposes,
audiences, perspectives and stylistic
effects
Expressing and developing ideas
Analyse and evaluate the effectiveness of
a wide range of sentence and clause
structures as authors design and craft
texts
Expressing and developing ideas
Analyse how higher order concepts are
developed in complex texts through
language features including
nominalisation, clause combinations,
technicality and abstraction
Expressing and developing ideas
Refine vocabulary choices to discriminate
between shades of meaning, with
deliberate attention to the effect on
audiences
Expressing and developing ideas
Understand how to use knowledge of the
spelling system to spell unusual and
technical words accurately, for example
those based on uncommon Greek and
Latin roots
Text structure and organisation
Understand conventions for citing others,
and how to reference these in different
ways
Literature
Creating literature
Create literary texts that reflect an
emerging sense of personal style and
evaluate the effectiveness of these texts
Creating literature
Create literary texts with a sustained
‘voice’, selecting and adapting appropriate
text structures, literary devices, language,
auditory and visual structures and
features for a specific purpose and
intended audience
Creating literature
Create imaginative texts that make
relevant thematic and intertextual
connections with other texts
Literacy
Creating texts
Create sustained texts, including texts that
combine specific digital or media content,
for imaginative, informative, or persuasive
purposes that reflect upon challenging
and complex issues
SPEAKING & LISTENING
Content Descriptions
Language
Language variation and change
Understand that Standard Australian
English in its spoken and written forms
has a history of evolution and change and
continues to evolve
Language for interaction
Understand how language use can have
inclusive and exclusive social effects, and
can empower or disempower people
Literature
Responding to literature
Reflect on, extend, endorse or refute
others’ interpretations of and responses to
literature
Literacy
Interacting with others
Identify and explore the purposes and
effects of different text structures and
language features of spoken texts, and
use this knowledge to create purposeful
texts that inform, persuade and engage
Interacting with others
Use organisation patterns, voice and
language conventions to present a point
of view on a subject, speaking clearly,
coherently and with effect, using logic,
imagery and rhetorical devices to engage
audiences
Interacting with others
Plan, rehearse and deliver presentations,
selecting and sequencing appropriate
content and multimodal elements to
influence a course of action
Creating texts
Review, edit and refine students’ own and
others’ texts for control of content,
organisation, sentence structure,
vocabulary, and/or visual features to
achieve particular purposes and effects
Creating texts
Use a range of software, including word
processing programs, confidently, flexibly
and imaginatively to create, edit and
publish texts, considering the identified
purpose and the characteristics of the
user
For a thorough breakdown of the learning focus, strands, sub-strands and course standards, see pages 37– 46 in the
AusVELS Year 10 English Syllabus.
(Year 10 English Context Electives. © 2014 English Faculty Melbourne High School. Up-dated 2015)
2
YEAR 10 ENGLISH – SEMESTER 2
CONTEXT Writing Task 1: Imaginative Writing
Student's Name: ................................................................................................... Class: ………….
Criteria
Barely meets the task
Meets some of the task
Meets most of the task
Meets the task
Content, Ideas and
Engagement
Limited or little understanding
of basic arguments and/or
ideas relevant to the Context
and presented in selected
text(s).
Some understanding of basic
arguments and/or ideas
relevant to the Context and
presented in selected text(s).
Clear understanding of
arguments and/or ideas
relevant to the Context and
presented in selected text(s).
Sophisticated understanding of
complex ideas and arguments
relevant to the Context and
presented in selected text(s).
Some evidence of ability to
draw on these in the creation
of own text that shows some
evidence of originality and
imagination.
Demonstrated ability to draw
purposefully on these in the
creation of an imaginative text
that holds some interest for the
reader.
Demonstrated ability to draw
on and develop these
creatively and imaginatively in
a highly original text that
engages the reader.
Knowledge and
understanding of the ideas
and arguments relating to
the Context and presented
in the selected text(s) to
produce an original
imaginative text that
engages readers
Little evidence of an ability to
draw on these in the creation
of own text that lacks
originality, flair and
imagination.
1–4
marks
Structure, Coherence
and Form
Coherent linking of ideas
and information
Effective use of narrative
techniques shaped
skilfully and coherently.
5–6
marks
7– 8
marks
Lacks coherent organisation
and sequential ordering of
ideas and information.
Ideas and information are
selected and ordered
adequately.
Limited or no use of narrative
techniques.
Adequate use of narrative
techniques.
Limited awareness of the form
and its stylistic features.
Adequate understanding of the
form and its stylistic features.
Achieves a well ordered text,
developing interesting ideas
Expression and
Language Mechanics
Basic expression; simple
vocabulary and sentences.
Expressiveness and
fluency.
Sentences lack structure;
appear incomplete or rambling
and rarely vary in length.
Limited vocabulary that does
not communicate strongly.
Jargon or clichés may be
present and detract from the
meaning.
Accurate control of
language mechanics.
Apt choice of vocabulary.
HD2
18 – 17
Above the standard
10.5
D1
16 – 15
D2
14 – 13
At the standard
10
Skilful use of narrative
techniques shaped coherently.
Some clear awareness of the
form with some clear attempt
at using the appropriate
stylistic features.
3
marks
Shapes content in a
recognisable form, confidently
adopting its stylistic features
appropriately.
4
marks
5
marks
Adequate expression of ideas;
some variation in vocabulary
and sentences.
Accurate expression of ideas;
challenging vocabulary and
complex sentences.
Sophisticated writing style;
precise language is used
expressively and fluently.
Most sentences are wellconstructed but have a similar
length. Includes words that
communicate clearly, but the
language lacks variety, punch
or flair.
Most sentences are wellconstructed with varied length.
Includes wide and varied
vocabulary, but occasionally
the words are used
inaccurately or seem
overdone.
All sentences are wellconstructed with varied length.
Confident use of broad, apt
and varied vocabulary.
1–2
marks
HD1
20 – 19
Develops a coherent and
logically shaped and sustained
text.
Uses and shapes narrative
techniques appropriately.
Understanding of form
and its stylistic features
1–2
marks
9 – 10
marks
3
marks
C1
12 – 11
C2
10 – 9
Below the standard
9.5
NA
• Task not undertaken
• Task not submitted or incomplete
4
marks
S1
8–7
S2
6– 5
Well below the standard
9
5
marks
L1
4
L2
3
9
BS
2–1
8.5
NA *
• Late submission
• Task redeemed
(Year 10 English Context Electives. © 2014 English Faculty Melbourne High School. Up-dated 2015)
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YEAR 10 ENGLISH – SEMESTER 2
CONTEXT Writing Task 2: Comparative Essay
Student's Name: ................................................................................................... Class: ………….
Criteria
Barely meets the task
Meets some of the task
Meets most of the task
Meets the task
Content
Limited or little understanding of
basic arguments and/or ideas
relevant to the Context and
presented in selected texts.
Some understanding of basic
arguments and/or ideas relevant
to the Context and presented in
selected texts.
Clear understanding of
arguments and/or ideas relevant
to the Context and presented in
selected texts.
Sophisticated understanding of
complex ideas and arguments
relevant to the Context and
presented in selected texts.
Demonstrates a limited or basic
knowledge of the issues in the
topic and the texts.
Demonstrates adequate
knowledge of the issues in the
topic and the texts.
Demonstrates some clear
knowledge of the issues in the
topic.
Demonstrates a perceptive
exploration of the issues in the
topic.
Draws on some textual evidence
or some aspects of the texts and
makes some basic connection
with the topic.
Selects some appropriate textual
evidence to support a developed
response. May treat texts
disproportionately or unevenly.
A close reading of two or more
texts is demonstrated through
comparative discussion of
selected textual evidence.
A close and perceptive reading
of two or more texts is
demonstrated through careful
selection and a sophisticated
comparative analysis of textual
evidence.
Knowledge and
understanding of the ideas
and arguments relating to
the Context and presented
in the selected texts
Understanding of the topic
and relevance of response
Appropriate selection and
comparative analysis of
relevant textual detail from
two set texts.
1–4
marks
Structure and coherence
Effectiveness of
introduction, main body and
conclusion.
Effective ordering of ideas
into developed and
substantiated paragraphs
supported by comparative
evidence from two texts
Coherent linking of ideas
and information.
Introduction lacks detail and
exploration of topic.
Topic sentences are lacking or
not clearly stated; offers some
support for its ideas which are
largely underdeveloped.
Evidence from two texts is very
thin and/or largely lacking; little
or no attempt to compare or
contrast evidence.
Lacks connections between
paragraphs and/or sentences
and quotations. Lacks coherent
organisation and sequential
ordering of ideas.
Conclusion is absent or lacks
conviction.
5–6
marks
Introduction is present but does
not fully explore the topic or the
make the position clear.
Topic sentences may not be
clearly evident or relate directly
to the topic; ideas tend to lack
development.
Evidence from two texts is not
adequately compared or
contrasted and often not used
well to fully illustrate the
argument.
Relevant use of
metalanguage and apt
choice of vocabulary.
Accurate control of
grammar and punctuation.
Expressiveness and
fluency.
Introduction engages with all
parts of the topic and provides a
convincing and controlled
position.
Topic sentences state the main
issues which are developed in
some detail.
Topic sentences identify and
explore the main issues for
discussion. Paragraphs are
well-controlled with substantiated
and developed arguments.
Arguments are supported with
textual evidence from two texts
with some evidence of
comparative analysis.
Appropriate evidence from two
texts are compared and
contrasted to support and
illustrate each main argument.
Coherent paragraphs, sentences
and quotations are linked and
ideas logically sequenced and
structured.
Conclusion clearly restates the
position of the argument.
Conclusion is strong and
effectively restates the position
of the argument.
3
marks
4
marks
5
marks
Simple written expression and
limited, perhaps basic, or no use
of relevant metalanguage.
Adequate written expression and
use of some relevant
metalanguage.
Expressive and fluent writing and
appropriate use of relevant
metalanguage.
Highly expressive and fluent
writing and highly appropriate
use of relevant metalanguage.
Sentences lack structure; appear
incomplete or rambling and
rarely vary in length. Uses a
limited vocabulary that does not
communicate strongly. Jargon or
clichés may be present and
detract from the meaning.
Most sentences are wellconstructed with some length
variation. Uses relevant
vocabulary to express ideas.
Some tense inconsistency.
Most sentences are wellconstructed with varied length.
Uses wide and varied
vocabulary, but occasionally the
words are either ‘commonplace’,
used inaccurately, or seem
overdone. Consistent use of
present tense.
All sentences are wellconstructed with varied length.
Uses accurate, wide and varied
vocabulary. Consistent use of
present tense.
HD2
18 – 17
Above the standard
10.5
Introduction covers the topic and
provides a clear position.
Conclusion leaves a sense of
incompleteness.
1–2
marks
HD1
20 – 19
9 – 10
marks
Paragraphs, sentences and
quotations are clearly linked with
clear sequencing and structure
of ideas.
Some clear linking of
paragraphs, sentences and
quotations; some adequate
sequencing and ordering of
ideas.
1–2
marks
Expression and language
mechanics
7–8
marks
D1
16 – 15
3
marks
D2
14 – 13
At the standard
10
C1
12 – 11
C2
10 – 9
Below the standard
9.5
NA
• Task not undertaken
• Task not submitted or incomplete
4
marks
S1
8–7
S2
6– 5
Well below the standard
9
5
marks
L1
4
L2
3
9
BS
2–1
8.5
NA *
• Late submission
• Task redeemed
(Year 10 English Context Electives. © 2014 English Faculty Melbourne High School. Up-dated 2015)
4
This unit is currently under development by the course writing team: Anne-Marie Brownhill (Leader), Joan
Morgan & June Johnstone.
The Context
BANNED BOOKS
What is about certain texts that inspire controversy? What aspects of our humanity are we so frightened of that we
would ban a book or film? Can literature ever cross lines that ought not be crossed? This unit will look at works of
literature that have been banned at certain times and in certain countries and explore what it is about these novels
that makes them inspire such strong, and often negative, responses.
Essential Question
Is there every any justification for the censorship of literature in society?
Key Questions
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Is censorship ever acceptable/understandable?
Can literature cross lines that ought not to be crossed?
Is it the job of art to expose the problems with and darker side of human nature?
Is art always a form of political/historical/social contexts and expression?
Is there a time and place for censorship?
When in history has literature been banned?
Why has literature been banned?
Who decides what is acceptable and unacceptable for public consumption?
Should literature have a rating system as films and games do?
Should literature and art be exempt from censorship and ratings?
Why is a book different to a film in that regard?
What books have been banned in the past and why?
Are there any books currently banned in the world?
Does political correctness excuse revisions and censorship of classics such as Huckleberry Finn?
Is there a difference between what we can read and what we can see?
With regards to the media what is and is not in the public interest?
General Questions
A range of activities that provide stimulus for inquiry into and exploration of the
Context
Resources
Research task – students work in groups to research what books are currently
banned around the world and where these books are banned. They will focus on
cultural significance of censorship and on the key themes which present problems
regarding censorship.
General Google search will
suffice
Book from Melb Uni (Blair)
IPad for research and
presentation
What theme, issues or ideas in texts lead to censorship and what is the
historical/socio-political context for this?
Supplementary texts – Wilfred
Owen poetry
Wikileaks articles
Pussy Riot articles
Excerpts from Reading Lolita
in Tehran
Writing a persuasive piece on the subject of censorship
Class debate on issues around censorship
(Year 10 English Context Electives. © 2014 English Faculty Melbourne High School)
5
Core Text: Fahrenheit 451
Analysing & Exploring the Text
1. Questions on the text
1. How does Faber define the value of books? Does his definition of “quality” apply to media other than printed
books? Do you think his definitions are accurate or not? Explain.
2. Discuss Montag’s relationship with Mildred. Is this a typical marital relationship in their culture? Discuss the role
of family in the characters’ lives, particularly in relation to the TV parlor “families” and their nature and function.
3. Describe Clarisse’s effect on Montag and her function in the novel. How and why does she change him? Why
does she vanish from the novel?
4. Discuss the use of quotations from literature in Fahrenheit 451. Which works are quoted and to what effect? Pay
specific attention to “Dover Beach,” the Bible, and quotes from Shakespeare.
5. Read the poem “Dover Beach,” by Matthew Arnold. In what ways is it significant that Montag reads this
particular poem to Mildred and her friends?
6. Why do you think Beatty hates books?
7. How plausible is the future envisioned in this novel? Specifically, do you think the author provides a convincing
account of how censorship became so rampant in this society?
2. Activities
Resources
CONTEXT – research task, class discussion about censorship and
IPad brainstorm, wordcloud, read Owen poetry and record themselves
reading and analysing as per IPad apps ‘Sonnets’ and ‘The
Wasteland’, watch and study film focussing on racial issues and
historical context, write creative task as Boo Radley, Scout, Gem, Tom
etc. Excerpts from Catcher in the Rye, general discussion on
propaganda.
http://www.poemhunter.com/i/ebooks/pdf/
wilfred_owen_2004_9.pdf
TEXT RESPONSE – character profiles, author background research,
include Bradbury short stories for style, consider whether they think
censorship will become a problem in the future, read analyses of the
novel and critical commentaries.
Film Fahrenheit 451
Bradbury short stories
ANALYSIS – Articles on wikileaks, Pussy Riot, Piss Christ, Bill
Henson, Salman Rushdie (at teacher’s discretion).
Library articles and resources on issues
as listed
Book – Famous Speeches
List of banned books
Possible excursions – Melbourne Uni Banned Books
NGV – presentation on banned artworks
3. Analytical Context Essay Topics
Fahrenheit 451
1. How plausible is the future envisioned in this novel? Specifically, do you think the author provides a convincing
account of how censorship became so rampant in this society?
2. Analyze Captain Beatty. Is he truly an idealogue in support of censorship or is he hiding an allegiance to
freedom of expression?
3. Discuss the complexities of Bradbury's message. Is he against all forms of censorship?
4. What aspects of this society does Bradbury appear to detest the most?
(Year 10 English Context Electives. © 2014 English Faculty Melbourne High School)
6
Supplementary Texts – Wider Reading
Activities & Tasks (i.e. questions, tasks, scenarios, etc.)
Resources
Film Text 1
To Kill A Mockingbird
Other questions as per online unit:
http://resources.mhs.vic.edu.au/mockingbird/
1. Why was this novel/film so provocative?
2. What are the key themes in this novel which an audience at
the time would have found confronting?
3. Discuss the director’s portrayal of the black community and the
characters of Calpurnia and Tom Robinson. Are they realistic
or idealised?
4. If you were to create a modern film adaptation of the novel
what decisions would you make? How do think modern
audiences would respond to the racial issues presented?
5. Discuss why the novel and film were banned.
6. Which of the novel’s concerns would have contributed to the
censorship of the text?
Film Text 2
Flowers for Algernon
Not Without My Daughter
The Crucible
Literature: novels, plays, poetry, short stories
Novels – Fahrenheit 451,Catcher in the Rye, Animal Farm,
Metamorphoses, Uncle Tom’s Cabin
Plays – The Crucible, Spring Awakening, Lysistrata
Poetry – Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon
‘Dulce Et Decorum Est’, ‘Anthem for Doomed
Youth’
Short stories – ‘The Fireman’, by Ray Bradbury; ‘Flowers for
Algernon’ by Daniel Keyes
Media Texts (articles from newspapers, magazines, etc.)
Articles on Wikileaks
Articles on Pussy Riot
Articles on Salman Rushdie
Discuss the news in general – what is of public interest?
Search school library
Search school library
Search school library
Search school library
Multimodal Texts (e.g. video clips, blogs, web, graphics, cartoons,
documentaries, current affairs etc.)
Wikipedia – List of books banned by Governments
Wikipedia
Journalists fired by Fox News
YouTube – Funny Sesame Street Unnecessary Censorship?
List of Australian censorship
Banned Music: 21 Artists Censors Tried to Silence
Art Works (provide URLs) (per row = a text; add rows as required)
Piss Christ
Bill Henson’s photography
Guernica – Picasso
(Year 10 English Context Electives. © 2014 English Faculty Melbourne High School)
7
Creating and Presenting
Prompts for Comparative Essay and Creative Narrative Writing
13. Censorship is always wrong.
14. There are times where it’s not in the public interest to know everything.
15. Governments should never seek to control our consumption of art.
16. It is the role of literature to expose the forces behind our society.
17. Who should assume responsibility for protecting us from undesirable material?
18. There will always be cultural justifications for censorship.
19. Censorship is a necessary evil.
20. Art is always dangerous.
21. Censorship reveals a lot about a society’s values and morals.
22. Everything in life in censored in some way, by someone.
23. There is a difference between what we can see and what we can read.
24. We should respect the right of each nation to determine their artistic freedoms.
Scenarios (prompts with specified purpose, audience and form)
Fahrenheit 451
1.
Write a speech by – or an interview with – Ray Bradbury on the issue of censorship both in his novel and in
society today.
2.
Write a letter as the woman upstairs with the books explaining why you would rather burn with your books than
live in this society anymore.
3.
Write a discussion between members of the advisory board whose job it is to decide whether or not Fahrenheit
451 should be banned.
Enrichment / Extension: Extended Research Project
1. Research the legion of decency and film censorship in America.
2. Research books that are currently banned in Australia.
3. Research one author whose works have been banned.
4. Research the origins of censorship and historical movements where censorship has occurred.
5. Research Nazi propaganda and the famous incidents of book burning.
6. Choose two countries and compare the different issues pertaining to censorship.
7. Read through the attached list of “banned books”.
(a) How many books do you recognise or know about? List these.
(b) Which of these books have you read? List these.
(c) Of these books, and what you know about them, do you think they should have been banned? Justify your
opinion.
8. Choose at least one book from each category, Find out about the book – read a synopsis of it or better still, read
the book or skim through it. Do you think these books should be banned? Justify your opinion.
(Year 10 English Context Electives. © 2014 English Faculty Melbourne High School)
8