Document 81496

LTHIER
HEA
LIF
E
LI
A
LE!
TY
S
E
V
L
Y
FI
EL
T.
EAT W
&
ST
AY
P H Y SIC
AL
L
TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION
FITNESS MODULES:
BEING FIT: FUN AND FANTASTIC FOR YOU!
HOW LOW CAN YOU GO? TAKE THE SCREEN TIME CHALLENGE!
FOOD MODULES:
BUILDING HEALTHY EATING HABITS WITH THE FOOD GUIDE PYRAMID
STAMP OUT PORTION DISTORTION!
EATING FOR ENERGY!
FRUITS AND VEGGIES—GIMME 5!
FUN MODULES:
TAKE THE 10,000-STEP CHALLENGE!
LET’S GET COOKING!
KEEP YOUR BODY PARTS RUNNING RIGHT!
TUNING IN TO FOOD ADVERTISING AND MARKETING
FEELINGS MODULE:
BUILDING HEALTHY SELF-ESTEEM
FAMILY MODULES:
WHERE YOU LEAD, THEY WILL FOLLOW: A PARENT’S IMPORTANT JOB AS A ROLE MODEL
COMMUNICATING WITH KIDS
STAY CONNECTED VIA E-MAIL!
MEASURE YOUR SUCCESS
RESOURCES
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
The Kidnetic.com Leader’s Guide contains activity modules for teaching groups of 9- to 12-year-old kids
and their families about living a healthy lifestyle. The Leader’s Guide features modules that teach kids
about Fitness, Food, Fun and Feelings, and special Family modules directly involve parents in moving
the whole family toward better health. Materials found in the Stay Connected Via E-mail section help
you reinforce new habits via e-mail once the module series ends.
WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW BEFORE YOU BEGIN:
The modules can be used in the order they are
presented in the Leader’s Guide, as stand-alone
activities or in any order you wish.
these activities include topic talking points and
discussion questions, a group activity, a take-home
activity that involves parents and other family
members and a follow-up activity. Instructions and
handouts for teaching these activities are included.
The modules can be conducted in formal or informal
settings such as classroom settings or after-school
programs.
The two activity modules in the Family section
include instructions and handouts for parents, as
well as a sample note for you to send home
encouraging parents’ involvement in the activities.
The modules are designed for groups of kids within
the 9–12 age range.
Each module can range from 30 to 60 minutes in
length, but can be adapted to meet shorter or
longer time frames, as well as to smaller or larger
groups.
Other Leader’s Guide components include:
Measure Your Success—Helps you to evaluate
the impact of the Kidnetic.com modules.
Stay Connected Via E-Mail—Contains a sample
note to parents asking for an e-mail address so you
can follow up with information, tips and “words of
encouragement” after the activity series ends. This
section also contains sample follow-up e-mail
messages.
Each activity module in the Fitness, Food, Fun and
Feelings sections includes:
Module Goals—Let you know what kids should
learn from each module.
Quick Start Ideas—Learning activities that take
just a few minutes. You can conduct these activities
with minimal preparation in a variety of settings.
Activity Action Plan—A longer, more structured
learning activity plan that can be conducted in a
classroom or more formal group setting. Generally,
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
Resources—A list of Web sites to visit for more
information.
We’d love to hear your feedback on the Leader’s Guide.
Let us know how it’s working by sending us a note:
[email protected]
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
BEING FIT: FUN AND FANTASTIC FOR YOU
FITNESS
BEING FIT: FUN AND FANTASTIC FOR YOU
GOALS
Being fit and physically
active is important for
everyone, kids included.
The Quick Start Ideas
and Activity Action
Plan in this module
will help you:
To get kids moving, try some
of these fun outdoor and indoor
ideas:
Explain to kids how
exercise helps them
look good, feel good
and stay healthy.
OUTDOOR IDEAS:
1. Jump rope or play touch
football
2. Play kick ball, basketball,
soccer or softball
3. Set up relay races
4. Take an adventure hike
5. Play Frisbee®
6. Set up an obstacle course
with cones or chairs
7. Have a monkey bar hanging
contest to see who can hang
on the longest
INDOOR IDEAS:
1. Dance
2. Hold a hula-hoop contest
3. Stretch
4. Limbo dance
5. Play musical chairs
6. Play Chinese jump rope (See
instructions at the end of
this module)
7. Play Twister®
8. Play “catch” with soft foam
balls
For more ideas, refer to the
Fitness Bright Papers section
of Kidnetic.com/guide.
1
BEING FIT: FUN
& FANTASTIC
FOR YOU!
Raise kids’
awareness of how
much physical
activity they get.
Encourage kids to
think of ways to
become more
active.
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN
WHAT YOU NEED:
❑
❑
❑
Top 5 Reasons Why Exercise is Cool Bright Paper—review for
background information plus one copy for each child to take home
“My Top Moves” Activity Log—one copy for each child to take home
(Optional) Flip chart, board or paper to record kids’ ideas
WHAT TO DO:
Use the Talking Points/Discussion Questions below to explain the
benefits of exercise. Refer to the Top 5 Reasons Why Exercise is Cool
Bright Paper for additional background information. Then, proceed with the
Follow-Up Activity to “brainstorm” ideas for physical activity in a variety of
settings. Following the brainstorm, explain the Take-Home Activity.
TALKING POINTS/DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:
❑
Today, we’re going to talk about the top 5 reasons why exercise is cool!
Who can guess what some of them are?
Reason #1: Exercise makes you feel good. Why do you think that is? It helps
your body relax and feel better. It makes you breathe deeply and makes more
oxygen go to your brain and muscles, which makes you feel even better. Exercise
also makes you stronger so you’re better able to do things you like to do!
Reason #2: Exercise helps keep your weight healthy. How do you think it
does that? Exercise helps burn off the calories from the food you eat and
helps keep your weight where it should be. Without enough exercise, you
might gain too much weight.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FITNESS
BEING FIT: FUN AND FANTASTIC FOR YOU
2
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN (CONTINUED)
Get the group moving by
doing one of the Quick
Start Ideas in this module
or one of the ideas from
the brainstorm discussion.
Give each child a copy of
the “My Top Moves”
Activity Log. Explain how
to fill it out and ask them
to track their “moves” for
a specific number of days,
depending on how often
the group meets.
Give each child a copy of
the Top 5 Reasons Why
Exercise is Cool Bright
Paper. Ask them to read
it and talk about it at
home with their parents
or caregivers.
At the next meeting, ask
kids to share feedback
from their activity logs.
What were the most fun
activities you wrote in your
log? Which of these
activities could you do with
your family? With your
friends? By yourself? How
could you have been more
active? What new ideas
did you hear from others
today that you will try?
Have the group choose an
activity shared from
someone’s log and try it
together.
Reason #3: Exercise makes your heart happy. How do you think it does that?
The heart is the hardest-working muscle in the body. Its #1 job is to pump
blood all over your body.
Aerobic exercise is any activity that makes your heart beat faster and your
muscles use more oxygen. Who can name some examples of aerobic exercise?
Some examples are running, fast walking, jumping rope, swimming, basketball,
in-line skating, soccer and bike riding. We need to do aerobic exercise at least
two or three times a week for 20 to 30 minutes each time. The more you do it, the
longer you’ll be able to play hard at your favorite games without getting tired.
Reason #4: Exercise makes you stronger. How do you think it does that?
“Resistance” exercise makes your muscles stronger and sometimes larger.
As your muscles get stronger, you can do active things like riding your bike,
jumping rope or playing basketball for a longer time without getting tired.
Having stronger muscles in your arms, legs and torso (middle) also makes it less
likely that you’ll get hurt while you play because muscles protect the joints
where bones meet—this is where a lot of injuries happen. For stronger arm
muscles, try swimming, push-ups, pull-ups or hanging from the monkey bars. For
stronger leg muscles, try running, fast walking, in-line skating or bike riding.
Reason #5: Exercise makes you flexible. What does it mean to be flexible? It
means your body can bend and stretch easily. It also means you can play
harder without straining or spraining muscles. Tumbling, cheerleading,
gymnastics, swimming, yoga, karate, tae kwon do and other martial arts make
you more flexible. So will reaching for your toes, the sky or bending sideways.
The main thing is to move gently and stop when you feel the stretch.
❑
All in all, kids should total up 60 minutes of exercise every day. It’s easy
when you think about all of the fun ways you can get moving. And even
things like helping clean the house or raking the yard count, too!
FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITY:
Conduct a “brainstorm session” with the kids that includes the following
“thought starter” questions:
❑
❑
❑
Now we know why exercise is cool! Which reasons were new to you?
Which ones did you already know?
What are the most fun ways you get exercise?
What are fun ways to exercise outside when it’s hot? Outside when it’s
cold? Inside the house? With friends? On your own?
For physical activity ideas in these settings, refer to the following Fitness
Bright Papers at Kidnetic.com/guide: Cool Things to Do Outside When It’s
Hot and Sticky, Cool Things To Do Outside When It’s Cold, Get Moving in
Groups, What to Do When You Are Stuck at Home and How to Get
Moving and Have Fun When It’s Just You.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FITNESS
BEING FIT: FUN AND FANTASTIC FOR YOU
Keep track of all the ways you get moving! Write down stuff like walking around,
biking, skating, dancing, climbing, swimming, playing ball, doing active chores like
vacuuming or raking and anything else you do!
Then write down how long you did it (shoot for a total of 60 minutes each day) and how
you felt (for example, energetic or strong).
Day
How I Got Moving
How Long I Moved
How I Felt
My favorite ways to move: ___________________________________,
_______________________ and _________________________.
For more fun ways to get moving, go to www.kidnetic.com/guide.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
3
FITNESS
BEING FIT: FUN AND FANTASTIC FOR YOU
HOW TO PLAY
CHINESE JUMP ROPE
Chinese jump rope is nothing like traditional jump rope, but kids
love it anyway!
NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS: At least three kids
WHAT PLAYERS NEED: A Chinese jump rope (a loop of colored elastic) and a place to jump
HOW LONG IT TAKES: Five minutes to an hour
RULES OF THE GAME: To start the game, two players put the Chinese jump rope around their
ankles and stand a couple of feet apart. The third player goes first.
The object of the game is to complete a series of jumps and tricks without making a mistake. Each
time a player finishes a series of moves, the rope moves up. The rope starts around the players’
ankles, then moves up to their knees, then up to their waists. A player can’t stop between moves. If
a player lands on the rope when he/she is not supposed to, or doesn’t complete a jump, the player is
out and it’s the next player’s turn. The best thing about Chinese jump rope is that there are no
winners or losers—if a player successfully finishes his/her moves at the waist level, he/she must
stop and let the next player take a turn.
Here are the series of moves each jumper must complete:
Move 1: 2-4-6-8 The player must jump from side to side four times with his/her feet
straddling one side of the rope.
Move 2: IN-OUT The player must jump so that both feet are inside the rope. Then he/she
must jump so that both feet are outside of the rope with one foot on each side.
Move 3: IN-ON The player must jump so that both feet are inside the rope. Then he/she
must jump so that both feet land on top of the rope.
Move 4: CROSSOVERS To complete a crossover, the player must step outside the rope.
He/she should place his/her feet under one end and jump over the other end. Then he/she
must jump out of the rope all together. The player must do a crossover on both sides. Finally,
he/she must do a double crossover. Once again the player places his/her feet under one end
and jumps over the other end of the rope. Then, instead of jumping out, the player pivots
his/her left or right foot back and out (the rope should form a diamond shape around the
player’s ankles). Next, he/she jumps out of the diamond so that both feet land on either side of
the rope.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
4
FITNESS
BEING FIT: FUN AND FANTASTIC FOR YOU
5
Top 5 Reasons Why Exercise is Cool
REASON #1: Exercise Makes You Feel Good
Most people know what exercise is, but
do you know why exercise is so
important? It isn’t so you can look all
sweaty like people on TV commercials
for exercise equipment. And it isn’t so
you can have huge muscles to bust out
of your clothes like a superhero, either.
Exercising is a most excellent way to feel happy, whether you do it on
your own or with a group. If you’ve had a tough day at school, a fight
with your friend, or just feel kind of blue or stressed out, exercising can
help you relax and feel better. Plus, when you’re breathing deeply during
exercise and bringing more air into your lungs, your brain likes the extra
oxygen. And when you’re active and running around, sometimes it’s hard
to think about just what was bothering you.
Exercise is important because it keeps
people’s bodies—and minds—healthy.
Without exercise, we wouldn’t feel or
look very good. Actually, there are so
many reasons why exercise is good for
you, it’s time to get right into it and see
why it’s cool to be fit!
Exercise can make you feel better about yourself, too. When you are
stronger and better at doing things, you can feel pretty proud—whether
you scored the winning goal or Hula-Hooped for an hour straight!
REASON #2: Exercise Helps Keep Your Weight Healthy
Every time you eat food, your body does the same thing: it “eats” the
nutrients in the food as fuel. It burns these nutrients, or calories, to give
us energy. You need calories for all the stuff you do, like brushing your
teeth and breathing. So it’s important for kids to get all the calories they
need from the foods they eat.
But if the body isn’t able to use all the calories that are coming from
food, it stores them away as fat. Exercise helps keep your weight right
for your height by burning up extra calories. When you exercise, your
body uses that extra fuel to keep you going strong.
REASON #3: Exercise Makes Your Heart Happy
Your heart is the hardest-working muscle in your body. Its #1 job is to
pump blood through your body every day of your life! Since it can’t lift
weights to get stronger, it needs you to do aerobic exercise.
Aerobic is a fancy word for needing oxygen, and aerobic exercise is any
kind of activity that makes your muscles use oxygen. Aerobic exercise is
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FITNESS
BEING FIT: FUN AND FANTASTIC FOR YOU
Building up all different types of muscles is easy to
do. For awesome arms, try push-ups, pull-ups, tugof-war or twirling a baton. And don’t forget the
strength of the sea: rowing in a rowboat or canoe is
great for building strong arm muscles. For strong
leg muscles, try running, blading, skating and bike
riding. And for strong stomach muscles (these are
the muscles called “abs”—abdomen is a fancy
word for the area below your rib cage), try some
half sit-ups (with your knees bent and your feet on
the floor), bike riding or even swirling a Hula-Hoop
around your waist. Now that’s fun!
the kind you do over and over to keep bringing fresh
oxygen to all of your muscles. When you do aerobic
exercise and bring in that oxygen, your heart
becomes stronger (and even a tiny bit bigger!). The
number of blood cells in your blood increases, so
the blood can carry even more oxygen. The blood in
your body even moves more easily through the blood
vessels. All these things mean that your body works
better to keep you healthy, and you can play hard
without getting worn out.
It’s a good idea for kids to do some kind of aerobic
exercise two or three times a week, for 20 to 30
minutes at a time. Bring on the oxygen by
swimming, basketball, ice or roller hockey, jogging
(or walking fast), in-line skating, soccer, crosscountry skiing, biking and rowing. Even dancing,
skipping and jumping rope are aerobic activities.
REASON #5: Exercise Makes You Flexible
Can you touch your toes easily without yelling
"ouch"? If so, you’re pretty flexible, which means
you can bend and stretch your body without too
much trouble. But as people get older they tend to
get less flexible, so that’s why it’s important to be
active when you’re a kid—to stay flexible. Plus,
when you’re flexible, you can play harder without
having to worry about getting sprained and
strained muscles.
Try to move for 60 minutes every day. This can include
your favorite aerobic activities and other moves like
walking the dog or doing things around the house, like
vacuuming, sweeping and raking leaves. You can even
reach your 60-minute goal by moving for 10 minutes
at a time throughout the day. Go for it!
It’s easy to find things to do for good flexibility!
Tumbling and gymnastics are great ways to become
more flexible. And say “yes” to yoga. Don’t forget
dancing, especially ballet. And for fans of karate,
tae kwon do and other martial arts, you’re in luck:
these sports are great for flexibility, you’ll be
feeling fine and having fun!
REASON #4: Exercise Makes You Stronger
All the muscles in your body do a fine job when you
use them for easy stuff, like picking up a book or
walking down the stairs. But what about using
them for harder stuff, like taking long bike rides,
climbing a tree or carrying your backpack to class?
That’s where exercise comes in: it makes your
muscles get stronger and sometimes larger. As your
muscles get stronger, you can do more active things
for longer periods of time. And strong muscles also
help protect you from injuries when you play,
because they give better support to your joints
(where your bones meet).
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
6
Reviewed by the Kidnetic.com Scientific Advisory Panel, 2002
&
FAMILIES
HOW LOW CAN YOU GO? TAKE THE SCREEN TIME CHALLENGE!
HOW LOW CAN YOU GO? TAKE THE SCREEN TIME CHALLENGE!
GOALS
Too much time
spent on sedentary
activities may
increase kids’ risk
for being overweight.
The Quick Start
Ideas and Activity
Action Plan in this
module will help you:
FITNESS
1
HOW LOW CAN YOU GO? TAKE
THE SCREEN TIME CHALLENGE!
Increase kids’ awareness of the amount of
time they spend in sedentary “screen time”
activities such as watching TV, playing video
games or using the computer.
Explain why too much screen time may not be
healthy.
Encourage kids to replace some daily screen
time with physical activity.
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN
WHAT YOU NEED:
❑
Challenge kids to a “TV free”
day and ask them to report
back on what they did instead.
Have kids shout out zany
ways to get moving in front
of the TV during commercials
(e.g., hopping on one foot
doing jumping jacks). Try out
some ideas with the group.
If you have a computer
available, divide kids into
teams to compete for best
time in the Scavenger Hunt
or Fitness Challenge; both
can be found in The Kore.
You can play them online at
Kidnetic.com/guide.
Get them moving online! Ask
kids to log on to Kidnetic.com/
guide at home to try Fitness
Challenge, Scavenger Hunt,
Move Mixer, Betchacant
or a Wet Head Game.
❑
❑
❑
Setting Limits on Screen Time Bright Paper—review for
background information plus one copy for each child to take home
How Low Can You Go? Screen Time Challenge log—two copies for
each child to take home
(Optional) Flip chart, board or paper to record kids’ ideas
(Optional) Prize(s) such as a step counter, jump rope, ball or water bottle
WHAT TO DO:
❑
Use the Talking Points/Discussion Questions below to stimulate a
discussion about “screen time.” Refer to the Setting Limits on Screen
Time Bright Paper for additional background information. Following
the discussion, explain the Take-Home Activity.
TALKING POINTS/DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:
❑
❑
❑
❑
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
Today we’re talking about “screen time.” What is screen time? It’s time
spent in front of a screen watching TV or videos, playing video games or
using the computer.
Now, just think about TV. How much TV do you think kids watch each
day? Kids watch 3 hours, on average.
How much TV do you watch each day?
How much total screen time (TV, videos, video games, computer) do you
think you get each day?
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
HOW LOW CAN YOU GO? TAKE THE SCREEN TIME CHALLENGE!
FITNESS
2
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN (CONTINUED)
❑
Give each child two
copies (one for them and
one for a family member)
of “How Low Can You
Go? Take the Screen
Time Challenge!” log
and explain how to fill it
out. Encourage kids to
“challenge” a parent or
other family member to
see who can spend the
lowest amount of screen
time in a given time
period. Ask them to bring
their completed log back
to the next meeting.
Mention prizes, if using.
❑
❑
❑
❑
Is a lot of screen time good for you or not so good for you? Why? It’s
not so good if it means you’re not moving around (being physically
active) enough. Here are some other reasons to spend less time in front
of a screen: you will have more time for other activities such as
socializing with friends, reading, being with your family or learning new
hobbies (cooking, crafts, etc).
Being active makes you fit and helps you look good and feel good (as
necessary, review other benefits of physical activity from Being Fit:
Fun and Fantastic for you).
Would it be easy or hard for you to cut back on screen time? Why?
How much time do you think you should spend on screen time? (Note:
Work with the group to agree on an amount of time that they think is
reasonable.)
What else is fun to do and gets you moving? Let’s come up with some
ideas you can try at home. (For ideas, refer to the Setting Limits on
Screen Time Bright Paper or the Fitness Bright Papers at
Kidnetic.com/guide.)
Give each child a copy of
the Setting Limits on
Screen Time Bright
Paper. Ask kids to take it
home for their parents to
read. Include a brief note
encouraging parents to
read the Bright Paper
and to participate in the
Screen Time Challenge.
At the next meeting, ask
kids to share feedback
from their logs. Who had
the lowest total amount of
screen time? What fun
physical activities did they
do instead?
If using prizes, award
them to kid(s) with the
lowest screen time
score(s). Or, give a round
of applause.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
HOW LOW CAN YOU GO? TAKE THE SCREEN TIME CHALLENGE!
FITNESS
Listen up! Here’s the challenge: See how little time you can spend in front of a screen
doing stuff like watching TV or videos, playing video games or using the computer.
Each day, write down how many hours and minutes you spent on screen time. Every
time you move around instead of vegging in front of a screen, write down what you did
instead. You can even challenge someone in your family!
This is one challenge where the lowest score wins!
Day
How Many Hours & Minutes
of Screen Time I Had Today
(e.g., 1 hour and 15 minutes)
Type of Screen Time
How I Got Moving Instead
(e.g.,TV, video games, computer)
(e.g., Rode my bike, danced, played catch)
Now, add up the number of hours and minutes of screen time you had and write your total below.
Total Screen Time: ___________________________________________________________
For more fun ways to get moving, go to www.kidnetic.com/guide.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
3
HOW LOW CAN YOU GO? TAKE THE SCREEN TIME CHALLENGE!
FITNESS
FOR ONLINE FUN WITH FITNESS!
Log onto Kidnetic.com/guide to get kids moving with Fitness Challenge, Scavenger Hunt, Move
Mixer and Betchacant, featured on the home page. If kids are online at home, suggest the “at
home activities.”
SCAVENGER HUNT AND FITNESS CHALLENGE
Divide kids into Scavenger Hunt relay
teams. Kids take turns finding each item.
The team with the lowest total time wins.
At home: Ask kids to do Fitness
Challenge or Scavenger Hunt every day
for a week and track their times to
determine their “personal best.”
Do Fitness Challenge together as a
group “physical activity break.”
MOVE MIXER
Do any one of the dances in Move Mixer
as a group physical activity break.
At home: Ask kids to do Move Mixer
every day for a week. Encourage them to
make up their own dances as well as
using the pre-designed dances.
BETCHACANT
Do the featured Betchacant dare as a
group physical activity break.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
At home: Ask kids to do Betchacant every
day for a week and to “dare” a friend or family
member each time. Have them report back
on their favorite “dare” and how they did.
&
FAMILIES
4
HOW LOW CAN YOU GO? TAKE THE SCREEN TIME CHALLENGE!
FITNESS
5
Setting Limits on Screen Time
What’s the big deal?
How much time do your kids spend in front
of the TV or computer screen each day?
Children who don’t get enough physical activity are at increased risk for becoming
overweight or obese. Spending hours watching TV and surfing the Internet crowds out
time for physical activity.
On average, children and adolescents
log nearly three hours of TV-watching
daily—and that doesn’t include time
spent viewing videotapes, playing video
games or using the computer.
Experts recommend that children total at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical
activity most days of the week but, ideally, every day. They can accumulate this total
throughout the day in chunks of 10 minutes or more. Activities may include sports, active play
such as biking or jumping rope and household chores such as vacuuming and sweeping.
If you’re raising a crop of couch potatoes (or mouse potatoes!), try these tips to set
some limits on screen time and get them moving:
Set a screen time budget. Allot kids one to two hours per day to spend on TV,
video games or fun time on the computer—their choice!
Devise an after-school action plan. Watching TV is the #1 after-school activity for
many kids. Sometimes they just need ideas for what else they can do. Brainstorm
with your kids to create a “Top 10” list of activities to get them on their feet after
school. Activities can include active play such as riding bikes or shooting baskets,
walking the dog, doing household tasks or even helping to prepare dinner. Post the
list right on the fridge so kids can pick an activity when they get home from school.
Get them moving in front of the tube. Set up an exercise bike in the TV room and
require kids to put in some “pedal” time while they watch TV. Or suggest they jog
in place or do some stretches during commercials. Buy or rent a fun exercise
video such as aerobic dance, tae kwon do or yoga—and do it with them.
Tune out at meal times. Turning off the TV during family meals helps you and your
kids tune into what’s going on in each other’s lives. In addition, you’re more likely
to focus on how much you’re eating and enjoy your food more.
Turn the tables—on yourself. The best way to cure your kids of being couch
potatoes is to cut back your own screen time and make family fitness first on your
list. You’ll be amazed at how much extra time you “find” when you click off the tube.
Reviewed by the Kidnetic.com Scientific Advisory Panel, 2002
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
BUILDING HEALTHY EATING HABITS WITH THE FOOD GUIDE PYRAMID
BUILDING HEALTHY EATING HABITS WITH THE FOOD GUIDE PYRAMID
GOALS
Eating a variety of
foods each day is
important for
staying healthy and
feeling good. The
Quick Start Ideas
and Activity Action
Plan in this module
will help you:
FOOD
1
BUILDING HEALTHY EATING
HABITS WITH THE
FOOD GUIDE PYRAMID
Teach kids how many servings they need from
the Pyramid food groups each day.
Figure out whether they’re getting the right
number of servings from each food group.
Explore ways to include any foods they’re missing.
* You may have heard that the Food Guide Pyramid is being revised. For more information about USDA’s plans for the
Food Guide Pyramid, visit www.usda.gov/cnpp/pyramid-update/index.html. Information in this module will be updated
as soon as the revisions are finalized.
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN
WHAT YOU NEED:
❑
❑
During lunch or snack time,
discuss what kids are
eating and drinking and
where these items fit into
the Pyramid. Refer to
The Food Guide Pyramid
Bright Paper for
background information.
Have kids name a favorite
food from each of the five
Pyramid food groups.
“Food Guide Pyramid” handout—one copy for each child
The Food Guide Pyramid Bright Paper—review for background
information plus one copy for each child
❑
“Scaling the Food Guide Pyramid: How Do Your Servings Stack
Up?” worksheet—two copies for each child
❑
(Optional) Measuring cups and spoons for demonstrating different
serving sizes from food groups. Food models are another way to
demonstrate serving sizes of various foods. If you don’t have food
models, bring in a few food samples to demonstrate serving sizes such
as: cooked pasta or rice, cereal, bread, beverages (can use water as a
way to show amount in glass), etc.
WHAT TO DO:
❑
Give each child a copy of the “Food Guide Pyramid” handout to refer to
during the discussion. Use the Talking Points/Discussion Questions
to explain the Pyramid and what foods go in each food group. Continue
on to the Follow-Up Activity. Then, explain the Take-Home Activity.
TALKING POINTS/DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:
❑
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
The Food Guide Pyramid shows groups of foods that make up a
healthy way to eat. The Pyramid also shows how much of the foods in
each group to eat every day.
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
BUILDING HEALTHY EATING HABITS WITH THE FOOD GUIDE PYRAMID
FOOD
2
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN (CONTINUED)
❑
The foods toward the bottom of the Pyramid should
make up most of what you eat every day. The foods
near the top of the pyramid should make up a
smaller amount of what you eat every day.
❑
The Food Guide Pyramid lists a range of servings
to eat from each food group every day. Most kids
should eat at least the smallest number of servings
to get the good nutrition they need.
❑
The Pyramid is divided into five food groups plus
the tip. Take a look at your Pyramid handout and
we’ll see what’s in each group and how much you
should eat every day.
❑
1/2 cup chopped raw vegetables like (coleslaw)
or 3/4 cup of vegetable juice.
❑
Fruits also provide carbohydrates and fiber.
Carbohydrates give your body energy and fiber
keeps things moving through your body.
Goal: 2 to 4 servings each day.
Examples of one serving: 1 medium-size apple,
banana or orange, 1/2 cup of applesauce or
3/4 cup of 100% juice (small glass or one juice
box).
Bread, Cereal, Rice and Pasta Group
The foods in this group provide carbohydrates,
which give your body energy. These foods also
have lots of B vitamins and iron.
It’s good to choose whole grains from this
group. These are foods like whole wheat bread,
oatmeal and popcorn. They have fiber, which
keeps things moving through your body.
❑
❑
Examples of one serving: 1 cup of milk (skim or
1% low fat are best), 1 cup of yogurt, 1 slice of
Swiss or cheddar cheese or 2 slices of
American cheese.
❑
Vegetable Group
The foods in this group provide vitamins and
minerals. For example, carrots and sweet
potatoes have vitamin A, tomatoes and peppers
have vitamin C and spinach has iron.
Examples of one serving: 2 to 3 ounces of
cooked lean meat, poultry or fish; the following
foods count as 1 ounce of meat: 1 egg, 1/2 cup
beans (pinto or navy) or 2 tablespoons of
peanut butter.
❑
Examples of one serving: 1 cup of raw leafy
vegetables (salad), 1/2 cup cooked vegetables,
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
Meat, Poultry, Fish, Beans, Eggs
and Nuts Group
The foods in this group provide protein,
B vitamins and minerals like iron and zinc.
Goal: 2 to 3 servings or a total of 5 to 7 ounces
each day.
Vegetables also provide carbohydrates and
fiber. Carbohydrates give your body energy and
fiber keeps things moving through your body.
Goal: 3 to 5 servings per day.
Milk, Yogurt and Cheese Group
The foods in this group provide protein and
calcium (for bones and teeth).
Goal: 2 to 3 servings each day.
Goal: 6 to 11 servings each day. Make at least
half of these servings whole grains. This Pyramid
group is the biggest and so the foods in this
group should make up most of what you eat
every day.
Examples of one serving: one slice of bread, 1/2
cup cooked rice or pasta, about 1 cup of readyto-eat cereal, 1/2 bagel or 1/2 English muffin.
Fruit Group
The foods in this group provide vitamins and
minerals. For example, apricots and cantaloupe
have vitamin A, oranges and strawberries have
vitamin C and bananas have potassium.
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
Fats, Oils, and Sweets
These foods are found in the Pyramid tip and
are not really part of a food group. These foods
FAMILIES
BUILDING HEALTHY EATING HABITS WITH THE FOOD GUIDE PYRAMID
FOOD
3
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN (CONTINUED)
are in the smallest part of the Pyramid because it’s best to eat just
small amounts of these foods.
Give each child a second
copy of “Scaling the
Food Guide Pyramid:
How Do Your Servings
Stack Up?” worksheet
and one copy of The Food
Guide Pyramid Bright
Paper. Ask kids to read the
Bright Paper at home
with their parents and to
work together to fill in the
Pyramid worksheet with all
the foods and drinks the
child consumes for one day.
At the next meeting, share
feedback from worksheets.
Did you build a healthy
Pyramid? In what groups
did you get the right
number of servings? Did
you have too many foods
in some groups and not
enough in others? What
are some changes you
could make to build a
healthier Pyramid?
Fats and oils tend to be things we put on food or use to cook food.
Examples are butter, margarine, mayonnaise and cooking oils like
olive, peanut or corn oil (used to fry and bake).
Sweets are things like candy, jelly or soft drinks.
Goal: Eat just a little.
❑
Combination Foods
It’s easy to see where something like a banana or a glass of milk
fits into the Pyramid. But what about foods like pizza or
cheeseburgers?
These are called “combination” foods because their parts or
ingredients fit into a combination of Pyramid food groups. Here’s
how pizza and cheeseburgers fit into the Pyramid:
• 1 slice of cheese pizza: 1 bread serving (crust), 1/4 vegetable
serving (tomato sauce), 1/2 milk serving (cheese)
• 1 cheeseburger (1/4-pound): 2 bread servings (bun), 2 meat
servings (hamburger), 1/2 milk serving (cheese)
Who can think of other “combination” foods? Let’s figure out where
their “parts” fit into the Pyramid.
FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITY:
❑
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
Give each child a copy of the “Scaling the Food Guide Pyramid:
How Do Your Servings Stack Up?” worksheet. Ask kids to draw
or write the name of their favorite food in the box provided for each
food group. Have everyone share with the group.
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FOOD
BUILDING HEALTHY EATING HABITS WITH THE FOOD GUIDE PYRAMID
4
KEY
Fats, Oils & Sweets
USE SPARINGLY
Fat (naturally occurring
Sugars
and added)
(added)
These symbols show that fat and added
sugars come mostly from fats, oils, and
sweets, but can be part of or added to
foods from the other food groups as well.
Milk, Yogurt &
Cheese Group
2-3 SERVINGS
Meat, Poultry, Fish,
Dry Beans, Eggs
& Nuts Group
2-3 SERVINGS
Vegetable Group
3-5 SERVINGS
Fruit Group
2-4 SERVINGS
Bread, Cereal, Rice
& Pasta Group
6-11
SERVINGS
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Use the Food Guide Pyramid to help you eat better every
day…the Dietary Guidelines way. Start with plenty of Bread,
Cereals, Rice, and Pasta; Vegetables; and Fruits. Add two to three
servings from the Milk group and two to three servings from the
Meat group.
Each of these food groups provides some, but not all, of the
nutrients you need. No one food group is more important than
another—for good health you need them all. Go easy on fats,
oils, and sweets, the foods in the small tip of the Pyramid.
To order a copy of “The Food Guide Pyramid” booklet, send a $1.00 check or money
order made out to the Superintendent of Documents to: Consumer Information
Center, Department 159-Y, Pueblo, Colorado 81009.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Human Nutrition Information Service, August 1992,
Leaflet No. 572
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
BUILDING HEALTHY EATING HABITS WITH THE FOOD GUIDE PYRAMID
How many servings do you need each day?
Women &
some older
adults
Children,
teen girls,
active
women,
most men
Teen
boys &
active
men
Calorie level*
about
1,600
about
2,200
about
2,800
Bread group
6
9
11
Vegetable group
3
4
5
Fruit group
2
3
4
Milk group
**2–3
**2–3
**2–3
Meat group
2, for a
total of
5 ounces
2, for a
total of
6 ounces
3, for a
total of
5 ounces
*These are the calorie levels if you choose lowfat, lean foods
from the 5 major food groups and use foods from the fats, oils,
and sweets group sparingly.
A Closer Look at Fat and Added Sugars
The small tip of the Pyramid shows fats, oils and sweets.
These are foods such as salad dressings, cream, butter,
margarine, sugars, soft drinks, candies, and sweet desserts,
Alcoholic beverages are also part
of this group. These foods provide
calories but few vitamins and
minerals. Most people should go
easy on foods from this group.
Some fat or sugar symbols are shown
in the other food groups. That’s to
remind you that some foods in these
groups can also be high in fat and
added sugars, such as cheese or ice
cream from the milk group, or french
fries from the vegetable group. When
choosing foods for a healthful diet, consider the fat and added
sugars in your choices from all the food groups, not just fats,
oils, and sweets from the Pyramid tip.
**Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding, teenagers, and
young adults to age 24 need 3 servings.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
FOOD
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
5
BUILDING HEALTHY EATING HABITS WITH THE FOOD GUIDE PYRAMID
FOOD
6
The Food Guide Pyramid
The Food Guide Pyramid also gives the number of servings you should eat
from each part of the Pyramid every day. It often gives a range of numbers,
like six to 11 servings, or two to four servings. Most kids need to eat at least
the small number of servings to get the nutrients they need. (Nutrients are
the things in foods that help our bodies to be healthy.) And many kids will
need more than the small number, especially kids who are really active or into
sports and need lots of energy.
The Food Guide Pyramid was designed as
an easy way to show the groups of foods
that make up a good diet. It also shows
how much of these different groups you
need to eat to stay healthy. It’s shaped like
a pyramid (rather than a circle or square)
to explain the different proportions of
foods to one another. The foods you see at
the base (the widest part) should make up
the biggest part of what you eat. The
foods you see as you go up the Pyramid
(and the Pyramid gets skinnier) should
make up smaller parts of what you eat.
KEY
Fats, Oils & Sweets
USE SPARINGLY
Fat (naturally occurring
and added)
Sugars
(added)
These symbols show that fat and added
sugars come mostly from fats, oils, and
sweets, but can be part of or added to
foods from the other food groups as well.
Milk, Yogurt &
Cheese Group
2-3 SERVINGS
Meat, Poultry, Fish,
Dry Beans, Eggs &
Nuts Group
2-3 SERVINGS
Vegetable Group
3-5 SERVINGS
Fruit Group
2-4 SERVINGS
Bread, Cereal, Rice
& Pasta Group
6-11
SERVINGS
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
BUILDING HEALTHY EATING HABITS WITH THE FOOD GUIDE PYRAMID
vegetables are an important part of a
healthy diet. Veggies are great
because they have lots of vitamins
and minerals. Carrots and spinach are
good sources of vitamin A, and don’t
forget tasty tomatoes and red and
green peppers for vitamin C. And be
sure to eat bunches of broccoli and
spinach for a little bit of everything.
Bread, Cereal, Rice
and Pasta Group
This group is the base or foundation
of the Pyramid. This means that the
foods in this group should make up
the biggest part of what you eat all
day. That’s because bread, cereal,
rice and pasta are all great sources
of carbohydrates, which your body
uses as its major energy source. So
if you want lots of power, be sure to
hit the bottom of the Pyramid!
Vegetables also provide carbohydrates
for the energy your body needs, as
well as lots of fiber.
And carbohydrates aren’t the only
bonus you’ll get from this food
group: you’ll also get lots of B
vitamins and iron. And when you
choose “whole grains” like whole
wheat bread, oatmeal, shredded
wheat and popcorn, you’ll get fiber,
too. Fiber is important because it
helps you digest food so it moves
through you the way it should.
The Food Guide Pyramid suggests
that people eat three to five servings
from this group each day. That’s
easy! Here are some examples of
what counts as one serving:
1 cup of raw leafy vegetables
1/2 cup of other vegetables,
cooked, canned or chopped raw
3/4 cup of vegetable juice
The Food Guide Pyramid suggests
that people eat six to 11 servings
from this group each day. Try to
make half of your servings “whole
grains.” Here are some examples of
what counts as one serving:
Fruit Group
The fruit group is down near the
bottom of the Pyramid. This means
that many daily servings of fruit are
an important part of a healthy diet.
Fruits are fabulous because they
provide important vitamins that keep
you feeling fine and looking good.
Vitamin C is a big player in this food
group–it’s in fruits like oranges,
strawberries, watermelon and lots
more. And just say “a” for apricot—
and vitamin A!
one slice of bread
1/2 cup of cooked rice or pasta
1/2 cup of cooked cereal
1 ounce of cold cereal
1/2 bagel or English muffin
Vegetable Group
Fruits also give you carbohydrates,
the body’s favorite kind of fuel. And
don’t forget fiber—fruit is loaded
with it!
The vegetable group is toward the
bottom of the Pyramid. This means
that lots of daily servings of
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FOOD
7
The Food Guide Pyramid suggests
that people eat two to four servings
from this group each day. Here are
some examples of what counts as
one serving:
1 medium-size apple, banana
or orange
1/2 cup of chopped, cooked or
canned fruit
3/4 cup of 100% fruit juice
(like orange juice or grapefruit
juice)
Milk, Yogurt and Cheese Group
This food group is higher up on the
Pyramid. This means that even
though these foods are important for
good health, you don’t need to eat
as many of them in one day as you
do of foods lower down on the
Pyramid. Eating and drinking milk,
yogurt and cheese gives you protein
power and is the best way to catch
all your calcium. Low-fat and fatfree milk, yogurt and cheese have as
much protein and calcium as the
regular types.
The Food Guide Pyramid suggests
that people eat two to three
servings from this group each day.
Here are some examples of what
counts as one serving:
1 cup of milk
1 cup of yogurt
1-1/2 ounces of natural
cheese like Swiss or cheddar
2 ounces of processed cheese
like American
BUILDING HEALTHY EATING HABITS WITH THE FOOD GUIDE PYRAMID
FOOD
Fats, Oils and Sweets
Meat, Poultry, Fish, Beans, Eggs
and Nuts Group
Fats, oils and sweets are a little
different from the other parts of the
Pyramid, because they don’t make
up a “group” in the same way the
other foods do. They sit at the very
top of the Pyramid—the tiniest part.
This means it’s best to eat just small
amounts of the foods found here.
This food group is higher up on the
Pyramid. This means that even
though these foods are important for
good health, you don’t need to eat as
many of them in one day as you do of
foods lower down on the Pyramid.
Meat, poultry (like chicken and
turkey), fish, beans, eggs and nuts
have one thing in common: they all
supply you with the important
nutrient protein. So this is the perfect
part of the Pyramid for protein!
Fats are found in foods like butter,
margarine and mayo. Oils like olive
oil or corn oil are 100% fat. Your
body needs some fat to stay healthy,
but it’s smart not to have too much.
The same for sweets like candy and
soft drinks. They contain sugar, which
can give you a quick energy boost,
but it’s smart not to have too much.
The Food Guide Pyramid suggests
that people eat two to three
servings (or a total of five to seven
ounces) of foods from this group
each day. Here are some examples:
By following the Food Guide
Pyramid, you’ll be sure to feel and
look your best!
2 to 3 ounces of cooked lean
meat, poultry or fish count as
one serving
1 egg counts as 1 ounce of
lean meat
1/2 cup of cooked beans
(kinds like pinto, black and
navy beans) counts as 1 ounce
of lean meat
2 tablespoons of peanut butter
count as 1 ounce of lean meat
Reviewed by the Kidnetic.com Scientific
Advisory Panel, 2002
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
8
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
______________________
______________________
______________________
Vegetable Group:
______________________
______________________
______________________
Milk Group:
Vegetable Group
3-5 SERVINGS
Milk, Yogurt &
Cheese Group
2-3 SERVINGS
Fats, Oils & Sweets
USE SPARINGLY
&
FAMILIES
________________________________________________
________________________________________________
________________________________________________
Bread Group:
6-11
SERVINGS
Bread, Cereal, Rice
& Pasta Group
Fruit Group
2-4 SERVINGS
Meat, Poultry, Fish,
Dry Beans, Eggs &
Nuts Group
2-3 SERVINGS
Sugars
Fat (naturally
occurring
(added)
and added)
These symbols show that fat and added
sugars come mostly from fats, oils, and
sweets, but can be part of or added to
foods from the other food groups as well.
KEY
________________________________________________
________________________________________________
Fat, Oils, Sweets:
______________________
______________________
______________________
Fruit Group:
______________________
______________________
______________________
Meat Group:
BUILDING HEALTHY EATING HABITS WITH THE FOOD GUIDE PYRAMID
FOOD
9
Scaling the Food Guide Pyramid:
How Do Your Servings Stack Up?
Directions: Think about what you have eaten over the past day and write the foods down next to the group they belong in.
For “combination foods,” think about what the food has in it and write the parts (ingredients) next to the group. If you know the amounts
of what you ate, that will help but it’s more important to get general sense of what you ate over the course of a day. How did you do?
STAMP OUT PORTION DISTORTION!
FOOD
STAMP OUT PORTION DISTORTION!
GOALS
1
STAMP OUT PORTION DISTORTION!
It’s easy to think that
healthy eating is all
about what foods you
eat. But, how much you
eat is just as important.
The Quick Start Ideas
and Activity Action
Plan in this module will
help you:
Explain how favorite foods fit into a healthy diet.
Compare typical portion sizes of foods to
serving sizes from the Food Guide Pyramid or
Nutrition Facts food label.
Increase awareness of portion sizes eaten.
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN:
WHAT YOU NEED:
❑
❑
Have kids read the Portion
Distortion Bright Paper
and do the Portion Size
Matching Game.
At lunch or snack time, ask
kids to estimate their
portion sizes. Use foods
with labels and discuss
how the portion they
usually eat compares to the
serving size on the package.
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
Fitting In Fast Food Favorites and Figuring Out Food Labels Bright
Papers—review for background information
Portion Distortion—It’s How Much You Eat That Counts Bright
Paper—review for background information plus one copy for each child
Packages of various foods and drinks to compare some “typical”
portions to Pyramid or Nutrition Facts food label servings during the
portion distortion demonstration. Here are some ideas:
❑ Largest size French fries vs. smallest size French fries
❑ Can of soft drink (12 oz.) vs. larger plastic bottle (20 or more ounces)
❑ King size candy bar vs. regular size
❑ Snack size bag of pretzels or chips vs. larger “grab” bag size
Paper or plastic plate (dinner size), plastic cup (medium size, 16 oz.)
Measuring cup (to hold up to 2 cups of liquid)
“Serves You Right Matching Game” handout—one copy for each child
(Optional) Flip chart, board or paper to record kids’ ideas
WHAT TO DO:
❑
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
Use the Talking Points/Discussion Questions below to talk about
“portion distortion.” Refer to the Portion Distortion—It’s How Much
You Eat That Counts, Fitting in Fast Food Favorites, and Figuring
Out Food Labels Bright Papers for additional background information.
Following the discussion, conduct the Follow-Up Activity. Then,
explain the Take-Home Activity.
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FOOD
STAMP OUT PORTION DISTORTION!
2
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN (CONTINUED)
TALKING POINTS/DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:
❑
Give each child a copy of the
Portion Distortion—It’s
How Much You Eat That
Counts Bright Paper and
the “Serves You Right
Matching Game” handout
to take home. Ask them to
read the Bright Paper and
complete the matching game
with their parents. At the
next meeting, use the
information in the Bright
Paper to review the
answers to the matching
game. Did any of the
comparisons surprise you?
Which ones did you like
best? Will you use these
ideas to reduce portion
distortion when you eat the
foods listed in the matching
game? Which ideas?
Make kids Portion
Distortion Detectives for
a day. Ask them to scope
out Nutrition Facts labels
in their kitchen or at the
supermarket. How does the
portion they would eat or
drink compare to the
amount listed on the label?
Challenge kids to reduce
portion distortion at least
once before next meeting.
At the next meeting, ask
what examples of portion
distortion they “detected”
and how they “solved”
portion distortion for
themselves.
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
Today we’re going to talk about “portion distortion.” What is a portion?
What do you think portion distortion is?
Portion distortion is eating or drinking a super large amount because
that’s how much was in the package or bottle or because that’s how
much you were served. What are some things you tend to eat or drink a
lot of for these reasons?
What are some reasons that portion distortion might not be so good for you?
What are some foods or drinks that you see packaged or served in very
large portions?
Do you think you can’t have these foods or drinks if you want to eat
healthy? That’s not true—you don’t have to give up foods you like!
Foods like chips, cookies and candy “fit” in a healthy diet IF you avoid
portion distortion by watching how much you eat and how often.
What are some ways to reduce portion distortion? Here are some ideas:
❑ Take control. Buy a smaller size, ask for less next time you are served
food or split a serving with a friend. If you are making your own food,
think about whether the portion you are eating is meant for one, two
or three people.
❑ Think about your drink. Drinks can come in very large bottles or
cups. Try ordering a smaller sized drink or switching your drink—
milk and juice have vitamins and minerals you may be missing.
Water and diet soda are great ways to quench thirst, too.
❑
What can you do if you eat too much once in a while? We all do that
sometimes! If you “pig out,” just balance it by eating less at your next meal
(chances are you won’t be very hungry anyway) or by burning it off with
some extra walking, running, biking or whatever way you like to move.
FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITY:
This activity is a “portion distortion demonstration.” Before this activity, check
the Nutrition Facts label on the packages of foods and drinks you are using to
see how many servings each package holds. Label the bottom of each item.
❑
❑
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
Hold up the packages of foods and drinks one at a time. How does this
compare to how much you usually eat or drink? Compare larger and
smaller sizes for each item.
Put the contents of each item onto a plate or into a cup. Does it seem like
more or less of the food or drink than when it was in the package? Would
eating or drinking from a plate or cup change how much you’d have?
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FOOD
STAMP OUT PORTION DISTORTION!
3
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN (CONTINUED)
❑
❑
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
Ask kids to guess how many servings each package holds. Compare to
actual number of servings from the Nutrition Facts label. Check the
Nutrition Facts label for the serving size and measure out this amount
onto a plate or into a cup. Does the amount surprise you? Why? Is the
serving size from the label more or less than what you usually eat?
Pass packages around so kids can locate the number of servings and
serving sizes for each item.
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FOOD
STAMP OUT PORTION DISTORTION!
Can you guess how much is a serving? A serving of each food or group of foods listed on
the left matches up in size with one of the things listed on the right. Draw a line to
connect each left-hand food with the correct right-hand object. Use the Portion
Distortion—It’s How Much You Eat That Counts Bright Paper to check your answers.
1/2 cup fruit, vegetables, cooked cereal, pasta or rice
computer mouse
3 ounces cooked meat, poultry or fish
6 dice
1 tortilla
4 checkers
1/2 bagel
baseball
1 teaspoon of margarine or butter
Small soft drink lid
2 tablespoons of peanut butter
Your thumb tip
1 small baked potato
Deck of cards
1 pancake or waffle
Small fist
1 medium apple or orange
Golf ball
4 small cookies
Small 7-inch plate
1 1/2 ounces of cheese
1 music CD
Get even smarter about healthy eating at www.kidnetic.com/guide.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
4
FOOD
STAMP OUT PORTION DISTORTION!
5
Fitting in Fast Food Favorites
Be size wise. It’s OK to get the huge-size fries or burger when you’re
really hungry or are working out a lot. But eating the biggest sizes all
the time can slow you down. Most times, order a smaller burger, fries
and soft drink. Or split the big fries with a friend.
There’s no doubt that a meal of a burger,
fries and soft drink tastes great. And it’s
fun to stop at your favorite fast food
place with your family or friends. Here
are some ways to eat fast food and be
healthy, too:
Balance it out. If you eat a lot at lunch, work in some extra walking or
biking and go light with soup and salad for dinner.
Pull a switch. Instead of the usual burger and fries, choose something
new like a grilled chicken sandwich and a side salad.
Think about your drink. You can get milk or fruit juice at many
places. They taste great and give you vitamins and minerals. Interested
in low-calorie drinks? Bottled water and diet soft drinks can quench
your thirst, too.
Reviewed by the Kidnetic.com Scientific Advisory Panel, 2002
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FOOD
STAMP OUT PORTION DISTORTION!
6
Figuring Out Food Labels
The Nutrition Facts food label is printed somewhere
on the outside of food packages, and it’s usually
easy to find. Fresh food that doesn’t come in a
package still sometimes has nutrition facts—many
supermarkets list the nutrition information for the 20
most popular fruits and vegetables, as well as
seafood (fish).
You know how lots of books have a
table of contents in the front? The
table of contents is a list of the
different things you’ll read when you
go through the book.
The Nutrition Facts food label on food
packages is a lot like the table of
contents in a book. It gives you
information about the food inside, and
what nutrients you’ll get from the food.
(Nutrients are the things in foods that
help our bodies to be healthy.) It tells
you about all the parts that make up
the whole.
Most nutrients are measured in grams, also written
as g. Some nutrients are measured in milligrams,
written as mg. Milligrams are very tiny—there are
1,000 milligrams in a gram. Other information is given
in percentages. The nutrition information is based on
eating 2,000 calories (this is a measure of how much
energy a food provides) in a day, the amount that
many school-age kids eat.
Serving Size
The serving size tells you how much of the food
gives you the amounts of nutrients listed. It can be
measured in lots of ways. Many times, though, serving sizes are measured in ways
that help people understand how much they’re eating, like in cups (one cup of
cereal) or numbers (two cookies or five pretzels).
The serving size for a food can depend on how much the foods weighs or how big
the pieces are. For example, a serving size for cold cereals is one ounce. For some
cereals that’s one cup, but for others it’s 3/4 cup or 1-1/4 cups. Sometimes two or
three small cookies are one serving, but other times one big cookie is one serving!
It can all be a little confusing, and that’s why it’s important to check out the
serving size before digging in.
Servings per Container or Package
A serving is the measure of how much food gives you the amounts of nutrients
listed. The servings per container or package tell you how many servings are in the
whole package. So if a box of cookies has 21 cookies, and the cookie maker’s
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FOOD
STAMP OUT PORTION DISTORTION!
7
Cholesterol and Sodium
serving size is three cookies, then there are seven servings of
cookies in the box. (Math comes in handy with food labels!)
These numbers tell you how much cholesterol and sodium
(a mineral that’s in salt) are in one serving of this food.
Cholesterol and sodium are usually measured in milligrams.
Cholesterol is listed on the label because, to keep their
hearts healthy, some people want to make sure they don’t
eat too much cholesterol. Sodium is listed on the label
because some people, to keep their blood pressure healthy,
want to make sure they don’t eat too much sodium.
Calories and Calories From Fat
The number on the left of the label tells you how many
calories are in one serving of the food. The number of
calories tells you the amount of energy in the food.
The number on the right, calories from fat, tells you how
many of the total calories come from the fat in the food.
Calories can come from protein, carbohydrate and fat. The
label lists the calories from fat (rather than listing the
calories that come from the other two nutrients) because
many people want to make sure they don’t eat too much fat.
Total Carbohydrate, Fiber and Sugars
The number listed for total carbohydrate tells you the
amount of carbohydrates in one serving of the food.
Carbohydrates are usually measured in grams.
% Daily Value
Carbohydrates are your body’s primary source of energy.
The more active you are, the more carbohydrates you need!
% Daily Value tells you how much of the daily recommended
amount of each nutrient is in one serving of the food. %
Daily Values for total fat, saturated fat, total carbohydrate
and fiber are based on eating 2,000 calories a day. % Daily
Values for sodium and other minerals and vitamins stay the
same no matter how many calories you need to eat. So if
one serving of a food has a % Daily Value of 25% for
carbohydrate, that means a person who eats 2,000 calories
in a day will get 25% of the carbohydrates he/she needs on
that day. The other 75% must come from other foods to
reach the important 100%.
Listed under total carbohydrate are the amounts of fiber and
sugars in one serving of the food. Fiber and sugars, which
are two types of carbohydrates, are listed in grams.
Protein
This number tells you how much protein is in one serving of
the food. Protein is usually measured in grams. Protein’s
main job is to build muscle, keep organs strong and fight off
disease, but your body also can use it for energy.
Total Fat and Saturated Fat
Vitamin A and Vitamin C
The number listed for total fat tells you how much fat is in
one serving of the food. Fat is usually measured in grams.
Fat is actually an important nutrient that your body uses to
grow and develop. Just remember not to eat “too much of a
good thing!” Listed under total fat is the amount of a kind of
fat called saturated fat in one serving of the food. Saturated
fat is listed in grams. Saturated fat is listed on the label
because, to keep their hearts healthy, some people want to
make sure they don’t eat too much saturated fat.
This lists the amounts of vitamin A and vitamin C, two really
important vitamins, in one serving of this food. The amount is
measured in % Daily Values, so if a food has 80% of vitamin
A, one serving gives you 80% of the vitamin A you need for
the whole day.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
Food companies must list the amounts of vitamins A and C.
If they want to, they also can list the amounts of other
vitamins. (Cereal companies often list the amounts of other
vitamins found in cereal. If the company adds any vitamins,
they must list them.)
&
FAMILIES
FOOD
STAMP OUT PORTION DISTORTION!
minerals found in cereal. If the company adds any minerals,
they must list them.)
Calcium and Iron
This lists the amounts of calcium and iron, two really
important minerals, in one serving of the food. The amount
is measured in % Daily Values, so if a food has 10% of iron,
one serving gives you 10% of the iron you need for the
whole day.
Calories per Gram
These numbers show how many calories are in one gram of
fat, carbohydrate and protein. This information is always the
same for every food, and is printed on the food label so
people can find it when they need it.
Food companies must list the amounts of calcium and iron.
If they want to, they also can list the amounts of other
minerals. (Cereal companies often list the amounts of other
Reviewed by the Kidnetic.com Scientific Advisory Panel, 2002
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
8
&
FAMILIES
FOOD
STAMP OUT PORTION DISTORTION!
Portion Distortion—
It’s How Much You Eat that Counts
Portion Size Guide
Do you think healthy eating is boring?
Not so! You can eat healthy and still eat
your favorites like chips, cookies and
candy. One trick is to keep tabs on how
much of these foods you eat.
1/2 cup fruit, vegetable, cooked cereal, pasta or rice = a small fist
3 ounces cooked meat, poultry or fish = a deck of cards
Did you ever experience portion
distortion? Like when you munch on an
order of fries that could feed your whole
family? Next time, halt portion distortion
by splitting those fries with a friend or
getting the smaller size. Instead of a
mega-size candy bar, see whether the
smaller size hits the spot just as well.
1 tortilla = a small (7 inch) plate
1/2 bagel = the width of a small soft drink lid
1 teaspoon of margarine or butter = your thumb tip
2 tablespoons of peanut butter = a golf ball
Don’t sweat it if you pig out on a food
sometimes. When that happens, balance
it out by eating less than usual at your
next meal and working in some extra
walking or biking.
1 small baked potato = a computer mouse
1 pancake or waffle = a music CD
1 medium apple or orange = a baseball
Meanwhile, check out this Portion Size
Guide to see how one serving of
different foods from the Food Guide
Pyramid compares to stuff you have
around the house:
4 small cookies (like vanilla wafers) = four checkers
1-1/2 ounces of cheese = 6 dice
Reviewed by the Kidnetic.com Scientific Advisory Panel, 2002
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
9
EATING FOR ENERGY
FOOD
EATING FOR ENERGY
GOALS
1
EATING FOR ENERGY!
The notion of “having
more energy” helps
motivate kids to
adopt healthier habits.
The Quick Start Ideas
and Activity Action
Plan in this module
will help you:
Teach kids about the link between healthy eating
habits and feeling more energetic.
Raise kids’ awareness of their own eating habits,
especially relating to breakfast and snacking, and
how these habits might affect their energy levels.
Encourage kids to try new options for breakfast
and/or snacks.
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN:
WHAT YOU NEED:
Poll kids on how often they eat
breakfast or snacks and what
their favorite breakfast or snack
is. Ask how skipping breakfast
or snacking affects how much
energy they have and why.
Distribute the “Be a Breakfast
Champion” handout or the
“Check Out Smart
Snacking” handout. Ask each
child to choose a breakfast
and/or snack to try at home.
Provide the group with a
simple breakfast or snack and,
while they’re eating, discuss
one or two benefits. See the
handouts in this module for
breakfast and snack ideas.
If kids are online at home,
suggest they try a breakfast
or snack from The Recipe
Roundup at Kidnetic.com/
guide and report back on
how they liked it.
❑
❑
❑
❑
Eating for Energy Bright Paper—review for background information
“Be a Breakfast Champion” handout—one copy for each child to take
home AND/OR
“Check Out Smart Snacking” handout—one copy for each child to
take home
(Optional) Flip chart, board or paper to record kids’ ideas
WHAT TO DO:
❑
Use the Talking Points/Discussion Questions below to discuss how
eating habits—breakfast and/or snacking in particular—affect the
amount of energy kids have. Refer to the Eating for Energy Bright
Paper for additional background information. Following the discussion,
explain the Take-Home Activity.
TALKING POINTS/DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:
❑
❑
❑
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
Today we’re talking about how what you eat and when you eat affects
how much energy you have.
How do you feel when you have a lot of energy? When you are low on
energy?
How does food give you energy? What are some eating habits that give you
energy? That zap your energy? Eating meals at regular times and eating lots
of different foods from the Food Guide Pyramid like fruits, vegetables,
grains, milk and meat are two important habits that give you energy.
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FOOD
EATING FOR ENERGY
2
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN (CONTINUED)
(BREAKFAST)
❑
Give each child a copy of
the “Be a Breakfast
Champion” handout
AND/OR the “Check
Out Smart Snacking”
handout and explain how
to fill them out.
For breakfast handout,
ask kids to try at least
one new breakfast from
the list.
For snacking handout, ask
kids to try 2-3 new snacks
from the list and to check
off what they tried.
Advise kids to tell their
parents what snacks they
want to try so Mom or
Dad can make sure the
snacks are available.
At the next meeting, ask
kids to share what new
breakfasts/snacks they tried
and how they liked them.
❑
❑
Eating breakfast is another important way to get energy. Breakfast fills
your “empty tank” to get your body and brain going after a long night
without food.
Breakfast gives your body energy to move you through the day. It feeds
your brain so you can listen in class, get your schoolwork done and
even do better on tests.
Do you eat breakfast? How often and what? How do you feel if you skip
breakfast and have to go a long time before eating?
(SNACKING)
❑
❑
❑
❑
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
Having a snack is another way to get energy, but it’s important to be
smart about the way you snack.
When is snacking not so smart? It’s not smart to snack when you’re not
really hungry, but you snack anyway because it’s a habit, like when
you’re watching TV. Or, if you always snack on the same things, like
cookies, chips, candy and soft drinks. These are OK sometimes, but
there are lots of different snacks you can try.
When is it smart to snack? It’s smart to snack when you’re hungry and
have to go a really long time between meals and you need some fuel to
do your homework or to go outside and play.
When you have a snack it’s smart to eat enough to take the edge off
your hunger, but not so much that you’re stuffed when it’s time for
dinner. But, if you’re doing something really active like playing a sport,
taking a dance class, biking or running around with your friends, it’s OK
to eat a bigger snack.
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FOOD
EATING FOR ENERGY
Eating breakfast every day is the way to stay on top of your game! Breakfast charges
up your body and brain so you feel great and think straight. So, before you hit the door,
chow down on your favorite breakfast or try one of these winning ideas:
TOTALLY MIXED UP CEREAL AND FRUIT. Stir together two or more of your favorite
cereals hot or cold, you pick. Then, mix in some fruit like a sliced banana or raisins. Top with
milk or yogurt.
FLIPPED OUT PANCAKES. Toast a frozen pancake. Then, give it a totally unique topper like a
squished up banana, sliced peaches, applesauce, peanut butter or a slice of cheese.
ON A ROLL BREAKFAST WRAP. Grab a pancake, tortilla or piece of bread. Next, roll up your
favorite fillings—refried beans and cheese, cottage cheese and fruit, peanut butter and jelly
or whatever sounds good.
SANDWICHING IN BREAKFAST SANDWICH. Slap together a sandwich like PBJ, turkey and
cheese, ham and cheese, roast beef and cheese or—what the heck—just cheese!
RAID THE FRIDGE FAVORITES. Grab a slice of last night’s pizza, spaghetti or chicken. Enjoy
with a glass of milk or juice.
GRAB-AND-GO GOODIES. Being in a hurry is no reason to skip breakfast! Grab a few of
these foods to eat on the go: Cereal bar, bagel, muffin, piece of fruit, box of raisins, string
cheese, juice pouch, yogurt drink, mini bottle of milk or cup of yogurt or applesauce.
For more winning breakfast ideas, go to The Recipe Roundup section at www.kidnetic.com/guide!
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
3
FOOD
EATING FOR ENERGY
Snacking smart helps pump you up so you feel good and have lots of energy to get
things done and just have fun!
Pick some snacks to try from this list. (Ask Mom or Dad to buy the ones you don’t have
in the house.) Check off the ones you try. Then, voice your snack opinion in the spaces
at the bottom.
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
Low-fat yogurt—try
freezing those squeezable
tubes
String cheese
A fistful of peanuts or
trail mix
Frozen fruit bars
Any fresh fruit like grapes,
an apple, banana or
orange—you pick!
Any dried fruit like raisins
or apricots
Any veggie, especially
easy-to-eat ones like cherry
tomatoes, baby carrots and
cut-up green peppers
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
Graham crackers
(don’t forget the milk!)
Fortune cookies
❑
❑
❑
Fig bars
Cereal bar or granola bar
Low-fat chocolate milk
Orange juice
Half a toasted bagel
topped with a cheese slice
Pudding
Applesauce
Whole-wheat crackers
smeared with peanut
butter
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
Pretzels
Salsa and baked tortilla
chips
Hummus (chickpea dip)
and pita bread
A cup of soup and a
couple of crackers
Bowl of cereal—hot or
cold
A nuked potato topped
with ketchup
Cold, cooked chicken
A slice of pizza—hot or
cold
Snack I liked best:: ______________________________________________________
Snack I didn’t like so much: ______________________________________________
Snack I’ll try next: ______________________________________________________
To learn more about smart snacking, check out www.kidnetic.com/guide.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
4
FOOD
EATING FOR ENERGY
5
Eating For Energy
Do your eyelids droop during morning
math class? Do you crash on the couch
after school? Yawn through your
homework? Maybe you’re not choosing the
right fuel to keep your body and brain
running in high gear. If you need an energy
boost, try these four tips:
1. Start your day with breakfast.
Breakfast fills your "empty tank" to get you going after a long night
without food. And it can help you pay attention in school. Easy-tomake breakfasts include cold cereal with fruit and low-fat milk,
whole-wheat toast with peanut butter, yogurt with fruit, whole-grain
waffles or even last night’s pizza!
2. Snack smart.
Snacks are a great way to refuel. Choose snacks from different food
groups—a glass of low-fat milk and a few graham crackers, an apple
or celery sticks with peanut butter and raisins or some dry cereal. If
you eat smart at other meals, cookies, chips and candy are OK for
occasional snacking.
3. Eat more grains, fruits and vegetables.
These foods give you carbohydrates, which your body and brain use
for energy. They also give you vitamins, minerals and fiber. Besides,
they taste good! Try foods made from grains such as whole-wheat
bread, bagels, pita bread, spaghetti and oatmeal. Bananas,
strawberries and melons are some great-tasting fruits. Munch
veggies like lettuce, tomatoes, peppers and zucchini raw, on a
sandwich or in a salad.
4. Don’t go too long without eating.
Your body needs a steady supply of fuel to run right, so stick with
regular meal and snack times. If you’re busy and can’t stop to eat, grab
a banana, a cheese stick or a squeezable yogurt to keep you going.
Reviewed by the Kidnetic.com Scientific Advisory Panel, 2002
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FRUITS AND VEGGIES—GIMME 5!
FOOD
FRUITS AND VEGGIES—GIMME 5!
GOALS
1
FRUITS & VEGGIES—GIMME 5!
Many kids fall
short on eating
recommended
amounts of fruits
and vegetables. The
Quick Start Ideas
and Activity Action
Plan in this module
will help you:
Explain to kids why fruits and vegetables are not
only good for them, but help them feel good and
look good, too.
Teach kids how many servings of fruits and
vegetables they need each day and compare to
how many they actually eat.
Encourage kids to try tasty new or familiar fruits
and vegetables.
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN
WHAT YOU NEED:
❑
Hand out and review the
Totally Weird Ways to
(Fruit and) Veg Out Bright
Paper. Ask each child to
pick an idea to try at home.
Do the talking points and
discussion without the fruit
and vegetable sampling.
Provide a simple fruit or
veggie snack such as
grapes, apple slices or baby
carrots. While the kids are
eating, ask them why fruits
and vegetables are good for
them and to name their
favorite fruit and vegetable.
Ask kids to name or write
down as many fruits and
vegetables as they can that
begin with each letter of
the alphabet.
❑
❑
❑
❑
Totally Weird Ways to (Fruit and) Veg Out Bright Paper—review for
background information plus one copy for each child to take home
“Finger-friendly” samples of fruits and/or vegetables such as grapes,
apple slices, baby carrots or broccoli florets. If possible, include some
“unusual” ones that are in season such as kiwi or mango cubes, yellow,
orange or red bell pepper slices or tiny “grape” tomatoes
Copies of the “Fruits and Veggies: Taste Test” handout for each child
to score the fruit and vegetable samples
Small paper cups or plates for samples; napkins or paper towels
(Optional) Flip chart, board or paper to record kids’ ideas
WHAT TO DO:
❑
Use the Talking Points/Discussion Questions below to discuss how
fruits and vegetables are great for you and taste great, too. Refer to the
Totally Weird Ways to (Fruit and) Veg Out Bright Paper for
additional background information. Following the discussion, pass out
fruit/vegetables samples; explain the Take-Home Activity.
TALKING POINTS/DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:
❑
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
I bet you all know that fruits and vegetables are good for your health.
Who can tell me why?
•
&
They contain vitamins and minerals that you need to grow up
healthy and strong and to look good and feel good, too. They also
contain fiber, which is good for you.
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FOOD
FRUITS AND VEGGIES—GIMME 5!
2
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN (CONTINUED)
❑
•
Plant a small patch of
fast-growing veggies such
as radishes or lettuce for
kids to tend and enjoy
right from the garden.
❑
Visit a “Pick Your Own”
farm where kids can see
fruits and vegetables
growing in the fields.
❑
Tour a local farm, farmer’s
market or community
garden. Or consider having
a farmer or gardener
speak to your group.
Some supermarkets offer
tours for kids, which
include learning about and
sampling a variety of
fruits and vegetables.
Contact your local
supermarket manager to
see if they offer tours.
❑
❑
❑
❑
Give each child a copy of
the “Fruit and Veggies:
Taste Test “ handout and
explain how to fill it out.
Ask kids to try at least try
2-3 ideas from the list and
to write down how they
liked them.
At the next meeting, ask
kids to share the ideas
they tried and how they
liked them.
Fruits and veggies are especially high in two vitamins. Who can tell me
which ones?
❑
They’re high in vitamin A and vitamin C. Vitamin A is important for
healthy eyes and skin. Vitamin C is important for healthy body
tissues and healthy gums. It also helps you heal when you get a cut.
Fruits and veggies high in vitamin A are often deep yellow, orange or
red in color. Who can name some? Examples include carrots, sweet
potatoes, cantaloupe, mango, apricots and red bell peppers. Some deep
green veggies are also high in vitamin A like spinach and turnip greens.
Who can name a fruit or veggie that’s high in vitamin C? Examples
include oranges, grapefruit, strawberries, red and green bell pepper,
broccoli and tomatoes.
You need to eat at least 5 servings of veggies and fruits every day
(that’s 3 for veggies and 2 for fruits).
Servings aren’t very big. A serving of veggies is only one cup of lettuce
or 1/2-cup of cooked veggies like corn, carrots or green beans or a
small (6-ounce) glass of vegetable juice. A serving of fruit is one piece
like an apple, banana, orange or pear, or 1/2-cup of grapes or strawberries
or a small (6-ounce) glass of 100% fruit juice. One thing to remember:
something that is “fruit-flavored” doesn’t usually have any fruit in it!
But you don’t have to eat a whole serving at a time—smaller amounts
can add up to a serving—like 1/2 a banana + 1/2 an apple = 1 serving
of fruit.
The fruits and veggies that are “in” some foods like fruit smoothies,
vegetable soup and zucchini bread count, too!
Name the fruits and veggies you ate yesterday or today. Which ones
are your favorites? Least favorites?
FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITY:
❑
❑
❑
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
Pass out the fruit/vegetable samples and ask which ones kids
like/dislike.
Have them rate the samples using the “Fruits and Veggies: Taste
Test” handout. Once they have completed the score sheet, have them
talk about their ratings.
Remind kids that tastes will change as they get older: keep trying
because they may like it next time!
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FOOD
FRUITS AND VEGGIES—GIMME 5!
We all have foods we like a lot and some we don’t like as much. Sometimes, it takes a few
tries before a food tastes good to us. Also, if you haven’t tried a food in a while, you may be
surprised that it tastes better or different now than it did the last time you tried it.
DI RECT I ONS : Taste each fruit or vegetable sample. Write down the name of what you sampled and give its
taste a score based on the following scale:
5
Yum! I will
ask my family
to buy this!
4
Pretty good.
I will try
this again.
3
Okay. I will
eat this if it’s
on my plate.
2
Not so good.
I will eat this
if I have to.
1
Yuck! I am
not eating
this again!
For each score, think about why you gave the fruit or vegetable that score. What did you really like or dislike about
the fruit or vegetable? Was it the sweetness, sourness, the way it feels in your mouth (squishiness, juiciness, etc.) or
something else?
Fruit or Vegetable Tasted
Taste Score I Gave This Score Because…
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
3
FOOD
FRUITS AND VEGGIES—GIMME 5!
4
Totally Weird Ways to (Fruit and) Veg Out
Pick out something funny sounding. Like kohlrabi…or cardoon…or
carambola—the first two are veggies and the second one’s a fruit! Go
grocery shopping with your parents and ask them to buy the funniest
sounding fruit or veggie you can find. Taste-test it with your family when
you get home.
You’ve heard it at least a million times—
eat your fruits and veggies! After all,
they’re packed with lots of good-for-you
vitamins, minerals and fiber.
To look good and feel good, you need
to eat at least 5 servings of fruits and
veggies every day (that’s 2 for fruits
and 3 for veggies) Yikes, you say? Calm
down, a serving’s not that big!
Bite into a PBB, PBA, PBR or PBC sandwich. Instead of jelly, that’s
peanut butter with sliced bananas, sliced apples, raisins or shredded carrots.
Chill out with a frozen fruit bar. Ask your parents to get the kind made
with 100% fruit juice.
A serving of fruit is just one apple,
banana or orange, 1⁄2-cup of grapes,
strawberries or canned peaches, or a
small (6-ounce) glass of 100 percent
juice. A serving of veggies is only one
cup of lettuce or 1⁄2-cup of cooked stuff
like corn or green beans.
Create a different kind of crunch. Pile your sandwich with sliced
cucumber, arugula, radishes, celery, red pepper or water chestnuts.
Order a pineapple-topped pizza. If fruity pizza’s not your thing, load it
with veggies like green peppers, mushroom, onions and tomatoes.
Escape with a frozen grape. Take some grapes off the stem, wash and
dry them, put them in a bowl or a sealed plastic baggie and pop them into
the freezer for an hour or so. A real cool treat!
More good news! You don’t have to eat
a whole serving at one time. Think about
this equation: 1⁄2 banana at breakfast +
1⁄2 apple for a snack = 1 serving of fruit!
Create a patriotic yogurt. Stir blueberries and chopped up strawberries
into vanilla yogurt.
Eating even smaller bits of fruits and
veggies throughout the day count toward
your total. And you might be amazed at
how fruits and veggies are in lots of other
foods you eat (think vegetable soup or
veggie-topped pizza, even)!
Mash up some color. Instead of regular mashed potatoes, ask Mom or
Dad to make some mashed sweet potatoes. They’re orange, smooth and
oh-so-sweet!
You think those are weird ways to get your fruits and veggies? How about some Edible
Apple Lips or Insect-Infested Logs? Find these recipes and more at www.kidnetic.com/guide.
If your usual fruit and veggie
selections seem ho-hum, try these
totally weird but tasty ways to (fruit
and) veg out today!
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
Reviewed by the Kidnetic.com Scientific Advisory Panel, 2003
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
TAKE THE 10,000-PLUS STEP CHALLENGE!
FUN
TAKE THE 10,000-PLUS STEP CHALLENGE!
GOALS
1
TAKE THE 10,000-PLUS
STEP CHALLENGE!
Wearing a step
counter is a fun way
for kids (and adults!)
to become more fit
and active. For good
health, fitness experts
recommend that adults
total 10,000 steps
(about 5 miles) each
day. Some fitness
experts recommend
that children take even
more steps each day.
Simple step counters are available at sporting
goods stores or can be ordered online. The
Quick Start Ideas and Activity Action Plan in
this module will help you:
Teach kids that taking at least 10,000 steps a
day is a great fitness goal—taking more steps
is even better.
Make kids more aware of how physically active
they are by having them count their steps.
Challenge kids to take more steps each day.
Give a step counter to one child to wear. Then, have kids guess how many steps it takes to walk around the
block, the track or another area. Then, take that walk and see who came closest. Give the step counter to
another child to wear and repeat the game by walking another area.
No step counters?
• Take a walk and count your steps as you go.
• Brainstorm different ways to take more steps each day. For example, getting up to change the channel
instead of using the remote or walking around while talking on the phone.
• Hold a “jump rope challenge.” Divide kids into two teams. Have each child take a turn at jumping rope while
team members count the number of times the child jumps without missing. The team that totals the highest
number of jumps wins.
• Encourage kids to walk, bike, skate or ride a scooter to school with an adult. The Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention has developed a Kids Walk-to-School program that aims to increase opportunities for daily
physical activity by encouraging children to walk to and from school in groups accompanied by adults. For
more information: www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/kidswalk.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FUN
TAKE THE 10,000-PLUS STEP CHALLENGE!
2
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN:
WHAT YOU NEED:
Divide kids into teams for
a step counter relay. Give
each team a step counter
and explain how to wear
it. Team members take
turns wearing the step
counter for a specific time
period (e.g., each member
wears it for 24 hours if
the groups meets daily).
(Or, if you have enough
step counters, give one
to each team member.)
NOTE: For this activity, taking
turns wearing a step counter
works best if your group meets
daily. To keep the momentum
going for groups that meet less
often (e.g., once a week), provide
each child with his or her own
step counter to wear every day
between meetings, if possible.
Hand out the Are You Up
for the 10,000 Step
Challenge? Bright Paper
for kids to read at home
with their parents and the
“Take the 10,000-Plus
Step Challenge!” log to
record their steps when
it’s their turn to wear the
step counter.
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
Are You Up for the 10,000 Step Challenge? Bright Paper—review
for background information plus one copy for each child to take home
“Take the 10,000-Plus Step Challenge!” log—one copy for each
child to take home
(Optional) Flip chart, board or paper to record kids’ ideas
(Optional) Step counters
Flip chart, board or paper to record kids’ steps
(Optional) Prize(s) such as the step counters used for this activity or
another fitness-related prize such as a jump rope, ball or water bottle
WHAT TO DO:
❑
Use the Talking Points/Discussion Questions below to talk about
how taking at least 10,000 steps a day is a great way to get fit. Refer
to the Are You Up for the 10,000 Step Challenge? Bright Paper for
additional background information. Following the discussion, explain
the Take-Home Activity.
TALKING POINTS/DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:
❑
❑
How many steps do you think you take each day? Fitness experts say
that grown-ups should take at least 10,000 steps a day! That equals
about 5 miles. It’s good for kids your age to take even more steps than
that each day.
Let’s talk about some ways you could take more steps each day. Things
like walking to a friend’s house instead of getting a ride or walking up
the stairs instead of taking the elevator. (Brainstorm list of ideas.)
At the next meeting, record
on a flip chart, board or
sheet of paper the number
of steps taken by each
child who wore the step
counter. (Or, if each child
wears a step counter,
record the total number
of steps for each team.)
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FUN
TAKE THE 10,000-PLUS STEP CHALLENGE!
The relay continues until
each team member wears
the step counter for one
time period. (Or, if each
child wears a step counter,
continue for a defined
period of time, such as one
week). The team with the
highest total number of
steps wins the challenge!
Distribute prizes to the
winning team members. Or,
give a round of applause.
Throughout the relay, ask
kids to name the most fun,
creative or crazy ways they
added steps to their day.
(OPTIONAL) Make it a “cityto-city” challenge. Use an
atlas or online service that
provides driving directions
(e.g., www.yahoo.com) to
figure out the number of
miles between your city
and another city—the
distance can be close or
far depending on how
long the activity continues.
Multiply the number of
miles between the cities
by 2,000 to determine the
number of steps between
the two cities (e.g.,
between Chicago, Illinois,
and Toledo, Ohio, there
are 244 miles or 488,000
steps). The first team
to take enough steps to
“reach” the other city
wins the challenge!
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
3
FUN
TAKE THE 10,000-PLUS STEP CHALLENGE!
This is the place where you log your steps each day!
Here’s what to do: First thing in the morning, strap a step counter on your waistband
above your hipbone. Keep it on all day! Then, right before you go to bed, use the
spaces below to write down the number of steps shown on your step counter.
It’s great to reach 10,000 steps each day—it’s even better to take more steps! It’s OK if
you’re under 10,000 steps to start with—just work on taking a few more steps each
day until you hit the big 10,000! If taking 10,000 steps is no sweat for you, shoot for
15,000 steps instead.
Day
Number of steps I took today
Now, add up all of your steps and record your
GRAND TOTAL: ____________________
Most fun ways I got more steps:
____________________________________
____________________________________
____________________________________
For more fun ways to “get stepping,” go to
www.kidnetic.com/guide.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
4
FUN
TAKE THE 10,000-PLUS STEP CHALLENGE!
5
Are You Up For The 10,000 Step Challenge?
Start by counting steps in your
daily routine. How many steps is
it from:
How many steps do you take every day?
Fitness experts say we should take 10,000
steps every day, but can you imagine
counting all of those steps? Yikes!
Your bedroom to the front door?
One easy way to measure how many
steps you take is to invest in a step
counter. You can probably find one that
doesn’t cost a lot at a local sporting goods
store or a store that has a sporting goods
department. The step counter doesn’t
have to be anything fancy—it just has to
count your steps.
Your locker to your homeroom
or first class of the day?
Your front door, around your
house or building and back to
the front door?
Your locker to your best
friend’s locker?
Step counters work when you attach them
to the waistband of your clothing. They
count how often your hips move up and
down as you walk—and that equals the
number of steps you take.
Your home to a friend’s home?
One class to another?
The entrance of your school to
your locker or first class?
It’s fun to use a step counter to see how
many steps you usually take in one day.
To track your progress, wear your step
counter all day. Then, before you go to bed,
write down the number of steps shown on
your step counter. Are you close to 10,000?
Are you way under or over? It’s OK if you’re
way under 10,000 steps to start with—lots
of people are! Work on taking a few more
steps each day until you hit the big 10,000.
Then, try for even more. Wherever you
start, the goal is to challenge yourself to
take even more steps.
Easy ways to sneak extra steps
into your day:
Get up and walk around during
commercial breaks while
you’re watching TV
If you go shopping with a parent,
have them park farther away
from the entrance to the store
Walk around while you’re
brushing your teeth or on the
phone with a friend
If you’re on the computer, set
a timer to remind you to get
up every 30 minutes or so and
walk around
Of course, taking a long walk each
day with your family or a friend is a
great way to meet the 10,000-step
challenge! What other ideas can you
come up with to take more steps? Do
you feel like you’re becoming more
active? Do you notice that you’re
taking more steps each day now that
you’re counting them? Good!
Now keep stepping!!!
Get up to change the channel
instead of using the remote
If you walk to school, take a
longer route (or maybe on the
way home so you’re not late!)
Are you ready to take the 10,000-step
challenge? Let’s get stepping!
Take the stairs more often
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
Become a part-time pet walker
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
Reviewed by the Kidnetic.com
Scientific Advisory Panel, 2002
LET’S GET COOKING!
FUN
LET’S GET COOKING!
GOALS
1
LET’S GET COOKING!
Involving kids in
preparing a recipe gives
them a sense of
accomplishment and
heightens their interest
in eating the fruits of
their labor! The Quick
Start Ideas and Activity
Action Plan in this
module will help you:
Explain the benefits of preparing your own food.
Teach the importance of proper hand washing
before preparing food.
Foster teamwork.
Provide a tasty and nutritious snack.
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN
WHAT YOU NEED:
❑
Use one of the recipes
included in this module to do
a “cooking demo” for the
kids. Show them how to
prepare the recipe. Give
each child a sample to taste.
Have kids work together to
prepare a simple snack. For
example, they can wash
apples, peel and section
oranges or mix together a
“trail mix” of cereal and
raisins.
If kids are online at home,
ask them to prepare any
recipe from The Recipe
Roundup at Kidnetic.com/
guide with their parents.
Have them report back on
what they made and how
they liked it.
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
Soap and running water, liquid hand cleanser, moist towelettes or a
spray bottle of soapy water and a spray bottle of plain water for hand
washing; paper towels to dry hands
Recipe sheets for Insect-Infested Logs, Super-Duper Shakin’ Snack
Mix and Grape-n-Cheese Mini-Kabobs—one copy for each child
Ingredients and equipment to make one of the above recipes—your
choice (see “What’s In It?” and “Stuff You Need” section of the recipe
you choose)
Designated “workstations” with needed ingredients and equipment for
kids to prepare the recipe in teams
Small paper plates and napkins for recipe sampling
(Optional) Flip chart, board or paper to record kids’ ideas
WHAT TO DO:
Use the Talking Points/Discussion Questions below to briefly talk about
the importance of proper hand washing. Following the discussion, proceed
with the benefits of preparing your own food and the recipe preparation
activity. Then, explain the Take-Home Activity.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FUN
LET’S GET COOKING!
2
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN (CONTINUED)
TALKING POINTS/DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:
Part 1: BENEFITS OF PREPARING YOUR OWN FOOD
Today we’re going to make a great snack together! But before we get
started, think about why it might be a good idea to make your own
snacks or meals. What are some reasons you might want to learn more
about cooking?
❑
❑
❑
❑
There are a lot of great reasons to make your own food: it’s fun, it tastes
great, and sometimes it can even be cheaper and faster than buying it
already cooked from a grocery store, restaurant or fast food place.
There’s another reason making your own snack might be a good idea.
Can you think of what that might be?
Sometimes, foods we prepare ourselves can be healthier than foods we
purchase elsewhere. For example, having a bowl of cereal at home is
usually a lot healthier than grabbing a candy bar or doughnut from a
vending machine. Another example is that making something like
spaghetti and salad at home for dinner will usually be better for your
body than fast food. Can anyone think of other examples?
Part 2: HANDWASHING
There’s something VERY important we need to do before we start
cooking. Who can guess what?
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
It’s washing our hands. Why is that so important?
It’s because even if your hands don’t look dirty, they can still have lots
of germs on them that can get on your food and make you sick.
Always give your hands a good washing before you start touching food
and after you touch raw meat, chicken, fish or eggs.
Who can guess how many seconds of hand washing it takes to get your
hands really clean? It takes a full 20 seconds! A fun way to keep track
is to sing two choruses of “Happy Birthday” because that takes about
20 seconds!
It’s also important to wash your hands again after you finish fixing food.
You also can wash your hands with a liquid hand cleanser, moist
towelettes or a spray bottle of soapy water and a spray bottle of plain
water instead. These come in handy when there’s no soap and running
water, like when you’re camping or on a picnic.
Let’s wash up! (Use one of the above methods to wash hands; sing two
choruses of “Happy Birthday.”)
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FUN
LET’S GET COOKING!
3
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN (CONTINUED)
FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITY:
Hand out remaining two
recipes to kids. Ask them
to prepare at least one of
them at home with their
parents.
At the next meeting, ask
kids which recipe they
tried and how they and
other family members
liked it.
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
This is a recipe preparation activity.
Divide kids into teams at workstations and provide each child with a
copy of the recipe their team will prepare.
Have kids read the recipe all the way through before they get started.
Be on hand to provide assistance and answer questions.
When the teams are finished, have them serve and sample the finished
product.
Ask: How do you like this snack? Do you think it’s good for you? Why?
Is cooking fun? Why? Will you make this snack again at home?
Have kids help clean up their workstations. Wash hands again.
Ask what other
cooking/food preparation
activities they do at home.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FUN
LET’S GET COOKING!
INSECT-INFESTED LOGS
Makes 4 servings
WHAT’S IN IT?
4 (8-inch) celery stalks
1/2 cup creamy peanut butter
2 tablespoons currants
2 tablespoons apricot bits or 6 dried apricots sliced into mini “worm-like” pieces
STUFF YOU NEED
Cutting board
Cutting knife
Butter knife
Dry measuring cups
Measuring spoons
4 snack-size plates
HOW TO PUT IT TOGETHER
1. Sit the celery stalks down on a cutting board. Saw each celery stalk in half with a cutting
knife to make eight (4-inch) pieces.
2. With a butter knife, spread the peanut butter from its measuring cup in each piece of celery.
These are your “logs.”
3. On top of the peanut butter, sprinkle the currants (“baby ants”) and apricots (“worms” or
“larvae”) straight from their measuring spoon.
4. Lay two Insect-Infested Logs onto each plate.
5. Take a bite—if you’re not too grossed out! They’re weirdly wonderful!
WHY IT’S GOOD FOR YOU
Per serving: 220 Calories, 16 g Total Fat, 3.5 g Saturated Fat, 0 mg Cholesterol, 190 mg
Sodium, 14 g Total Carbohydrates, 3 g Dietary Fiber, 9 g Sugars, 9 g Protein, 8% Vitamin A,
6% Vitamin C, 4% Calcium, 6% Iron
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
4
FUN
LET’S GET COOKING!
SUPER DUPER
SHAKIN’ SNACK MIX
Makes 3 servings
WHAT’S IN IT?
1 cup mini pretzels
1 cup white cheddar cheese or cheese flavored popcorn
1/2 cup puffed wheat or other mini wheat cereal
1/4 cup cashew halves and pieces or peanuts, lightly salted
1/4 cup raisins
STUFF YOU NEED
Large-size bowl
Dry measuring cups
3 sealable, sandwich-size plastic bags
HOW TO PUT IT TOGETHER
1. Into a large-size bowl, dump each ingredient from a dry measuring cup.
2. Toss the ingredients together by shimmyin’ and shakin’ the bowl!
3. Throw the snack mix into 3 sealable, sandwich-size plastic bags.
4. Grab it as a speedy snack on the go!
WHY IT’S GOOD FOR YOU
Per serving: 200 Calories, 9 g Total Fat, 2 g Saturated Fat, 0 mg Cholesterol, 460 mg Sodium,
27 g Total Carbohydrates, 2 g Dietary Fiber, 10 g Sugars, 5 g Protein, 4% Vitamin A, 4% Vitamin C,
2% Calcium, 10% Iron
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
5
FUN
LET’S GET COOKING!
GRAPE-N-CHEESE
MINI KABOBS
Makes 2 servings
WHAT’S IN IT?
24 red or green grapes
4 ounce chunk part-skim mozzarella cheese
STUFF YOU NEED
Small bowl
Cutting board
Cutting knife
12 toothpicks
2 snack plates
HOW TO PUT IT TOGETHER
1. Measure out the grapes into a small bowl.
2. Plop the cheese onto a cutting board.
3. Cut the cheese with a cutting knife into 12 cubes—like dice!
4. Slide 1 grape, 1 cheese cube and 1 more grape onto each toothpick.
5. In clock-like style, lay out a spiral of the kabobs on 2 snack plates—2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and
12 o’clock!
WHY IT’S GOOD FOR YOU
Per serving: 200 Calories, 10 g Total Fat, 6 g Saturated Fat, 30 mg Cholesterol, 300 mg
Sodium, 12 g Total Carbohydrates, less than 1 g Dietary Fiber, 10 g Sugars, 16 g Protein,
8% Vitamin A, 10% Vitamin C, 40% Calcium, 2% Iron
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
6
KEEP YOUR BODY PARTS RUNNING RIGHT!
FUN
KEEP YOUR BODY PARTS RUNNING RIGHT!
GOALS
1
KEEP YOUR BODY PARTS
RUNNING RIGHT!
When kids are having
fun, they hardly know
they’re learning! The
Quick Start Ideas
and Activity Action
Plan in this module
will help you:
Use a fun format to teach kids about the
relationship between healthy eating, physical
activity and a healthy body.
Give specific information on what various body
parts do and how to keep them healthy.
Provide easy “health tips” for kids to try.
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN
WHAT YOU NEED:
❑
Have kids complete the
“What’s Missing? Find My
Body Parts Game” handout.
Have kids complete the
“What’s This For
Anyway? Matching
Game” handout. Then,
review the functions of
each body part.
Have kids complete the
“Body Parts Quiz” handout
and discuss the answers
(Note: this activity may work
better with kids who are in
6th grade and older).
At each meeting, use the
“Go” and “Whoa”
information from the InnerG
handout or computer game,
or the information in the
“Body Parts Quiz” handout
to give tips on what’s healthy
and unhealthy for a body part.
❑
❑
IF A COMPUTER IS NOT AVAILABLE: Copies of the following four
handouts (one for each child): “What’s Missing? Find My Body Parts
Game,“ “What’s This For? Matching Game,” “InnerG—Go and
Whoa!” and the “Body Parts Quiz.” Pens/pencils, scissors and glue to
complete handouts.
IF A COMPUTER IS AVAILABLE: If you have Internet access, you can do
this activity “live” by logging onto Kidnetic.com/guide and going to the
InnerG section of the site. Make sure to familiarize yourself with how
the game works so you can explain it to the kids.
(Optional) Flip chart, board or paper to record kids’ ideas.
WHAT TO DO:
Use the Talking Points/Discussion Questions to discuss how healthy
eating and physical activity help the body stay healthy and feeling well.
Proceed with one of the Follow-Up Activity options described below. Then,
assign and explain one or more of the Take-Home Activities.
TALKING POINTS/DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
❑
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
Did you know that you own one of the most amazing machines ever
created? Guess what it is (you all have one)? Your body! Think about it,
everything about your body from your brain, eyes and teeth to your
blood, muscles and inner organs is incredible! People have built many
machines, but we’ll probably never create body parts that work as well
as the ones we have right now!
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FUN
KEEP YOUR BODY PARTS RUNNING RIGHT!
2
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN (CONTINUED)
❑
If you used the handouts
only (no computer) with the
group and kids are not
online at home:
Ask each child to take
home their completed
matching game and/or
quiz to test their parents
and/or siblings about
their “body part smarts.”
If you played the InnerG
game on the computer with
the group:
Give each child copies of
the “What’s This For
Anyway? Matching
Game” and the “Body
Parts Quiz” handouts to
complete at home with
their parents.
If kids are online at home:
Assign each child an
InnerG body part. Ask
them to go to the InnerG
game at Kidnetic.com/
guide and to “click and
drag” their assigned body
part into the correct area
of InnerG. A Bright Paper
related to their body part
will pop up under the Go
and Whoa window. Ask
them to read the paper and
write down 2 or 3 facts to
present to the group at the
next meeting.
❑
❑
❑
❑
I’m going to name some important body parts—who can tell me what
each one does? (Use the “InnerG—Go and Whoa!” handout to
review functions of the 10 listed body parts.)
Eating healthy and getting lots of exercise are important for a healthy
body, to look good and to have lots of energy so you can play hard and
do other fun things.
What are some eating habits that are good for your body? Eating
breakfast every day and eating lots of fruits and vegetables are two
good habits. They help give you energy.
What are some eating habits that are not so good for your body?
Skipping breakfast, eating the same foods over and over and getting too
full all the time aren’t so good for your body and can zap your energy.
Also not good is having too many “once in awhile” things like chips,
cake, sweets and soft drinks more than once in awhile.
Getting lots of exercise and moving around a lot revs up your body!
Spending too much time sitting around can make your body feel
sluggish. How does your body feel when you move around a lot? When
you sit around a lot?
FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES:
If using handouts only (no computer):
Give each child copies of the “What’s Missing? Find My Body
Parts,” “What’s This For Anyway? Matching Game,” “InnerG—
Go and Whoa!” and “Body Parts Quiz” handouts and a pen/pencil,
scissors and glue.
❑
❑
❑
❑
Explain how to complete the handouts. (Note: quiz may work better
with children in 6th grade and older. For younger children, skip the quiz,
complete the “What’s Missing? Find My Body Parts” and “What’s
This For Anyway? Matching Game” handouts and review the
“InnerG—Go and Whoa!” handout).
After kids complete the handouts, go around the room and have each
child give one answer from the quiz and/or matching game, or have the
whole group shout out the answers. If you didn’t use the quiz, have
each child talk about a “GO” or “WHOA” for one of the body parts.
Ask kids what new things they learned about staying healthy and which
ones they’ll try. Ask what they already knew and what habits they
already do.
(continued on next page)
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FUN
KEEP YOUR BODY PARTS RUNNING RIGHT!
3
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN (CONTINUED)
If using the InnerG computer game:
Assign each child one of the 10 InnerG body parts (eyes, bones,
kidneys, muscles, blood, heart, brain, teeth, intestines or liver).
❑
Assign each child an
InnerG body part. Ask
them to go to the InnerG
game at Kidnetic.com/
guide and to “click and
drag” their assigned body
part into the correct area
of InnerG. Recipes
related to their body part
will pop up under the Go
and Whoa window. Ask
them to make one at
home with their parents
and to tell the group
about it at the next
meeting.
❑
❑
❑
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
Each child takes a turn to “click and drag” their assigned body part into
the correct area of InnerG. Then, they read aloud the “Go” and Whoa”
that pops up for their assigned body part.
Continue until each child has a turn and all of InnerG’s body parts are
assembled.
Ask kids what new things they learned about staying healthy and which
ones they’ll try. Ask what they already knew and what habits they
already do.
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FUN
KEEP YOUR BODY PARTS RUNNING RIGHT!
DI RECT I ONS: InnerG is missing some important
parts. Cut out the missing parts below and glue them back
where they belong. Then check out the InnerG—Go and
Whoa! handout to see what keeps each part healthy (GO)
or not so healthy (WHOA).
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
4
FUN
KEEP YOUR BODY PARTS RUNNING RIGHT!
DI RECT I ONS: Draw a line between each body part and its job.
BODY PART
HERE IS MY JOB
Brain
Pumps blood to all parts of the body.
Form your framework so you can stand up straight and tall.
Eyes
Send images to your brain so you can see.
Teeth
Carries oxygen and nutrients to your cells and hauls away
waste.
Muscles
Absorb nutrients (like carbohydrates, protein, fat, vitamins and
minerals) from food and make solid waste from the rest that
comes out when you go to the bathroom.
Blood
Bones
Filters and cleans germs out of your blood and stores some
vitamins until you need them.
Heart
Grind up your food into tiny pieces so you can swallow it.
Liver
Controls your ability to think, speak, see, hear, remember
things and feel stuff.
Work constantly to filter extra water and other things from
your blood to make urine.
Kidneys
Intestines
Contract so you can move your body.
To check your answers, look at the “Jobs in Your Body” column for each body part on the
“InnerG—Go and Whoa!” handout.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
5
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
Send images to your
brain so you can see.
Grind up your food into
tiny pieces so you can
swallow it.
TEETH
Controls your ability to
think, speak, see, hear,
remember things and
feel stuff.
BRAIN
EYES
JOBS IN YOUR BODY
BODY PART
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
Stop slipping those veggies to the dog! You need to
eat them for healthy eyes.
Don’t snack all the time. The more times you snack,
the more your teeth are under an “acid attack” that
can cause cavities—YIKES!
Keep your eyes peeled on cooked carrots. Both raw
and cooked carrots contain beta-carotene, which your
body turns into vitamin A—one of the good guys for
your eyes. Cooking softens up the carrot so your body
gets more beta-carotene out of it.
Scrub ‘em. Always put that toothbrush in your mouth
after you eat to brush away carbohydrates— things
found in some foods that can cause cavities.
Pick your teeth, not your nose. Now go get in there and
floss ‘em, Kid! Flossing cleans between your teeth where
your toothbrush can’t reach.
Dude! Don’t go out in the sun without shades! Not
only is it totally uncool, but the sun can hurt your eyes
if you don’t protect them.
Use your noodle! Don’t even think about skipping
breakfast, especially before a test. Your brain needs
fuel to figure out the answers.
WHOA
Be bright about fruits and veggies. The brighter the
color, the more goodies for our eyes. Look into red
peppers, carrots, spinach, berries and cantaloupe.
Try some brain food that’s tough to pronounce. Ask
Mom, Dad or another adult to cook one of these
tongue-twisting whole grains: quinoa (KEEN-WAH),
triticale (TRIHT-IHKAY-LEE), bulgur (BUHL-GUHR),
couscous (KOOS-KOOS) or kamut (KAH-MOOT).
Feed your brain its favorite foods. It thrives on the
carbohydrates in bread, cereal, pasta, fruits and veggies.
GO
INNERG—GO & WHOA!
KEEP YOUR PARTS WORKING
KEEP YOUR BODY PARTS RUNNING RIGHT!
FUN
6
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
BONES
Form your framework
so you can stand up
straight and tall.
Carries oxygen and
nutrients to your cells
and hauls away waste.
Contract so you can
move your body.
MUSCLES
BLOOD
JOBS IN YOUR BODY
BODY PART
&
FAMILIES
Get your bones in motion by playing, running and
jumping. Moving your bones makes them stronger.
Chug a couple glasses of low fat milk or orange juice
with calcium. Do it daily. Your bones need it bad
because 99% of the calcium in your body is in your
bones.
Improve your iron intake. Gulp down some OJ with
your oatmeal or cold cereal. The vitamin C in the OJ
helps your body use more of the iron in the oatmeal or
cold cereal.
Get your blood pumping by eating foods with lots of
iron. The mineral iron is an important part of your red
blood cells, which carry oxygen all over your body.
Fuel your muscles with carbohydrates like bread, pasta
and cereal. Carbohydrates are your muscles’ favorite
fuel source. Plus, muscles store some carbohydrates in
case they need fuel later.
GO
Don’t bore your bones. If you want strong ones, you
gotta excite ‘em by moving ‘em. Sitting around a lot
can make your bones get weaker.
Sheeeesh. How many times do we have to say this?
Don’t skimp on foods and drinks with lots of calcium!
Your body needs calcium for strong bones and to use
for other important jobs in your body. When you don’t
get enough calcium, your body “robs” calcium from
your bones to use in other ways.
Don’t skip foods with iron in them! If you do, you
might feel tired all the time. That’s because your red
blood cells need iron to carry oxygen all around your
body.
Don’t slack. Get outta here. Go. PLAY. Your muscles
like to get used. The more you use them, the stronger
they get.
No need to eat mountains of meat. Sure, meat
contains protein just like your muscles do—but eating
tons of protein won’t make your muscles stronger. All
you need is about 6 ounces of high-protein foods a
day. That’s two pieces of beef, chicken or fish that are
the size of a deck of cards.
WHOA
KEEP YOUR BODY PARTS RUNNING RIGHT!
FUN
7
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
Work constantly to filter
extra water and other
things from your blood
to make urine.
Absorb nutrients (like
carbohydrates, protein,
fat, vitamins and minerals)
from food and make solid
waste from the rest that
comes out when you go
to the bathroom.
KIDNEYS
INTESTINES
Filters and cleans germs
out of your blood and
stores some vitamins
until you need them.
Pumps blood to all parts
of the body.
HEART
LIVER
JOBS IN YOUR BODY
BODY PART
&
FAMILIES
Move your body so food rides smoothly right through
you. It makes total sense. The more you move and
jiggle things around inside your intestines, the quicker
and easier “stuff” comes out!
Eat foods that make you “go”…to the bathroom! The stuff
called “fiber” in foods like fruits, veggies and raisin bran
makes it easier for you to have a B.M. (Bowel Movement).
Make a watery mess with watermelon juice trickling
down your chin. You don’t have to drink all your water
to have healthy kidneys. The water in watery foods
like watermelon, oranges and cucumbers counts, too!
Flood your kidneys. Drink lots of water. That makes it
easier for your kidneys to make urine (pee) by filtering
extra fluids and other stuff from your blood.
Fill ‘er up. Your liver loves the carbohydrates in bread,
cereal, rice and pasta. Your liver stores some
carbohydrates as an emergency fuel source for your
body in case you start to run low.
Get your heart pumping. Breathe hard. Bike, dance, run
and jump. That means PLAY! Why? Because your heart
is a muscle that likes a good workout.
Color your meals. Eat red, orange, yellow, green and
blue by getting lots of different fruits and veggies. The
colors mean there’s cool “food chemicals” in there
that help keep your heart healthy.
GO
Don’t dry out. Drink water. And then drink some more.
The more water you drink, the softer the stuff in your
intestines gets, which makes it easier to go to the
bathroom.
Don’t forget to drink enough fluids, otherwise your pee
will be dark and smelly_P.U. central! You’re drinking
enough—and making it easier for your kidneys to
work—when you make a lot of pee that’s light in color.
Don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink up. Your insides
are already too dry by then. That makes it harder for your
kidneys to remove “waste” from your body in your urine.
Anyway, what do you want, the Sahara Desert inside you?
No, no, no, no, no. You don’t actually have to eat liver
to keep your liver healthy. All your liver asks is for you
to eat healthy by following the Food Guide Pyramid.
Don’t scarf down too much fatty stuff. If you do, over
time, you might make it hard for your heart to pump
blood through your vessels.
Don’t be a couch spud, Bud. Get away from the
screen. Now. A healthy heart needs action, not a lot
of sitting around.
WHOA
KEEP YOUR BODY PARTS RUNNING RIGHT!
FUN
8
FUN
KEEP YOUR BODY PARTS RUNNING RIGHT!
Take this quiz to find out how to keep your body parts in good working order. For each
statement, fill in the blank with the correct body part from the list below. Then, check
the answers at the bottom. Don’t peek!
BODY PARTS: EYES BONES
KIDNEYS MUSCLES
1. The “carbs” (carbohydrates) in bread, pasta
and cereal are great fuel to make your
__________ move.
2. Eating foods with fiber like fruits, veggies
and raisin bran and getting some exercise
helps stuff move smoothly through your
__________ and come out the other end!
BLOOD HEART
HEART BRAIN TEETH INTESTINES LIVER
6. Don’t get rattled! The formula for healthy
__________ is easy: Get plenty of calcium
(like from milk) + do lots of playing, running
and jumping.
7. WWHHRRRRR! Want to avoid the dentist’s
drill? Give your __________ the brush after
you eat.
3. Pumping up on foods with iron like meat,
spinach and many cereals is important for
healthy __________.
8. Keep the beat! Your __________ is a
muscle. Get it thumping and make it stronger
by biking, dancing, running and jumping.
4. Rely on it! Your __________ stores some of
the carbohydrates in bread, pasta and cereal
as an emergency fuel supply.
9. Eating breakfast before a test is smart cuz it
helps your __________ get down to business.
5. Who are you kidding? You know you should
drink lots of water so your __________ can
do their job of making urine (pee).
10. Don’t look now, but eating bright-colored
fruits and veggies like berries, cantaloupe,
carrots and red peppers is great for your
__________.
Want to learn more? Go to www.kidnetic.com/guide to play with InnerG—a cool click-anddrag game that helps you keep your body parts healthy!
4. liver
&
3. blood
5. kidneys
6. bones
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
FAMILIES
2. intestines
7. teeth
&
ANSWERS: 1. muscles
8. heart
9. brain
10. eyes
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
9
TUNING IN TO FOOD ADVERTISING AND MARKETING
FUN
TUNING IN TO FOOD ADVERTISING AND MARKETING
GOALS
1
TUNING IN TO FOOD
ADVERTISING AND MARKETING
Children are exposed
to a steady stream
of advertisements
for foods and drinks.
The Quick Start
Ideas and Activity
Action Plan in this
module will help you:
Raise kids’ awareness of techniques used in
food ads and on food packages that capture
attention and give products appeal.
Call attention to the appropriateness of food
and drink portion sizes depicted in ads and to
the presence or absence of physical activity
messages/examples.
Highlight promotional messages/techniques
used on food packages.
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN
WHAT YOU NEED:
Ask kids to describe a food
or drink ad they saw
recently, whether they
wanted to try the product
and why. Use background
information found in the
Teaching Your Kids About
Food Advertising and
Marketing Bright Paper
to help kids understand and
evaluate advertising
techniques that make the
product appealing.
❑
Teaching Your Kids About Food Advertising and Marketing Bright
Paper—review for background information plus one copy for each child
to take home
❑
Magazine ads for various foods and drinks—at least one ad for each
child to evaluate. Include ads for a variety of foods/drinks such as fast
food, pizza, snack chips, candy, fruits/vegetables, soft drinks, sports
drinks, milk, fruit juice, etc.
❑
Materials for food packaging discussion—e.g., an apple plus 2-3
packaged apple products such as a box of apple juice, a jar of
applesauce and a single-serve apple pie.
❑
“Be a TV Food Ad Reviewer” handout—one copy for each child to
take home
❑
(Optional) Flip chart, board or paper to record kids’ ideas
WHAT TO DO:
At lunch or snack time, ask
kids to examine packaged
foods and drinks they’re
consuming (e.g., granola bar,
milk carton, juice box, etc.)
and to describe what
elements of the package
make the product appealing.
❑
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
Use the Talking Points/Discussion Questions below to talk about food
advertising and how to evaluate it. Refer to the Teaching Your Kids
About Food Advertising and Marketing Bright Paper for additional
background information. Following the discussion, explain the TakeHome Activity.
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FUN
TUNING IN TO FOOD ADVERTISING AND MARKETING
2
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN (CONTINUED)
TALKING POINTS/DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:
Give each child a copy of
the Teaching Your Kids
About Food Advertising
and Marketing Bright
Paper and the “Be a TV
Food Ad Reviewer”
handout to take home.
Ask kids to give the Bright
Paper to their parents to
read and to complete the
handout with their
parents while watching
TV. At the next meeting,
ask each child to use their
completed handout to
give their “review” of a
TV ad they saw. Ask
whether completing the
activity changes the way
they “view” food and
drink ads and how they
might react differently to
ads in the future.
Record food commercials
on videotape and bring to
class. Have kids watch
commercials with you and
complete the “Be a TV
Food Ad Reviewer”
handout. Ask whether
completing the activity
changes the way they “view”
food and drink ads and how
they might react differently
to ads in the future.
❑
Today we’re talking about advertisements for things you eat and drink
to find out why ads might make you want to try the product.
❑
What do you think is the purpose of food ads? Companies use ads to
help sell their products.
❑
Who can describe an ad for a food or drink that you saw recently in a
magazine or newspaper or on TV? Did the ad make you want to try the
food/drink? Why? Do you already eat/drink the product? If so, did
seeing an ad have anything to do with you trying it for the first time or
for continuing to eat/drink it?
❑
What things do companies include in their ads to sell their products?
Some common things are animation, music, bright colors or celebrities.
❑
(Give each child one magazine ad to review.) Can you name some ways
your ad tries to catch your attention and sell the product? (Allow each
child an opportunity to respond.)
❑
What does the ad seem to say that the product will do for you (e.g.,
you’ll be stronger, smarter, have more fun if you eat/drink the product)?
Do you believe it?
❑
How do these things affect your thoughts about the product and
whether you want to try it?
❑
(If you’ve conducted the Food Guide Pyramid module) How does the
portion size of the product shown compare to what’s recommended by
the Food Guide Pyramid? How does it compare to the amount you
usually eat?
❑
Does your ad show someone being physically active/getting some
exercise? Would showing that be a good thing? Why? Remember, being
active is important because it helps burn off some of the food you eat
so you stay at a healthy weight.
❑
Companies use a product’s package as another way to draw attention to
the product.
❑
(Refer to apple/apple products or your chosen examples.) Let’s compare
this apple to the packaged products that are made with apples. What is
the same about each item? What is different? What do you like about
each item? What do you dislike? Which one are you more likely to
choose? How does the way the product looks/what’s on the package
help you form your opinion?
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FUN
TUNING IN TO FOOD ADVERTISING AND MARKETING
3
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN (CONTINUED)
❑
What are some other things you see on food packages that might make
you want the product? Examples are “premiums,” such as when there’s
a prize inside the box or you can send for a product; being able to enter
a sweepstakes or contest for a chance to win a prize; or being able to
join a club of some type.
❑
Who’s ever asked for a food product so you could have/participate in
one of these things? Tell us about it and whether you ended up liking it
as much as you thought you would.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FUN
TUNING IN TO FOOD ADVERTISING AND MARKETING
Companies that make foods and drinks often advertise on TV, hoping you’ll want to buy
their product. To help you decide, it’s good to think about how ads “talk” to you.
Grab Mom or Dad (or both!) and tune into the tube to “review” some ads (commercials)
for foods or drinks. Use the spaces below to write down what you think about one ad.
What food or drink was featured in the ad?
__________________________________
__________________________________
What does the ad do to catch your attention and
help sell the product (for example, does it use
animation, music, bright colors or celebrities)?
__________________________________
__________________________________
__________________________________
What does the ad seem to say the product will do
for you (for example, you’ll be stronger, smarter,
have more fun if you eat/drink the product)?
__________________________________
__________________________________
__________________________________
Do you believe this? Why?
__________________________________
__________________________________
__________________________________
Is the amount of the food or drink shown in the
ad too big to eat or drink at one time, too small
or just right?
__________________________________
__________________________________
Does the ad show people doing active things like
getting some exercise? If so, what are they doing?
__________________________________
__________________________________
After seeing the ad, do you want to try the food
or drink? Why?
__________________________________
__________________________________
Overall, I give this ad a (check one)
Thumbs Up
❑
❑ Thumbs Down
Explain why:
__________________________________
__________________________________
Excellent job! After all that hard work, learn some fun ways to move your body at www.kidnetic.com/guide.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
4
FUN
TUNING IN TO FOOD ADVERTISING AND MARKETING
5
Teaching Your Kids About Food
Advertising and Marketing
Helping Kids Understand and Evaluate Food Ads
Like many parents, you may be concerned
about how the food advertisements your
children see affect their eating habits.
A good way to begin evaluating food advertising messages is to point out products in
television and magazine ads, and ask your children to describe the similarities and
differences. While discussing the ads, ask:
Kids ask for products such as fast food,
cookies, candy, chips and soft drinks for
many reasons. For example, kids like the
taste or might associate eating them with
fun family times. Seeing ads for these
products is another reason kids request
them. Nutrition experts agree that all
foods can fit into a healthful diet when
children and adults practice balance,
variety and moderation in their food
choices. It’s important to teach children
that foods such as whole grains, fruits,
vegetables, lean meats and low-fat dairy
products contain more nutrients (such as
vitamins and minerals) than other foods
and should form the foundation of their
diets. Good ways to help your children
make healthful choices are to show them
how to follow the Food Guide Pyramid,
lead by example and help them
understand and evaluate food ads.
What methods (e.g., animation, music, bright colors or celebrities) do the
manufacturers use to sell their products?
How do these methods affect your children’s thoughts about these products?
Do the props make the product more interesting to them?
What is the message? (e.g., you’ll be stronger, smarter, have more fun if you
eat/drink the product.) Do your children believe it?
How does the portion size of the product shown compare to what’s recommended by
the Food Guide Pyramid? How does it compare to the amount your child usually eats?
A product’s packaging is another way to draw attention to the product. To illustrate, ask
your children to examine an apple; then ask them to look at the packaging or labels on
apple juice, applesauce or apple pie. Ask them to explain the similarities and differences
between each product, and what they find attractive about each product.
Special Promotions: Premiums, Sweepstakes and Contests, Clubs
Three popular methods of marketing foods are “premiums,” “sweepstakes and contests”
and “clubs.” These are appropriate forms of children’s advertising as long as they meet
the Children’s Advertising Review Unit’s (CARU) Self-Regulatory Guidelines for Children’s
Advertising (discussed in next section). Knowing about the following CARU suggestions
for advertisers can help you and your children benefit from these types of ads.
Premiums
Premiums have been around since Dick Tracy decoder rings and Little Orphan Annie stickers
were offered more than 60 years ago. Children sometimes have difficulty distinguishing
products from premiums. Therefore, CARU suggests that advertisers do the following:
If product advertising contains a premium message, the child’s attention should be
focused primarily on the product. The premium message must clearly be secondary.
Conditions of a premium offer should be stated simply and clearly. Disclaimers and
disclosures should be stated in terms that can be understood by the child audience.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FUN
TUNING IN TO FOOD ADVERTISING AND MARKETING
Sweepstakes and Contests
Interactivity—The child should
perform some action whereby he or
she joins the club and receives
something in return (e.g., filling out
a form or application and receiving
a card or certificate). Watching a
program or eating in a restaurant
does not constitute membership.
Sweepstakes can be exciting, as any adult
who has played a lottery or entered a
drawing can attest. Advertisers must be
careful not to raise children’s expectations
about their chances of winning or inflate
their perception of the prize(s) offered. When
you see an ad with a sweepstakes, notice if
the advertiser has followed these points:
The prize(s) should be clearly
presented.
Continuity—There should be an
ongoing relationship between the
club and members, such as a
newsletter.
The likelihood of winning should be
clearly noted in the audio portion of
the commercial in language
children can understand.
Exclusivity—The activities or
benefits derived from club
membership should be exclusive to
its members.
All prizes should be appropriate for
the child audience.
Be sure that any information that the
sponsoring organization receives about
your children is used only for this club and
not released to other services.
Alternate means of entry should be
disclosed.
CARU’s Self-Regulatory
Guidelines for Children’s
Advertising
Online contests should not
require the child to provide more
information than is necessary
and, where possible, should be
limited to providing the child’s
and parent’s e-mail addresses.
When a child enters a contest,
parents should be contacted
directly to provide offline contact
information to fulfill the contest.
The Children’s Advertising Review Unit
(CARU) of the Council of Better Business
Bureaus is the industry-supported selfregulatory system of the children’s
advertising industry.
CARU works with the industry to ensure
that advertising directed to kids is truthful,
and above all, fair. By promoting
adherence to self-regulatory guidelines,
CARU seeks to maintain a balance
between regulating the messages children
receive from advertising and promoting
the dissemination of important information
to children through advertising.
Kids’ Clubs
Kids love clubs! Anytime your children want
to join a club, be sure to ask several key
questions (What will you get? What will the
club entitle you to? Is a purchase necessary?
How much do you have to spend?) Before
advertisers use the word "club," the
following requirements should be met:
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
CARU’s Guidelines* are based on the
following seven basic principles:
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
6
1. Advertisers should always take into
account the level of knowledge,
sophistication and maturity of the
audience to which their message is
primarily directed. Younger children
have a limited capacity for evaluating
the credibility of information they
receive. They also may lack the ability
to understand the nature of the
information provided. Advertisers,
therefore, have a special responsibility
to protect children from their own
susceptibilities.
2. Realizing that children are imaginative
and that make-believe play constitutes
an important part of the growing up
process, advertisers should exercise
care not to exploit unfairly the
imaginative quality of children.
Unreasonable expectations of product
quality or performance should not be
stimulated either directly or indirectly
by advertising.
3. Products and content which are
inappropriate for use by children
should not be advertised or promoted
directly to children.
4. Recognizing that advertising may play
an important part in educating the child,
advertisers should communicate
information in a truthful and accurate
manner and in language understandable
to young children with full recognition
that the child may learn practices from
advertising which can affect his or her
health and well-being.
5. Advertisers are urged to capitalize on
the potential of advertising to influence
behavior by developing advertising that,
wherever possible, addresses itself to
positive and beneficial social behavior,
such as friendship, kindness, honesty,
justice, generosity and respect for others.
FUN
TUNING IN TO FOOD ADVERTISING AND MARKETING
7. Although many influences affect a
child’s personal and social development,
it remains the prime responsibility of
the parents to provide guidance for
children. Advertisers should contribute
to this parent-child relationship in a
constructive manner.
6. Care should be taken to incorporate
minority and other groups in advertisements
in order to present positive and pro-social
roles and role models wherever possible.
Social stereotyping and appeals to
prejudice should be avoided.
*The Guidelines apply to advertising addressed
to children under age 12, except for Internet
and online advertising, which apply to children
under age 13.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
To learn more about the CARU
Self-Regulatory Guidelines for
Children’s Advertising or to find
out how to complain about a
children’s ad that runs afoul of
CARU standards: www.caru.org.
Reviewed by the Kidnetic.com Scientific
Advisory Panel, 2002
7
BUILDING HEALTHY SELF-ESTEEM
FEELINGS
BUILDING HEALTHY SELF-ESTEEM
GOALS
Our feelings and
thoughts about
ourselves make up
our self-esteem.
Having high selfesteem increases
the likelihood that
children will make
decisions that are
right for them,
rather than following
the crowd.
1
BUILDING HEALTHY
SELF-ESTEEM
The Quick Start Ideas and Activity Action Plan
in this module will help you:
Explain to kids the concept of self-esteem.
Help kids identify signs of high and low selfesteem.
Teach kids how to improve their own selfesteem, as well as a friend’s.
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN
WHAT YOU NEED:
❑
Use the information in the
Self-Esteem and You! and
Developing Your Child’s
Self-Esteem Bright Papers
to briefly explain to kids the
concept of self-esteem.
Then, ask each child to
name a favorite activity that
helps them feel good about
themselves. Encourage
them to name interpersonal
activities such as giving a
compliment or helping
someone with a homework
problem, rather than naming
physical attributes such as
running fast or being pretty.
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
Self-Esteem and You! Bright Paper—review for background
information plus one copy for each child
Sheets of paper and pens/pencils for the Follow-Up Activity
Developing Your Child’s Self-Esteem Bright Paper—review for
background information plus one copy for each child to bring home
“Top 20 Ways to Build Healthy Self-Esteem” handout—one copy
for each child
“You’re Invited to a Special Plate Dinner Event” handout—one
copy for each child
(Optional) Flip chart, board or paper for recording kids’ ideas
WHAT TO DO:
❑
Use the Talking Points/Discussion Questions to discuss the concept
of self-esteem. Conduct one of the Follow-Up Activities. Then, assign
and explain one or both of the Take-Home Activities.
TALKING POINTS/DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:
❑
❑
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
Today we’re talking about “self-esteem.” Does anyone know what selfesteem is?
Self-esteem is the way you think about yourself and the things you do.
Having high self-esteem means you feel proud of who you are and what
you can do. People with high self-esteem have the courage to try new
things and they expect good things to happen to them.
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FEELINGS
BUILDING HEALTHY SELF-ESTEEM
2
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN (CONTINUED)
❑
Give each child a copy of the
“Top 20 Ways to Build
Healthy Self-Esteem”
handout and explain how to
fill it out. Ask kids to work
with their parents at home
to check off ideas they will
try and to fill in 1 or 2 of
their own ideas. Also give
each child a copy of the
Developing Your Child’s
Self-Esteem Bright Paper
for their parents to read.
At the next meeting, ask
kids to share feedback.
What ideas from the
handout did you try? How
did you feel about yourself
after trying the ideas?
What new ideas did you
hear from others today that
you will try?
Give each child a copy of the
“invitation” handout so they
can invite their parents and
other family members and
caregivers to a “special
plate” dinner event. Use the
information on the invitation
to explain the activity.
At the next meeting, ask
kids to share feedback.
What did your family say
about you when you ate
dinner on the “special
plate?” How did you feel?
What good things did you
say about your family
members or caregivers
when they ate dinner on
the “special plate?” How
did they feel?
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
People with high self-esteem are willing to do things like asking
questions that might make them look dumb, sharing embarrassing
stories with friends or sharing secrets with friends. They take these risks
because they have confidence that others view them in a positive way.
Do you have a friend with high self-esteem? How can you tell?
Having low self-esteem means you aren’t feeling very good about
who you are and what you can do. People with low self-esteem are
sometimes afraid to try new things because they think they will fail.
They may also believe that others don’t like them or that they cannot
depend on the friendship of others.
Do you have a friend with low self-esteem? How can you tell?
Having high self-esteem can help you make choices that are smart
for you even if other people are doing things differently. Can you think
of ways that having high self-esteem might help you?
Many successful people actively do things to boost their self-esteem.
For example, many write down all the positive things they can
remember others saying about them. Try this for yourself. Start a list
of good things others have said about you and add other good things
you know about yourself. When you need a boost, look at your “good
things” list. It can help cheer you up!
Here’s something else to try: Think about the thing that bothers you
most about yourself and keeps you from feeling good about who you
are and what you can do. Try to decide whether or not you can do
something to change this thing. If you can’t work it out by yourself,
talk it over with your parents or another adult you trust and ask for
help on how to make things better.
Sometimes, doing healthy things like moving around more or eating
better help your self-esteem, too.
What are other ways to help improve your self-esteem? What are ways
to help a friend with low self-esteem feel better?
FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITY:
❑
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
If the group knows each other fairly well: Give each child a pen or
pencil and enough sheets of paper to write down the names of all the
children in the group (one name per sheet). Then, ask each child to write
down one thing they like or enjoy about being with each of the other
children. If a child can’t think of a positive thing about another child,
gently encourage them with some suggestions (e.g., Do you like the way
he smiles? The way she jumps rope? The color of his shirt?). Collect the
sheets. (Alternative ideas to using sheets of paper: tape an index card to
each child’s back and have kids write compliments down on card.)
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FEELINGS
BUILDING HEALTHY SELF-ESTEEM
3
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN (CONTINUED)
❑
❑
Compile the sheets and read aloud the comments made about each
child. How does it feel to hear positive things others said about you?
Which thing makes you feel the best? Which thing surprised you the
most? How did you feel toward the other kids? Are you more likely or
less likely to want to talk to them and be friends? (Give each child the
sheets about themselves to take home.)
If the group doesn’t know each other very well: Give each child a
pen or pencil and a sheet of paper. Break kids into pairs and have them
spend 5 minutes “interviewing” each other to find out interesting things
about the other child. Then, have each child tell the rest of the group
about the child they interviewed. Types of interview questions to ask:
• What’s your favorite food?
• What’s your favorite color?
• What’s your favorite subject in school?
• What’s your favorite way to play outside?
• What’s one thing you are really good at doing?
• What’s one thing you are working on getting better at doing?
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FEELINGS
BUILDING HEALTHY SELF-ESTEEM
Having high self-esteem doesn’t just happen by itself! Sometimes you have to try new things to help
you feel good about yourself.
Over the next few days, try a few of the ideas below and see how you feel afterward. Check off the
ideas you tried and put “TS” next to the ideas you will “Try Soon.” Some of the ideas may not seem
like ways to make you feel better but they might make your family or friends feel good—which lifts
your spirits, too! Add your own “feel good” ideas to the bottom of the sheet.
Move more every day:
walk, run, swim, jump, play
Ask your Mom, Dad or a
grandparent to remind you
of all the things they love
about you
Try a new food
Learn to make something
new to eat
Smile and say hello to at
least one new person today
Appreciate nature: watch a
sunrise, gaze at the stars
or walk in the woods
Do a job around the house
without being asked
Take an art class
Help someone out
Talk to a friend
Tell yourself encouraging
things
Find a new friend
Encourage a friend
Learn a new skill like
walking on your hands,
skateboarding or juggling
Keep a diary or journal
Pay someone a
compliment
Accept compliments with
a “thank you” instead of a
“yeah, right”
Create a scrapbook of
your favorite memories
Get creative: write a poem
or a story or draw a picture
Create a “feel good” box
with notes, pictures, and
other reminders of things
that make you feel good
Volunteer at a senior center,
animal shelter or other
community organization
What other ways can you think of to boost your self-esteem?
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
Find out more ways to feel good about yourself at www.kidnetic.com/guide.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
4
FEELINGS
BUILDING HEALTHY SELF-ESTEEM
HOSTED BY: Your Family
WHEN:
Any Time Your Family Eats Dinner Together
WHERE:
Your Table
Find a dinner plate in your house that is different from the ones your family usually
uses. Each time the family has dinner together, let a different person eat their
dinner from the special plate, starting with the youngest family member. During the
meal, family members take turns saying one thing they appreciate, like or enjoy
about the person with the special plate.
WHY:
Builds self-esteem (especially among children) and encourages communication
between family members.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
5
FEELINGS
BUILDING HEALTHY SELF-ESTEEM
6
Self-Esteem and You!
So, What the Heck is Self-Esteem?
Ever heard of something called “selfesteem?” It’s a very important part of
what makes you who you are. But
other kids can’t see it like they see the
color of your hair or your eyes, or
whether you are short or tall. You can’t
see it either, but it affects how you act
and feel every day.
To understand self-esteem, let’s break it down into two parts. Having
“esteem” for someone or something means you think that person or thing has
a lot of value. Here’s an example. If you really admire your mom for all her
hard work at her job and at home, it means you “hold her in high esteem.” It’s
the same as saying you appreciate her or value her.
And “self,” of course, is talking about YOU! When you put the two together,
you get self-esteem! It means how much you value yourself and the things
you do.
The Higher the Esteem, the Better
High self-esteem is the same as good self-esteem. Low self-esteem is the
same as bad self-esteem. You should always shoot for high self-esteem. The
higher the better!
But what does high self-esteem really mean? High self-esteem is important
because it helps you feel proud of what you can do in school or around the
house, or when you play. It also gives you the courage to try new things and
expect good things to happen. High self-esteem means you like yourself, even
if you make a mistake.
When your self-esteem is high, you think positive thoughts about yourself.
You value yourself and try to make decisions that will help you stay healthy,
like trying to eat pretty well, exercising enough and getting plenty of rest.
That way, you’ll have enough energy to do all the things you want to do.
What’s the Deal with Low Self-Esteem?
Maybe you know a kid who has low self-esteem. This kid might be hard on
him/herself–like telling him/herself that he/she isn’t any good at math so
he/she shouldn’t even try. Or, he/she may think that nobody likes him/her and
does not expect other kids to be nice to him/her very often.
When you were younger, you might have heard the story “The Little Engine
that Could.” The story is about a little engine that keeps telling himself, “I
think I can, I think I can” when he’s faced with a big challenge. The engine is
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FEELINGS
BUILDING HEALTHY SELF-ESTEEM
How to Help a Friend
showing high self-esteem, but if he had low self-esteem,
he might keep telling himself “I think I can’t, I think I
can’t.”
Do you know someone who might have low self-esteem?
Here are some tips that can help him or her to increase
their self-esteem:
Sometimes a kid will have low self-esteem if others don’t
encourage him/her enough or if they put him/her down a
lot. Other times, a kid’s self-esteem can be hurt at school
if classes are too hard and he/she begins to think he/she
isn’t smart. Sometimes, a kid feels bad about the shape
of his/her body. The good thing is that a kid’s self-esteem
can get higher when a teacher, friend or parent
encourages him/her.
Remember that people are OK no matter what
shape, size or color their body comes in. If your
friend is worried about his/her weight or size,
suggest that he/she talk it over with his/her
parents. They might take him/her to the doctor to
make sure that things are all right. A school nurse
or guidance counselor is good to talk with, too.
Some kids with high self-esteem can start to feel bad
about themselves. This could happen when a kid moves
and doesn’t make new friends right away. Or, if a kid’s
parents decide to get a divorce, the kid might worry a
little about whether his/her parents can still do things
with him/her like before.
When you do active stuff like playing sports or
riding bikes, encourage your friend to join you
rather than sitting on the sidelines or staying home.
Sometimes we need to love and accept things that
can’t be changed, like skin color and shoe size.
Compliment your friend about his/her good points,
like, "I wish my legs were as strong as yours. You
skate really well."
Don’t Go Low
Of course, everyone feels low now and then. But
having low self-esteem is not OK because it can stop
you from doing new things, making friends or trying
your best in school.
Find a way to tell your friend that you’re glad
he/she is your friend. You might say that you’re
glad he/she took a walk with you, or that you like
eating lunch with him/her.
Having good self-esteem is an important part of growing
up. As you get older, you’ll keep facing tough
decisions—especially when other kids pressure you. If
you have high self-esteem, you’ll have the confidence to
make your own decisions. Although usually it’s fun to do
what your friends do, sometimes friends decide to do
something you don’t want to do. Kids with high selfesteem make their own decisions—the decision that’s
right for them.
Ask your friend if it’s OK to give him/her a special
nickname. If he/she thinks he/she’s too short, ask if
you can call him “Big Man” or “Shaq.” If he/she thinks
he/she’s too big, ask if you can call him “Tiny” or
“Slim.” Funny nicknames like these can let your friend
know that you don’t care what he/she looks like—you
just want to have fun and be friends with him/her.
Reviewed by the Kidnetic.com Scientific Advisory Panel, 2002
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
7
&
FAMILIES
FEELINGS
BUILDING HEALTHY SELF-ESTEEM
8
Developing Your Child’s Self-Esteem
Signs of Healthy and Unhealthy Self-Esteem
Healthy self-esteem is an important part
of a child’s armor against the challenges
of the world. Kids who feel good about
themselves seem to have an easier time
handling conflicts and resisting negative
pressures. They tend to smile more readily
and enjoy life. These kids are realistic and
generally optimistic.
Self-esteem can be defined as a combination of feeling loved and capable.
A child who is happy with his/her achievements but does not feel loved may
eventually experience low self-esteem. Likewise, a child who feels loved but
is hesitant about his/her own abilities can also end up feeling poorly about
himself. Healthy self-esteem results when both aspects are achieved.
Self-esteem fluctuates as a child grows. It is frequently changed and finetuned, as it is affected by a child’s experiences and new perceptions. It helps
for parents to be aware of the signs of both healthy and unhealthy self-esteem.
In contrast, for children who have low
self-esteem, challenges can become
sources of major anxiety and frustration.
Children who think poorly about their
abilities have a hard time finding solutions
to problems. The more they have selfcritical thoughts and self-doubts, such as
"I’m no good" or "I can’t do anything right,"
the more likely they may become passive,
withdrawn or depressed. Faced with a
new challenge, their immediate response
is "I can’t." Read on to discover the
important role you can play in promoting
healthy self-esteem in your child.
A child who has healthy self-esteem tends to enjoy interacting with others.
She’s comfortable in social settings and enjoys group activities as well as
independent pursuits. She’s willing to pursue new interests. When challenges
arise, she is able to work toward finding solutions. She voices discontent
without belittling herself or others. For example, rather than saying, "I’m an
idiot," she says, "I don’t understand this." She knows her strengths and
weaknesses, and accepts them. A sense of optimism prevails.
A child who has unhealthy self-esteem may not want to try new things. He
frequently speaks negatively about himself, saying such things as, "I’m
stupid," "I’ll never learn how to do this," or "What’s the point? Nobody cares
about me anyway." He exhibits a low tolerance for frustration, giving up
easily or waiting for someone else to take over. Children with low self-esteem
see temporary setbacks as permanent and intolerable conditions, in part
because these setbacks seem like a pattern to them. Children with low selfesteem may not expect much from others, such as invitations to do things
together. A sense of pessimism predominates.
What Parents Can Do to Help
How can a parent help to foster healthy self-esteem in a child? Here are
some tips that can make a big difference:
Watch what you say. Children are very sensitive to parents’ words.
Remember to praise your child not only for a job well done, but also for
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FEELINGS
BUILDING HEALTHY SELF-ESTEEM
their effort. But be truthful. For example, if your
child doesn’t make the soccer team, avoid saying
something like, "Well, next time you’ll work harder
and make it." Instead, say something like, "Well,
you didn’t make the team, but I’m really proud of
the effort you put into it." Reward effort and
completion instead of outcome.
proud of her. Leave a note in her lunch box that
reads, "I think you’re terrific!" Give praise
frequently and honestly, without overdoing it. Kids
can tell whether something comes from the heart.
Give positive, accurate feedback. A comment
such as, "You always eat too much,” may cause a
child to start believing it. A better statement is, "I
noticed you snacked a lot after school today, but
then you chose an apple for dessert tonight. That’s
one good way to make sure you don’t eat too
much.” This encourages her to make a healthy
choice again next time.
Be a positive role model. If you are excessively
harsh on yourself, pessimistic or unrealistic about
your abilities and limitations, your child may
eventually mirror you. Nurture your own selfesteem, and your child will have a great role model.
If something bad happens, don’t make general
negative statements about others, such as, “People
are mean” or “You can’t count on anybody.” Your
child may not realize that your statements are
stronger than how you really feel.
Help your child become involved in
constructive experiences. Activities that
encourage cooperation rather than competition are
especially helpful in fostering self-esteem. For
example, mentoring programs in which an older
child helps a younger one practice a favorite sport
can do wonders for both children.
Identify and redirect your child’s inaccurate
beliefs. A child who is a good softball player, but
strikes out sometimes may say, " I’m no good at
softball. I always strike out.” Not only is this a
false generalization, it’s also a belief that will set
him up for failure. Encourage your child to see the
situation in its true light. A helpful response might
be, "You are a good softball player. You have a
great throwing arm and run the bases really fast.
You just need to spend more time on your swing.
We’ll work on it together."
Consider professional help. If your child has low
self-esteem, he or she may benefit from talking
with a professional. Ask your child’s doctor or your
religious advisor for a referral to a therapist,
clinical psychologist or mental health counselor
who specializes in children’s issues.
For information on psychology and self-esteem issues, go to
the American Psychological Association’s help center.
Be spontaneous and affectionate with your
child. Your love will go a long way to boost your
child’s self-esteem. Give her hugs. Tell her you’re
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
9
Reviewed by the Kidnetic.com Scientific Advisory Panel, 2003
&
FAMILIES
FAMILY
FAMILY MODULES
Parents’ support of and participation in the Take-Home Activities in these modules is crucial for
reinforcing the healthy habits kids learn about with the group. Below is a sample note for you to
customize and send or mail home to parents as you begin the modules. The note describes what
their child will be learning about and encourages them to participate at home.
The note also introduces topics and handouts from the Family modules, which are designed for
parents to use at home with their children.
Over the next (few days, weeks), your child will learn
basic principles for leading a healthy lifestyle,
especially in the areas of physical activity and healthy
eating. Your child will learn about and participate in
activities relating to (Insert names or general
descriptions of the activity modules you plan to cover).
SAMPLE NOTE
FOR PARENTS
ENCOURAGING
THEIR
PARTICIPATION
IN TAKE-HOME
ACTIVITIES
During this time, I will send home handouts, work
sheets and articles for you to review or work on with
your child. Your interest and support in doing these
assignments at home is essential for helping your child
practice the ideas learned in class.
In addition, I’m enclosing information meant just for
you on two important topics. The first topic is about
your important job as a role model for fostering
healthy habits in your kids. The second topic is about
how to “keep the lines of communication” open with
your kids. I hope you find this information useful and
will try some of the ideas and activities.
Please contact me if you have questions or feedback.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
WHERE YOU LEAD THEY WILL FOLLOW:
A PARENT’S IMPORTANT JOB AS A ROLE MODEL
FAMILY
WHERE YOU LEAD THEY WILL FOLLOW:
A PARENT’S IMPORTANT JOB AS A ROLE MODEL
1
WHERE YOU LEAD,
THEY WILL FOLLOW:
A PARENT’S IMPORTANT JOB
AS ROLE MODEL
GOALS
When it comes to
establishing healthy
eating and physical
activity habits, parents
are the most influential
role models for their
children. If parents
practice healthy habits,
children usually follow
their lead. The Activity
Action Plan in this
module will help parents:
Understand the importance of their job as a
role model for establishing healthy habits in
their kids.
Provide ideas for role modeling healthy
behaviors.
Consider ways that families can “team up” to
take small steps toward better health.
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN
WHAT YOU NEED:
Have kids pair up. One child
acts as the “parent/adult,” the
other as the “child.” Have the
“child” ask the “parent/adult”
to do one of the suggested
activities listed on the “Take
the Lead” handout and to
explain to the “parent/adult”
why it’s important to them.
❑
“Take the Lead! You’re the Most Important Role Model”
handout—one copy for each child to take home or one copy to mail
home to each child’s parents
❑
Make Fitness a Family Affair Bright Paper handout—one copy for
each child to take home or one copy to mail home to each child’s parents
❑
Note for parents encouraging participation in the activity (see sample note)
WHAT TO DO:
❑
Send, mail or e-mail the note, the handout and the Bright Paper home
to parents.
(OPTIONAL) FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITY:
❑
At a later meeting, use the Talking Points/Discussion Questions
below to ask kids what their families are doing together to eat healthier
or be more physically active.
TALKING POINTS/DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:
❑
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
Doing things to be healthy is a lot more fun when you do them with
other people. Some of the best people to get healthy with are your
parents (or caregivers) or your brothers and sisters.
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FAMILY
WHERE YOU LEAD THEY WILL FOLLOW:
A PARENT’S IMPORTANT JOB AS A ROLE MODEL
2
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN (CONTINUED)
❑
Can you think of anything you usually do with your family/caregivers
that helps you eat healthy or be active?
❑
What are some things you might ask your family to try that will help all
of you be healthier?
❑
For example, could you ask them to…(use ideas from the “Take the
Lead” handout to suggest things kids might ask their
parents/caregivers to try).
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FAMILY
WHERE YOU LEAD THEY WILL FOLLOW:
A PARENT’S IMPORTANT JOB AS A ROLE MODEL
“Actions speak louder than words,” according to traditional wisdom.
If you want your kids to eat healthy and be physically active, look to your own actions first. If you
are practicing healthy habits, your kids are more likely to follow your lead. Like many people, you
might be struggling to improve your own habits. Below are some ways to make healthy changes as
a family. Try a new tip each week, but be realistic—small steps work better than giant leaps!
at least 3 of the 5 Pyramid
food groups are included.
Eat meals together as
often as possible. You’ll
eat healthier and catch up
at the same time.
Let your kids help in the
kitchen. They’ll learn
fast and eat well at the
same time.
Use cooking and shopping
time as family time.
Head out for a family walk
or bike ride each evening
after dinner.
Take up a new sport as a
family.
Stop watching from the
sidelines: play with your kids
Take the kids on a
supermarket safari! Pick a
Pyramid food group and
let kids “hunt down” one
new food to try.
Let everyone choose the
amount of food that’s right
for his or her hunger level.
When eating out,
encourage your family to
split large entrees and
desserts or take half home
to enjoy the next day.
Make the table a battlefree zone. Schedule a
family meeting at a
later time to handle
disagreements.
Turn off the TV during
meal times. Tune in to
your internal signals of
hunger and fullness
instead.
Avoid monitoring and
commenting on what and
how much your kids eat.
Provide a balanced meal
and let them choose from
what’s offered.
Make it a family rule that
snacks and meals are
eaten at the table and not
in front of the TV.
Have each family member
plan at least one meal per
week. Make sure foods from
Plan a family vacation with
lots of activities like hiking,
swimming or biking.
Walk your kids to school.
Cancel your membership
in the clean plate club!
Eat until you’re satisfied
and then STOP.
For more tips on raising a healthy family, go to the Parents’ Place area at www.kidnetic.com/guide.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
3
FAMILY
WHERE YOU LEAD THEY WILL FOLLOW:
A PARENT’S IMPORTANT JOB AS ROLE MODEL
4
Make Fitness a Family Affair
In today’s world of cars, computers, TV and
every possible convenience imaginable, it’s
tough for adults and kids alike to be
physically active–and it shows.
Head out for a family walk or bike ride each evening after dinner.
Spend a weekend afternoon roller-skating, in-line skating or playing
touch football.
According to the Surgeon General’s report
on Physical Activity and Health, more than
60 percent of adults aren’t physically
active on a regular basis, and 25 percent
aren’t active at all.
Go on a family vacation that includes lots of hiking, swimming or biking.
Participate as a family team in a charity fun run, fun walk or car wash.
Purchase a family membership at the community recreation center, YMCA
or health club. Schedule family trips there a few times each week.
Children soon follow in their parents’
footsteps. Nearly half of young people are
not vigorously active on a regular basis,
with dramatic declines occurring during
adolescence.
Practice sports such as basketball, baseball or soccer with the kids.
Take tennis or golf lessons together. Check your local park district for
opportunities.
Sedentary people of all ages miss out on
the many benefits of physical activity. These
include reducing risk for chronic diseases
such as heart disease, diabetes and high
blood pressure, as well as promoting a
healthy weight, strong bones, muscles and
joints and a sense of well-being.
Team up to do housework or yardwork.
Visit walking-friendly places such as museums and zoos.
Reviewed by the Kidnetic.com Scientific Advisory Panel, 2002
As a parent, you play a vital role in
helping your children to stay active for
life. Be a role model–be physically active
yourself and display a positive attitude
that being active is fun and feels good.
Provide regular opportunities for the whole
family to enjoy physical activity together.
This list of ideas will get you started:
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
COMMUNICATING WITH KIDS
FAMILY
COMMUNICATING WITH KIDS
GOALS
Parents who regularly
spend time talking
with their kids are
more in tune with how
kids think and feel.
When parents talk
with their kids about
the importance of
healthy habits, kids
1
COMMUNICATING WITH KIDS
usually will listen. The Activity Action Plan in
this module will help parents:
Understand the importance of talking
regularly with their kids about concerns
for their health and other issues.
Implement basic ideas for establishing open
communication between themselves and
their kids.
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN:
WHAT YOU NEED:
❑
Have kids pair up. One child
acts as the “parent/adult,” the
other as the “child.” Have the
“child” practice starting a
conversation about a tough
problem with the “parent/adult.”
Here are some suggested
topics if kids need ideas for
what to talk about:
Being teased or bullied at
school or elsewhere;
Being offered cigarettes
or drugs by other kids;
Getting a bad grade on a
test or report card;
Feeling bad about how
you look;
Having trouble with
friends at school.
❑
❑
❑
“Communicating with Kids: Keep the Lines Open” handout—one
copy for each child to take home or one copy to mail home to each set
of parents
“Parenting Isn’t for Sissies: Resources That Can Help” handout—
one copy for each child to take home or one copy to mail home to each
set of parents
Note for parents encouraging participation in the activity (see sample note
in the introduction of the Family modules)
(OPTIONAL) Is Something Bugging You? How to Ask for Help
Bright Paper—one copy for each child
WHAT TO DO:
❑
Send, mail or e-mail the note and the handouts home to parents.
(OPTIONAL) FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES:
❑
❑
(continued)
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
When you meet with the kids, give each child a copy of the Is
Something Bugging You? How to Ask for Help Bright Paper. Ask
kids to read and discuss it at home with their parents.
Use the Talking Points/Discussion Questions below to help kids
brainstorm ways to talk to their parents about problems and concerns.
Then provide them with copies of the Is Something Bugging You?
How to Ask for Help Bright Paper to read and bring home to talk
over with their parents.
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FAMILY
COMMUNICATING WITH KIDS
2
ACTIVITY ACTION PLAN (CONTINUED)
TALKING POINTS/DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:
❑
If kids need ideas for what to
say first:
Something happened at
school and it’s bothering
me. Can we talk about it?
I want to talk to you
about something but I’m
afraid you are going to
get mad at me. Can we
talk about it?
❑
❑
❑
Have you ever had a problem that was really bugging you that you
weren’t sure how to handle? What did you do?
Who can you talk to when you have a tough problem?
Sometimes it can be hard to talk to your parents about tough problems.
Who can think of ways to make it easier to talk to your mom, dad or
caregiver about a tough or embarrassing problem? (If kids run out of
ideas, use suggestions from the Is Something Bugging You? Bright
Paper.)
Talking to someone (mom, dad, relative, caregiver, teacher or another
adult) can really help you feel better: don’t keep it all to yourself when
you are having a tough time. Let other people help!
I’m feeling really bad
lately about a situation.
Can you help me figure
out what to do?
I need to tell you about
something and I know you
won’t like it. Instead of
trying to tell me how to fix
it or getting mad, will you
please just listen to me?
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
FAMILY
COMMUNICATING WITH KIDS
Communication between children and parents is the foundation for strong family
relationships. No matter what issues concern you, establishing a strong, trusting
relationship with your child means they’ll be more likely to follow your example and meet
your expectations. And, if your children feel comfortable talking with you, you’ll have a
better chance of guiding them in the right direction—whether it’s toward health or away
from danger. Below are some ways to keep the lines of communication open.
Encourage Conversation: Be available to your child. Turn off the phone, TV and
computer during certain hours like dinnertime and tune into your children instead. If possible,
set up a routine at dinner for family members to discuss the day’s activities. Do your best to
listen without interrupting or expressing judgment or criticism about what they say.
Use Active Listening Skills: Active listening means showing your child you are
focusing on what they are saying. Look directly at them with an open facial expression and
periodically express nonverbal understanding by nodding your head or saying “uh-huh.”
When your child wants to tell you something, listening fully without trying to solve their
problem or making judgments may be the best solution. Kids are very good at solving
problems themselves. Sometimes they’re just looking for an encouraging nod to know that
you understand.
Control Your Emotions: Sometimes kids will tell you things that will alarm or anger you.
Try not to respond, especially if you are angry. Take a few deep breaths and keep listening.
After you calm down, tell your child how you feel and why. For example, if your child says she
uses her lunch money to buy treats at school, you might say, “When you use your lunch money
to buy treats instead of a meal, I worry that you won’t get the important vitamins and minerals
you need to stay healthy.” Then, see if you can find a solution that works for both of you.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
3
FAMILY
COMMUNICATING WITH KIDS
Respect Your Child’s Viewpoint: Kids often see things differently from their parents.
When this happens, gain a better understanding of their perspective by asking your child why
he or she feels or thinks the way they do. Avoid lecturing about why they are wrong. If you
respect your child’s viewpoint, they are more likely to respect yours as well.
Do a Daily “Walk and Talk:” Take a 10-15 minute walk with your child to discuss a
topic such as the importance of healthy eating or physical activity, school, current events,
sports or family matters. Take turns deciding the topic.
Take Special Time to be Together: Spending special time alone with each of your
children helps improve communication. Each week, go on an outing, take a walk or enjoy a
special meal. Don’t use this time to solve problems or bring up concerns—just enjoy being
together!
For a fun way to communicate with your kids, try the Kidnector e-mail messaging service at
www.kidnetic.com/guide.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
4
FAMILY
COMMUNICATING WITH KIDS
Children don’t come with directions. You aren’t alone if you find raising your kids to be
an extremely challenging job. Here are some ways to find answers and get help with
parenting issues.
Your pediatrician, school guidance counselor, local library, or hospital can direct you to
parenting classes, books and hotlines. In addition, many online resources are listed
below. If you don’t have a computer at home, you can access the Internet free-of-charge
at most libraries.
FOR INFORMATION, PARENTING
RESOURCES AND HOTLINES:
National PTA’s Common Sense:
Strategies for Raising Alcohol and
Drug-Free Children
(www.pta.org/commonsense/index.html)
FOR PARENTING TIPS, ARTICLES,
BOOKS AND INTERVIEWS WITH
EXPERTS ON A VARIETY OF
PARENTING TOPICS:
FOR ONLINE PARENTING CLASSES:
Parents Encouraging Parents
(www.parentingonline.org)
TO FIND A SUPPORT GROUP:
Parents Anonymous
(www.parentsanonymous.org)
TO “CHAT” ONLINE WITH OTHER
PARENTS:
Positive Parenting
(www.positiveparenting.com)
Parent Soup (www.parentsoup.com)
The Parent's Journal with Bobbi
Conner (www.parentsjournal.com)
Dr. Spock (www.drspock.com)
The National Parenting Center
(www.tnpc.com)
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
5
FAMILY
COMMUNICATING WITH KIDS
6
Is Something Bugging You?
How to Ask for Help
Here are five steps for what to do:
Did you ever have a problem that
was really bugging you? Maybe you
wanted to talk it over with your
parents, but you were kind of nervous
about it or didn’t know how to bring
it up. That’s OK! Everybody feels that
way sometimes. Your parents will
want you to talk with them so they
can help you. When you finally do
talk to your folks, I bet you’ll be
surprised (and relieved) at how well
they can handle embarrassing
conversations. That’s a big part of
their job. After all, they’re parents!
1. Try to figure out what’s really bothering you. Maybe another kid
at school is teasing you, or you don’t like something about the way
you look. It’s OK if you’re not sure. It’s enough to tell your parents
that you’re feeling bad and have them help you figure out why.
2. Practice how you’ll say it. If you’ve ever been in a school play, you
know it’s important to rehearse your lines. It’s the same thing with
knowing how to bring up problems. You could practice saying, “Mom,
something that happened at school is bothering me. Can we talk about
it right now?” But don’t worry if it doesn’t come out perfect—Mom
and Dad won’t care! Would you care if a younger brother or sister
couldn’t find the right words to tell you what was bothering them? Of
course not! That’s kind of like how mom and dad will feel with you.
3. Decide whether you want to talk to both your parents together,
or just mom or just dad. It’s okay to talk to just one of them at first.
Then choose when might be a good time to talk. Sometimes you’ll
want to make sure it’s quiet and you’re alone. Maybe that’s when
you’re eating dinner together, when one of them is driving you
somewhere, or when they come in your room to say good night. Other
times it’s easier to talk if you’re doing something but you don’t need
100 percent concentration for it, such as playing catch or cooking
together. Of course, if the problem is super-important—like you are
hurt or in trouble—you’ll need to tell your parents right away and
shouldn’t wait for an “ideal” time to tell them.
4. If you have an idea for how your parents can help you, tell
them about it and see what they think. It’s OK if you don’t have
an idea—they can help you figure out a way to solve your problem.
Or maybe you just want them to listen—that’s fine, too.
5. If you don’t feel like talking to Mom or Dad about your
problem, talk to someone else who cares about you and who
you feel good around. Maybe it’s one of your grandparents, a
school counselor, a teacher or an aunt or uncle.
One thing’s for sure—talking over your problems with someone you trust
almost always helps you feel tons better!
Reviewed by the Kidnetic.com Scientific Advisory Panel, 2003
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
STAY CONNECTED VIA E-MAIL!
1
STAY CONNECTED VIA E-MAIL!
STAY CONNECTED VIA E-MAIIL!
Once the module series ends, you can continue to reinforce the healthy new habits kids learned
about and began to practice during the series. “Staying connected” with kids and parents via e-mail
is a fun and quick way for you to send follow-up information, tips and “words of encouragement”
that help the family sustain a healthy lifestyle. Below is a sample note for you to customize and send
home to parents toward the end of the series. The note asks parents to provide an e-mail address so
you can send follow-up messages. (Use the parent’s e-mail address to reach their children.)
Also below are sample e-mail messages for you to send to kids and to parents at regular intervals
(e.g., every month or so following the end of the series). Customize these messages or use them as a
guide to create your own.
NOTE: If you or the children’s families don’t have e-mail access, consider modifying the information and sending it by regular
mail. If this isn’t realistic, think about other ways to reach the families once you have completed the modules. Perhaps you can
put healthy tips in a community newsletter, school newspaper or weekly notices sent out by schools to parents.
SAMPLE NOTE
ASKING
PARENTS
TO PROVIDE
E-MAIL
ADDRESSES
TO RECEIVE
FOLLOW-UP
INFORMATION
As you know, for the past several weeks, (child’s name)
has participated in activities relating to leading a
healthy lifestyle, especially in the areas of physical
activity and healthy eating. I enjoyed having (child’s
name) in class and hope you enjoyed being involved
during the “at home” activities.
(OPTIONAL: Add statement evaluating child’s progress
during the activity series.)
Our activity series is drawing to a close and we’ve
accomplished a lot. To help healthy new habits take hold,
I’d like to occasionally send e-mail messages to you and
your child to provide additional information, tips and ideas.
If you want to receive these e-mail messages, please
provide the information below and return to me by
(insert date).
Please contact me if you have questions or feedback.
Thank you!
YES, please send me and my child additional
information at this e-mail address: ______________________
Child’s Name:____________________________________________________
Parent’s Signature: ______________________________________
Date: ________________________________________________
Return this form to: (Insert contact information)
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
2
STAY CONNECTED VIA E-MAIL!
Subject: Ideas to Get Moving and Get More Energy
SAMPLE
FOLLOW-UP
E-MAIL
MESSAGES FOR
CHILDREN
Hi (insert child’s name)!
I was just thinking about all the fun ways we got
moving and got more energy when our group met
(time frame)! Are you still (insert activity conducted
during series such as moving around for 60 minutes
a day, counting your steps, cutting down on screen
time, etc.)?
If you need an energy boost, go to www.kidnetic.com
right now and try out today’s Betchacant activity—I
dare you! Or try out a Wet Head Game. Better yet,
create and submit your own—I bet it will be great!
Healthy regards,
(insert name)
Subject: Yummy Recipes
Hi (insert child’s name)!
Did you enjoy the time we made (insert recipe name)
together? Are you hungry now? How about a bowl of
Brewed Monkey Brain Stew or a few Sawed-off
Thumbs? Yum! You can find recipes for these
delicious dishes in the Gross Out Delights section of
the Recipe Roundup at www.kidnetic.com.
While you’re there, check out the Bright Papers
“Food” section for articles like What the Heck is
Junk Food? and Why Drinking Water is the Way to Go.
I think you’ll like them!
Healthy regards,
(insert name)
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
3
STAY CONNECTED VIA E-MAIL!
Subject: Helping Self-Esteem
SAMPLE
FOLLOW-UP
E-MAIL
MESSAGES FOR
CHILDREN
(CONT.)
Hi (insert child’s name)!
One of my favorite meetings was when we talked
about self-esteem and how to feel good about
ourselves—remember that?
I saw an article in the Bright Papers “Feelings” section
at www.kidnetic.com called Being You is a Beautiful
Thing! I wanted you to know about it because it has
some great tips for feeling good about yourself every
day—I hope you like it!
Healthy regards,
(insert name)
Subject: Additional Resources for Healthy Families
SAMPLE
FOLLOW-UP
E-MAIL
MESSAGES FOR
PARENT
Dear (insert parent’s name):
I hope you and (insert child’s name) enjoyed
participating in our healthy lifestyle activities and that
the whole family is benefiting from some healthier
eating and physical activity habits.
To keep the momentum going, I encourage you to visit
the Parents’ Place area at www.kidnetic.com. Here
you’ll find lots of Bright Paper articles packed with
tips on raising a healthy family. Just a few examples
are Time-Saving Tactics for Healthy Family Eating,
Make Fitness a Family Affair, Four Steps for Helping
an Overweight Child and Tip the Calorie Balance in
Your Family’s Favor.
Take a peek at the kids’ area as well to see how
www.kidnetic.com makes physical activity and healthy
eating fun for your child.
Healthy regards,
(insert name)
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
4
STAY CONNECTED VIA E-MAIL!
Subject: Great Family Friendly Recipes
SAMPLE
FOLLOW-UP
E-MAIL
MESSAGES FOR
PARENT (CONT.)
Dear (insert parent’s name):
When our group met, we had fun making and eating a
recipe called (insert recipe name). I hope you and
(insert child’s name) had an opportunity to make one
of the recipes I sent home for you to try together.
Cooking with kids is an excellent way to spend time
together and to foster healthy eating habits. For a
variety of easy recipes you and your child can make
together, go the Family Friendly section of the Recipe
Roundup at www.kidnetic.com.
I think your whole family will enjoy dishes like French
Toast with Tropical Fruit Salsa, Sloppy Turkey Joes
and Make-your-own Taco Bar.
Healthy regards,
(insert name)
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
MEASURE YOUR SUCCESS
1
MEASURE YOUR SUCCESS
MEASURE YOUR SUCCESS
This section contains information and forms that will help you evaluate the impact of
implementing the Kidnetic.com modules. The guidelines below provide a simple way to
measure program outreach and the Leader’s Guide’s effect on health behaviors. If you
need to collect more in-depth evaluation data, please see the “Additional Resources”
section under “Tools for Measuring Your Success.”
WHY MEASURE YOUR SUCCESS?
Allows you to measure the impact your program is having on participants.
Provides justification for funding to share with decision-makers.
Points out ways to improve your program.
HOW TO MEASURE
Ask participants to complete the Check Your Health form both before you begin teaching the
modules and after you complete them. Compare answers given by the same participant before
and after teaching the modules.
Complete the Tally Sheet to record information about the number of participants, handouts
distributed or number of families reached.
After completing the module series, use the Follow-Up Summary form to record contacts
made with participants via e-mail.
WHAT TO MEASURE
Using the Check Your Health form, assess how many participants went from “I don’t usually
do this” to either “I would like to try this soon” or “I do this most of the time.”
Using the Tally Sheet, document the number of participants in each module, number of
handouts distributed and number of families reached, allowing you to collect any information
that illustrates how you reached your community.
Using the Follow-Up Summary form, track the subject and number of follow up e-mail
messages sent to participants.
WHEN TO MEASURE
Before and after completing the modules as a way to gauge behavior change.
While the modules are conducted to track participation and handout distribution.
After the modules are completed to track follow-up contacts and feedback.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
2
MEASURE YOUR SUCCESS
TOOLS FOR MEASURING YOUR SUCCESS
Check Your Health form
Tally Sheet to track activity modules
Follow-Up Summary form to track post-activity e-mail contacts (sample follow up messages
are located in the Stay Connected Via E-mail section)
Additional Resources—If you need to conduct a more in-depth evaluation, the resources
below will help you learn more about program evaluation and offer ideas on how to collect
additional information:
• Centers for Disease Control Handbook on Evaluating Physical Activity Programs:
http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/physical/handbook/pdf/handbook.pdf
• Performance Indicators from Hearts N’ Parks Program:
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/prof/heart/obesity/hrt_n_pk/cm_perf.pdf
• Administration on Children, Youth, and Families (ACYF) has developed THE PROGRAM
MANAGER’S GUIDE TO EVALUATION:
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/core/pubs_reports/prog_mgr.html
• An online publication about program evaluation for non-profit groups:
http://www.mapnp.org/library/evaluatn/fnl_eval.htm
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
3
MEASURE YOUR SUCCESS
Please check one of the following:
❑ I am just starting to learn
❑ I have already learned about
about ways to be healthier.
ways to be healthier.
For each of the ideas below, please check off (✔) if you:
✔Do this most of the time
❑
✔Would like to try this soon
❑
✔Don’t usually do this
❑
I do this most I would like to I don’t usually
of the time
try this soon do this
I eat 5 fruits and vegetables every day.
I eat my meals and snacks at a table instead of
while watching TV.
I spend more time playing outside or doing other
things than watching TV.
I read labels on food items to check the
serving size.
I eat breakfast every day so I will have energy and
feel great.
I feel good about who I am and what I can do.
I spend at least an hour every day in motion:
walking, riding, playing, or swimming.
I eat the right amount of foods from all the
groups of the Food Guide Pyramid.
I serve myself when I eat so I won’t eat more than
I really want to.
I snack only when I am hungry, not when I am bored.
I eat in a healthy way to keep my body healthy
and strong.
I wash my hands to stay healthy.
I make my own snacks to stay healthy.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
4
MEASURE YOUR SUCCESS
TALLY SHEET
Module Taught
Date
# of Participants
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
# of Handouts Distributed
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
# of Families Reached
5
MEASURE YOUR SUCCESS
FOLLOW-UP SUMMARY FOR
E-MAIL MESSAGES SENT
Date Sent:______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Subject: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
# Participants Reached: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Comments: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Date Sent:______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Subject:__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
# Participants Reached: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Comments: _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Date Sent:______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Subject: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
# Participants Reached: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Comments: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Date Sent:______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Subject:__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
# Participants Reached: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Comments: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Date Sent:______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Subject: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
# Participants Reached:________________________________________________________________________________________
Comments: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Sample follow-up e-mail messages are located in the Stay Connected Via E-mail section.
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
RESOURCES
1
RESOURCES
GENERAL RESOURCES
The links below will take you to background information on physical activity, nutrition
and body weight for children:
PHYSICAL ACTIVITY
Importance of physical activity:
• http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/physical/importance/index.htm
Importance of physical activity to health:
• http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/physical/importance/inactivity.htm
Physical activity recommendations for young people:
• http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/physical/recommendations/young.htm
You inspire strong minds (brochure for classroom teachers):
• http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dash/physicalactivity/brochures/pdf/teacher.PDF
NUTRITION AND BODY WEIGHT
Dietary guidance for healthy children aged 2 to 11 years:
• http://www.eatright.org/Public/GovernmentAffairs/92_adap0199.cfm
Overview of childhood overweight:
• http://www.aphafoodandnutrition.org/overwt.html
Trends and statistics on childhood overweight:
• http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/pubs/pubd/hestats/overwght99.htm
PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND HEALTHY EATING
Resources and tools to promote health among children of all ages:
• http://www.kidnetic.com
• http://www.ific.org
• http://www.brightfutures.org
• http://www.verbnow.com
• http://www.5aday.com
• http://www.fns.usda.gov/TN
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
2
RESOURCES
RESOURCES FOR
REGISTERED DIETITIANS/
NUTRITION/
HEALTH PROFESSIONALS
The links below are for you if you promote healthy eating and physical activity to kids
and their families or work with overweight children in a clinical, community or
classroom setting.
ASSESSING WEIGHT STATUS IN CHILDREN
CDC growth chart training modules:
• http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/growthcharts/training/modules/modules.htm
Body Mass Index (BMI) for children and teens:
• http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/bmi/bmi-for-age.htm
Growth Chart: Body Mass Index for Age, Boys 2 to 20 years:
• http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhanes/growthcharts/set3/chart%2015.pdf
Growth Chart: Body Mass Index for Age, Girls 2 to 20 years:
• http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhanes/growthcharts/set3/chart%2016.pdf
Body Mass Index (BMI) Calculator:
• http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/bmi/calc-bmi.htm
PREVENTING AND TREATING CHILDHOOD OBESITY
Childhood obesity—partnerships for research and prevention:
• http://www.ilsi.org/file/obesitybigone.pdf
Evaluation and treatment of childhood obesity:
• http://www.aafp.org/afp/990215ap/861.html
Patient counseling guidelines for families with overweight children and adolescents:
• http://www.wellpoint.com/press_room/special_reports/health_parenting/PhysHandbook_
062003b.pdf
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
3
RESOURCES
RESOURCES/HANDOUTS FOR KIDS AND PARENTS
Helping your overweight child:
• http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health/nutrit/pubs/helpchld.htm
An interactive Web site for kids and parents designed to help kids make smart decisions about
eating and exercise:
• http://www.kidnetic.com
Helping your child lose weight (handout for parents):
• http://www.familydoctor.org/handouts/343.html
Healthy habits for healthy kids—a nutrition and activity guide for parents:
• http://www.wellpoint.com/healthy_parenting/index.html
Helping your child make healthy food choices:
• http://www.brightfutures.org/nutritionfamfact/pdf/BWEng/MC810bw.pdf
• http://www.fns.usda.gov/TN/Parents/index.htm
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
4
RESOURCES
RESOURCES FOR
PARKS & RECREATION
PROFESSIONALS AND
OTHER COMMUNITY
YOUTH SERVICE
PROVIDERS
The links below are for you if you promote healthy eating and physical activity to kids in
a recreational setting such as an after-school program or summer camp.
COMMUNITY-BASED PROGRAMS
Background information on Hearts N' Parks, a national, community-based program supported by
the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health and
the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) with the goal of reducing risk for obesity
and heart disease:
• http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/prof/heart/obesity/hrt_n_pk/index.htm
PHYSICAL ACTIVITY TYPES AND INTENSITY
Components of physical fitness:
• http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/physical/components/index.htm
Definitions of intensity for physical activities:
• http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/physical/pdf/PA_Intensity_table_2_1.pdf
Talk test for measuring intensity of physical activities:
• http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/physical/measuring/talk_test.htm
RESOURCES/HANDOUTS FOR KIDS AND PARENTS
Kids in motion (handout for parents):
• http://www.acefitness.org/fitfacts/pdfs/fitfacts/itemid_15.pdf
Helping your child keep a healthy weight (handout for parents):
• http://www.familydoctor.org/handouts/344.html
An interactive Web site for kids and parents designed to help kids make smart decisions about
eating and exercise:
• http://www.kidnetic.com
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES
5
RESOURCES
A web site to help 9-13-year-old kids get active and have fun:
• http://www.verbnow.com
A companion Web site for parents:
• http://www.verbparents.com
A web site about real families making lifestyle changes:
• http://www.fitfamilyfitkids.com
KIDNETIC.COM LEADER’S GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING
&
ACTIVE LIVING FOR KIDS
&
FAMILIES