SUDOKU! - pvmcitypaper

ISSUE
333
www.pvmcitypaper.com
Issue 333
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
March 2015
Need to Know
2
ISSUE
333
manners to present the check before it is
requested, so when you’re ready to leave,
ask «La cuenta, por favor» and your bill
will be delivered to you.
MONEY EXCHANGE: Although
you may have to wait in line for a few
minutes, remember that the banks will
give you a higher rate of exchange than
the exchange booths (caja de cambio).
Better yet, if you have a «bank card»,
withdraw funds from your account back
home. Try to avoid exchanging money at
your hotel. Traditionally, those offer the
worst rates.
I
f you’ve been meaning to find a little information on the region,
but never quite got around to it, we hope that the following will help.
If you look at the maps on this page, you will note that PV (as the locals call
it) is on the west coast of Mexico, smack in the middle of the Bay of Banderas
- one of the largest bays in this country - which includes southern part of the
state of Nayarit to the north and the northern part of Jalisco to the south.
Thanks to its privileged location -sheltered by the Sierra Madre mountainsthe Bay is well protected against the hurricanes spawned in the Pacific.
Hurricane Kenna did come close on October 25, 2002, but actually touched
down in San Blas, Nayarit, some 200 kms north of PV.
The town sits on the same parallel as the Hawaiian Islands,
thus the similarities in the climate of the two destinations.
AREA: 1,300 sq. kilometers
POPULATION: Approx. 325,000
inhabitants
CLIMATE: Tropical, humid, with
an average of 300 sunny days per year.
The temperature averages 28oC (82oF)
and the rainy season extends from late
June to early October.
allowed under certain circumstances
but fishing of any kind is prohibited.
Every year, the Bay receives the visit
of the humpback whales, dolphins and
manta rays in the winter. During the
summer, sea turtles, a protected species,
arrive to its shores to lay their eggs.
FAUNA: Nearby Sierra Vallejo
hosts a great variety of animal species
such as iguana, guacamaya, deer,
raccoon, etc.
ECONOMY: Local economy is
based mainly on tourism, construction
and to a lesser degree, on agriculture,
mainly tropical fruit such as mango,
papaya,
watermelon,
pineapple,
guanabana, cantaloupe and bananas.
SANCTUARIES:
Bahía
de
Banderas encloses two Marine
National Parks - Los Arcos and the
Marieta Islands - where diving is
CURRENCY: The Mexican Peso is
the legal currency in Mexico although
Canadian and American dollars are
widely accepted.
Index
BUSES: A system of urban buses
with different routes. Current fare is
$7.50 Pesos per ticket and passengers
must purchase a new ticket every time
they board another bus. There are no
“transfers”.
TAXIS: There are set rates within
defined zones of the town. Do not enter
a taxi without agreeing on the price with
the driver FIRST. If you are staying in a
hotel, you may want to check the rates
usually posted in the lobby. Also, if you
know which restaurant you want to go,
do not let the driver change your mind.
Many restaurateurs pay commissions to
taxi drivers and you may end up paying
more than you should, in a secondrate establishment! There are 2 kinds
of taxi cabs: those at the airport and
the maritime port are usually vans that
can only be boarded there. They have
pre-fixed rates per passenger. City cabs
are yellow cars that charge by the ride,
not by passenger. When you ask to go
downtown, many drivers let you off at
the beginning of the area, near Hidalgo
Park. However, your fare covers the
ENTIRE central area, so why walk 10 to
15 blocks to the main plaza, the Church
or the flea market? Pick up a free map,
and insist on your full value from the
driver! Note the number of your taxi in
case of any problem, or if you forget
something in the cab. Then your hotel or
travel rep can help you check it out or
lodge a complaint.
TIME ZONE: The entire State of
Jalisco is on Central Time, as is the
area of the State of Nayarit from Lo
de Marcos in the north to the Ameca
River, i.e.: Nuevo Vallarta, Bucerías,
La Cruz de Huanacaxtle, Sayulita, San
Pancho, Punta Mita, etc. North of Lo
De Marcos, Guayabitos, La Peñita,
San Blas, etc. are on Mountain Time,
i.e.: one hour behind PV time.
TELEPHONE CALLS: Always
check on the cost of long distance
calls from your hotel room. Some
establishments charge as much as U.S.
$7.00 per minute!
CELL PHONES: Most cellular
phones from the U.S. and Canada may
be programmed for local use, through
Telcel and IUSAcell, the local carriers.
To dial cell to cell, use the prefix 322,
then the seven digit number of the
person you’re calling. Omit the prefix if
dialling a land line.
LOCAL CUSTOMS: Tipping is
usually 10%-15% of the bill at restaurants
and bars. Tip bellboys, taxis, waiters,
maids, etc. depending on the service.
Some businesses and offices close from
2 p.m. to 4 p.m., reopening until 7 p.m. or
later. In restaurants, it is considered poor
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
WHAT TO DO: Even if your allinclusive hotel is everything you ever
dreamed of, you should experience at
least a little of all that Vallarta has to
offer - it is truly a condensed version of
all that is Mexican and existed before
«Planned Tourist Resorts», such as
Cancun, Los Cabos and Ixtapa, were
developed. Millions have been spent to
ensure that the original “small town”
flavor is maintained downtown, in the
Old Town and on the South Side.
DRINKING WATER: The false
belief that a Mexican vacation must
inevitably lead to an encounter with
Moctezuma’s revenge is just that:
false. For the 21st year in a row, Puerto
Vallarta’s water has been awarded
a certification of purity for human
consumption. It is one of only two
cities in Mexico that can boast of such
accomplishment. True, the quality of
the water tested at the purification plant
varies greatly from what comes out of
the tap at the other end. So do be careful.
On the other hand, most large hotels
have their own purification equipment
and most restaurants use purified water.
If you want to be doubly sure, you can
pick up purified bottled water just about
anywhere.
EXPORTING PETS: Canadian and
American tourists often fall in love with
one of the many stray dogs and cats in
Vallarta. Many would like to bring it
back with them, but believe that the laws
do not allow them to do so. Wrong. If
you would like to bring a cat or a dog
back home, call the local animal shelter
for more info: 293-3690.
LOCAL SIGHTSEEING: A good
beginning would be to take one of the City
Tours offered by the local tour agencies.
Before boarding, make sure you have a
map and take note of the places you want
to return to. Then venture off the beaten
path. Explore a little. Go farther than the
tour bus takes you. And don’t worry this is a safe place.
ISSUE
333
Your Comments
[email protected]
Dear Editor:
Our “PV Mirror” paper-delivery-girl is celebrating
her birthday!
Kay L. is a loyal Canadian snowbird, like over twenty
of us at the Marina Golf Condominiums. Kay is a
fantastic lady. She gets up early each morning when the
new edition of your wonderful newspaper is delivered
in bulk to the reception area of our condominium. Kay
religiously (and silently -thank god!- because most of
us are recovering from the day before!) delivers the
“PV Mirror” to our door steps. That’s a lot of walking
and climbing stairs. A lot of us have lost the agility she
has. We have the pleasure of reading your newspaper
while having our first coffee... delicious.
Kay has been doing this for the last few years.
Since it’s yet another birthday for our beloved papergirl (does it give you a sense of our ages and hers
- which will remain a secret?), I was wondering if
you could print this message to express our deepest
recognition for that service and a BIG “HAPPY
BIRTHDAY, KAY!” from your friends at the Marina
Golf Condominiums. I am sure Kay will appreciate
reading this little message in your next edition.
Best regards
Richard
Dear Editor,
We have just returned from our fourth winter
escape to PV and we do plan on returning again next
year. Let’s face it. PV is a little piece of paradise.
On the first page of your PV Mirror you have a
section on taxis and the defined fares for city areas.
We came across two incidents when the driver stated
an over inflated fare. From the airport to where we
were staying was 180 pesos. When the time came to
return to the airport the fare was stated at 200 pesos.
The other, the night of the thunder storm, we had
booked the pirate ship cruise. To postpone we had to
go to the Maritime Terminal and have our reservation
changed. The fare out was there was 100 pesos and the
fare back the same. The next week the driver said the
fare out was 120 pesos. The fare back was still 100.
There seems to be some unscrupulous drivers, perhaps
thinking the tourists don’t know about the fare structure.
These over-inflated drivers did not receive a tip.
Can the PV Mirror print the information about the
fares to and from the defined areas and/or is there a
pamphlet available for visitors to can carry with them
so they can see how much they should be charged?
You have a wonderful and helpful publication that I
read on line to keep up with events and happenings in
PV. Keep up the good work.
Collaser
Dear Editor,
I read the letter written by Mrs. Eleanor Walenius.
The “Lady in Black” and I were on the same bus on the
way to the market. Now the follow-up / continuation
of “Drama at the Market” (Issue #332).
That Saturday we took the bus on our way to the
market. Enters this incredible “for her age” lady. A
real chic beauty, all in black and white, including her
hair wonderfully cut. She wore designer glasses and
I noticed a tattoo on her neckline. Smiling to myself,
I am thinking to myself that even the tattoo has class.
We all get off the bus at the market and each one of
us gets busy. I am walking alone -my sister and her
friend are out of sight- when I see the “Lady in Black”
bending over a lady on her back, lying amongst
flowers, obviously sick. The Lady reassures hers, while
dampening her forehead with wet kleenexes. The tattoo
is now even easier to see. I smile to the lady lying down
and she does a little tata with her hand before closing
her eyes again. The “Lady in Black” tells one of her
friends not to wait for her and to go on to the bridge
game. “This will take a little time.” The other lady
leaves. I ask the “Lady in Black” if she needs any help.
“No, no, everything will be fine.” She spoke with a firm
and smooth voice to reassure her patient. There are two
persons wearing a Securidad uniform, present on the
site. I leave. The End, so I thought…
The day before yesterday, in the Mirror, I notice a
Letter to the Editor: Drama at the market. Oh, my
God, the lady that was lying down. I just couldn’t
believe it. She is looking for the “Lady in Black” who
took care of her. I write to the Mirror, but too late for
my letter to be published. She lives in the Marina and
plays bridge. Those were the only hints I had. The
end… so I thought.
Yesterday, we were on our way to the Sheraton when
two chic ladies hopped on the bus. I frown. The one
that reminds me of the “Lady in Black” is dressed
in all white, has a different hairdo and wears orange
glasses. “Is it her?” I asked my sister. “Looks like her
but we can’t tell, can we?” They stand up, obviously
to go around Liverpool’s. I’m sitting in the middle of
the bus. “Oh my God,” I say to my sister. “It IS her.”
I rush to the front: “Excuse me, aren’t you the lady
who helped another lady last Saturday at the market?”
“Yes,” she says shyly. “She is looking for you. Look
in the Mirror. She is looking for you.” “Does she
mention her name?” “Yes she does.” “Thanks,” she
says before stepping down to the sidewalk. The End?
Continued on Next Page
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
Sound Off
3
4
Sound Off
ISSUE
333
Continued letters to editor...
I will never know if they met. I must admit it was quite exciting to find
this “Lady in White” and identify her by a tattoo. I noticed while she was
waiting to get off the bus that she had another tattoo on the left forearm.
I hadn’t seen a chic and classy lady in her late 60s or early 70s, wearing
tattoos. It had to be the “Lady in Black” and so it was...
I was at the right places many times. Last Saturday, on the bus on
my way to the market, encountering the “drama” at the market, reading
the letters in the PV Mirror, which I had never done, writing a first time
to the Mirror, being in the bus last night and sitting where I could see a
second tattoo.
Good luck to both of you.
Arlette Cousture, OC CQ
French Canadian writer
Dear Editor,
Can somebody please tell me why bikes & skateboards are allowed on
the Malecon?
We feel like we are taking our lives in our hands every time we walk
the “gauntlet”, as that is what it has become. Three skateboards veering
down on you as you are walking is not a pleasant experience. If bikes
were being manned by persons out for a pleasure ride that would be fine.
Unfortunately they ride their bikes like maniacs, swerving this way and
that, and you never can anticipate where they are heading next. I usually
just come to an immediate stop, and hope and pray they go around me.
The Malecon is such a beautiful piece of art, and we do so enjoy
walking it most days. We’re finding that over the years, this problem
worsens all the time. The other day, we witnessed an old man, almost
knocked to the ground, trying to dodge a skateboard.
Please Puerto Vallarta, keep the Malecon beautiful, eco friendly
and a joy to walk. Do not allow skateboards or bicycles to invade the
pedestrians’ space, making walking unsafe to all!
Publisher / Editor:
Allyna Vineberg
[email protected]
Contributors:
Anna Reisman
Joe Harrington
Harriet Murray
Stan Gabruk
Krystal Frost
Giselle Belanger
Gil Gevins
Ronnie Bravo
Tommy Clarkson
Luis Melgoza
Todd Ringness
Christina Larson
Dr. Fabio Cupul
Janie Albright Blank
Catherine Beeghly
Polly C. Vicars
Thomas Landry
Office & Sales: 223-1128
Graphic Designer:
Leo Robby R.R.
Webmaster:
PVMCITYPAPER.COM
Online Team
Cover Photo:
“Taking a Break at the
RiverFest”
by Anna Reisman
Barb Boulter
PV Mirror es una publicación semanal.
To the editor:
I would like to thank you for your wonderful publication and the
invaluable service you provide to our community.
I read the “Ask Luis” article with interest last week where a reader
was looking to know what charities are thoroughly vetted. Luis gave
a very thoughtful and informative reply. I would like to note that he
identified “Mamas Unidas por la Rehabilitacion de sus Hijos” as an
organization that is both a federally authorized tax-exempt donee and is
also recognized in the state of Jalisco.
I would like to note that this is the official charity name for the charity
more commonly known as Pasitos de Luz. Pasitos is proud of the status
it has as a recognized charity that can accept tax exempt donations.
Pasitos de Luz provides vital services to disabled children and their
families living in extreme poverty in Puerto Vallarta and the surrounding
communities.
All of these services are provided 100% free of charge. More information
about donating or volunteering is available at http://www.pasitosdeluz.org
Certificados de licitud de título y
contenido en tramite. Prohibida la
reproducción total o parcial de su
contenido, imágenes y/o fotografías sin
previa autorización por escrito del editor.
An important notice
The PVMIRROR wants your views and
comments. Please send them by e-mail to:
[email protected]
250 words max, full name, street or e-mail
address and/or tel. number for verification
purposes only. If you do not want your name
published, we will respect your wishes.
Letters & articles become the property of
the PVMIRROR and may be edited and/or
condensed for publication.
The articles in this publication are provided
for the purpose of entertainment and
information only. The PV Mirror City
Paper does not accept any responsibility or
liability for the content of the articles on
this site or reliance by any person on the
site’s contents. Any reliance placed on such
information is therefore strictly at such
person’s own risk.
Note:
To Advertisers & Contributors and those
with public interest announcements,
the deadline for publication is:
2:00 pm on Monday of the
week prior to publication.
Barb Bremner
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
ISSUE
333
Dear Editor,
Like a lot of other multi-month annual visitors, it
is time to hop the return flight to the U.S.
Every year, I enjoy reading your weekly
publication with its articles on entertainment, local
culture, gardening, puzzles, real estate, fishing and
of course, the letters to the editor.
After 24 years visiting here, I have a request: Is
it possible that you can include the local paper civic
headlines so that we can know more about the entire
city that a lot of us return to every year? My Spanish
classes have paid off and I read a lot of local news
from Vallarta Opina. Can’t you at least devote a
column about the local city news events in addition
to all the “gringo” happenings?
For example, I am amazed that you never reported
about the electrification of the Malecon nor the City
apparently taking inventory of the artworks. Isn’t
that news that we should know?
Finally, it is sad that nothing was reported of the
policeman/soldier who lost his life and the other who
was wounded protecting all of us in this community.
The action of these local heroes should be noted.
A sign on the highway says that there are 200,000+
people here in PV. (I don’t know if that reflects the
annual snowbirds) but the point is that everyone
should realize that in a city this size there’s the bad
mixed in with the good. How about reporting a
“bigger” picture of events?
Thanks to all who work at your fine newspaper!
Ed from Mpls
Dear Ed,
Firstly: Thank You so much for the compliments.
I’m glad you enjoy our publication.
You are not the first to ask for more “civic” local
news. Believe it or not, we do scan the local papers
regularly for such items. Unfortunately, much of the
news we find is either political or simply bad. We
prefer to focus on the positive, especially since we
have online readers from all over the world.
Also, it’s always a question of available space
in each issue of the Mirror. Therefore, if there are
many time-sensitive events whose organizers want
our English-speaking visitors to be aware of, we
must give those priority.
By the way, the sign on the highway hasn’t been
changed in over a decade. In reality, the town’s
regular population, not counting its visitors, has
been estimated at over 350,000.
The Ed.
Dear Editor,
We attended the annual Riverfest on March 7,
to give our support for this cause. The music was
excellent, non stop, and the food was also good.
We enjoy bidding on the items in the silent auction
and had a few picked out to bid on. We checked out
the tables earlier and picked out the ones we were
interested in and decided to return when it got close to
closing time for the bids, as that is when the bidding gets
going. The bidding was to stop at 3:15. We got there
to put our bids in at 3:10 and were told that they had
closed the bidding at 3:00. We were very disappointed
at this, as were other people that had come to put bids
in. I have gone to many silent auctions and have never
experienced this before. The charity loses money and
some people have won something that really wasn’t
won fairly at a big discount.
We really enjoy reading the PV Mirror and thanks
for all the info.
Kind Regards
M. Mitchell
Dear Editor,
Thanks a lot for the weekly paper. As a winter
long resident of PV, it’s a must read for me and for
everyone else in our building. We frequent a lot of
the places you’ve mentioned.
Last night it was Frankie’s Italian. Always as
good as all the revues. I love food so I’m always
looking for a new spot to try and rate on trip advisor.
Tom in PV
Dear Allyna,
I have to tell you about this past Thursday Marina
vendors festival. This is a well known and visited
attraction that benefits the very small vendors and
the restaurants around the Marina area.
What is so impressive about this past Thursday is
that we had a total of 280 vendors, far surpassing the
previous number of 178!
We now have three musical venues on Thursdays
along the Marina Malecon to keep everybody’s
spirits high. This past Thursday, the marimba and
the trios along with the mariachis were having fun,
but the salsa band was outstanding and it turned out
to be a public dance. I guess that’s what a festival
is supposed to be. The vendors were happy, the
restaurant patrons and owners were happy and the
tourists were thrilled as well as the locals. It was
great to see so many people having fun. Fridays
are Marina Cultural Day, with artists presenting
their wares and a dancing troupe or folkloric ballet
performing at 7 p,m.
I encourage everyone to come out to the Marina
on Thursdays for the festival and on Friday for the
cultural events. It’s fun and you are supporting the
local vendors and artists.
Joel C. Hart
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
Sound Off
5
6
Within PV
ISSUE
333
From Prince Edward Island, Canada,
to Colonia Volcanes, Puerto Vallarta
By
Thomas Landry
For the past 5 or 6 years, a retired priest from a
small French Acadian community in Prince Edward
Island, Canada has spent his winters in Puerto Vallarta
. During almost half a century of tireless work, Father
Éloi Arsenault has long championed the poor and
needy throughout his communities.
Upon first arriving in Puerto Vallarta, Father Éloi
quickly became involved in helping some of the poorest
residents of the city - the children of Colonia Volcanes.
Far away from the golden sunlit beaches strewn with
luxury resorts is this small neighborhood of Volcanes.
This area of the city is the poorest, and the furthest
away from those shores and as high up the side of the
mountain as possible. Any further is the mountainside
jungle where local services like streets, water and sewer
don’t reach. Father Éloi immediately fell in love with
the families of Volcanes. No matter how poor they are,
the mothers all work hard to make certain their children
are neat and wearing clean clothes. They have pride
in knowing that just because their children are poor
doesn’t mean they should be dirty.
It is the resolve of these determined mothers trying
to get the best possible education for their children that
was the genesis of the Volcanes Community Education
Project (VCEP). This project has been teaching English
and computer skills to the children after school hours.
Nowhere in Mexico is this type of learning experience
available to public primary school students, especially
those from the poorest part of town.
To help pay the English and computer teachers at the
after school program, fund-raising is a yearly necessity.
Since its inception, the VCEP has spearheaded and
built a library at the school which is used during the
mornings to teach secondary students in grades 7 to
12, as well as English to local parents. In the evenings,
it’s local mothers who run the library and make certain
it is available as a study center for secondary students.
It is a haven of light in an area where often students
study by street lights, free Wi-Fi access to help in their
homework in a city where only the rich can afford it
at home, and a safe study environment with printers
available to be able to compete on an even footing with
students from richer areas of the city.
Father Éloi has seen first hand how this project
and the teachers are making a difference in this poor
community. It’s offering the families of Volcanes hope
for the future and for their children.
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
He has diligently fundraised for the past four years to
help pay for the four teachers. Luckily, he is very well
known, liked and people trust him when he asks for
donations. Each year his results have been increasingly
outstanding. Initially, he was able to raise about C$
7,000. The next year when he arrived in Puerto Vallarta,
his campaign had raised another C$11,000. In the fall
of 2013, over C$ 21,000. was donated while in the fall
of 2014, his tireless work raised slightly over C$24,000.
These are incredible amounts when considering that
most of the 130 donations were for amounts of $50 to
$200. Of course, several businesses were able to help to
bring in those amazing total contributions.
His yearly contributions have become an integral part
of the funding to our VCEP Kids Education Program.
It supports over 300 students enrolled in our classroom
program as well as the community library and helps pay
for the 4 professional teachers on our staff. It also helps
pay for school supplies, various outings around the city
and the normal operations of our school. Without these
donations, all school programs would be left in a very
difficult financial situation.
The children of Volcanes have heard Father Éloi speak
of Summerside, Wellington , Abram Village, Mont Carmel
, Egmont Bay. For them, the people from so far away in
Prince Edward Island must be the most generous people
in the world to care enough to help a poor area such as
Volcanes. They all appreciate him and have welcomed him
as an honored guest to their own little church during special
services. They know that Father Éloi is not only a man of
GOD; he is also a follower of the finest virtues of charitable
works. Because of his life-long beliefs and yearly effort, he
is definitely making a difference in the lives of the children
and their families in Colonia Volcanes.
For more information on the Volcanes Community
Education Project, please contact: Art Fumerton at
[email protected]
Telephone from US &
Canada : 011-52-1 + 322-158-8815 Web Site : www.
volcanesproject.com
ISSUE
333
From Los Mangos
Public Library…
G
abriela Garcia will begin
doing tours of the Public Library
- Biblioteca Los Mangos, every
remaining Saturday of March,
for those interested in learning
about the programs, classes,
workshops and many services
that the Library provides to the
community.
If you are hesitant about
choosing a charity or civil
association, if you want to
donate but are unsure about
what it is we do, if you feel
education and literacy are the
only ways to change a person’s
future, then you must join us.
Tours will start at 10 a.m. on
March 14, 21 and 28. If you
want more information, please
call Gabriela, VP of the Board
at 322-137-5799.
Xtreme Trips donates $5,000. USD
to Biblioteca / Library Los Mangos
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
Within PV
7
Xtreme Trips has been in business for 14 years, with
this being their 4th year in Puerto Vallarta. Since their first
year running a full spring break program in spring 2012,
they have increased their traveler counts year after year
and now are happy to say they have over 4,000 students
coming to Vallarta with their company.
They work exclusively with three different hotels and
also have a full service villa program so they try to create
and help business with as many resources as we can here
in PV. Not only do they charter 3 hotels over the month
of March, but also work exclusively with the Mandala
Group to put on a month-long Music Festival for only
their Xtreme Trips Spring breakers, bringing in world
renowned DJ’s to perform each night at the top night
clubs in Vallarta.
The city of Vallarta has become a “Second home” to
both their staff and their travelers, which is why they
wanted to give back to this city that has given them this
great opportunity.
Xtreme Trips is very excited to be working with
Vallarta’s Public Library, the Biblioteca Los Mangos,
to help educate those who may not be able to afford
it. Xtreme Trips’ primary business is that of university
students and they feel honored to be part of such an
amazing charity that helps to get children and adults on a
level where they too can pursue a higher education.
Within PV
8
ISSUE
333
Last Bingo of the season at Nacho Daddy’s!
Wednesday, March 18th!
Successful 2015 Becas Ball
Next: Becas Breakfast on March 18, 2015
I
t’s our last bingo this season and it
promises to be great! Cards go on sale at
5:00 pm and bingo starts at 6:00 pm. Close to
100 players came out last bingo - come and
see why it’s so popular! At Nacho Daddy’s
we have a final cash blackout game with the
winner taking home half the pot in pesos.
This is what some of our past winners
have walked away with this season - An
AMAZING $3500 pesos, $4100 pesos and
$4300 pesos - IN CASH!!!!
We use paper cards and bingo daubers - we supply the daubers!
Buy a package of seven - three card regular games for 100 pesos and
additional cards for the cash blackout bingo at three for 100 pesos or
singles for 50 pesos. It only takes one to win! Increase your chances of
winning even more by bringing clothing to donate to the Pasitos de Luz
or Colina Spay and Neuter accounts at Deja New Consignments; you
will receive one free bingo card for each of the seven regular games.
Our raffle prizes and bingo bags are amazing! For our last bingo
of the season, we have many great prizes including a necklace from
Diamonds International, gift certificates from Anejo Limon and
Langostinos, a night at Casa Isabel, a certificate for a half rack of
ribs from El Rio BBQ, cut and eyebrow threading from Alexander
A Salon, yoga classes from Mikki Prost, tickets to Boutique Theatre,
a set of annual vaccines from Mascota’s Veterinaria, massage from
Quetzalli Spa and more! We also have more great sponsors that
include Barcelonas Tapas, Artepil Spa, Déjà New Consignments,
Figeroa’s Burritos, Fab-Fabric Fellows, Cassandra Shaw Jewelry,
Bill Kelly, and Diablo’s Bar and Tapas to name a few. Our bingo
bags have over $1000 pesos in gift certificates in every bag!
Best of all, you are supporting two great charities in Puerto Vallarta.
All proceeds from your generosity help the children of Pasitos de
Luz - a special needs centre in Pitillal - to receive meals, therapy,
compassion and education; and you help Colina Spay and Neuter
who offer spay and neuter services for cats and dogs free of charge to
those who are unable to pay.
By
Polly G. Vicars
A
glorious evening began as
guests arrived at the Club Regina.
The sky was clear and the sun was
out in all of its glory. Guests were
taken to the garden area where the
Four Seasons Punta Mita had set up
a gigantic bar to serve four of their
specially designed cocktails for this
“Casablanca” evening. The drink
which led to Humphrey Bogart’s
memorable words to Ingrid Bergman,
“Here’s looking at you, kid,” as he
fixed her a Champagne Cocktail was
Four Seasoned into a Mexican 75
champagne cocktail which included
the usual ingredients with Tequila
Don Fulano Añejo added - a sensory
delight to be enjoyed leisurely by
beautifully dressed Ball goers.
The delightful cocktail hour
afforded time for the guests to peruse
the nearly 100 silent auction items all donated by generous people who,
like Becas, believe that education is
the key to success.
The band Enlace played, the two
dance floors filled with ball goers, while
listeners were equally entertained with
their eclectic repertoire.
During a pause in the music,
Presidents Mariel and Carlos
Fregoso welcomed everyone and
gave appropriate thanks to all who
made this evening possible.
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
Then Maria Karina Macias Aguirre
introduced the University scholarship
students who had spent the evening
helping make it the success that it
was. The students expressed their
heartfelt gratitude for the help that
Becas, and all of you who support
Becas, is allowing them to achieve
their goals of obtain an education.
Then the talented folks of Grupo
Prana directed by Alejandro Peredo
put on a show unlike any seen before
in Puerto Vallarta, depicting Bogie
and Ingrid.
On stage, some fiery dances took
place. The show ended in a fire dance
capped by an incredible fireworks
display in the almost full moon night.
Next for Becas Vallarta is the
March Becas Breakfast at the River
Café on Wednesday, March 18th, at
9:30 a.m. This will be a delicious
breakfast as only the River Café
can provide. Tickets are $200 pesos
each, we’ll have wonderful raffle
prizes and a small silent auction.
Please make your reservations early
as the tickets go fast. You may buy
your tickets from any Becas member
or by calling or e-mailing Polly
Vicars at 223-1371 or [email protected]
gmail.com. Remember: your money
goes to improve the lives of more
than 400 students this year.
Need Tickets? Call me!
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9
Creative Aging
PV Garden Club
meeting
The Puerto Vallarta
Garden
Club
March
meeting will be at No Way
Jose! on March 19th at 11
a.m. The guest speaker
will be Jane Peabody,
a past V.P. of the San
Francisco Garden Club.
She will be speaking
about and demonstrating
floral arrangement. Jane
was a flower arranger for
27 years at Filoli Gardens
in Woodside, California.
During this time she
also was involved with
Bouquets to Art at the De
Young Art Museum in San
Francisco. This is a special
event where she chose a
painting and interpreted
that painting in a flower
arrangement placed in
front of it. She has also
done arrangements for
weddings, luncheons and
other special occasions.
Jane has loved flowers
since she was a child and
has created some gorgeous
gardens over the years.
The P.V. Garden Club
would like to thank all
who supported our fundraiser at the Hacienda
Palo Maria on Feb 26th.
Those who contribute to
“Beautifying
Vallarta”
are supporting not only a
more beautiful, clean and
verdant city, but making it
more attractive to tourism,
thus creating a vibrant
economy to support all
the other great causes in
Puerto Vallarta.
A presentation by Norma Schuh and Dan Grippo
IFC Clubhouse, Thursday, March 19, 7 PM
E
very moment of life really is an incredible gift that
brings with it special blessings and unique challenges. The
aging experience can be a time of celebration - of thriving,
not just surviving. As actress Sophia Loren observed, “The
fountain of youth exists in your mind, your talents, and the
creativity you bring to your life and the lives of the people
you love.” Whatever your age, whatever your situation, “The
privilege of a lifetime is being who you are,” in the words
of author Joseph Campbell.
This presentation on Creative Aging will invite you to
celebrate the gift of aging and offer some tools and new
ways of thinking about and approaching the later years so
that no matter your circumstances or “limitations” (another
word for “opportunities”) you can ensure that these years
are indeed golden!
Democrats Abroad Costa Banderas Chapter
Annual Meeting
Monday, March 16, 2015
M
Norma Schuh is a playwright, actress, author, and
presenter. She holds a Master’s Degree in Human
Development with a special interest in spirituality, aging,
mortality and humor. In Puerto Vallarta she has conducted
workshops and written for various local media. She is an
adjunct instructor at St. Mary’s University in Minneapolis,
where she teaches Confronting Personal Mortality as part
of the Human Development Masters Program.
Dan Grippo is an author, lecturer, meditation teacher,
and certified Spiritual Director. He holds Masters Degrees
in Religious Studies and Latin American Studies and a
Ph.D. in Mexican History.
Requested donation at the door: $50 pesos or 2 kilos
of food aid for community services.
Doors open at 6:15 p.m. Cash bar.
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
embers and friends of Democrats
Abroad: We are holding our Annual
Meeting and Fiesta of the Costa Banderas
Chapter on Monday, March 16th from 5 to
7 p.m. at Nacho Daddy’s, located at 287
Basilio Badillo.
There will be hors-d’oeuvres, and one
drink (beer, well drink or soda) included.
Happy hour 5-7 for additional beverages.
This is a light-hearted event, open to all
Dems and friends of Dems.
• Recap of 2014-2015
• Discuss the Presidential Race of 2016
• Election and Intro of Officers for 2015/16
• New Chair Speaks on 2015/16
• YOUR Thoughts!
• 65 pesos per person suggested donation
R.S.V.P. to [email protected]
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Here we go again
By
J
Tim Wilson
ust what we need! Another hate group has
been formed. If you have been keeping up with
our articles you know what GAYPV thinks of
hate groups and hate speech no matter whether
anti gay or anti straight. The Southern Poverty
Law Association keeps us informed on the
formation of hate groups, boycotts and the like.
GAYPV received this communiqué. One Million
Moms has just given birth to One Million Dads.
One Million Moms is the brainchild of gay hate
group American Family Association. The law
center upgraded the classification of One Million
Moms from a group using hate speech to a hate
group in 2010 (a whole lotta hating going on!)
and they have been on the watch list ever since.
Why the new group? GAYPV crack researchers
investigated and here is what we discovered.
Just how many moms are there in One Million
Moms? Try to find their Facebook page. It has
disappeared. Inside sources have revealed to
GAYPV there were 70,152 Facebook fans at its
last existence and 2,771 twitter followers. Quite
a shortcoming from their one million goal with
over thirty five years to recruit.
Maybe moms can’t follow their boycott
philosophies. Remember that this is the group
that refused a charitable donation that was
delivered with a Harvey Milk stamp on it. I
wonder if Rev “Boycott Brother” Sharper would
refuse a large donation delivered with a white
Oscar nominee Michael Keaton stamp on it?
Here are some recent campaigns raged by One
Million Moms. You will want to go to bit.ly/
gaypv037 to see the complete list which includes
the videos of the products they boycotted. It’s
hilarious. Last year, they boycotted Kmart for
the all male commercial Show Us Your Joe,
where men were “thrusting in a sexual way”
to the tune of Jingle Bells wearing Joe Boxers.
Something missing at home, Mom? Methinks
“The lady doth protest too much”. They
proclaimed Hotwire was in Hot Water when
Hotwire interviewed a gay couple booking for
vacation (see bit.ly/gaypv038). Perhaps Mom
hasn’t had a vacation lately? They called for a
boycott of Kellogg’s for its support of Atlanta
gay pride and use of Tony the Tiger in a gay
marketing campaign (see bit.ly/gaypv039). Stop
eating products from every company boycotted
by One Million Moms! That means no more
Burger King, Carl’s Jr, Hardee’s. There is only
Chick-Fil-A left and they are closed on Sundays!
Moms would have to cook again. No mom
wants that! No more Frosted Flakes, Graham
Crackers, Betty Crocker, Procter and Gamble,
Kraft mac and cheese, Pop Tarts, or General
Mills. What’s left? Your family would starve!
Some of their boycotts backfire - as many
boycotts do. Advertisers like JC Penny rally their
supporters when Mom called for the removal of
Ellen Degeneres as their spokesperson. JC Penny
stood by their decision and Moms retreated.
The Mom parent association –the American
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
Family Association- sent GAYPV an action
alert demanding Supreme Court justices
Ginsburg and Kagan recuse themselves from
the upcoming same sex marriage decision.
Why? These justices have officiated same
sex marriages already and are not impartial.
Using that logic, Clarence Thomas, Breyer, and
Sotomayor should recuse themselves because
they have officiated heterosexual marriages.
Maybe One Million Dads will be more
successful than One Million Moms. After all,
some reports are now showing men are shopping
more online now and spending more than women.
bit.ly/gaypv043. The number of fathers at home
in 2014 with their children for any reason has
nearly doubled since 1989 according to the Pew
Research Center from the US Census. Maybe
they think companies will listen when men lead
the boycotting efforts. Stand by because I am
calling Rev Sharper on this!
Tim Wilson
Is owner and editor of GAYPV Magazine (www.GAYPV.mx)
in Puerto Vallarta. This magazine features news,
a complete list of gay and friendly businesses and events,
interesting stories, and around town photos of gay and
friendly businesses and people in Mexico. It is available
in print, online and the new app on Apple newsstand in
December 2014. Tim is an official member of NATJA where
he and GAYPV contributors provide content and press
releases about Puerto Vallarta as a “beyond Gay Friendly”
destination to international LGBT media outlets.
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By
T
he more time that passes for
me in this world, the more I realize
that I am a pretty loyal guy. When I
find something I like, I pretty much
stick with it. However, this comes
with a built-in drawback, in that I
tend not to experiment too much…
particularly when there’s a longensconced favorite involved. After
all, if it ain’t broke…
One of my most favorite Vallarta
moments is when the rising sun
sneaks up on the surrounding Sierra
Madre with fresh morning kisses of
sweet sunlight. I don’t think I will
EVER tire of this heavenly reminder
when all of creation sings out in
unison of the promise and hope of a
new day. And all is absolutely well
with my soul.
One of my most favorite “crash day”
activities is to take full advantage of
a perfectly welcoming tropical beach
within easy walking distance of my
home. Truthfully, it’s SO easy to
take this reality for granted, which is
somewhat shameful really.
For more than 15 years, my
favorite beachfront getaway has been
Ritmos Beach Café (a.k.a. “Green
Chairs”, formerly Looney Tunes) at
the far south end of Los Muertos
Beach. The Ritmos’ blended drinks
and smoothies are outstanding. Their
food is diverse and surprisingly
healthy for what appears to be a
basic beach club of great magnitude.
Ritmos is still owned by the Tune
family, and their capable manager
Miguel keeps everything the way
Tony likes it: Wonderful!
There is always great music
playing at Ritmos, so sit closer to
the ocean if you like it more quiet. I
usually end up on the southernmost
Todd Ringness
section for a better shoreline view
and a little less busy beach. If you
get there by 10 a.m., you’ll get to
choose your favorite palapa and
enjoy extra serenity before the music
starts up. But if there’s a big party
in town (i.e. Semana Santa or Latin
Fever) Ritmos is completely loco, so
be warned. When you go, do yourself a
BIG flavor favor and make sure
you order a side (or two) of Chef
Alvaro’s homemade BBQ sauce.
Everything on the menu is great, but
my favorites are the chicken strips
(hand-cut breast meat fried in a light
tempura-style batter) or the club
house sandwich with real chicken
and bacon (no luncheon meat here).
Both come with delicious French
fries, but if you must, sub in a side
salad with their vinaigrette dressing.
Portions are generous and served
right to your beach chair piping hot
and ready to enjoy.
This week my wife Sandra Gaye
and I and our new puppy Daisy
enjoyed an evening stroll along the
south malecon in search of a new
make-it-your-way ice cream shop,
just before the north side of the
Rio Cuale pedestrian bridge. This
is a pretty unique concept… they
blend your selected ingredients
with milk and then flash freeze
the concoction to make the frozen
dessert right before your eyes. Just
don’t expect traditional creamy ice
cream. The flavor was good for sure,
mostly because I chose my favorite
ingredients! While on the malecon,
I also managed to enjoy one of my
long-time favorite street snacks, elote
in a cup. If you haven’t already,
consider trying this piping hot kernel
corn shaved from the cob into a
cup, and topped with all manner of
fattening creams, cheeses and sauces
(your choice) with lime and salt.
Muy rico! There are several stands
selling elote in the evenings only, on
the south malecon near the Los Arcos
amphitheater right in front of the
Naval Museum.
You may be surprised to learn that
as a child, I was an aspiring magician.
My parents bought me that popular
toy magic hat one year for Christmas
and the tricks took. My cousin Mark
the Magnificent and I were both into
it and we were favorites at family
events when we were kids. I don’t
know how much real talent Todd
the Terrific had, but we sure had fun
and managed to make a few dollars
disappear every once in awhile too!
Alas, a magic career wasn’t in the
cards for me and I traded the wand
for a computer by the time I hit high
school. Presto! Instant computer
nerd with no time for tricks.
Luckily, a new act debuts on the
south side this week that just might
cause my old hobby to reappear.
Todd Diamond is a professional
magician who has performed in 17
different countries and specializes
in parlour, stage and close-up magic.
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11
Todd’s show takes the intimate stage
at the Boutique Theatre above
Nacho Daddy’s for three shows only,
March 19th to 21st. You can enjoy the
dinner show package (featuring my
favorite, the filet mignon) or choose
the show only. Dinner begins at 5
p.m. (especially perfect for all my
Saskatchewan farmer friends!) and
the show begins at 6 p.m., which
means you can be in bed by 9 p.m. (if
you want!) Todd Diamond Magic
Show tickets start at only US $17 and
are available by calling 222-4198 or
by visiting VallartaTickets.com
I was recently treated to the shrimp
fondue at Langostinos on Los
Muertos Beach, and it’s now one of
my new favorites! What about you?
Go ahead and drop me a note to let
me know what you’ve discovered
lately: [email protected] — I
would love to hear from you! Be they
tantalizing treats or magical moments,
may you too stumble upon some
delightfully unexpected favorites this
week. Blessings upon you!
Todd Ringness
Along with his wife Sandra Gaye are the founders of Vallarta Tickets, a Canadian online
ticketing agency serving the Banderas Bay region and beyond. You can usually see this man
about town, or you can email: [email protected]
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
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Calendar / Directories
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Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
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Airline Directory
AEROTRON
226-8440
AIR CANADA 01 800 719-2827
AIR TRANSAT 01 800 900-1431
ALASKA
01 800 252-7522
AMERICAN
01 800 904-6000
CONTINENTAL
See United
DELTA 01 800 266-0046
FRONTIER
01 800 432-1359
INTERJET
01 800 011-2345
SUN COUNTRY 01 800 924-6184
UNITED
01 800 864-8331
US AIRWAYS 01 800 428-4322
AEROMEXICO 01 800 021-4000
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
Calendar / Directories
13
14
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Last Shuffle …on the South Side!
Shuffle on Basilio Badillo comes to
an end for the season on the 20th of
March. This was the 5th year since
its creation. Some businesses have
come and gone, but the block party
continues its success by welcoming
W
ell, it is that time of year
again when we start saying
goodbye to the snow birds and a lot
of our friends that winter part time
here in beautiful Puerto Vallarta.
This year went by way too fast.
Vallarta is getting busier and busier
each year. It was an exceptional
season with restaurants having
line-ups and long waits and
vendors selling out of their wares
at the various markets.
The Street party in the south
side, called the South Side
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
people to their street with an
energy and excitement that makes
it one of the most well attended
and awaited event in town.
Don’t miss the last party, Friday,
March 20th, from 6 to 10 p.m.
Municipal government organizes events
to benefit seniors’ day care centers
T
he City’s Department of Human Services is organizing a couple
of events to aid 32 day care centers for seniors in Puerto Vallarta.
- Breakfast at Porto Bello on March 17th at 9 a.m. Price: $160
Pesos per person.
Tickets can be purchased at Carol’s Boutique, 250 Basilio Badillo,
or Lucy’s Cucu Cabaña at 295 Basilio Badillo.
- Bingo on March 25th at Nacho Daddy’s at 6 p.m. We will send
information on the rest of the events as soon as we have the dates.
100% will go to improve the 32 seniors’ day care centers in Puerto
Vallarta. The Seniors attend this centers while the caretaker goes to
work to support the needs of the Senior. We will improve the centers
by painting them, electrical wiring, new tables and chairs, buy table
games and provide some food for them, as well as adult diapers.
We will keep you informed of the work we do as we finish each
center.
You are welcome to join us on our venture as these are the most
vulnerable Seniors who depend on some one to take care of them on
their last years of their lives, most seniors are 70 to 100 years old, and
need lots of TLC, food and medication; by attending these centers, they
learn to socialize with others as well as eat a balance diet, which for
many of them might be the only decent meal of the day. LOTS of love
and care is mostly needed for our elders in town. Won’t you join us?
Thank you so much for helping the most needed people in our
community.
March 2015
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Who was Saint Patrick?
S
t. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland, is one of
Christianity’s most widely known figures. But for all
his celebrity, his life remains somewhat of a mystery.
Many of the stories traditionally associated with St.
Patrick, including the famous account of his banishing
all the snakes from Ireland, are false, the products of
hundreds of years of exaggerated storytelling.
It is known that St. Patrick was
born in Britain to wealthy parents
near the end of the 4th century. He
is believed to have died on March
17, around 460 A.D. Although his
father was a Christian deacon, it has
been suggested that he probably took
on the role because of tax incentives
and there is no evidence that Patrick
came from a particularly religious
family.
At the age of 16, Patrick was taken
prisoner by a group of Irish raiders
who were attacking his family’s
estate. They transported him to
Ireland where he spent six years in
captivity. (There is some dispute
over where this captivity took place.
Although many believe he was taken
to live in Mount Slemish in County
Antrim, it is more likely that he was
held in County Mayo near Killala.)
During this time, he worked as a shepherd, outdoors
and away from people. Lonely and afraid, he turned to
his religion for solace, becoming a devout Christian.
(It is also believed that Patrick first began to dream of
converting the Irish people to Christianity during his
captivity.)
After more than six years as a prisoner, Patrick
escaped. According to his writing, a voice -which he
believed to be God’s- spoke to him in a dream, telling
him it was time to leave Ireland.
To do so, Patrick walked nearly 200 miles from
County Mayo, where it is believed he was held, to the
Irish coast. After escaping to Britain, Patrick reported
that he experienced a second revelation - an angel in
a dream tells him to return to Ireland as a missionary.
Soon after, Patrick began religious training, a course
of study that lasted more than 15 years. After his
ordination as a priest, he was sent to Ireland with
a dual mission: to minister to Christians already
living in Ireland and to begin to convert the Irish.
(Interestingly, this mission contradicts the widely held
notion that Patrick introduced Christianity to Ireland.)
Familiar with the Irish language and culture, Patrick
chose to incorporate traditional ritual into his lessons
of Christianity instead of attempting to eradicate
native Irish beliefs. For instance, he used bonfires
to celebrate Easter since the Irish were used to
honoring their gods with fire. He also superimposed
a sun, a powerful Irish symbol, onto the Christian
cross to create what is now
called a Celtic cross, so that
veneration of the symbol
would seem more natural to
the Irish. Although there were
a small number of Christians
on the island when Patrick
arrived, most Irish practiced a
nature-based pagan religion.
The Irish culture centered
around a rich tradition of oral
legend and myth. When this
is considered, it is no surprise
that the story of Patrick’s life
became exaggerated over the
centuries - spinning exciting
tales to remember history has
always been a part of the Irish
way of life.
About those
leprechauns…
In case you were wondering about the leprechaun
that’s watching the lovers taking a break from the
recent RiverFest along the Rio Cuale (on our cover) it
is said that he and his kind are a type of fairy in Irish
folklore, usually depicted as little old men, wearing a
coat and hat, who partake in mischief.
Usually, leprechauns are solitary creatures who
spend their time making and mending shoes and have a
hidden pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. If captured
by a human, the leprechaun has the magical power to
grant three wishes in exchange for his freedom.
Leprechaun-like creatures rarely appear in Irish
mythology and only became prominent in later
folklore. The earliest known reference to the
leprechaun appears in the medieval tale known as the
Echtra Fergus mac Léti. The text contains an episode
in which Fergus mac Léti, King of Ulster, falls asleep
on the beach and wakes to find himself being dragged
into the sea by three leprechauns. He captures his
abductors, who grant him three wishes in exchange
for release.
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
Beyond PV
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The 7 Arts
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It just keeps getting better
as The Palm celebrates attendance records with live music & comedy
It’s been a record-breaking season at The Palm
Cabaret, with acts that have included established
favorites and newcomers alike. Live music &
comedy, and two comedic stage productions round
out the season, now through April 11.
Vallarta favorite Amy Armstrong, affectionately
known as the gal with ‘the voice of an angel,
and the mouth of a sailor’, performs both music
and comedy in her show ‘Diva Loca’ (Crazy
Diva). Amy, best known for her brassy, bawdy
comedy and powerful vocals, will be joined by
special guests, including popular Argentinean duo
Bohemia Viva on guitar and vocals. ‘Diva Loca’
is now playing through March 31. And Luis and
Andrea of Bohemia Viva star in their own show,
featuring steamy love songs and sizzling Latin
rhythms, now playing through April 5. Please see
the link below for specific show times and online
tickets for all shows at The Palm.
Celebrity impersonators Joe Posa and Thirsty
Burlington are back by popular demand for a
second engagement of ‘An Evening at The
Birdcage’. Hilarious comedy and some of the best
impersonations of your favorite celebrities outside
Las Vegas. Posa hosts the evening as comedy icon
Joan Rivers, welcoming guests Liza Minnelli,
Barbra Streisand, Judy Garland and more. And
Burlington’s Cher is as good as it gets, with a
striking resemblance to the superstar and spot-on
live vocals. ‘An Evening at The Birdcage’ is now
playing through March 21. All shows 9:30 p.m.
This season’s biggest hit is the stage comedy
‘Greater Tuna’, starring Tracy Parks and Chaz
Weathers. Now in its third extended run, Tuna has
taken literally hundreds of audience members to
the third smallest (fictional) town in Texas, where
the Lions Club is too liberal and Patsy Cline never
dies. The two actors portray 20 men, women,
children, and animals (with 42 costume changes)
in this comedy hit about a small town, small minds
and big hearts. ‘Greater Tuna’ is now playing
through April 1.
Latcho & Andrea - The Blond Gypsies are
European recording artists who perform Gypsy
Rumba and Spanish Flamenco Guitar music.
Both of German descent, Latcho & Andrea take
influences from around the world, authentically
producing the mysterious and passionate sounds of
Gypsy Flamenco music. Their shows have thrilled
audiences and their popularity continues to soar.
They have two remaining performances on March
21 & 31 at 7 p.m.
Luna Rumba, featuring Cheko Ruiz on vocals
& guitar and George “Geo” Uhrich on violin,
mandolin, flamenco & electric guitars, is a fusion
of Gypsy, Latin, Celtic, Flamenco, Middle Eastern
and Rock, all spiced up with hot Rumba and
Cuban rhythms. From beautiful, romantic ballads
to fiery dance pulsations, their music has been
judged “world class” in international songwriting
competitions. Luna Rumba has one remaining
show on March 23 at 7 p.m.
The Palm will offer both Spanish and English
versions of the comedy stage production of
Princesas Desesperadas, or Desperate Princesses,
the hit stage play about four Disney princesses’
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
journey to “happily ever after.” Written by
Mexican playwright Tomás Urtusástegui, the
comedy follows four Disney princesses a decade
after they begin their new lives at the end of the
stories we already know. The English version,
starring Amy Armstrong and Cesar Daniel Bravo
Ramirez (of Equus fame), begins March 24 -27,
and the Spanish version will play April 2 -11.
Paco Ojeda will present the final installment
of the popular ‘Happy Birthday Tribute Series’,
celebrating the life and music of Barbra
Streisand on Sunday, March 29 at 7 p.m. Ojeda’s
presentations are always thorough, informative
and very entertaining with a variety of guest
performers, including Kim Kuzma and Amy
Armstrong. These events almost always sell out,
so best to get tickets early.
The Palm is well-known for bringing top notch,
cutting-edge entertainment to Vallarta. Inside you’ll
find an intimate, completely refurbished 90-seat
cabaret with outstanding sound and lighting, creating
the ambiance of cabarets from days gone by. Shows
are scheduled seven days per week with two different
shows nightly through April, 2015. The Palm also
offers matinées at 4 p.m. on selected shows.
The Palm is non-smoking (a patio is provided
for smokers), located at 508 Olas Altas in the
Romantic Zone on the south side of town. Tickets
may be purchased online 24/7, and at The Palm’s
Box Office, open from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily.
A full calendar of performances, information and
online tickets are available at www.ThePalmPV.
com You can also find the Palm on Facebook at
The Palm Cabaret and Bar.
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Comedy classics take The Boutique stage
Anthology show reinvents laughs of yesteryear
By
Catherine Beeghly
Entertainment Writer
T.J. Hartung hopes people will complain about the show he’s written and
directing, “Anthology of Comedy.” But not with the kinds of complaints
you might expect.
“‘My jaw muscles hurt from laughing too much.’ ‘My
stomach and side muscles hurt.’ ‘My underwear is wet.’
‘My mascara is running from laughing so hard I cried,’”
T.J. quipped. “But I am not responsible for anyone’s
running mascara, or wet underwear.”
A Puerto Vallarta resident, T.J. is an avid fan of classic
comedy sketches, and put his favorites together for The
Boutique Theatre’s new original show, “Anthology of
Comedy.” The next mainstage dinner theater show at The
Boutique Theatre will recreate classic moments in comedy
history, presented with local performers, readers’ theaterstyle. Dinners will be served at 5 p.m. with the curtain
rising at 6 p.m., March 26, 27 and 28.
Among the well-known sketches are those made famous
by comedy legends George Carlin, Lily Tomlin, Flip
Wilson, Redd Foxx, Abbott & Costello, Johnny Carson,
Flip Wilson, “Father Guido Sarducci,” and others. In his cast are Boutique
veterans Alice Averett, Catalina Meders, Steve Jackson, Catherine Beeghly,
and newcomer Gloria Tyson.
“Cast members will be reading various roles in a number of comedy
routines, subject to change, based on cast wishes, the weather, phases of
the moon, the direction of the wind, and several conditions that are too
complicated to reveal,” he said. The performers will also jump in as
announcers, and in short comedic bits T.J. wrote to transition the sketches.
T.J. hopes to tap into people’s nostalgia for some of the “good old days.
I want the show to bring up memories - memories of good times, good
friends, good TV shows, etcetera.”
T.J. is retired from a career in computer technology​, managing hotel
operations for more than 30 years.
In 2001 he began his “retirement career” at the now-defunct Santa Barbara
Theater in Puerto Vallarta. “Steel Magnolias” was the first show he was part
of. He’s worked with nine directors in seven venues, on more than 40 shows
in Puerto Vallarta, mostly as a technical director doing lights and sound.
“It was a natural transition for me,” he said, “because my
degree is in computer science, back in the days when you
had to be able to both design the hardware and write the
software.”
T.J. has lived in PV for almost 21 years, and received
his Mexican citizenship 10 years ago.​ He’s active with
the International Friendship Club, as VP of administration,
web master, and newsletter composer.
“I’m also on the board of directors of the Vallarta
Botanical Gardens, where I often give talks on orchids. In
May, I’ll be on a speaking tour throughout New England
and East Central Canada, where I’ll be talking to 13
different orchid societies about Mexican orchids, and
promoting tourism to PV.” Dates and locations can be
found on www.pvorchids.com
T.J. met his wife Helen in PV more than 18 years ago,
and they’ve been married 15 years. He’s written articles
for “Orchids Magazine,” the official publication of the American Orchid
Society, and has been writing articles for local newspapers for many years
under a pseudonym. The March 26, 27 and 28 shows will be presented at
The Boutique Theatre, upstairs at Nacho Daddy’s, 287 Basilio Badillo in the
Romantic Zone on the south side of town.
A dinner-and-a-show option is offered at 5 p.m. Diners can choose a steak,
chicken or vegetarian meal, or order off the regular menu at the “Mex-Tex”
restaurant. Show-only tickets are also available. Audiences are invited to
remain for the dance music lively crowds enjoy, immediately following each
show, on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights. Nacho Daddy’s charges no
cover for its live music shows, presented almost every night of the week.
For information, please call 322-192-4616. Tickets for all Boutique
Theatre shows are available at www.vallartatickets.com
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
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Vallarta falls in love with The Plaids
Forever Plaid - The Heavenly Musical
Hit opened in the Main Stage Theater
March 10th (and runs till April 4th, 2015, at
7 p.m.) TO RAVE REVIEWS. Under the
direction of Alfonso Lopez. Relive an era when doo-wop was king,
big hairdos were in, cars had enormous
fins, and the harmonizing bands of the 50s
were all the rage. This hallmark jukebox
musical comedy by Stuart Ross centers
on a quartet whose dream of recording
an album ended in a bus collision
while on their way to their biggest
gig. Now they’ve been miraculously
revived for the show that never was. You’ll be humming along with the great
nostalgic pop hits of the 1950’s and rollin’
in the aisles from the delightful patter of the
original clean-cut boy band – The Plaids. Featuring such hits as Sixteen Tons, Chain
Gang, Three Coins in the Fountain,
Perfidia, Cry, Catch a Falling Star, Day-O,
Gotta Be This or That, Matilda, and Heart
and Soul.
The Plaids get a chance to look back
at their lives, and they discover that they
didn’t just have wonderful lives; their lives
were wonderful, because they lived them
together. Together they can achieve the
unimaginable, the unexplainable. Starring
local
performers
Elvis
Martinez, Alfonso Lopez, Roberto
Duran and Jose Maria Caudillo with Bob
Bruneau at the piano. Forever
Plaid is produced by Act II
Entertainment and Mary Amelotte .
The Voice of Vallarta - Walk Like a
Man Week with Guest Star Paul Fracassi The Voice of Vallarta returns to the Main
Stage with Walk Like a Man week and music
from the 80´s. This week on The Voice of
Vallarta, Paul Fracassi, star of the Walk
Like a Man show now appearing in the
Red Room, takes the stage and mentors the
contestants. Paul has selected a song for
each of the contestants that they must sing.
Join us on Sunday at 8 p.m. (and don’t
be late!) Paul will open the show with a
special song to the contestants. The 2nd
part of the night, the contestants compete
singing songs from the 80´s.
The Voice of Vallarta has had its share
of drama over the last few weeks with triple
eliminations, contestants highjacking the
show and dropping out without warning
to producers and, as in the case of this
last Sunday, just not showing up, judges
throwing fits and refusing to vote and
tears... lots of tears. One thing is sure: The
Voice of Vallarta is hotter than ever! The
Voice is down to the top six and who goes
home no one knows. Join us every Sunday
for Vallarta’s favorite show The Voice of
Vallarta at 8 p.m. Sundays. Love Concert to support the kids
of ALAS School of Music March 14th at 8 p.m.
Please join us and the Children of ALAS,
School of Song, in a benefit concert on
Saturday, March 14th at 8 p.m. on the
Main Stage at ACT II Entertainment. LOVE, the Concert, will feature both solo
performances by Kharla Barrigan, Michael
Gibney and Edoardo Rocha along with
choral performances by the incredible
children’s choir of ALAS. ALAS inspires, nurtures and brings
together the children of Puerto Vallarta,
many who have come from very broken
places, and through the art of song, dance
and theater, brings a new found way
of expression and freedom, and in the
process healing and love transpires to both
the children and their families. We look
forward to seeing you and thank you ahead
of time for your contribution. (100% of
all profits and proceeds will go directly to
funding ALAS, Escuela de Canto.)
The Main Stage theater is located in the Act II Entertainment STAGES complex upstairs at 300 Insurgentes, corner of Basilio Badillo, in the Romantic Zone on the south side of town. Tel.: 222-1512.
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
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Paul Fracassi Walks Like a Man
at The Red Room Cabaret
PAUL FRACASSI WALK LIKE A MAN
“Walk Like A Man” pays tribute
to hugely popular New Jerseybased recording stars Frankie
Valli & The Four Seasons. The
show features 23-year old singing
sensation Paul Fracassi, a former
Star Search and Canadian Idol semifinalist and graduate of Toronto’s
famous St. Elizabeth School for The
Performing Arts. His vocal range and
showmanship are always a big hit.
Fracassi’s backup band, featuring some of Toronto’s top musicians,
provides the famous backbeat and vocal harmonies of The Four Seasons,
with a thrilling fidelity that will make you feel you’re discovering them
for the first time. Walk Like A Man was inspired by “Jersey Boys”, the hit movie and
stage play about the life and times of The Four Seasons. But the songs
are all that the two entities share. Walk Like A Man is a sixties-style
concert that presents a nostalgic look at The Four Seasons’ amazing body
of work. Paul Fracassi’s show, featuring the group, is the kind of show
that made the young Frankie Valli, Bob Gaudio, Nick Massi and Tommy
DeVito rich and famous. It may someday do the same for Paul Fracassi. Songs featured in the show include “December ‘63”, “Sherry”, “Big
Girls Don’t Cry”, “Can’t Take My Eyes Off Of You”, “Dawn” and of
course “Walk Like A Man”. Powerful music, fabulous vocals, in a word,
unforgettable.
March 15, 20, 22, 27, 29 at 9:30 p.m., March 14, 18 at 7:30 p.m.
LUNA RUMBA - thrills audiences
with their sonic tapestry of Latin
Fusion, Gypsy Flamenco, Arabic
Melodies, Cuban Rhythms, Celtic
Riffs and even Latin Jazz. Their
shows are a celebration of musical
fusion, human diversity, creativity,
warmth and virtuosity. Fiery violins,
rumba-flamenco guitar, hot keyboard
riffs and cool bass ride on top of the
unstoppable polyrhythmic grooves
created by the exotic percussion instruments and drums. If this weren’t
enough, be prepared to hear vocals that will melt your heart and warm
your soul.
Every week in the Red Room Cabaret…
CASHETTA - As a Singer,
Comic, Emcee, Magician and
Fabulous
Psychic
Medium,
Cashetta is a one of a kind
entertainer that is not to be missed!
Tuesdays & Saturdays at 9:30 p.m.,
Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m.
MISS CONCEPTION - An
all live singing show with your
favorite story book characters …
with a twist.
The Wonderful World
of Miss Conception Mondays at 7:30 and 9:30 p.m.,
Thursdays at 9:30 p.m.
KIM KUZMA - Being her
10th year of performing in PV,
Kim has learned to simply give
what audiences want from her. “Just Kim” is exactly that. Kim’s
Acustico show features Kim and
her fantastic 5 piece band.
Acustico - Sundays at 7:30 p.m.,
Just Kim - Wednesdays at 9:30 p.m.
ELVIS – ROB KNIGHT Rob Knight holds the title of
Pacific Northwest 2014 Division
Champion as an Elvis Tribute
Artist. Forever Elvis is reminiscent
of his lively and passionate Las
Vegas stage shows and concerts.
Forever Elvis Wednesdays at 4:00 p.m.
The Red Room Cabaret Bar is located in the Act II Entertainment STAGES complex, upstairs at 300 Insurgentes, corner of Basilio Badillo, in the Romantic Zone on the south side of town. Tel.: 222-1512.
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
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Map
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Magic man dazzles with comedy, mind-reading
Boutique Theatre presents international headliner Todd Diamond
By
Catherine Beeghly
Entertainment Writer
Audible gasps could be heard earlier
this month at the Stage and Forum Theatre,
where Todd Diamond was making objects
appear and disappear, as well as peering
into volunteers’ eyes to see what they were
thinking. “How did he do that?” wide-eyed
patrons marveled.
The agile, lanky illusionist will deliver
his personal blend of comedy and magic
to three shows at The Boutique Theatre,
upstairs at Nacho Daddy’s, 287 Basilio Badillo in
PV’s Romantic Zone. The March 19, 20 and 21
shows wrap up his season performing in Mexico.
“What you’ll see is the result of 20 years of
practice, and award-winning sleight-of-hand tricks.
I’ve learned from some of the best in magic,” the
entertainer said. “The second half of my show is
when I do mentalist work, and read people’s minds,
to show we’re all connected in this crazy world.”
Diamond uses constant interaction with the
audience. “My show is different in the sense that I
combine comedy and magic, and in how I put it all
together. It’s hard to describe myself. My show is
messy. Cards end up all over the stage. Mom would
not approve.”
Diamond was drawn into the world of illusion when he saw a live
performance of David Copperfield. His hobby soon turned into
his profession, as he added mind-reading and pickpocketing to his
repertoire. In the last two decades, Diamond has performed in latenight spots from New York to California. He has entertained scores
of Fortune 500 companies, and has fooled some of the biggest names
of stage and screen. He has also appeared in more than 17 countries,
including a recent run of TV specials in Indonesia, which were seen by
millions of viewers in Indonesia, China,
Singapore and Malaysia.
Diamond has performed at various
stages in Mexico, wrapping up a recent
engagement at the Stage & Forum
in Nuevo Vallarta. His show at the
Boutique Theater will be the last chance
Mexico audiences can see him this
season. Diamond is grateful to the warm
reception he’s received here.
“When I got here in Puerto Vallarta, the response
has been, ‘Wow, I’ve lived here 20 years and
never seen a magician.’ It’s been an interesting
experience. People here have been very welcoming
and supportive.”
Since 1997, Diamond has been a professional
entertainer, as well as a stage and tour manager.
He has worked with entertainers Doug Pinnick
and Kirby Van Birch, as well as being a manager
for the Chinese Acrobats. His hobbies are reading,
business, video gaming, competition shooting,
computers, theater, film, and creative writing.
A dinner-and-a-show option is offered at 5 p.m.
Diners can choose a steak, chicken or vegetarian
meal, or order off the regular menu at the “Mex-Tex” restaurant.
Show-only tickets are also available.
The Boutique Theatre also presents Mikki Prost in “Forever Patsy,”
the Patsy Cline tribute show that nearly always sells out. Her next
shows are March 17 and 31.
For information, please call 322-192-4616. Tickets for all shows are
available at www.vallartatickets.com
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
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Los Bambinos’ last Latino Show
of the season March 27th
By
T
Christina Larson
his Monday, Mexico
celebrates a National holiday,
with schools, banks and
other institutions weighing
in on their “Puente” (threeday weekend) in honor of
Benito
Juarez’
birthday.
Among many controversial
policies, this liberal politician
instated laws during his 14
years in presidential office
that encouraged agrarian
reform, freedom of press, and
separation of church and state.
I am certain that on Saturday
nights, he could be spotted in
the hip nightclubs enjoying
popular music of the era, with
songs such as La Llorona.
This week on Tuesday night
in Los Bambinos’ Flashback
World Favorites tour show, the
group flashes way back with a
short salute to the Revolution
and Reform era of Mexico.
Among the Classic-Rock
Favorites in their Tuesday
night show, Los Bambinos
play selections by the Everly
brothers and the Bee Gees,
bringing to life the vocal
harmonies of the Beach Boys
in a special medley. A featured
selection you can’t miss is
the Monkees I’m a Believer,
played with Los Bambinos
memorable Latin twist.
For those desiring an
evening of live Latin music,
Los Bambinos -with the
Morales brothers’ fabulous
four-part harmonies- is the
perfect show for you. Los
Bambinos present their very
last Latin Friday night show
of the season on Friday the
27th of March in a concert
taking you on a musical
tour from the Revolution
Era to Contemporary hits.
They bring you the heart of
Latin American music that
is an intimate part of their
own musical history. The
impressive guitar work and
instrumentation
resulting
from
two-decades
of
musical study shines in this
performance, ringing out the
soul-felt harmonies that only
four true brothers vocals
could capture. Don’t miss it!
Whether planning a private
event or wanting a fun night
out while in town, Los
Bambinos music delivers the
heart of Puerto Vallarta to
you. The group brings choice
entertainment to each and
every event and show, melding
disciplined vocal study and
inherent musical talent with
over ten years of international
performance experience. Their
memorable performances truly
bring any party to life!
Los Bambinos perform
Flashback World Favorites
tour every Tuesday 8-10 p.m.
The next Friday show of the
season will be March 27th 8-10
p.m. Both shows are at Roxy
Rock House with live music
every night at 217 Ignacio
L. Vallarta, in the Romantic
Zone on the south side of
town. Tickets and booking at
www.losbambinosmusic.com
or 222-4357, English spoken.
See you at the show!
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
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Yvan Genest opens at Galleria Dante, Friday, March 20th!
Cocktails 6 to 10 p.m.
His experiences with different cities,
other people and their customs are
reflected is his paintings - airplanes, fish,
trips, people. In Mexico he is particularly
inspired by the freedom he finds in Mexican
crafts and the colorful life here. With his
light, luminous and eye-catching colors,
his distorted and imaginative forms and
figures, Genest brings to life a fascinating
world which parallels our own. He will
tell you that he was greatly influenced by
expressionism of different periods, such as
Francis Bacon, Picasso, Satin and Chagall. Yvan has an incredible sense for color.
His paintings are bright and cheerful, all
combined with sense of freedom and fun.
Even if you do not understand them, you
want to see more of his paintings and are
compelled to purchase one. To celebrate his 30 years of non-stop
creation, Yvan Genest is publishing a
fabulous table book about his art, an
illustrated anthology that will cover three
decades of his art, including his European,
American and Mexican periods. It will
include many quotes (from Yvan but also
from artists he admires) about art and the
practice of art in general and in particular
as well as a biography. The anthology will
be illustrated with hundreds of photos of
Yvan’s works and studios over the years.
This show will represent two of his bestknown styles: his “abstract iconography”
and his “street scenes”. Galleria Dante is
located at 269 Basilio Badillo.
Yvan’s
career as a painter had
unconventional beginnings. At first, his
artistic temperament drove him to music.
From the age of 17, he traveled throughout
Europe as a singer performer until his return
to Montreal, many years later. But without
the tradition of coffee shops & bars where
one can sing, as in Paris, Yvan couldn’t
make a decent living as a singer. So he
started selling watercolors, door to door
and on the street. This survival activity was
the beginning of an unforeseen but fertile
ground for his unique imagination.
Since his first watercolors 31 years ago,
Yvan has lived, painted and exhibited in
many cities and countries, while building
his unique iconography. He has created
thousands of original paintings, drawings,
watercolors, pastels, etchings, engravings
and digital works.
An international painter, he now shares
his time between Montreal and Puerto
Vallarta. This tall, gentle-natured man
created his first exhibit in 1976, at Galeria
La Chamade in Rennes, France. Eight
years later, his reputation followed him to
Montreal, where he exhibited at the Galérie
Au Coin des Artistes. In the mid 90’s his
work was introduced to Vallarta and ever
since he has been one of the main artists of
the Vallarta Art scene. Saturday 14 to Friday 20
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Galería Corsica
13 years representing Mexican artists at their best in PV
L
ocated in what used to be the house of renowned local artist Jesús Botello “Tellosa” and
right across the street from the Café des Artistes turret, Galería Corsica celebrates its 13th
anniversary this season.
During all these years, Galería Corsica has represented more than 50 Mexican and Latin
American artists and has performed a large number of solo and collective exhibitions in their
premises or cultural art venues. The gallery has worked with museums including the Dolores
Olmedo Museum, the José Luis Cuevas Museum, the Palacio del Arzobispado Museum and
the Universidad Metropolitana Museum, all of them located in Mexico City and it has also
participated in International art fairs, in places like Singapore, Hong Kong and Mexico City.
Activities have also diversified to producing exhibitions in alternative spaces and partnership
projects with other galleries at a national and international level.
The new space has six rooms to display outstanding fine art pieces coming from all over
Mexico and, starting this season, Latin America. After focusing from the very beginning on
Mexican Fine Art, partners Jean Pierre Renucci and
José Villavicencio have decided to broaden their
scope to art from countries like Colombia and Cuba.
Particularly interesting is the courtyard, where
you can see “outdoors art” - a space filled with
bronze sculptures out in the open which are a true
delight to your senses.
This year, Galería Corsica is also celebrating its
St. Regis gallery’s first year in Punta Mita, Nayarit,
which is located right at the entrance and where they
display some of the artists that have made them earn
their good reputation, together with new ones since
the owners always keep on looking to add more
talent to their artist catalogue. At the St. Regis, art
is displayed not only in its own space, but also in
different places such as the lobby and the outdoors.
Showcasing a wide range of the best traditional
and contemporary Mexican fine art, Galería Corsica
is the right place for the discriminating collector and
for anyone interested in top Mexican fine art.
Galería Corsica is located at 756 Guadalupe Sánchez,
in downtown Puerto Vallarta, and has an exclusive
exhibiting space at the St. Regis Hotel in Punta Mita.
Phone: 223-1821. www.galeriacorsica.com
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
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Joe Harrington
The Second Most Exotic
Marigold Hotel
The demographics at the theater
I watched this film at had to have an
average age of around 70. Last time
I saw what is called with affection
the blue-haired crowd was when
I watched the wonderful Quartet.
Hollywood should finally realize that
us senior citizens will plunk down
Social Security money to watch a
movie if it appeals to us old folks.
This movie does not only that, but is
well written and well acted.
This movie stars a few legends,
people like Maggie Smith, Dame Judi
Dench, Bill Nighy and Dev Patel.
The dialogue sizzles with one liners.
Not slap your knee jokes, but human
condition one liners with observations
on life, mostly about getting older and
handling same. An example: Bill
Nighy, who is sparking – or trying to Dame Judi Dench, tells her, “I admire
someone who plants a tree knowing
she will never sit in its shade.”
Thought provoking.
Like its predecessor, this movie
shows that people hunger for love and
companionship no matter how old
they are. And they also can embrace
the joy of living and laughing just
as much as a teenager if they allow
themselves to. It also shows that
deep friendship and respect can exist
between the young and the old – as in
Patel and Smith.
When I left the theater I heard
comments,
actually
overheard
comments, from various people. A
woman, crawling along on her walker,
said to her companion, “Fabulous.”
That one word sums up this movie.
Elements of it also reminded me,
especially the ending, of Slumdog
Millionaire. Meaning a sensational
dance number with people of all ages
cutting the rug with high energy.
Rotten Tomatoes top critics gave this
a 64% approval rating, the audience
slightly higher with 68%. Here is
what a few top critics wrote. Richard
Roeper of the Chicago Sun Times said,
“I’d love to see a third “Marigold”
adventure. Better yet, a Masterpiece
Theater-type TV series, where we
get to spend an hour every week wit
the regulars of the hotel and various
newcomers who stop in.” That is
a suggestion I would second in a
heartbeat. Next is Stephen Rea of the
Philadelphia Inquirer, “All manner
of subplots weave their way through
the film, which teems with “colorful”
characters and saccharine clichés. But,
like the first film, it’s next to impossible
not to find diversion in the company of
such stalwarts as Dench and Nighy and
Smith.” Peter Traver of Rolling Stone
commented, “When such consummate
actors as Maggie Smith, Judi Dench,
Bill Nighy and Penelope Wilton show
up together in a movie, even a sequel
as wobbly as this one, you’d be wise to
just sit back and behold.”
Those three critics represent the
two-thirds who liked the movie.
Here’s representation of the one-third
who did not. Boston Globe’s own
Peter Keogh wrote, “Performances
from venerable thespians such as
Judi Dench, Maggie Smith, and Bill
Nighy are nuanced and piquant, but
they are stuck in a story with too
many moving parts – most of which
are worn out from over use – that
never get anywhere.” And finally for
the naysayers, we have John Hartl
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
of the Seattle Times: “the storyline
of the sequel ends up tying itself in
knots, and the addition of a splashy,
expensive-looking
Bollywood
musical number just underlines the
lack of perspective.”
What interested me about all the
above comments from the big shots is
that none of them mentioned Dev Patel,
who is the lead actor, meaning more
screen time than Nighy, and Richard
Gere, who, although not a mere cameo,
has not much screen time. Patel delivers
a great performance, as usual. Who
can forget his brilliant performance
in Slumdog Millionaire? For a young
actor, this guy delivers consistently. He
has been in the following movies: The
Road Within, Chappie, The Best Exotic
Marigold Hotel, About Cherry, The
Last Airbender, and Abhinay Samrat.
This guy will be only twenty-five this
coming April 23. Talk about hitting
the ground running. The only other
guy I can think of that did the same
thing is Ed Norton, with his debut and
incredible performance in Primal Fear.
Recommendation: If you are over
sixty, if you are young at heart, if you
enjoy being entertained, if you liked
The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, then
this flick is a must.
Joe Harrington
Is an internationally published true crime
writer and documentary filmmaker.
Send comments or criticism to
[email protected]
Artwork by Bob Crabb.
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Happy St. Patrick’s Day!
M
any people wear something green on St Patrick’s Day which is
known in the U.S. and other countries as “wearing of the green”. Usually
people would wear green to show their Irish heritage & culture on the
day that everyone’s Irish, but in Ireland the wearing of the green doesn’t
really exist, well in terms of celebrating its culture. However, the Irish
do wear Shamrocks to symbolize the teaching of the holy trinity by St
Patrick. A small bunch of Shamrocks would be pinned to the breast of
their outer coats.
Despite the religious foundations of St. Patrick’s Day, this holiday
has evolved over time and the festivities on March 17 have become
synonymous with heavy drinking. Many adults consume large quantities
of alcohol on St. Patrick’s Day as they celebrate. Regular beers are often
dyed green. Bars and restaurants help people indulge with specials on
Irish beers, such as Guinness, Murphy’s, Harp and Smithwick’s. Other
popular Irish drinks include Jameson’s whiskey and Bailey’s Irish Cream,
and of course …Irish Coffee!
One of the traditional foods served on St. Patrick’s Day is corned beef
and cabbage. The Irish have used cabbage as a staple in their diet for
centuries. Quality Irish bacon was originally served with cabbage in
Ireland for the March 17 festivities, but many of the first Irish immigrants
in the United States could not afford bacon so they used corned beef as a
substitute, having been influenced by their Jewish neighbors. This trend
caught on, and corned beef and cabbage is now the standard dish at St.
Patrick’s Day celebrations.
Ireland has dramatically changed over the years leaving behind some of
the older traditions. One thing that is not as popular as it once was but is
seen as a typical Irish tradition is its blessings. Many of the Irish blessings
that are a thing of the past in Ireland are still kept alive by people from
all over the world.
If you’re in Puerto Vallarta as you read this, and you have a hunkering
for something Irish on Tuesday, you might consider Coco Tropical in the
Romantic Zone or D’z Route 66 Diner in the Marina, though there are
other restaurants sure to advertise special dishes for that special day.
May the roads rise to meet you,
May the wind be at your back,
May the sun shine warm upon your face,
The rain fall soft upon your fields,
And, until we meet again,
May God hold you in the palm of His hand.
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
Good Bites
27
Health Matters
28
By
ISSUE
333
Krystal Frost
HONEY of a deal… the traditional super food…
With
the increasing threat of
antibiotic-resistant infections and
drug over-use, the return to honey not
overly consumed as a natural, multipurpose healing therapy makes all the
sense in the world.
Honey was a conventional therapy
in fighting infection up until the
early 20th century, at which time its
use slowly vanished as penicillin
took center stage. Using raw honey
instead of topical antibiotics and
cough medicines, for example, is a
simple way to decrease your overdependence on drugs.
Honey should be considered
medicinal and if you suffer from signs
of elevated insulin such as:
Overweight, high blood pressure,
high blood cholesterol, diabetes.
If you have elevated insulin levels,
you’ll want to limit consumption of
honey just like you would sugar and
grains, as it will raise your insulin
levels.
Know your honey producer as
commercial suppliers have a nasty
habit of feeding their bees sugar or
corn syrup to produce more honey.
This type of honey has little nutritional
or medicinal value compared to
natural wild honey. The flavor of the
honey depends on where the hives
are and what’s in bloom. We like the
peach and eucalyptus honey, which
are creamy and rich in color.
Bee pollen is an ancient holistic
remedy used throughout the modern
and ancient world. Unfortunately the
vast amount of uses that pollen can be
used for are often overlooked.
What is Pollen?
Bee pollen is gathered by
honeybees, and is the food of the
young bee. It is considered one of
nature’s completely nourishing foods
as it contains nearly all nutrients
required by humans. Bee pollens are
rich in proteins (approximately 40%
protein), free amino acids, vitamins,
including B-complex, and folic acid.
Bee pollen contains many elements
that products of animal origin do
not possess. It is richer in proteins
than any animal source. It contains
more amino acids than beef, eggs,
or cheese of equal weight. About
half of its protein is in the form of
free amino acids that are ready to be
used directly by the body. Recognize
that a one teaspoon dose of pollen
takes one bee working eight hours a
day for one month to gather. Each
bee pollen pellet contains over two
million flower pollen grains and one
teaspoonful contains over 2.5 billion
grains of flower pollen.
Here are just 10 great reasons to add
fresh bee pollen to your daily diet…
although there are many more!
1. Energy Enhancer - The range
of nutrients found within bee pollen
makes it a great natural energizer. The
carbohydrates, protein and B vitamins
can help keep you going all day by
enhancing stamina and fighting off
fatigue.
2. Skin Soother - Bee pollen is often
used in topical products that aim to
treat inflammatory conditions and
common skin irritations like psoriasis
or eczema. The amino acids and
vitamins protect the skin and aid the
regeneration of cells.
3. Respiratory System - Bee
pollen contains a high quantity of
antioxidants that may have an antiinflammatory effect on the tissues
of the lungs, preventing the onset of
asthma.
4. Treating Allergies – Pollen
reduces the presence of histamine,
ameliorating
many
allergies.
Everything from asthma to allergies
to sinus problems were cleared,
confirming that bee pollen is
wonderfully effective against a wide
range of respiratory diseases.
5. Digestive System - In addition
to healthful vitamins, minerals and
protein, bee pollen contains enzymes
that can aid in digestion. Enzymes
assist your body in getting all the
nutrients you need from the food that
you eat.
6. Immune System Booster - Pollen
is good for the intestinal flora and
thereby supports the immune system.
According some holistic health
experts, bee pollen has antibiotic-type
properties that can help protect the
body from contracting viruses. It’s
also rich in antioxidants that protect
the cells from the damaging oxidation
of free radicals.
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
7. Treats Addictions – Used
holistically for healing addictions and
inhibiting cravings by suppressing
impulses.
Because bee pollen
crashes cravings, it is a very useful
research is needed into this benefit,
particularly when it comes to weight
management.
8. Supports the Cardiovascular
System - Bee Pollen contains large
amounts of rutin, an antioxidant
bioflavonoid that helps strengthen
capillaries, blood vessels, assists with
circulatory problems and corrects
cholesterol levels. Its potent anticlotting powers could help prevent
heart attack and stroke.
9. Prostate Aid - Men who suffer
from benign prostate hyperplasia can
find relief by using bee pollen. Bee
pollen can help reduce inflammation
to stop frequent urges to urination
10. Infertility Problems - Bee
pollen stimulates and restores ovarian
function, therefore may be used to
assist in accelerating pregnancy. As
well as being a hormonal booster it is
also a great aphrodisiac!
Dosis: 1 tsp in the morning with
fruit or juice is perfect. I eat it straight
as I like the mild honey flavor.
Last note: Please support our bee
population that has been declining
all over the world due to the use of
pesticides and GMO cultivation’s and
other factors… more on this:
http://environment.about.com/
od/biodiversityconservation/a/
honeybees.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Colony_collapse_disorder
Krystal Frost
Is a long time resident of Puerto Vallarta.
Graduate of University of Guadalajara, and
specialized in cosmetic acupuncture at
Bastyr University in Washington State. She
is the owner of Body & Sol for over 20 years
where she practices traditional Chinese
medicine, acupuncture, massage therapy,
yoga, meditation and nutritional counseling.
She has created healing programs for
individuals, retreats and spas. For questions
and comments - Cell: 322 116-9645,
Email [email protected]
ISSUE
333
Adult daughters of alcoholics…
and maybe the rest of us too!
(part 1 of 2)
By
Giselle Belanger
T
here is a classic book in the
addiction field written specifically
about daughters who grow up in
alcoholic homes. Robert J Ackerman,
Ph.D., spent his career specializing
in alcoholic families and has written
numerous books.
This one in
particular is “Perfect Daughters”.
In it, he describes the experience of
growing up in an alcoholic home,
differentiates between the impact
of alcoholic mothers and alcoholic
fathers, and describes the long-term
effect into adulthood. He focuses on
the impact on parenting, relationships,
intimacy, self-esteem, the need to be
perfect, the need to be controlling, and
much more. His findings are based on
years of research and interviews with
these women.
The rest of us
Interestingly, these traits do not
just apply to women nor do they only
apply to growing up in an alcoholic
home. I have known many people
who have very similar if not exact
traits growing up in homes with some
other stressor such as a bi-polar parent,
or a borderline parent, or a workaholic
parent. I think many of you relate to
and identify with these descriptions
and types. Many of the characteristics
also fit the descriptions of children
according to their birth order.
As a child, you probably adapted to
life the best you could which required
developing
certain
“adjustment
behaviors”. They probably: a) kept
you from feeling abandoned, b) met
the expectations of others, c) helped
you to create some balance in your
life, d) helped you to overcome
inconsistency and chaos. Although
they probably worked well for you
then, do you still need them now?
Do you even know what they are?
RN, LCSW
If you continue to implement these
behaviors, they prolong more of
the same; same pain, same crisis,
same dysfunctional relationships.
Do you want to break-free from old
childhood behaviors and roles? Are
they holding you back and keeping
you from growing?
You have to know what to change
Wanting to change is one thing;
knowing what to change is quite
another. Ackerman identifies eight
different patterns that carry over from
childhood and he identifies positive
and negative implications.
He
explains that you, this adult woman,
are a survivor and you possess many
positive qualities.
The negative
qualities or characteristics cause you
pain and keep you from enjoying life.
The key to recovery is to overcome
the negative characteristics. He then
identifies a list of things you need to
do to transition from those negative
characteristics.
8 Types: (Keep in mind that no one
type completely describes anyone and
that you will probably identify with
several).
The Achiever: all-knowing, ever
competent, totally in control, very
responsible, accomplishment–oriented.
Her accomplishments are the basis
of her self-worth. Her self-worth is
always external, so that the only way
to be validated is to do things that
others recognize as worthwhile. She
is emotionally motivated by a sense
of inadequacy or not being good
enough. She compares herself to
others and always feels that they are
better. In relationships, she wants to
be in control and is usually willing to
do more than her share to achieve it.
Some of the negative characteristics
are: perfectionist, difficulty relaxing,
can’t express feelings, never wrong,
workaholic, marries a dependent
person, fears failure, and unable to play.
The Triangulator: never deals with
anyone or anything directly, always
has excuses; it’s never her fault. She
became the focal point in her parent’s
relationship by acting out in negative
unacceptable behavior so that they
could avoid dealing with each other.
She is courageous, creative, has lots
of friends, and is adventurous. Her
negative characteristics are: conduct
disorders, substance abuser, passiveaggressive, poor communication
skills, angry, and manipulative.
The Passive one: noticed more
for what she doesn’t or won’t do, for
example, she is never the player in
the game; always the spectator, she
is never the actor, but the reactor, she
goes along with everything and has
low self-esteem. In relationships,
she tolerates a tremendous amount of
inappropriate behavior, is willing to
be second, never expresses her needs,
and takes the path of least resistance.
She is tolerant, highly adaptable, a
loyal friend, empathic, a good listener.
The negative characteristics include:
low self-worth, eating disorders,
depressed, joyless, shy, lonely, and
won’t standup for herself.
The Other-Directed One: relies
heavily on what other people think
she should do and is always trying
to be the person she thinks everyone
expects her to be. The emotional
motivation is a deeply rooted fear of
being abandoned if she exposed her
feelings and needs.
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
Health Matters
29
She believes that in order to be
accepted, she should do what others
want her to do. If she is in pain, she
will hide it. She pretends she is
always happy. She does everything
for everybody else and has great
difficulty doing anything for herself.
She has a very limited self-identity. In
relationships, she is overly sensitive
to criticism, denies her own feelings,
and has a terrible time establishing
boundaries. She is charming, has a
good sense of humor, is adaptable, team
player, cooperative, energetic, joyful.
The negative characteristics include:
indecisive, no sense of self, overly
dependent, and needs constant approval.
Well, so far, how many of you have
identified with any of these types or
maybe they remind you of a friend or
family member?
(All information in this article is
from: ACKERMAN, Robert (2002)
Perfect Daughters (revised edition).
Deerfield Beach, FL, USA: Health
Communications, Inc., ch 10, pgs
171-198.)
Note: Be sure to look for next
week’s article, which will continue
with the other four types.
Giselle Belanger
RN, LCSW (psychotherapist) is available
for appointments in person, by phone,
or by skype webcam. Contact info:
[email protected] Mex cell: 044
(322) 138-9552 or US cell: (312) 914-5203.
30
Vallarta Voices
By
M
ISSUE
333
Anna Reisman
any years ago, I used to be
one of those horoscope junkies
who read their daily horoscope
religiously in the hope that
everything “will be all right”. I
stopped doing that a few years ago,
but now I’m wondering if Mercury
wasn’t retrograde these past few
days… Miscommunications…
First of all, the fact that Canada
and the U.S. have set their clocks
ahead one hour -while we still have
a few weeks to go before we do the
same on the night of April 4th- has
messed up my entire TV viewing
schedule. For those who don’t
know me well: I’m a TV addict,
and there are a few series I try hard
to follow religiously.
Now with the east coast feed
coming in two hours early and the
west coast ones only one hour late,
it’s played havoc with my evenings
of multitasking (watching TV while
working on the computer).
Then I had set up a lunch meeting
with some friends from out of town
but one of them didn’t feel well, so
he asked if we could postpone it to
the next day. Sure, no problem, but
I had no way of contacting the other
couple, so I had to go meet them,
choose another restaurant and do an
encore the following day.
That day, knowing that my
plumber said he’d come between
2 and 4, I asked my girlfriend to
call me on my cell if he showed
up before my return. He did, but
he never rang the bell so she didn’t
know he was waiting downstairs
for a half-hour or so before going
back to his home at the other end of
the world… Never a dull moment
in my little corner of it.
We’ve got a very busy
couple of weeks coming
up, not only in Mexico,
but around the world, with
celebrations of all types,
ranging from an age-old Irish
tradition to the long awaited
Spring Equinox - an event
older than civilization itself
– to those honoring a famous
Mexican hero.
The first falls this week, St.
Patrick’s Day on Tuesday, March
17th, the anniversary of his death
in the 5th century. The Irish have
observed this day as a religious
holiday for over a thousand
years and today St. Patrick’s Day
is celebrated by people of all
backgrounds in the U.S., Canada,
and Australia, Japan, Singapore,
Russia ...and Puerto Vallarta.
You will find a number of
restaurants offering plenty of
traditional Irish dishes this
Tuesday. Do support them if you
are Irish, feel Irish …or just want
to be “green” for a while.
Then we have the last South Side
Shuffle of the season, on Friday
the 20th. Honestly, I just don’t
know where the months flew. It is
also the day for this year’s Spring
Equinox, followed by President
Benito Juárez’ birthday on March
21st (usually observed officially on
the 3rd Monday in March).
So theoretically, we should be able
to say “Spring is here, the grass has
riz, I don’t know where the birdies
is…”, right? True, our sunsets have
been spectacular and they’re going
to become even more so as we near
the “rainy season”. When I first
moved down here, it used to start the
third week of June, like clockwork,
but over the last few years it has
become impossible to predict the
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
weather. I think that applies to our
entire little blue planet…
Nevertheless, the nights are
still very cool …and it rained on
Monday! Again! So we have no
idea what’s going on. My friends
in British Columbia
totally whiffed on their
ski season, while those
in Ontario and Quebec
are still shoveling snow.
But, I will be an optimist
and state categorically:
“Spring may really be
around the corner.”
Once again, there’s
loads of happenings
around town, but one I
would really recommend
for Friday evening is the last South
Side Shuffle. Trust me, it’s fun.
There’s music, drinks, snacks and
so many beautiful items to pick up.
And did I mention fun?
If you’re on the other side of
town, check out the counterpart
events on the Malecon of Marina
Vallarta on Thursday. Those too
are worth your while. Other than
that? Well, how about all the good
shows at the Boutique Theater,
Act II and The Palm? And there’s
a whole slew of offerings at the
IFC… As I said: loads of good
stuff – all to be enjoyed after a
fabulous dinner at one of PV’s
many great restaurants. If I have
a little more space next week, I’ll
include some of the photos I took
at the RiverFest… best and most
successful event they’ve ever
held… over 600 people! I am truly
happy for Pasitos de Luz.
Have a most enjoyable St.
Patrick’s Day and a great week,
dear readers. May your Mirror
always reflect a happy, healthy you.
Hasta luego. [email protected]
ISSUE
333
Ask Luis
By
Luis Melgoza
Dear Luis: I am confused, you have
written that in order to rent a property
in fideicomiso, the fideicomiso permit
must expressly state that you may do
so, or you may forfeit the property just
for renting it.
My realtor insists that this is nonsense
and all property in fideicomiso may be
rented when the owner is not using it.
Dear Reader: The confusion is
caused by how many folks choose
to understand the word residential,
and misunderstanding the official
fideicoimiso permit requirements.
Residential fideicomiso permits for
real property in the restricted zone
may be granted to foreign individuals,
to foreign corporate entities, or to
Mexican corporate entities with a clause
admitting foreigners, as long as the
property is destined to be the owner’s
personal dwelling (the individual or
corporate entity’s officers, employees
or non-paying guests).
Fideicomiso permits for real
property destined for any use other
than residential (i.e. rental or other
commercial use) may only be granted
to Mexican corporate entities with a
clause admitting foreigners.
Foreigners
(individuals
and/or
corporate entities) may only have real
property in fideicomiso in the restricted
zones as the personal dwelling of the
individual or corporate entity’s officers,
employees or non-paying guests; since
a rental property is, by definition,
commercial, they would have to
establish a Mexican corporate entity,
with a clause admitting foreigners, to
acquire real property for any use other
than as their personal dwelling.
This is what the Secretariat of Foreign
Relations, the authority in charge of
granting or denying restricted zone
fideicomiso permits, has to say about this:
“In accordance with article 27,
fraction I of the Mexican United States’
Political Constitution, foreigners are
barred from acquiring direct domain of
land and waters within 100 kilometers
of Mexico’s international borders and
within 50 kilometers of the beaches.
Foreign use and enjoyment of real
property within these zones is only
allowed by means of a fideicomiso, per
Title II of the Foreign Investment Law.
“The permits granted by the
Secretariat of Foreign Relations to
create fideicomisos are meant to allow
the use and enjoyment of real property
within the restricted zones by foreigners
(individuals or corporate entities) or
by Mexican corporate entities with a
clause admitting foreigners, as long
as the real property is destined for
residential purposes, for a maximum
term of 50 years. The fideicomiso
contract must be recorded by a Notary
Public.” (The emphasis is mine).
Source (in Spanish): http://www.
sre.gob.mx/index.php/permiso-paraconstituir-un-fideicomiso-en-zonarestringida
Foreigners wishing to acquire
rental property may do so, as well, by
incorporating a Mexican entity with a
clause admitting foreigners:
“In accordance with article 10,
fraction I of the Foreign Investment
Law, Mexican corporate entities with a
clause admitting foreigners that acquire
real property within the restricted
zones to be destined for non-residential
purposes, must submit the corresponding
notice of the real property acquisition
to the Secretariat of Foreign Relations,
within sixty days of the acquisition.
Furthermore, when the Mexican
corporate entity replaces its clause
excluding foreigners with the clause
admitting foreigners, it must notify
the modification within 30 days of the
change, per the last paragraph of article
16 of the same Foreign Investment Law.
“As ordered by article 7 of the
Regulations to the Foreign Investment
Law and the National Registry of
Foreign Investments, notice of the
acquisition of real property for
non-residential purposes within the
restricted zones must be submitted to
the Secretariat of Foreign Relations
for each real property, meeting the
following requirements:
“A Aviso10 application published
in the Oficial Journal of the Federation
on March 6, 1997, indicating the date,
corporate name, legal representative,
Mexican address to receive official
notices, property acquisition date and
deed number. The application must
have an original signature.
“B. Property location and description.
“C. Clear and precise description of
the uses to which the property will be
destined.
“D. Attach photocopy of the
notarized deed of acquisition.
“E. If the notice is submitted within
the allotted time-frame, pay the fees
established by article 25, fraction X of
the then current Federal Fees Law at
any banking institution, or by means of
an electronic transfer of funds through
a certified financial institution.
“F. If the notice is extemporaneous,
pay the fees established by article
25, fraction XI, section d of the then
current Federal Fees Law at any
banking institution, or by means of an
electronic transfer of funds through a
certified financial institution.
“G. The notice must be submitted in
duplicate.”
Source (in Spanish): http://www.
sre.gob.mx/index.php/aviso-deadquisicion-de-inmuebles-porsociedades-mexicanas-con-clausulade-admision-de-extranjeros-en-lazona-restringida-que-se-destinen-aun-fin-no-residencial
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
Legal Matters
31
“In accordance with article 11, fraction
V of the Regulations to the Foreign
Investment Law and the National
Registry of Foreign Investments, when
it is necessary to expand the matter of
a fideicomiso (property surface) and/
or change the object of the fideicomiso
contract constituted under the
permissions defined by article 11 of the
Regulations to the Foreign Investment
Law and the National Registry of
Foreign Investments, the financial
institutions (deed-holding bank) must
obtain the corresponding permit from
the Secretariat of Foreign Relations.”
Source (in Spanish): http://www.
sre.gob.mx/index.php/permiso-paraampliar-la-materia-o-duracionsuperficie-del-inmueble-objeto-delfideicomiso-o-modificar-los-finesde-un-fideicomiso-ya-autorizado-forma-presencial
Send me your questions to [email protected]
pvgeeks.com, I am not able to answer
each message privately due to the
volume of mail I receive. I do not
take legal cases, I am retired from the
practice of Law.
Luis Melgoza
Is a former PRI (Mexico’s ruling party)
Head Counsel and Legal Adviser to the
Mexican Congress. Although retired
from the legal profession, he is a highly
respected consultant for both the foreign
and Mexican communities in Puerto
Vallarta. Luis’ PVGeeks is the premiere
wireless high-speed Internet provider in
Puerto Vallarta. For Internet service, you
can reach Luis at [email protected]
32
Real Estate
ISSUE
333
Title insurance is offered and you have to decide if you want
to pay for this.
Insurance is not required for a purchase, or for a mortgage.
It is optional. Be sure to check with your attorney or notary if
there are issues, which warrant insurance. Some of the reasons
to buy insurance are if the property is adjoining the federal
maritime zone, is over a million USD purchase price, or research
discovers the property has had problems in the past.
You are better served to ask how the process is different from
what you know if you are buying in a different country. Others
may let you assume procedures, which do not exist. With some
much information available to us, we can become overwhelmed
with details and start relying on our prior experience. In this
day and time, we have to be aware of lack of knowledge and
dishonesty from people working with us.
Buying real estate is very serious step to take in any country,
even if it is your own. For foreign real estate, you need a new
set of glasses.
VIEWPOINT
By
Harriet Murray
What buyers should know about
real estate escrow and deposits
Mexican real estate
If you have found a property, and you want an offer, I
recommend the following:
Your offer should include time for you to conduct due
diligence, an inspection, or other concerns. Beware of your
having to put your deposit into the escrow company before
these issues are resolved.
Mexico does not require funds to be put up by the buyer in
order to have a binding offer. In fact, the country does not
require escrow. But for you, as a foreign buyer these two issues
are important to understand for your safety.
You can put your escrow deposit into the title company once
you have accepted the results of your due diligence. Don’t be
convinced to do otherwise by an agent who doesn’t know the
facts. This might be a way to get you to comply faster, but you
do not need to send money in advance of diligence on your
behalf.
If you withdraw from the offer, then you don’t have to fight
to get your funds back from the escrow. Many times the title
company may require your signature and the sellers. This is to
protect this company from legal issues, but it may take a lot of
time and the procedures are not the same, as you would expect.
You would send the second deposit, or balance of the purchase
price into the escrow company several days ahead of closing.
Harriet Murray
Can be contacted at: [email protected]
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
ISSUE
333
Marlin, Sailfish, Dorado,
they’re all out there, bait issues!
By
Stan Gabruk
This week we pick up where we
left off last week. Things are pretty
much the same with some small
differences. We still have fish, tons
of fish, we also have tons of bait and
there lies the problem. It’s a bait
factory out there, you name the bait,
we’re sporting it right now! Blue
Runners, Sardines, Flying fish, Bullet
Skippies, Krill shrimp, Krill squids (1
inch), Google eyes, Skippies and who
knows what else. The full moon isn’t
helping things either, when you have a
fish looking upwards at a light-backed
surface they can see everything with
their razor sharp eyes. It’s wholesale
fast food and it’s easier in the early
morning and later afternoon to early
evening as the bite is a little strange.
But if you follow what I’m saying,
then it should help you be one of the
¨lucky¨ few…
Inside the bay things have gotten a
little weird on the positive side. The
biggest surprise has been big bull
Dorado hanging around the south end
of the bay close to the beaches. That’s
the good news, the bad news is you
can drive yourself crazy, nothing more
frustrating than having a Bull Dorado
in your ¨reach¨ just to have them ignore
your bait! Also in the bay area, Skip
jack Tuna to 30 lbs., Bullet Bonito,
Bonito of the Arctic variety, and
Snapper to 30 lbs. with the average in
the 15 to 20-lb range for now. Needle
Fish to 40 lbs., Jack Crevalle from 20
to 50 lbs., Snook at the river mouths
for the lucky few targeting them.
Four-hour trips have been hard on the
captains, with fish ignoring baits, but
there are fish to be had and normally
these conditions will only last a few
days. So stay tuned, things can change
faster than my ex-wife’s credit limit!
Outside of the bay we’re still
seeing some nice sized Wahoo, but
(Owner of Master Baiter’s Sportfishing & Tackle)
remember, these are
not schooling fish
and hitting one is a
matter of luck and
skill combined. Wire
leaders are suggested,
but line-shy fish will
avoid visible line or
wire leader, so it’s a double edged
thing. Having said that, off El Moro
and the Marieta Islands we’re seeing
40 to 60 lbs. Wahoo striking baits and
lures alike. Rooster fish are moving in
around the ¨Islands¨, running anywhere
from 30 to 50 lbs. or larger, but again,
you need to figure out a way to turn
their head. Other players in the area
are naturally Skip Jack Tuna, Bonito,
Needle fish, newly arriving Snapper
to 30 lbs., and of course the list goes
on. One thing we do appreciate is the
arrival of Pompanos, a.k.a. Cookies,
they’re great tasting and they’re
around the islands. They are taking
bait and they’re one of the few that
are. Great tasting, it’s not unusual to
boat forty, but make sure you throw
the babies back so they can live to
see another day and we can continue
to enjoy their March arrival. Eight
hours is probably your best fishing bet
at the moment, but for those looking
for larger fish, then you’ll be looking
at Corbeteña or El Banco.
Speaking of Corbeteña and El
Banco, our world famous fishing
grounds, we have Black and Blue
Marlin ranging from 300 to 450 lbs.
Strange stuff in deed for March, so it’s
a weird world we’re dealing with out
there. Same situation, early morning
bites, bait overload with a heavy
measure of frustration is the order of
the day. You have a shot, not a great
shot, but hey, fishing is fishing and
if all you’re going to do is play the
percentages then you’ll never get that
finned fantasy I speak of. So take a
shot, hit it for 10 or 12 hours and if
you don’t get a strike, head to the
islands and hit more abundant species
like Pompanos, Roosters, Snapper or
Skip Jack Tuna.
One thing we’re seeing is Barracuda
moving in to the area in larger
numbers around the Marieta Islands.
Individually, Barracuda are not a threat
or danger in the water, they look a lot
like a Wahoo. But in mass or larger
numbers they will attack shiny objects
like lures or a person’s wristwatch
- which happens to be connected to
you at the time. Seriously, if you’re
snorkeling in the water and you see
a school of Barracuda, get out of
the water or at the very least make
sure you don’t have jewelry or shiny
stuff on. Just a friendly warning that
hopefully is unfounded.
We have beer coolers or Koozies in
the shop right now, they’re five dollars,
not cheap, but they’re being shipped
down from Oklahoma, so we have to
deal with all those related expenses,
but we have them and they’re cool. Be
warned, it says ¨I Master Bait¨ on the
bottom when you tip your beverage
up.. ha ha ha…
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
Fish Tales
33
We’ve opened a second location at the
intersection of Insurgentes and Basilio
Badillo in the Romantic Zone on the
south side of town, in the old Casa
de Cambio location. It may be easier
to explain the location as on the road
that goes to Conchas Chinas. You’ll
know us by the huge fishing mural on
our new location. We’ll
be booking charters,
tours and selling our
world famous T-shirts,
hats
and
assorted
products.
Come by,
say hello to Michele. If
you’re a legal citizen,
Caucasian(ish) and need
a part or full time job in
a fun environment, contact me and we
can talk.
Until next time, don’t forget to kiss
your fish and remember: at Master
Baiter’s Sportfishing & Tackle “We
Won’t Jerk You Around!”
Master Baiter’s has changed
locations in Marina Vallarta,
now between docks A and B
on the boardwalk.
Email your
questions to me at: [email protected]
MasterBaiters.com.mx Web page:
www.MasterBaiters.com.mx , local
Phone at: (044) 322 779-7571 or if
roaming: 011 521 322 779-7571 cell
phone direct. Facebook: http://www.
facebook.com/pages/Master-BaitersSportfishing-Tackle/88817121325
The trade name Master Baiter’s ®
Sportfishing and Tackle is protected
under trade mark law and is the sole
property of Stan Gabruk.
34
Hi-Tech
ISSUE
333
Tech News Round-up…
D
ateline
Washington
D.C.:
Washington loves to form committees to
investigate things - no big secret there.
What is surprising is when a committee
actually discovers something.
It was recently uncovered that when
Congressional investigators asked
the State Department for documents
from Hillary Clinton, related to the
attack on the Benghazi diplomatic
compound, they only received 300
emails from Hillary’s official State
department email account!!
Now how could you or I, get more
emails in an average week than
Hillary Clinton did as Secretary of
State on this important topic? This
did not make sense considering the
scale of the attack and lives lost. As
more digging revealed, it appears
Hillary had been using a personal
email account to conduct official State
Department business the entire time
she was Secretary of State.
So did Hillary just not like having
an email address like “[email protected]
state.gov”? Did she prefer “the.
[email protected]” or “mrs.
[email protected]”? (Examples are
for humor only and not actual email
addresses of Hillary’s).
The private email story actually gets
more complicated than that. Some
reports are that the actual private email
she used was “[email protected]
com”. This would mean it was an
actual private email server that had
been set up for the Clintons.
Companies and individuals can set up
a private email server relatively easy,
but whereas government email servers
are required by law to keep back-ups of
all their emails for years, private email
servers are not. Hillary “may” have
found a way around this “paper trail”.
Back in the year 2000, then Senator
Hillary Clinton, was no fan of email
and didn’t use it at all. There is even a
video clip of her at a fund raiser saying
“as much as I’ve been investigated and
all of that, you know, why would I ever
want to do e-mail?” It seems Hillary’s
distaste of emails and its paper trail
are deep seeded and lend weight to
this whole private email server as a
deliberate and well thought out plan.
It is a policy that government
employees can only use private email
accounts for official business if they
turned those emails over to be entered
into government computers for
archive and preservation.
Throughout her time as Secretary of
State, Hillary’s staff maintained her
government business on the private
email server and never entered them
into the State Department servers to
be preserved. After numerous requests
(some going back to 2011) Hillary’s
advisers, in late 2014, reviewed her
private email account and decided
which emails to turn over to the
State Department. So Hillary has
now finally turned over some 55,000
pages of emails from her private
email account, but there is no way to
independently verify if that is all there
“is” or “was” on this subject.
I’m sure this topic will be talked
about in more detail during any
presidential run Hillary mounts for
2016. There’s nothing like a little
blood in the water to make a US
election interesting.
Dateline San Francisco California:
As I write this, the Apple Spring
Forward event has just wrapped up.
Since being announced last September,
the Apple Watch has been ripe for
rumors and speculations. Let’s get into
the hard facts about this smart watch
and other goodies announced today.
If you’ve been thinking about buying
an Apple TV to do online streaming,
you’ll be glad you waited. Tim Cook
Apples’ CEO just announced a price
reduction for Apple TV to $69. US,
down from $99. US. As well there
will be an exclusive agreement with
HBO to offer cable free streaming of
its programming - for a $14.99 US per
month subscription.
On the Apple laptop front, the new
MacBook was unveiled today as well.
Included are a new 12” Retina screen
with a 2,304 by 1,440 resolution and
just 13.1mm thick - 25% thinner than
the current 11-inch MacBook Air!
The new MacBook uses 30% less
power and has a new redesigned track
pad called Force Touch. The standard
mechanical track pad looks like it’s
going to be replaced eventually on all
Apple laptops.
The new MacBook ships on April
10 and starts at $1,299. US with a 1.1
GHz Core M processor, 256GB Solid
State Drive and 8GB RAM.
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
For the more powerful MacBook
with a 1.2 GHz processor and 512GB
Solid State Drive, you’ll be looking
at $1,599. US. Both models will be
available in Silver, Space Grey and
Gold (like the iPhone colors).
We’ve covered a lot of the previously
released details on Apple’s new smart
watch in previous articles, so I won’t
go into all that again. What has
remained a secret and ripe for rumors
are the prices. So here we go… hold
on to your wallets!
The “Apple Watch Sport” model is
made of lightweight aluminum and
comes in silver and space grey as well
as two thicknesses – 38 mm or 42 mm.
You can select your band from 5 colors
of “fluoroelastomer” bands (synthetic
rubber). Price is between $350. US and
$400. US, depending on the thickness
you select. Available April 24th.
The “Apple Watch” model is stainless
steel and will start at $550. US and goes
up to $1,050. US, depending on the
band and other customized options you
choose. The “Apple Watch Edition”
model is 18K gold and if I haven’t lost
you yet, the price will be around the
$10,000 US area… depending on your
configuration. GULP !!
The battery will get 18 hours of
“normal” use, Apple says, so daily
charging will be needed. The only
good thing is that the new “magnetic
charging” technology is included in
the watches, so wireless charging, in
place of connecting a USB cable, will
make life somewhat easier.
If anyone reading this does end up
getting the gold model, let me know
what you think. I think it’s as close to
one as I’ll ever get!
That’s all my time for now. See
you again next week... until then,
remember: only safe Internet!
Ronnie Bravo
Ron can be found at CANMEX Computers.
Sales, Repairs, Data Recovery,
Networking, Wi-Fi, Hardware upgrades,
Graphic Design, House-calls available.
www.RonnieBravo.com,
Cellular 044-322-157-0688 or just
email to [email protected]
ISSUE
333
Trans Gender Fender Bender
By
I
Gil Gevins
might have been a little confused.
More than usual. Due to a powerfully
synergistic reaction between my
normal state of awareness (fuzzy)
and the ingestion of too much
Raicilla (the world’s most flammable
moonshine). I rarely drink Raicilla
these days, having been warned off
the volatile liquid by a succession
of Ologists: Gastroenterologists,
Cardiologists, Entomologists and
Abnormal Psychologists*.
(*Personally, I have never met a
normal psychologist, but that doesn’t
mean there aren’t any.)
But Sunday at the beach just
wouldn’t be Sunday at the beach
without Raicilla. And this was
Sunday. We were, in fact, driving
home, having already spent the day
getting sunned and stunned at Las
Animas Beach. My wife was at the
wheel (a good move, considering),
while I sat beside her, my brain
floating around the Crab Nebula
somewhere.
Rounding a corner just three
blocks from our house, we came
upon a sight so startling we had no
choice but to pull over and gawk.
(Sorry, I have to back up here
in order to provide some context.
Several days prior to the hallucinatory
events I am about to describe, Lucy
and I had gone down to the malecon
to watch Vallarta’s annual Mardi
Gras Carnival Parade. This festive
celebration is patterned after the
Carnival in Mazatlan, which was
borrowed from the one in New
Orleans, which was stolen outright
from the one in Brazil.
Our own Vallarta-style Carnival
parade is always an entertaining
affair, involving as it does dozens
of flamboyant floats, most of which
are filled with colorfully garbed
transvestites, in varying degrees
of undress. My wife, who really
appreciates
well-formed
male
buttocks, had a fantastic time. And
so did I, even though there was only
one female derriere on display, and
all of us would have slept far more
soundly that night had it been left
safely under wraps.)
But getting back to my mental
confusion and how it nearly landed
me in jail. There we sat in the car,
staring at the aforementioned mindboggling spectacle. “Look!” I said.
“It’s a float from the Mardi Gras
parade. They must be lost.”
“The parade already happened,”
Lucy pointed out.
“When?”
“Last Tuesday.”
“Then, these must be stragglers,” I
said, opening the door and stumbling
out onto the street.
“Wait a minute!” Lucy said.
“Where are you going?”
“To take pictures of the float.”
“It’s not a float!”
“Of course it is,” I said, whipping
out my cell phone.
“You’re going to get arrested!”
Lucy cried, scrunching down in her
seat.
I approached the float, which
consisted of a large pick-up truck
decorated to look like a police
vehicle. Standing beside it were two
men in the costumes of policemen.
And filling the back of the truck were
a dozen transvestites, packed in so
tightly that all their breasts had been
scrunched into unnatural locations.
One gal looked like she was growing
a double goiter.
Perhaps I should have mentioned
earlier that this particular corner, the
corner where my wife had pulled to
the curb, though only three blocks
from our house, happens to be the
epicenter of Puerto Vallarta’s nongender- specific Pay-Per-Screw
industry. Whenever we drive past
this corner, we like to guess which of
the sex-workers are men, and which
are women. After an exhaustive indepth study, we concluded that the
taller, thinner, better looking hookers
are always men, while the shorter,
plumper, less attractive pleasure
providers tend to be women.
In any case, at the moment all
of the above had been temporarily
bleached from my brain. I was
experiencing
what
Mexican
psychologists refer to as an
“involuntary Raicilla flashback”.
It was as if the small sinking speck
of awareness, still peering out
from beneath the quicksand of my
inebriation, had been beamed in its
diminished entirety all the way back
to the parade.
“Great costumes,” I told the cops,
as I began to snap photos with the
cell phone. “Very realistic. And you
girls look fantastic!” I shouted up at
the occupants of the float.
At this point, everyone began
making a great deal of noise. From
her seat in the car, Lucy began to
honk the horn. From his present
location (six inches from my face),
the fat policeman began to shout.
And the girls, stuck together like
an upright package of uncooked
spaghetti in the back of the truck, all
began to squeal.
“Call me!” a tall skinny blond in
yellow hot pants (with an Adam’s
apple the size of Mt. Whitney)
shouted. “Ginger: 133-2715!”
“Gloria: 167-8976!” another
shrieked.
“Lavender: 101-6969!”
“Stop!” It was my nemesis, the
rotund “policeman”, still pretending
to be in charge. “No pictures!”
“Oh, you are adorable!” I told him.
“I mean, the shirt, the hat, the badge,
the moustache - they’re perfect. But
those pants. Ugh! Why cover up that
beguilingly broad behind? Too much
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
Gil Gevins’ Page
35
cellulite? You know, three dozen
doughnuts a day will do that, dude.”
(In the interests of journalistic
excellence, I should point out that
Mexican policemen generally do not
eat doughnuts, which is why, what
I actually said was, “Maybe you
should lay off the tacos, fatso.”)
“This is an official police
operation!” the obese cop declared.
“Remove yourself at once!”
“Remove myself? What am I, a
stain? Hey, let’s see some leg,” I said
to a “redhead” in the truck.
“It’s a little crowded in here,” the
redhead said. “How about a private
show tomorrow? Amanda: 134-66…”
“Take one more picture,” the
policeman said, “and you’re under
arrest!”
“Well,” I said, weighing my
options, “okay. As long as I get to
wear handcuffs and a blindfold. Have
you seen Fifty Shades of Green, yet?
Personally, I found it kind of tame.
By the way, why aren’t you dressed
like a woman? You’d make a great
Rosanne Barr. Just drop twenty kilos,
shave the moustache, lose the ear
hair and, please, forget the G-string.
You put that thing on, you’ll never
see it again. They’ll have to call in
a team of spelunkers just to find the
damn thing.”
Gil Gevins
Is the author of four hilarious books,
including the cult-classic, PUERTO
VALLARTA ON 49 BRAIN CELLS A DAY,
and his latest and greatest, SLIME AND
PUNISHMENT. Signed copies of all Gil’s
books are available at LUCY’S CUCU
CABAÑA, located at 295 Basilio Badillo;
or as E-Books on Amazon.
36
Nature’s World
ISSUE
333
Lice – a bond of
friendship between people
By
A
Dr. Fabio Cupul
t one time or another, we’ve
been infested by lice. Most of us deny
that because we erroneously associate
it with poor hygiene and a social status
of poverty. Lice are parasites that do
not differentiate between the most
beautiful hair that lies on silk sheets
and the unkempt one that lies on some
newspapers on a busy sidewalk of any
city. What is certain is that those lice
that infest the hair of a human being can
only live with that being and no other
place (24 hours away from someone’s
head = its death sentence as it has no
food, nor the adequate temperature
and humidity needed for its survival).
They move through contact when two
heads meet; however, it is improbable
that they can be transferred through
combs (they’re very hard to pull off
a hair), exchange of clothes, hats or
caps, or bed sheets, as they would die
of hunger in an environment as hostile
as clothes or sheets.
The presence of lice among humans
is more frequent during childhood, as
children are in constant contact with
each other, either in the classroom or
when they form groups to play their
endless games. It is precisely during
that stage of life that parents subject
their children to numerous treatments
and home remedies to eradicate those
bothersome insects. Among those
methods there are covering the hair
with mayonnaise or oil – almond,
olive or coconut, mouth wash, and
vinegar …among others. There
have even been some who have
used commercial insecticides
applied directly onto the hair.
The first option to eliminate
those pesky intruders is to
remove them manually with the help
of special combs or tweezers, just as
our cousins the monkeys do to clean
up and strengthen the group’s loving
bonds. The best is to use the efficient
commercial products that contain
pyrethrine or permethrin, which kills
lice within 10 to 30 minutes.
Scientist call this infestation suffered
by humans “pediculosis” (when there
are more than a dozen lice on one
head). Although it is true that lice do
not represent a transcendental danger
to public health - as they do not cause
serious problems nor do they transmit
diseases - they could pose a “danger”
because they cause irritation and
itchiness of the scalp through their feces
and saliva, leading to discrimination,
low self-esteem and even sometimes a
decrease in scholastic achievement in
the case of children.
Head lice (Pediculus capitis – from
Latin, meaning “the head thing with
small feet”) are found practically
around the world, as long as there are
humans. They are perfectly adapted
to life on our heads. As they are
wingless, they have a flat body and
its three pairs of feet are modified
into hooks to grab onto the hair shaft,
while the structure of their mouth
serves to perforate the skin and suck
out the blood.
There is no risk of dying from the
blood lost to lice. They only measure
2.1 to 3.3 millimeters and they only
have to feed once a day (without which
they die of hunger). At each feeding,
they can suck the equivalent of 0.0001
ml of blood. Its body, mainly the
abdomen, is flexible which enables
the louse to enlarge itself to consume
more blood at each “meal”. Lice live
approximately 20 days. As adults, i.e.:
approx. 10 days old, the female can lay
as many as 7 eggs per day for a total of
55 to 300 during its lifetime.
Lice eggs, known as nits, are placed
on the hair shaft, one by one, by the
female, at one millimeter from the
scalp, using a special glue so they
will not move. An egg will take 7
to 10 days to incubate and hatch to
produce a little louse ready to feed.
Lice are often found on the back of
the head, above the neck and behind
the ears. It is also interesting to note
that Caucasians are more susceptible
Solution to crossword on page 39
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
to such infestations, perhaps because
their hair is usually finer.
Lice have been with us for thousands
of years; in fact, they have been found
on Peruvian mummies over 3,000
years old. Their cohabitation with
humans has allowed for their
inclusion in some of our belief
systems. Thus, among Spanish
traditions, there was one that
recommended people suffering
from anemia to chew or eat lice
taken from another individual.
On the other hand, still in Spain,
there is a strange remedy to
treat cardiopathy (heart aches)
whereby one should eat lice in
tortillas (the Spanish kind, made with
eggs and potato).
In the ancient Inca empire, the
poorest would pay tribute to the town
governors with lice. This did not
mean that they were too poor to have
anything else to give, far from it. On
the contrary, the louse was the symbol
of solidarity among people: the act
of de-licing implied companionship
and affection. This is illustrated in a
Peruvian myth that says, “A husband
and his wife were fighting all day. As
the day went on, the wife began to
scratch, so her husband asked, ‘Come
here, what’s wrong? Let me look at
you.’ He saw that she had a lot of lice,
so he removed them and they became
friends again. This was an act of God.
It is said that lice will always create
bonds of friendship and affection
between husband and wife.”
Dr. Fabio Germán Cupul-Magaña
Coastal University Center (CUC) of
the University of Guadalajara
Email: [email protected]
Solution to Sudoku on page 39
ISSUE
333
Nature’s World
The Vallarta Botanical Garden making a difference in Puerto Vallarta tourism
By
Neil Gerlowski
Executive Director, VBG
In
mid-March, the Canadian
Garden Tourism council will host
the North American Garden Tourism
Conference in Toronto in conjunction
with Canada’s premier annual floral
festival, “Canada Blooms.” This
year the newly formed International
Garden Tourism Network
will also act as a participating
organization and bring in
many new speakers through its
wide and growing influence.
Conference leaders asked the
Vallarta Botanical Garden to
participate by presenting how
our garden has made a tourism
difference in Puerto Vallarta.
From our perspective,
we have served as a
successful local model of
sustainable
eco-tourism
while
spotlighting
our
region’s abundance of truly
incredible Mexican native
plants. Nearly ten years after
the Vallarta Botanical Garden
opened to the public our work
continues to inspire others
to enjoy and care for their
natural world. While our garden
has enjoyed the benefits of increased
recognition internationally and by
our local community, we are helping
our region as a whole become known
as a world-class garden destination.
It is hard to calculate the overall
results to our local economy from
tourism generated by our Garden, the
improved livelihoods of those who
benefit from our thriving tourism
industry, and increased quality of
life to those who frequent the VBG.
Quite clearly though, the VBG and
our family of supporters is making
an incredible positive difference
here in Puerto Vallarta as is best
evidenced by the ever-increasing
flow of visitors to our Garden and
their wonderful commentaries.
This month of March, the VBG’s
Operations Director, Jesús Reyes,
will be representing us at the
upcoming North American Garden
Tourism Conference.
Capomo Harvest Festival
Saturday, March 21
By
Alan Heinze
Research Coordinator, VBG
J
oin Vallarta Botanical Garden Patron and former Executive
Director of the American Rhododendron Society, Dee
Daneri, for a dedication of the Dick and Dee Daneri Vireya
Rhododendron House currently under construction. Scheduled
for completion and a soft opening in June, this structure will
soon host the only collection of Vireya Rhododendrons in
Mexico as well as a lovely selection of accompanying plants.
While work continues, the frame of this building’s roof is
scheduled to be completed in time for our dedication.
Capomo, also known as breadnut, is both the name of a native
tree (Brosimum alicastrum) and its fruit. Capomo berries are
covered by a thin edible tissue which is an important source of
food for a variety of wild animals like deer and bats. Cattle will
also consume the fruits and local farmers are therefore keen
to maintain capomo stands, generating multiple environmental
services to all. The nutrient rich seeds are harvested, processed
and commercialized by local families, who value these forests
for their beauty and the livelihood they provide.
Come learn about this incredible native forest crop during our
Capomo Harvest Festival on March 21st. Gather capomo from
the forest floor and learn about nutritious and delicious recipes
that you can prepare at home to include this tropical superfood
into your diet.
Garden Amenities and Services
He will present to an international
audience of leaders in the garden
and tourism industries about the
difference the Vallarta Botanical
Garden has made in Puerto Vallarta
and how our work continues to
bring great benefits to our local
communities and México in general.
As of this moment, the Vallarta
Botanical Garden is listed in
TripAdvisor.com as number 5 of
181 “Things To Do” in Puerto
Vallarta with just shy of 1,000
incredibly complementary visitor
commentaries.
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
Visit the Gardens’ Hacienda de Oro Restaurant for authentic
Mexican food and brick-oven pizza. Our new menu includes
delicious dishes such as fish and shrimp tacos. Hike the
Gardens’ nature trails and bask in tropical mountain scenery.
Experience the Orchid Conservatory, Gift Shop, plant nursery,
tequila tasting and more. You can even shop the Gardens
remotely through our online store. The very best of Vallarta!
Spend the day in the Gardens for only $60 pesos. The Gardens
are about a 30-minute drive south of Old Town, Puerto Vallarta,
on Carretera a Barra Navidad at km 24, just past Las Juntas
y Los Veranos, all easily accessible by public transportation.
Our world-class plant collections, miles of hiking trails through
native forests and a host of special activities give you countless
reasons to visit us soon. Tel.: 223-6182. Open from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m., Tuesday to Sunday. Web site: www.vbgardens.org
March 2015
37
38
Nature’s World
ISSUE
333
Planting Roots
in Mexico
By
Tommy Clarkson
Virginia Creeper
Parthenocissus quinquefolia
Family: Vitaceae
Also known as American ivy,
five-fingered ivy, five-leaved
ivy and woodbine
F
rom the outset I gotta’ assert –
“This is a very flexible plant!”
It cheerfully thrives from as far
north as Southern Canada, through
the U.S. to as far south as – at least
- here in the State of Colima on the
Central Mexican Pacific coast. I
know the latter to be true as it happily
hangs from our coconut log planter
on the southern edge of our Dining
Palapa Terrace.
Super easily grown, it handles with
equal aplomb average, medium to
well-drained soil varying from full
sun to part shade. Suffice it to say,
it’s not a difficult guy to grow!
That having been said, the Virginia
Creeper’s ideal environment is the
“wet but well-drained, nutrient-rich
woodland with abundant trees and
shrubs on which its active tendrils
can attach and grow.” In the absence
of trees, however, it can still attain a
rather dominant presence by forming
a dense ground cover through
effective employment of its extensive
tendrils as roots. Some folks, in fact,
use it as a sturdy, ground cover in
areas where grass won’t grow.
The five-fingered Virginia creeper
is easily distinguished from the
somewhat similar appearing vine
- but dermatitis inducing - threeleafed poison ivy. The leaflets of
Parthenocissus quinquefolia are 3
to 8 inches long, elliptical, coarsely
toothed and arise from a single petiole
and can, on older vines especially in
the shade, form a leaf up to one foot
(30.5 cm) in total diameter. Its vines
are covered with a grayish brown
bark, roughened with concave leaf
scars. With age, these get woodier/
sturdier as fine tentacles (for wont of
a better description) reach out from
them along the vine. These can form
new stems or become tendrils used
by the plant to attach itself to that on
which it wishes to grow.
These tendrils grow to 4 or 5 inches
(10 – 12.5 cm) with 5 to 8 terminal subbranches. They attach themselves onto
whatever they wish to grow by a tiny,
tip disk that secretes a resinous cement.
The strength of the adhesiveness of this
resin is such that a single tendril can
support up to ten pounds. The tendril
branches that wander about finding no
surface from which to grow, twist into
cork-screw shapes that hangs from the
vine’s main stem.
The numerous branches of a fully
mature Virginia creeper grow toward
the strongest light averaging 4 to
5 inches per year with, given the
absolute best conditions, growth all
the way to 20 feet per year!
“Has it flowers?” you ask. Yes,
they’re small, inconspicuous, and
colored near white to green. They
cluster on the tips of the leaf petioles
hidden from view underneath the
leaflets. In “bit of the bizarre”, they
can be “unisexual” (containing either
male or female structures) or, as is
more common, “bisexual”) containing
both male and female structures.
Eaten by creatures of the wild, both
avian and mammalian, the clusters
of dark blue berries (poisonous
to humans) atop the flower stalks
have their seeds dispersed via the
feces of whatever animal ingested
them. Those which survive this fate
ultimately fall to ground and either
germinate or are consumed by small,
foraging rodents.
The five fingered, Virginia
creeper is easily identified. . . .
unless - as it does 0 it sometimes
throws in a “sixth finger”!
The leaflets are three to eight inches
long, elliptical, coarsely toothed and
arise from a single petiole.
Seemingly just full of questions,
you next may ask, “In what other
ways is the Virginia creeper of use
to ‘critters of the wild?” Well, for
one, it provides a great place for bird
nests, such as the American robin
and the hermit thrush. And second,
butterflies and moths – such as three
species of sphinx moths - lay not
only lay their eggs on the leaves of
the Parthenocissus quinquefolia, but
also use the “insect lovely” leaves for
habitat as well as food for their larvae.
Dermatitis
problems
aside,
its leaves are rich in numerous
protective chemicals. Consumption
of the leaves by us humans may
lead to severe vomiting, diarrhea,
and narcosis. So said, in controlled
doses - purportedly - these very
same, leaves have been utilized to
treat superficial injuries such as
skin rashes, toothaches, bruises,
bunions and corns as well as internal
maladies ranging from liver disease
and headaches to urinary ailments
and, bronchitis. (Note: While the
antiseptic properties of Virginia
Creeper leaves are substantively
documented, the efficacy of these
other uses remain unproven.)
Virginia Creeper will grow over
most varieties of shrubs and on most
types of pine or hardwood trees but,
beware, it can become a parasite,
killing the host on which it grows.
Tommy Clarkson
Ours happily hangs from our
coconut log planter on the
southern edge of our Dining
Palapa Terrace.
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
In Manzanillo, visit Ola Brisa Gardens,
Tommy and Patty’s verdant, multiterraced tropical paradise nestled on
a hill overlooking the magnificent vista
of Santiago Bay. Leisurely meander its
curved, paved path, experiencing, first
hand, a delicious array of palms, plants
and flowers from all over the world.
Or, e-mail questions to him at
[email protected]
For back issues of “Roots”, gardening tips,
tropical plant book reviews and videos of
numerous, highly unique eco/adventure/
nature tours, as well as memorable
“Ultimate Experiences” such a Tropical
Garden Brunches and Spa Services,
please visit www.olabrisagardens.com
ISSUE
333
Brain Teasers
Solution to Crossword
on Page 36
SUDOKU!
Sudoku is a logic-based placement puzzle.
The aim of the puzzle is to enter a numerical digit from 1 through 9 in each row,
column and group of squares enclosed by the bold lines (also called a box). Each
box must contain each number only once, starting with various digits given in some
cells (the “givens”). Each row, column, and region must contain only one instance of
each numeral. Completing the puzzle requires patience.
It is recommended as therapy because some studies have suggested they might
improve memory, attention and problem solving while staving off mental decline
and perhaps reducing the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.
Solution to Sudoku on Page 36
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015
39
ISSUE
333
Saturday 14 to Friday 20
March 2015