Serving the underserved

Lady Broncs fall to Cheyenne East in state tourney semifinal, B1
WEEKEND
Saturday, March 14, 2015
129th Year, No. 251
Serving Sheridan County,
Wyoming
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The charm
of the
modern farm. C1
Serving the underserved
Sheridan Health Center celebrates 10 years
BY TRAVIS PEARSON
[email protected]
Going full circle for
math on Pi Day, A3
SHERIDAN — Strong or weak, man or woman, rich or poor, big or small — anybody can get sick. Illness never discriminates.
For millions of Americans, disease or injury means struggling to pay for health
care in a system as confusing as it is expensive.
The Sheridan Health Center, however, represents a beacon for those unsure how to
navigate paying for an ailment or even everyday care. The free clinic provides medical treatment for local uninsured, low-income residents.
This month, SHC celebrates its 10-year anniversary. After a decade, the clinic
offers more services and hours than ever before, but representatives insist none of
the growth and accomplishments would be possible without the generosity and support of the community.
WASHINGTON (AP) —
Saturday is the day when
love of math and a hankering for pastry come full circle. Saturday is Pi Day, a
once-in-a-year calendar date
that this time squares the
fun with a once-in-a-century
twist.
Seeing a need
Kathie Schonenbach, a registered nurse at the Sheridan County Public Health,
was one of the founders of what was originally called the Free Clinic of Sheridan.
Through her job, she saw a number of patients who needed help paying for services.
So, more than three years before SHC ever opened its doors, a group of individuals started meeting monthly to discuss the possibility of beginning an alternative
option. They toured other Wyoming free clinics to figure out how a similar practice
could begin in Sheridan.
SEE HEALTH , PAGE 2
600 gather for Empty
Bowl fundraiser, A7
SHERIDAN — Some say
soup is good for the soul,
and when you’re enjoying a
hot bowl with 600 friends
and fellow community members, coming together to
support a good cause, that
saying becomes all the more
real.
Sheridan man sentenced for felony forgery, stalking and burglary
BY KELLI HEITSTUMAN-TOMKO
[email protected]
SHERIDAN — A Sheridan man was sentenced in two different courtrooms for two different cases Thursday in 4th Judicial District
Court.
Joel Scott Elliott, 37, was sentenced first by
Judge John Fenn for felony forgery in the
smaller courtroom of the district court before
moving to the larger courtroom to be sentenced on charges of felony stalking and
felony burglary by Judge William Edelman.
Each charge carried a possible sentence of
10 years in prison and $10,000 in fines.
In each case, Elliott was represented by
Jeremy Kisling. The state was represented by
Deputy County and Prosecuting Attorney
Darci Phillips.
Fenn handed down a split sentence on the
forgery equivalent to the time Elliott already
served and three years of supervised probation. Fenn noted that Elliott had already paid
restitution to the victim.
Elliott was hired by the owners of Mike’s
Dozer and Backhoe Service in 2013. Elliot was
paid $3,250 by check for the job.
The First Federal Savings Bank called the
backhoe service soon after the check was
issued, however, to inform them two checks
had been issued to Elliott for $3,250. A “stop
payment” was put on the second check. When
authorities inspected the check, they found it
had been forged. Elliott admitted to authorities he had created the second check for
deposit.
Elliott initially pleaded not guilty to the
charge and was free on a $5,000 unsecured
bond. A two-day jury trial was set for June 4.
Elliott changed his plea in May in conjunction
with a plea deal, though, and sentencing was
planned for Aug. 5.
But Elliott was arrested for felony stalking
and felony burglary in July. He had been convicted of misdemeanor stalking of the same
victim in 2012.
SEE FELONY, PAGE 7
Federal judge rules for tribe in dispute over eagle permits
Longtime FMHS
teacher announces
retirement, C3
SHERIDAN — Geri Roth,
one of the original teachers
at Fort Mackenzie High
School, has announced that
she will be going into retirement at the end of this year.
For 18 years she taught what
some see as the heart of
FMHS, the Discovery class.
CHEYENNE (AP) — A federal judge has
ruled the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
improperly denied a permit to kill bald eagles
to the Northern Arapaho Tribe on its central
Wyoming reservation.
U.S. District Judge Alan B. Johnson ruled
Thursday that Fish and Wildlife violated the
Northern Arapaho’s religious rights. He
ordered the agency to reconsider the tribe’s
application.
Johnson’s ruling, coming in a case the
Northern Arapaho filed in 2011, is the latest
round in a contentious dispute with the federal government over the tribe’s need to kill
eagles for its annual Sun Dance.
Johnson ruled the agency was wrong to
limit the Northern Arapaho permit to taking
two eagles a year only outside the boundaries
of the Wind River Indian Reservation. The
tribe shares the reservation with the Eastern
Shoshone Tribe, which has its own religious
grounds for opposing the killing of eagles.
In his ruling, Johnson stated that the issue
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of whether the federal government may burden one American Indian tribe’s exercise of
its religious rights to benefit another tribe
hasn’t come up before in federal law. However,
he wrote that it’s clear the First Amendment
prohibits it.
‘The judge ruled that it was a violation
of their religious rights, and it’s part of our
duty to hold up their religious rights and
freedoms. I believe the agency will
definitely have to reconsider its position on
issuing that permit.”
Ivy Allen
Tribal liaison with the Fish and Wildlife Service
Arapaho Tribe were not immediately successful on Friday.
Ivy Allen, tribal liaison with the Fish and
Wildlife Service in Lakewood, Colorado, said
Friday the agency will review the judge’s
order and act on it, but said it’s too early to
say how long that would take.
“The judge ruled that it was a violation of
their religious rights, and it’s part of our duty
to hold up their religious rights and freedoms,” Allen said. “I believe the agency will
definitely have to reconsider its position on
issuing that permit.”
The Northern Arapaho sued the federal
agency in 2011 to get the bald eagle permit following the federal prosecution of Winslow
Friday, a young tribal member who shot a bald
eagle on the Wind River Indian Reservation in
2005 for the Sun Dance. Friday ultimately
pleaded guilty and was ordered to pay a fine
in tribal court.
Attempts to reach a lawyer for the Northern
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144 Grinnell Ave. Sheridan, WY 82801
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Today’s edition is published for:
Amy Albrecht
of Sheridan
SEE EAGLES, PAGE 7
OPINION
VOICES
PAGE SIX
ALMANAC
4
5
6
9
SPORTS
B1
COMICS
B4
HOME & GARDEN C1
YOUTH
C4
A2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2015
HEALTH : Funded through generosity
FROM 1
Before moving any further, though, the group had
to get an idea of the need
within the community,
another founder, Dr. Sy
Thickman, said.
Representatives handed out
surveys in the community
and at the hospital health
fair.
“We estimated that it
would be essentially onefifth of the population. We
figured about 5,000 people
were either without insurance or without money
enough to get care,”
Thickman said. “That was a
gross estimate, but sufficient to warrant some further entities going into a
free clinic.”
It wasn’t that low-income
individuals had no options
previously. Emergency
rooms often provide what’s
referred to as “charity care”
for those without the means
to pay, but this became a
burden for the hospitals,
Schonenbach said.
“We as a group thought it
would just benefit our community as a whole to help
people get back on their feet
and be a better part of our
community, a better part of
their family. It was just a
win-win for our entire community,” she said, adding
that numerous volunteers
helped keep momentum
going. “It was huge. The
more we gathered information, the larger we saw the
need and the importance of
starting to develop this.”
After establishing 501(c)3
nonprofit status and finding
a location — Sheridan
Memorial Hospital originally charged $1 per year for
use of a building on West
Fifth Street — the doors
opened in March 2005.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Registered nurse Stormy Fanning, left, discusses a patient’s case
with nurse practitioner Brenda Fischer Thursday at the Sheridan
Health Center on East Whitney Street.
Sheridan County and be
between the ages of 19 and
64.
SHC does not see individuals who take opiate medication or who could utilize
services already offered in
Sheridan County, like psychiatric care or reproductive health.
treatments better and they
also know how to treat problems better.”
These workshops and the
new location both contribute toward another goal:
incorporating all aspects of
issues the underserved deal
with.
“One thing is that
Sheridan Health Center is
involved with initiatives
Invaluable service
working with low-income
The qualifications might
people, so we can help be
sound specific, but SHC
that voice, not only medical
actually serves a wide array but also to understand some
of clients and proves invalu- of the other challenges,”
able to their everyday
Kindt explained.
health and well-being. The
founders wanted to offer
The next 10 years
medical care to those who
In many ways, it’s imposmight have skipped seeing a
sible to avoid politics when
doctor altogether or waited
discussing health care.
until an ailment required
While SHC has helped
an emergency room visit.
countless individuals, repreThis goal has not changed.
sentatives don’t have a clear
“This is an opportunity
for people to get health care idea of what the next
without the onus of a finan- decade might look like.
“In the best of all worlds,
cial burden,” Thickman
said.
this would not be neces“People think we just take sary,” Thickman said of the
care of people who aren’t
clinic. “There would be a
working,” Kindt said. “We
social right for health —
take care of the working
that health care is a given.
poor. We take care of the
But in our current system,
people … who have dealt
health care is not a given.
with
medical
bankruptcy
.
And that’s why this is necesUp and running
We take care of people who
sary.”
Many community memhave not had access to medThe Affordable Care Act,
bers spoke with skepticism
ical care, so they’re just try- often called Obamacare, has
more than a decade ago,
ing to get healthy enough to created a lot of confusion
questioning how a free clin- where they can start workon what the future holds for
ic could survive. As it turns ing again.”
the clinic, since, at its core,
out, the answer was right in
“There are a number of
the ACA strives for everythe mirror.
people who have required
one to have health insur“It’s funded through the
this care, that, because of
ance. In theory, those who
generosity of our communi- this care, can work and be
cannot afford health insurty, through the local founda- healthy enough and get out
ance would get subsidies,
of this care provision,”
tions, and then private
and those who opt not to
Thickman added.
donations as well as from
purchase health insurance
SHC nurse practitioner
our patients,” SHC
could be fined.
Brenda Fischer, FNP-C, has
Those without a job or
Executive Director Cathi
with a low-paying job could
Kindt explained. “There is a seen numerous success stories. Whether keeping some- be excluded from fines
suggested $10 donation for
one out of the hospital or
despite not having insurservice or whatever people
ance, though.
can contribute. That’s what treating an individual with
chronic issues, success is
“There is also the exclusupports the clinic.”
relative but equally reward- sion factor because they’re
Sheridan County and
SMH remain very supporting for those at SHC — not
exempt from that penalty if
ive with in-kind donations
to mention patients.
the cost of insurance is
like affordable rent and
And growth has accompa- greater than like 8 percent
reduced-price pharmaceuti- nied success.
of their income,” Kindt
cals, respectively, she added.
The clinic originally
said.
Another point of emphamaintained four hours per
None of those associated
sis came in duplication of
week. In the years since, it
with SHC, unsurprisingly,
services, which SHC
has expanded to two full
can predict the future politifounders wanted to avoid at days (8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.)
cally. What Kindt will confiall costs.
each week, available by
dently say is that the clinic
“We were very sensitive
appointment. SHC now
will continue serving
about interfering or invadoperates in the Public
patients as long as it can.
ing a private practitioner’s
Health building at 31 E.
“There are just so many
service,” Thickman said.
Whitney St., a central locaquestions, not only in our
“We were quite definite
tion near various other
state but also nationally
about the financial need for services.
about, excuse the pun, but
care and indeed would have
SHC also offers various
ensuring that all are
that evaluated on a sixclasses each year addressinsured,” she said. “I guess
month basis to make certain ing a wide array of health
in the mean time we just
that that individual who
issues.
keep doing what we’re
was being served required it
“We’ve developed little
doing and we know there
because of their financial
clinics. We have profession- are people to serve. We’re
circumstances.”
als who will come in and
here for the duration. As
Clinic personnel examine
address a different facet of
long as we’re needed, we’ll
pay stubs to ensure patient
that condition,” Fischer
be here.”
eligibility. Clients must not
said, adding medical
And if the clinic is there,
have current medical insur- providers will often work
continuing to operate at a
ance; cannot be qualified for with clients one on one or
high level and helping an
Medicaid, Medicare,
set up stations. “[Patients]
underserved demographic,
Veteran Affairs medical
leave here with a better
all of those involved with
care or Indian Health
understanding. If they
SHC say it is due to the volServices; they must live in
understand, they follow
unteers and the community
support it has received the
past decade.
“I just think we need to
thank our community for
being here for us. If it wasn’t for the community, we
wouldn’t be here,” Kindt
said. “This is a communitysupported and driven project. Thank you for being
here the last 10 years.”
The Sheridan Health
Center will host a Business
After Hours to celebrate its
anniversary on Wednesday
from 5-7 p.m. at 31 E.
Whitney St.
SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A3
Going full circle for math and pastries on a special Pi Day
WASHINGTON (AP) — Saturday
is the day when love of math and a
hankering for pastry come full circle. Saturday is Pi Day, a once-in-ayear calendar date that this time
squares the fun with a once-in-acentury twist.
Saturday is 3-14-15, the first five
digits of the mathematical constant pi: 3.141592653. The best times
to celebrate are at 9:26 and 53 seconds, morning and evening. The
next time that happens is in March
2115.
“It’s a portal into this magical
mysterious world of mathematics,”
said University of California
Berkeley mathematician and
author Edward Frenkel. “Pi is special.”
Pi is the constant used to calculate the area of a circle, as in pi
times the radius squared, but it
appears all over other parts of
mathematics. It “is kind of a basic
atomic building block” for math,
said Temple University mathematician and author John Paulos, who
was interviewed at precisely 3:14:15
p.m.
In some places, Pi Day is celebrated with the edible type of pie.
“It’s a real exciting moment
for math enthusiasm,” said
Nathan Kaplan, a Yale
University math professor,
who called it a time for people to “remember how
much fun they found some
of the stuff in school.”
Kaplan acknowledged
that most people don’t really recall math as fun, blaming that on how it’s taught:
“There’s fun stuff out there
in the quantitative world.”
One interesting aspect of
pi is that it is irrational,
which means the decimals
after 3 go on to infinity
with no repeating patterns.
Yet in 1897, a bill before the
Indiana legislature tried to
round it up to 3.2. It fell
flat.
“We cannot change it. It’s
not subject to opinion or
taste or time,” Frenkel said.
“How many things like this in
the universe mean the same
thing to everyone through
time and space?”
This pi story goes full circle,
with exactly 314 words.
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COURTESY PHOTO |
The University of Wyoming range management team placed third at the International Society for
Range Management’s Undergraduate Range Management Exam. One member of the team, Shelby
Baumgartner, back row, third from left, is from Clearmont.
BY ALISA BRANTZ
[email protected]
CLEARMONT — After a
special musical performance Wednesday night by
Tri-M, the Sheridan County
School District 3 honor
music group, a former
Olympic athlete joined the
coaching team at ArvadaClearmont High School,
preliminary discussion on
how to tighten the district
budget by $200,000 began
and an architect’s bid to
manage summer projects
was accepted at the monthly meeting of the SCSD3
board of trustees.
Accounting firm Bennett,
Weber and Hermstad presented the district’s annual
audit report. The audit was
clean and offered some
assistance to the discussions beginning in the district surrounding how to
“trim the fat” after the district’s funding for next year
was reduced from $3.9 million to $3.7 million.
The External Cost
Adjustment ensured by the
passing of House Bill 1 with
language granting it generated an increase to the district’s overall budget that
was significant enough for
the current staffing levels
to be maintained, according
to SCSD3 Superintendent
Charles Auzqui.
“The ECA was a huge
bonus to us and we are so
grateful for that being
passed,” Auzqui said. “It’s
going to allow us to balance
out our staffing and keep
the people we need in
place.”
He added that the administration does not anticipate cutting certified staff
but will review areas to
make the needed cuts next
month.
The board approved
Aaron Cleare as head coach
of the junior high track
team. Cleare previously ran
in the Olympics and was an
All-American athlete in college. His wife, Ashley, a fellow former All American,
was approved as the assistant coach.
Three of four certified
staff contracts up for
renewal were approved and
Roy Doke (7-12 Spanish and
K-6 elementary teacher),
Elisa Olson (K-12 music
teacher) and Kim Davis (.75
time 7-12 English teacher)
will all return next year.
Also returning, Ross
Walker (7-12 science
teacher) received tenure.
Additionally, Dale
Buckingham Architects
was selected to bid and
supervise the district’s
summer projects. It will get
started on prioritizing projects and sending them out
for bid next week after asking $17,585 for the job.
Some of the projects the
firm will be bidding out
include sealing doors at
Arvada Elementary, as well
as replacing weather siding
on the north side of the
building. Clearmont High
School has some soffits on
the roof that need to be
replaced as well as gutter
issues. The architects will
develop a carpet replacement plan for the whole district and address ADA compliance issues on sidewalks
as well as safety issues with
fencing on recreation fields,
among other things.
In other news, Shelby
Baumgartner of Clearmont
was part of the University
of Wyoming range management team that finished
third at the International
Society for Range
Management’s
Undergraduate Range
Management Exam in
February. The UW team
won a tiebreaker with the
University of Alberta and
was one point from tying
for second-place with South
Dakota State University.
The students are rangeland ecology and watershed
management majors in the
College of Agriculture and
Natural Resources and have
been practicing for the competition since September.
The URME is a two-hour
professional examination
with six subject-specific
areas and includes realworld problems requiring
complex calculations.
The exam is so similar to
the one taken by professionals to earn SRM’s certified
professional in rangeland
management designation
that the exam requirement
is waived for students placing in the top 10 percent
and have at least five years
of experience after graduation.
In other business:
• district Business
Manager John Camino
reported 44 percent of the
total 2014-2015 budget
remains available.
• Food Service Director
Greg Rohrer reported
Wednesday that all district
activities requiring concessions are now over and a
year-to-date intake report
on concessions will be provided at next month’s meeting.
• the new school bus stop
sign camera systems have
been ordered with a goal of
them being installed on all
the buses by June.
• the district hired a new
custodial services company
called Bruco that will provide supplies and training
to all of the district’s custodial staff beginning March
27.
• Camino reported the
majority of the district
housing project paperwork
is now complete and a goal
has been set of having the
new singlewide in place by
May 1.
• the board is looking at
developing a combination
school agreement in order
to be able to combine with
home schools and other
public schools on extra-curricular activities, as they do
not currently have a policy
in place.
• the School Facilities
Commission has asked the
district to present its preferred plan in regards to
what to do with the old
Rock School. District
administrators will plan a
community meeting to
begin gathering ideas and
input.
• administrators will host
a staff training on March 30
based around everything
that is needed to present for
Wyoming accountability on
the schools that did not
meet expectations.
Office Manager
Production Manager
A4
OPINION
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Why
innovating is
never easy
SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2015
TRENDING ON THE WEB |
nytimes.com
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Hilary Clinton.
3. Putin, said to be 'perfectly
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4. The heart-stopping climbs
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5. ISIS still on the attack,
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6. Zuckerberg lawsuit documents show animosity with
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7. Michael Graves, postmodernist architect who designed
towers and teakettles, dies at
80.
8. Strength is weakness.
9. How to survive the college
admissions madness.
10. Serena Williams strikes
the right note in a time of turmoil.
A
colleague recently introduced me to
Clay Christensen and his concept of
“disruptive innovation.” The phrase is
a bit of a buzzword these days, appearing in Forbes, The Seattle Times, The
Economist and even leading to events like a
“festival of disruption.”
For those of you who don’t know him,
just as I didn’t, Christensen is known in the
business world primarily for his book “The
Innovator’s Dilemma,” which is a business
school staple.
Christensen has said
that disruption “transforms complicated expensive products into things
that are so affordable and
accessible that many
more people can own
them and use them.” He
added that he believes
EDITOR’S
that disruptive innovaCOLUMN
tions have accounted for
nearly 100 percent of all
|
of the jobs that have been
Kristen Czaban
created in America in the
last 100 years.
Examples of disruptive innovation that
Christensen uses are personal computers,
which uprooted the market for mainframe
and mini computers (I know millennials
are asking ‘What the heck are those?’).
Other examples are cellular phones, community colleges, discount retailers and
retail medical clinics.
According to Christensen, disruptive
innovation describes a process by which a
product or service takes root initially in
simple applications at the bottom of a market and then moves up market, eventually
displacing established competitors.
This is what makes innovation so difficult
and what brings companies to the idea of
the “innovator’s dilemma.” The dilemma is
the choice companies have to make between
holding onto an existing market by doing
the same thing a bit better or capturing
new markets by embracing new technologies and adopting new business models.
New business models? Hold the (cellular)
phone.
Why throw out a business model that has
been your bread and butter for decades?
That just isn’t rational, especially when
you’re talking about trading it for a model
with lower profit margins.
And that’s why businesses don’t do it and,
Christensen argues, new technologies cause
great firms to fail.
The biggest piece of all of this, as in most
business ventures, is risk. Do you bet your
bread and butter on the untried, untested
and what may turn out to be the unworthy?
I’m not finished with Christensen’s book
quite yet (though it is keeping me up at
nights and causing book hangovers). My
colleague mentioned that the book can
leave some readers feeling rather pessimistic. What’s a business to do when
faced with such a dilemma? Is all hope lost?
Are all big, established businesses doomed?
Well, my colleague said Christensen
didn’t really answer that in “The
Innovator’s Dilemma.” But, he has since
published a book called “The Innovator’s
Solution,” which I’ve been told isn’t nearly
as convincing.
Maybe it is naive, or maybe it is innovative (wink wink), but I think such disruptions bring about enormous opportunities
— both for consumers and businesses alike.
As I walked down Main Street on Friday
on my way to grab a cup of coffee, it was
hard not to think about how this concept
might apply to small-town businesses as
much as the Kodaks and IBMs of old. How
many local businesses are struggling with
the “innovator’s dilemma” right now? I
would bet many, especially as the Internet
continues to compete with local business.
After all, I’m not sure where I would be in
my life without things like Twitter,
Facebook, Netflix, iTunes and Google.
THE SHERIDAN
Press
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Office Manager
Mark
Blumenshine
Production
Manager
O
Hillary Clinton's secret mess
n March 2, the story broke that Hillary Clinton had possibly
violated email regulations while secretary of state.
You could almost hear the collective gasp in Washington: Oh,
no, here we go again.
But then the next evening, Clinton was feted
at the EMILY'S List 30th Anniversary Gala
dinner as though nothing had happened. Only
the trumpets were missing from what felt like
her coronation as the Democratic presidential
nominee and, possibly, the next president of
the United States.
Fast-forward a dozen days and Clinton's
position in the presidential sweepstakes
seems less assured, her inevitability not so
KATHLEEN
inevitable.
The most perplexing question isn't about the
PARKER
emails themselves, but why she put every|
thing at risk over such a small detail, declining to segregate her personal and business
email.
There can only be one answer and it isn't “convenience,” as
Clinton claims. Think of another word that begins with the letter 'C': control.
Clinton claims she opted for the convenience of one cellphone
and a personal server — rather than use a government-issued
phone for business and another device for personal matters.
Too much stuff to lug around?
So the whole question of her conduct as secretary of state
boils down to a few ounces of electronic equipment. Hate to say
it, but only a woman could come up with such an excuse. It's all
about the purse.
Plainly, Clinton didn't want anyone snooping around her virtual file cabinet, and who does? But this isn't the point. When
you are secretary of state and are mulling a run for president,
you steer clear of anything and anyone remotely questionable.
No one should know this better.
Questions that merit serious consideration include whether
the Clinton server was secure. Hillary insists that it was
because her New York home, where the server lives, is protected by the Secret Service. Given the optional sobriety of agents
these days, this is less than reassuring. Then, too, hacking
doesn't require on-site handling.
Here's the real muddle for Clinton. Whether her server suffered no breaches — and whether there's nothing in those
DROP US A LINE |
The Sheridan Press welcomes letters to
the editor. The decision to print any submission is completely at the discretion of
the managing editor and publisher.
Letters must be signed and include an
address and telephone number – which
will not be published – for verification
purposes. Unsigned letters will not be
published, nor form letters, or letters that
we deem libelous, obscene or in bad taste.
Email delivery of letters into the Press
works best and have the best chance of
being published.
32,000 deleted personal emails — matters little. In politics,
you're guilty as perceived. It looks bad.
Most likely this error (rather than crime) is a function of
remoteness more than dishonesty. The Clintons have been
around so long, they are the essence of bubble life. Removed
from the hubbub of ordinary existence — escorted, driven,
valeted, catered to, styled, fluffed and obeyed — being Clinton
means never having to hear the word “no.” It must be easy to
forget that you have to live by the same rules as everyone else.
This is a concept the Clintons have never fully accepted. One
can understand, given their extended public life — and the
hyper-scrutiny under which they live — that they might seek to
erect high walls around their private lives. Fame and celebrity
breed not just insularity but also paranoia.
Maybe there's nothing of interest in those personal emails,
but how would we know? Team Clinton handpicked the “personals” and now they're deleted, thus creating the impression
that she is hiding something. The Clintons always seem to be
hiding something. Not so much holding their cards close to the
chest as kicking the body back behind the dust ruffle.
Even though investigations into every “gate” associated with
them in the past — Travelgate, Filegate, Troopergate, youname-it-gate — failed to produce much more than a blue dress,
there seemed to be something not quite right. And now there's
this. Not illegal per se, but not quite right.
Clinton says she figured that because all her communications
to state staff went to the .gov server, they automatically would
have gone into storage as required. True, but what about the
rest? What's in those deleted emails? Don't we imagine that personal and business often overlap in the Clinton Rolodex?
Adding to the suspicion is that the 55,000 pages of emails that
Clinton did turn over to the State Department surfaced only
after the House select committee investigating Benghazi
requested her correspondence about the attack. Would she have
turned them over anyway?
Maybe. Still and again, it doesn't look good. And the entire
mess serves as a reminder of a movie we've seen before — and
it wasn't so great the first time. Whether this episode proves
fatal remains to be seen, but we won't hear the end of it until
every note of condolence, yoga date and wedding plan is known
to someone other than Hillary.
KATHLEEN PARKER is a syndicated columnist of The Washington Post, a regular guest on television shows
like The Chris Mathews Show and The O’Reilly Factor, and is a member of the Buckley School’s faculty. She won
the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for distinguished commentary.
IN WASHINGTON |
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Letters can be edited for length, taste,
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Write: Letters to the Editor
The Sheridan Press
P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyo. 82801
Email: [email protected]
President Barack Obama Rep. Cynthia Lummis
The White
1004
House
Longworth
1600
HOB
Pennsylvania
Washington,
Ave.
DC 20515
Washington,
DC 20500
Phone: 202-225-2311
Phone: 202-456-1111
Toll free: 888-879-3599
Fax: 202-456-1414
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Sen. Mike Enzi
Sen. John Barrasso
Senate
307 Dirksen
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Senate
Building 379A
Office Building
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Phone: 202-224-3424
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The 1st Amendment: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the
freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.
COMMUNITY
VOICES
SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A5
COMMUNITY PERSPECTIVES |
L
JAY
STENDER
|
Local foods can be an economic driver in Sheridan
ast September, folks from the
Sheridan Farmers Market opened my
eyes to another perspective around
the benefits of using locally grown
foods as an economic driver. That perspective is an awareness and prescriptive, but
gradual, shift to locally grown foods and
products which generates more than cash
in local farmers’ hands — it creates a community, jobs and products that are healthy
and desired by the buying public.
As we become more self-reliant, they
also set the stage for long-term, self-driven community sustainability. These
benefits, from a buy local, live local, have been identified
throughout the country, and even venture capital is interested in funding local food initiatives to reduce supply
chain risks and capture the “healthy food” market.
Wyoming Department of Agriculture is now tracking
“farmers markets” events.
Recent literature, McKibben and Pollen, have documented the overall long-term benefits of live, buy and prosper
local. Specifically, Bellingham, Washington, and Grand
Rapids, Michigan, have changed buying habits to focus on
locally generated foods and products. As a simple example,
in Grand Rapids, via McKibben, more than 250 businesses
have driven to the Local First initiative in three years.
You can imagine the impact that has on a community of
80,000 people. Yes, these cities are metro areas larger than
Sheridan but we have some very similar aspects. The key
one is capability to grow local produce. Historically,
Sheridan’s agriculture footprint included sugar beets,
dairies, gardens, wheat, corn and even timber products.
And to add to this we have ample water and energy. The
speed and efficiency of long-distant transport enables
price advantages for many of these products from largescale production entities and our local sources retreated to
the aisles of the local grocery store.
This transport-driven market enabled standardization of
produce characteristics, consistent prices and ample quantity. But wait! The fastest-growing food markets… aka
whole foods, are driven by diversity and naturally raised
foods. We don’t have a “Whole Foods” store here — we
have our local providers that can meet the demands of this
niche. Whole natural foods are present at the farmers markets and church sales where plants have their own blemishes and character and can be traced back to a garden in
Sheridan or Ranchester or a cattle ranch in Birney. It’s
hard to beat field corn from Dayton or Lodge Grass,
Montana.
What sets Sheridan apart, naturally, is the geography
and climate to enable propagation of wide variety of foodstuffs locally. Thus the proposal to encourage and embrace
the local opportunity as we can build this into a year-long
economic engine.
JAY STENDER is the executive director of Forward Sheridan.
LETTER |
Obama, Kerry negotiations
put world at nuclear risk
Re: Milbank column, Press, Mar 12
I
The prescience of Daniel Patrick Moynihan
n the mid-1960s, a social scientist noted
something ominous that came to be
called “Moynihan's Scissors”: Two lines
on a graph crossed, replicating a scissors' blades. The descending line charted
the decline in the minority male unemployment rate. The ascending line charted the
simultaneous rise of new welfare cases.
The broken correlation of improvements
in unemployment and
decreased welfare
dependency shattered
confidence in social salvation through economic growth and reduced
barriers to individual
striving. Perhaps the
GEORGE
decisive factors in comWILL
bating poverty and
enabling upward mobil|
ity were not economic
but cultural — the
habits, mores and dispositions that equip
individuals to take advantage of opportunities.
This was dismaying because governments know how to alter incentives and
remove barriers but not how to manipulate culture. The assumption that the condition of the poor must improve as
macroeconomic conditions improve was
to be refuted by a deepened understanding of the crucial role of the family as
the primary transmitter of the social capital essential for self-reliance and betterment. Family structure is the primary
predictor of social outcomes, as Daniel
Patrick Moynihan knew in 1965.
Fifty years ago this month, Moynihan,
then a 37-year-old social scientist working
in the Labor Department, wrote a report,
“The Negro Family: The Case for
National Action,” that was leaked in July.
The crisis he discerned was that 23.6 percent of African-American births were to
unmarried women. Among the “tangle”
of pathologies he associated with the
absence of fathers was a continually
renewed cohort of inadequately socialized adolescent males. This meant dangerous neighborhoods and schools where
disciplining displaced teaching. He would
later write: “A community that allows a
large number of young men to grow up in
broken families, dominated by women,
never acquiring any stable relationship
to male authority ... that community asks
for and gets chaos.”
Academic sensitivity enforcers and
race-mongers denounced him as a racist
who was “blaming the victim.” Today, 72
percent of African-American children
are born to single women, 48 percent of
first births of all races and ethnicities
are to unmarried women, and more than
3 million mothers under 30 are not living
with the fathers of their children.
In 1966, Sargent Shriver, head of
President Johnson's “War on Poverty,”
was asked how long it would take to win
the war.
He replied, “About 10 years.” The conventional wisdom was Kennedy's cheerful
expectation that a rising economic tide
would lift all boats. America now knows
that bad family structure defeats good
economic numbers.
Today, a nation dismayed by inequality
and the intergenerational transmission of
poverty must face the truth that political
scientist Lawrence Mead enunciated
nearly 25 years ago: “The inequalities
that stem from the workplace are now
trivial in comparison to those stemming
from family structure. What matters for
success is less whether your father was
rich or poor than whether you knew your
father at all.”
Moynihan, undaunted by his shrill critics who stifled debate and research,
brought his barbed wit to the subject,
suggesting that an important determinant of the quality of American schools
was their proximity to the Canadian border. That is, high cognitive outputs, measured by standardized tests, correlate less
with high per pupil expenditure than
with a high percentage of two-parent
families, which are not scattered randomly.
The election of Kennedy was celebrated
in academia as the empowerment of the
professoriate. Moynihan ruefully remembered the euphoric expectation of "the
direct transmission of social science into
governmental policy." We still are far
from fully fathoming all that has caused
the social regression about which
Moynihan was prescient. There has been
what he called “iatrogenic government,”
an iatrogenic ailment being one caused
by a physician or medicine: Some welfare
policies provided perverse incentives for
absent fathers. But the longer Moynihan
lived, the more he believed that culture
controls more than incentives do.
“The role of social science,” he would
write, “lies not in the formulation of
social policy, but in the measurement of
its results.” Not in postulating what will
work but in demonstrating what does
work. And, increasingly, what
does not work.
Chastened by “the obstinacy
of things,” Moynihan recalled
a Harvard chemist defining
the problem that exists, in the
physical sciences and perhaps
in social science, when, in
Moynihan's phrasing, “the
number of variables interacting with one another in any
given situation makes that situation extraordinarily complicated and difficult to fathom.”
Moynihan asked the chemist
at what number of variables
this problem begins. The
chemist replied: “Three.”
GEORGE F. WILL is a Pulitzer-prize winning
newspaper columnist, author and television
commentator for The Washington Post Writers Group.
He has authored books on baseball, politics, and
American culture.
Dana Milbank writes, “… 47
Republican senators did their level best to
bring us closer to war by writing a letter
to Iran's mullahs.” He and other leftwing
ideologues are irate that these Republican
senators dared to intervene in American
statecraft by addressing an open letter to
foreign leaders about a current international issue.
It’s interesting that Milbank and his ilk
were silent when some Democrat congressmen travelled to Iraq in 2002 to show
“solidarity” with Saddam Hussein
against America. Then there was Rep.
Nancy Pelosi travelling to Syria in 2006 to
meet with Syrian dictator Bashar Al
Assad. No accusations of “treason” there!
After all – those were Democrats!
What’s really happening here is that
Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu and
these 47 Republican senators have
exposed this so-called “deal” with Iran for
what it is – dangerous appeasement. And
the Democrats are fuming because public
opinion polls now show large public opposition to this whole effort by President
Barack Obama and Secretary of State
John Kerry to put the world at serious
risk by acquiescing to Iran’s efforts to
develop offensive nuclear weapons.
The Obama Administration is trying to
“negotiate” with a country whose leaders
still revere the memory of the late
Ayatollah Khomeini who wrote as far
back as 1942 that “all the countries conquered by Islam or to be conquered in the
future … shall live under Allah’s law: Kill
[the non-Muslims], put them to the sword
….” As to people who think that Islam is a
religion that seeks peace and avoids war,
he added the following: “I spit upon those
foolish souls who make such a claim. …
Those [who say this] are witless.”
Iran’s leaders continue to publicly call
for the destruction of America and Israel
while Secretary Kerry seeks a “deal” with
these madmen. He and Obama simply
refuse to face this threat head on and deal
with it. And yet it’s the 47 Republican
senators who had the courage of their
conviction who are the “problem” here.
I believe that these brave senators,
including Sen. Mike Enzi and Sen. John
Barrasso, both from Wyoming, are simply
trying to inject some sanity into the
increasingly insane matter of “negotiating” a “deal” with a radical Islamic terrorist state dedicated to our ultimate
destruction – a country which is already
armed with missiles and now seeks to put
nuclear warheads atop them.
Vera Cole
Sheridan
A6
PAGE SIX
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2015
HEALTH WATCH |
TODAY IN HISTORY |
Journey from
patient to
board member
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
T
he World Health
Organization defines
reproductive health care
as “A state of physical,
mental and social well-being in
all matters relating to the
reproductive system at all
stages of life.”
I have been a client of
Reproductive Healthcare of
the Bighorns (formally
Family Planning of the
Bighorns) since 2002. I had
seen an article in The
Sheridan
Press stating that
they were
opening an
office on
Thurmond
Street and
that they
provided
MANDY
medical
CANTRELL
services for
|
uninsured,
low-income
clients. At
that time I was working on an
associate degree at Sheridan
College and fit all of the lowincome requirements needed
for the subsidized health care
that they provided as I was
uninsured and was working a
part-time job.
A common myth of a family
planning facility is that it
only provides birth control
and testing for sexually transmitted diseases. However, at
Reproductive Healthcare they
have both a physician’s assistant and a nurse practitioner
on staff to provide similar
services that our local gynecologist’s offices provide. In
2005, I had a test come back
pre-cancerous and the allfemale staff were very supportive, caring and respectful
during the whole process for
me, and I am truly grateful
for that.
Since 2007 I have worked for
a company that provides medical insurance, but I am still a
client. They have the technology and knowledge that I
desire in my health care
needs, and accept insurance.
I am very grateful to
Reproductive Healthcare of
the Bighorns for all the
health care that they have
provided to me in the many
stages of my life, and I am
also grateful to all of the local
private donors who support
this wonderful organization
and will continue to support
it.
In early 2015, I was asked if
I would like to join the Board
of Directors for Reproductive
Healthcare of the Bighorns
and I gladly accepted. In this
journey as a board member, I
would like to see the caring
and professional staff continue to assist those in the community with all of their
reproductive health care
needs whether they have the
ability to pay or not.
MANDY CANTRELL is a board member at
Reproductive Healthcare of the Bighorns.
TIPPED OVER |
Three Dog Night
keyboardist Jimmy
Greenspoon dies
BY DERRIK J. LANG
AP ENTERTAINMENT WRITER
Jimmy Greenspoon, the keyboardist for rock band Three
Dog Night, has died. He was
67.
Greenspoon’s agent, Chris
Burke, said he died
Wednesday of cancer at his
home in North Potomac,
Maryland, surrounded by his
family.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Feed the Birds
Ruthie White, as the little old bird woman, sings “Feed the Birds” during the “Mary Poppins” dress rehearsal Monday evening
in the Sue Henry auditorium at Sheridan High School.
LOCAL BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Fishing pier at Kleenburn
to be dedicated Thursday
SHERIDAN — Officials from Sheridan County,
the Wyoming Game and Fish Department and
representatives from Rehabilitation Enterprises
of North Eastern Wyoming will dedicate a new
fishing pier at 2 p.m. Thursday.
The pier is a handicapped-accessible pier at the
Kleenburn Recreation Area.
The dedication ceremony is free and open to the
public.
For additional information, call Ace Young at
751-9874.
The Kleenburn Recreation Area is located off
Interstate 90 at exit 14.
Big Horn Woman’s Club
to meet Sunday
SHERIDAN — The Big Horn Woman’s Club will
meet Sunday at 12:30 p.m. at the Big Horn
Woman’s Club clubhouse.
The annual “Guest Sunday” meeting will
include a carry-in lunch. Members are encouraged to bring family and friends, as well as food
to share, for an afternoon of good food and visiting.
Tom Ringley will also present at the meeting.
For additional information, contact Kathy
Hosford at 674-7656.
The Big Horn Woman’s Club clubhouse is located at 314 S. Second St. in Big Horn.
Tween Challenge next
week to feature cooking
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan County Fulmer
Public Library will continue to offer programming for “tweens” through April.
Organizers of the events said the programs
were developed because many kids have outgrown children’s story time but aren’t quite
ready for the teen section and are often overlooked.
The program, “Tween Challenge Takeover,” will
include activities and experiments that will draw
from the fields of science, technology, engineering, art, mathematics and the “maker-space”
movement.
The programs will be on Tuesdays and
Thursdays from 3:30-5 p.m. and are meant for kids
in fifth through seventh grades.
The following is the schedule of activities
planned through April.
March 17 and 19 — Cooking
March 24 and 26 — Computer science
March 31 and April 2 — Pottery
April 7 and 9 — Scriptwriting
April 14 and 16 — DIY board game
April 21 and 23 — Fiber art
April 28 and 30 — Biodiversity
For additional information, contact the library
at 674-8585.
The Sheridan County Fulmer Public Library is
located at 335 W. Alger St.
Hydropower presentation set
for Monday, roundtable Tuesday
SHERIDAN — The University of Wyoming
Extension Office will host a presentation and conversation highlighting the “Wyoming Small
Hydropower Handbook” on Monday and Tuesday.
A formal presentation will be held Monday at 6
p.m. at the Sheridan College/UW Watt
Agricultural Building in room 132. The facility is
located at 3401 Coffeen Ave.
A luncheon roundtable will be held at Pistol
Pete’s Café in Buffalo on Tuesday at 12:30 p.m.
The restaurant is located at 800 N. Main St.
For additional information, contact Scott
Hininger at 674-2980 or Blaine Horn at 684-7522, or
see renewables.uwyo.edu.
SUNDAY AND MONDAY EVENTS |
Sunday
• 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Home and Garden Show, Sheridan Holiday Inn, 1809 Sugarland Drive
• 2 p.m., “Mary Poppins,” Sheridan High School, 1056 Long Drive, $7 in advance, $8 at the door
Monday
• 6 p.m., Small Hydropower in Northeast Wyoming formal presentation, room 132, Sheridan
College/University of Wyoming Watt Agricultural Building, 3401 Coffeen Ave.
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On March 14, 1923,
President Warren G. Harding
became the first chief executive to file an income tax
return, paying a levy of $17,990
on his $75,000 salary.
On this date:
In 1743, a memorial service
was held at Faneuil (FAN’-yul)
Hall in Boston honoring Peter
Faneuil, who had donated the
building bearing his name.
In 1794, Eli Whitney
received a patent for his cotton
gin, an invention that revolutionized America’s cotton
industry.
In 1885, the Gilbert and
Sullivan comic opera “The
Mikado” premiered at the
Savoy Theatre in London.
In 1900, Congress ratified
the Gold Standard Act.
In 1939, the republic of
Czechoslovakia was dissolved,
opening the way for Nazi occupation of Czech areas and the
separation of Slovakia.
In 1951, during the Korean
War, United Nations forces
recaptured Seoul (sohl).
In 1964, a jury in Dallas
found Jack Ruby guilty of
murdering Lee Harvey
Oswald, the accused assassin
of President John F. Kennedy,
and sentenced him to death.
(Both the conviction and death
sentence were overturned, but
Ruby died before he could be
retried.)
In 1967, the body of
President John F. Kennedy was
moved from a temporary grave
to a permanent memorial site
at Arlington National
Cemetery.
In 1975, “Monty Python and
the Holy Grail,” a sendup of
the legend of King Arthur, had
its world premiere in Los
Angeles. Academy Award-winning actress Susan Hayward,
57, died in Los Angeles.
In 1980, a LOT Polish
Airlines jet crashed while
attempting to land in Warsaw,
killing all 87 people aboard,
including 22 members of a U.S.
amateur boxing team.
In 1990, the Soviet Congress
of People’s Deputies held a
secret ballot that elected
Mikhail S. Gorbachev to a new,
powerful presidency.
In 1991, a British court overturned the convictions of the
“Birmingham Six,” who had
spent 16 years in prison for a
1974 Irish Republican Army
bombing, and ordered them
released.
Ten years ago: A judge in
San Francisco ruled that
California’s ban on gay marriage was unconstitutional (a
state appeals court later
reversed the decision). China’s
parliament enacted a law
authorizing force to stop rival
Taiwan from pursuing formal
independence. About 1 million
people rallied in Beirut,
Lebanon, demanding Syrian
withdrawal and the arrest of
ex-Prime Minister Rafik
Hariri’s killers. U2, The
Pretenders, The O’Jays, Percy
Sledge and blues legend Buddy
Guy were inducted into the
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.
Five years ago: French voters, scarred by their country’s
economic crisis, dealt
President Nicolas Sarkozy and
his conservative leadership a
stern blow by strongly favoring
leftist candidates in regional
elections. Actor Peter Graves
died in Los Angeles at age 83,
four days short of his birthday.
One year ago: The West
braced for a vote by the
Crimean Peninsula to secede
from Ukraine; calling the
results all but a foregone conclusion, U.S. Secretary of State
John Kerry urged Russia’s parliament against accepting any
offer to claim Crimea as its
own. Tony Benn, 88, a committed socialist who irritated and
fascinated Britons through a
political career spanning five
decades, died in London.
Thought for Today:
“Achieving life is not the
equivalent of avoiding death.”
— Ayn Rand, American author
(1905-1982).
SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A7
EAGLES: Agency had issued one permit
FROM 1
Former U.S. District Judge William
Downes originally dismissed the federal
charges against Friday, ruling that it would
have been pointless for him to apply for a
permit to take an eagle on the reservation
because the Fish and Wildlife Service
wouldn’t have given it to him anyway.
“Although the government professes
respect and accommodation of the religious practices of Native Americans, its
own actions show callous indifference to
such practices,” Downes wrote in 2006.
A federal appeals court in Denver reinstated the charge against Friday before his
case was transferred to tribal court.
The bald eagle was removed from the federal list of threatened species in 2007, following its reclassification in 1995 from
endangered to threatened. However, the
species has remained protected under the
federal Bald and Golden Eagle Protection
Act.
The Fish and Wildlife Service allows permits to some other tribes to take or maintain certain other types of birds. But
agency officials said the permit it issued to
the Northern Arapaho Tribe in 2012 allowing it to kill two bald eagles was the first
such permit it ever had issued.
The Fish and Wildlife Service maintains
a stock of carcasses of eagles and other
protected birds — many of them killed by
wind turbines and power lines — at a
repository in Colorado. It will release feathers or other bird parts to members of federally recognized tribes who apply for them.
Northern Arapaho tribal members, however, have said it’s unacceptable to them to
use an eagle carcass from the federal repository for their Sun Dance.
Senior members of the Northern
Arapaho Tribe appeared at an appeals
court hearing court in Denver in late 2007
in support of Friday. Nelson P. White Sr.,
then a member of the Northern Arapaho
Business Council, said after the hearing
that the birds American Indians receive
from a federal depository were rotten, or
otherwise unfit for use in religious ceremonies.
“That’s unacceptable,” White said after
the court hearing. “How would a nonIndian feel if they had to get their Bible
from a repository?”
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
True Colors cosmetology student Cami Stowe laughs at 3-year-old Aidric Fenton’s reaction to
the tickle of face paint during the Empty Bowl fundraiser Thursday at the Sheridan YMCA.
The event benefits the Volunteers of America Community Shelter in Sheridan.
600 gather for Empty Bowl fundraiser
BY ALISA BRANTZ
[email protected]
FELONY: Taking full responsibility
for his client relayed that family would support him in a probationary situation and
When police questioned Elliott, they
reminded the court Elliott had not had a
found a hoodie and bandana consistent
criminal history until he was 34 years old.
with that worn by the burglar caught by
Phillips though, pointed out that while on
the victim’s surveillance camera. When
probation for misdemeanor stalking, Elliot
committed a felony and then, while on
asked where he had been July 11, Elliott
bond for that felony, committed two more.
changed his story three times. He was
Elliot addressed the court on his own
arrested and charged with felony stalking
behalf, saying he was embarrassed and
and felony burglary and held on a $25,000
ashamed and he was taking full responsicash bond. The state moved to have the
bility for his actions. He told the court that
unsecured bond that had been issued for
the forgery revoked. Elliot remained incar- he was sorry for the harm he had caused
his victim and her daughter, saying he
cerated until his sentencings.
Lt. Travis Koltiska of the Sheridan Police planned to move to Montana to work with
Department testified that the police had
relatives and leave the area for the good of
been given letters written to Elliott’s cellhis victim.
mate Robert Weber and to Weber’s mother.
Edelman sentenced Elliott to not less
In the letters, Elliott said he was looking
than five years and no more than 10 years
for someone to be a “false witness” and tes- in prison with credit for 242 days spent
tify they’d overheard the victim telling a
incarcerated while awaiting sentencing. He
coworker she’d made up stories about being also ordered restitution to the victim on
stalked in order to get Elliott into trouble.
several issues in which his interference
Koltiska also testified that a close friend of
called for financial response on her part.
Fenn’s sentence from earlier in the day
Elliott’s told police he had been concerned
will run concurrent to any probation or
that the situation between Elliott and his
parole Elliot faces after his release from
victim would become a murder/suicide.
prison.
Kisling told the court letters of support
FROM 1
More bids sought for plugging
Wyoming coal-bed methane wells
CHEYENNE (AP) — The
Wyoming Oil and Gas
Conservation Commission
is about to solicit another
round of bids to plug and
clean up abandoned coalbed methane wells, with an
eye toward that work picking up once the weather
warms up.
“We’ve identified what we
want to do this year as far
as packages geographically.
We put a list of wells
together, how they’re going
to be plugged, then we’re
going to put it out for bid,”
Wyoming Oil and Gas
Supervisor Mark Watson
said Thursday.
“We’re just getting ready
this next week or so to get
that going.”
Gas developers have abandoned thousands of wells
amid a bust in northeast
Wyoming’s coal-bed
methane industry. Most
companies have taken
responsibility for plugging
their wells, but others have
walked away without doing
anything.
The commission over the
last year or so has overseen
plugging and cleanup of 381
wells at a cost of $1.7 million, according to Watson.
Another 3,508 wells still
must be addressed. The
commission set a goal of
plugging and remediating
about 300 wells a year.
Work continued through
the winter: Crews plugged
14 wells in January and 25
in February. Warmer weather will help to pick up the
pace — but not so much if
Wyoming gets another wet
spring.
Last year, the plugging
effort was slowed by rainy
weather, followed by tall
grass that needed to be
mowed lest the work trucks
start wildfires.
“The spring has some of
Saudi convict sues Colorado
prosecutors, FBI for defamation
DENVER (AP) — A Saudi national who was denied a
request to serve out the reminder of a Colorado prison sentence in his home country is suing prosecutors and FBI
agents for defamation.
In a federal lawsuit filed Friday, Homaidan al-Turki says
the officials claimed he had terrorist ties and mischaracterized his crimes in order to derail his transfer.
Then-prisons director Tom Clements initially approved
al-Turki’s transfer but reversed his decision in March 2013,
one week before he was killed at his home in Monument.
The lawsuit says Clements changed his mind because the
officials said al-Turki was a national security threat. AlTurki says the officials then falsely leaked the theory that
he had a role in Clements’ killing.
the biggest issues,” Watson
said.
Reclaimed bonds and a
conservation tax paid by oil
and gas developers help to
pay for the orphan well
plugging program.
SHERIDAN — Some say
soup is good for the soul,
and when you’re enjoying
a hot bowl with 600
friends and fellow community members, coming
together to support a
good cause, that saying
becomes all the more
real.
The seventh annual
Empty Bowl fundraiser
was held Thursday night
at the Sheridan County
YMCA.
The event offers attendees the opportunity to
experience a meal that
someone would likely
have in a shelter — soup,
bread and water — and
take home the handmade
bowl they dined from to
serve as a daily reminder
in their home that somewhere out there, someone’s bowl, and hungry
stomach, is going empty.
The event — complete
with kids’ games and face
painting, live music, a
silent auction and plenty
of camaraderie — bene-
fits the Volunteers of
America Northern
Rockies homeless shelter
located on the Veterans
Affairs Medical Center
campus.
This year, the ticket
sales and auction items
raised more than
$17,000 for the community shelter.
“Without the support
of this community, the
shelter would not be
able to serve those in
need,” said Claude
Alley, director of
Homeless Services for
Volunteers of America.
“Last year alone we
provided 8,691 nights of
sheltered sleep and
served 14,027 meals, but
the numbers that really
excite me are the 92
people we helped move
into permanent housing and the 16 families
that we provided with a
safe place to stay while
they got back on their
feet."
The Empty Bowl was
started as a national
grassroots campaign for
hunger and homeless
awareness and was adopted by the VOA. The event
has grown over the years
and is the main source of
income for a program
that relies entirely on
community support.
A8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2015
Empty
Bowl
fundraiser
Delivery as low as $108 a year!
Call TODAY!!
– 672-2431 –
Event volunteer Kaycie
Garner, left, serves Jack
Livingston during the
Empty Bowl fundraiser
Thursday at the
Sheridan YMCA. The
event benefits the
Volunteers of America
Community Shelter in
Sheridan.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Five Sheridan College professors granted tenure
BY ALISA BRANTZ
[email protected]
SHERIDAN — When you work hard
at your job and have been consistently
employed for a number of years, you
hope to have earned a level of job
security, a perception that your
employer will allow you to continue
doing what you do best for more years
to come. In the education world, this
level of security is more than a perception, it’s a guarantee in
the form of tenure.
Tenure is a system, often
in the form of internal policy, used by many schools,
colleges and universities
in America by which a
Hodnett
teacher or college professor is granted the contractual right not to have his or her job
terminated without just cause.
The system was developed to protect
teachers from potential backlash of
generating original ideas during
research. Outlined by the “1940
Statement of Principles on Academic
Freedom and Tenure” of the
American Association of University
Professors, tenure gives scholars the
intellectual autonomy to conduct
research and to report their honest
conclusions without fear of retaliation if the findings dissent from prevailing opinion, openly disagree with
authorities or are of an unfashionable
topic.
Prior to tenure, according to the
AAUP, there were also issues in education of favoritism or allowing financial benefactors of the institution to
dictate employment of educators
through their personal demands made
to the board of trustees.
At Sheridan College, the tenure
track includes an extensive review of
the professor done over a four-year
period. This review includes student,
self and dean evaluations; the professor’s institutional service, professional and scholarly activity score; course
observations and more.
For the first four years of employment at the college, faculty on the
tenure track are on a year-to-year contract with no guarantee of renewal.
Upon renewal at the fifth year, tenure
is automatically granted, or the board
of trustees can grant tenure at any
time.
Faculty who achieve tenured status
may expect annual contract renewal.
During the monthly board meeting
of the Northern Wyoming
Community College District board of
trustees Tuesday, tenure was granted
to nine professors in the district,
including five from Sheridan College.
"Receiving tenure at our college is
an important vote of confidence from
our administration and the board of
trustees,” Vice President of Academic
Affairs Dr. Richard Hall said. “These
faculty members are valued team
members. They have proven to be positive contributors to our institution's
mission and focus to create student
success.”
Sheridan College faculty
granted tenure:
• Lacey Anesi, dental
• Britni Camino, nursing
• DannyLee Hodnett, theatre
• Rachel Kristiansen, psychology
• Scott Newbold, biology
AGENDAS |
Dayton Town Council
7:30 p.m. Wednesday
Dayton Town Hall
• Recite the Pledge of Allegiance
• Approval of agenda
1. additions
2. deletions
• Approval of the March 2 regular
meeting
• Announcements/correspondence
• Old business update
1. Administer the oath of
office to Laurie Walters-Clark
2. Presentation from Cloud
Peak Scanning on Dayton’s historical documents
3. Citizen communique
4. Council
comments/requests for future agenda
items
Sheridan County Fulmer Public Library
Board of Trustees
4:30 p.m. Wednesday
Fulmer Public Library
335 W. Alger St.
•Call to order and welcome guests
• Approval of agenda
• Disposition of minutes of Feb. 18
• Treasurer’s report
• Communications
A. Library correspondence
B. Board correspondence
• Director’s report
A. Monthly statistics
B. Items of interest
C. Departmental and branch
report
• Committee reports
A. Friends of the Library (next
meeting April 14)
B. Foundation (next meeting
May 18)
• Continuing business
A. Library logo
B. 2015-16 budget discussion
• New business
A. Credit card acceptance
• Adjournment
Sheridan County School District 2
Board retreat
8:30 a.m. Saturday
Ranch at Ucross
• Open session
1. Board governance
2. Alternative school collaboration
3. Break
4. Legislative update
5. PLC District Leader Report
6. Lunch
7. 2015-2016 North Central
Association Board goals
8. 2015-2016 Board meeting
schedule
• Break
• Executive session
1. Personnel
Sheridan City Council
6 p.m. work session
Council Chambers
Sheridan City Hall
55 Grinnell St.
• Optional One-Cent Sales Tax recipient
presentations
Sheridan City Council
7 p.m. regular meeting
Council Chambers
Sheridan City Hall
55 Grinnell St.
• Pledge of Allegiance
• Invocation to be given by Doc Nelson,
Calvary Chapel Sheridan
• Roll call of members
• Approval of Consent Agenda
A. Agenda
B. Minutes of Regular Council
Meeting Feb. 17 and March 2
C. Claims
D. Approval Ordinance 2151 PL
14-40, 2324 Dry Ranch Road Annexation,
annexing approximately 3.14 acres into
the city of Sheridan. Additionally, zoning
said 3.14 acres as part of an B-2 Business
District
E. Approval Award of Bid New
2015 or Current Production Automated
Two-Arm side Loading Refuse Collection
Vehicle to CMI-TECO in the amount of
$312,527.00.
F. Approval Award of Bid New
Ten Man Recycling Sorting Station.
ONE(1)New 90 Degree Feed Conveyor;
New 90 Degree Transfer Conveyor; New
Cross-Belt Magnet to Worldwide
Recycling Equipment Sales, LLC in the
amount of $134,475.00.
G. Award of Bid new Recycling
Baler to Excel Manufacturing in the
amount of $106,704.70.
H. Approval Award of Bid new
96 Gallon Residential Recycle Carts to
Toter, LLC in the amount of $ 325,791.60
. Approval Cooperative
Agreement for Burkitt Improvements
J. Approval appointment of
Cindy Morris to fill the remaining term of
Monty Webb on the Planning
Commission, through December 2015
• Communications from Junior Council
• Old business
• New business
A. Approval Cooperative
Agreement for Holloway Avenue from
11th to 15th streets
B. Public hearings
1. Public hearing
Consideration of Resolution 06-15:
Lincoln Drive/Fifth St. land trade; a resolution approving an exchange of land
between the city of Sheridan and Jeff
and Reeda George, said proposed
exchange to be governed under the provi-
sions of WS §15-1-112(b)(ii). Total land
area owned by each party is 265 sq. ft.
and both parcels are situated in the SE ¼
SW 1/4, Section 23, Township 56, Range
84 West, 6th P.M., Sheridan County
Wyoming. Both parcels of land are valued
at $1,590.
2. Public Hearing
Consideration of Resolution 07-15:
Sheridan Avenue/E. First St. Land Trade;
a resolution approving an exchange of
land between the city of Sheridan and
Stonemill Construction, LLC; said proposed exchange to be governed under the
provisions of WS §15-1-112(b)(ii). Total
land area owned by the city of Sheridan is
each party is 1,680 sq. ft. and the land
area owned by Stonemill is 10,755 sq. ft.
The city parcel situated in the N ½ NW ¼,
Section 26 and the Stonemill parcel
located in the NE ¼ NW ¼ of the of the
same Section 26, Township 56, Range 84
West, 6th P.M., Sheridan County
Wyoming. The city parcel valued at $1,512
and the Stonemill parcel valued at
$9,680.
C. Approval of Resolution 0615: Lincoln Drive/5th St. Land Trade; a
resolution approving an exchange of land
between the City of Sheridan and Jeff
and Reeda George, said proposed
exchange to be governed under the provisions of WS §15-1-112(b)(ii). Total land
area owned by each party is 265 sq. ft.
and both parcels are situated in the SE ¼
SW 1/4, Section 23, Township 56, Range
84 West, 6th P.M., Sheridan County
Wyoming. Both parcels of land are valued
at $1,590.
D. Approval of Resolution 0715: Sheridan Avenue/E. 1st St. Land Trade;
a resolution approving exchange to be
governed under the provisions of WS §151-112(b)(ii). Total land area owned by the
City of Sheridan is each party is 1,680 sq.
ft. and the land area owned by Stonemill
is 10,755 sq. ft. The City parcel situated in
the N ½ NW ¼, Section 26 and the
Stonemill parcel located in the NE ¼ NW
¼ of the same Section 26, Township 56,
Range 84 West, 6th P.M., Sheridan
County Wyoming. The City parcel valued
at $1,512 and the Stonemill parcel valued
at $9,680.
E. Public hearing retail liquor
license
F. Award of Retail Liquor
License #21
G. Approval Ordinance 2152
amending sections of Sheridan City Code
Section 2-9.1 pertaining to appointment
and removal of certain officers
H. Approval to go into executive session to discuss issues per
Wyoming Statute 16-4-405; (a ) (iii) On
matters concerning litigation to which
the governing body is a party or proposed
litigation to which the governing body
may be a party
I. Approval to reconvene in
open session
J. IAFF Local #276 Union
negotiations
• Comment from the Council and the
public
Sheridan County Commission
Staff meeting
9 a.m. Monday
Second floor commissioners library
Sheridan County Courthouse addition
224 S. Main St.
• Call to order
• Reports from staff/elected officials
• Adjourn
Sheridan County Commission
Staff meeting
9 a.m. Tuesday
Second floor boardroom
Sheridan County Courthouse addition
224 S. Main St.
• Call to order and Pledge of Allegiance
• Consent agenda
A. Minutes from staff meeting, March 2
B. Minutes from regular session, March 3
C. Minutes from staff meeting, March 9
D. Minutes from special session, March 10
E. Acknowledge letter from
American Tower Corporations, re: sublease of ground lease 110690 and subsequent leaseback of a portion of Site
112812, located at 1753 Victoris St.
F. Ratify agreement between
Sheridan County Public Works
Department and Dustbusters Inc. for the
2015 dust suppressant supply project, in
the amount of $261,225, budgeted from
Capital Facilities Tax
G. Affirm Office of State
Lands and Investments application for
construction of improvements on state
land
• Consider agenda
• Announcements
• Public comments on matters not on
the agenda
• Consider Award of 2015 CMAQ project
• Consider Resolution 15-03-006 support National Agriculture Day and Locally
Raised Foods
• Consider Q-00-018: Burgess Quarry —
temporary permit extension
• Consider agreement for transfer of
entitlements
• Consider lease with Department of
Administration and Information,
Construction Management
• Consider lease with Big Goose
Aviators, LLC
• Consider contract for purchase of real
property (Milward Water Hole)
• Consider reappointment(s) to
Historical Preservation Commission
• Consider reappointment to Planning
and Zoning Commission
ALMANAC
SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
Wyoming, Montana continue
working on Tongue River lawsuit
5-Day Forecast for Sheridan
SUNDAY
73
49
Cloudy
76
A couple of
afternoon
showers
40
49
Almanac
Mainly cloudy
and not as cool
32
56
Temperature
Precipitation (in inches)
24 hours through 5 p.m. Friday ...................... 0.00"
Month to date................................................. 0.17"
Normal month to date .................................... 0.34"
Year to date .................................................... 1.90"
Normal year to date ....................................... 1.44"
53
24 hours through noon Friday ........................ 0.00"
Today
Sunday
Monday
Rise
Set
7:23 a.m.
7:21 a.m.
7:19 a.m.
7:12 p.m.
7:13 p.m.
7:15 p.m.
The Moon
Today
Sunday
Monday
New
Rise
Set
3:04 a.m.
3:56 a.m.
4:43 a.m.
12:53 p.m.
1:56 p.m.
3:05 p.m.
First
Full
4p
5p
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection. Shown is the highest
value for the day.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High;
11+ Extreme
Shown is today's weather.
Temperatures are today's highs
and tonight's lows.
Hardin
75/51
Parkman
71/49
Dayton
72/48
Lovell
66/45
Cody
68/54
Ranchester
72/48
SHERIDAN
Big Horn
67/42
Basin
67/42
73/49
Mar 27
Apr 4
Apr 11
For more detailed weather
information on the Internet, go to:
www.thesheridanpress.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2015
Gillette
71/47
Buffalo
71/50
Worland
69/44
Wright
67/47
Kaycee
68/52
Thermopolis
66/43
Mar 20
Clearmont
72/45
Story
68/47
Last
Weather on the Web
UV Index tomorrow
National Weather for Saturday, March 14
Broadus
72/41
32
Big Horn Mountain Precipitation
3p
April 10, 1931 - March 1, 2015
More clouds
than sunshine
38
The Sun
High/low .........................................................62/33
Normal high/low ............................................48/21
Record high .............................................69 in 1994
Record low ............................................... -8 in 1950
2p
Frank Edward Voler
WEDNESDAY
Sun and Moon
Sheridan County Airport through 5 p.m. Fri.
9a 10a 11a Noon 1p
OBITUARY |
Regional Weather
TUESDAY
MONDAY
Billings
73/53
Plenty of sun
A9
Frank Edward Voler, 83, passed away in San Tan Valley, Arizona on March
1, 2015 with his family by his bedside. He was born in Sheridan, Wyoming
on April 10, 1931 of Slovenian-American parents.
Frank is survived by his loving wife of 37 years, Shirley; his half-brother
Joseph Schmautz of Florida; stepdaughter Cheryl Mori (Tony) of
Burlingame, California; their son, Blake and daughter Karina; stepson Dave
Darby (Susy) of San Tan Valley, Arizona; and their children, Alex and Mia;
water deliveries in only
had shorted deliveries at
sister-in-laws Joanne Budnick and Janet Harkey; nephew Scott Schmautz
two recent years. Montana the state line nearly every
(Barbara); two nieces, Stephanie Mahon and Judy Woolston (Dean); and
had argued that Wyoming
year since 1950.
many cousins.
He was preceded in death by his parents, Frank and Stefania Voler, halfDEATH NOTICE |
brother Jack Schmautz and his son Donald Voler.
Opal Elizabeth “Beth” Garrison
Frank graduated from Sheridan High School in 1948, and attended the
University of Wyoming where he graduated with a Bachelor of Science
Opal Elizabeth “Beth” Garrison, 72, of Sheridan, passed
away on Friday, March 13, 2015, at her residence.
Frank Edward degree in mechanical engineering. He was immediately employed by Exxon
(Creole) Petroleum Corp. operating in Venezuela. He arrived in Venezuela in
Online condolences may
be
written
Voler
the summer of 1952 to begin his career in Creole's Eastern Division. His
at www.kanefuneral.com.
career spanned 31 years and encompassed many experiences from the westKane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangeern Lake Maracaibo region to Creole's main office in Caracas. There he worked as a Reservoir
ments.
Engineer in the Production Department. Frank took advantage of the beautiful golf courses in
the Caracas area and became an accomplished golfer. In 1983, Frank retired and they moved back
SERVICE NOTICE |
to Sheridan. He continued his golf, and renewed his love of trout fishing in the nearby Big Horn
Mountains. Within the Creole Annuitants Association (U.S.), Frank was very involved in bringCharles “Ed” Smith
ing Venezuelan guests to the yearly reunions, most of whom could not have afforded to attend.
Charles “Ed” Smith, 68, of Ranchester, passed away on He devoted much of his retired life to helping friends and family.
Frank and Shirley moved to Arizona in 2011 to be near family as a result of Frank's
Wednesday, March 11, 2015, at the Sheridan Memorial
Alzheimer's disease.
Hospital with his family by his side.
Frank touched many lives with his gentle spirit and was a loving Opa to his four grandchilA visitation will be held at 6 p.m. with a Rosary at 7 p.m. on
Sunday, March 15, 2015, at Kane Funeral Home with Father dren, ages 4 to 19. His sense of humor will be especially missed by all.
A memorial service and burial is planned at a later date in San Tan Valley, Arizona.
Brian Hess officiating. A Mass will be held at 10 a.m. on
Donations may be made in Frank's name to Alzheimer's Association, Sheridan Wesleyan
Monday, March 16, 2015, at Holy Name Catholic Church with
Father Brian Hess officiating. A reception will follow at the Church, or the donor's choice.
Elks Lodge.
Memorials to honor Ed may be made to the Elks General
Fund at 45 W. Brundage, Sheridan, WY 82801.
Online condolences may
be
written
at www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
CHEYENNE (AP) —
Lawyers for Wyoming and
Montana are weighing
how to proceed in a
lawsuit involving a dispute over allocation of
water on the Tongue
River.
The U.S. Supreme
Court last month
issued an order asking
the states to consider
whether they could
agree to work things
out, considering the
costs of continuing to
litigate will likely
exceed any possible
recovery for damages.
Barton Thompson Jr.,
a Stanford University
law professor, has been
presiding as a special
master over the lawsuit, which Montana
filed against Wyoming
in 2007.
Thompson in
December released a
350-page report to the
court recommending
that it find Wyoming
shorted Montana in
TODAY
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Regional Cities
City
Billings
Casper
Cheyenne
Cody
Evanston
Gillette
Green River
Jackson
Today
Hi/Lo/W
73/53/pc
65/45/s
62/41/s
68/54/s
59/38/s
71/47/s
62/32/s
49/34/pc
Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
73/33/c
74/41/c
72/43/pc
70/40/pc
65/40/pc
76/43/c
67/36/pc
47/33/c
Mon.
Hi/Lo/W
43/32/sh
58/35/sh
64/35/pc
56/37/sh
67/40/pc
52/33/sh
68/35/c
54/30/c
City
Laramie
Newcastle
Rawlins
Riverton
Rock Springs
Scottsbluff
Sundance
Yellowstone
Today
Hi/Lo/W
59/39/s
66/41/s
60/39/s
62/41/s
59/36/s
72/40/s
64/46/s
49/27/pc
Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
67/38/pc
73/43/c
66/38/pc
68/43/c
65/37/pc
82/41/pc
69/38/c
47/28/sh
Mon.
Hi/Lo/W
63/33/pc
48/29/sh
66/35/c
54/37/c
68/36/c
67/34/c
43/28/sh
49/25/c
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Shown are
today's noon
positions of
weather systems
and precipitation.
Temperature
bands are highs
for the day.
A10
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2015
SPORTS
SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B1
Semifinal heartbreaker
Broncs end
season with
one-point loss to
Cheyenne Central
BY MIKE DUNN
[email protected]
SHERIDAN — Simply put, the
Broncs just couldn’t get the ball in
the bucket in their narrow 51-50 loss
in the 4A state basketball tournament
consolation semifinals to the
Cheyenne Central Indians.
The loss ends the season for the
Broncs.
Outside, inside, from the corners or
straight up, the Broncs couldn’t get
the 3-point shots to drop, going 0-5
from behind the arc in the opening
quarter. The Broncs defense showed
up to play, though and the zone kept
the Indians off the scoreboard and
away from the rebounds.
But Central rallied, and in the final
minute of the quarter the Indians
grabbed four points that gave Central
a 10-7 lead after the first.
The offensive struggle continued in
the second. Shot after shot ricocheted
off the rim and into the Indians’
hands. The Broncs only solace was
found at the free-throw line, which
accounted for nearly half of the
team’s points.
Sheridan was finally able to put it
together midway throughout the
quarter after back-to-back 3-pointers
by Dylan Daniels and Coy Steel
launched an 8-0 run for the Broncs.
The Broncs gave themselves more
than enough opportunities in the
third with their offensive rebounds,
but shots refused to fall.
Central showed off their athleticism midway through the quarter.
Knocking down one off-balance shot
after another, a 13-1 Indian run gave
Central a 10-point advantage. The
tide turned again — a Daniels 5-0 run
and another Steel 3-pointer cut the
lead to three. A buzzer-beater at the
end of the quarter gave the Indians a
38-33 lead heading into the final eight
minutes of regulation.
Both teams took off the gloves and
came out swinging in the fourth.
COURTESY PHOTO | BLAINE MCCARTNEY/WYOMING TRIBUNE EAGLE
Sheridan's Kaycen Townsend battles Cheyenne East's Jesse Erickson for a loose ball in the second half Friday evening at the Casper Events Center.
Lady Broncs lose
51-47 to
Cheyenne East
BY MIKE PRUDEN
[email protected]
SHERIDAN — Some coaches say defense
wins games. Others put the emphasis on
the foul line. Cheyenne East utilized both
to take down the Sheridan Lady Broncs, 5147, in yesterday’s state tournament semifi-
SEE BRONCS, PAGE B2
Natrona County
32
Sheridan
47
Sheridan
44
Cheyenne East
40
Rock Springs
30
Campbell County
81
Riverton
4A girls state
basketball
81
Kelly Walsh
Cheyenne East
51
Cheyenne Central
Championship
game to be
played
Saturday in
Campbell County
Casper.
56
Riverton
51
Campbell County
47
SEE SEMIS, PAGE B2
4A boys state
basketball
Natrona County
46
Riverton
Cheyenne East
58
55 points a game on a league-best 44 percent shooting, shot just 29 percent yesterday and 7 percent from behind the arc. The
Lady Thunderbirds also stole the ball from
Sheridan 10 times and blocked six shots.
But Sheridan’s defense kept the Lady
Thunderbirds from running away with it.
The Lady Broncs, who are right behind
East with the second-best defense in 4A,
held Cheyenne to 33-percent shooting and
10 percent from 3-point range.
The exception in the Sheridan offense
was Dylan Wright. Wright got going early
and often for the Lady Broncs, dropping in
layups and short jumpers on her way to 10
first-half points to give her team a 20-19
lead at the break.
The tides seemed to be turning at the
start of the second half.
Natrona County
31
Campbell County
Cheyenne Central
41
Kelly Walsh
39
66
Natrona County
44
Kelly Walsh
Cheyenne Central
33
Sheridan
Cheyenne East
56
32
nal matchup.
While the Lady Thunderbirds shot just 61
percent from the charity stripe in the
game, they got there a lot, especially in the
fourth quarter. East shot 36 free throws in
the game. Twenty-two of those came in the
final eight minutes, just one fewer than
Sheridan shot for the entire game.
East hit 15-of-22 in the final quarter, and
those freebies would be the differencemaker as the Lady Thunderbirds meticulously stretched their lead until the final
horn sounded at the Casper Events Center.
On the other end of the floor, Sheridan
hit just 12 of its 23 free throws (52 percent),
blending right in with the rest of the
Sheridan offense.
East’s league-leading defense made things
difficult for Sheridan, mixing an extended
zone look with their man-to-man to force
tough shots. The Lady Broncs, who average
Championship
game to be
played
Saturday in
Casper.
9 p.m. Friday
Campbell County
Evanston
18
Sheridan
Third-place
game
10:30 a.m.
Saturday
Cheyenne Central
Kelly Walsh
Third-place
game
1:30 p.m. Saturday
B2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2015
SEMIS: Sheridan trailed by nine in fourth
FROM B1
After East ended the first half on a 6-0
run, Justene Hirsig drained a 3-pointer to
start the second half and give the Lady
Thunderbirds the lead. Sheridan’s Kaycen
Townsend answered at the other end to
immediately steal the lead right back.
East used a Hirsig deep ball as momentum and pushed the lead to nine at the
halfway point in the fourth quarter.
But Sheridan wasn’t quite out of it.
Gatorade Player of the Year Robbi Ryan,
still recovering from a bad ankle sprain
suffered late in the regular season, scored
her first point of the ballgame on a free
throw that seemed to get some pep back in
her step. She rifled a pass to Wright on a
backdoor cut that got the Sheridan center
two free throws and cut the deficit to four.
The intensity carried over to Sheridan’s
full-court press, and back-to-back East
turnovers turned into Ryan and Emily
Julian buckets to tie the game with a
minute and a half to play.
The Lady Broncs got over the hump, but a
handful of made free throws later ended
Sheridan’s hopes at a state title.
The big question mark for Sheridan coming in was Ryan, who scored just six points
in her first game back from the injury on
Thursday. The ankle still seemed to bother
her as she couldn’t get much lift on her
shots or push on her drives. The junior finished just 1-of-10 for four points, but she did
corral seven boards.
Wright led all scorers with 16 points to go
with eight rebounds. Townsend added 13
points for the Lady Broncs.
East was led by Cosette Stellern’s 11
points and 16 rebounds. Kayla Evans
chipped in 12 points, including 6-of-6 from
the foul line.
Although the loss ends their state-championship run, Sheridan still sits on a 21-4
record and will battle Cheyenne Central in
the third-place game today at 10:30 a.m.
Cheyenne Central lost to Gillette, 56-41, in
the other semifinal game on Friday.
BRONCS: Missed late 3
FROM B1
A Bronc full-court press
caused rushed shots and
turnovers for Central.
Sheridan tied the game
at 41 at the three-minute
mark, but were dealt a
major blow when center
and leading rebounder
Drew Boedecker fouled
out with 2:17 left in the
game.
However, others stepped
up in his absence.
Trailing 49-47 with 21
seconds to go, Blake
Godwin’s attempt at a 3pointer was no good. An
intentional foul gave
Central two shots from
the line and the ball.
Making one on two separate trips to the line
gave Central a two-possession, 51-47 lead. The lastsecond Blake Baker 3pointer didn’t do enough
for the Broncs, and
Sheridan ended the season with a one-point loss.
The Broncs were led by
Daniels with 13 points followed by Kris Clark who
tallied eight. Sheridan
finished the game shooting 29.6 percent from the
field and 54.5 from the
line.
COURTESY PHOTO | BLAINE MCCARTNEY/WYOMING TRIBUNE EAGLE
Cheyenne East's Jesse Erickson puts up a shot over Sheridan's Jennae Fieldgove as she drives to the
basket in the second half during the semifinal game of the Class 4A state basketball tournament
Friday evening at the Casper Events Center.
Kentucky remains undefeated,
Villanova avoids upset as conference tourneys march on
GREENSBORO, N.C. (AP)
— Marcus Paige hit two
free throws with 3.9 seconds left to help No. 19
North Carolina beat No. 3
Virginia 71-67 on Friday
night in the Atlantic Coast
Conference semifinals.
Paige also hit a huge shot
to beat the clock in the
final minute, helping the
fifth-seeded Tar Heels (2410) hold off the tournament's top seed and reigning champion in a tense
finish.
Freshman Justin Jackson
scored a season-high 22
points to lead the Tar
Heels, who never trailed
and led by 13 points before
all-ACC guard Malcolm
Brogdon singlehandedly
brought the Cavaliers (29-3)
back.
Brogdon scored 22 of his
25 points in the second half.
North Carolina will play
the Duke-Notre Dame winner.
NO. 1 KENTUCKY 64,
FLORIDA 49
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP)
— Aaron Harrison and
Karl-Anthony Towns each
scored 13 points in
Kentucky's victory over
Florida in the
Southeastern Conference
quarterfinals.
Kentucky (32-0) outrebound Florida 39-33, including a 16-11 edge offensively
that created extra chances
and earned frequent trips
to the free-throw line.
Towns also had 12
rebounds.
Kentucky hit 19 of 23 free
throws, while Florida was 3
of 5.
The Wildcats will play
Auburn in the semifinals.
Jon Horford scored 15
points for the Gators (1617).
NO. 4 VILLANOVA 63,
PROVIDENCE 61
NEW YORK (AP) — Ryan
Arcidiacono hit two free
throws with 3.1 seconds left
after a questionable foul
call, and Villanova beat
Providence to reach the Big
East title game for the first
time since 1997.
The Friars' Kris Dunn,
who shared conference
Player of the Year honors
with Arcidiacono but outplayed him Friday, made a
layup off a turnover to tie
it with 12.4 seconds remaining. Arcidiacono then
drove to the hoop and Ben
Bentil, whose steal and
assist led to the tying basket, was called for a foul
even though replays
appeared to show little contact.
Providence scoring leader
LaDontae Henton ended a
rough night by missing a
long 3-pointer at the buzzer
that would have won it.
Top-seeded Villanova (312) will face the GeorgetownXavier winner.
Dunn had 22 points, nine
assists and seven rebounds
for Providence.
NO. 6 WISCONSIN 71,
MICHIGAN 60
CHICAGO (AP) — Sam
Dekker scored 17 points,
Frank Kaminsky added 16
points and 12 rebounds and
Wisconsin beat Michigan
in the Big Ten quarterfinals.
Dekker and Kaminsky,
the Big Ten Player of the
Year, combined to score all
their team's points in a
decisive 9-2 run that broke
a 54-all tie. The top-seeded
Badgers (29-3) will play
Purdue in the semifinals.
Zak Irvin led Michigan
(16-16) with 21 points and 11
rebounds.
NO. 8 MARYLAND 75,
INDIANA 69
CHICAGO (AP) — Dez
Wells scored 22 points,
Melo Trimble added 17 and
Maryland won its first Big
Ten postseason game, beating Indiana in the quarterfinals.
The Terrapins (27-5) got
nine points from Wells in
the final nine minutes and
made just enough defensive
stops down the stretch to
put away the Hoosiers (2013). They shot 7 of 8 from
the free-throw line in the
final 39 seconds to seal it.
That gave the longtime
Atlantic Coast Conference
power its eighth straight
win and a spot in the semifinals against the Ohio
State-Michigan State winner.
Yogi Ferrell led Indiana
with 18 points.
NO. 9 KANSAS 62, NO. 16
BAYLOR 52
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP)
— Wayne Selden Jr. scored
20 points and Kansas
turned up its suffocating
defense to beat Baylor in
the Big 12 semifinals.
Perry Ellis returned from
an injury to add 11 points
for the top-seeded
Jayhawks (26-7), though
their leading scorer limped
off the floor after getting
tangled up late. Ellis never
went back into the game
after trainers checked on
his right knee.
The Jayhawks will face
the Iowa State-Oklahoma
winner.
Kenny Chery had 20
points for Baylor (24-9).
NO. 20 SMU 74, EAST
CAROLINA 68
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP)
— Nic Moore scored 20
points to help SMU beat
East Carolina in the
American Athletic
Conference quarterfinals.
Markus Kennedy added
15 points and six rebounds
for the top-seeded
Mustangs (25-6). They will
face Temple in the semifinals.
Terry Whisnant and
Antonio Robinson each had
18 points for East Carolina
(14-19).
NO. 22 ARKANSAS 80,
TENNESSEE 72
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP)
— Rashad Madden made
four late free throws and
Arkansas held off
Tennessee in the
Southeastern Conference
quarterfinals.
Bobby Portis was 9 of 10
from the line en route to 26
points and Michael Qualls
added 20 for Arkansas (257). The second-seeded
Razorbacks will face the
South Carolina-Georgia
winner.
Josh Richardson had 22
points and 10 rebounds for
Tennessee (16-16).
NO. 24 DAVIDSON 67, LA
SALLE 66
NEW YORK (AP) — Tyler
Kalinoski beat the clock
with a driving layup to cap
Dadidson's comeback
against La Salle in the
Atlantic 10 quarterfinals.
SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B3
SCOREBOARD |
NBA |
National Basketball Association
By The Associated Press
All Times EDT
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W
L
Pct
x-Atlanta
50
14
.781
d-Cleveland
42
25
.627
Chicago
40
26
.606
d-Toronto
38
26
.594
Washington
37
28
.569
Milwaukee
34
31
.523
Indiana
30
34
.469
Miami
29
35
.453
Charlotte
28
35
.444
Boston
27
36
.429
Brooklyn
25
38
.397
Detroit
23
41
.359
Orlando
21
45
.318
15
50
.231
Philadelphia
New York
13
51
.203
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W
L
Pct
12
.810
d-Golden State 51
45
20
.692
d-Memphis
d-Portland
42
20
.677
Houston
43
22
.662
L.A. Clippers 42
23
.646
San Antonio
40
24
.625
GB
—
9½
11
12
13½
16½
20
21
21½
22½
24½
27
30
35½
37
GB
—
7
8½
9
10
11½
Dallas
41
25
.621
New Orleans 36
29
.554
Oklahoma City 35
29
.547
Phoenix
34
32
.515
Utah
28
36
.438
Denver
24
41
.369
Sacramento
22
42
.344
L.A. Lakers
17
47
.266
Minnesota
14
49
.222
d-division leader
x-clinched playoff spot
___
Thursday’s Games
Washington 107, Memphis 87
Indiana 109, Milwaukee 103, OT
Utah 109, Houston 91
Cleveland 128, San Antonio 125, OT
New York 101, L.A. Lakers 94
Friday’s Games
Philadelphia 114, Sacramento 107
Chicago at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Miami at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.
Orlando at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Golden State at Denver, 9 p.m.
Atlanta at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Detroit at Portland, 10 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Sacramento at Washington, 7 p.m.
Boston at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Brooklyn at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
11½
16
16½
18½
23½
28
29½
34½
37
Milwaukee at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Utah, 9 p.m.
New York at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Chicago at Oklahoma City, 1 p.m.
Houston at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Denver at New Orleans, 6 p.m.
Cleveland at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Minnesota at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Portland at Toronto, 7 p.m.
New York at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Atlanta at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
NHL |
National Hockey League
By The Associated Press
All Times EDT
EASTERN CONFERENCE
GP
W
d-N.Y. Rangers 66
42
d-Montreal
68
42
69
42
Tampa Bay
43
N.Y. Islanders 70
Pittsburgh
67
39
Detroit
66
37
Washington
69
36
Boston
67
35
Ottawa
67
32
Florida
67
30
L
17
19
20
23
18
18
23
22
24
23
OT
7
7
7
4
10
11
10
10
11
14
Pts
91
91
91
90
88
85
82
80
75
74
Philadelphia
69
28
27
14 70
New Jersey
68
28
29
11 67
Columbus
68
30
34
4 64
Toronto
68
27
35
6 60
Carolina
66
25
33
8 58
Buffalo
67
19
42
6 44
WESTERN CONFERENCE
GP
W
L
OT Pts
d-St. Louis
67
43
19
5 91
d-Anaheim
69
42
20
7 91
Nashville
69
42
20
7 91
Vancouver
67
38
25
4 80
Chicago
67
40
21
6 86
Calgary
67
37
25
5 79
Minnesota
67
37
23
7 81
Los Angeles
67
33
21
13 79
Winnipeg
68
33
23
12 78
68
34
26
8 76
San Jose
Dallas
69
32
27
10 74
Colorado
68
31
26
11 73
Arizona
68
21
39
8 50
Edmonton
69
18
39
12 48
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
d-division leader
Thursday’s Games
Boston 3, Tampa Bay 2, SO
St. Louis 1, Philadelphia 0, SO
Colorado 2, New Jersey 1, SO
Pittsburgh 6, Edmonton 4
Dallas 5, Carolina 3
Ottawa 5, Montreal 2
Columbus 3, Detroit 1
Florida 4, Winnipeg 2
Los Angeles 4, Vancouver 0
Chicago 2, Arizona 1
San Jose 2, Nashville 0
Friday’s Games
Columbus 5, Edmonton 4, SO
Ottawa 2, N.Y. Islanders 1
Dallas 4, Washington 2
Anaheim at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Toronto at Calgary, 8 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Detroit at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Boston at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Chicago at San Jose, 4 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m.
Montreal at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Florida at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Vancouver, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
New Jersey at Arizona, 9 p.m.
Calgary at Colorado, 10 p.m.
Nashville at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Detroit at Pittsburgh, 12:30 p.m.
Florida at N.Y. Rangers, 5 p.m.
Carolina at Columbus, 5 p.m.
St. Louis at Dallas, 6 p.m.
Philadelphia at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
Boston at Washington, 7:30 p.m.
Nashville at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Atlantic 10 Conference championship to be aired on CBS Sunday
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALL TIMES EDT
Saturday, March 14
AUTO RACING
11:30 a.m.
FS1 — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice
for CampingWorld.com 500, at Avondale,
Ariz.
12:30 p.m.
FS1 — NASCAR, XFINITY Series, pole
qualifying for Faster Tougher Brighter
200, at Avondale, Ariz.
2:30 p.m.
FS1 — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, "Happy
Hour Series," final practice for
CampingWorld.com 500, at Avondale, Ariz.
4 p.m.
FOX — NASCAR, XFINITY Series,
Faster Tougher Brighter 200, at Avondale,
Ariz.
12:30 a.m.
NBCSN — Formula One, Australian
Grand Prix, at Melbourne
1:30 a.m.
ESPN2 — NHRA, qualifying for
Gatornationals, at Gainesville, Fla.
(delayed tape)
BOXING
9:45 p.m.
HBO — Light heavyweights, Isaac
Chilemba (23-2-2) vs. Vasily Lepikhin (170-0); heavyweights, Vyacheslav Glazkov
(19-0-1) vs. Steve Cunningham (28-6-0);
champion Sergey Kovalev (26-0-1) vs. Jean
Pascal (29-2-1), for WBO/IBF/WBA light
heavyweight titles, at Montreal
CYCLING
10 p.m.
NBCSN — Paris-Nice, stage 6, Vence to
Nice, France (same-day tape)
GOLF
6:30 a.m.
TGC — European PGA Tour, Tshwane
Open, third round, at Pretoria, South
Africa
1 p.m.
TGC — PGA Tour, Valspar
Championship, third round, at Palm
Harbor, Fla.
3 p.m.
NBC — PGA Tour, Valspar
Championship, third round, at Palm
Harbor, Fla.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
11 a.m.
ESPN2 — America East Conference,
championship, teams and site TBD
1 p.m.
CBS — Big Ten Conference, doubleheader, semifinals, teams TBD, at Chicago
ESPN — Southeastern Conference,
semifinal, teams TBD, at Nashville, Tenn.
ESPN2 — Mid-Eastern Athletic
Conference, championship, teams TBD, at
Norfolk, Va.
3 p.m.
PICKLES
NON SEQUITUR
ESPN — Southeastern Conference,
semifinal, teams TBD, at Nashville, Tenn.
ESPN2 — American Athletic
Conference, semifinal, teams TBD, at
Hartford, Conn.
3:30 p.m.
FS1 — Conference USA, championship,
teams TBD, at Birmingham, Ala.
5 p.m.
ESPN2 — American Athletic
Conference, semifinal, teams TBD, at
Hartford, Conn.
6 p.m.
CBS — Mountain West Conference,
championship, teams TBD, at Las Vegas
ESPN — Big 12 Conference, championship, teams TBD, at Kansas City, Mo.
6:30 p.m.
ESPNU — Southwestern Athletic
Conference, championship, teams TBD, at
Houston
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 — Mid-American Conference,
championship, teams TBD, at Cleveland
8 p.m.
FS1 — Big East Conference, championship, teams TBD, at New York
8:30 p.m.
ESPN — Atlantic Coast Conference,
championship, teams TBD, at Greensboro,
N.C.
9 p.m.
ESPNU — Big Sky Conference, championship, teams and site TBD
9:30 p.m.
ESPN2 — Southland Conference,
championship, teams TBD, at Katy,
Texas
11 p.m.
ESPN — Pac-12 Conference, championship, teams TBD, at Las Vegas
ESPNU — Western Athletic
Conference, championship, teams TBD,
at Las Vegas
11:30 p.m.
ESPN2 — Big West Conference, championship, teams TBD, at Anaheim, Calif.
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
NBCSN — Montreal at N.Y. Islanders
SOCCER
8:40 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League, Queens
Park at Crystal Palace
10:55 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League, teams
TBA
1:25 p.m.
NBCSN — Premier League,
Manchester United at Burnley
Sunday, March 15
AUTO RACING
3:30 p.m.
FOX — NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
CampingWorld.com 500, at Avondale,
Ariz.
7 p.m.
ESPN2 — NHRA, Gatornationals, at
Gainesville, Fla. (same-day tape)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
1:30 p.m.
FS1 — West Virginia at Texas
CYCLING
3 p.m.
NBCSN — Paris-Nice, final stage, Nice
to Col d'Eze, France (same-day tape)
GOLF
6 a.m.
TGC — European PGA Tour, Tshwane
Open, final round, at Pretoria, South
Africa
1 p.m.
TGC — PGA Tour, Valspar
Championship, final round, at Palm
Harbor, Fla.
3 p.m.
NBC — PGA Tour, Valspar
Championship, final round, at Palm
Harbor, Fla.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m.
CBS — Atlantic 10 Conference, championship, teams TBD, at Brooklyn, N.Y.
ESPN — Southeastern Conference,
championship, teams TBD, at Nashville,
Tenn.
ESPN2 — Sun Belt Conference, championship, teams TBD, at New Orleans
3:15 p.m.
ESPN — American Athletic Conference,
championship, teams TBD, at Hartford,
Conn.
3:30 p.m.
CBS — Big Ten Conference, championship, teams TBD, at Chicago
6 p.m.
CBS — NCAA Tournament, Selection
Show, at Indianapolis
8:30 p.m.
ESPNU — NIT Selection Show, at
Charlotte, N.C.
NBA BASKETBALL
1 p.m.
ABC — Chicago at Oklahoma City
3:30 p.m.
ABC — Houston at L.A. Clippers
NHL HOCKEY
Noon
NBC — Detroit at Pittsburgh
7:30 p.m.
NBCSN — Boston at Washington
SOCCER
9:25 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League,
Southampton at Chelsea
11:55 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League, Tottenham
at Manchester United
5 p.m.
ESPN2 — MLS, New England at New
York City
7 p.m.
FS1 — MLS, Los Angeles at Portland
Bridge
THE PROBLEM OF THE 13TH WINNER
Zsa Zsa Gabor said, “To a smart girl, men
are no problem — they're the answer.”
Today's deal features a declarer-play problem. Whether male or female, can you find
the answer? South is in seven spades, and
West leads the diamond queen to dummy's
ace.
When South learns of spade support
opposite, he plunges into Blackwood.
South starts with 12 top tricks: eight
spades, one heart, two diamonds and one
club. The obvious extra winner will come
from a successful club finesse. But is there
another possibility?
Yes, if the missing hearts are splitting 43, dummy's heart six can be established —
if declarer has four dummy entries: three
to ruff low hearts and one to get back to
the dummy to cash that 13th heart. What
are those entries?
South plays a spade to his king, leads a
heart to dummy's ace, ruffs a heart,
returns to dummy with a spade to the jack,
ruffs another heart, plays a spade to
dummy's ace, and ruffs a third heart. What
now?
Declarer must trump his winning diamond king in the dummy! Then he discards
his club queen on the heart six and claims.
Note that if hearts had split 5-2, South
would have fallen back on the club finesse.
Zsa Zsa Gabor made a couple of other
great comments about men: “I never hated
a man enough to give his diamonds back.”
And “I was an excellent housekeeper.
Every time I got divorced, I kept the
house.”
0314_A Section Template 3/13/15 4:28 PM Page 1
B4
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BABY BLUES® by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman
COMICS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2015
DRS. OZ & ROIZEN
Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen
MARY WORTH by Karen Moy and Joe Giella
BORN LOSER® by Art and Chip Sansom
GARFIELD by Jim Davis
Whole grains are red-hot!
Seventy-five percent of supermarket shoppers say they're
looking to buy more. The
National Restaurant
Association just announced
that going with the grain is a
top food trend for 2015, ahead
of artisanal ice cream, exotic
herbs and food trucks. And
now, a massive new study
shows they can save your
heart and your life.
Researchers from the
Harvard School of Public
Health tracked the diet and
health of 117,000 women and
men for 25 years to uncover
this whole-grain connection.
People who ate more -- as in
whole-grain bread, oatmeal,
brown rice or barley, even 100
percent whole-grain crackers
and pasta -- had a 9 percent
lower mortality rate during
the study's time period. Their
heart health was superior,
too. For every daily serving
they munched, risk of dying
from a heart attack, stroke or
related problem dropped 5
percent. On average, they ate
enough grains to lower heartrelated deaths 15 percent.
That's a huge benefit from
one of the easiest food groups
to love. And it's not the only
advantage. Other studies
have already shown that
choosing foods made with
fiber-rich, nutrient-packed
grains instead of the refined
kind can slash your risk for
Type 2 diabetes by as much
as 30 percent, reduce stroke
risk up to 36 percent, cut
odds for heart disease by 28
percent and help banish belly
fat. Inviting more whole
grains over for meals may
even lower your risk for asthma, colon cancer, gum disease and high blood pressure!
The greatness of 100 percent whole grains is a team
effort. Compared with refined
grains, whole grains are a
superior source of satisfying
fiber because the outer layer,
called the bran, isn't polished
off. Whole grains also have
more protein, a smidge of
good fat and a rainbow of
good-for-you vitamins and
minerals because the nutrient-rich germ is intact, too.
And they deliver a slow drip
of energizing carbs found in
the grain's endosperm layer.
These bonus nutrients that
make up the "whole" in whole
grains do plenty of important jobs in your body. Fiber
slows the digestion of carbohydrates, so blood sugar rises
more slowly. One type -- soluble fiber -- can lower your
cholesterol. Another type -insoluble fiber -- helps keep
you regular. Phytochemicals
in the germ discourage lousy
LDL cholesterol from turning
into artery-clogging plaque,
while phytoestrogens may
help fight off some cancers.
So why not try a new 100
percent whole grain this
week? These tips can point
you in the right direction,
whether you're a newcomer
to whole-grain goodness or a
long-time fan looking for
something completely different.
Go for fast-cooking whole
grains. Dr. Mike likes to cook
up a big pot of brown rice,
barley or quinoa on Sundays
and then keep it in the fridge
for fast meals during the
week. Another option is
grains that cook in 10-15 minutes, such as quick pearl barley, bulgur or quick-cooking
farro. You also can look for
ready-to-heat, precooked
grains in pouches.
Make an easy switch.
Instead of white bread, go for
100 percent whole grain; boot
white pasta for 100 percent
whole-grain noodles; pick a
100 percent whole-grain
breakfast cereal. Don't buy
any product based on the
words "whole grain" on the
label; it doesn't mean 100 percent whole grain unless it
says "100 percent" on the
ingredients list.
Branch out. Serve an
ancient grain, like quinoa,
millet, amaranth or spelt.
Each has its own strengths.
Quinoa is high in protein,
millet's tiny grains are rich
in magnesium, and amaranth
cooks into a creamy porridge
that's delicious on cold winter mornings. You can buy
these grains as flour to add to
muffins. Now, there's a great
way to start a hot new trend
in your house!
DEAR ABBY
Pauline Phillips and Jeanne Phillips
FRANK & ERNEST® by Bob Thaves
REX MORGAN, M.D. by Woody Wilson and Tony DiPreta
ZITS® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
DILBERT by S. Adams
ALLEY OOP® by Dave Graue and Jack Bender
BOYFRIEND'S SISTER
COMPLICATES WOMAN'S
PLANS FOR THE FUTURE
DEAR ABBY: I am 19 and
recently decided to move to
Denver to live with my high
school sweetheart, "Logan."
His sister "Emily" had been
living with him for about a
month before I moved in, and
I expressed concerns about
that. Logan assured me she'd
be moving out soon and he
didn't want to lose any time
with me.
Since day one Emily and I
have butted heads. She's a
bartender who works three
nights a week. She sleeps all
day and doesn't help with
bills or with cleanup. She
also wastes money on her
"habits." She has been mean
to me, said spiteful things
and caused problems between
Logan and me.
I love Logan, and I want to
spend the rest of my life with
him, but I'm at a loss as to
what to do about his sister.
We have talked about it many
times, but things are only getting worse. Please help. -CROWDED IN COLORADO
DEAR CROWDED: As you
have probably noticed, you
have nothing to gain and
much to lose by further alienating his sister. A departure
date for Emily should have
been agreed upon before you
moved in. Because that didn't
happen, you are now in the
position of an "interloper,"
and because you are judgmental about her lifestyle,
that she would resent you
and act out is understandable.
Be smart. Recognize that
the current living arrangement isn't healthy for your
relationship with Logan and
move out. Do NOT ask him to
choose between you and his
sister. If Logan is as serious
about you as you are about
him, he may decide to choose
on his own and encourage
Emily to find a place to live
as was originally planned.
DEAR ABBY: My sister,
"Margaret," cheated on her
husband for 30 years out of
their 30-year marriage. Her
husband had a visual impairment that led to blindness,
and for the last 10 years he
was completely dependent on
her. I'm the only one in the
family she confided in about
her affairs all these years.
We're both now in our 60s.
Margaret's husband died
last year of cancer, and then
her boyfriend left her
because he wanted a real
relationship and she did not.
She was devastated about
both events, but cannot let go
of being rejected by her
boyfriend.
I am sick and tired of hearing about this boyfriend and
his and her choices. I never
approved of how my sister
lived her life. Margaret's husband was a good man who
would do anything for her.
I recently suggested she
speak to her grief counselor
about this so she can find
some peace in her life. Now
she tells me she has cut me
completely out of her life,
but she continues to send me
nasty emails. She's also badmouthing me to my brother
and my children (who know
nothing). How do I deal with
this? -- TIRED OF HER
DIRTY LITTLE SECRET
DEAR TIRED: You gave
your troubled sister some
good advice; it's a shame she
didn't heed it. Now here's the
way I recommend you deal
with what she's doing: Tell
your brother and your children EVERYthing you have
written to me. After that,
direct any emails you receive
from your sister into trash
without reading any more of
them, ever. Do that, and you
will find that like magic
there will be less drama, turmoil and stress in your life.
Classifieds 031415_Layout 1 3/13/15 3:58 PM Page 1
CLASSIFIEDS
Phone: (307) 672-2431
SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2015
Fax: (307) 672-7950
www.thesheridanpress.com
TO PLACE YOUR AD
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
DEADLINES
B5
RATES & POLICIES
Deadline
Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 days . . . . . . . .6 days . . . . . . . . . . . .26 days
Monday ........................................................................Friday 2:30 PM
2 lines (minimum) . . . . . . .$10.75 . . . . . . .$16.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$40.00
Tuesday.................................................................... Monday 2:30 PM
Each additional line . . . . . .$4.75 . . . . . . . . $7.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$17.50
Email : [email protected]
Wednesday ............................................................Tuesday 2:30 PM
Visit : 144 Grinnell Street, Downtown Sheridan
Thursday........................................................... Wednesday 2:30 PM
Mail : P.O. Box 2006, Sheridan, WY, 82801
Friday...................................................................... Thursday 2:30 PM
Include name, address, phone, dates to run and payment
Saturday ...................................................................... Friday 2:30 PM
We reserve the right to reject, edit or reclassify any advertisement accepted by us for publication. When placing an ad in person or on the phone, we will read all ads back to you for
your approval. If we fail to do so, please tell us at that time. If you find an error in your
classified ad, please call us before 9 a.m. to have it corrected for the next day’s paper. The
Press cannot be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Claims cannot be considered unless made within three days of the date of publication. No allowances can be
made when errors do not materially affect the value of the advertisement.
Phone: (307) 672-2431 Fax: (307) 672-7950
Monday – Friday, 8am – 5pm
Run Day
All classified ads run for free at www.thesheridanpress.com!
All classified ads running in Monday’s Press also run in the weekly PressPlus at no additional charge!
Events
GET OUT & SHOP!
March 14. 9am-4pm
SHS Gym. A day of
shopping with area
vendors.
Household Goods
KELLERINC BRAND
Table w/ 6 chairs and a
hutch. Excellent
condition. $1200 OBO.
Contact Tempe at
307-752-7346.
Boats
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
Broadway Apts.
2 bdrm, 1 bath
townhouse
Available in
Dayton, WY.
Rent based on
income.
Please call
307-751-1752 or
1-888-387-7368
Toll-Free for application
Equal Housing
Opportunity
LARGEST SELECTION
ANYWHERE!!
Surf/Wakeboard boats,
Fishing boats, Family
boats! New and preowned! Warranty and
Free delivery!
lovell.midwayautoandm
arine.com,
307-548-7571
Rummage Sale
CLOCK REPAIR.
All types, cuckoo,
mantle, grandfather,
etc. Pick up & delivery
avail. Call American
Radio. Located at the
Powder Basin Shopping
Center, 2610 S.
Douglas Hwy. Suite 235
in Gillette. Ask for Jerry
307-685-1408.
Lawn & Garden Eq.
TORO
SNOWBLOWER.
2 cycle. $125.
307-674-4160.
For Lease
BUILDINGS
FOR LEASE
Rail Road Land
& Cattle Co.
Has Shop Space,
Warehouse Space,
Retail Space,
Office Space and
much more
for lease!
673-5555
Furnished Apts for Rent
1BR. NO smk/pets.
$575 + elec + dep.
Coin-Op W/D.
307-674-5838.
ROCKTRIM. $500 / mo.
Wi-Fi/Cable. 763-2960.
STAGE STOP MOTEL
CLEAN. Weekly &
Monthly rates. Internet,
cable & utilities incl.
307-672-2477.
WKLY
FR
$210.
Monthly
fr
$630.
Americas Best Value
Inn. 307-672-9757.
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
CLEAN/QUIET 1BR.
732
W.
Burkitt.
$625mo. incl. h/w/s.
Garage. No smk/pets.
307-752-4066.
TIDY 1BR upstairs. 124
Griffith. $600/mo inc.
everything.
No
smk/pets. 752-4066.
Help Wanted
OLDER COUPLE w/
housebroke 18 yr old
cat, looking to rent 2-3
BR/2 Ba & 2 car
garage, or pole barn.
Ground
floor
W/D
hooks. Excellent ref's.
Current lease expire
April 30, 2015. Would
like to be outside city of
Sheridan, but not too
far. Leave msg 307655-5481 or write to:
Rental Needed P.O.
Box 6103, Sheridan,
WY 82801
FISH PROCESSING
IN ALASKA
O'Hara Corporation
seeks fish processors
for work onboard
vessels in Alaska. Long
hours, heavy lifting,
high production
required. Contracts are
75 days long.
Office Space for Rent
Pets & Supplies
NEED GOOD HOME
for Active, wellmannered
2 yr. old Welsh Corgi.
Unpapered.
Housebroken. Loves to
watch TV. $200.
307-674-9024.
PUREBRED GOLDEN
retriever pups: $375/F
$350/M. 307-655-9146.
Wanted to Rent
1 BR apt. $600/mo +
dep.; 2 BR $650/mo +
dep. Utilities incl. Call
307-752-7848 for appt.
2 BR/1 BA. dwnstrs.
apt. C/A & heat. Pets
approve w/ dep. W/D.
Fncd. yd. $750 + util. +
sec. dep. Avail. immed.
Call 307-674-7894
COZY 2BR. Off street
parking. Washer/Dryer.
Oak Hardwood floors.
$600 + Dep + Elec. No
smkg/pets. Lease/ref's.
Call for appt. 752-4735.
LARGE LOFT
overlooking Main St.
1400+/- SF. W/D.
Cable, internet, utilities
incl. $975/mo.
2BR APT. w/ carport,
storage, internet, heat
incl. $700/mo.
307-751-3401
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
2BR/1.5 BA, Near hosp.
$1095. 307-752-3665.
Mobile Hm. Space for
Rent
2500 SQ FT Office Retail space w/ parking.
1415 N. Main. 752-4662
CORNER SUITE w/
MTN VIEWS. 1,000 sq.
ft. 2 private offices,
conference & reception
areas. 307-672-8700.
MILL INN TOWERS
Office suite w/ beautiful
mtn. views. Ample
parking. 24/7 access.
Util. paid. 2161 Coffeen
Ave. 307-672-6401
Storage Space
DOWNER ADDITION
STORAGE 674-1792
E L D O R A D O
STORAGE Helping you
conquer space. 3856
Coffeen. 307-672-7297.
CALL BAYHORSE
STORAGE 1005 4th
Ave. E. 307-752-9114.
WOODLANDPARK
STORAGE.COM
5211 Coffeen
Call 307-674-7355
New Spaces
Available!
CIELO STORAGE
307-752-3904
INTERSTATE
STORAGE. Multiple
Sizes avail. No
deposit req'd.
307-752-6111.
RV SPACE, Big Horn. $150/MO. 13' x 31'
By day, month or year. room. Dock. Overhead
door. 307-256-6170.
307-674-7718.
Motorcycles
Work Wanted
'02 HARLEY Soft Tail
Springer. Cherry black.
Custom
bags
&
windshield. $7500. 6746108.
HOUSE
PAINTING,
general labor, cleaning
& cleanup. New Ref's.
683-7814 (cell).
2012
ROKON.
Upgraded trail breaker.
Call 307-655-9405
ROOFING LABORERS
NEEDED
Call 307-278-0314
ATV’s
FT POSITION.
For more info
www.landscapingservic
esinc.com
SKIDOO 670 Summit
Excellent Shape. $400.
307-655-9405.
Help Wanted
Apply in person on
Monday, MARCH 23rd
at 9:00 am -or- 1:00 pm
at the BILLINGS
Worksource Job
Service at 2121
Rosebud Dr., Billings
MT.
Pre-Registration is not
mandatory, Walk-ins
are welcome, please be
on time. Applicants
must stay for
Orientation and
Interview to be
considered for
employment.
Wages are CrewShare,
which is a percentage
of the value of the catch
for each trip.
oharacorporation.com
HIRING
Maitre’D
Bartender
Server
Banquet Server
Kitchen Staff
Hourly DOE
Training Provided
Download
applications at
www.thepowderhorn.com
under Contact Us/
Employment
Submit applications to
The Powder Horn
23 Country Club Ln.
Fax to: 672-5893
Contact Heidi at
673-4800 ext. 5
WILLIAMS CIVIL
CONSTRUCTION
is seeking certified
MSHA Foreman for a
project at Cloud Peak
Energy’s Spring Creek
Mine. Please fax
resume to 406-5229612 or apply online
at
www.williamscivil
construction.com
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
SHERIDAN COUNTY
YMCA
Looking for energetic,
self-motivated, patient,
responsible, creative
individuals.
Summer Camp:
Day Camp
Counselor – work
with ages 6-14, 6-8
weeks throughout
summer. 16 or older.
Resident Camp
Counselor – work
with ages 9-15, 8-10
weeks throughout
summer. Room and
Board inc. 18 years or
older.
YMCA of the
Bighorns
Resident Youth
Camp Cook Mon am Fri. am.
Summer schedule 10
weeks. Prepare meals
for 45 campers and
staff.
Desire to work in
youth camp setting
with quality kitchen
set-up.
Apps front desk of
Sheridan Y or
www.sheridanymca.or
g
THE CITY of
SHERIDAN is
currently accepting
applications for
energetic, detailoriented organized
and personable
individuals for the
position of Part-Time
Records Technician
at the Sheridan Police
Dept. Duties include
interacting with the
public and customers,
sending
correspondence to the
media and other
entities, filing, typing,
updating rosters,
photo copying, and
data entry. Office
equipment and
computer experience
preferred. This is a
fully benefited position
with a hiring range of
$15.56-$17.18/hr
DOE. Interested,
qualified applicants
should submit a
completed Police
Department Job
Application to 55
Grinnell Plaza,
Sheridan, WY 82801.
Qualified candidates
must pass a
comprehensive
background check.
Full job description
and job application
can be found at
www.sheridanwy. net.
The deadline for this
position is 3/16/15.
The City of Sheridan
is a drug-free
workplace.
OFFICE CLERK
needed at the NRCS
in Sheridan. 40
hrs/wk. $12.65/hr +
benefits. Email
resume to:
[email protected]
ultimaservices.com
and write “Sheridan”
in the subject line.
Go online today!
www.thesheridanpress.com
Classifieds 031415_Layout 1 3/13/15 3:58 PM Page 2
CLASSIFIEDS
B6 THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Now Hiring
Maintenance
Cocktail
Server
*Wage DOE
Apply in person at the
Front Desk.
1809 SUGARLAND DRIVE
SHERIDAN, WY
YMCA
EVENING/OVER NIGHT CUSTODIAL
POSITION
Sheridan County
YMCA has part or fulltime opening for teamoriented
janitorial/housekeepin
g staff person. Must
have eye for detail
and experience with
floor waxing and
cleaning. Shift is late
evening/overnight.
Applications available
at YMCA Front Desk.
Help Wanted
***$1,000***
SIGN-ON BONUS
Immediate Opening
Blue Rhino Driver
Blue Rhino, a
nationwide leader in
the propane industry,
is looking for a Full
Time Driver in
Sheridan, WY.
Requirements:
• 1+ year driving
experience
• Class A CDL w/
Hazmat & Tanker
Endorsements
• At least 21 yrs of age
• Ability to meet DOT
requirements
• Ability to lift up to
75 lbs.
Questions, call
303-289-9126
Apply online at:
www.ferrellgas.com
EOE/AAP/TMP/D/V
NOW TAKING
applications for Kitchen
Manager, Assistant
General Manager, Line
cooks, Servers w/ exp.
& Host/ Hostesses.
Morning & eve. shifts
avail. Apply in person at
1373 Coffeen Ave or
online at www.
pleaseapplyonline.com/
sugarlandenterprises.
Help Wanted
SHERIDAN COUNTY
School District #1 is
accepting applications
for a Special
Education Teacher for
the 2015-2016. The
candidate must be
eligible for a Wyoming
Teaching certificate in
special education, K12. This position will
serve in one of the
district’s resource
classrooms. Possible
coaching or student
activities may be
available. If interested,
contact Brandi Miller,
[email protected]
wy.us or visit district
website, www.
sheridan.k12.wy.us for
more information and
application. Position
open until filled.
E.O.E.
TRUCK DRIVER
WANTED
Looking for an
experienced Truck
Driver for loading and
unloading farm
equipment. Must have
a CDL. Qualified
candidate send
resume to Ed
DeTavernier Service
Manager
[email protected]
ipment.com or stop in
at Sheridan County
Implement 2945 West
5th Street Sheridan
Hints from Heloise
Walk This Way
Editor's Note: The accompanying photo
for this and future Saturday Heloise pet
columns will be available to newspapers
that receive the column through the website. If you receive the column by APwire
or U.S. mail and would like to receive the
photo at no extra charge, you can download
it. Call Reed Brennan Media Associates
Customer Service at (800) 708-7311, ext. 236.
Dear Readers: We know WALKING is a
wonderful way to get exercise, as well as
fresh air. Walking with someone else can
make it pleasurable. If you take a daily
stroll, do be careful if you are walking near
traffic. Here are some potential lifesaving
hints you need to know. My thanks to the
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (www.nhtsa.gov) for this information. I've added a few Heloise hints so you
come home safely:
Always be aware of your surroundings
and all vehicle traffic. This seems obvious,
but if you are on the phone, listening to
music with headphones or texting, you are
NOT being a safe pedestrian.
Make yourself highly visible, especially if
you walk (or jog) at dawn or dusk.
Wear bright-colored clothes -- fluorescent
vests and sneakers are the things to wear at
night or early in the morning. Carry a
flashlight for your safety.
Facing traffic is the direction you should
walk or jog.
Stop at stop signs, stoplights and yield
signs.
Be safe, not sorry! -- Heloise
P.S.: When walking or jogging at night,
please don't assume that drivers can see
you. You may be wearing fluorescent clothing, carrying a flashlight or have reflective
tape on your clothing. However, a driver
rounding a corner (at night) may not see
you at all! -- Heloise
PET PAL
Dear Readers: Kent and Lisa sent a picture of their gorgeous Australian shepherd,
Dodger, with amazing blue eyes! They say
he's as smart as he is handsome. To see
Dodger and other splendid Pet Pals, visit
www. Heloise.com and click on "Pets." -Heloise
TISSUE CATCHER
Dear Heloise: So many clothing pockets
have tissues left in them, especially during
the cold season, and they make their way
into the dryer. Place a microfiber cloth in
with the dryer load, and it will "capture"
the tissue. -- T. in Louisiana
Help Wanted
SIMON
CONTRACTORS, a
major road and bridge
contractor in WY, NE,
SD & CO, has
immediate openings in
our Highway
Division for the
following positions:
*ASPHALT ROLLER
OPERATOR
*ASPHALT CREW
DUMP PERSON
*TRACTOR-TRAILER
TRUCK DRIVERS
*ASPHALT PLANT
LOADER
OPERATORS
*FIELD MECHANIC
*WATER TRUCK
DRIVER
*FINISH BLADE
OPERATOR
*HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
Extensive travel
required; per diem
included. Commercial
licensing requirements
may apply. Please
visit our website for
full job descriptions.
Top wages with an
excellent benefits
package including
health, dental, vision,
401k with company
match, vacation,
holidays, life & more!
Visit our website at
www.
simoncontractors.com
to apply online or any
of our office locations
to apply in person.
Simon Contractors is
an Equal Opportunity/
Affirmative Action,
Gender/Race/
Disabled/Veteran,
Drug Free Workplace
Employer.
CONSTRUCTION
MATERIALS TESTING
TECHNICIAN.
Experience Preferred
but will offer training.
Wages DOE. Send
resume to box 227, c/o
The Sheridan Press,
PO Box 2006,
Sheridan, WY 82801
BUSY LOCAL OFFICE
looking for MANAGER.
Great salary w/
benefits. Send reply to
Box 226, c/o The
Sheridan Press, PO
Box 2006,
Sheridan, WY 82801.
SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2015
Help Wanted
SCSD #1 has the
following extra duty
positions available.
*BHHS Volleyball
Head Coach
*TRHS Volleyball
Head Coach
Please complete the
extra-duty application
(found on district
website) and return it
to Brandi Miller [email protected]
sheridan.k12.wy.us
If you have position
specific questions
please call the
perspective HS
Principal.
www.sheridan.k12.wy.
us. Positions are open
until filled. E.O.E.
FULL TIME C.N.A.s$500 Sign On Bonus
Day shift (6a-2p) and
Evening shift (2p-10p),
C.N.A.s- positions
available immediately.
Our full time team
members enjoy
employment which
offers access to
medical, dental, vision
insurance, paid time off,
flexible scheduling,
computerized
continuing education
system, opportunities
for growth and
advancement, as well
as, a warm, family-like
atmosphere. $500 Sign
on Bonus! If you are
energetic, caring and
enjoy giving excellent
care to seniors, then we
want you to join our
family. Apply in person
at 1551 Sugarland
Ridge.
TAKING
APPLICATIONS for a
Big Horn High School
Principal. Must have a
Master’s in school
administration. Must
have eligibility for a
Standard
Administrative
Certificate with
endorsement of
Principal K-12 as
issued by the WY
Professional Teaching
Standards Board.
Beginning date: 20152016 contract year –
approximately July 30,
2015. Please visit
district website,
www.sheridan.k12.wy.
us for more
information and
application.
LOST PET?
Place an ad!
Call 672-2431
Help Wanted
NOW HIRING CNA's.
Call Bruce at 307674-4416.
Lost & Found
LOST AT COUNTRY
KITCHEN: A round
silver cubic zirconia
clip-on.
Call
The
Sheridan Press @ 6722431 if found.
Antiques
ANTIQUE SALE
856 Coffeen Ave., #6
Sat & Sun March 14-15
8 am - 2 pm
Sheridan Collectables,
Art, Beer Stuff, Ammo,
Many collectables
Real Estate
DRIVE BY 1301 Pine
Dr. & enjoy the
spectacular view! Pick
up flyer at front door to
see pictures & floor
plan of this COZY
2BR/2Ba Patio Home
w/ 2 car garage.
Home
Owner's
Association
incl.
snow removal & yard
work. $235,000. Ideal
for seniors. 307-7522399.
ahead, you may be challenged to honor commitments and to be seen as
entirely trustworthy.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
This is one of those weeks
when acting on profound
faith in your fellow man
will work to your advantage. Take concrete steps
and actively work to reach
your career goals. Be a
trusted confidante to your
friends.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Maintaining a sense of formality with others could be
a good thing. Tensions
could be building under the
surface this week. Impulsive purchases may eat up
your walking around cash.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
You may prefer to risk the
unusual rather than settle
for the ordinary. Harmless
flirtations could be misconstrued in the week ahead.
Keep your thoughts to yourself if your money or a key
relationship is at stake.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): This week, your attention could center on your
public image. The juggling
act you perform to coordinate home and business
matters may need some
minor tweaking in light of
recent changes.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): The best helping
hand you can find is right at
the end of your arm. In the
week ahead, use your keen
intellect to tackle complex
problems rather than relying on input from others.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Sweeping changes at
home or in your career may
put you on the defensive
this week. This creatively
and remember F. Scott
Fitzgerald's comment: "The
test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold
two opposing ideas in mind
at the same time."
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): The direction of your
life could be in the hands of
others this week. Most of
those who enter your life
now are trustworthy. Excess enthusiasm requires
plenty of exercise, so find
appropriate outlets for your
energy.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Use tactfulness and
don't take sides. You may be
walking a balance beam as
the week unfolds. You have
both the good grace to
charm co-workers and the
determination to take care
of necessities.
IF MARCH 15 IS YOUR
BIRTHDAY: Recent
changes in your lifestyle
will set the tone for the next
4-6 weeks. New friends or a
more exciting social circle
makes you more aware of
the key things and people
that contribute most to your
happiness. June is a good
time to reassess your financial situation or career
path. You'll have more
sound business sense than
usual. Look for an important opportunity to improve
your life and find material
security in July, when op-
MANX VOLKSWAGON.
Fiberglass. Brand New
engine.
New
transmission & tires.
85% finished. $4000.
Call 674-6108. Leave
msg.
PRIME RATE
MOTORS is buying
clean, preowned
vehicles of all ages.
We also install B&W
GN hitches, 5th Wheel
Hitches, Pickup
Flatbeds, Krogman
Bale Beds. Stop by
2305 Coffeen Ave. or
call 674-6677.
Motor Homes
'03 WINNEBAGO
BRAVE. Workhorse
chassis. 8.1 L Chevy
Engine. Ellison 5 speed.
2 slides. Hydraulic
Jacks. 307-674-4160.
SATURDAY
March 14th
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
206 W. Works
$289,900 MLS# 14-580
Hosted by
Wendyllyn Dane
OPEN HOUSE
1908 ASH AVE.
Sat. March 14, 2015,
11:30 am - 1 pm
*3BR/2Ba
*1790 sq. ft.
*2 car att. garage
*.33 Ac w/ A great
view & wraparound
deck.
*$245,000
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
2350 Aspen Grove
$374,000 MLS# 15-139
Hosted by Bill Rapp
Autos-Accessories
2002 CHEVY IMPALA.
Runs Great. 35 MPG.
Cruise. A/C. OnStar.
Remote Entry. $4200.
See at J.B.'s. 752-3325
2005 CHEVY Tahoe
4WD. New tires. Well
maintained. 163K miles.
$6000. Call 672-0761
daytime.
Ask
for
Rodney.
2011 SOFTTAIL Deluxe
5,800 Miles
Two-Tone Brown
$12,500. 307-752-7131.
Omarr’s Daily Astrological
Forecast
BIRTHDAY GAL: Actress
Eva Amurri Martino was
born in New York City on
this date in 1985. This birthday gal currently plays the
recurring role of Sabrina on
"Undateable." She's also appeared on episodes of "How
I Met Your Mother," "New
Girl" and "The Mindy Project." Her film work includes
roles in "Stag," "That's My
Boy" and "New York, I Love
You." Martino is the daughter of actress Susan Sarandon and director Franco
Amurri.
ARIES (March 21-April
19): Tone it down. You know
that being assertive can
sometimes be perceived as
being aggressive. In the
week ahead, soften your
words more than usual so
you don't appear harsh.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): The turtle only makes
progress when he sticks his
neck out. You might find
that taking risks appeals to
you in the week ahead.
You'd be wise to hold off
until late in the week to
make major purchases.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Multitasking requires an
ambidextrous brain. You're
very capable of juggling
more than one task at a
time. This week, you may
try to please too many people too much of the time.
Take it easy!
CANCER (June 21-July
22): A desire to receive
recognition may be reflected in the way you handle money. During the week
Autos-Accessories
306 N. Main St.
Sheridan, WY
(307) 672-8911
Office Hours
Sat 9am-2pm
www.eracrc.com
Jeraldine Saunders
portunities previously unavailable to you may appear.
BIRTHDAY GUY: Actor
Tim Kang was born in San
Francisco, Calif., on this
day in 1973. This birthday
guy has portrayed Kimball
Cho on "The Mentalist"
since 2008. He's also appeared on episodes of "The
Unit," "The Office" and
"Monk." On the big screen,
Kang's film resume includes
"Rambo," "The Forgotten"
and "Two Weeks Notice."
Kang made his TV debut on
an episode of "The Sopranos" in 2002.
ARIES (March 21-April
19): Your relationships may
be of prime importance. Put
joint plans into motion and
strive to achieve long-term
objectives. Remember that
you must take baby steps
before you can walk independently.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Stick with the status
quo. You may find yourself
in between the proverbial
rock and the hard place.
Companions will lighten
trying situations by being
understanding and cheerful.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
If you move too fast, you
may stub your toe. You
won't be able to forge forward as quickly as desired
and must restrain your ambitions and delay some activities. Don't get tripped up
by acting on a whim.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Opportunities are loom-
ing around the corner. Snap
decisions may be needed to
keep up with quickly changing events. Those in your
immediate circle are loyal,
so follow their lead.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Work-related situations
could come full circle or to a
peak. Pesky details or emergencies could scramble
your schedule. Keep an ear
open for wise advice and
helpful information if
money is at stake.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
You could be dropping your
spending money much too
fast. Avoid being swept up
by a passing fad. Having an
extensive vocabulary may
be an asset, but keeping
your mouth shut at the
right time is priceless.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
An important opportunity
to better yourself is just
around the corner. Powerful insights could generate
some valuable ideas. Hold
off on implementing them,
but make sure to write
them down for future use.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): You may feel obligated
to compete with others for
space; the people around
you seem to be herding you
into a corral. Temporary
frustrations grow as financial limitations hem you in.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Thinking outside
the box can make you appear brilliant and help you
remain objective. Grand
ambitions are forming, but
you'd be wise to stick with
your present position.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): When you work hard to
achieve something you're
not fully committed to, the
effort can be stressful. But
when you work hard to
achieve something because
you love it, it's a passion.
Hold on to you passions.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Tensions may be strung
as tightly as a string on a
bow right now. Remain
philosophical if controversial subjects seem to bring
out the worst in people. Depend on diplomacy to win
the day.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Hold onto your wallet.
You may find that traveling
in exciting circles can be expensive. Money seems to
merely be using your pockets as a refueling stop before taking off again.
IF MARCH 16 IS YOUR
BIRTHDAY: The upcoming
4-6 weeks offers you a fine
time to just be yourself.
Your social circle could expand, perhaps through club
or organizational activities.
Express your wants and desires without reservation.
June is an excellent time to
make financial decisions
because you're shrewdness
is at a peak. A little bit of
concentrated effort in July
will show you the way to become that special person
others look toward as a sterling example. You can go
ahead with your most precious plans and may receive
the answer to your prayers.
031415Legals_Layout 1 3/13/15 4:31 PM Page 1
YOUR ELECTED
OFFICIALS |
CITY
John Heath
Mayor
307-675-4223
Public Notices
SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
WHY PUBLIC NOTICES ARE IMPORTANT |
Kristin Kelly
Councilor
307-673-4751
Shelleen
Smith
Councilor
307-461-7082
Thayer
Shafer
Councilor
307-674-4118
Alex Lee
Councilor
307-752-8804
Jesus Rios
Councilor
307-461-9565
Kelly Gooch
Councilor
307-752-7137
COUNTY
Pete Carroll
Treasurer
307-674-2520
Eda
Thompson
Clerk
307-674-2500
Nickie Arney
Clerk of District
Court
307-674-2960
John Fenn
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
William
Edelman
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
Shelley
Cundiff
Sheridan
County Circut
Court Judge
307-674-2940
P.J. Kane
Coroner
307-673-5837
Terry
Cram
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Tom
Ringley
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Mike
Nickel
Chairman
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Steve
Maier
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Dave
Hofmeier
Sheriff
307-672-3455
Bob
Rolston
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Paul
Fall
Assessor
307-674-2535
Matt
Redle
County
Attorney
307-674-2580
STATE
Matt
Mead
Governor
307-777-7434
Rosie
Berger
Representative
House Dist. 51
307-672-7600
Mark
Jennings
Representative
House Dist. 30
307-461-0697
John
Patton
Representative
House Dist. 29
307-672-2776
Mike
Madden
Representative
House Dist. 40
307-684-9356
Dave
Kinskey
Senator
Senate Dist. 22
307-461-4297
307-278-6030
Bruce
Burns
Senator
Senate Dist. 21
307-672-6491
Public notices allow citizens to monitor their government and make sure that it is
working in their best interest. Independent newspapers assist in this cause by
carrying out their partnership with the people’s right to know through public
notices. By offering an independent and archived record of public notices,
newspapers foster a more trusting relationship between government and its
citizens.
Newspapers have the experience and expertise in publishing public notices and
have done so since the Revolutionary War. Today, they remain an established,
trustworthy and neutral source that ably transfers information between
government and the people.
Public notices are the lasting record of how the public’s resources are used and are
presented in the most efficient and effective means possible.
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
The City of Sheridan, Wyoming will receive sealed bids
for the 2015 Rotomill & Overlay Project. The project
includes surfacing improvements to several streets
within the City of Sheridan; this work is generally
described as follows:
The Base Bid includes ± 11,500
Square Yards of asphalt milling, asphalt leveling, ± 12,700 Square
Yards of new asphalt pavement (2”
to 2.5”), and isolated soft spot repair. Work associated with the Base
Bid will occur on N. Linden Ave.
(from Loucks St. to Smith St.), N.
Jefferson St. (from Loucks St. to
Smith St.), W. Brundage St. (from N.
Linden Ave. to N. Thurmond St.) and
S. Thurmond St. (from W. Nebraska
St. to Kilbourne St.).
Bid Alternate 1 includes asphalt
leveling, isolated soft spot repair,
and ± 6,500 Square Yards of new
asphalt pavement (2”). Work associated with Bid Alternate 1 will occur
on the Big Horn Ave. Loop Road,
located east of Wyoming Highway
332 (Big Horn Ave.).
Sealed bids will be received at City Hall, to the Clerk’s
office on the 1st floor, until 3:30 p.m. local time on
Thursday April 9, 2015. The bids will then be opened
and read aloud at the Council Chambers on the 3rd floor
of City Hall.
All bids shall be submitted in accordance with and on
the forms included in the Project Manual. Bids shall be
submitted in a sealed envelope addressed to:
City of Sheridan
City Clerk’s Office
Attn: Brenda Williams
2015 Rotomill & Overlay
55 Grinnell Plaza
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
Contract Documents, including proposal Bid Forms,
Construction Drawings and Project Manual, have been
placed online at http://goo.gl/ls7GBI.
Contract Documents may be obtained on or after March
18, 2015 online at http://goo.gl/ls7GBI, at the nonrefundable cost of $10.00 per set.
A PRE-BID CONFERENCE will be held on April 1, 2015 at
11:00 a.m. local time, beginning in the Council Chambers
on the 3rd floor of City Hall, Sheridan, Wyoming.
Contractors, in submitting their respective bids,
acknowledge that such bids conform to all
requirements of Wyoming State Statute. Each bidder
must include a bid security with the bid, payable to the
City of Sheridan, in accordance with the Instruction to
Bidders.
No bidder may withdraw its bid after the scheduled
time of the bid opening. Bids are to remain open for 60
days after the bid opening. The Owner reserves the right
to reject any and all bids or parts thereof, and to waive
any irregularities of any bid. The Owner also reserves
the right to award the contract to such responsible
bidders as may be determined by the Owner.
By: /s/ Nicholas Bateson
Nicholas Bateson, Public Works Director, City of
Sheridan
Publish: March 14, 20. 28, 2015.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Wyoming Public Service Commission
(Commission) has given Montana-Dakota Utilities Co.
(MDU) authority pass on a wholesale gas cost decrease
of $0.381 per dekatherm (Dth) to its Residential, Firm
General Service, and Small and Large Interruptible
customers, and a decrease of $0.389 to its Seasonal
customers through its Commodity Balancing Account,
effective on and after March 1, 2015.
The average Residential and Firm General
Service customers using approximately 10.6 Dth in
March 2015 may expect a monthly gas bill decrease of
approximately $5.24 or 7.4%, before taxes. Actual bills
will vary with usage.
The proposed retail rate decreases result in a
projected dollar-for-dollar decrease in the Company’s
March 2015 total revenues of approximately $108,585
using projected sales volumes. The decreases do not
change the Company’s authorized rate of return.
Pursuant to Commission Rule §§ 249 and
250 a utility may apply to pass on to its customers
known or prospective wholesale commodity cost
increases or decreases on a dollar-for-dollar basis and
subject to public notice, opportunity for hearing and
refund.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B7
GLOSSARY OF TERMS |
Default: Failure to fulfill an obligation, especially the obligation to
make payments when due to a lender.
Encumbrance: A right attached to the property of another that may
lessen its value, such as a lien, mortgage, or easement.
Foreclosure: The legal process of terminating an owner’s interest in
property, usually as the result of a default under a mortgage.
Foreclosure may be accomplished by order of a court or by the
statutory process known as foreclosure by advertisement (also
known as a power of sale foreclosure).
Lien: A legal claim asserted against the property of another, usually
as security for a debt or obligation.
Mortgage: A lien granted by the owner of property to provide
security for a debt or obligation.
MDU’s application is on file at the
Commission’s offices in Cheyenne, Wyoming, and in the
Company’s Sheridan, Wyoming, business office, and
may be inspected by any interested person during
regular business hours.
Anyone who wants to file an intervention
petition, request for a public hearing, or a statement,
public comment or protest in this matter must file in
writing with the Commission on or before April 3, 2015.
A proposed intervention or request for hearing must set
forth the grounds under which they are made and the
position and interest of the petitioner in this
proceeding.
If you want to intervene in this matter or
request a public hearing that you will attend, or want to
make a statement, a protest or a public comment, and
you require reasonable accommodation for a disability,
please contact the Commission at (307) 777-7427, or
write to the Commission at 2515 Warren Avenue, Suite
300, Cheyenne, Wyoming 82002, to make
arrangements. Communications impaired persons may
also contact the Commission by accessing Wyoming
Relay at 711. Please mention Docket No. 30013-302-GP15 in your communications.
Dated: March 5, 2015.
Publish: March 7, 14, 2015.
Power of Sale: A clause commonly written into a mortgage
authorizing the mortgagee to advertise and sell the property in the
event of default. The process is governed by statute, but is not
supervised by any court.
Probate: The court procedure in which a decedent’s liabilities are
settled and her assets are distributed to her heirs.
Public Notice: Notice given to the public or persons affected
regarding certain types of legal proceedings, usually by publishing
in a newspaper of general circulation. This notice is usually
required in matters that concern the public.
Disclaimer: The foregoing terms and definitions are provided merely as a guide to the
reader and are not offered as authoritative definitions of legal terms.
LEGAL NOTICE POLICY
The Sheridan Press publishes Legal
Notices under the following schedule:
If we receive the Legal Notice by:
Monday Noon –
It will be published in
Thursday’s paper.
Tuesday Noon –
It will be published in
Friday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
BUFFALO SENIOR CENTER – NEW BUS SHELTER
PROJECT
BID ADVERTISEMENT
Project Category: Construction
Project Name: Buffalo Senior Center – NEW BUS
SHELTER
County/City/State: Johnson, Buffalo, Wyoming
Directions to Site: The Buffalo Senior Center is located in
Buffalo, WY at 671 W. Fetterman, Buffalo, WY 82834.
Bids Close: March 30, 10:00 AM MDT
Bids Received by: AJ Mock, Buffalo Senior Center, 671 W.
Fetterman St., PO Box 941, Buffalo, WY 82834.
All bids shall be made in accordance with forms
referenced to and/or made a part of the proposed
contract documents. Bids shall be submitted in a sealed
envelope with annotation “Buffalo Senior Center Bus
Shelter”.
Project Completion Date: Substantial Completion – May
15, 2015
Pre-Bid Meeting Information: A RECOMMENDED Pre-Bid
meeting for all Prime Contractors will be conducted at
10:00 a.m. MDT followed by a site tour on March 16,
2015 at the Buffalo Senior Center, 671 W. Fetterman,
Buffalo, WY 82834
Project Description: The project will consist of
constructing a three sided bus shelter. This project will
also include excavation of existing trees, an approach
from the parking lot, and gravel as the surface under the
shelter.
Owner: Buffalo Senior Center, 641 West Fetterman St.
PO Box 941, Buffalo, WY 82834. Phone: 307-684-9551
Soliciting Agent: Buffalo Senior Center, 671 W.
Fetterman, Buffalo, WY 82834. Contact: AJ Mock,
Executive Director. Phone: 307-684-9551
END OF BID ADVERTISEMENT
Publish: February 28, March 7, 14, 21, 28, 2015.
Saturday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Monday’s paper.
Thursday Noon –
It will be published in
Tuesday’s paper.
Friday Noon –
It will be published in
Wednesday’s paper.
• Complete information, descriptions and billing information are required with
each legal notice. A PDF is required if there are any signatures, with a Word
Document attached.
• Failure to include this information WILL cause delay in publication. All legal
notices must be paid in full before an "AFFIDAVIT OF PUBLICATION" will be
issued.
• Please contact The Sheridan Press legal advertising department at 672-2431 if
you have questions.
Public Notice
Per §18-3-516 (f) Access to county information is
available as follows: www. sheridancounty.com;
visit/write the Courthouse, 224 S. Main St., Sheridan,
WY, 82801; or call the specific department.
Publish: March 14, 2015
LEGAL NOTICE
The Montana Department of Natural Resources and
Conservation Southern Land Office is soliciting
responses to a request for proposal (RFP) for a
commercial lease to develop approximately 200 acres
of Trust land located northwest of Decker, MT in Section
16, T9S, R39E, Big Horn County. Responses must be
received at the DNRC Southern Land Office by Thursday,
4 June 2015 at 4 p.m. Mountain Time. Please visit the
DNRC web site at www.dnrc.mt.gov/leasing for the full
RFP and additional related information.
For questions or requests to visit the site contact Jeff
Bollman at the Department of Natural Resources and
Conservation Southern Land Office, 1371 Rimtop Drive,
Billings, MT 59105 or email at [email protected] or
phone (406) 247-4404. Hard copies of the RFP are
available on request.
Dated: 9 March 2015
Publish: March 14, 21, 2015.
Your Right
To Know
and be informed of government legal
proceedings is embodied in public
notices. This newspaper urges every
citizen to read and study these notices.
We strongly advise those seeking
further information to exercise their right
of access to public records and public
meetings.
B8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2015
`