THE HOMER NEWS THE HOMER NEWS

THE HOMER NEWS
FREE
Volume V
Thursday, February 26, 2015
Issue 18
FREE
United Way Polar Plunge is April 18
United Way for Cortland County Polar Plunge is a:
spec·ta·cle (spkt-kl) n.
a. Something that can be seen or viewed,
especially something of a remarkable or
impressive nature.
b. A public performance or display,
especially one on a large or lavish scale.
One more time Steve Cinquanti will be plunging
into the chilly waters at Yaman Park on March
7th to raise a few bucks for United Way.
Anything you can do to help would be very
much appreciated.
Many thanks for past and present support of
the community.-- and please do mention this to
anyone you think might want to donate too.
One way or the other come on down A[pril
18th and watch this fun community affair and
spectacle!
https://www.firstgiving.com/fundraiser/
SteveCinquanti/2015-great-polar-bear-challenge
FREE
THE HOMER NEWS
2 • February 26, 2015 • The Homer News
Around Town
The Voice of the Town
The Homer News
Published for Homer Residents
The Homer News is published
in Homer by The Homer News.
Distribution is
every other Thursday to all households and
businesses in Homer.
The Homer News is a community-based news-
paper dedicated to informing townspeople of current
events and issues; serving as a forum for the free
exchange of views of town residents; and celebrating
the people, places and happenings that make the
Town of Homer unique.
Editor:Donald Ferris
***
Subscription Rates:
The Homer News is delivered at no cost to all
Homer addresses in the 13077 zip code.
We are offering subscriptions for The Homer
News. Personal or out-of-town subscriptions are
available for $36 per year (First Class). Payable
in advance. Send check or money order to:
The Homer News,
P.O. Box 125, Homer, NY 13077
Email your address to:
[email protected]
Signed Articles, Letters, Photographs and
Drawings of interest are welcomed to be considered for publication. All articles are subject to
editing for clarity and length. Materials not used
will be returned if a self-addressed stamped
envelope is provided.
THANK YOU!
Circulation: 3,800 copies per issue.
Copyright © 2015 The Homer News
The Homer NEWS
P.O. Box 125 Homer, New York 13077
[email protected]
Telephone: 607-749-2613
Fill Your Cup-Fill Managing
the Pantry Coffee Concerns
House Benefit
About Falls
The Senior High Sunday School Class
at Homer Congregational Church will
be hosting a coffee house to benefit the Homer Methodist Food Pantry.
Come and listen to local entertainment
while enjoying a bottomless cup of coffee, tea or hot chocolate.
When: Saturday, March 21st
Where: Homer Congregational
Church Russell Fellowship Room
Doors Open: 7:00 pm
Event starts: 7:30 pm
Cost: $7 per person or $25 maximum for immediate family which
includes a bottomless cup of coffee, tea or hot chocolate
Desserts: Priced individually
Please enter the church through
the back entrance, which is handicap accessible.
100% of the admission cost will go
directly to the Homer Methodist Food
Pantry to help feed the hungry in our
community.
You can also show your support for
the food pantry by bringing in a nonperishable food item to the event!!
Have you turned down a chance to go
out with family or friends because you
were concerned about falling? Have
you cut down on a favorite activity
because you might fall? If so, A Matter
of Balance: Managing Concerns About
Falls is a program for you.
Fear of falling can be just as dangerous as falling itself. People who
develop this fear often limit their activities, which can result in severe physical weakness, making the risk of falling even greater. Many older adults
also experience increased isolation
and depression when they limit their
interactions with family and friends.
A Matter of Balance can help people
improve their quality of life and remain
independent.
A Matter of Balance is designed to
reduce the fear of falling and increase
activity levels among older adults.
Participants learn to set realistic goals
to increase activity, change their environment to reduce fall risk factors,
and learn simple exercises to increase
strength and balance.
Cortland County Area Agency on
Aging (AAA) and the Retired and
Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) are
offering A Matter of Balance: Managing
Concerns About Falls Tuesdays March
17 to May 5, 1 – 3pm, at the Homer
Senior Center, Homer Town Hall, 31 N.
Main St. Preregistration is required.
A workbook and light refreshments will
be provided.
Please call (607)753-5060 to register
or for more information.
Rotary Club Answers the Call to
Help Center for the Arts
March 7 - Saturday
The Homer Community Blood Drive
will be held from 8am to 1:00pm, at the
Homer 1st United Methodist Church, 16
Cayuga Street(on the Green). A Double
Red Cell Collection unit will be available
at this drive for type A-,B-,AB-, and O.
Anyone who wishes to donate should
call and make an appointment at
1-800-RED-CROSS or go to: www.redcrossblood.org Folks with appointments
are given first priority, but walk-ins are
welcome.
March 7 - Saturday
Homeville Presents: The 16th New
York Independent Battery, a hands on
display. Presenter Doug Deuel, Member
of Sons of Union Veterans of Civil War.
This program will be in the Museum
Theater at 1p.m. Admission to the program is $5.00
March 21 - Saturday
Homeville Presents: Homer Braves
Baseball . Presenter Tony Kissel. This
program will be in the Museum Theater
at 1p.m. Admission to the program is
$5.00
As space permits, The Homer News
will print a brief notice of your organization’s event at no charge in the EVENTS
CALENDAR. For more detailed notices we
suggest you purchase a display ad. Please
keep in mind our publishing schedule and
deadlines. March 4, 2015 for the March 12,
2015 issue.
American
Legion
News
For the good of our Community:
Homer Winterfest was a great success! Thanks to all who stopped by to
get warm and enjoy the Hamburgers/
Hot Dogs and the Wine Tasting.
Looking for an inexpensive, quick,
and easy dinner on Friday night? Drop
in and enjoy Hamburgers/Hotdogs and
Delicious Soups on alternate Fridays.
To Benefit Veterans:
We always welcome new members.
Want to become an American Legion
Member in Homer? Email us at:
[email protected] Also, do you
have ideas that would make our post
a destination place for you and guests
to come and relax in our smoke-free
atmosphere? We are always looking
for ways to enhance your visit and
would like suggestions.
NEW: National Commander’s “4X4”
webpage. In an attempt to reach a goal
of 4 million members of the American
Legion, Legion Auxiliary, Sons of the
American Legion and to raise $4 million
for charity programs, Commander Helm
has created a website for Members
and Non-Members. Visit www.legion.
org/4x4 for more information and to
donate to a charity of your choice.
Sign up for Honor & Remembrance
e-newsletter: This new e-newsletter
shares stories and photos of personal
war experiences, monuments honoring
those who served and sacrificed and
more. Visit www.legion.org/newsletters
to sign up.
Reminder - do not use your Veteran’s
ID as identification at any locations
besides the VA in order to keep your
SSAN secure.
Upcoming meetings: Saturdays at
1000 hours: February 28, March 28,
April 25.
Friend us on Facebook for
updates on news and events
as we receive them.
Contributors
Priscilla Berggren-Thomas, Ed Finkbeiner, Anita
Jebbett, Martin Sweeney, Matt Banazek, Harry
Coleman
Get The Homer News at:
Village Food Market, Homer Town Office, Homer
Village Office, Phillips Free Library, Homer Men’s
and Boys, Olde Homer House, Bev's, Oh My
Goodness Health Foods, Lucky Kitchen, Lily
Lanetree, Key Bank, Kory’s Diner, Super Cream,
Origins, Denny Jack's, Anderson’s Farm Market,
Crawl Space, Dandy Mart, Uncle Tom's Deli, Brown’s
Garage, Poole’s Drive In, Trinity Valley Dairy, Tops,
Walgreen’s, Hyde’s Diner, Tyler's Cleaners, CNY
Living History Center, Steve & Lu's Diner, Antiques
on James, First Niagara Bank-Homer.
On Line, www.TheHomerNews.com
All opinions expressed in Letters and
Commentaries
are those of the writers and not of
The Homer News,
which is published as an independent, non-biased
community service and forum.
EVENTS
CALENDAR
Rotary Breakfast Club members answered the call to help clean chairs at the
Center for the Arts on Saturday. Friday's e-mail was answered by Glen Reisweber,
Bill Masterson, Bess Koval, Ed Finkbeiner, Chuck Fieszli, Don Ferris, and Jim
Hopkins cleaned about 180 chairs in just over an hour.
Top photo, Bess Koval is hard at work cleaning a chair. Bottom photo, Bill
Masterson and Ed Finkbeiner used a "team" approach to cleaning chairs.
Brenda McIntosh-Clark, Adjutant
A gift subscription to The Homer News will
help keep your out-of-town friends and
relatives informed. $36/year. Call 749-2613
The Homer News • February 26. 2015 •3
Ed Finkbeiner
Eugene “Gene”
Smith
Trustee Candidate - Homer
for MAYOR
-Resident of Homer Village 29 years
-Currently Homer Village Planning Board Chairman
-Former Homer Village Zoning and Appeals Board Member
-Former Cortland County Board of Ethics Chairman
-Currently on Elizabeth Brewster House Board of Managers
-Serving as President of Elizabeth Brewster House Foundation
-Co-Chair of Elizabeth Brewster House Capital Campaign
-Retired United States Navy after 22 years of service
-Retired Ameriprise Financial Advisor
-Married with 3 grown children who graduated from
Homer Central School District
• Work with the Town to return Village
offices to Town Hall
• COMMUNICATE with residents on
issues and deliberations of the board
• Work with employees and residents
to keep expenses in check
• Seek ways to reduce garbage pick-up
costs through innovation
Please VOTE for me on Wednesday March 18, 2015
Noon - 9 p.m. - Community Bldg. (behind the fire Station)
[email protected]
Election Day is Wednesday, March 18, 2015
KevinTrustee
Slack
Candidate - Homer
• Always has the best interest of the village
at heart
• “The People’s Choice”
• Village Trustee for 4 years
• Village of Homer resident for 28 years
• Owner of Kory’s Place for 28 years
• Member of Homer Business Association
• Member of Homer Elks Lodge
Please remember to vote for Kevin Slack on Wednesday, March 18, 2015
from Noon ‘til 9 pm - Homer Community Building
PAID FOR BY FRIENDS TO ELECT KEVIN SLACK
Election Day is Wednesday, March 18, 2015
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED IN
VILLAGE OF HOMER
WHO: Are you at least 55, and
have a vehicle?
WHAT: Delivering Meals on
Wheels.
WHERE: To a few Homer Village
homebound residents.
WHEN: Can you spare an hour
one day a week?
The Retired & Senior Volunteer
Program is recruiting volunteers
for the Meals on Wheels program. Help is needed specifically
for the Homer area on Mondays,
Tuesdays, and Wednesdays for
about an hour beginning in late
morning. Training is provided.
Contact RSVP at 607-753-5057
or [email protected] about
this and other opportunities. Also,
Homer Senior Center, 31 N. Main
St. Homer, 749-2362 will have
info; ask for Debbie Chavoustie,
RSVP Program Coordinator &
Senior Center Manager.
CLASSIFIEDS
PAINTING SERVICES
WINTER BLUES got you down? Hire
Stroke of Genius for all your Painting
needs. Call Matt at 607-423-7850. 2b3a
WANTED TO BUY
We buy good estate jewelry, recyclable
gold, and coins. Call 607-753-7003 for
appointment. Sheridan's Jewelers, 8
Main Street, downtown Cortland.
BUSINESS SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL TIMBER
MANAGEMENT. Top prices paid for
all hardwoods. Recognized by D.E.C.
Region 7. No job too big or small.
3rd generation logger. NYLT member
certified. References available. Free
Estimates. Bush Logging & Forestry
2b15p
607/745-8121
Election Day is Wednesday, March 18, 2015
Homer WinterFest
The 15th Annual Homer WinterFest was once again an overwhelming success for
attendance, weather and participation. We want to thank the local organizations,
municipal departments, sponsors, and the many individual volunteers who made the
event a success.
Find WinterFest pictures, winners, and news at www.homerwinterfest.org
Thank you to everyone who contributed their time, effort, and financial support, no
matter how big or small the job. We hope we have not missed anyone:
MAJOR SPONSORS:
Economy Paving Co. Inc.; Suit-Kote Corporation; Homer Business Association
SPONSOR:
HoBeau’s Fireside Grill; Cortland County Convention & Visitors Bureau
SUPPORTERS:
Cinquanti Real Estate; Heritage Realty; Homer Men and Boys
CONTRIBUTORS:
K & H Motorsports; Key Bank; Cortland Self-Storage; Reagan-Riter Boiler
Works, Inc.; Albany International
VOLUNTEERS & HELPERS:
Economy Paving; Stephen Compagni; Trampus Henry; Hom-Cort Advantage;
Ed & Dee Finkbeiner; Ward & JoAnn Dukelow; MB Kingsley; Human
Dog Sled Participants; Snow Sculpture Participants; Paul Sweeney; Lime
Hollow Nature Center; Ralph Thornton & the Homer FireDepartment; Martin
Sweeney; Dunkin Donuts; Sellco; Village of Homer & DPW Crew; Fran Riter;
Paul Bunyan Products; Homer Elks; Homer American Legion & Auxiliary;
Homer Central Schools; Scott Cavalier & the HCS Custodial Staff
Homer PTO and volunteers; Homer Shakespearean Society & Louise Felker;
Jaff & Nadine Harris; Mike & Mandy Berry; Sally Kurtz; Mary Alice
Bellardini; Tony Ferro; Jerry Wilcox; Kathy Beardsley & the Landmark
Society; Gail Briggs; Wendy Fairchild; Zach, Steve & Maria Greenfield; Kelly
Sovocool; Don Ferris and the Homer News; Dan Cleary and the Cortland
Brewing Co.
Sincerely, the Homer WinterFest Committee:
Eric Mulvihill (Chair); Katie Quinlan (Treasurer); Sheila Quinlan (Sponsorship);
Sandy Cincotta (Wine Tasting); Steve Major (Advertising); Deb Slack (Parade);
Peg Sweeney (Outdoor Activities & Secretary); Sheila Quinlan (Chili CookOff); Annette Benson (Craft Fair); Brenda Contento (Antique Show); Jeremy
Boylan (Signage); Charlie Bernheim; Mark Bertram (Children’s Activities).
Homer WinterFest runs smoothly with good volunteers.
Interested? call 607-597-9595
Physical Therapy
Return to what matters most
Conveniently located in Homer Village next to Dashers Corner Pub
Evening and Weekend Hours
Accepting Credit Cards/Health Flex Account Cards
Physical Therapy Services including:
Orthopedic and Sports Rehabilitation• Acute and Chronic Conditions
Pre and Post Operative Care• Injury Reduction/Prevention Training•
Manual Hands on Care• Pediatric to Well Experienced Individuals•
Spinal Decompression
• Functional Movement Screening for athletes and active individuals alike
•
•
•
•
Call 749-2219 today to make an appointment!
Ehren Heyer, PT, MPT, Functional Movement Screen Certified Expert
6 North Main St., Homer, NY 607-749-2219 www.heyerpt.com
4 • February 26, 2015 • The Homer News
When Izzy and Moe Came to Homer
By Martin Sweeney, Town of Homer Historian
On February 14, 1922, a man walked
into the David Harum Hotel on Main
Street in Homer [where the fire station is
now] and presented himself to the man
behind the bar, Harry Cortright. He introduced himself to Cortright as a traveling
tobacco salesman, and said that he had
some fine cigars for sale at a reasonable price. Being of an affable nature
and genial in conversation, the salesman was able to convince Cortright
to agree to purchase an allotment of
cigars that would be delivered at a later
date. To seal the deal, the salesman
offered to buy drinks, and Cortright produced the requested libation.
What Cortright did not know was
that this was no salesman. This was
Prohibition Agent No. 1, Isidore Einstein,
a federal agent sworn to enforce the
18th Amendment that deemed the manufacture, transportation, and sale of
alcohol to be illegal effective January
17, 1920. By selling liquor to Einstein,
Cortright had committed a crime.
The next day, Einstein reappeared at
the David Harum Hotel. With him was
his partner and fellow agent, Moe Smith.
The pair had obtained a search and seizures warrant from US Commissioner
Wickham of Binghamton, and they had
local law enforcement personnel with
them. Stepping behind the bar, all they
could find was a solitary pint of liquor.
They then proceeded to conduct a
thorough search of the premises, which
included the upstairs. There the pair
came upon a room with a placard on
the door. The placard read “Quarantine
for Influenza.” Unfazed, the pair ordered
Cortright to open the door. He refused.
So, the pair broke it down. “Inside was
enough ‘evidence’ to convict a few hundred,” Einstein later told reporters.
Before the day was over, based upon a
lead they were provided, the pair visited
the Central Tire store on Port Watson
Street in the city of Cortland. Behind a
pile of tires and inside some of them,
they found a large quantity of liquor. The
pair claimed the store had been a distribution center for booze for some time.
As a result of the two raids in Cortland
County, three men were arrested and
set to appear before United States
Commissioner Wickham in Binghamton
on Thursday, Feb. 23, 1922.
District Attorney Albert Haskell, Jr. was
enthusiastic about the success of these
raids and complimented Einstein and
Smith for their accomplishment, and
they, in turn, spoke highly of Haskell’s
efforts in the operation. Soon after
Haskell’s recent election to the position
of DA, the press had reported: “The district attorney is determined to stop the
sale of intoxicants both in public places
and in private houses and says he will
spare neither time, pains nor money to
accomplish that end. He feels that a
good start has been made.” Haskell had
conducted a few successful raids earlier
in the south and east ends of the City
of Cortland, and the newspaper went
on to report that “All beverages seized
are stored in the basement at the court
house, which smells like a brewery, and
are under lock and key.” Apparently
Haskell’s efforts at law enforcement
had come to require the use of two
of history’s most famous enforcers of
Prohibition.
Working under the direction of Chief
Field Agent John S. Parsons of Oswego
and in conjunction with DA Haskell,
Einstein and Smith arrived in Syracuse
by train and then swept down upon
Cortland. Without prior announcement
of their arrival in the county, even to
other local law enforcement officers,
the pair was able to use the element of
surprise to their advantage. By the time
of these two raids, Einstein and Smith,
known in the popular press as “Izzy and
Moe,” had become household names.
Mere mention of their
names put fear and a
healthy respect for the
eighteenth amendment in the hearts
of men and women
engaged in bootlegging. On a train ride
from Monticello to Port Jervis, the pair
was recognized, and upon arrival at
Port Jervis, the engineer, in true Paul
Revere fashion, hopped off and ran
from gin mill to gin mill yelling, “They’re
coming. Izzy and Moe is coming!”
By early 1922 the agents were well on
their way to becoming famous for using
guile and jovial geniality to best the
bootleggers in sensational operations.
With well over 1,800 arrests and convictions to their credit, Izzy and Moe kept
coming across new challenges. Even
they had to smile about the novel way
Homer and Cortland proprietors had
tried to conceal their booze.
“Few bootleggers have shown the
brains evidenced by the proprietors
of ‘David Harum’s’ place in hiding the
stuff,” declared Izzy to a reporter. “It
was the first time we’ve been faced
with a quarantine sign, duly authorized
by the board of health. I’ve never seen
liquor quarantined before,” he added,
smiling.” “Well, Izzy, bootleggers seldom put the stuff in automobile tires,
notwithstanding the movies,” Moe interrupted, “and that’s what we found at
Cortland.”
The ratification in 1919 of the amendment to establish Prohibition required
federal and local police forces to
recruit new members rapidly in order
to enforce the law. With no background
in law enforcement, but speaking several languages (Yiddish, Hungarian,
German, Polish, with a little Russian,
French, Spanish and Italian) in addition to English, Izzy Einstein, a 1901
immigrant from Galicia, signed up as
Prohibition Agent No. 1. In a short
time, he invited his friend Moe Smith
to join him as a partner. Though both
were personally indifferent to temperance, they felt the law must be upheld,
no matter how hard it was to enforce.
Besides, it was good employment, and
they were good at it. According to
the February 28, 1938 issue of Time,
in their joint career they made 4,932
arrests, of which 95% (around 4,680)
gained convictions. They confiscated 5
million gallons of liquor, worth an estimated $15 million, and thousands of
bartenders, bootleggers and speakeasy
owners were sentenced to jail.
In late 1925, Izzy and Moe were “laid
off” in a reorganization of the bureau of
enforcement. A report in Time magazine
suggested they had attracted more publicity than wanted by the new, resentful
political appointee heading the bureau,
although the press and public loved the
duo. By 1930, both men had moved on
and were working as successful insurance salesmen.
Izzy died in 1938 after a leg amputation for diabetes, and Moe died on Dec.
16, 1960. The New York Herald Tribune
called them “the only prohibition agents
whom the public liked.” “Their exploits
and disguises touched America’s funny
bone,” stated the paper. To root out
bootleggers, they posed as vegetable
vendors, conductors, church-goers, and
grave diggers. They raided stills in cemeteries, basements, garages, and once
in the backroom of a church.
Izzy, wearing a fake goatee and posing as a delegate from Kentucky, and
Moe, wearing a cowboy hat and posing as a delegate from Montana, even
infiltrated the 1924 Democratic National
Convention in the old Madison Square
Garden in search of illegal alcohol. They
came up short. Only soda pop was
available. One sting operation involved
Where is The Homer
News Being Read??
Vivian and Jack Garvey were reading The Homer News in Vero Beach, FL
Raised Garden Beds Now Available at Homer
Community Gardens
Two raised beds are available for new
members at the Homer Community
Gardens, currently hidden under the
snow next to the DPW building on
North Fulton Street, but soon to be
alive and thriving when spring arrives. We are now accepting sign-ups for
these available raised garden beds.
Please email Elaine Norris at [email protected] or call 749-3423 for information. First-come, first-served. 2015 will be the sixth anniversary
of the Homer Community Gardens.
Homer Community Gardens is a loose
coalition of local gardeners who enjoy
sharing all the goodness of gardening. The Gardens are truly a community
effort with big thanks to lots of local people and organizations. We collaborate
with each other and we actively support
local school and community gardens,
helping weed and sharing seed.
Gardening has its own inherent
goodness, of course, but we find that
it also can be a powerful and positive
response to so many of the things that
worry us today about health, food quality, the environment, energy, the climate,
and the economy. We work together
to understand how all these things are
interwoven with each other.
the pair crawling up onto the beach
at Coney Island, shivering with cold
and demanding of a suspect enough
stimulant to save their lives. Another
sting had the two coming forth from
a car barn and informing a suspected
bootlegger that they had nearly frozen
to death in the line of duty during the
long, cold night and pathetically inquiring if a little alcohol might not be had
to revive them. When the liquor was
provided, the pair provided another
arrest to record.
Moe claimed that the accounts of
their disguises were overdone by the
press. In a 1933 interview, he said,
“We didn’t disguise none. If we went to
a golf club to make a pinch, and put on
golf knickers, the papers said we were
disguised.” The real agents looked
nothing like the G-men in the movies.
Moe looked more like an affable, prosperous automobile salesmen. Izzy, in
need of a shave, tended to be scruffier
in his sartorial appearance, with buttons
missing on his vest. Both were a bit
overweight and gave no outward sign of
being physically fit federal agents. And
neither ever carried a firearm, not even
during arrests.
Nevertheless, the successes of Izzy
and Moe became legendary. The two
who passed through Homer but once
were described in a 1925 Time article
as having experienced thrilling adventures comparable to those experienced
by Robin Hood “— adventures as thrilling as those of Sir Launcelot, as those
of Richard Cœur de Lion, as those of
Don Quixote de la Mancha."
The Homer News • February 26. 2015 •5
VILLAGE FOOD MARKET
HOME OF SHURFINE QUALITY FOODS AND PRODUCTS
HOURS: MONDAY-SATURDAY 8AM-9PM • SUNDAY 8AM-8PM
7 SOUTH MAIN ST. HOMER, NY. • (607) 749-3311•Prices Effective Monday March 2.-Saturday March 07 2015
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE ARE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAILERS OR WHOLESALERS • MEMBER OF OLEAN WHOLESALEGROCERY CO-OP. INC. • WE GLADLY REDEEM USDA FOOD STAMPS
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES • WE ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
MEAT Quality You Can Depend On
Boneless
Rueben’s
4
$ 18
1
$ 18
1
5-7 lb. avg. USDA Grade A
Fresh, All Natural
Fryer Chicken
Legs & Drums
USDA Grade A
lb.
Daisyfield
Smoked Pork
Shoulder Picnic
Ham
Shurfine • Jumbo
All Meat
Hot Dogs
lb.
Jumbo Packs
lb.
Shurfine, Deli Sliced
Corned Beef
or Pastrami
lb.
lb.
Sandridge, Deli Fresh
Traditional
Potato Salad
lb.
16 oz.
GROCERY Great Buys In Every Aisle
Kellogg’s
Shurfine
2/$
5/$3
5 oz.
5
Bisquick Mix
40 oz.
Regular or Low Sodium
Campbell’s V8 Juice
46 oz.
Betty Crocker • Several Varieties
Cookie Mixes
14-17.5 oz.
Wishbone Dressings
Select Varieties
28-32 oz.
Select Varieties
16 oz.
Select Varieties
Shurfine Vegetables
3
6
5
2/$
5
2/$
16 oz.
FROZEN
Shurfine Garlic Bread
$ 88
Shurfine
5
1
$ 99
3/$
16 oz.
5
Dutch Country Bread
Stroehmann’s
Brown & Serve Rolls
Shurfine
Round or Square Bread
5/$
Microwave Popcorn
29 oz.
Shurfine Soup
8.7-9.8 oz.
BUY 1, GET
1 FREE
Several Varieties
Sargento Shredded Cheese
8 oz
Salted or Unsalted
Shurfine Butter Quarters
ea.
2/$
2/$
6
5
4.5-5 oz.
PRODUCE
California
Iceberg Lettuce
head
Fresh, Juicy
18 oz.
20-22 oz.
1
$ 29
1
4 lb. bag
Salad Mix
12 oz. bag
Dole • Classic Blend
Jumbo
Green Peppers
Several Varieties • 48 oz.
Perry’s Ice Cream or Sherbet
lb.
BUY 1, GET
1 FREE
Perry’s
Nutty Cones
6 pk.
Perry’s
Ice Cream Sandwiches
THANK YOU FOR SHOPPING WITH US!
98¢
$ 98
2
98¢
$ 28
1
Navel Oranges
ICE CREAM
$ 99
3
2/$
4
5/$
10.5-10.75 oz.
Shake & Bake Mix
American Cheese Singles
1 FREE
5
2/$
3
5/$
2 pk.
Select Varieties
Kraft • Yellow or White • 12 oz.
BUY 1, GET
5
Chicken Noodle or Tomato
BREAD
Stroehmann’s 20-24 oz.
or Puree
Shurfine • Several Varieties
DAIRY
3/$
18 oz.
Tomato
Sauce
69 Big Roll Paper Towels
2/$
Select Varieties
Shurfine French Fries
1
Crunchy or Creamy
15.3-18 oz.
$
Shurfine
Peanut
Butter
Corn Flakes, Honey
Smacks & Raisin Bran
Tuna
In Water
Shurfine
Cereal
Chunk Light
3
$ 98
8
$ 78
1
$ 98
lb.
lb.
Roasting
Chickens
1
$ 48
1
2/$
3
Virginia or Maple
Honey Ham
$ 98
$ 88
Allen’s, Prime Young & Tender
Russer’s, Deli Sliced
Pork Sirloin
Chops
Corned Beef
Brisket Flats
35% Solution
Enhanced
DELI
ATM AVAILABLE
12 pk.
7
2/$
7
2/$
6 • February 26, 2015 • The Homer News
News from the Library
Tone problem areas
By Priscilla Berggren-Thomas
Iron Stomachs
Bruce sent me a link to a video of
a spaghetti eating contest between
a Golden Retriever and a German
Shepherd. It was supposed to show
that the German Shepherd was a
messy eater, trying to pick up one
strand of spaghetti at a time and dropping spaghetti all over the place. The
Golden was done in 3.6 seconds, eating the whole wad of spaghetti in one
bite and actually proving Goldens’ have
stomachs of iron and can gobble anything down without bothering to chew.
Having had three Goldens, I’ve never
understood the idea of having to coax
a dog to eat. Goldens show no discretion in eating, whatsoever. They’ll scarf
up anything: from dead things, to cow
pats, to rocks and clods of dirt. I’ve
have Goldens eat cans, mouse traps,
Christmas trees, and the handles of
filet knives. Often while lying on a water
bed.
There’s another video online of a
therapy dog trial, where the dogs have
to run down a straight course to their
owner, while bypassing large bowls
of food. Almost every breed succeeds
except, you guessed it, the Golden,
who takes about five minutes to run the
ten yards stopping to gobble up every
hot dog in sight. He even back tracks
for a few he missed. This unfortunately
is why my sweet Ben will never become
a certified therapy/reading dog.
Despite this fact, I’ve never had a
fat Golden, because it is much easier
to put my dog on a diet than to diet
myself. Somehow I just can’t keep
myself to three cups of kibble a day
with no whining in between. It’s particularly annoying because even after suffering the stomach bug, I am no svelter!
And if I had to be sick, I should have at
least lost some weight in the bargain.
But, it is the time for battling winter viruses and if one must be sick,
one should be able to be sick in a
genteel and civilized way. Lounging
on the couch, sipping tea, petting the
aforementioned Golden Retriever,
and watching a Murdoch Mysteries
marathon, or Miss Fisher’s Murder
Mysteries, or Midsomer Murders, or
anyone’s murders. So, stop by the
library for some DVDs, Blu-Rays, video
games, books on CD, even real books
to have on hand should you take to the
couch with some bug. But please bring
them back germ free, because we love
to share almost anything but the latest
virus.
What’s New at the Library?
Pre-School Story Time
Pre-School Story Time with Miss
Tammy is on Wednesday mornings at
10:30 am, when school is in session.
There are no programs on snow days
or school holidays. Please check the
Gain strength and flexibility
library website for upcoming themes.
Mar. 4th - Achoo!
Mar. 11th - Bedtime
Mar. 18th - Rain & Rainbows
Mar. 25th - Summertime
Have fun in a motivating group
Where: Homer Center for the Arts
When: Wednesday nights at 6:30, beginning Feb 25th
Cost: 10 Classes/$50
Contact: To register or for more information, please call (607) 280-8649
Rockin’ Readers
Rockin’ Readers, our K-2nd grade
story and activity time is on Wednesday
afternoons at 3:25 pm. Miss Tammy
will be offering a fun program with
stories, crafts, games, and songs.
There are no programs on snow days
or school holidays. Please check the
library website for upcoming themes.
Mar. 4th – Maple Sugar with Lime Hollow
Mar. 11th – Iditarod
Mar. 18th - St. Patrick’s Day Bash
Mar. 25th – Celebrate Doreen Cronin
104 YEARS
CLEANERS
“We’re as close as your phone”
Maker Space Open Hours
The library’s MakerSpace is open
every Tuesday from 5pm – 8 pm
and most Wednesdays from 6-8 pm.
LEGOS Mindstorms and Story Starter
sets, Cricut Explore, the digital drawing
tablet, and building kits and equipment
are available for use. Sign up to use
the 3-D printer and digitizer. 3-D printer
sign-ups are also available at other
times. Call the library for information.
The first Tuesday of the month is
always Writers’ Night @ the Maker
Space. Writers of all ages are welcome to come share craft ideas, seek
advice, and offer support. Join us
March 3rd at 6:30 pm for an hour of
writing magic.
We are also hosting MakerSpace
Demonstration nights. Demo Nights
are on the 3rd Tuesday of the
month. March’s Demo Night will be on
March 17th. The theme will be knitting.
Demo nights start at 6:30 pm.
Lego Club!
Lego Club for 1st and 2nd graders is
the 2nd Monday of each month from 4-5
pm. The club for 3rd and 4th graders will
be the 4th Monday of each month from
4-5 pm. Space is limited, so stop by
the library to sign up.
Mar.9th – 1st and 2nd grade club.
Mar. 23rd – 3rd and 4th grade club.
SciFi/Fantasy Book Club
Not enough swords and sorcery in
your life? Not enough good triumphing over evil? Well, we can help with
that. The SciFi/Fantasy book discussion open to adults and teens meets
the third Wednesday of the month at
6:30 pm. This is your chance to get
your fantasy, dragon, magic-wielding,
space travel, swashbuckling fix.
Wednesday, March 18th, we’ll be
discussing Grave Mercy by Robin
LaFevers. “Seventeen-year-old Ismae
escapes from the brutality of an
607/753-0812
Continuing to offer FREE pick-up and delivery in Homer
RT. 281 at SUMMIT STREET
CORTLAND, NY 13045
arranged marriage to the respite of the
convent of St. Mortain. Here she learns
that the god of Death has blessed
her with dangerous gifts and a violent
destiny. To claim her new life, she must
destroy the lives of others. But how can
she deliver Death’s vengeance upon
a target who has stolen her heart?”
Join us for another teen assassin,
this one during 15th century Brittany.
History collides with fantasy in the
page turning read.
Author E.K. Johnston visits
the library
Saturday, March 21st, E.K. Johnston,
author of the teen fantasy The Story
of Owen: Dragon Slayer of Trondheim
will visit the library. She will offer a
book discussion of the book with a
reading of the soon to be released
sequel, Prairie Fire, from 10:30 am
– 11:30 am. There will be a short
refreshment break followed by a writing workshop for interested teens from
noon until 1:30 pm. Call the library to
register. This event is funded in part by
Poets & Writers, Inc., with public funds
from the New York State Council on
the Arts with the support of Governor
Andrew Cuomo and the New York
State Legislature.
Teen Writers’ Group and Film
Club
If you are between 6th and 12th grade
and you love to write, or make movies, consider joining the Teen Writers’
Group, or Teen Film Club. Both groups
meet on Tuesdays. The Teen Writers
group meets from 3:30 until 4:30 pm,
followed by the Teen Film club which
JOHN FINN
meets from 4:30 until 5:30 pm.
The writers’ group works on all elements of fiction writing and all genres,
from fantasy to mystery and beyond.
The film club is working on a new film
with members acting as screenwriters,
actors, directors and editors. Join the
fun!
Help with Nooks, Kindles,
and Downloadable books
Do you need help downloading
ebooks and audiobooks to your Nook,
Kindle, or iPad? Let our Teen Tech
Volunteers help you. They are available Mondays, and Thursdays from
3-4 pm and can help you check out
and download e-materials. They can
also help with other computer questions. Call ahead, to make an appointment, or drop by.
Board of Trustees Meeting
The library board meeting is the third
Monday of each month. The March
meeting will be Monday, March 16th at
7 pm in the Community Meeting Room.
Meetings are open to the public.
For more information about any of
our programs call 749-4616 or check
out our website at www.phillipsfreelibrary.org.
Phillips Free
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Library Hours:
10 am to 6 pm
2 pm to 8 pm
10 am to 8 pm
2 pm to 8 pm
2 pm to 6 pm
10 am to 2 pm
Benson Davis Insurance
CCC
5325 Route 281 • Homer, NY • 607-749-3164
Complete Construction Concepts, LLC
Commercial • Residential • Industrial
Don Richards - Ted Renninger
131 S. Main Street
Homer, NY 13077
B
Cell: 607.745.7779
Ofc: 607.749.7770
m
Annette Benson, Lee Benson, Matt Banazek
156 South Main Street
Homer, NY 13077
We Care About Our Community
Local Residents & Your Neighbors!
Auto • Home • Commercial • Business & Snowmobile
8b14
Your “Homer” town insurance agency!
The Homer News • February 26. 2015 •7
BUSINESS DIRECTORY
12B15
Jim Hopkins
Financial Advisor
EdwardJones
4 Convenient Locations:
MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING
Luker Road • Rt. 13 North (2)
Copeland Ave., Homer
Sizes: 5’ x 10’ to 10’ x 30’
3 North Main Street
Homer, NY 13077
Bus. 607-749-2982 Fax 877-222-8712
Cell 607-591-1480
[email protected]
www.edwardjones.com
607.756.4307
Climate controlled available at Luker Road
12b14
(607) 749-5332 •
12B13
Fax: (607) 749-5740
HUGHSTON PLUMBING & ELECTRICAL
Homer, NY 13077
Commercial • Residential • New Construction • Service Work
(607) 753-0300
Licensed Master Plumber
Paving - Residential & Commercial - Asphalt Sealing
10B15
Lynn Hughston - Owner • Jill Jones - Office Manager
5056 State Route 41 • Homer, New York 13077
12B15
11b15
2b15
12b14
the PORT WATSON MINI CONFERENCE CENTER
Your GO-TO venue for every occasion!
Business Meetings-Conferences-Trainings
Stop by or give us a call today to book your event! 607-753-1447
5a15
Weddings-Birthdays-Graduations-Reunions-Anniversaries-Parties
Douglas Withey 607-345-0016 - Brian Withey 607-345-8519
[email protected] or contact us through our Facebook page
131 PORT WATSON STREET, CORTLAND, NY 13045
Did you make a New Year’s Resolution you need help with?
I can help you to a healthier lifestyle or cigarette free 2015!
Reiki Master-Stress Reduction-Relaxation-Craniosacral Therapy
Therapeutic Touch-Personalized Hypnosis Sessions
Smoking Cessation-Provider for Cancer Connects Therapy Program
Healing Arts Network
Moira McMahon RNBC
607.745.4325
Tom Niederhofer
Custom Homes & Remodeling
11 A Water Street
Homer, NY 13077
THE HOMER NEWS
Serving the Homer, NY Community
Nanci McCraine
Advertising Consultant
(607) 749-5649
607.339.5476
P.O. Box 125
Homer, NY 13077
www.tncustomhomes.net
[email protected]
[email protected]
www.TheHomerNews.com
and Acupuncture Chiropractic Center . 75 East Court Street Cortland
SUPER CREAM
DAIRY BAR
Homemade hard ice cream
Check out our food menu!
75 North West Road—Route 281
607-749-3348
Hours: 11am - 9 pm Wed thru Sun
Closed: Monday & Tuesday
Elizabeth Brewster House
NYS certified Adult Home/Respite Care Provider
41 South Main Street • Homer, NY
607-749-2442
Comfortable and Dignified Living in
a Gracious Village Setting
MICHAEL KILMER, administrator
[email protected]
5B15
Pat Hill Community Building
Behind the Homer Fire Department at 45 South Main St., Homer, NY
Contact Us For Your Rental Needs
3b15
315.696.8918
13b15
●Wedding Receptions ●Wedding Showers
●Birthday Parties ●Graduation Parties
●Family Reunions ●Work Parties
●Group Organizations ●Fundraisers
Please contact 607-310-8852
THE HOMER NEWS
Volume V February 26, 2015
Forest Preschool New To The Area
Imagine a school without walls, where
the playthings are the materials of the
forest and the curriculum is all around
you. Lime Hollow Forest Preschool
has done just that. Starting this past
fall, the first group of students attended
the inaugural class of Cortland’s first
outdoor, year round forest preschool.
The students arrive, backpacks full
of high energy snacks, and hike as a
group out to their Forest Home, stopping along the way to check out mud
puddles, animal tracks, mushrooms
and insects. “And boy, do they notice
if something has changed since they
last walked out,” says Maryfaith Miller,
School Director and co-teacher. If they
aren’t singing, they are listening for
bird calls.
Their Forest Home is a semi-circle of
shoulder-high waddle wall, constructed of branches woven together, with a
tarp overhead to offer some protection
from a downpour. The chairs of this
classroom are slices of tree logs small
enough so that the children can move
them around. There is a rope swing
nearby with a long arc for a good ride,
and logs for balancing. There is a fire
pit, and a typical day includes a fire to
warm and tell stories around.
The curriculum is child-led, discovery based and is therefore always
developmentally ideal. “When a child
wonders about the salamander she
has found under a rotting log, she
probably already has some knowledge
of the creature. The question she asks
is about the part that is still a mystery
to her. Our mentors might not provide
the answer right away, but instead
could ask a few more questions to
encourage the student to look more
closely or use other knowledge to
make a hypothesis. By building understandings on understandings the child
constructs a solid competency, and
the self-confidence to explore more
mysteries. Our mentors have learned
to ask questions that challenge the
student to explore deeply, without con-
Issue 18
YOU MUST REGISTER IN ADVANCE THRU CORTLAND COUNTY HEALTH DEPT. @ 758-5509
founding the student,” explains Miller.
Forest Preschool is a newly sprouted
idea for Cortland, but it’s roots are
more than 150 years old. In Germany,
and many parts of Europe a family can
choose between outdoor or indoor Kindergarten for their children, based on
the temperament and passions of the
individual child. In either case, formal
schooling does not begin until later.
Richard Louv, in his groundbreaking
book, “Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit
Disorder” found that, “Time in nature
is not leisure time; it’s an essential
investment in our children’s health
(and also, by the way, our own).”
That in one or two generations the
amount of time children actually spend
immersed in nature has decreased
dramatically. Louv makes a connection
between other behavioral disorders
like ADHD, ADD, depression, obesity
and ODD and Nature Deficit Disorder.
Erin Kenny, author of Forest Kindergartens, and founder of Cedarsong Forest
Kindergarten, finds that ‘the average
American child spends 6-7 hours a day
in front of a screen’ and ‘only 30 minutes a week in unstructured outdoor
play’.
Lime Hollow’s mission is to “provide
year-round environmental opportunities to the public through utilization and
protection of the natural and cultural
attributes of the Lime Hollow area,”
which dovetailed perfectly with Miller’s
mission to provide child-led, unstructured play time in nature.
Lime Hollow Forest Preschool is
currently accepting applications for it’s
spring season. The school is offering a
growing number of need-based scholarships. The group is also looking for
help funding some of the specialized
footwear and outerwear the students
must have to be comfortable in the
colder weather, and will be launching a
crowdfunding campaign shortly.
AARP SMART DRIVER
MARCH THRU AUGUST 2015
Month M T W Th F Sat Time
Location
5:30- Cortland Senior Center, Cortland County Office
8:30pm Building, Rm. B-1, 60 Central Ave., Cortland
9am – Cortlandville Town Hall, Meeting Rm.,
MAR
14
4pm
3577 Terrace Rd., Cortland
Scott Senior Center
APR
8 9
1- 4pm
United Methodist Church, Rte. 41, Scott
1:30Creamery Hills Harford Senior Center
APR
29 30
4:30pm
Creamery Rd., Harford
9am –
Virgil Town Hall
MAY
2
3:30pm
1176 Church St., Virgil
Marathon Senior Center
MAY 18 19
2- 5pm
Civic Center, Brink St, Marathon
5:30- Cortland Regional Medical Center, Auditorium
JUNE 1 3
8:30pm lower level, 134 Homer Ave, Cortland
9am –
Grace Christian Fellowship
JUNE
26
4pm
1250 Fisher Ave, Cortland
9am –
Cortlandville Town Hall, Meeting Rm.,
JULY
11
4pm
3577 Terrace Rd., Cortland
1:30Walden Place
JULY 21 22
4:30pm
839 Bennie Rd, Cortland
9am –
Homer Elks Lodge No 2506
AUG
12 13
12:00n
82 Cortland St., Homer
Truxton Senior Center, United Methodist
AUG 18 19
1- 4pm
Church, Rte. 13, Truxton
MAR
3 4
Max #
Instructor
Special instructions
35
Jean Ellsworth
Bring Beverage if
needed
35
John Hartman
Bring lunch
1 hour break
35
Joann Dukelow
12:00 Lunch available
@ Senior Center
35
Jean Ellsworth
12:00 Lunch available
@ Senior Center
20
Jean Ellsworth
Bring lunch
½ hour break
35
John Hartman
12:00 Lunch available
@ Senior Center
35
Joann Dukelow
Bring Beverage if
needed
35
John Hartman
35
Joann Dukelow
20
Jean Ellsworth
Bring Beverage if
needed
35
John Hartman
Bring Beverage if
needed
35
Joann Dukelow @ Senior Center
Bring lunch
1 hour break
Bring lunch
1 hour break
12:00 Lunch available
CLASS FEE IS $20 FOR AARP MEMBERS AND $25 FOR NON-MEMBERS
If You Want To Pay Full Price,
That’s Your Business. If You Want the
Best Price, THAT’S OUR BUSINESS!
1$ 5 9
9
8
2$ 9 9
8
2$ 8 9
8
3$ 4 9
control capabilities.
Don’t buy a car with salvage, total
loss, or rebuilt titles. If you do,
Do everything to make sure the car
was properly repaired back to manufacturer specs.
Don’t skip the test drive or mechanic’s
inspection.
Do get a Carfax Vehicle History
Report to find out about potential problems. Shop at the all-new Carfax.com
and get a free Carfax Vehicle History
Report with every car for sale.
Learn More
You and your teen can find more tips
plus a car buying guide on Carfax.com
as well
2$ 9 9
(NAPSI)—Many teens aren’t driving the safest cars, according to the
Insurance Institute for Highway Safety
(IIHS). Here are some dos and don’ts
to help put your teen in the safest ride
possible:
Do look for a car with good safety
ratings from trusted sources such as
IIHS and the NHTSA.
Don’t get a car with high horsepower.
Do get a car that your teen feels
comfortable driving and has few blind
spots/obstructions.
Don’t get a car that’s so old it lacks
the most up-to-date safety features.
Do seek cars with electronic safety
8
Safe Cars For Teens
Mon. - Fri.
Main St.,
Homer
visit us at *www.homermensandboys.com
607-749-7575
www.Cinquanti.com
Don’t Make a Move Without Us!
8:30-7:30,
Wed. & Sat.
8:30-5
From: The Homer News
P.O. Box 125
Homer, NY 13077
Copyright © 2015
Deliver to:
LOCAL BOXHOLDER
PRSRT STD
US POSTAGE PAID
HOMER NY
PERMIT No. 82
Where is The Homer News
Being Read??
Pictured from left to right are Scott Maryniak, Martin Sujkowski, me (Sarah
Sujkowski) holding the paper and Breck Aspinwall.
Sarah Sujkowski, her husband, Martin, and their friends, Scott Maryniak
and Breck Aspinwall went to the Adirondack High Peaks this recently for
their 7th annual snowshoe. This trip they went up Cascade and Porter
mountains. Here they are at the top of Cascade with 50 mile an hour
winds and sub-zero temps. They tried to get a good shot, but it was challenging.