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THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015 • TWICE CHOSEN THE NATION’S BEST NONDAILY PAPER • PORTLANDTRIBUNE.COM • PUBLISHED TUESDAY AND THURSDAY
Split revealed at community summit
Kitzhaber’s exit
alters 2016 election
MINORITIES VS.
NEIGHBORHOODS?
Shakeup may force
political prospects to
rethink goals, strategy
By PETER WONG
Capital Bureau
Community
Summit meeting
indicates that it
may be time to
rename the Office
of Neighborhood
Involvement
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE
The Native American Youth and Family Center has used some of its leadership grant
money to help design Thomas Cully Park, under development in Northeast Portland.
Officials led a tour there on March 5.
By JIM REDDEN
The Tribune
The hundred of Portlanders who
recently attended the city-sponsored 2015 Community Summit were
a model of diversity.
They comprised all races and ages,
including native Portlanders and recent immigrants. But despite finding
common ground on many issues, a
split was also evident at the daylong
event — one pitting representatives
from the city’s well-established neighborhood associations against minority
organizations.
The division was most visible at the
lunch session during the Feb. 28 event
at the Ambridge Event Center. It featured presentations by staff members
from five minority organizations supported in part of the Office of Neighborhood Involvement to increase community involvement in city affairs.
Several of the speakers suggested
the city has spent $3.2 million on such
organizations because neighborhood
associations do not help the people
they represent. Donita Fry, an employee of the Native American Youth and
Family Council, told the audience she
did not feel welcome at her neighborhood association.
The issue resurfaced during a ques-
PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: DAVID F. ASHTON
Neighborhood association and coalition leader Robert McCullough worries the city is
turning its back on Portland’s traditional public involvement organizations.
tion-and-answer session held by
Mayor Charlie Hales a short time
later. For many years, ONI has supported neighborhood associations by
funding the seven coalition offices
that serve them. But Al Ellis, a former chairman of the Beaumont
Wilshire Neighborhood Association,
told Hales there’s now a lot of talk
about the city going off in a different
direction.
Hales, who is in charge of ONI, replied that although “geographically
based” organizations like neighborhood associations are still a good
idea, Portland’s changing demographics require the city to find other avenues for increasing community
involvement.
The answer did not satisfy Robert
McCullough, chair of the Eastmoreland Neighborhood Association and
president of the Southeast Uplift coalition office. He complained that despite ONI support, some coalition
offices can’t even afford printed
newsletters.
“Many people aren’t on the Inter-
See SUMMIT / Page 2
When John Kitzhaber became the first Oregon governor to resign under pressure, state Treasurer Ted
Wheeler said it would “set
off a flurry of speculation
about what will happen
next.”
Gov. Kate Brown will lead
the list of political prospects
for what likely will become a
wide-open
2016 election
in Oregon.
For months,
Brown and
Wheeler were
discussed as
likely Democratic candidates for govBROWN
ernor in 2018
and both put
in time traveling around
the state to
appear at
public events.
Brown’s stops
included Madras and
Pendleton,
WHEELER
and she met
privately with
public employee union
leaders.
Brown has not said yet
whether she will run in 2016 for
the two years remaining in
Kitzhaber’s term — the midterm election is specified by
the Oregon Constitution. She
turned aside such a question at
her first meeting with reporters on Feb. 20.
If she does run, expect Republicans — who have not
elected one of their own as governor since Vic Atiyeh won reelection in 1982 — to mount a
serious challenge. As secretary
of state, Brown has won twice
statewide, but each victory
was by 51 percent in a multiplecandidate field in a presidential election year.
It’s not clear who Republicans would field; their legislative bench has been thin, even
though they have promising
candidates for the future. But
Allen Alley, a Lake Oswego
high-tech executive and former
party chairman who also was
the GOP nominee for state
treasurer in 2008 and a candi-
date for governor in 2010, might
decide to make another run
this time. He passed up a 2014
bid against Kitzhaber.
Former state Rep. Dennis
Richardson, the party’s nominee against Kitzhaber last
year, could feel he was vindicated. But he still lost to a politically weakened Kitzhaber
by 5 percentage points, and did
poorly in Multnomah and
Washington counties.
Will Brown face a challenger
in the Democratic primary?
History offers mixed signals.
Republican John Hall, thrust
into the governorship in 1947
after a plane crash killed the
governor and two other highranking officials, lost the Republican primary six months
later. It is still the most recent
time an incumbent governor
has lost a primary.
But Republican Paul Patterson, who became governor in
1952 when President Dwight
Eisenhower appointed Douglas
McKay as U.S. Interior secretary, easily won a full term in
1954.
Republican Elmo Smith, who
became governor when Patterson died of a heart attack in
1956, lost to Democrat Robert
Holmes for the remaining two
years in Patterson’s elected
term.
Wheeler would be the logical
challenger, because he too has
won two statewide elections —
in 2010 for the two years remaining in Ben Westlund’s
term, and in 2012 for a term of
his own.
Wheeler cannot run for treasurer again, based on an opinion sought by Brown and issued by Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum.
Wheeler — who had been
the elected chief executive of
Multnomah County running
for a second term when he was
named treasurer after Westlund died — could instead turn
north and run for mayor of
Portland. Hales told the Portland Tribune editorial board
on March 6 he would run for reelection.
The mayor’s race could draw
another candidate from state
ranks: House Speaker Tina
Kotek. The last such mayor
from state ranks was Vera
Katz, a three-time House
speaker, who was mayor from
1992 to 2004.
That still leaves secretary of
state, treasurer and attorney
general.
See ELECTION / Page 2
For the birds: Audubon gets new leader
New executive director creatively
led Portland Parks Foundation
By JENNIFER ANDERSON
The Tribune
The Audubon Society of
Portland was crowded with
school groups as usual last
Thursday morning.
A group of kindergartners
hiked down the path near the
pond, where Nick Hardigg was
standing.
“There’s a mallard up here,”
Hardigg offered helpfully.
A young explorer at the front
of the line had a quick retort: “I
think we saw it before you.”
Hardigg laughed, and made
more conversation with the students as they passed. These students who play in the park will
grow up to love the park, protect
it and advocate for it, he says.
“That’s what I love — the connection between environmental
protection and advocacy,” says
Hardigg, who on March 23 will
assume the post of executive director of the Audubon Society of
Portland. “We need that environmental ethic to carry forward
forever, or we’re finished.”
Portland Tribune
Inside
Will Audubon get
a new wildlife
care center?
New Executive
Director Nick
Hardigg hopes
so; he sees it as
key to
connecting
people to nature
across the city.
TRIBUNE PHOTO:
JONATHAN HOUSE
At Audubon, Hardigg sees the
potential to expand access to
kids and adults across the city, to
reach a more diverse audience.
He realizes not everyone can
make it out to Audubon’s forest
sanctuary on Northwest Cornell
Road, but wants to bring the
birds to the people: expanding
their sponsored bird walks
across the city, bringing their
“traveling birds” to the schools,
and boosting their other camp
and education programs.
“Birds are a great window on
the natural world,” Hardigg says.
“People get excited, and it makes
them think a litle more broadly
than looking out their own window. (Birds) depend on the whole
ecosystem.”
Hardigg hopes that will all
come together when he helps
lead Audubon in creating its next
SKY’S THE LIMIT AT UP
— SEE SPORTS, PAGE B12
strategic plan, including testing
the feasibility of a new major
project: building a new Wildlife
Care and Education Center.
Currently, the Care Center
takes in 3,500 birds and other
critters each year to be rehabilitated by the care center’s veterinarians and volunteers. But the
30-year-old building is too crowded and outdated.
The idea is to build a new, larger, state-of-the-art care center at
another location, to be determined. “This area is isolated,”
Hardigg says. “Where do we
place it to be accessible to the
people? We want a big vision.
We’re all excited. But we need a
strong plan.”
For the past two years, Hardigg has been executive director
for the nonprofit Portland Parks
Foundation, the three-person
fundraiser and advocate for Portland Parks & Recreation.
While at the foundation, Hardigg helped mobilize a grassroots love affair for the parks —
See HARDIGG / Page 3
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deliver balanced news that reflects the
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for reading our newspapers.”
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OWNER & NEIGHBOR
A2 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, March 12, 2015
Summit: Neighborhood associations push back
■ From page 1
net and we have no way to
reach them,” McCullough
said.
But ONI isn’t the only city
agency whose support is being questioned. Some neighborhood association officers
are also concerned about the
Bureau of Planning and Sustainability (BPS), which is updating the Comprehensive
Plan that guides city development. Members of the Multnomah Neighborhood Association (MNA) believe the current plan gives neighborhood
associations the primary role
for state required citizen involvement in planning-related
decisions. But they think the
proposed update reduces that
role in favor of vaguely defined “communities.”
“For me, the greatest concern about this flawed draft
plan is the deprecation of the
role of neighborhood associations with respect to the role
they currently play in the existing Comp Plan,” says MNA
member Bill Kiehorn.
MNA Chairwoman Carol
McCarthy and Land Use Committee Chairman James Peterson also have repeatedly
challenged the update schedule established by the BPS.
Peterson and McCarthy complain that, under the current
schedule, many details of the
plan won’t be finalized until
after it is adopted by the Planning and Sustainability Commission and sent to the City
Council for approval. Other
association officers have expressed similar concerns.
When the issue came up
during Hales’ question-andanswer session, he was asked
to extend the current March
13 deadline for submitting
written comments about the
update to the commission.
Hales deferred to policy adviser Jillian Detweiler, who
said the deadline would not be
extended, but noted the council will take comments on the
plan before approving it.
The answer did not go over
well.
National model
The defensiveness of so many neighborhood association
officers is a surprise. Portland
leaders have long called the
city’s neighborhood association system a national model
for public involvement. They
are volunteer organizations
run by boards elected by residents of the 95 official neighborhoods in the city.
The neighborhood association system came of age during the bruising fight to stop
the Mt. Hood Freeway in the
1960s and 1970s. The proposed
freeway would have run parallel to Powell Boulevard
through Southeast Portland,
ARTISTS RENDERING COURTESY NAYA
Portland is helping the Native American Youth and Family Center build a multi-generational housing project near its offices in Lents. The financial support comes in addition to
leadership grants from the Office of Neighborhood Involvement.
destroying 1,750 homes and
many businesses. Neighborhood activists elected new
members to the City Council
who opposed the plan.
When the council killed the
controversial project in 1974,
neighborhood associations
were praised for reversing
years of bad planning. The
council soon formalized the
system and created the Office
of Neighborhood Associations
to support it through coalition
offices.
“What the neighborhood
revolution did for Portland
was to expose to open debate
the political choices that had
been implicit in the planning
of the previous decade,” local
historian Carl Abbott wrote in
his 1983 book, “Portland: Planning, Politics and Growth in a
Twentieth-Century City.”
Today, however, many
neighborhood association
members feel they are constantly fighting City Hall.
Since the economy began improving after the Great Recession, associations have been
pushing back against density
increases supported by current planning policies. For example, association officers in
Southeast Portland were
among the first to complain
about new apartment buildings without parking. The
Goose Hollow Neighborhood
Association recently blocked
a proposal by the MAC Club to
build an apartment building
on its property. And about
half the neighborhood associations have called for the
council to appoint a citywide
task force to address residential demolition and infill issues.
“The key is that the 1975 experiment in urban democracy
that created most of the
neighborhood associations
and the coalitions has tended
to disrupt the smooth flow of
policy. Citizens tend to get in
the way with their parochial
interests,” McCullough says.
Emphasis on
minority communities
In the days leading up to the
2015 Community Summit, ONI
released a report on its work
with the minority organizations represented at the lunch
presentation. According to
the report, such organizations
represent “non-geographically based” communities. The
City Council directed ONI to
increase their involvement in
city affairs in 2006 by creating
the Diversity and Civic Leadership program. According to
the report, the program was
started in part because the
council did not consider
neighborhood associations diverse enough. But minority
outreach had never been part
of their responsibilities.
“They were the only established avenues for citizen participation,” explains ONI staffer Brian Hoop.
Under the Diversity and
Civic Leadership program,
ONI focused on communities
of color, immigrants and refugees. It contracted with existing nonprofit organizations
MINORITY
REPRESENTATION
During the past eight years, the
Office of Neighborhood
Involvement has distributed $3.2
million to six organizations.
They are:
■ Center for Intercultural
Organizing
■ Immigration and Refugee
Community Organization
■ Latino Network
■ Native American Youth and
Family Center
■ Oregon Action
■ Urban League of Portland
All except Oregon Action were represented at the 2015 Community
Summit lunch presentation.
serving those communities to
create “new channels of communication with city officials
to affect public policy.”
According to the report and
presentations, each organization used its grant funds to
develop its own culturallyspecific programs for increasing community involvement.
They range from classes
about the basics of city government operations to skill
building and leadership training. Specific programs include
NAYA workshops for youth
development and Urban
League workshops on social
justice and health equity. The
organizations have also organized testimony on city budget, planning and urban renewal proposals.
NAYA is also working with
Portland Parks & Recreation to
include an Inter-Tribal Gather-
ing Garden in the Thomas Cully Park under development in
Northeast Portland.
According to ONI Director
Amalia Alarcón de Morris,
the DCL program has been
largely responsible for the
city’s growing emphasis on
equity, including the creation
of the Office of Equity and prioritizing historically underserved East Portland for
transportation safety improvements, such as sidewalks and crossing lights. She
says that without the program, the Portland Plan that
will guide development over
the next 20 years would not
require that the historic treatment of minority communities
be taken into account.
“The Portland Plan is based
on an Equity Framework that
considers communities that
have been traditionally underserved,” she says. The Portland Plan is the foundation of
the draft Comp Plan update.
Despite the emphasis on minority communities, ONI
spends more of its $7.1 million
annual budget on neighborhood associations — $1.2 million compared to $500,000 on
the DCL program. But the report suggests ONI wants to
expand the program to include the homeless, renters
and LGBTQ community.
Changing the ONI name to
office of Community Involvement is part of the agency’s
five-year plan. Hoop says an
alternative is Office of Community and Neighborhood Involvement.
Election:
Brown
mum on
her plans
■ From page 1
An appointee as secretary
of state would complete the
slightly less than two years
remaining in Brown’s elected term — and could run for
two full terms. There is precedent for this: Clay Myers
served just under 10 years,
and Phil Keisling and Bill
Bradbury served more than
eight years each.
Although the Democratic
majority leaders — Diane
Rosenbaum of Portland in
the Senate, Val Hoyle of Eugene in the House — were
considered potential appointees, Brown opted for a caretaker, Jeanne Atkins.
The treasurer’s position,
with Wheeler having to vacate it in 2016, is wide open.
Attorney General Rosenblum has announced she
will run for election — and
there is no term limit on that
office.
031215
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©2015 Portland Tribune
NEWS A3
The Portland Tribune Thursday, March 12, 2015
Former A.G. Frohnmayer, dead at 74
Tributes are being paid to
Dave Frohnmayer, former
president of the University of
Oregon and former Oregon attorney general, who died Monday at the age of 74.
“He was a lawyer’s lawyer,”
says former Gov. Ted Kulongoski,
who like Frohnmayer was attorney general and also began in
elective politics as a state representative from Lane County.
“There are few times when
people come into our lives who
have as much talent and character who have such an effect on us
- and he was one of those people.”
Gov. Kate Brown, also a lawyer,
issued this statement Tuesday:
“I am heartbroken at the loss
of my wonderful and brilliant
friend Dave Frohnmayer. His
deep love of Oregon is reflected
in a lifetime of leadership and
public service. My thoughts and
prayers go out to Lynn and the
Frohnmayer family at this diffi-
cult time.”
Plans for a memorial service
will be announced.
A Frohnmayer
family
spokeswoman
says he died in
his sleep Monday, and he had
dealt with prostate cancer for
FROHNMAYER
more than five
years.
“We are devastated by his
passing but we are grateful that
his passing was peaceful,” says
the statement released Tuesday
by Marla Rae, who worked for
Frohnmayer and two of his successors as attorney general.
Frohnmayer joined the law
firm of Harrang Long Gary Rudnick in 2009 upon his retirement
after 15 years as University of Oregon president.
Stan Long was deputy attorney general under Frohnmayer the No. 2 position in the Oregon
Department of Justice — and Bill
Gary was solicitor general, the official who represents Oregon in
federal and state appellate courts.
The current attorney general,
Ellen Rosenblum, was a law student when Dave Frohnmayer
taught at the University of Oregon law school in the 1970s.
“Dave made such a tremendous impact on the attorney general’s office that all of us who
have followed him have tried to
fill his shoes,” Kulongoski said.
Frohnmayer was born July 9,
1940, in Medford. His father was
Otto Frohnmayer, a prominent
lawyer who emigrated from Germany and graduated in 1929 from
the University of Oregon law
school, which his son would one
day lead as its dean. His mother
was MarAbel Frohnmayer, a patron of the arts whose name is on
the University of Oregon music
building.
Otto Frohnmayer died in 2000,
and MarAbel Frohnmayer in
2003.
After high school graduation
in 1958, Dave Frohnmayer attend-
ed Harvard University, where he
earned a bachelor’s degree in
1962 and went on to a Rhodes
Scholarship at Oxford University.
He earned his law degree from
the University of California at
Berkley in 1967.
He was a special assistant to
Elliot Richardson, then the U.S.
secretary of health, education
and welfare, before he returned
to Oregon in 1971.
For a decade, he taught at the
law school, and as a volunteer, he
was an advocate for Oregon’s
open meetings and public records laws, which lawmakers
passed in 1973.
Frohnmayer won an Oregon
House seat in 1974, the same year
Kulongoski, also a lawyer, was
elected from a neighboring district in Lane County. Frohnmayer
was a Republican, Kulongoski a
Democrat.
Frohnmayer was elected attorney general in 1980, defeating
Democrat Harl Haas, then the
See FROHNMAYER / Page 4
Hardigg: Linking people, nature
■ From page 1
dubbing its website “Parklandia”
— that helped lead the $68 million Portland Parks bond to passage in November with flying
colors.
He came up with the term
“Parklandian” for parks supporters, to reflect the fun side of Portland’s parks.
By partnering with the parks
bureau, he helped fundraise for
the Summer Free for All series of
100 free concerts, movies and
Sunday Parkways events where
volunteers and Foundation staff
did outreach for the bond measure.
Hardigg also created the annual Parke Diem tradition, the
parks’ largest volunteer event,
which drew 1,300 people and 35
organizations last year, including
Audubon. The third annual event
is set for October 9-10.
“I had an idea, and didn’t have
a good name,” Hardigg says of
Parke Diem. “I just knew it had to
be fun. Just saying ‘volunteer’ is
not fun. It’s not about the volun-
teering, it’s about getting all the
community to join together and
showing appreciation for the
groups that volunteer all year.”
Before the Parks Foundation,
Hardigg led Alaska’s largest fundraising foundation for the environment, the Alaska Conservation Foundation, as well as The
Nature Conservancy in Oregon
as director of finance and operations.
Prior to that he was in charge
of public-private partnerships for
the National Park Service at the
Grand Canyon and Denali National Park.
His latest hiring at Audubon
means more of his energy, creative marketing ideas, and strategic thinking will help boost city
leaders’ goal to connect people
with nature wherever they live.
Hardigg will fill the vacancy left
by former executive director
Meryl Redisch, who left in July
after leading Audubon for 11
years.
Still work to be done
Before Hardigg assumes his
new post this month, he says he
has two big priorities at the
Parks Foundation.
One is to work on the campaign to solidify funding and support for one of his pet projects: a
footbridge over Burnside at the
Wildwood Trail Crossing, to help
pedestrians cross without fear in
busy traffic.
The project would cost an estimated $2.3 million; there’s a
grassroots effort underway to
secure grants and private donations. (More at parklandia.org/
footbridge).
His other priority is to help the
tiny foundation team’s transition
in the search for a new leader. It
will be a national search, but it’s
likely the position will be filled
with someone from Portland,
Hardigg says.
The challenge for the next
Foundation leader will be to continue the momentum after passage of the bond measure, Hardigg says: “There’s complacency.
People who live next to a good
park think everything’s good. A
fifth of Portland’s residents can’t
walk to a local park.”
Residents might feel the parks
bond will solve everything, but
that’s not the case either, Hardigg
says: “It’s paying for about a fifth
of the backlog. Things wear out.
There are a lot of facilities nearing the end of their useful life.
We’re not out of the woods.”
The first round of bond projects will soon roll out, as parks
bureau officials refine the scopes
of the projects, establish the sequence of projects, and the cash
flow requirements. They aim to
bring the first bond issue to the
City Council on April 1, according
to parks spokesman Mark Ross.
Both with his role on the Foundation and now leading Audubon,
Hardigg says nature education is
crucial to everyone, young and
old.
“We want to engage people
and get them to care,” he says.
“The pressures on these wild
lands is only going to increase.
You’ve got to build that love and
that ethic.”
T
here must be a
lot of money in
the so-called
sharing economy.
Airbnb spent the
most money lobbying the City
Council, according to
the last disclosure reports filed
with the City Auditor’s Office. The
short-term rental booking company reports spending $21,139.16 lobbying the
council in the fourth quarter of 2014 — the most recent period for which figures are available.
The next highest amount
was $7,930 spent by Pembina Pipeline, the company
that wants to build a propane terminal at the Port of
Portland. After that, the
Portland Business Alliance
and Schnitzer Steel both reported spending the same
amount — $6,106.03 — lobbying on a variety of issues
ranging from the proposed
street fee to the Willamette
Greenway.
Sharing economy companies are likely to figure
prominently in the reports
filed for the first quarter of
2015, too. The council has
continued trying to regulate short-term rentals.
And it also is preparing to
decide whether and how to
allow ride-sharing companies to operate in town. Officials from two of the largest providers — Uber and
Lyft — have been making
the rounds at City Hall in
recent months.
the 2015 Community Summit, Hales said he wants the
council to address the controversy over large and expensive infill houses in
existing neighborhoods before the
council approves the
update. But
that can’t
happen under
the current schedule.
At Hales’ direction, the
Bureau of Planning and
Sustainability is requesting
$332,000 to study the issue
in the budget that takes effect July 1. The request
says the study will take
more than 18 months to
complete. But the council is
scheduled to vote on the
comp plan update late this
year, well before the study
will be completed.
Hales’ staff says he
meant the study schedule
will be finalized before the
comp plan update is approved.
SOURCESSAY
Planning process overload
The process for updating
Portland’s Comprehensive
Plan is apparently so complicated, even Mayor Charlie Hales is having trouble
following it.
The state-required comp
plan update will determine
how the city grows over the
next 20 years. Speaking at
Booze you can use
Great news for cocktail
enthusiasts: The Oregon
Distillers Guild is pushing
legislation effort to establish an Oregon Spirits
Board, equivalent to the
state’s wine board, that
would support the state’s
distilled liquor industry.
The nine-member board
would support all aspects of
the industry, including the
manufacturing, marketing,
promotion, education, research and development,
and develop sustainable
business practices for Oregon distillers.
The board also would
create and maintain a longterm strategic plan for a
“world-class Oregon distilled liquor industry,” and
use it as a guide to allocate
funds and award grants for
projects.
If successful, this would
be the first state spirits
board in the country.
@jenmomanderson
501297.031015
By PETER WONG
Capital Bureau
Sharing economy
firms share wealth
with lobbyists
A4 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, March 12, 2015
Williams offers
fresh look at
school issues
Despite having no child at PPS,
Metro worker runs for board
By SHASTA KEARNS MOORE
The Tribune
TRIBUNE PHOTOS: MICHAELA BANCUD
Burton Francis (left) and Seth Johnson on Northwest 13th Avenue. They started Preserve the Pearl LLC after learning about a building in their
neighborhood that threatens livability and the Pearl’s historic character.
Preserve the Pearl faces
‘Godzilla’ of development
Group fights city
approval of new
150-foot tower
By MICHAELA BANCUD
For the Tribune
“The word is out,” Burton
Francis, a lawyer who lives
in the Edge Lofts, says from
a table at Urban Grind Coffee in the Pearl District.
“Portland is on the block, it’s
for sale. And this is our
great opportunity to become
like ... Seattle!”
Francis and neighbors Seth
Johnson and Tom Lawwill, citizen members of Preserve the
Pearl, have galvanized around
the Portland Design Commis- A Seattle developer wants to replace the former home of the Pacific Northwest College of Art with a
sion’s approval of Seattle-based 15-story, 150-foot apartment and office tower.
Security Properties’ design application to build a 15-story, viously had 75-foot building
The tower portion of the from Seattle throws a giant
150-foot apartment/office tower height limits.
building would be up to three shadow and steals iconic views
on what’s known
Security Proper- times the height of surround- of Mount Hood, Mount St. Helas Block 136.
ties bought Block ing mid- and low-slung build- ens and Union Station from the
Preserve the
136, located on ings. Nearby historic areas people.
Pearl LLC has filed
Northwest John- such as Northwest 13th Avenue
Preserve the Pearl LLC
an appeal to that
son Street between will become like “Disneyland” wants residents to know when
NORTHWEST
decision; Francis
12th and 13th ave- as their original fabric is lost, the Pearl District Neighborwrote the brief.
nues, from Pacific Northwest they say.
hood Association meets with
The area west of The Edge College of Art (PNCA) in 2013
It’s the Pearl’s “Godzilla mo- developers — before it’s a fait
Lofts, where the three live, pre- for $11.5 million.
ment,” they say: a monster accompli.
Francis attended a Pearl
neighborhood association
meeting only to learn that the
relevant committee had met
with developers the month prior. The November 2013 meeting
he missed was critical: that’s
when Security Properties presented its original proposal,
which called for two 10-story
buildings side by side. The
neighborhood association’s
Planning, Transportation and
Design Review committee
chairwoman, Patricia Gardner,
encouraged the developer to go
higher on the 12th Avenue side
instead.
“When the city looks for citizen input they look only to the
TribTown
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If you want to make schools
better for your kids, you probably need to start well before
they already are in school. At
least that’s what Emma Russac Williams believes.
Williams is running for Portland Public Schools’ board in
north-central Zone 2, opposite
heavy hitters Paul Anthony
and Jose Gonzales. Her only
child is 15
months old,
but she says
she knows many fa m i l i e s
with children.
“I think I’m
coming from a
little bit of a
WILLIAMS
unique perspective,” says
Williams, arguing that in contrast to jaded parents who have
been through the system, “I
don’t have any of that. I don’t
feel like I’ve been let down or
failed.”
Williams says she is concerned about the graduation
rate, arts programs and community outreach.
“I want to make school fun
again,” she says. “And a lot of
that is relationship-building
between everybody.”
A Florida native, Williams
came to Oregon seven years
ago and has worked ever since
at Metro regional government.
She is a program manager for
14 historic cemeteries in Multnomah County, places where
the likes of the Burnsides and
the Glisans were buried.
“When you walk through our
cemeteries you see all the street
names,” she says.
What Williams lacks in
knowledge of Portland Public
Schools’ inner workings, she
says she will learn quickly.
“Budget is something that I
don’t know a lot about right now
and that’s the honest truth,” Williams says. “But I will learn it.”
Williams says her funding priorities would be programs such
as SUN Schools, arts and free
breakfast programs.
As for the standardized testing debate that rages in the rollout of the Smarter Balanced Assessment this spring, Williams
says: “Parents are clearly unhappy with the testing, and the
more I talk to them the more I
understand. I mean, assessing
kindergarteners? That’s insane.”
Overall, Williams says:
“Something needs to change. I
really look forward to figuring
out what we need to do to make
it better.”
The final day to file for the
school board is March 19 with
the election on May 19.
Frohnmayer:
Resigned in 1991
■ From page 3
Multnomah County district attorney. He was re-elected in 1984 and
1988, the second time with both
Republican and Democratic nominations.
He ran for governor in 1990, but
lost to Democrat Barbara Roberts in a race where an independent anti-abortion candidate
drew a modern-day record 13 percent of the votes. Roberts became
Oregon’s first female governor.
Frohnmayer resigned at the
end of 1991, with a year left in his
third term as attorney general, to
become dean of the University of
Oregon law school.
In mid-1994, he was chosen as
the 15th president of the university. He retired in 2009.
“It was a learning process for
him,” said Kulongoski, who was
governor during many of Frohnmayer’s later years in that job.
“As you watched, he got better
and better as time went on in how
to lead a large institution.”
Frohnmayer is survived by his
wife, Lynn; sons Mark and Jonathan, and daughter Amy. Also
among survivors are a brother,
John, who lives in Corvallis and is
a former chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, and a
sister, Mira. Another brother,
Philip, died in 2013.
Two of his other daughters
have died, both of Fanconi anemia, a rare blood disease. Katie
died at age 12 in 1991, and Kirsten
at age 24 in 1997.
In 1989 he and his wife founded
the Fanconi Anemia Research
Fund to promote the search for a
cure.
The family statement issued
Tuesday notes that Frohnmayer
kept his own health problems private:
“Much of Dave’s life was devoted to fighting devastating
health crises that enveloped his
family. These battles were complicated by the intense public attention that inevitably accompanied his lifelong commitment to
public service. He was adamant
that his own health issues would
remain private.”
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The Portland Tribune Thursday, March 12, 2015
NEWS A5
{ INSIGHT }
Hales is running; now it’s time to show why
A
s Portland Mayor Charlie Hales makes plans
to run again in 2016, he
doesn’t look invulnerable as a candidate. But he also
doesn’t appear fatally damaged
by any missteps of the past two
years.
That means
the mayor has
another year to
push forward on several initiatives and establish a firmer record of accomplishment prior to
the 2016 campaign. Because
Hales hasn’t sealed his fate in either direction, the question of
whether he will have a big-name
opponent becomes more interesting. Whoever jumps into the
race will have to raise substantial dollars to overcome Hales’
head start, but the right candidate certainly could make things
competitive.
OUROPINION
Portland
Tribune
FOUNDER
Dr. Robert B. Pamplin, Jr.
Hales announced his intent to
run for re-election during an editorial board interview with the
Portland Tribune on Friday,
March 6. He believes he has the
right skills to lead Portland during a period of “unprecedented”
change. As for the first two years
of his tenure, Hales argues that
much of his time has been spent
cleaning up problems from the
past, including a strained relationship between the police and
community.
Now, Hales says he is ready to
lead more assertively on issues
such as affordable housing, urban renewal in East Portland and
street maintenance.
Hales’ priorities are generally in
line with the views of his constituents, so the question in 2016 will
be whether a potential opponent
can be more effective in producing
concrete outcomes for the city’s
residents. State Treasurer Ted
Wheeler and Oregon House
Speaker Tina Kotek are being
mentioned as possible candidates.
Either would be formidable, but
we also believe Hales can determine his own political destiny.
The May 2016 primary is just 14
months away. That means Hales
must show meaningful progress
toward his stated goals over the
next eight months if he hopes to
ward off a heavy-hitting challenger in 2016.
He also must avoid making
monumental mistakes. In our
view, that means staying far
away from the idea of a municipal income tax to pay for streets.
Hales and Transportation Commissioner Steve Novick must
find less onerous solutions to the
problem of deteriorating infrastructure.
Despite grumblings about
Hales’ and Novick’s previous
handling of a proposed street
fee, there’s no reason to believe
2016 will be a time of great unrest in Portland. The economy is
strong. The city has basked in a
period of mostly positive national exposure. Problems that have
been with us for decades —
homelessness among them —
are still present, but Hales won’t
be blamed for failing to budge
the immovable.
However, a robust economy
and rising tax collections also
represent an opportunity for investment and accomplishment.
Hales is correct in recognizing
that Portland has entered a special period of growth and change.
As mayor, he’s in a position to
make a permanent mark on this
city — and now is the time to
demonstrate how he plans to do
it.
TW0VIEWS
Pair of bills tightens rules on e-cigs
PRESIDENT
J. Mark Garber
MANAGING EDITOR
Vance W. Tong
DIGITAL MEDIA EDITOR
Kevin Harden
VICE PRESIDENT
Brian Monihan
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
Christine Moore
CIRCULATION
MANAGER
State should ban sales to Protect kids from
minors, leave adults alone nicotine hazards
MYVIEW
Gregory Conley
Kim Stephens
CREATIVE
SERVICES MANAGER
Cheryl DuVal
PUBLISHING SYSTEMS
MANAGER/WEBMASTER
Alvaro Fontán
NEWS WRITERS
Jennifer Anderson, Steve
Law, Jim Redden, Joseph
Gallivan, Peter Wong,
Shasta Kearns Moore
FEATURES WRITER
Jason Vondersmith
SPORTS EDITOR
Steve Brandon
SPORTSWRITERS
Kerry Eggers,
Jason Vondersmith,
Stephen Alexander
SUSTAINABLE LIFE
EDITOR
Steve Law
COPY EDITOR
Denise Szott
DESIGN
Keith Sheffield
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Jonathan House
Jaime Valdez
INSIGHT
PAGE EDITOR
Keith Klippstein
PRODUCTION
Michael Beaird, Valerie
Clarke, Chris Fowler,
Gail Park
CONTRIBUTOR
Rob Cullivan
WEB SITE
portlandtribune.com
CIRCULATION
503-546-9810
6605 S.E. Lake Road
Portland, OR 97222
503-226-6397 (NEWS)
The Portland Tribune
is Portland’s independent
newspaper that is trusted
to deliver a compelling,
forward-thinking and
accurate living chronicle
about how our citizens,
government and
businesses live, work
and play. The Portland
Tribune is dedicated
to providing vital
communication and
leadership throughout
our community.
B
efore the Oregon Legislature adjourns in July, state legislators
should ensure that they ban the sale
of vapor products, commonly referred to as electronic cigarettes, to minors.
At the present time, 41 states responsibly
do just that. Oregon’s legislators would be
remiss, however, in following suit by passing
House Bill 2546 and Senate Bill 340. As written, these bills stand to do far more harm
than good for both public health and small
businesses in Oregon.
Regrettably, the sponsors have attached
provisions to their bills that also would prohibit the “vaping” of smoke-free and tobacco-free vapor products in every area in Oregon where smoking is not permitted. This is
a classic case of government officials creating a solution to a problem that does not exist. Such restrictions are simply not justified
by the evidence.
Vapor products are battery-operated devices that
heat a nicotine-containing or
nicotine-free liquid to create
a vapor that contains none of
the tar or carbon monoxide
that makes cigarette smoke
so hazardous. Laboratory
tests repeatedly have shown
that the chemicals present in
CONLEY
exhaled vapor are at trace
levels which are not harmful
to bystanders.
Since their introduction in the United
States in 2006, the use of vapor products by
adult smokers looking to quit has grown
substantially. Indeed, recent studies in Minnesota and Oklahoma found that vaping is
now the most frequently used quit-smoking
tool in those states. The same is likely true
in Oregon.
Just three states — New Jersey, Utah and
North Dakota — have prohibited vaping
wherever smoking is banned. State lawmakers and federal regulators have recognized
that vaping is an important public health issue that should not be acted on hastily. Instead of taking steps that could have unintended consequences, many policymakers
are studying this issue carefully and letting
the scientific evidence grow.
The central reason Oregon and other
states have enacted public smoking bans
was to combat the harm caused by secondhand smoke. Increasingly, anti-vaping activists are ignoring this and arguing that the
public use of a smoke-free product will
somehow “renormalize” the smoking of actual cigarettes.
This is absurd. There is absolutely no evidence that e-cigarette use is serving as a
“gateway” to smoking. In fact, evidence to
date suggests that the “gateway” is swinging
in the reverse direction: The federal government’s Monitoring the Future study found
that while past month vaping by youth has
increased, past month and daily smoking by
teens experienced record declines from 2013
to 2014.
Derek Yach, who previously headed tobacco control for the World Health Organization, came out against prohibitive vapor policies last month. “We need clear, unambiguous messages to smokers about the safety
and benefits of e-cigs,” he wrote in the Spectator. Yach’s comments echo the sentiments
of a growing number of public health professionals from around the world who have realized the potential that vapor products save
and improve the lives of tens of millions of
smokers.
Public health advocates should be deeply
concerned that emerging scientific surveys
are showing that a significant number of
adult smokers falsely believe that vaping is as
hazardous as smoking. Oregon legislators
should not take any action that codifies the
false belief that the risks associated with vaping (for both users and bystanders) are in any
way similar to smoking. Equating cigarette
smoking with vaping is reckless and will only
serve to further discourage adult smokers
from using a vastly less harmful alternative.
The sponsors have thus far rejected attempts to amend their bills to at least make
reasonable exemptions for adult-only facilities like vape shops, vaping conventions and
bars. Such allowances would at least partially stifle the negative impact of these bills on
small businesses and smokers looking to
quit. Plus, if preventing youth from seeing
adults vaping in public is a primary goal of
the bills’ sponsors, exempting adult-only areas would not impede that.
Last year, the Oregon Legislature had the
opportunity to pass a bill by Rep. Andy Olson (R-Albany) that would have prohibited
the sale of vapor product to minors. Instead,
just like this year, children were used as political pawns to push for a competing bill
that also would have prohibited vaping
where smoking is banned. In the end, no bill
passed. Despite stated concerns about youth
access, sales to minors were left legal in order to pursue an agenda aimed at limiting
adult use.
The Oregon Legislature should not allow
this to happen again. Those who oppose vaping are free to make their case, but they
should not do so by holding hostage an otherwise clean, popular and common-sense
youth access proposal.
We urge leaders in both chambers to push
for passage of HB 2918 and SB 797, both of
which would ban sales of vapor products to
minors without also enacting unnecessary
usage prohibitions.
Gregory Conley is the president of the American
Vaping Association, a nonprofit organization based
in Hoboken N.J. that advocates for small- and medium-size businesses in the vapor product and electronic cigarette market.
MYVIEW
Elizabeth Steiner
Hayward and
Kathleen Taylor
C
urrently, Oregon is behind the nation when
it comes to protecting
our kids from exposure to nicotine.
Although teen use of traditional cigarettes is declining,
recent studies show that they
are increasingly turning to ecigarettes — electronic devices
that can deliver nicotine and
other toxic substances directly
into the respiratory system.
One in every 10 middle and high
school students reported trying
an electronic cigarette in 2012,
double the number in 2011.
It is clear that these products are an attractive introduction to nicotine
for young people, and flavors
such as bubble
gum and root
beer float only
escalate the
problem. Moreover, Oregon
has the highest
STEINER
rate in the naHAYWARD
tion of tobacco
sales to minors.
We find these statistics appalling — and motivating.
A wide group of stakeholders, including child welfare advocates, health care personnel,
business interests, law enforcement and state and local government officials, have put forward two bills this session to
tackle nicotine use by kids.
Oregon is one of only nine
states that allow sales of e-cigarettes to minors. House Bill
2546 will regulate e-cigarettes
in the same way as traditional
cigarettes — by banning their
sale to minors and prohibiting
their use in indoor public places and places of employment.
Prohibiting the sale of these
products to kids is just common sense.
Moreover, with the November passage of the state’s marijuana initiative (Ballot Measure 91), law enforcement
strongly supports the expansion of the Indoor Clean Air
Act to include e-cigarettes.
It is increasingly difficult to
determine what substances are
being used in these e-cigarette
devices — whether it’s nicotine, candy-flavored liquid or
marijuana. Prohibiting the use
of these devices in indoor public places provides a clear,
bright line that the public can
understand and law enforcement can apply. HB 2546 passed
the House March 2 with overwhelming bipartisan support
(by a 56-2 vote) and now awaits
action in the Senate.
Furthermore, Oregon is one
of only eight states that do not
require a license to sell tobacco. Senate Bill 417 will require
tobacco retailers and sellers of
e-cigarettes to be licensed.
This is an essential component
in protecting kids from purchasing nicotine products, because when we know who sells
tobacco and e-cigarettes in Oregon, we can start reducing
sales to minors.
In addition, licenses will require that tobacco not be sold
near schools or inside pharmacies. Creating a culture that
separates nicotine products
from medications is essential
to limiting their use by kids.
We applaud retailers, such as
CVS pharmacies, which have
already taken steps to stop
selling tobacco products.
The bottom line is, we want
to prevent nicotine dependence
and its severe health impacts
before they begin. Eliminating
teen smoking is essential to
preventing addiction to nicotine later in life, and even e-cigarette retailers agree that children should not be allowed to
purchase e-cigarettes.
With HB 2546 we can take
that common-sense step to ban
sales to minors. Passing licensure requirements will further
help us fight against nicotine
addiction.
We are ready to fight for the
health of our children and send
a clear message that nicotine is
an adult substance that has serious health consequences.
State Sen. Elizabeth Steiner Hayward, a family physician and mother, represents Northwest Portland
and Beaverton. State Rep. Kathleen
Taylor, a mother and former management auditor for the State of Oregon, is newly elected from House
District 41, representing Milwaukie,
Oak Grove and Southeast Portland.
Both are sponsors of HB2546 and
SB417.
Portland Tribune editorial board
Submissions
■ J. Mark Garber – president, Portland Tribune
and Community Newspapers Inc.
503-546-0714; [email protected]
■ Kevin Harden – digital media editor, Portland Tribune
503-546-5167; [email protected]
■ Vance Tong – managing editor, Portland Tribune
503-546-5146; [email protected]
The Portland Tribune welcomes essays on topics of public interest. Submissions should be no longer than
600 words and may be edited. Letters should be no longer than 250 words. Both submissions should include your
name, home address and telephone number for verification purposes. Please send submissions via e-mail:
[email protected] You may fax them to 503-546-0727 or send them to “Letters to the Editor,”
Portland Tribune, 6605 S.E. Lake Road, Portland, OR 97222.
A6 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, March 12, 2015
Memorial
Tributes
In Loving Memory
Niki Marie Westfall
November 1, 1969 March 2, 2015
Service Directory
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Feb. 9, 1967 – March 7, 2015
www.ANewTradition.com
Winnifred F. Allum
Robert F. Strickland
July 28, 1921 to February 20, 2015
October 2, 1924 - February 19, 2015
R
522307.031115
obert (Bob) Strickland, of Gresham,
Oregon died peacefully on February 19,
2015 at home, surrounded by his family.
Bob was born in 1924 to Jesse and O’Greita
Strickland in Kansas City, MO. He was the oldest of
four brothers. The family moved to Oregon in
1938. Bob enlisted in the US Army Air Corps during WWII. He was a B-24 Liberator crew member
flying bombing and supply missions in India and
China. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying
Cross for heroism and extraordinary achievement as
a Radio Navigator. He served in the US Army Air
Corp and Active Army Reserves from 1942 to 1953.
Bob attended the Lake Grove Christian Church
where he served as Elder for many years. Since
moving to Gresham 18 years ago, Bob has attended
Good Shepherd Community Church where he has
faithfully attended the Prime Movers Class every
Sunday until one month before he passed.
Bob is survived by Ida, his loving wife of 68
years, his three children Susan Teeter, David
Strickland and Rob Strickland, son-in-law Jerry
Teeter, daughter-in-laws Becky Strickland and
Linda Strickland, 10 grandchildren, and 14 great
grandchildren and a large extended Johnson family.
Please join us for a Celebration of Life to be held
at 3:00 p.m. on Sunday March 15, 2015 at Good
Shepherd Church in Boring, Oregon.
A private military honors burial will occur at
Willamette National Cemetery on Monday, March
16th, 2015.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to
Good Shepherd Community Church, Prime Movers
Class.
Lincoln Memorial Park
and Funeral Home
11801 SE Mt Scott Blvd | Portland, OR 97086
503-771-1117
Winnifred Fern (Smith)
Allum, age 93, of Gresham went
home to be with her Lord and
Savior on February 20, 2015.
“Winnie” was born in Detroit
to Daniel Smith and Jessie
(Armstrong) Smith. She grew
up in Williamston, MI, graduated
high school in 1940, and
REWDLQHGDWHDFKLQJFHUWL¿FDWHLQ
1941. Winnie taught grades 1-8
in
historic
one-room
schoolhouses: Meech and North Leslie. During the last
two years of WWII she worked in Detroit and built
fighter planes as a “Rosie The Riveter”.
Winnie moved to Phoenix, Arizona in 1946 and
attended Arizona Bible Institute, where she met her
husband, Harry Allum. After graduating from ABI,
Winnie attended the School of Missionary Medicine in
Los Angeles for one year. Winnie & Harry were
married on June 13, 1948, at La Iglesia Evangelica
Bautista church in Phoenix. In addition to raising a
family with Harry, Winnie earned a BS in Elementary
Educ. at Grand Canyon College in Phoenix, and a MA
in Elementary Education at NAU in Flagstaff.
Winnie and Harry moved from Flagstaff to Gresham
in 1971, and joined Grace Community Church. Winnie
taught Reading in Gresham and Parkdale public
schools. After retiring in 1979 she tested home-schooled
children. Winnie and Harry were enthusiastic gardeners,
and maintained an extensive garden at home. They
enjoyed taking scenic drives along the Gorge and
camping on the Oregon coast. She was an insatiable
reader throughout life, quick-witted with a great sense
of humor.
Winnie was preceded in death by her husband of 49
years, Harry (1997), sons Samuel and Stephen, sisters
Rosalie and Elma, and her brother Norris. She is
survived by her daughter Hilda and grandson Jesse
(Leyla) of Washington, son Daniel (Alexis) and
grandchildren Katherine, Jacob, and Savannah of
Nevada, and many nieces and nephews in Michigan.
A Celebration Service will be held: Saturday, March
21, 2015, 1:00 pm at Grace Community Church, 800
SE Hogan Road, Gresham
LincolnMemorialPk.com
THE
ECONOMICS
OF FILM
THE DOWN AND DIRTY
ON PORTLAND’S BURGEONING
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BY KENDRA HOUGE
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Tribune
MARCH 18, 2014
Business
In lieu of flowers, the family suggests contributions to
p:ear (pearmentor.org), 338 N.W. 6th Ave., Portland, OR
97209; Villalobos Rescue Center (www.vrcpitbull.net),
PO Box 771127, New Orleans, LA 70177; the American
Heart Association, (www.heart.org); or your favorite charity.
To send the family condolences or to sign the online
guestbook, visit www.fuitenrosehoyt.com
No Hidden Costs, Guaranteed
Privately Owned Cremation Facility
498348.031015
Ronald Allan “Ron” Aho,
48, of Forest Grove, Oregon,
passed away suddenly on
March 7, 2015, from a cardiac event while gathering
rocks for his dream Koi pond.
A celebration of life will
be held at 2 p.m. Saturday,
March 14, at the Fuiten,
Rose & Hoyt Funeral Home,
2308 Pacific Ave. in Forest
Grove, with Rudy Tinoco,
pastor of the Sonrise Church Forest Grove campus,
officiating. Viewing hours will be Friday, March 13, 5
to 7 p.m., and Saturday, March 14, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Family and friends are invited to attend a reception
following chapel services held in the fellowship room
of the funeral home.
Ron was born February 9, 1967, in Portland,
Oregon, to Allen and Imogene Aho. He attended
Portland schools and graduated from Jefferson High
School in 1985.
Ron owned and operated Ron’s War Game Supply
for about five years. He worked for Intel in a number of
positions for 19 ½ years and was employed as a systems
programmer at the time of his death.
He was an enthusiast of paintball, boating, geocaching, riding roller coasters, pond building and koi keeping. He was an active member and office holder of the
Cascade Koi and Goldfish Club, and has been active in
the Northwest Koi and Goldfish Club. He treated his
neighbors and others with multiple holiday decorations
and was working on a much grander Christmas light
and music display.
He married Monica Jane Jackson at South Lake
Tahoe on June 9, 2007. They lived in Hillsboro before
building their home in Forest Grove in 2011.
Survivors include his loving wife, Monica; mother,
Imogene of Forest Grove (formerly of Portland); two
sisters and brothers-in-law, Carolyn and Donald J.
“D.J.” Lyon of Portland, and Sharon and Charles
“Chuck” Jones of Vancouver, Washington; three nieces, two nephews and a great-niece.
He was preceded in death by his father, Allen, and
numerous aunts and uncles.
Traditional Funeral $$1,975
1,475
500
Immediate Burial $$550
498351.031115
467734.031814
Ronald A. Aho
412210.012413
495
SIMPLE CREMATION $$545
495
Niki Westfall was born Niki Marie
Huff on November 1, 1969 and died
on March 2, 2015 in Sandy, Oregon at
the age of 45. Niki was born in Caldwell,
Idaho to Teresa (Painter) and Alan Huff.
Niki Marie, which translates to “victory of the
people”, lived up to her name by focusing her life on
helping others. She dedicated her life to raising her
children and helping those in need. Starting from a
young age, she would bake cookies for her younger
sister every day after school. As she became an adult,
she became what her daughter calls “an incurable
rescuer”, taking in exchange students, foster children,
and homeless pets. She prided herself on being a stayat-home mom, insisting that raising the family was
more important than anything else.
She had a creative mind and loved to craft with
her family and friends. She received multiple awards
for her ceramics and taught at her grandmother’s shop
in Wilder, Idaho and especially enjoyed teaching kids.
Rarely did a holiday pass that she did not break out a
new craft to share with her family and friends. As was
her nature, she loved to share the experience of
crafting and gave away most of what she created. In
her sister’s words, “everyone’s home is full of stuff
she made”. We are all grateful for these treasures. The
family will also treasure the fond memories of family
trips, watching Star Wars and X-files, and all of the
little ways that she made them happier.
Niki is preceded in death by her father, Alan. She
left behind her husband, David; her children Jake,
Sam, Samantha, Cannon and Tasia; her mother,
Teresa; her sister, Tera; and countless others whose
lives she touched and who cared about her deeply.
She was a beloved wife, mother, daughter, sister and
best friend. She is gone, but will never ever be
forgotten.
A Ceremony of Life will he held on Saturday,
March 14th at 1:00 p.m. at Sandy Funeral Home.
NEWS A7
The Portland Tribune Thursday, March 12, 2015
Pearl: Concerned about losing uniqueness
■ From page 4
Pearl District Neighborhood Association,” Francis says. “But the PDNA
does not speak for everyone.”
On Friday the Portland City Council approved the West Quadrant Plan
with Commissioner Amanda Fritz as
the sole voice of opposition. The farreaching West Quadrant plan raises
building height limits in the Pearl,
Old Town/Chinatown, South Waterfront and downtown.
Seth Johnson created and maintains Preserve the Pearl’s website
and along with Francis recently testified before the City Council.
“We aren’t motivated by self-interest; we want to keep people informed,” Johnson says. “We care
about the history of the neighborhood.”
Block 136 plans don’t meet basic
requirements of the city’s own planning philosophy, says Francis.
“It builds a wall and destroys the
connection to the river. Our concern
is losing the uniqueness of the Pearl,
which is already gone north of Love-
PRESERVE THE
PEARL APPEAL
Preserve the Pearl filed an appeal with
the City Council over the Planning
Commission’s approval of Block 136.
Block 136 is the former home of Pacific
Northwest College of Art (PNCA). The college sold the building for $11.5 million
before it moved to its new location in the
North Park Blocks. Preserve the Pearl’s
appeal is scheduled for 3 p.m.,
Wednesday, April 8, at 1221 S.W. Fourth
Ave., Room 140.
Web: preservethepearl.org
joy,” he says.
Tom Lawwill is a longtime Portland real estate professional and a
Preserve the Pearl supporter. He recently sold Pearl developer John Carroll the Jim Stevens Auto Body Shop,
where Carroll plans to break ground
on a 14-story apartment building.
“I work it from both sides,” he says.
“This isn’t about loss of views, and
we aren’t anti-development. We’re
just asking for respectful density.
That’s all we’re asking for.”
PNCA sold their
old building for
$11.5 million
before moving to
their new
location in the
north park
blocks.
TRIBUNE PHOTO:
MICHAELA BANCUD
Celebrate
Placing an obituary is a final
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The Pamplin Media Group offers both
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To place a tribute, please go online to
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A8 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, March 12, 2015
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1
NEWS A9
The Portland Tribune Thursday, March 12, 2015
Kitzhaber outsourced Bills aim to regulate
$3.1M in policy work GMO crop growing
Former Gov. John Kitzhaber’s administration paid
outside contractors more
than $3.1 million for policy
development work to support
his third-term agenda.
Matt Shelby, a spokesman for
the Department of AdministraTRIBUNE FILE PHOTO
tive Services, said the KitzhaOne of the policy contracts approved by Governor Kitzhaber went to a
ber administration used a specompany run by a friend of fiancee Cylvia Hayes.
cial procurement process to
hire contractors to create a
10-year strategic plan for Ore- the state terminated the con- Oregon, it involved working
gon, which set long-term goals tract and never paid Public with the Governor’s Office to
to guide the state’s two-year Works under the amendment.
develop a more skilled work
budgets. The process allowed
Bella remembered the situa- force. The contract essentially
the Governor’s Office, Depart- tion differently, and wrote in an called for Bella to serve as a
ment of Administrative Servic- email that the contract exten- policy adviser to the Governor’s
es, Department of Human Ser- sion allowed him to work on Office, reviewing audits, ideas
vices, Oregon Health Authority, implementation of the employ- for pilot projects, and meeting
Department of Education, Ore- ment plan in 2013.
with the governor’s staff.
gon Employment Department
“During that time, the (ClosWhen Bella’s state contracts
and Oregon Housing and Com- ing the Employment Gap) work ended, a private group stepped
munity Services to hire 21 group met almost every month, up to pay for his continued work
prequalified contractors for and there were four work on policy. Bella contracted diwork related to Kitzhaber’s pol- groups established that consist- rectly with the Oregon Busiicy goals.
ed of various agencies and ness Council from the spring
“The reason that we created stakeholders,” Bella wrote. The through fall 2014 to coordinate
this group was Kitzhaber came group completed a report on its the group’s work on poverty rein and created the office of the work, and Bella wrote that he duction with Hayes’ Prosperity
state operating officer, and “staffed all the (group’s) stake- Initiative, vice president Jeretasked Michael with working holder meetings, interagency my Rogers wrote in an email
with agencies on goals in the meetings, work group meet- Thursday. Rogers said he did
10-year plan,” Shelby said, re- ings, and was the primary au- not know how much the group
ferring to chief operating officer thor of the 32-page report.”
paid Bella, because its bookMichael Jordan. “That’s someBella said his employment keeper was out of the office.
thing that wasn’t necessarily with Public Works lasted eight
The Willamette Week newsbeing done before.”
years and “during that time I paper reported last fall that the
It’s unclear whether Gov. worked for state governments Oregon Business Council paid
Kate Brown will continue the all over the country on work- for a spokeswoman to help publevel of policy contracting that force development, including licize Hayes’ Prosperity Initiaoccurred in Kitzhaber’s admin- Delaware, New Mexico, Con- tive with money from a $35,000
istration. Brown spokesman necticut, Arizona and Pennsyl- Northwest Area Foundation
Chris Pair wrote in an email vania.”
grant.
Thursday that “regarding conThe Business Council is one
Another Public Works contracting practices, Gov. Brown sultant also worked on the em- of the four main organizations
is working with staff to assess a ployment gap contract, Bella behind the Oregon Business
number of policies and areas of wrote, and “my salary for Pub- Plan, which calls leaders tolic Works was around $60,000, gether every year to formulate
focus.”
Under the procurement sys- might have been even less, and an agenda for state action.
tem, the Governor’s Office and included work not just in Ore- Kitzhaber relied on the plan
state agencies were authorized gon, but also for projects in a and the support of business
to sign work orders worth up to number of other states.”
groups to drive his own agenda.
Public Works also landed at
$10 million. Firms hired through
Shelby said Bella was open
the process included polling least one contract during about his role working with
firm DHM Research, the public Kitzhaber’s third term that was Hayes and the Oregon Business
relations firm Pyramid Commu- separate from the special pro- Council. “That’s who was paynications, the economics firm curement process. Although ing him,” Shelby said. “That’s
ECONorthwest and the Univer- the $12,500 contract signed in where he was coordinating with
sity of Washington Center on June 2012 was with Business the first lady quite a bit.”
Reinventing Public Education.
One of the consultants hired
was Steve Bella, a friend of
Kitzhaber’s fiancee, Cylvia
Hayes, who introduced Hayes to
employees at a Wisconsin think
talk called The Center for State
Innovation that briefly worked
with Hayes on a proposal to coordinate green energy policy in
West Coast states, The Oregonian reported last fall.
Bella was a fellow at The Center for State Innovation, and he
and Hayes both own homes in
Bend. In addition, Bella worked
as a consultant for West Chester, Pa.-based Public Works
LLC.
In August 2012, the Department of Administrative Services hired Bella at $200 an hour
through Public Works LLC. The
state paid for the work with a
Medicaid grant, and Bella had
four months to produce a plan
to “empower historically unemployed and under-employed Oregonians in obtaining meaningful employment” by Dec. 31,
2012. The state paid Public
Works a total of $88,890 under
the contract. In April 2013, the
state amended Bella’s consulting contract to authorize addiFind your path to hope and healing at
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By MATEUSZ PERKOWSKI
Capital Bureau
SALEM — Critics claim
proposed restrictions on
growing biotech crops in
Oregon would undermine
voluntary coexistence efforts and spark new conflicts between farmers.
Legislation that would give
state regulators more authority over the production of genetically modified organisms
is touted by supporters as
protecting organic and nonGMO growers.
House Bills 2674 and 2675
would both provide the Oregon Department of Agriculture the power to decide
where GMOs can be planted
and whether to restrict their
cultivation to prevent crosspollination with other crops.
“I want all farmers to succeed, and the only way to do
that is to coordinate how
we’re doing it,” said Rep. Peter Buckley, D-Ashland, who
introduced the bills.
Under HB 2674, ODA would
be required to establish “control areas” for biotech crops
that allow the agency to set
conditions for their production. Any GMOs growing outside such control areas would
be considered “an infestation
su b j e c t t o e r a d i c at i o n . ”
Farmers who produce biotech crops would pay an assessment to ODA, with the
funds compensating growers
who suffer from “contamination” from GMOs.
HB 2675 would authorize
ODA to designate production
areas for biotech crops, with
any GMOs growing outside
those zones subject to “control area” conditions. The
agency also could create reserves where no biotech
crops can be cultivated. Buyers of GMO plants or seed
would have their royalty
agreements with biotech developers reported to ODA.
The ODA currently can set
up control areas to protect
crops from pests and diseases and to prevent cross-pollination between canola and
related seed crops, said Ivan
Maluski, policy director for
Friends of Family Farmers, a
group that supports stronger
GMO regulation.
“The law is already on the
books. It’s a question of what
that authority looks like,” he
said during a March 5 hearing of the House Committee
on Rural Communities, Land
Use and Water. “There’s
precedent here. ODA already
does this.”
In 2013, Oregon lawmakers
pre-empted local governments from restricting GMOs
because such power belongs
exclusively to the state, but
ODA doesn’t actually regulate them, he said.
However, critics of the proposed legislation say the current system works fine.
By requiring ODA to limit
biotech crops, the bills favor
other types of farming, said
Barry Bushue, president of
the Oregon Farm Bureau.
“We don’t want anyone pitted against each other,” he
said.
If a farmer enters into a
contract vowing to produce
seed with no trace of biotech
genes, it’s up to the grower to
ensure those conditions are
met, Bushue said.
“The responsibility for that
zero tolerance is not my
neighbor’s, it’s mine,” he
said.
If the ODA regulates GMOs
based on geography, some
farmers will want to be within more restrictive areas but
others will not, said Greg Loberg, manager of the West
Coast Beet Seed Co.
Conflicts between biotech,
conventional and organic
farmers will persist within
each area, he said. “I don’t
see any end to that cycle of
control areas.”
Rep. Brad Witt, D-Clatskanie, said he was troubled
by the prospect of legislators
giving the “thumbs up or
thumbs down” to specific
crops, which began with the
“camel’s nose under the tent”
with restrictions on growing
canola.
“That’s an exceedingly
slippery slope I don’t want to
go down,” he said. “I think
that’s a horribly wrong foot
to get off on.”
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A10 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, March 12, 2015
Oregon proposes a roundabout
way to increase traffic safety
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ODOT pushes for
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By JIM REDDEN
The Tribune
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The tragic deaths of Pacific University freshmen
Kiden Dilla and Ayan Osman
helped prompt a strange parade of giant trucks for a
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The fatal accident focused attention on a proposal by the Oregon Department of Transportation to replace the heavily
traveled intersection — which
does not have a traffic light —
with a roundabout, a circular
design that rotates vehicles
around and through intersections without using lights. Construction could start early next
year and be completed in 18
months.
According to ODOT Senior
Urban Design Engineer Rich
Crossler-Laird, a roundabout
would increase safety without
creating as much congestion as
a stoplight. The need is growing
as traffic increases on Highway
47, a major connection from U.S.
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Ironically, a roundabout al-
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Meadows racehorse track
last Thursday.
The Portland teenagers and
best friends were killed last
April when their car was struck
by a truck while they were turning left onto Highway 47 from
Southwest Verboort Road near
Forest Grove. The intersection
was still marked by a handmade
memorial of crosses and flowers
last weekend — for Dilla, Ayan
and a third young woman who
died in the same way eight
years ago.
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TRIBUNE FILE PHOTO
Hanjin Shipping has sailed off into the sunset and no replacement is in sight because of ongoing labor-management problems at Terminal 6.
By JIM REDDEN
The Tribune
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Port of Portland officials believe they cannot replace the
embattled operator at Terminal 6 — even though keeping
International Carrier Terminal Services Inc. Oregon risks
further labor-management
friction.
In fact, port Executive Director
Bill Wyatt says Terminal 6 will
simply be down if ICTSI Oregon
leaves.
“We can’t afford to operate it,”
Wyatt says of the loading and unloading facilities at Oregon’s only
deep water port.
According to Wyatt, the port
lost millions of dollars a year
when it operated the port for
most of its existence. When the
port sought a private operator
several years ago, ICTSI Oregon
was the only company willing to
do so.
The port now has a long-term
contract with ICTSI Oregon that
cannot be broken except for
cause. Under the contract, ICTSI
Oregon is required to pay the
port $4.5 million a year, regardless of the volume of shipments
through the terminal.
Years of disputes between ICTSI Oregon and the International
Longshore and Warehouse
Union local have taken their toll,
however. Hanjin Shipping, the
largest shipping line serving the
terminal, pulled out earlier this
month, reducing business there
by around 80 percent. Wyatt says
the bad publicity generated by
the fights will effectively discourage any other operator from taking over Terminal 6.
“There’s no there there,” Wyatt says of the possibility of replacing ICTSI Oregon.
At the same time, Wyatt says
the tentative labor agreement recently reached by the Portland
Maritime Association and the local’s parent union could help ease
tensions at Terminal 6. The PMA
represents operators in all 29
West Coast ports, including ICTSI Oregon. According to Wyatt,
the agreement it reached with
the ILWU includes provisions for
quickly resolving the kinds of
grievances that have led to work
slowdowns in Portland in recent
years.
Until the labor-management
dispute is resolved, the port has
no hope of recruiting another
large shipping line to replace
Hanjin, Wyatt says. Even then,
the process could take years, he
adds.
Despite the tentative contract
agreement, the public war of
words has continued between
ICTSI Oregon and the ILWU local. Each has blamed the other
for problems leading up to losing
Hanjin. And both say the behavior of the other party will make it
hard to find a replacement shipper.
“This will be a difficult task,
given that the situation at Terminal 6 goes much deeper and has
been going on much longer than
the current labor dispute at other
West Coast ports. We are hopeful, however, that the ILWU will
cease its work stoppages and
slowdowns and work with us in a
cooperative venture to provide a
thriving and productive container terminal for the good of the
Columbia River region. We are
certainly willing to work with the
ILWU to that important end,”
ICTSI Oregon CEO Elvis Ganda
said in a statement after Hanjin
announced it was leaving Portland.
For its part, the ILWU has
continued to criticize ICTSI Oregon as an anti-labor Phillippines-based interloper using
the Port of Portland to break
into the potentially lucrative
American market.
“It’s a sad day when local
port management thinks the
best they can do is to have the
Portland’s terminal run by a
company that’s based in the
Philippines and unwilling to respect U.S. working standards.
It’s port management’s job to
provide a gateway for cargo for
our region, and it would be extremely irresponsible for them
to throw in the towel based on
its tenant’s failure to thrive.
The port is a public resource,
and it’s up to port management
to step up and find a way to fix
its failed privatization experiment with ICTSI,” ILWU
spokeswoman Jennifer Sargent
said last week.
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South Tabor Family Physicians, LLP
The Portland Clinic, LLP
Westside Internal Medicine
For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings call 503-575-9737 or 711 TTY.
PacificSource Community Health Plans, Inc. is an HMO/PPO plan with a Medicare contract.
Enrollment in PacificSource Medicare depends on contract renewal. A salesperson will be present
with information and applications. You must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium.
Limitations, copays and restrictions may apply. Benefits and premium may change on January 1 of
each year. Other providers are available in our network. Plans available in Clackamas, Multnomah,
and Washington counties. Y0021_MRK2955_CMS Accepted.
508040.031015
Attend one of our free seminars to learn about the new $47
MyCare Medicare Advantage Plan with Portland Coordinated Care.
The Old Spaghetti Factory
Wednesday, March 18, 2015
12725 Southeast 93rd Avenue
Clackamas, OR 97015
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
504882.030415
NEWS A11
The Portland Tribune Thursday, March 12, 2015
State election
records system
needs $2.2M
upgrade
Legislature asked
to fund repairs for
overloaded Orestar
By HILLARY BORRUD
Capital Bureau
PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: CHASE ALLGOOD
At Portland Meadows, a large truck and trailer used for hauling heavy equipment makes its way through a mock-up of the roundabout
proposed on Highway 47.
Roundabout: Plan would boost safety,
create less congestion than a stoplight
■ From page 10
ready exists at the intersection
of Verboort and Martin Road
just one mile to the east. ODOT
also has proposed another
roundabout just south of Verboort Road, where Highway 47
intersects with David Hill Road.
Crossler-Laird and other
ODOT employees spent most of
March 5 testing a full-size mockup of the proposed roundabout
designs in the large parking lot
at Portland Meadows, just off
Interstate 5 in North Portland.
They were joined by contractors, Washington County transportation officials, and representatives of several trucking
companies, who brought along
some of their largest rigs.
ODOT staged its first-ever
truck rodeo (with smaller
trucks) at the Deschutes County Fairgrounds the previous
weekend to test a proposed
roundabout for U.S. 20 (Oregon
126) near Sisters.
It tested the U.S. 20 roundabout again Thursday morning
using the big trucks, followed by
afternoon tests for the Oregon
47 roundabouts.
The Highway 47 roundabout
would be 180 feet in diameter.
Tests were staged with traffic
cones standing in for hard
shoulders and sandbags for soft
shoulders.
The largest truck and trailer
at the test was owned by Wilhelm Trucking. It is used to haul
heavy construction equipment,
including earth-moving machinery. At 130 feet long and 18 feet
wide, it is only allowed on the
roads after obtaining permits
for authorized routes. Under the
expert hands of an experienced
driver, the massive rig traveled
both directions through the
Highway 47 test course without
crushing any of the cones —
meaning the configuration
could work. Other trucks to
pass the tests included a fully
loaded log truck and a truck
hauling a manufactured home.
“The test went well. The
trucks were able to make it
through the course even better
than our computer models predicted,” said Steve Litchfield, a
senior project manager with the
CH2M Hill consulting firm
working on the project.
That means the current design will work for the vast majority of vehicles, Crossler-Laird
said. But to accommodate rare
cases when even larger vehicles
might come through, engineers
are proposing the roundabout
be located just east of the current intersection, leaving a
straight stretch of highway that
could be cordoned off until an
unusually monstrous load needed to pass through and the road
could be briefly reopened, he
said.
Trucks like those of Hillsboro-based Omega Morgan,
which carry electrical transformers, might fall into that category, Crossler-Laird said.
According to Litchfield, the
next step is to compile the test
results into a report and present
it to the Mobility Committee, an
ODOT advisory panel representing the freight industry. If
committee members approve
the project, ODOT will finalize
the construction schedule and
budget.
ODOT first began researching roundabouts in 1997 and
produced a “Modern Roundabouts for Oregon” report in
Rebecca Brown, Comcast, Natalie Cha, Mark Garber, Pamplin Media Group
June 1998. At the time, roundabouts were widely used in foreign countries and had recently
been built in Florida, Maryland
and Vermont.
ODOT built two on state highways in 2000, one in Astoria and
the other in Bend. But the
roundabout effort stalled after
that, in part because of organizational changes that decentralized ODOT, Crossler-Laird said.
Meanwhile, local governments built roundabouts on
smaller roads throughout Oregon. And Washington state installed more than 100 on its
highways.
The Oregon Legislature later
asked for more study of roundabouts and required ODOT to
involve stakeholders, including
the freight industry, in its decisions.
Despite its size, the Portland
Meadows parking lot was almost too small for the test. The
largest trucks had trouble turning around after leaving the
course at the north end. But the
expert drivers were able to get
their rigs back to the starting
lines to complete the tests by
the end of the day.
Oregon’s campaign filing
and finance software touches a lot of people in the state,
from City Council candidates to initiative filers.
It also provides a public window on campaign finance activities and Election Night results.
The Oregon Election System
for Tracking and Reporting, better known as Orestar, is one of
the state’s newer computer systems at seven years old, but the
Secretary of State’s Office wants
to update the system to fix several problems and asked the
Legislature for $2.2 million to do
so, according to a top elections
official. The proposal would
boost maintenance and support
for the system, including the creation of a user help desk.
In the meantime, the Secretary of State’s Office has identified $150,000 it can use to hire a
consultant to evaluate the system. The agency issued a request for proposals Feb. 27 for a
consultant to conduct a performance review of the system
and bids are due by March 30,
spokesman Tony Green wrote
in an email this week.
Lawmakers have mandated
more functions for the system
over the years, such as online
candidate filings, and Orestar
grew more complex and developed more “bugs” as a result,
according to a budget request
document.
“There is a looming risk of
failure to meet the deadlines in
the future as the bugs and
workarounds increase with
each enhancement to the application,” according to the budget document.
Jim Williams, elections director for the secretary of
state, said in late January that
Vipanchi Mungara, Runner-Up
CONGRATULATIONS
2015
I
Regional Spelling Bee Champion
Natalie Cha!
West Linn student Natalie Cha, 12, from Three Rivers Charter
e
School correctly spelled “nonuple” and “geniculate” to win the
12th annual Portland Tribune/Comcast Regional Spelling Bee
this past Saturday at Hollywood Theatre.
Runner-up: Vipanchi Mungara, 11, from
Carden Cascade Academy.
The Portland Tribune and Comcast wish Natalie
the best of luck this May at the Scripps National
Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C.
501688.031215
Thank you to our wonderful sponsors:
“the whole idea is the system is
built for transparency, following the money,” and the state
needs to review whether Orestar is meeting that goal or
needs improvements.
It’s a priority for budget
writers on the Legislature’s
Joint Committee on Ways and
Means, but one for which they
have yet to identify funding. In
the budget framework unveiled
in mid-January, they listed the
Orestar proposal under “additional issues to be resolved.”
Orestar now handles more
than half a dozen “modules” of
information, from campaign finance data to voter’s pamphlet
information, Williams said.
The system has handled more
than 1.7 million transactions,
most of which were campaign
contributions and expenditures. However, 2,600 candidates used the system to file for
election and the Secretary of
State’s Office processed nearly
2,000 voter’s pamphlet filings
using Orestar.
Williams said the Secretary
of State’s Office wants to conduct a complete review of Orestar’s performance, then make
improvements so it functions
better during elections. For example, the Secretary of State’s
Office encountered problems
in 2014 when it tried to begin
accepting credit cards to pay
filing fees.
“We found some problems
with people electronically filing voter’s pamphlet or measure statements,” Williams
said. For example, some consultants file statements for
multiple candidates and measures and Orestar receipts
were not itemized, which made
it difficult for those people to
seek reimbursement from the
campaigns that employed
them.
Orestar’s processing time for
some filings also reached more
than six hours, which caused
concern for candidates who
worried the system would
show they missed key deadlines, Williams said.
Luc Ta, 3rd Place
A12 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, March 12, 2015
Wheels!
Dodge refreshes the versatile
Charger for 2015 model year
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JOHN M. VINCENT
Many safety systems first offered on Volvos have made it to the rest of the industry, but the company still
leads the way in forward-looking pedestrian and bicycle collision avoidance technology in vehicles such as
the 2015 V60 Sport Wagon.
REVIEW
Decoding the technology of
automobile safety systems
By JOHN M. VINCENT
For Pamplin Media Group
W
ith nine models offered,
including an all-wheel
drive version and the
707-horsepower Hellcat, the Dodge Charger is one of the
most versatile cars on the market.
With a base price under $28,000, it’s
also a fantastic value for a full-size
sedan.
The Charger’s exterior been thoroughly updated for the 2015 model
year, gaining new front and rear exterior designs and an upgraded interior. Photos just
don’t do justice to
The Charger’s the modern front
exterior been lighting graphics,
with LED accent
thoroughly lighting. Although
updated for it doesn’t look quite
as menacing as the
the 2015
outgoing model, the
model year, new design is still
boldest of any
gaining new the
sedan on the marfront and
ket today.
rear exterior On the inside of
the new Charger
designs and very little has been
an upgraded left untouched,
though many of the
interior.
changes are more
subtle than the exterior refresh. There’s a new, more
ergonomic, and safer electronic shifter for the now-standard eight-speed
automatic transmission. Displays
have been upgraded with a 7-inch
full-color multifunction display in the
instrument cluster, and the industryleading UConnect 8.4 infotainment
system available to top the center
stack.
Of the nine models available, three
are most noteworthy. Of course, the
Charger Hellcat, with its 707-horsepower supercharged V-8 is amazing,
By JOHN M. VINCENT
For Pamplin Media Group
T
hroughout much of the history of
the automobile there was one
clear truth: In case of an accident,
the bigger vehicle wins. However,
with advanced safety technology, it’s often
the smarter vehicle that can avoid the accident in the first place.
Like most automotive safety features, advanced technology is brought first to market on high-end luxury cars. That was the
case with the now mandatory anti-lock
brake, traction control and electronic stability control systems.
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JOHN M. VINCENT
The 2015 Dodge Charger can be the family sedan on the weekdays and a track-day warrior
on the weekend. It’s tough to find a sedan that achieves anywhere near the performance for
the price of the new Charger.
and would be my choice over the
Challenger Hellcat. While the performance is similar, the Charger is simply easier to drive, handles better,
and features two additional doors,
making the back seat actually usable.
At $63,995, the Charger Hellcat offers supercar performance with a
price tag significantly less than vehicles with competitive performance.
While the Hellcat offers the ultimate in sedan performance, the
Moving into the mainstream market are
more advanced technologies that can provide information to drivers before they see
the impending collision, and actively assist
drivers in avoiding those impacts. For many
buyers it can be daunting to decipher the
alphabet soup used to market these systems.
Adding a radar, optical or laser sensor to
the front of a vehicle is like adding an extra
set of eyes that’s constantly monitoring the
road ahead. Forward collision warning systems (FCW) will alert distracted drivers of
impending rear-end collisions, and in many
cases automatically brake to prevent or
See SAFETY / Next page
Charger R/T Scat Pack provides an
even better balance of great performance and reasonable price. At
$39,995, it features a 485-horsepower
6.4-liter HEMI V-8 and much of the
equipment previously found only on
SRT models, including impressive
Brembo four-piston caliper front
brakes.
The R/T Scat Pack includes Dodge
Performance Pages on the UConnect
See CHARGER / Next page
For 2015, the Dodge
Charger gains the
UConnect 8.4 infotainment interface, a 7-inch
full color dash display
and an improved gear
selector.
TRIBUNE PHOTO:
JOHN M. VINCENT
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JOHN M. VINCENT
Subaru has expanded the availability of EyeSight optical driver assistance technology to almost all vehicles
in their lineup. The system provides collision warning, adaptive cruise control and lane departure warning.
www.armstrongvw.com
Armstrong Volkswagen
NEW 2015
NEW 2015
VW
PASSAT S 1.8T
VW JETTA S
AUTOMATIC
199 199
$
$
36
MONTHS
1AT
229 229
NEW 2014 VW TOUAREG
AUTO SHOW SAVINGS SPECIAL
6165
$
LAST
ONE!
DUE AT
INCEPTION
$
1AT
OFF
MSRP
2015
JETTA S
2015
VW GOLF TSI S
2015
PASSAT S 1.8T
2015 GOLF GTI
2.0T S 2 DOOR
NEW 2014 MODELS
2014 JETTA TDI
VALUE EDITION
2014 TOUAREG
3.6L SPORT
$6165
OFF MSRP
Automatic, Air, Keyless Entry,
AM/FM/CD Stereo, Power
Windows and Locks.
Automatic, Air, Keyless Entry,
AM/FM/CD Stereo, Power
Windows & Locks, Tilt/Cruise.
6 Speed Manual, AM/FM/CD
Stereo, Air Conditioning, Power
Windows/Locks
17,950 $19,950 $21,950 $23,950
$
1 AT
Automatic, Leather, Bluetooth,
Touchscreen Display, Alloy
Wheels.
1 AT
Sale price after $1565
Armstrong Discount. MSRP
$19,515. Vin# 253531
1 AT
Sale Price after $1565
Armstrong Discount. MSRP
$21,515. Vin# 029240
1 AT
Sale Price after
$1,360 Armstrong Discount.
MSRP $23,310. Vin#006399
Sale price after $1700
Armstrong discount. MSRP
$25,650, Vin# 050505
Automatic, Turbo Diesel,
Heated Seat, Air Cond.
4Motion, AWD, Automatic,
Power Options, AM/FM/CD
Stereo, Navigation and more.
19,950 $43,450
$
1 AT
1 AT
Sale Price After $3755
Armstrong Discount, MSRP
$23,705. Vin #445553
Sale Price after
$6,165 Armstrong Discount,
MSRP$49,615. Vin # 015465
ARMSTRONG VW SELECTION OF CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED VEHICLES
2014 VW JETTA SE
Vin# 360572
$
1 AT
13,850
2.29% 60MOS.**
UP
APRTO
2012 VW GOLF GTI
Vin #201092
20,950
$
1 AT
2.29
504867.031215 W
%
UP
APR TO
60MOS.**
2012 VW PASSAT SE
17,850
Sunroof,
$
Navigation.
Vin # 044414 1 AT
1.49% 60MOS.**
UP
APR TO
2014 VW TIGUAN 4MOTION
Vin# 598027
20,950
$
1 AT
2.29
%
UP
APR TO
60MOS.**
$
ARMSTRONG
SERVICE LOANERS
FOR SALE!
SAVE MONEY, ALL UNDER
8000 MILES
MODEL
2014 JETTA S
2014 JETTA TDI
2014 PASSAT
2014 JETTA TDI
2014 TIGUAN
2014 PASSAT
2012 VW BEETLE 2.0 TURBO
Vin# 620743
1 AT
VIN#
MSRP
DISCOUNT
396881 SO
$18,310
LD! $2,360
264851 SO
$24,815
LD! $3,865
035174 $26,885
$4,935
411409 $26,485
$3,535
536500 $27,475
$3,525
085831 $31,165
$4,215
SALE PRICE
$15,950
$20,950
$21,950
$22,950
$23,950
$26,950
• 2 YEAR OR 24,000 MILE BUMPER TO BUMPER LIMITED WARRANTY
• 24 HOUR ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE • 112 POINT INSPECTION
17,950
$
2013 VW JETTA TDI
18,750
Premium,
$
Sunroof.
Vin# 410045 1 AT
2.29% 60MOS.**
2.29
2014 VW JETTA TDI
2011 VW TOUAREG TDI
UP
APR TO
Automatic,
Vin #382861
$
1 AT
2.29
22,950
% UP
APRTO
60MOS.**
**Available through VCI, on approved credit, A+ tier, expires 3/18/15. All sales subject to prior sale, pictures for illustration only
Armstrong
Volkswagen
DUE AT
INCEPTION
Lease MSRP $23,695, Cap Cost $18,750 after $3945 Armstrong Discount and $1000 Customer Bonus.
$0 Cash or Trade Down, $0 Security Deposit, $229 First Payment and $348 OR License title and admin. Fee
totaling $577 due at inception plus $1000 Customer Bonus. Total lease cost $8,592. Residual $11,137. Vin#
066605. $625 Acquisition fee included in payments. 10K Miles per year. Financing through VCI on approval of
credit. Expires 3/18/15.
DON’T
Lease MSRP $19,515, Cap Cost $16,905 after $1,610 Armstrong Discount and $1000 Customer Bonus. $0 Cash or
Trade Down, $0 Security Deposit, $199 First Payment and $348 OR License title and admin. Fee totaling $547 due at MISS IT!
Savings include $6165 Armstrong discount
inception plus $1000 Customer Bonus. Total lease cost $7,512. Residual $10,928. Vin# 253531. $625 Acquisition fee
included in payments. 10K Miles per year. Financing through VCI on approval of credit. Expires 3/18/15.
Vin#015465. MSRP $49,615 - Sale $43,450.
NEW 2015 MODELS ON SALE NOW!!
36
MONTHS
20000 SE McLoughlin Blvd., Gladstone, OR
www.armstrongvw.com
Sales/Service/Parts
1-888-331-6314
TOLL
FREE
%
UP
APR TO
60MOS.**
38,950
Executive Model
$
Vin # 005361
1 AT
2.29
%
UP
APR TO
60MOS.**
NEWS A13
The Portland Tribune Thursday, March 12, 2015
Wheels!
CAR BUYING…… FAST SIMPLE
& WELL WORTH IT!!
Regular maintenance means better mileage
By the Car Care Council
E
ven though gas prices
are relatively low, most
drivers still want the
best mileage they can
get. Here are tips from the Car
Care Council for making your
vehicles the “greenest” it can be.
■ Keep your car tuned. Regular engine performance maintenance will help you burn less
gas, pollute less, and prevent car
trouble down the line. This includes checking the spark plugs,
replacing the fuel and air filters,
replacing ignition system and/or
emission system parts if needed
and ensuring the onboard computer control system is working
properly.
■ Drive Smart. How you
drive has a lot to do with fuel
economy. Avoid sudden starts
and stops and go the speed limit.
Drive wisely and minimize unnecessary miles by consolidat-
Safety:
■ From previous page
minimize the severity of the accident.
State of the art systems, such
as Volvo’s City Safety, can also
see pedestrians and bicycles, anticipating their movement into
the path of the
vehicle. The
system will
There are
then activate
two main
braking in an
technologies att e m p t t o
the colliavailable to avoid
sion.
The forward
prevent
sensors also
common
enable adaptive
backing
cruise control
(ACC) systems
accidents.
that keep your
vehicle a set
distance from the vehicle in
front. Advanced versions of ACC
can slow the car to a stop in
heavy traffic, restarting and
maintaining proper spacing
when traffic moves forward.
There are two main technolo-
Charger:
■ From previous page
system that allows drivers to
fine-tune the driving characteristics of the car, monitor launch
control and access performance timers.
All-wheel drive is offered on
V-6 models, and the system is
excellent. It operates as a rear-
ing errands, getting good directions and avoiding excessive
idling. Use your vehicle’s cruise
control as much as possible and
its air conditioning as little as
possible.
■ Lighten the load. Get the
junk out of the trunk and the
stuff out of your car, with the exception of emergency items such
as a spare tire and a first-aid kit.
Extra items weigh the vehicle
down and cause an increase in
gas usage.
■ Check spark plugs. A vehicle can have four, six or eight
spark plugs, which fire as many
as three million times every
COURTESY: CAR CARE COUNCIL
1,000 miles. A dirty spark plug Maintaining your car can be a fun and
causes misfiring, which wastes educational family affair.
fuel.
■ Maintain the cooling sys- improved radiator caps on the
tem. A cooling system thermo- market today that allow the coolstat that causes the engine to ing system to operate at a higher
run too cold will lower the fuel temperature before boiling over,
efficiency of a car by as much as increasing the system’s efficienone or two mpg. There also are cy and reducing emissions.
gies available to prevent common backing accidents. Backup
cameras provide a view of the
area behind the vehicle, displaying a video image to the driver.
Many provide a set of arcing
guidelines to show your path
in relation to the direction that
you are steering.
Honda has announced that
all new models will be
equipped with rear-view cameras. They’re the first full-line
manufacturer to do so.
Backup sensors use radar to
identify objects behind the vehicle. In many cases they’re
superior to backup cameras in
preventing collisions. While
you can ignore the images
from a camera, it’s harder to
ignore the audible warnings
from the backup sensors.
Some systems, including the
one on the Infiniti QX60, will
automatically brake if you ignore the audible warning.
Such autonomous intervention might just prevent you
from backing over a neighbor’s
child on a tricycle.
Blind spot warning systems
alert drivers with audible and
wheel drive powertrain with
the front axle disconnected to
maximize fuel economy. When
additional traction is needed —
or the need is anticipated — the
system seamlessly adds torque
to the front wheels. The front
wheels are always engaged
during cold weather or when
the wipers are on.
In a recent test of the allwheel drive Charger on a sheet
of snow-covered ice, the system
AUTOEVENTS
Cascade Cars & Coffee
Every Saturday, 8-11 a.m., Cascade Station Starbucks, 9911
Northeast Cascades Parkway, Portland. No entry fee, all cars
welcome.
59th Annual Portland Roadster Show
Friday through Sunday, March 20-22, Portland Expo Center, 2060
N. Marine Dr. Hundreds of vehicles, displays, special guests and
vendors. Presented by the Multnomah Hot Rod Council. For more
information, visit: portlandroadstershow.com
Dubs & Donuts
Saturday, March 21, 9 a.m., Sesame Donuts, 11945 Pacific Hwy.,
■ Tire checks. Proper tire
pressure can improve gas mileage by 3.3 percent or 10 cents per
gallon. Tire pressure should be
checked at least monthly, including the spare.
■ Gas caps. A loose, cracked
or damaged gas cap allows gas to
escape from your tank as a vapor, wasting fuel and increasing
vehicle emissions. It’s also wasting your gas money!
■ Maintenance the air conditioning. The A/C system
should be inspected annually,
during which a technician
checks pressures to test operation, refrigerant charge and outlet temperatures.
■ Vehicle fuel system. Replacing your car’s fuel filter every two years or 24,000 miles and
have your fuel injectors flushed
our every 30,000 miles to save
money at the pump.”
For more information, visit the Car Care
Council at: carcare.org.
We take Pride in our inventory and
sell the best cars in town all at affordable prices
Take advantage of our easy credit process
GO TO: WWW.GAGEAUTO.COM
Here are this week’s specials...
2012 HONDA CIVIC
1 Owner, Just 30K Miles,
Automatic, Air, ABS. #35778
1 AT
1 AT
1 AT
$13,000
1 AT
$11,888
1 AT
Adaptive Cruise Control sensors on the front of the Honda Accord Hybrid Touring
sedan allow the car to maintain a safe following distance from the car ahead.
visuals if they are in danger of
changing lanes into other vehicles. More advanced systems
can use steering or braking to
prevent such a lane change.
Similarly, lane departure
warning systems aim to prevent drivers from unintentionally drifting out of their lanes.
Rear cross traffic warning
systems identify traffic coming
from the side as you are backing up. Imagine you’re between two large SUVs in a
parking lot and need to back
out. RCTW sensors see and
alert you to that side traffic
that you can’t see from the
driver’s seat.
operated with exceptional predictability, and was unflappable
when equipped with performance snow tires.
Hellcat V-8.
Transmission: 8-speed automatic with
manual mode
EPA estimated mileage: From 19
City/31 Highway (V-6) to 13/22 (Hellcat)
Length: 198.4 - 200.8 inches
Curb weight: 3.934 lbs. (SE)
Final assembly: Ontario, Canada
2015 Dodge Charger
Base price: 9 models from SE ($27,995)
to Hellcat ($63,995) plus $995 destination.
Type: 4-door, 5-passenger full-size
sedan.
Engines: 3.6 liter V-6, 5.7-liter HEMI V-8,
6.4-liter HEMI V-8, 6.2-liter Supercharged
Tigard. Casual gathering hosted by Rose City Volksters, but
all makes and models welcome. Regular event continues third
Saturday of every month.
Eugene Roadster Show
Saturday and Sunday, March 28-29, Willamalane Center for
Sports and Recreation, 250 S. 32nd St., Springfield. Hundreds of
vehicles on display, discount admission for Blood Drive, cans of
food collected for Food for Lane County. For more information,
visit: roadstershows.com
PIR Auto Swap Meet
Thursday, April 9, 7 a.m. - 4 p.m., Portland International
Raceway, 1940 Victory Blvd. Five miles of vendors booths lines the
raceway. Admission $5, parking $10.
Reach John Vincent at [email protected]
gmail.com or @OregonsCarGuy on Twitter.
John M. Vincent is a third-generation
Oregon journalist. Reach him at [email protected] or @OregonsCarGuy on Twitter.
World of Speed memberships available
Annual memberships are now available for
the World of Speed, a nonprofit motorsports
museum opening on April 24 in Wilsonville.
The memberships include $35 for individual
students, $95 for families, and $1,500 for charter
members, and more. All include admission to
the museum, invitations to member-only
events, 10 percent discounts at the gift shop,
race car simulator rides and food. Charter
memberships include invitations to exclusive
events and recognition on the Charter Member
Wall.
“Memberships are an imperative component
of World of Speed as they help to support our
robust education mission,” says executive
director Tony Thacker.
For more information, visit: worldofspeed.
org.
Tonkin Gresham Honda wins award
Tonkin Gresham Honda has won Honda’s
prestigious President’s Award for the fifth year
in a row.
The annual award is presented to Honda
dealerships for exceptional performance in all
facets of their operations, including profitability,
sales, vehicle condition, customer experience,
service retention, and brand representation.
Only 125 of the more than 1,000 Honda
dealerships from across the country are eligible
to receive the award each year. This is the fifth
time Tonkin Gresham Honda has won the ward
in the last seven years. It is located at 24999 S.E.
Stark Street in Gresham.
“At our store, we are a team with a vision that
feels that if we treat our customers as if they are
our own family, they will notice the Tonkin
Gresham Honda difference. An automobile
purchase is not a small decision, and we realize
COURTESY: ZACH HENKIN/DRIVE OREGON that,” says General Manager Scott Sidell.
Drive Oregon offered free rides in all-electric
“Honda has a proud tradition of delivering
vehciles at the State Capitol to mark the release of excellence in everything we do. Dealerships
that earn this coveted recognition are role
its report on their economic benefits.
$14,000
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2011 NISSAN SENTRA SR
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2009 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
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2011 CHEVY EQUINOX
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2010 JEEP LIBERTY 4X4
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2008 DODGE DURANGO SLT 4X4
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Boards, Rear Air. #35431
1 AT
2011 MAZDA TRIBUTE
AM/FM/CD Stereo, Full poewr options.
#35701
51st Annual Portland Swap Meet
Friday, April 10 through Sunday, April 12, Portland Expo Center,
2060 N. Marine Dr., Portland. Hosted annually by six area antique
car clubs, the largest auto parts swap meet on the West Coast
with approximately 3,500 vendor stalls. For more information,
visit: portlandswapmeet.com
$22,000
2010 DODGE CHALLENGER SE
Reduced Price, Just 9K Miles Loaded with
options. #35589
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JOHN M. VINCENT
MILE
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2011 HYUNDAI SONTA
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Stereo. #35457
$9,888
2010 CHEV COLBALT XFE
Air Conditioning, AM/FM/CD Stero, Spoiler,
Good Gas Mileage. #35340
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2013 VW BEETLE
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FM/CD Stereo. #35506
$22,000
2009 FORD EXPLORER LIMITED 4X4
Leather, Heated Seats, Running Boards,
Rear Air. #35704
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$24,888
World of Speed opening
Friday, April 24, 27490 SW 95th Ave., Wilsonville. New nonprofit
performance car museum and education center features more
than 100 cars in the permanent collection and several rotating
exhibits. For more information, visit: worldofspeed.org
2011 CHEVY TRAVERSE 1LT AWD
3RD Row Seat, Back-up Camera, Sun
Roof, Leather. #35758
Jim Dandy’s Cruise In
Saturday, May 16, Jim Dandy’s Drive-In, N.E. 97th and Sandy,
Portland. Hosted by Road Knights, all cars welcome.
1 AT
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models for building positive connections with
customers,”says John Mendel, executive vice
president of automobile sales for Honda.
2014 CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 4X4
3RD Row Seat, Leather, Heated Seats,
Tow Package, Backup Camera. #35706
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CAB 4X4
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Boards, Bedliner & More. #35435
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2008 FORD RANGER XLT
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5 Rangers in stock. #35800
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Just 69K Miles, Automatic, ABS, Power
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2012 DODGE RAM 2500 LARAMIE
SLT 4X4 TURBO DIESEL 4X4
Extended Cab, 5.9L., Leather, #35610
Edmunds.com honors six dealers
Edmunds.com has honored six Portland-area
car dealerships with its third annual Five Star
Dealer Awards. Edmunds.com is an influential
online source of automotive news and reviews.
The awards recognize car dealers who
earned the highest marks for customer
satisfaction in Edmunds.com’s Dealer Ratings
and Reviews. The six dealers are: Beaverton
Toyota, Dick’s Country Chrysler Jeep Dodge
Ram, Gresham Toyota Scion, Kuni Lexus of
Portland, Wentworth Subaru, and Weston Kia.
“We at Edmunds.com believe in putting the
customer first, and our dealer partners embrace
that same commitment to excellence,” says
Edmunds.com CEO Avi Steinlauf. “These
dealerships’ dedication to making the carbuying process easy earned glowing reviews
from their customers, and we congratulate
them on a job well done.”
$36,888
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LOW Stress, LOW Pressure, LOW PRICE LEADER
Acura recognizes
Ron Tonkin Acura dealership
Ron Tonkin Acura has received Acura’s 2014
Dealership of Distinction award. The annual
award is Acura’s highest honor, presented only
to its dealerships that demonstrate total
operational excellence. Only 84 Acura
dealerships earned the honor for 2014.
“Delivering exceptional experiences at every
interaction in our dealerships is critical, and our
Dealership of Distinction are role models for
creating the best possible experiences for Acura
clients,” says Mike Accavitti, senior vice
president and general manager at Acura.
Ron Tonkin Acura is located at 9655 S.W.
Canyon Rd. in Beaverton. It carries the full line
of Acura performance luxury vehicles, from the
gateway ILX luxury sedan to the 7-passenger
Acura MDX crossover.
2009 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED 4X4
Showroom Condition, All Leather, Moon
Roof, Navigation. #35598
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2013 FORD EXPLORER 4X4
New Body Style. 3rd Row Seat, V-6,
Leather. #35628
$28,000
$26,888
2010 FORD F150 XLT SUPER CREW 4X4
Low miles, clean & dependable.
Bargain Priced. #35777
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CREW CAB 4X4 Just 54K Miles,
Tonneau Cover and More! #35464
$38,500
2008 DODGE RAM 2500 LARAMIE
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Lift. TURBO DIESEL #35302
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Family Owned and Operated Since 1998
www.gageauto.com
504703.031115
Drive Oregon has come up with new reasons
to buy an electric vehicle — helping the state’s
economy.
The EV advocacy organization released a
report on Feb. 25 that argues they keep more of
their owner’s money in the state, helping to
create jobs and increase tax revenue.
According to “The Returns to Vehicle
Electrification,” some of the money that goes
into the state economy comes from the $7,500
federal tax credit for EV purchases. More comes
from the money not spent on gas or diesel, most
of which goes to out-of-state corporations.
Instead, the money spent on electricity to
charge the batteries goes to utility companies,
most of which are based in Oregon.
The report estimates that the roughly 5,000
EVs already on Oregon’s roads are contributing
between $1.79 million and $10.15 million
annually to the economy, and between $191,600
and $676,700 to state and local tax revenue.
Drive Oregon is calling for the 2015 Oregon
Legislature to create a state rebate program to
encourage the sale of EVs even more.
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5 speed, AM/FM/CD, full power options.
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AUTONEWS
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All vehicles subject to prior sale. Prices good through 3/18/15.
A14 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, March 12, 2015
A name you know and trust
let’s
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2015 CITY EXPRESS
THESHORTLIST
BREAD & BREW: INTRODUCING THE OREGON STARKA PROJECT — PAGE 3
STAGE
Weekend!Life
‘Pilot Season’
The second annual festival by the Action/Adventure
Theatre — which puts on
“Theatre for TV people” —
features many works in 3
1/2 weeks after putting out
a public call to writers, directors and creators to submit their ideas for the company’s next episodic show.
There were four pilots
chosen, and a winner
among the four will be provided with a full mainstage
run during the 2015-16 season. The lineup: “From Beyond,” by Brian Kuwabara,
cosmic horror period comedy, March 12-15; “Punching
and Wizardry,” by Ben
Coleman, comedic serial
combining Dungeons and
Dragons and contemporary
relationship issues, March
19-22; “Nesting,” by Joel
Patrick Durham, semi-improvised horror thriller,
March 26-29; “No Man’s
Land,” semi-improvised
comedy taking place in an
all-girls Catholic school,
April 2-5. All shows start at
8 p.m. at Action/Adventure,
1050 S.E. Clinton St. (tickets
$12 advance, $16 at door,
actionadventure.org).
‘The Great Divorce’
Lost souls take a bus ride
to heaven in this adaptation
of the C.S. Lewis book by
the Fellowship for the Performing Arts, which also
puts on “The Screwtape
Letters.”
8 p.m. Friday, March 13, 4
and 8 p.m. Saturday, March
14, Newmark Theatre, 1111
S.W. Broadway, portland5.
com, $37-$104
SECTION B
PortlandTribune THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015
Irish eyes
are smiling
Portland dons the green,
offers plenty of merriment,
music for St. Patrick’s Day
By ROB CULLIVAN
Pamplin Media Group
St. Patrick’s Day can be an opportunity to
honor a Christian saint, an ethnic holiday to
celebrate your Irish heritage, or a bacchanalian bout of beer-soaked revelry.
If you’re of Irish descent, it’s likely you’ve experienced all of these at one time or another in
and around March 17. Here
are some opportunities to
mark St. Patrick’s Day whatever way you want in Portland:
■ The All-Ireland Cultural
Society of Oregon hosts its 74th
annual St. Patrick’s Day Celebration from 4 to 9 p.m. Tuesday,
March 17, in the Ambridge Event
Center of Holy Rosary Church, 376 N.E.
Clackamas St.
Admission is $10 for ages 21 and older, $5
for ages 12-20 and $1 for ages 11 and younger.
See ST. PATRICK’S / Page 2
Live Wire
Fresh off his appearance
on “Top Chef,” Gregory
Gourdet, executive chef at
Departure, will be part of
the next radio/stage variety
show, along with fellow runner-up Doug Adams, writer
Peter Mehlman (“Seinfeld”
and “not that there’s anything wrong with it”
phrase), astrophysicist Sara
Seager and more.
7:30 p.m. Saturday,
March 14, Revolution Hall,
1300 S.E. Stark St., livewire
radio.org, $20, $25 day of
show, $35 VIP, $15 students
MUSIC
Thomas Lauderdale
The Portland pianist of
Pink Martini teams up with
the Oregon Symphony and
Music Director Carlos Kalmar for works by Beethoven
and Gottschalk.
7:30 p.m. Saturday,
March 14, 2 p.m. Sunday,
March 15, 8 p.m. Monday,
March 16, Arlene Schnitzer
Concert Hall, 1037 S.W.
Broadway, orsymphony.org,
$22-$125
George Clinton and
Parliament Funkadelic
and Dirty Revival
The Rock and Roll Hall of
Fame member and 15 members of his groups return to
Portland.
9 p.m. Wednesday, March
18, Crystal Ballroom, 1332
W. Burnside St., crystall
ballroompdx.com, $25, $27
at door
MISC.
Rock & Worship Roadshow
The seventh annual
event, sponsored by Compassion International, includes tour founders MercyMe, as well as Crowder,
Matt Maher, Jamie Grace,
Tedashii and Group 1 Crew.
7 p.m. Saturday, March
14, Moda Center, rosequarter.com, suggested $10 donation
Bricks Cascade
The annual Lego convention returns to Portland
with creations by adult
Lego enthusiasts and young
builders from around the
world.
10 a.m.-4 p.m. SaturdaySunday, March 14-15, Oregon Convention Center, 777
N.E. Martin Luther King Jr.
Blvd., brickscascade.com,
$8
‘Road to WrestleMania’
According to the Rose
Quarter, tickets are still
available for the WWE Live
stop, which will include
Daniel Bryan battling Kane
in a “Portland Street Fight”
and Roman Reigns taking
on Big Show.
3 p.m. Sunday, March 15,
Moda Center, rosequarter.
com, $20-$100, $13 parking
TRIBUNE FILE PHOTO: JAIME VALDEZ
Among the St. Patrick’s Day attractions at Kells is the Kells Irish Pipes and Drums outfit. There are several St. Paddy’s events planned — for honor and revelry.
PCC spritzes up classic ‘Hairspray’
Redo of ‘80s
musical proves it
still has body, shine
By CAITLIN FELDMAN
Pamplin Media Group
Evan Tait never thought
he’d play a love interest.
He’d been pigeonholed as
the “best friend type,” an actor destined to be cast in
roles that were supportive,
not leading. So when he
found out that he’d been cast
as Link in “Hairspray,” all he
could do at first was sob.
“It’s funny when opportunity knocks,” the 20-year-old
Beaverton resident says. “Link
is one of my dream roles, because I watched him growing
up, and I was like, ‘I want to do
this role, and I’m never going
to be able to do this role.’ It’s a
dream coming true.”
With the Portland Community College Sylvania Campus
production of “Hairspray,”
through March 15, Tait’s
dreams aren’t the only ones
coming true. Combining the
talents of about 100 people on
stage and behind the scenes,
Portland
Community
College’s
production of
“Hairspray,” the
Sylvania
Campus’ first
musical in six
years, features
the talents of
about 100
people.
PAMPLIN
MEDIA GROUP:
JONATHAN HOUSE
it’s the first musical the school
has produced in more than six
years, and the result of countless hours of hard work. For
co-directors and faculty members Julianne Johnson-Weiss
and Dan Hays, the hope is that
this large-scale production will
strengthen the relationship between the various art disciplines at the school and excite
more students about the programs there.
“I kept looking at everybody
going, ‘We need to do a musical. We need to do a musical,’”
says Johnson-Weiss, director
of vocal music at PCC Sylvania. “When the economy
tanked, we’d gotten a whole
bunch of people in the arts,
and then things started chang-
ing back and they drifted
away.”
Johnson-Weiss was losing
musical theater students in
part because they simply
couldn’t offer them what they
needed. She began teaching a
musical theater vocal class
two years ago, but it still
wasn’t the necessary push. A
musical was what she needed,
and she needed Hays to help
her.
Friends since growing up in
Portland together in the 1970s
and ‘80s, the pair starred together in productions during
high school and at the University of Portland. They took
their careers in different directions for a time, but ultimately,
both landed in education, Hays
on the technical theater side,
Johnson-Weiss with vocals.
Though “Hairspray” is their
first time directing together,
their goals with the production
are the same.
“No. 1 is to get more students involved in our programs, and to see our programs as one entity — the performing arts — rather than
music is here, dance is here,
theater is here,” Hays says.
“And we needed to address
the fact that we were losing
those who were triple threats:
singers, dancers, actors,” says
Johnson-Weiss. “You have to
cultivate that, too. You can’t
just have them pop up out of
nowhere.”
But deciding to put on a musical came with one large,
looming question — what mu-
See ‘HAIRSPRAY’ / Page 2
B2 LIFE
The Portland Tribune Thursday, March 12, 2015
Portland!Life
‘Hairspray’: First PCC musical in six years
■ From page 1
sical would they do?
Several options were
brought to the table, but were
vetoed for various reasons.
When “Hairspray” was the last
musical standing, there was
talk that it might not be edgy
enough, that it was too “popcorn,” but Johnson-Weiss was
quick to quell those fears.
“Look at the time period
right now,” she says. “We’re all
talking about inclusivity. We’re
all talking about racial tensions. We’re all talking about
accepting each other. That’s
what the show’s themes are.”
And yet, the show’s themes
haven’t been limited to the
stage. They’ve extended to every
aspect of the production and
have been the cornerstones of
the students’ character and personal development.
“It’s a lot easier to get into
character when you’re around
people who you trust and who
accept you, because then you’re
not afraid to go out of your
boundaries, and you’re not
afraid to get a little more outlandish,” says Annie Rose Latchford, who plays Penny. “Everybody kind of puts themselves
out there, even when we’re not
rehearsing.”
This inclusive feel, or “safe
space” as many of the students
referred to it, has allowed them
to elevate their craft. Fostering
this environment was another
goal of the directors, and they
worked with stage manager
Danielle Bash to get there.
“Sometimes, when situations
got a little crazy, Julianne was
really great working with me
and saying ‘We’re going to
breathe. We’re going to work on
this,’” Bash, 30, says. “It wasn’t
until this weekend that we saw
things piece together. Everything just came alive. There are
COURTESY OF CAROLANN PHOTOGRAPHY
The All-Ireland Cultural Society of Oregon hosts a family friendly
celebration at the Ambridge Center in Northeast Portland, March 17.
Traditional dancers are an important feature of the event.
PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: JONATHAN HOUSE
Co-director Julianne Johnson-Weiss aimed for “inclusivity” and “accepting each other” with the musical
“Hairspray.”
certain parts, even now, certain
moments and scenes where I’ll
just start getting teary-eyed. It’s
such a beautiful, beautiful
show.”
This sentiment was shared by
numerous other students in the
production. Their love for the
people they’ve gotten to work
with and the musical’s message
came up again and again as the
best part of the process, a process that has taken up so many
of their days and nights. When
asked how they’ve managed to
balance this show with classes,
jobs and friends, awkward
laughter ensued — “Hairspray”
has been their life for the past
few months — there hasn’t been
room for much else. But no one
seemed upset about it.
“What I really like about the
show is getting to meet and
work with all these wonderful
people,” says Dominic Mallari,
21, who plays IQ. “Being a part
of this musical has allowed me
to make a lot of new friends and
wonderful memories.”
Chie Tanaka, a 19-year-old
who plays Little Inez in the
show, agrees.
“I feel like we’re such an accepting cast,” she says. “I feel
comfortable doing whatever.
Even if I mess up, I’m not embarrassed or anything, because
we’re all learning here.”
Before the first dress rehearsal, the cast stood on stage with
Johnson-Weiss, humming and
holding hands. The energy was
palpable, and they weren’t even
performing for an audience.
“You’re going to do a great
job,” Johnson-Weiss told them.
“I appreciate you, and I know
that you can hit the next level.”
It seemed effortless as the
actors became their characters.
But somehow, you also could
sense that they’d put pieces of
themselves into it, too, that
they weren’t removed from the
situation — they were in it.
“If this was anywhere else, I
would probably be scared out of
my wits and have quit by January,” says Tait, the actor who
never thought he could play a
character such as Link. “This is
such a safe environment that
we’re able to explore, and we’re
able to not just make the characters our own, but make the
characters who we are.”
The play continues at 11 a.m.
Thursday, March 12, 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, March 13
and 14, and 2 p.m. Sunday,
March 15, at PCC Sylvania Performing Arts Center, 12000
S.W. 49th Ave. (tickets $10,
available at door).
What’s all the buzz about
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St. Patrick’s: Plenty
of bagpipes, Guinness
■ From page 1
Beer, wine, pop and food will
be on sale.
The family friendly party includes art displays, as well as
face-painting. We can testify
it’s one of those rare occasions
in Oregon where parents get
to relax and have a drink in a
public place as the children
run around and have fun.
“It is truly the only large
St. Patrick’s Day festival
where parents can be with
their children the whole
time,” says Sam Keator, a former society president and
longtime member.
The party kicks off its musical portion with a performance
by the Tualatin Valley Fire &
Rescue Pipes and Drum Band
at 4:20 p.m. Members of the
band have performed in Boston, Chicago, Colorado
Springs, Alaska and internationally in Guadalajara, Mexico, in fall 2005 and again in
2006. Band members have performed at Dropkick Murphys
shows in both Portland and
Boston and, in 2008, the band
played for Irish President
Mary McAleese when she visited Portland. You can learn
more about the band at tvfr
pipesndrums.org.
The Molly Malone Irish
Dancers take the floor at 5:15
p.m. The group showcases beginner to championship-level
dancers at Celtic festivals,
county fairs, community
events, restaurants and clubs,
and special occasion performances such as weddings and
parties. You can learn more at
yeatesacademy.com.
At 6:15 p.m. the All-Ireland
Cultural Society’s Tir Eoghain
Ceili Dancers perform, followed at 7:15 p.m. by the Mikey
Beglan County Cavan Ceili
Band. Beglan is known in the
acoustic folk and Irish music
communities for his rhythmic
button accordion playing, a favorite of local dancers.
“He’s just the happiest guy,”
Keator says of Beglan. “He’s always great, especially for the
dancing.”
For more information, visit
OregonIrishClub.org.
■ Biddy McGraw’s Irish
Pub, 6000 N.E. Glisan St., hosts
a celebration from noon to 1:30
a.m. March 17. Admission is
$10. Performers include the
FireFingers Duo, the Stringtown Ambassadors, the Bob
Soper Duo, Sprig, Cul an Ti,
Stomptowners and Grafton
Street.
■ County Cork Public
House, 1329 N.E. Fremont St.,
offers traditional Irish music
and food from March 13 to 17.
The pub opens at noon and
admission is free. For more
information, call 503-284-4805.
■ Kells, 112 S.W. Second
Ave. hosts the biggest St. Patricks’s party in town, with
musical and dance performances taking place from Friday, March 13, through March
17, both inside the pub as well
as outside in a tented area.
Performers include Grafton
Street, Andrew Paul Woodworth, Coming up Threes, the
Kells Pipers, An Daire Irish
Dance, Cul an Ti, Na Rosai,
the Murray School of Irish
Dancing, An Dáire Irish Dancing, Flight of Earls and Thick
as Thieves. Kids festivities
take place from 11 a.m. to 5
p.m. Saturday and from 11
a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday. Ticket
prices vary. For more information, visit kellsportland.com
■ Paddy’s, 65 S.W. Yamhill
St., is Portland’s oldest Irish
pub and hosts festivities from
Friday, March 15, through St.
Patrick’s Day. A tented street
party kicks off at 11 a.m.
March 17 and features bands,
pipers, dancers, food and
drink. It’s $10 to get in after 2
p.m. A limited number of VIP
passes are available. Contact
[email protected] for
details.
■ ‘Kiss Me, I’m Irish’ — It’s
a first-ever St. Paddy’s show
by Portland Story Theater,
showcasing the best of Gaelic
gab during an evening of
tales, songs, dance and music,
hosted by Penny Walter and
featuring Maura Conlon, Lawrence Howard and Lynne
Duddy, as well as performances by Brian O’Hairt and Innisfree. The details: 8 p.m.
Saturday, March 14, Alberta
Abbey, 126 N.E. Alberta Ave.,
portlandstorytheater.com,
$15, $18 at door
■ The 37th annual Shamrock Run, with some 35,000
runners (selling out for the
sixth consecutive year), will
be held at 7:30 a.m. Sunday,
March 15, and it includes a
Waterfront Park party at 8:15
a.m. and eight bands along
the course. Also, from 11 a.m.
to 7 p.m. Friday, March 13, and
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday,
March 14, there’ll be a free fitness fair at the Oregon Convention Center, 777 N.E. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. For
info: ShamrockRunPortland.
com.
■ St. Agatha Catholic
School, 7960 S.E. 15th Ave.,
plays host to the St. Patrick’s
Day Festival and Parade, noon
to 5 p.m. Saturday, March 14.
There’ll be authentic food,
Guinness beer and a carnival.
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LIFE B3
Portland!Life
Bits&Pieces
What’s better than one new
local artisan vodka? Three!
Three distilleries join
forces to create aged
spirits for Oregon
Starka Project
By JENNIFER ANDERSON
The Tribune
COURTESY OF NOREMAC STUDIOS
Oregon Distillers Guild President and Big Bottom Distilling Founder Ted
Pappas introduced Oregon Starka Project vodkas last weekend at Toast
2015.
Portland-based Bull Run Distillery came to him and suggested a collaboration.
They got John Ufford of Indio Spirits involved, and the
trio set off to
put finished
vodka into various types of
barrels to add
flavor notes,
depth and
body.
Pappas used
zinfandel barrels that he’d
also used for
port and zinfandel-finished bourbon, while
Medoff put his into a combination of pinot noir and rye barrels. Ufford used barrels from
his own James Oliver rye
whiskey, made at his distillery
Bread&Brew
Biweekly food and drink
news and reviews
near Bridgeport Village with
French oak and apple staves
(the vertical slats on barrels).
“Barrel-aged vodkas have
been done before; that’s not
new,” Pappas says. “What’s
new is three distilleries come
up and do the same type of
product with their own spin,
and release it at the same
time. It’s the collaboration
that’s unique and not the product itself. But I will say the
products are freaking rocking.
I am beyond happy with how
they turned out.”
They targeted the release
for the holiday season last fall,
but were delayed by labeling
issues due to the uniqueness
of the product, Pappas says.
“The feds didn’t know what
to do with it,” he says. For instance, they were told they
couldn’t use the word “aged,”
Do good
“Good Deeds Day” will be
Sunday, March 15, and publicists are encouraging Portlanders to get involved for the benefit of others and the planet. It is
said that 900,000 people in 50
countries do good things on the
Long-distance training
Portland Fit has announced
its 18th annual marathon and
distance training season, which
starts with orientations March
21 and 28 at Zidell Yards.
There’ll be instruction for runners and walkers; registration
is available through April at
portlandfit.com.
Members meet each Saturday, starting April 4 or 11.
— Jason Vondersmith
Lent Service - Wednesday’s Noon and 7pm
Maundy Thursday - April 2 Noon and 7pm
Good Friday - April 3, 7pm
Easter S
Sunday - April 5, 10:30am
Pastor David Zemke
Immanuel Lutheran Church
7810 S.E. 15th Avenue in Sellwood • 503-236-7823
Bring the whole family!
Beautiful,
Authentic
Byzantine
Crosses
20% off
thru March
@jenmomanderson
Each one 800 years
old with certificates
of authenticity.
By ROB CULLIVAN
Pamplin Media Group
The Flamin’
Groovies have
quite a history
— and plans for
a new album.
They’ll play
Dante’s on
March 12.
Feelin’ Groovie
COURTESY OF
ANNE LAURENT
ing, “it’s an incredible privilege
to be at my age and still playing
rock ‘n’ roll for people who still
want to hear it.”
Power-pop pioneers, janglerock innovators, alt-rock godfathers — whatever you want
to call them, The Flamin’
Groovies were one of those
bands that should have been
much bigger in the popular
mind, but nonetheless made
an impact that still echoes in
the rock world. You can hear
the Groovies’ influence in
bands like R.E.M., the Cranberries, Throwing Muses and
a host of other post-punk outfits, but the band also knew
how to play Stonesy blues
rock, especially when it was
fronted by Roy Loney, who left
in 1971. The band’s most famous post-Loney album, 1976’s
D ave - E d m u n d s - p r o d u c e d
“Shake Some Action,” could be
considered a seminal alternative rock record, its much acclaimed title cut covered by
Cracker and used in the 1995
movie “Clueless.” From garage rock to post-punk, the
Groovies’ eclectic experiments
have covered all kinds of sonic
ground.
“We just played the music
we loved,” Wilson says. “We’re
a thinking man’s punk band.”
Fans of the Groovies can
look forward to a new album in
2016, and the band already has
released a teaser cut off it,
“End of the World,” a steadydriving Byrds-style rocker, replete with patented Groovies’
vocal harmonies. The group
also will be the subject of a
documentary set to be released
next year by Kurt Feldhun of
ESPN’s “Fishin’ Impossible.”
Overall it’s a groovy time to be
a Groovie, Wilson notes.
“I feel like a nice old bottle of
burgundy,” Wilson says with a
laugh. “I’m ripe and mature
and ready to drink.”
Quick hits
Visit our downtown location.
■ Indie folk-rockers The Dodos join Springtime Carnivore
for a 9 p.m. show Friday, March
13, at the Doug Fir Lounge, 830
E. Burnside St. $15. Info: 503231-9663, dougfirlounge.com.
■ Portland folk singer John
Craigie marks the release of a
new CD and shares the stage
with Laurie Shook of the Shook
Twins at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, March 13-14, at Alberta
Street Pub, 1036 N.E .Alberta
St. $12 in advance. Info: 503-2845665, albertastreetpub.com.
■ Speaking of the Flamin’
Groovies’ loving Cracker, David Lowery and Johnny Hickman will be featured in an
acoustic set at 7 p.m. Sunday,
March 15, at Mississippi
Studios, 3939 N. Mississippi
Ave. $20. Info: 503-288-3895,
mississippistudios.com.
■ Melodic house-music pioneer Bakermat performs at 9
p.m. Wednesday, March 18, at
Branx, 320 S.E. Second Ave. $15.
Info: 503-234-5683, branxpdx.
com.
507 SW Broadway 503.227.3437
www.JudithArnellJewelers.com
HEADACHES
RELATED TO YOUR NECK?
You may be eligible for a federallyfunded research study on frequent
neck-related headaches.
• Must be 18 years or older
• Care provided by licensed chiropractors
• Participants will be compensated
• Limited spots available
For more information,
call the Center for
Outcomes Studies at
1-800-678-9072 or
visit www.uws.edu/
headache
504792.030315
LiveMusic!
WHAT DO YOU COLLECT?
All curio cabinets, in
stock and special order,
on sale through March.
Display your
collectibles in
style!
KUHNHAUSEN’S
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486442.031015
504813.030515
Chris Wilson’s musical compatriot, singer-guitarist Cyril
Jordan, has just sent him an
Instagram of himself, dressed
in a mod-style jacket.
The pic notes Jordan and the
other Flamin’ Groovies, bassist
George Alexander and drummer Victor Penalosa, are rehearsing in San Francisco for
their upcoming tour. They’ll
hook up with Wilson, who recently moved to Portland from
London — in part because Oregon just legalized pot — to
play along with The Pynnacles
and Criminal Guitars for the
Groovies’ tour kickoff at 9 p.m.
Thursday, March 12, at Dante’s,
350 W. Burnside St.
Tickets are $15. Info:
danteslive.com.
Sitting outside a Portland
bar, you can literally see the
fact that he’s about to go on
tour sink into Wilson’s head.
He pounds a clenched right fist
in the open palm of his left
hand as a big grin spreads
across his face.
“This is gonna rock!” the
guitarist-singer exclaims, add-
since that’s typically associated with years, rather than a
finishing style.
Vodka is technically unaged,
so they had to go back and
forth on wording for the label,
the three distillers dealing
with different regulators’
guidelines.
In the end, Pappas says the
three vodkas complement one
another well, and they’ve already put down next year’s
batch.
He envisions much more
collaboration within the industry, which now has 47 small
distillers in the state — No. 5
in the country.
(All are considered small
except Hood River Distillers,
which acquired Northwest
Portland-based Clear Creek
Distillery last year and bottles and blends eight brands
plus their own vokda and
schnapps.)
More Oregon distilleries
are on the rise: More than a
dozen distilled spirits permits
are on file, in the process of
opening.
That’s great news for cocktail enthusiasts, especially
with the rise in use of bitters,
tonics and syrups.
But if there’s anything
poised to take center stage in
Oregon, it’s whiskey, Pappas
says.
Most local distillers got
their start here just five to 10
years ago, flavoring and bottling whiskey they sourced
from the Midwest — and distilling their own quick-to-market vodka to pay the bills in
the meantime.
But like Pappas, in recent
years they’ve been barreling
their own whiskey, which will
hit maturity in a few years.
“In five years, it’ll be very
few merchant-bottled whiskey
in the state,” Pappas predicts.
“We’ve all been making our
own. ... People are going to
take note of the malted, singlegrain products, and go ‘Wow.’”
Anjali and The Incredible Kid,
Portland’s resident top Bollywood
and bhangra deejays, plan to return from another trip India, just
in time for their welcome party.
They’ll be featured in the
Tropitaal A Desi-Latino
Soundclash, 9 p.m. to 2 a.m.
Saturday, March 14, at Goodfoot Lounge, 2845 S.E. Stark
St. ($5, anjaliandthekid.com).
DJ Daniela Karina will play
an all-Reggaeton set from 9 to
10 p.m., and there’ll also be
Moombahton, Digital Cambia,
3Ball Guarachero, Dembow and
more for a 21-and-over, multicultural, all-night dance battle.
Anjali and The Incredible Kid
have been playing the hipster
neighborhoods of Bandra in
Mumbai, Hauz Khas in Delhi,
and Chandigarh in Punjab.
508147.030515
When Ted Pappas planned
a special release of three
aged vodkas made by three
local distillers this month,
he knew he needed to brand
it.
He and his distilling partners called it the Oregon Starka Project — after an old Russian custom — and had male
and female models do the
pouring last Saturday while
dressed as KGB agents.
“I asked them to wear dark
suits and look like they came
off the Russian mafia,” says
Pappas, founder of Big Bottom
Distilling in Hillsboro and
president of the Oregon Distillers Guild. “We can’t take
ourselves too seriously.”
For the second year in a
row, Pappas was the guild’s coordinator for Toast 2015, the
fifth annual artisan spirits festival in Portland, held last Saturday at the Leftbank Annex.
Amid the thousand attendees, 40 distillers’ tables, and
five local restaurants’
booths, the
KGB agents
were in a space
called the Starka Lounge.
The Starka
Project is Portland’s spin on
the Russian
custom of
burying an
oaken barrel of
vodka when a
child is born and unearthing it
to serve to guests on their
wedding day.
Pappas says his project
started more than a year ago,
when Lee Medoff of Northwest
Dance-off
day, including painting homes
for seniors, cleaning beaches
and parks, renovating community centers, creating public
gardens, caring for animals in
shelters and more.
Among the Portland projects:
■ Children’s Book Bank:
Teens clean and repair books
for the Children’s Book Harvest
■ Store to Door: Parents and
their children create birthday
cards for the elderly and disabled
■ Habitat for Humanity Portland: Teens work on affordable
housing
■ Friends of Trees: Volunteers plant native trees and
shrubs
See good-deeds-day.org or
find info on Facebook and
Twitter.
503974.031015
The Portland Tribune Thursday, March 12, 2015
Tuesday-Friday 10-6 • Saturday 10-5
2640 East Burnside Street, Portland, OR
www.kuhnhausensfurniture.com • (503) 234-6638
B4 LIFE
The Portland Tribune Thursday, March 12, 2015
Place your ad by calling (503) 620-SELL (7355)
www.Community-Classif ieds.com
Your Neighborhood Marketplace
Help
Wanted
H E L P WANTE D
Office Assistant
Mechanic – Agricultural
3RUWODQG7ULEXQH0DLO5RRP
Columbia Empire Farms, located in Sherwood, OR, has a
full-time Mechanic position open. The Agricultural Mechanic will diagnose, adjust, repair, or overhaul farm machinery and vehicles, such as tractors, harvesters, equipment, and irrigation systems. Mechanics are expected to
utilize their experience to locate and diagnose the problem and then generate a cost-effective solution. Computer aided systems may assist troubleshoot and even
repair the faulty part or parts. Minimum requirements include: One (1) year + years of experience performing
service repairs or certificate/diploma from a recognized
program; ability to perform basic repairs and required
maintenance using special tools and equipment; proficient knowledge of mechanical, electrical and hydraulic
systems used in the repair of agricultural machinery and
equipment; ability to operate vehicles and equipment
used for diagnostic purposes; and, proficient oral and
written communication skills. The job conditions include:
Frequent bending and stooping; ability to repeatedly lift
up to 75 lbs.; standing for extended periods of time; occasional work outdoors in extreme heat or cold, rain or
snow; occasional work on ladders; occasional work in
confined spaces; ability to work extended hours and
weekends, if needed; and, valid driver’s license with and
insurable driving record required. If you meet the qualifications, and are interested in applying, please send a resume to: PO Box 1, Dundee, OR 97115. EOE.
Part time positions available in the Gresham Outlook
mailroom. We are looking to fill two shifts, Monday,
2:30pm-9pm and Wednesdays, 12pm-8pm. The job
would be working on an inserting machine putting together the Portland Tribune for delivery. These positions
require that you be able to lift at least 50lbs, and stand
for long periods of time. More hours could be available
by covering for the graveyard shift throughout the week.
These positions will pay $9.50 per hour, and will require
a background check and drug test. Please send resume
to [email protected] or stop by and fill out
an application.
The Gresham Outlook is located at
1190 NE Division St. Gresham, OR 97030
_________________________________________
'HOLYHU\7UXFN'ULYHU
+,*+6&+22/ -81,25621/<
If you’re a junior in high school, you can join the
National Guard through the Split Training Option and
be back from Basic Combat Training in time for your
senior year. Next year, you’ll be back in time for
college. Joining the Guard will open many doors for
you with benefits like college tuition assistance and
excellent training. Plus, it’s one of the best part-time
jobs you can have while in high school.
The 2015 Split Training Option season ends April 30.
Applicants must be 17 years old and have parental
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Eligibility restrictions apply. Contact your local National
Guard Representative and secure your future now.
SSG Phillip Cano
(541) 588-0253
Oregonguard.com
Interviews will be from 8:00am -- 5:00pm.
Call to schedule an interview –
971-371-5971 Also, Walk-Ins Welcome
$GYHUWLVLQJ6DOHV&RQVXOWDQW
29020.030315c
Tuesday - Thursday,
March 10th – March 12th
Facility Address:
PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR - Day Shift
Brentwood Corp, a manufacturer of high-quality hardwood & laminate cabinet doors has immediate opening
for an experienced supervisor to oversee high volume,
deadline driven department. Must have excellent interpersonal, leadership & troubleshooting skills. Qualified candidates must have 3-5 years of manufacturing /
production supervisor exp. Along w/competitive
wages, we offer low cost medical, dental & life
insurance for our employees at 30 days & other
generous benefits.
Send resume to [email protected]
Become a Care Partners Hospice Volunteer!
Care Partners (formerly Hospice of Washington
County) has been providing community based,
not-for-profit hospice care since 1982.
Our volunteers are able to serve patients and their
families in many ways.
Contact Robin, Volunteer Coordinator for information:
(503)648-9565 [email protected]
Pamplin Media Group is searching for a delivery truck
driver. The qualified candidate will have a clean driving
record, and be able to drive a 24-foot box truck. Ability
to use manual pallet jacks, electric pallet jacks, fork lifts
and be able to carry 50 pounds of weight are requirements. The position is full time, with overtime possible
on occasion. Candidates must pass a criminal background check and a pre-employment drug test. CDL is
not required, but the candidate will have to pass a DOT
physical. Salary is dependent on experience. Pamplin
Media Group offers competitive salaries, medical and
dental benefits, and a 401K. Please send resumes to
Don Atwell at 1190 NE
Division, Gresham, OR 97030
Wilsonville Spokesman Community Reporter
The Wilsonville Spokesman, a weekly newspaper, is
seeking a full-time reporter to cover Wilsonville, Ore.,
one of the fastest growing cities in the Portland metro
area. The ideal candidate for this position is a versatile
writer with professional experience in both news and
features. Photography experience is a big plus. While
coverage of city government, community events and local business is a key part of this position, the community reporter should also have the ability to sniff out enlightening, interesting and amusing enterprise stories
that give residents unique insights into their community.
The community reporter is not responsible for covering
education or sports. Send a resume, cover letter and
three clips to Editor Luke Roney via email at
[email protected] File size is limited to 5M.
No phone calls.
Do You Have the Heart to Serve
Those at the End of Life?
5350 SW 107th Ave.
Beaverton, OR 97005
Hiring for the following positions
for 1st & 2nd Shift:
*TRUSS ASSEMBLER
*CLASS A - CDL DRIVERS
(Crane exp preferred)
The Contract Publishing Department is seeking a
part-time (20 hours per week) sales person to join our
team. We are looking for someone who is a team
player, has a great personality and is a “go-getter”.
This position will be primarily east side territory and
state of Washington. Contract Publishing works with a
number of Chambers of Commerce and member organizations. The ideal candidate should be comfortable
adapting to the needs of individual chamber personalities and requirements. A positive attitude is a must.
Job requirements include strong organizational skills,
computer skills, focus, and ability to multi-task, professional phone skills and in person ability to close sales.
For more information, please forward a resume and
salary history to: [email protected]
or fax 503 620-3433
_________________________________________
Help
Wanted
“We had a great
response to our
advertisements placed
in The Spotlight. It is
always a pleasure
working with our local
publications.”
Tori Sullivan | Customer
Service Manager
Cardinal Services
Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association is looking for a part time Office
Assistant(15-18
hours/week). Position requires strong PC skills, accurate and detail oriented.
General office and phone
communication skills necessary. Experience in billing a plus. Mail resume to
ONPA, 4000 Kruse Way
Place, Bldg 2 - STE 106,
Lake Oswego, OR 97035
or
email
to
[email protected], enter office assistant in subject line. No phone calls
please. Fax 503-624-9811.
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&RRUGLQDWRU
The McLoughlin Memorial
Association, a non-profit
organization, located in
Oregon City, is seeking a
part-time Association Coordinator, responsible for the
management and overall
operations of the
Association. For a full job
description and application
instructions, e-mail
[email protected]
gmail.com . The
application deadline is
March 19, 2015.
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Electrician/Millwright
Mechanic
3-Phase Electrician/Millwright Mechanic needed
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Sawmill experience important. Good pay and benefits. Regular hours and
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Email Resume to
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award-winning publications at kiosk and festivals
throughout the metropolitan area. If you have excellent
communication skills, the drive to succeed and ability
to work independently this could be the perfect
position for you.
Bobcat Central, Inc.
Regular part-time (primarily Friday, Saturday & Sunday
but some weekday work is required). Hourly wage plus
excellent commission. Sales experience preferred.
Provide own transportation & ability to lift up to 25lbs.
Background check & drug screen required.
Please submit resume to
[email protected] or fax to
503-620-3433.
BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB
NOW
HIRING!
0DUNHWLQJ&RQVXOWDQW
Heavy
H
ea Equipment Field Service Technician
specializing in Forestry equipment.
REQUIRED SKILLS
• Understanding of standard hours to conform to
warranty standards and customer expectations.
• Ability to organize projects, priorities, and time
management.
• Critical level of attention to detail.
• Know the importance of Equipment
Maintenance
• Effective written and verbal communication skills
to work successfully with the customers, as well
as other employees.
• Ability to work in a team environment and
accurately accomplishes work assignments
under minimal supervision.
• Ability to understand and process service
documentation and adhere to service policies
and procedures
• Ability to read, writes, analyze, and interpret
common correspondence and effectively present
information to top management or public
groups.
• Ability to use computer used to diagnose service
problems
• Ability to solve and define problems collects
data, establish facts, and draw valid conclusions.
• Ability to interpret a variety of instructions
furnished in written, oral, diagram, or schedule
form.
• Maintain an adequate inventory of technicians
hand tools to meet the service and repair
• Ensure all customers’ requests on the repair
order are completed to a high quality standard
• Strive to complete all repair orders within the
time allotted
• Identify and advise the Service Manager, Director
of Services of any additional repair items found
• Maintain a clean and professional appearance at
all times
• Keep work area clean and tidy at all times
BENEFITS
• 401k plan with employer match
• Medical, Dental, Vision Plans
• Life Insurance
• Paid Holidays, Sick Leave and Vacation Pay
Big Valley Tractor
Send resume to
[email protected]
www.bigvalleytractor.com
COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS
✵
YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MARKETPLACE
✵
for ad rates, general
information or help
writing your ad in any one
of our
Community Newspaper
Publications
and get the RESULTS
you want!
Radio Advertising Sales
[email protected]
papers.com
Oregon’s 2014 Radio Station of the Year, KPAM 860,
and sister station Sunny 1550, are seeking Portland’s
next great radio Account Executive. If you know how to
build long-term relationships with small to mid-size
business owners, care about bringing results to those
businesses, and can do it without ratings, then KPAM
and Sunny could be your next home. The successful
candidate will be motivated with high integrity and a
strong desire to win and make a good living. Extensive
experience in broadcast media sales is necessary.
KPAM and Sunny are two locally-owned radio stations
offering excellent benefits and above average compensation plans in an employee focused environment.
We are an equal opportunity employer.
Please send resume to:
General Sales Manager
Email: [email protected]
No phone calls please
Call Mindy!
503-546-0760
$'237,21 /29(
We promise your child a
happy, joyful, secure life.
Expenses paid. Call
1-800-943-7780
Rickreall Gun Show
Sat. Mar 14: 8am - 5pm
Sun. Mar 15: 9am -4pm
Adults $6
Kids under 12 FREE.
FREE Parking!
Polk County
Fairgrounds
Rickreall, Oregon
503-623-3048
GET
FAST
RESULTS
THROUGH
THE CLASSIFIEDS
CALL NOW!
CALL
503-620-SELL
A P PAR E L / J EW E L R Y
WE BUY GOLD
Sterling Flatware -Silver-Pocket Watches
The Jewelry Buyer
20th N.E. Sandy PDX 503-239-6900
www.jewelrybuyerportland.com
M-Fri. 9:30-5 Sat 10-4
28390.012315
Heavy Equipment Mobile Field Service
Technician will perform at a highly skilled
level repairs and maintenance on large
heavy equipment brands such as Doosan,
Tigercat. Industrial Tractors and Bobcat
Equipment when required. Specifics of
Mobile Technician will be to PM service,
troubleshoot, repair and service HVAC
units, and any other services required on
heavy mobile equipment and tractors.
Must be able to diagnose mechanical,
electrical and other defects on all of our
equipment. Other services includes tune-ups
on new units, service AC units, adjusting,
installation of new condensers, switches
etc. Must be able to make an estimated
diagnosis, discuss service repairs and
problems with the customer, shop foreman
and Director of Service. Maintain records
on services and write accurate work orders.
Ability to maintain valid Class A Driver’s
License and clean driving record to safely
drive large service vehicle. Maintain a clean
and professional appearance at all times.
Must have own tools.
EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE
• High school diploma or equivalent and basic
math skills
• Prior mobile service experience as a HVAC service
technician is mandatory
• Prior experience working on compact
construction mobile equipment such as skid
steer valuable
• Prior experience working on Doosan or Tigercat
brands required
• Welding skills
• Forklift Certified
NEED HELP
WITH YOUR
CLASSIFIED
AD?
The Gresham Outlook, a twice-weekly newspaper, is
seeking a high energy, motivated salesperson to join
our sales team as an outside Marketing Consultant. We
are looking for someone with previous advertising
experience, a proven track record of success, a strong
prospector, organizational and computer skills. An
existing account base will be provided, but our new
team member will be required to contact and create
new accounts. Must have reliable transportation and a
clean driving record. Pre-employment drug screen and
good references required. This is a full time position
with commission on all sales, a base salary, mileage
expenses and full benefits that include health care and
vacation. If you have a passion for sales and are committed to success, send your resume and cover letter to
Cheryl Swart, Advertising Director –
[email protected]
Announcements/
Notices
29041.031015c
Bobcat Central in Stockton, California,
is a heavy equipment dealer offering new
and used sales, parts, service and rentals
of brands like Bobcat, Tigercat, Doosan,
Kubota, Land Pride and Stihl.
Serving surrounding areas such as San
Joaquin, Stanislaus, Calaveras, Tuolumne,
Merced, Amador, and recently Reno,
NV. We are a one-stop dealer for your
agricultural and construction equipment
needs. Find new and used construction
equipment like skidders, feller bunchers,
backhoes, excavators, compact tractors,
compact track loaders, skid steer loaders,
attachments, implements, utility vehicles,
telehandlers, trenchers and much more for
sale and rent in California
Kitchen Staff
needed for Outdoor School
site in Corbett/Springdale
area. Head Cook and
Kitchen assistant positions
available, full and
part-time. Seasonal. Work
dates March 15th - May
29th, 2015. Reliable
transportation required.
Apply online:
https://multnomah.tedk
12.com/hire/index.aspx
More information? Call Jeff
503-257-1608
503-620-SELL (7355)
✵
8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
✵ WWW .C OMMUNITY -C LASSIFIEDS .COM
LIFE B5
The Portland Tribune Thursday, March 12, 2015
MONEY & CELL PHONE
Found in NE Portland in
Feb. 2015. Call Portland
Police to identify and
claim.
:H3D\7RS'ROODU
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8VHG(OHFWURQLFV
Miscellaneous
Wanted
Pets & Supplies
$10-10,000 A-#1 BUYER $
I want jewelry. Costume
etc, also pre-80’s glassware& misc. 503-869-2802
BORDER COLLIE
PUPPIES
$450 born Dec 27th.
Ready Feb 27th for good
homes. Vet checked, first
shots, and dew claws removed. Mom and Dad are
pure breeds and great with
families. Call Sharon at
503-740-3973
Wanted: Old US &
Foreign Coins,
Currency & Tokens
Monte 503-580-5211
Lessons/Instructions
Piano Lessons
Now Available!
Learn in your home or my
studio. Ages 5 & up.
Adults & seniors encouraged.
503-629-5033.
[email protected]
Schools/Training
MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED!
Train at home to process
Medical Billing & Insurance
Claims! NO EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online training
at Bryan University!! HS
Diploma/GED &
Computer/Internet needed!
1-877-259-3880
&DOO
*HW&DVK
7RGD\
Fireplaces/
Woodstoves
WHITFIELD
PELLET STOVE
Can be used in mobile
home. $500 includes pellets. 503-982-0902
Firewood/
Heating Supplies
SONY SURROUND
SOUND AUDIO SYSTEM
Includes 5 speakers, bass
woofer & remote. $85.
503-819-5126
Office Furniture &
Supplies
CASH for DIABETIC
TEST STRIPS
Help those in need.
Paying up to $30 per
box. Free pickup.
Call Sharon:
Sheds/Outdoor
Buildings
Business
Opportunities
$77(17,21
5($'(56
Due to the quantity and
variety of business opportunity listings we receive, it is impossible for
us to verify every opportunity
advertisement.
Readers respond to
business opportunity
ads at their own risk. If
in doubt about a particular offer, check with the
Better Business Bureau,
503-226-3981 or the
Consumer Protection
Agency, 503-378-4320,
BEFORE investing any
money.
Loans
It is illegal for companies
doing business by phone to
promise you a loan and
ask you to pay for it before
they deliver. For more information, call toll-free
1-877-FTC HELP. A public
service
message
from
Community Classifieds and
the Federal Trade Commission.
CHIHUAHUAS: Puppies,
$450 & up. Financing avail.
Adult adoptions also avail,
$100/ea. Reputable Oregon Kennel. Unique Colors, Long & Short Haired,
Tiny to Hearty sizes.
Health Guaranteed, UTD
Vaccinations/ Wormings,
Litterbox Trained, Socialized. Video/Pictures/
Info/Virtual Tour:
www.chi-pup.net
References Happily Supplied! Easy I-5 Access.
Drain, Oregon. Umpqua
Valley kennels, Vic & Mary
Kasser, 541-459-5951.
Cole:
&8672032/(
%8,/',1*6
5,',1*$5(1$6
Furniture/
Home Furnishings
PREMIUM OAK DINING
SET $950. Solid oak, dark
stain, smooth finish table,
66”-102” long x 39” wide.
6 solid oak chairs.
Matching buffet cabinet
w/removable top hutch 78”
tall x 58” wide x 19” deep.
Excellent condition.
971-277-3979
Garage/Rummage
Sales
¶[¶[¶
$UHQD
¶[¶[9HKLFOH
6WRUDJH
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or visit
barnsrusonline.com
This is the mysterious and
unique Cole who has silky
black fur, a slender build,
beautiful green eyes and a
passion for cat toys! While
it may not happen immediately, Cole enjoys being affectionate with people and
will climb up on them and
hug them like a koala bear
once he gets to know
them. Come visit Cole at
Animal Aid’s Show & Tell
Saturday or call
503-292-6628 option 3 for
more information.
Why buy used, when
you can buy from
Cynthia Fischborn
ESTATE SALE
15014 NW Aberdeen
Drive
SAT: 11-3 & SUN: 11-2
SAVAGE MEMORIAL
PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
139th & SE Mill
(Between Stark &
Division)
March 13 & 14: 9 - 4
Household Goods,
Glassware, Vintage
Furniture, Books,
Clothes, Collectibles &
Lots More!
You Don’t Want to
Miss This Sale!!!
Sporting Goods
PORTLAND N:
“Original” Rose City
GUN SHOW
March 21, 9am-6pm
March 22, 9am-4pm
Portland EXPO Center
Admission $10
503-363-9564
wesknodelgunshows.com
Pets & Supplies
AKC BLACK LAB
PUPPIES
Excellent hunting lines
w/champions on both the
dame & sire sides. Dew
claws removed. 6 females,
3 males. Born Jan 31st.
Ready for new homes Mar
21st. $900 503-899-9346
ALI
Annual Book Sale
Auctions
First Unitarian Church
Sat, March 14th &
Sun, March 15th
10:00am to 2:00pm
1011 SW 12th Ave
SamAuctions.com
877-726-2828
Building Materials
60s BATHROOM SINK
& TOILET
Retro salmon color fixtures
are perfect for a vintage
look and color expression.
The classy, older fixtures
are nice, strong and efficient. This one is in great
condition – clean with no
chips, damage or defects.
An excellent replacement
or
new
fixture.
Call
503-296-8510 for more info
or to see. Make an offer.
STORAGE
PROBLEMS??
Call
Community Classifieds
and place a Marketplace
ad to sell your overstock
items FAST
-Reasonable Rates
- Quality Readers
-Quick Results
Call (503) 620-7355
www.communityclassifieds.com
Health Care
Equipment
SCOOTER: Phantom Doctor K, electric, 3-wheel, excellent condition, easy to
transport, $250/obo.
503-982-3707.
Ali is a 7 year old female
cat. She loves children, riding in cars, and sitting on
laps. She enjoys her head
scratched and will purr
loudly in appreciation. She
is a very calm cat that
learns quickly. She comes
from a family with children
and makes a great pet.
Contact Cat’s Cradle Rescue for information on how
to meet this nice family cat
by calling 503.320.6079.
Gladys is a great lap cat.
She likes to talk, regardless of whether or not anyone is listening, and she’s
always happy with the occasional pet. You can visit
the humorous Gladys at
Cat Adoption Team’s Sherwood shelter: 14175 SW
Galbreath Drive.
503-925-8903
catadoptionteam.org
Tuesday-Friday, 12-7 pm;
Saturday-Sunday, 12-6
pm; Closed Monday
As soon as you meet Harry
Belafonte, you’ll see how
friendly and affectionate he
is. Harry has experience
getting along with dogs,
but he’d prefer not to live
with any other cats. Harry
Belafonte is waiting at Cat
Adoption Team’s Sherwood shelter: 14175 SW
Galbreath Dr.,
503-925-8903.
catadoptionteam.org
Tuesday-Friday, 12-7 pm;
Saturday-Sunday, 12-6
pm; Closed Monday
LABRADOODLE
PUPPIES for Sale!
Nice,
low-to-no-shedding
labradoodles ready to go to
new homes the first week
of March. Four males &
two females still available.
Check out their puppy blog
http://labradoodlesoregon.blogspot
.com/
for
pictures
& descriptions of each
puppy. All puppies are
black & have wavy to curly
coats.
Call
Dan
at
503-927-2210 to schedule
to see them or questions.
Need homes: 3 Mastiffs,
10 mos old. 2 females, 1
male.Derrick 503-550-2165
0,1,$785(
$8675$/,$1
6+(3+(5'
PUREBRED PUPPIES
FAMILY RAISED
Parents Onsite, are
Family Pets, 1st shots,
wormed, dew claws & tails
removed. weighs between
15-25lbs, $550 & Up
APPLE:
Machinery & Tools
MACHINERY
Bridgeport Milling Machine
$3000.
Machinist Metal Lathe
$800.
Compressor $500.
503-266-2429
Miscellaneous for
Sale
0RYLQJ
*RRG6WXII&KHDS
Rakes and shovels, $2 ea.;
16’ aluminum extension
ladder, $45; treadmill, $50;
rowing
machine,
$15;
2-step ladder, $10; 3-step
ladder,
$15; 2
white
roll-a-round carts, $10 ea.;
50 ft. extension cords, $5
ea.; 4 window fans, $6 ea.;
wheelchair, $50; 50 asst.
8x10” or smaller frames,
$1 ea.; larger picture
frames $5; 8 lb. fiberglass
splitting maul, $8; 3 portable electric-oil heaters, $15
ea.;
Great
majestic
6-burner wood/coal stove,
manufactured by Majestic
Stove Co. of St. Louis,
$2,500 (OBO) includes an
antique cast iron waffle
maker, and pot w/lid.
Private Road, single car
access. Call for appointment,
503-829-7829
Molalla area.
✵
ESTACADA
$6.$%287285
12'(326,7
237,21
Beautiful 1, 2 & 3 bdrm,
laundry hook-up, kitchen
applces. Storage shed.
Includes water & sewer!
6HF2.
[email protected]
(PDLOIRU
GHWDLOV
New Heritage Village
Apple will be the apple of
your eye. She is ia gorgeous 2 year old medium
hair brown tabby, She
loves to bat balls around
on the floor and play tag
with other cats. She is
spayed, vaccinated, microchipped with a lifetime free
registration, and eligible for
30 days free health insurance. Email today to meet
this sweet cat at the
[email protected]
Autos Wanted
Build your dream home
in Lake Oswego steps
away from the lake.
Exceptional
proposed
homes by BC Custom
Construction.
Beautiful
Mascord designed floor
plans with 2,300 square
feet. 3 bedroom + Den, 3.1
baths. Luxury amenities include hardwood floors,
granite counters, alder
cabinetry, cultured stone
front and more. Large
10,000 square foot lots. 3
Lake easements available.
38%/,6+(5¶6
127,&(
All real estate advertised
herein is subject to the
Federal Fair Housing
Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status
or national origin, or intention to make any
such preferences, limitations or discrimination.
State law forbids discrimination in the sale,
rental or advertising of
real estate based on
factors in addition to
those protected under
federal law. Oregon
State law forbids discrimination based on
marital status. We will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for real
estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings
advertised are available
on an equal opportunity
basis.
Cindy Sehorn
Singh-Soldera
Properties
503-307-4100
WOODBURN:
1507sf home with 6862sf
lot - $197,500 by Owner.
1973 Santiam Drive,
Woodburn OR 97032 Larger S Estates homes,
dbl garage. Home in
Woodburn Senior Estates
55+ community.
For full description &
pictures, e-mail:
[email protected]
503-951-7066 /
541-382-8900.
MOTIVATED SELLER
REDUCED PRICE
$104,999 includes land
with HOA $220.
3 Bed, 2 Ba, Dbl. Carport,
J & M HOMES
Alice 503-970-2669
:$17726(//"
We have buyers!
List your
MANUFACTURED HOME
JandMHomes.com
503-722-4500
WrightChoiceHomes.com
!~VIDEO’S~!
Pictures & details
Oregon’s friendliest and
Most informative website
Huge selection of
MANUFACTURED &
MOBILE HOMES.
Family Owned Since 1992
ZULJKWFKRLFHKRPHVFRP
Manufactured
Homes/Lots
PRINEVILLE
1 acre building sites, public
water, power, privacy, secure area. Ideal for retirement or snowbirds. 6 miles
from new hospital & shopping. $29,900, some terms.
Dave 503-804-2652
PRINEVILLE
5 acres on new paved
dead end road. Well,
power, view, privacy. 6 miles to town. New hospital,
school, shopping. Close to
mtn & lake recreation
areas.
$69,000,
some
terms. Dave 503-804-2652
Wanted:
Looking to buy any & all
WWII (1941-1945) era
Jeeps or trailers. I pay
cash for Ford GPWs,
Willys MB & Bantam T3
or M100 Trailers.
Any condition, running
or not, or just a load of
spare parts.
No title, no problem!
I’ll come & haul it out &
leave CASH in your
hands. See website for
all the details:
www.ibuyoldjeeps.com
or call 503-631-8949
Boats/Motors/
Supplies
15’ SMOKERCRAFT: Nice,
EZ Loader trailer, 15hp
Honda Motor, electric start.
LOTS of extras! $3,250.
Ask for Al, 503-981-9673
between 8am and 5pm.
Cars For Sale
1(:0DUOHWWH
6SHFLDO
1404 sqft,4/12 roof, arch
shingles,dbl dormer, 9lite
door,glamour bath,
appl pkg, fireplace,
$69,900 finished on site
PRICE GUARANTEED
THROUGH MARCH
JandMHomes.com
503-722-4500
PLEASE NOTE:
ABBREVIATIONS destroy the
intent of your ad. Your ad
should be attractive and easy
to read. Let us help you put together your ad. Call us today at
(503) 503-620-SELL
2005 DODGE
WHEELCHAIR VAN
Excellent condition. 74k mi.
Automatic ramp. $14,000
obo. 503-668-2487
Houses for Rent
µ0(5&85<
ESTACADA
3 Bdrm, 2.5 Bath
1,500 sq. ft. house, newly
remodeled, built in 2000.
Includes
refrigerator,
range, microwave, propane
fireplace. W/D hookup in
nice utility room. $1,800
per mo., $1,100 deposit,
$600 pet deposit. Call
503-630-6982,
evenings
best.
Grand Marquis 2-dr, white,
199K miles, 460 engine,
skirts, past DEQ
2017 tags, $2300.
(503) 654-1101
You can find just about
anything in the
Classifieds.
Call 503-620-SELL
(503-620-9797)
Commercial
Property
LINCOLN CITY
Corner Building
FAST GROWING Lincoln
City, corner commercial
building, parking in rear,
$295,000 owner will
finance. 541-992-9495
NEED YARD HELP?
See the Classified
Service Directory!
To place your ad,
call (503) 620-SELL(7355).
FOB Hubbard, Or. Subject to code requirements.
Price subject to change without notice.
PO Box 407, Hubbard, OR. 97032
OR CCB#86204 WA CCB# PARKEB1071D6
YARD STEEL ART: Fish,
Bells, Chinese symbols,
Peace symbols, Flowers,
Birds & more! Very Heavy.
503-452-8459.
COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS
Houses for Rent
Homes for Sale
Acreage/Lots
ccb# 117653
PORTLAND SW:
Sheeters, Coffee Equip,
Electric Pallet Jacks,
Hussmann RL Doors, Meat
Saws and Grinders,
Combi Ovens and More!
8427 S 208th Street
Kent, WA 98031
PUBLIC LIVE/ONLINE
BIDDING!
‘80 COMMODORE
Newly remodeled Dbl wide
manufactured home,
2bdrms, with large closets,
1 bath, W/D hook-ups,
kitchen has new Pergo
flooring, new cabinets &
counter tops, New Dishwasher, sink & faucet,
electric range, living & bedroom has new carpet &
trim, New hotwater heater,
carport & two sheds, This
home is in a nice quiet 55
& older park with club
house & swimming pool.
space rent $540 includes
water/garbage, $19,500
owner will finance with 3/4
down or part trade for
truck. CALL MIKE
(503) 875-1531
LINCOLN CITY
BEACH HOUSE Retreat! Located in Roads
End, Lincoln City’s “premier area” with its own
special beach attractions. Across the street
from the Ocean, the construction is an authentic Cape Cod design. The home was originally
built by Oregon’s infamous artist, Ruth Dennis
Grover, where she lived for years before building another across the street. Our 4 bedroom,
two bath “second home” provides ocean views
from two decks, is 1900+ SF and has been
totally remodeled and updated with a plethora
of unique designer features and upscale
furnishings. Call 503-789-3161 for more
details. Listed at $447,700. No Realtors please.
(Claremont Community)
10176 SE 82nd Ave.
Clackamas 97015
503-774-1045
4500 NE 122nd Ave.
Portland 97230
503-257-4732
**Cornerstone Equip
Mgmt AUCTION**
VARIETY OF
COMMERCIAL FOOD
EQUPIMENT!
Sat March 14th
@10:30am
PRVW 3/13 9am-3pm
Manufactured
Homes/Lots
LAKE OSWEGO:
PORTLAND SE
HUGE CHURCH
Appliances
1,114 sf. Ground level. Enclosed garage plus extra parking. Private balconies.Ceiling fans. Mini split heating and
A/C system. Tile back splashes in kitchen, stainless steel
appliances, vinyl wood flooring, pantry built in, work areas,
W/D in unit. Wired for alarm systems. Offering 3 months
free gym membership at Timber Town Fitness with 1
year Lease signing! Small dogs 25 lbs and under allowed
with pet deposit. 271 SW Zobrist St. Estacada, OR 97023
For More Information Call 503-794-3760
C O A S TAL P RO P E R TI E S
HARRY:
COMIC BOOKS WANTED
Private collector seeks
comics from the ‘40s-’70s.
Appraisals given, cash pd.
(503) 528-1297
NOW LEASING! BRAND NEW!
BEAVERTON
House is alarmed
Antiques/Collectibles
$779,000 • MASTER ON THE MAIN
3 BEDROOM 2 1/2 BATH • 3 CAR GARAGE
3637 Sq ft • .49 of an Acre • RMLS # 15493418
This outstanding Pacific Northwest custom home is the
quintessential Craftsman & still featured w/ Mascord today! Top notch materials and naturescape have created
a very liveable but resort, retreat like feel. The open floor
plan is handcrafted with impressive timbers, stone, granite and Crate & Barrel fixtures. 4th bedroom option and
RV parking potential! No HOA w/ plenty of room for a
shop! ALL this situated on .49 of an acre on a private
cul-de-sac w/ walking trails and minutes to an abundance of neighborhood parks, schools and more trails!
Contact: Brandi Erskine for more info. 503-515-9972
BHG Realty Partners
%GUP%DWK3OH[LQ'7(VWDFDGD
NW Portland • 97229
www.estatesale-finder.c
om/provider/cynthiafisch
bornestatesales
Build Smart
Visit: www.quailhomes.com
Call Jon Girod, 360-907-5800
GLADYS:
Antq square farm table,
press back chairs, Eastlake dresser & washstand, Antq potty chair,
Childs Morris chair, Antq
art, new Fiesta dishes,
yard/garden, holiday,
fine/costume jewelry,
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26348.062014c
FOUND
Computers/
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28889.012015
Lost & Found
B6 LIFE
The Portland Tribune Thursday, March 12, 2015
RVs & Travel
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source of local news.
Multnomah Days
Tucker sisters
See your friends and neighbors
— Pages 9-11
Identical twins turn 100
— Page 5
Call 911
Police
Blotter
New monitoring devices help
victims on the scene
— See PAGE 3
— Page 6
PRSTRT. STD
AUTO CR
US POSTAGE PAID
GRESHAM, OR
PERMIT NO. 32
S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 2 • O N L I N E AT S W C O M M C O N N E C T I O N . C O M • N O . 2 3 3 • F R E E
wilsonvillespokesman.com
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2013 • THE WILSONVILLE LEADER IN NEWS FOR 28 YEARS
One last
patrol for
a retired
sheriff
Glass half full
Local author publishes e-memoir about life,
death and love
By DREW DAKESSIAN
The Connection
Chastity Glass is beautiful.
Her blonde hair falls in waves, just barely grazing her
tanned shoulders. She wears glasses, sometimes, and her unlined face is rarely without a small, comforting smile. She
looks like she could be a surfer, or possibly a librarian.
What sets her apart from the scores of other blonde, tan
and happy 30-somethings from California is a poem tattooed on her right forearm:
“i am scared
of being scared…
and so,
I am not
even if i am.”
She was 27 years old, living in Hollywood and recently
dumped when she met Anthony Glass, a handsome video
editor who worked at her office. They were instantly attracted to each other, exchanging poetic and increasingly flirtatious emails and quickly falling in love. Just a few months
after they started dating, their love story, a story of what she
calls “that young 20s love when you start making plans,” was
unexpectedly and indelibly altered.
He was diagnosed with stage III colon cancer.
When he told her, she didn’t think twice about whether to
stay with him: they were in this together
Rise and fall
Graduated athletes leave key
voids at Wilsonville
— See SPORTS, Page 14
VOLUME 28, ISSUE 36 • $1.00 / 35 CENTS HOME DELIVERY
Q With new control tower in works, airport boosts local job market
Bill Bell gets visit from
police K-9 unit, ride-along
with Wilsonville police
This DC-3 was
restored by
Aerometal
International, a
company
dedicated to
rebuilding
vintage aircraft
to FAA
standards.
By JOSH KULLA
The Spokesman
Back in 1971, law enforcement technology
did not include much, if anything, that could
remotely be considered digital.
That’s the world of policing inhabited by Bill
Bell, who served as sheriff of Wasco County from
1968 to 1971. Today, Bell is retired and lives in Wilsonville. And the tools used by current police officers are replete with technology only hinted at in
1960s cinema.
“Everything from the concept of a computer in
the car that automatically reads license plates and
talks to you, that’s ‘Star Trek’ stuff,” said Sgt.
˜Ãˆ`iÊ̅ˆÃÊi`ˆÌˆœ˜\ÊThe Buckeroo final standings
Local filmmakers rush for contest
Aurora airport becoming an
pÊ-iiÊ«>}iÊn
1SPEPPE
4MSRIIV
Page 12
Vol. 108 No. 49 Two sections, 24 pages
YOUR ONLINE SOURCE FOR
LOCAL NEWS
WilsonvilleSpokesman
19Ê£ä]ÊÓä£ÎÊÊÊ● 6"1Ê£ä£]Ê "°ÊÓn ●/Ê"Ê,Ê Ê 7-Ê",Ê£ääÊ9,-ÊÊÊ● f£Ê
Wednesday, August 14, 2013
$1.00
Crash critically
injures chief of
J.C. ambulance
By Holly M. Gill
News Editor
Susan Matheny/The Pioneer
Debris is strewn across U.S. Highway 97 on Aug. 8, at the scene of a crash that critically injured
Madras resident Don Heckathorn, chief of Jefferson County Emergency Medical Services.
The chief of the Jefferson County Emergency Medical
Services, Don Heckathorn, 64, was critically injured Aug.
8, when his motorcycle was struck by a car on U.S. Highway 97, at Dover Lane.
Heckathorn, who has managed JCEMS since March
2007, was northbound on the highway around 3 p.m.,
when an eastbound 1996 Cadillac, driven by Gerald Scott
Green, 36, of Prineville, failed to stop at the stop sign on
Dover Lane, and collided with Heckathorn's motorcycle.
According to Oregon State Police, which is investigating the crash, Heckathorn, who was riding a 2012 Harley
Davidson motorcycle and wearing a helmet, sustained
life-threatening injuries, and was transported by Lifeflight
to St. Charles Bend. Green was not injured.
No citations had been issued as of Monday.
The Jefferson County Sheriff's Office, JCEMS, Jefferson County Fire Department, and Oregon Department of
Transportation assisted at the scene. The highway was
closed for nearly an hour, and investigators remained at
See Ambulance on page 3
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A 19-year-old Molalla man
injured Sunday, June 30,
while trying to rescue his
drowning friend on the
Molalla River is asking for
help to find his backpack that
floated away on an innertube
during the ordeal.
Kyle Sauvageau had a
standard black
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strapped to his
LœÞÃ
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left it behind to
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Inside this edition: Canby’s annual 3-on-3 basketball tournament,
Nothing but Net, filled up the streets around Wait Park Saturday. —
See stories and photos on page 12, 13 and 15
Canby Herald
SERVING CENTRAL OREGON SINCE 1881
CentralOregonian
M
K
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF CROOK COUNTY
THE CANBY LEADER IN LOCAL NEWS FOR 107 YEARS l JULY 31, 2013 l WWW.CANBYHERALD.COM l VOLUME 107, NO. 31 l $1 ON THE STAND, 50 CENTS HOME DELIVERY
50 CENTS
Downtown
parking
issues get
exposure
■ Among all 36 counties
the local weekly wage
ranked fourth in the
Fourth Quarter 2012
BY RAY HUGHEY
[email protected]
Members of the Canby business
community met July 23 as the
Downtown Parking Task Force to
address parking issues in the city’s
core.
“We invited downtown business
owners and managers to come together
to discuss some potential parking
changes,” said Jamie Stickel, manager
of the city’s Main Street program.
Stickel led the session attended by
about 15 business people. Mayor Brian
Hodson also participated in the meeting held in the police department community room.
READ: PARKING, Page 18
PRINEVILLE, OREGON, FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013
VOL. CXXXI — NO. 71
Crook County’s average weekly wage
Walden
confident ranks higher than most of the state
about
Bowman
legislation
Jason Chaney
Central Oregonian
Crook County may have one of
the highest unemployment rates
in Oregon, but those who earn an
income make more on average
than most the state’s other counties.
A recent report compiled by the
U.S. Department of Labor’s
Bureau of Labor and Statistics
revealed that Crook County ranks
fourth in weekly wage among all
36 counties for Fourth Quarter
2012, and second out of the 31
counties with fewer than 75,000
residents.
Washington County tops the
state at an average of $1,101 per
week, while Multnomah County
averages $988, Benton County
$918, and Crook County $908. All
four counties exceed the state
average wage of $871 per week,
but three of them fall short of the
$1,000-per-week national average.
Crook
County
Economic
Development Manager Russ
Deboodt attributes the higher
See WAGES, page A7
RUSS
DEBOODT
FIRED UP ABOUT
FIRE COVERAGE
TRAINING
to be ready to take care of
Congressman Greg Walden addresses
local business leaders during a round
table meeting this last Wednesday.
BY RAY HUGHEY
[email protected]
The Pamplin Media Group’s 24 newspapers offer more original, local news from more places
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477956.062514
Scott Granger addresses the Powell Butte residents during Tuesday evening’s meeting at the Powell Butte community center. A total
of 135 community residents attended the meeting.
The Portland Tribune Thursday, March 12, 2015
Ballard Street
Portland!Life
Scary Gary
LIFE B7
Free Range
Dog Eat Doug
Strange Brew
Dogs of C Kennel
501928.020315
Nest Heads
B8 SPORTS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, March 12, 2015
TribunePuzzles
The Crossword Puzzle
SOLUTIONS
“UNIVERSAL TRUTH” By Pawel Fludzinski Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
'HJUHHRI
interest?
90 Biblical words
before and after
“for”
91 Bearing
92 Vulgar
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monogram
'RXJODV$GDPV·
facetious answer
to the Ultimate
Question of Life,
the Universe, and
Everything
97 Arctic blast
99 Phil Collins gear
101 Like some
landings: Abbr.
104 But, to Brutus
9HUGXQ·VULYHU
'HQBB
Nederland
110 Aquarium
favorites
112 Its first printing
had 95-Across
lines on most
pages
116 Hatch, as a plot
17 Bread brushed
with ghee
18 Harmonize
19 O.T. book
24 Getting __ years
29 Night fliers
32 LAX postings
33 Columbus Blue
-DFNHWV·RUJ
DOWN
$SKURGLWH·VORYH
1 Tijuana locale
2 Take __ the waist: 35 Hit lightly
36 Taj __
alter
37 Protein-building
3 Back in the day
acid
4 Parting wish
38 “The Gates of
5 Yale student
Hell” sculptor
6 Checkered start?
40 Pond ducks
7 Legalese adverb
42 “The Jungle Book”
3KLODWHOLVW·VLWHP
pack leader
9 It has 95-Across
43 Lien, say
spots
44 Contract
10 Mysterious
stipulations
character
46 Magic, on
11 Hosp. areas
scoreboards
12 Mournful mother
47 Grandma
of myth
50 Brunch cocktail
13 Spanish titles
'UDIWFKRLFH
14 Stubborn one
52 Farm abode
'LVWDQWWUDYHOHU
55 Bridle part
16 King who died at
56 Egyptian god of
95-Across
117 Increase gradually
118 Kind of watch or
warning
119 Funny blunder
120 Quakes
121 Cheaters, to
teachers
the dead
59 95-Across
appears on street
signs near this Big
Apple landmark
60 Pull
62 NYSE overseer
65 Part of RSVP
66 Painter Fra Filippo
__
67 Makeup mogul
Elizabeth
68 Scottish
landowner
70 Revolutions,
perhaps: Abbr.
71 Arg. miss
72 High schooler
73 Iconic bull
74 Its atomic number
is 95-Across
75 Lean-__: sheds
76 Jazz title
77 Cartoon stinker
78 Part of un año
80 Impressionist
John
81 Honorarium
84 Adorn
86 London gallery
87 Sometime it goes
89 Explosive
compounds
91 __ Butterworth
93 Brake neighbor,
informally
95 Melt together
0REVWHU·VFRGHRI
silence
98 Elicit
100 Hayseeds
101 Longing
102 First-century
emperor
103 Cassoulet, e.g.
&RXVWHDX·V
milieux
107 “This guy walks
into __ ...”
108 “M*A*S*H” star
109 Subj. for Euclid
111 Sun. delivery
113 Cable co. that
merged with AT&T
114 Poly- ending
115 Uplifting wear
Sudoku
Answers
Puzzle 1
Puzzle 1
Sudoku
Puzzles
Puzzle 2
Crossword
Answers
3/12/15
©2015 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
[email protected]
1400 NE Second Ave.
Portland, OR
503.736.3642 | www.pacificacalaroga.com
484921.070814
Keeping minds
& bodies ACTIVE
for 47 years!
Puzzle 2
YOUR ADVERTISEMENT HERE
CROSSWORD
480263.030414
ACROSS
*HQHVSOLFHU·V
field
8 They have strings
attached
14 In __: sort of
20 Astronaut Fisher,
the first mother in
space
21 He played House
22 Spreads out
23 His number
95-Across is
now permanently
retired
25 Scholar
26 Fit to __
27 Habituate
28 Move up and
down
30 Piece of cake
31 Peruvian coin
34 Makes bubbly
,W·VURXJKO\
95-Across
kilometers
39 Busy co. on
9DOHQWLQH·V'D\
41 Short-lived 1765
statute
45 Hardly virtuous
46 Classical theater
48 Effervesce
49 Avoids detection
50 Pacific
archipelago
53 In __ and out ...
6LQJHU'L)UDQFR
55 President number
95-Across
57 Gracile
'RJ·VDJH
61 Op-ed pieces
62 Bridge coups
63 Tiller opening?
64 “Understood”
66 Bochco series
*DPEOHU·V
strategy
75 Pedicab, e.g.
79 Persian Gulf land
80 It contains
95-Across crude
gallons
82 Wine: Pref.
6HDQ&RPEV·
stage name
85 Like some wine
glasses
86 Hosiery hue
Family Style Customer Service
Delivery Service $ Custom Cutting $ Special Orders
7609 SE Stark St.
(503) 254-7387
Mrplywoodinc.com
by Eugene Shaffer
SOLUTIONS
Answer
3/12
CRYPTOQUIP
©2015 King Features, Inc. 3/12
3/12
3/12
WHEN THE TWO
STEAKS ON THE
GRILL GOT INTO A
BAD ARGUMENT, DO
YOU THINK THEY
WERE EMBROILED?
Cryptoquip solution:
HOME DELIVERY coming to a mailbox near you!
Getting your Portland news is easier than you think.
Published every Tuesday and Thursday | www.portlandtribune.com | 503.684.0360
SPORTS B9
The Portland Tribune Thursday, March 12, 2015
Eggers: New OSU offense ‘fast’
TRIBUNE FILE PHOTO
(the receiver) group more than
any group.”
■ Before spring drills began,
Andersen indicated he would
give the seven quarterback
prospects equal repetitions for
two weeks, then narrow it to
three for the final three weeks
of camp.
On Saturday, that timeline
changed.
“We’ll move forward a little
quicker than we thought initially,” the first-year Beaver
mentor said. “The top three
kids will start to get more reps
on Tuesday. We can’t continually have seven quarterbacks
go through the rotation and
make any strides. We’ll whittle
that down, and you’ll see it
Tuesday at practice.”
Andersen didn’t provide any
hints, but the guess here is the
three will be Del Rio, the 6-1,
205-pound sophomore who
backed up Sean Mannion a
year ago; Nick Mitchell, a 6-2,
195-pound redshirt freshman,
and Seth Collins, the 6-3,
185-pound true freshman from
El Cajon, Calif., who graduated
early from high school.
Del Rio had his moments in
the scrimmages, throwing
some good balls and once
sprinting left and diving for a
first down. Mitchell shows a
good arm and has some running skills.
Collins is an intriguing prospect, a youngster who threw
for 1,013 yards and 12 touchdowns and ran for 988 yards
and 17 TDs as a prep senior
last fall. He has sprinter’s
speed, seems to like to take off
with the ball and “made a couple of plays with his feet” during the scrimmages, Andersen
noted.
I can’t imagine the Beavers
would turn the starting QB job
over to a true freshman. I’m
guessing, though, Collins is
the type of athlete the coaches
envision running their offense
[email protected]
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moving forward.
■ The quarterbacks seem to
enjoy the new offense.
“It’s fast,” said Del Rio,
whose father — Oakland Raiders head coach Jack Del Rio —
watched practice and visited
with Andersen afterward for
about 10 minutes. “It’s fun
when we can execute. We need
to do a better job as quarterbacks of having more polished
offensive execution. It’s going
to take some time. I’d like to
see us make progress faster
than some people expect.”
“All the quarterbacks are
athletic,” redshirt freshman
Marcus McMaryion said. “We
all have enough athleticism to
operate the offense. It’ll come
down to who functions in the
offense the best.”
Del Rio, who transferred to
OSU from Alabama last year
and won a battle with Brent
VanderVeen for the backup
role, said the competition is
nothing new for him.
“At Alabama, we had six
quarterbacks, and then (he
competed) with Brent last
year, so this is really my third
time,” Del Rio said. “You have
to focus on doing the best you
can, being positive, being a
good communicator and trying
to put the ball in the playmaker’s hands.”
■ Storm Woods was suited
up and did some things during
the practice, but wasn’t involved in the scrimmage sessions. When I asked Andersen
about the 6-foot, 205-pound senior three-year starter at running back, the coach was
vague. I asked if there were an
injury. “Nothing major,” the
coach said. “We need to get
him going. He’ll be more involved on Tuesday.”
Assuming he is healthy,
Woods should be the starter.
Then it would be a battle between Brown, the 5-10,
205-pound junior, and Damien
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PORTLAND TRIBUNE PUBLIC NOTICE 031215
View legals online at: http://publicnotices.portlandtribune.com
PUBLIC AND LEGAL NOTICES
These notices give information concerning actions planned and
implemented by attorneys, financial institutions and government
agencies. They are intended to keep you and every citizen fully informed.
Space-reservation deadline for all legal notices is Thursday 10 am
one week prior to publication. Please call Louise Faxon at (503) 546-0752
or e-mail [email protected] to book your notice.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON
FOR MULTNOMAH COUNTY Juvenile Department
In the Matter of HEMPE, KATIE, A Child.
Case No. 2002-81896
PUBLISHED SUMMONS
TO:
Jennifer Hempe
IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OF OREGON:
A petition has been filed asking the court to establish
paternity to the above-named child. YOU ARE DIRECTED TO
FILE A WRITTEN ANSWER to the petition NO LATER THAN
30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF LAST PUBLICATION
OF THIS SUMMONS, specified herein, admitting or denying the allegations in the petition and informing the court
of your current residence address, mailing address and telephone number. YOUR ANSWER SHOULD BE MAILED TO
Multnomah Juvenile Complex, 1401 NE 68th Ave, Portland,
Oregon 97213. You are further directed to appear at any subsequent court-ordered hearing. AN ATTORNEY MAY NOT
ATTEND ANY COURT-ORDERED HEARING IN YOUR
PLACE. THEREFORE, YOU MUST APPEAR EVEN IF
YOUR ATTORNEY ALSO APPEARS.
This summons is published pursuant to the order of the
circuit court judge of the above-entitled court, dated February
10, 2015. The order directs that this summons be published
once each week for four consecutive weeks, making four publications in all, in a published newspaper of general circulation in
Multnomah County.
Date of first publication: February 19, 2015.
Date of last publication: March 12, 2015.
NOTICE
READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY
IF YOU DO NOT FILE A WRITTEN ANSWER
AS DIRECTED ABOVE, OR DO NOT APPEAR AT ANY
SUBSEQUENT COURT-ORDERED HEARING, the court
may proceed in your absence without further notice and
ESTABLISH PATERNITY to the above-named child either
ON THE DATE AN ANSWER IS REQUIRED BY THIS
SUMMONS OR ON A FUTURE DATE, and may make such
orders and take such action as authorized by law.
RIGHTS AND OBLIGATIONS
(1)
YOU HAVE A RIGHT TO BE
REPRESENTED BY AN ATTORNEY IN THIS MATTER.
If you are currently represented by an attorney, CONTACT
YOUR ATTORNEY IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING
THIS NOTICE. Your previous attorney may not be representing you in this matter.
IF YOU CANNOT AFFORD TO HIRE AN
ATTORNEY and you meet the state’s financial guidelines,
you are entitled to have an attorney appointed for you at
state expense. TO REQUEST APPOINTMENT OF AN
ATTORNEY TO REPRESENT YOU AT STATE EXPENSE,
YOU MUST IMMEDIATELY CONTACT the Multnomah
Juvenile Department at 1401 NE 68th Ave, phone number 503988-3463, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. for
further information.
IF YOU WISH TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY, please retain
one as soon as possible. If you need help finding an attorney, you
may call the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (503)
684-3763 or toll free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636.
IF YOU ARE REPRESENTED BY AN ATTORNEY,
IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO MAINTAIN CONTACT
WITH YOUR ATTORNEY AND TO KEEP YOUR ATTORNEY
ADVISED OF YOUR WHEREABOUTS.
(2)
If you contest the petition, the court will
schedule a hearing on the allegations of the petition and
order you to appear personally and may schedule other hearings related to the petition and order you to appear personally. IF YOU ARE ORDERED TO APPEAR, YOU MUST
APPEAR PERSONALLY IN THE COURTROOM, UNLESS
THE COURT HAS GRANTED YOU AN EXCEPTION
IN ADVANCE UNDER ORS 419B.918 TO APPEAR BY
OTHER MEANS INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO,
TELEPHONIC OR OTHER ELECTRONIC MEANS. AN
ATTORNEY MAY NOT ATTEND THE HEARING(S) IN
YOUR PLACE.
PETITIONER’S ATTORNEY
Patrick G. Ward
Assistant Attorney General
Department of Justice
1515 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 410
Portland, OR 97201
Phone: (971) 673-1880
ISSUED this 12th day of February, 2015.
Issued by:
/s/ Patrick G. Ward
Patrick G. Ward #024788
Assistant Attorney General
Publish 02/19, 02/26, 03/05, 03/12/2015.
PT1343
FIRST
EDITION
TERRY BOYD’S
5am to 9am
Monday-Friday
9am
5am to
to Noon
9am
Monday-Friday
with Tim Hohl and Terry Travis
Call Tom Fitkin
Fitkin
488582.111314
Already, new
Oregon State
football coach
Gary Andersen is
narrowing the
field of
quarterback
candidates in
spring camp from
seven to three to
see who will get
the most reps the
rest of the way.
Haskins, the 5-9, 225-pound
sophomore, for the backup
role.
“We have to get at least two
running backs we feel comfortable with,” Andersen said.
The running backs “haven’t
had a lot of opportunity to get
hit yet. We’ll look at it when
we have a big scrimmage (next
Saturday); it will be a good day
to see where we’re at.”
■ When I focused on the defense, I noticed linebackers
Darrell Songy and Rommel
Mageo making plays. Songy —
the 6-foot, 225-pound sophomore who redshirted due to a
season-long suspension last
year — was one of the few
players Andersen singled out
afterward.
“Songy had a nice practice,” Andersen said. “He had
a lot of energy and excitement, which he always does.
He made some nice plays.”
I also noticed tackle Kyle
Peko, whose long battle to
gain academic eligibility has
grown to almost epic proportions in Beaver Nation.
Sources say coaches are confident he will pass a class
this spring and be eligible for
August training camp. If it
happens, I envision Peko and
Grimble being the starter Dtackles.
■ Cyril Noland-Lewis — a
6-1, 205-pound junior who is in
a battle for a starting safety
job — said Saturday’s practice
amped up the enthusiasm on
the defensive side.
“We were a little more excited to put on the pads,” said
Noland-Lewis, who had an interception. “It was more gamelike, more real. That’s what
‘Coach A’ preaches.
“Today the defense won, but
that’s no reason to get cocky.
Everybody still has lots of
work to do.”
How is the new coaching
staff?
“They get excited a lot,” Noland-Lewis said. “They jump
around. You may catch them
dancing. It’s spontaneous.
Sometimes you don’t expect
that from your coaches.
“But that’s a part of football,
to keep the high energy up.
Nobody wants to go through
the motions and be boring, because that’s not how it is on
(game-day) Saturdays. We
want to keep that same kind of
approach at practice.”
508020.031015
won it, so it’s 1-1-1.”
■ Offensive players wore
white, defensive players black
and quarterbacks orange jerseys over shoulder pads, with
shorts. Even without hip or
thigh protection, Andersen allowed plenty of contact during
the scrimmages — except on
the QBs. Defenders often
brought ball carriers to the
turf, and there were some
pretty good collisions.
■ I watched the offense
more than the defense. This
was OSU’s third practice and
its first with pads, so it’s very
early, but I was interested to
see which players got the first
reps.
The first offensive group
was Luke Del Rio at quarterback; Chris Brown at running
back; Victor Bolden, Jordan
Villamin, Rahmel Dockery and
Hunter Jarmon at receiver; Sean Harlow at left tackle, Fred
Lauina at left guard, Josh
Mitchell at center, Kammy
Delp at right guard and Dustin
Stanton at right tackle.
When the Beavers went
with a tight end, Caleb Smith,
Kellen Clute and Nall all got
plenty of time. Nall, the promising 6-2, 250-pound redshirt
freshman out of Central Catholic, already has caught the
eye of the new coaching staff,
it would seem.
■ Delp’s presence in the
starting O-line surprised me.
The 6-3, 345-pound redshirt
freshman — who played on the
scout team a year ago — is a
load, but he didn’t seem to be
moving well. He may need a
spring and summer of conditioning to prepare him for a
starting role next fall.
“Kammy is very gifted athletically,” Andersen told me after practice. “He’s trying to
grasp things mentally.”
■ Several players who are
rehabbing or recovering from
injuries sat out the practice,
including tackle Gavin Andrews and center Isaac Seumalo. I would expect Andrews to
start in place of Stanton at
right tackle when he is
healthy.
I saw Seumalo and had a
short conversation. He told me
his twice surgically repaired
left foot is coming along, but
he hasn’t yet been cleared to
run. There is plenty of time
until the Beavers’ Sept. 5 opener, but we talked about him
needing to show patience.
That’s hard for a kid who
hasn’t played football in more
than 15 months.
I think the OSU coaches will
proceed with the idea that, if
Seumalo can get healthy and
be available to them, it will be
a bonus.
■ Among others who didn’t
participate in contact drills
were defensive linemen Jalen
Grimble, Luke Hollingsworth
and Noke Tago, offensive lineman Robert Olson and receiver Richard Mullaney. It will be
interesting to see how Mullaney — a great possession receiver who missed most of last
season after elbow surgery —
figures into the rotation in the
fall.
The receivers are OSU’s
strongest group, but Baldwin
was less than satisfied with
what he saw Saturday.
“They are the group that is
supposed to be the shining
star on this team, but that star
wasn’t very bright today,”
Baldwin said. “They didn’t
catch the ball very well; they
didn’t play with confidence
and enthusiasm. When you’re
young at quarterback like we
are, you need to give them
help. I was disappointed in
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The Portland Tribune Thursday, March 12, 2015
Leykam: Sand volleyball program in works
■ From page 1
rehabbed annually.
UP recently completed a $2.5
million renovation at the Chiles
Center, expanding the ticket office, men’s locker rooms,
weight room, training room
and a sports Hall of Fame room.
A $1 million Joe Etzel Field
project this year reaped a new
Astroturf field, scoreboard,
bullpen and fencing, and a
grass berm was added down
the right-field line. Fundraising
for lighting that will allow for
twilight and night games is expected to be completed in time
for next season.
Over the last year, a team
room and locker rooms have
been renovated and a live video
streaming operation added at
the Louisiana Pacific Tennis
Center.
On the horizon, however,
looms something as big or bigger than anything that has happened in years in terms of UP
athletic facilities. The university owns 35 acres of land along
the Willamette River along the
south side of campus. Tentative
plans for the site call for construction of a track and field
plant, a tennis center, two fullsize soccer practice fields, and
a boat house and dock for the
crew program.
Initially, the Pilots had
looked at moving baseball
there, too, but opted for the
sport to remain at its current
site next to the Chiles Center
and Merlo Field sites.
“The river property will be a
game-changer,” Leykam says.
“We’ve remediated the land,
and we’ll start raising money
for (the project) soon. In the
next 18 to 36 months, we’ll begin the project.”
In recent years, men’s cross
country and track and field
have been Portland’s most successful programs. Coaches Rob
Conner and Ian Soloff have done it without a track. Pilot runners and track and field athletes train at Roosevelt High.
“We want to continue on the
success of the programs Rob
and Ian have built,” Leykam
says. “We need our own track
facility. We have also joined the
Mountain Pacific Sports Federation — with schools such as
Stanford, Oregon and UCLA —
for indoor track.”
Conner has spearheaded the
Pilots’ most successful program during his 25 years as
head coach of men’s cross
COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY OF PORTLAND
University of Portland athletic director Scott Leykam realizes the importance of the men’s basketball program for the success of Pilots sports,
noting 93 percent of the revenue is driven by that one program.
country and track, winning 23
conference cross country titles.
Since 1996, his cross country
teams have finished among the
top 10 at the NCAA Championships seven times, including
third last fall. Conner’s cross
country teams have reached
the NCAA meet 10 straight
years; in that duration, Oregon
has made it eight times. The
Pilots have advanced at least
one runner to the NCAA track
and field championships 23
straight years.
Under Soloff, the UP women
have won the WCC cross country championship several
times, finishing second last fall.
The Pilots’ most important
sport, though, is men’s basketball.
“From a conference standpoint, 93 percent of the revenue
is driven by men’s basketball,”
Leykam says. “Gonzaga has
dominated. Saint Mary’s has
been consistently strong, and
the other schools are trying to
carve their path.”
In his nine years as head basketball coach, Eric Reveno is
128-156 overall, including 54-84
in WCC play. The Pilots, who
lost to BYU in the semifinals of
the conference tournament
Monday night, have never
reached the tourney finals during Reveno’s reign. They have
had winning league records
only twice, finishing third at 9-5
in 2008-09 and third at 10-4 in
2009-10. The Pilots tied for sixth
place among the 10 teams at
7-11 this season.
Leykam and Reveno worked
together at Stanford, where
Reveno was an assistant coach
for 10 years.
“I’ve known Eric for almost
20 years,” Leykam says. “Eric
has been at the University of
Portland for nine years. He
wouldn’t be here if he didn’t
bring value.”
Asked if Reveno’s job is in
jeopardy, Leykam says, “You
can’t just look at the coaches.
We have to look in the mirror.
Are we doing enough with facilities, cost of attendance, recruiting budgets, everything, to
make sure our coaches are on
an even footing with our
peers?”
Average attendance for UP
men’s basketball games at the
4,852-seat Chiles Center this
season was 2,156. That’s less
than the 2,971 average for UP
women’s soccer — Portland’s
other major program — last fall
at Merlo Field.
The Pilots were a national
power for years, first under the
late Clive Charles, then with
current coach Garrett Smith.
From 1994-2005, they reached at
least the national semifinals
seven times and the finals three
times, winning in 2002 and ’05.
After going 17-3-1 and losing
in the first round of the NCAA
playoffs in 2013, the Pilots were
7-9-3 last fall, missing the national tournament for the first
time since 1999. In 12 seasons
as head coach, Smith is 200-4720, with seven conference titles.
“We lost some key pieces
from our 2013 team and had
some trouble last season,”
Leykam says. “Women’s soccer
has become more competitive
nationally, with the Pac-12,
ACC and SEC placing more em-
phasis. We play a very difficult
schedule. We don’t dodge anybody. We have a good recruiting class coming in. We’ll look
to turn the corner next year. I
like where we’re positioned in
the next two to three years.”
Men’s soccer, which averaged 1,148 fans per home date
in 2014, has struggled in recent
years under Bill Irwin. The Pilots were 4-11-4 overall and 0-61 in conference play last fall
and are 24-42-8 over the past
three seasons. They haven’t
reached the NCAA Tournament since 2009.
Under Charles — from 19862002, UP was 213-91-32 —winning five league crowns and
twice reaching the NCAA semifinals.
“I don’t think anyone is
pleased with last year’s results,” Leykam says. “The biggest thing is to adjust to the
recruiting landscape. I like our
returnees and the kids we
signed for next season. But we
can’t finish at the bottom in
men’s soccer, and Bill agrees
with me. The conference has
gotten better, but we should be
in the top half of the league.”
Most of the other UP athletic
programs have not been successful in terms of record.
Aaron Gross’ men’s tennis
teams have had several winning seasons in his 18 years
and tied for third in the WCC
last season — he was named
conference coach of the year —
but generally finish in the middle of the pack. During Susie
Campbell-Gross’ 20 years at the
women’s tennis helm, the Pilots
have never finished higher
than fourth.
In his 17th year as baseball
coach, Chris Sperry has experienced only one winning season
and had a career record
through last weekend of 283472 overall and 122-140 in conference action. The Pilots were
4-15 this season heading into a
Tuesday matchup with Oregon
State.
“The competition has gotten
tougher, and we’re competing
in a cold-weather environment
against WCC schools such as
Pepperdine, Loyola-Marymount and San Diego,” Leykam
says. “But with the money
we’ve invested in the program
and facilities comes higher expectations.”
Under new coaches this season, the Pilots finished 7-23 in
women’s’ volleyball (Brent
Crouch) and 4-26 in women’s
basketball (Cheryl Sorenson).
Leykam says he is optimistic the
new regimes will produce better
results in both programs.
Leykam says the Pilots will
likely add a women’s sand volleyball program in the near future.
“Every other school in the
conference is going to have it,”
he says.
Don’t look for a change in conference affiliation, Leykam says.
“I like the WCC a lot,” he
says. “For us, the institutions
fit, and it’s not just geography.
We’re all private, faith-based
institutions, so we have similar
models.”
All the while, Leykam will
continue to focus on fundraising to make UP programs more
attractive to recruits, who can
help produce winning teams
that fans want to watch.
“We need to step up some
sports,” he says. “I like where
we are in others. We’re working
very hard to get every program
moving in the right direction.”
[email protected]
@kerryeggers
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SPORTS B11
The Portland Tribune Thursday, March 12, 2015
Thursday, March 12
Prep boys basketball: 6A consolation, Chiles Center, 9 a.m.,
10:45 a.m. ... 5A semifinals, Gill
Coliseum, Corvallis, 1:30 p.m.,
3:15 p.m.
Prep girls basketball: Class 6A
quarterfinals, Chiles Center,
Roseburg-South Medford, 1:30
p.m., Jesuit-South Salem, 3:15
p.m., Sheldon-Beaverton, 6:30
p.m., Southridge-St. Mary’s
Academy, 8:15 p.m.
College men’s basketball: Pac12 quarterfinals, MGM Grand
Garden Arena, Las Vegas, Nev., Cal
or Washington State-Arizona, noon,
Arizona State or USC-UCLA, 2:30
p.m., Oregon State or ColoradoOregon, 6 p.m., Stanford or
Washington-Utah, 8:30 p.m. (first
three games Pac-12 Networks, late
game ESPN) ... Big Sky quarterfinals, Missoula, Mont., Eastern
Washington-Idaho, 10 a.m.,
Sacramento State-Portland State,
12:30 p.m., Northern ArizonaNorthern Colorado, 4:30 p.m.,
Montana-Weber State, 7 p.m.
College acrobatics and tumbling: Baylor at Oregon, 6:30 p.m.
Mariners: Seattle-Oakland exhibition, noon.
Saturday, March 14
Friday, March 13
Winterhawks: Prince George at
Portland, Memorial Coliseum, 7
p.m.
Prep boys basketball: 6A tournament, Chiles Center, 9 a.m.
fourth-place game, 1:30 p.m. thirdplace game, 3:15 p.m. championship game.
Blazers: Detroit at Portland, 7
p.m. (CSNNW).
Winterhawks: Portland at
Spokane, 7 p.m.
Prep boys basketball: Class 6A
semifinals, Chiles Center, 1:30
Friday, March 13
TV&Radio
Thursday, March 12
Prep girls basketball: JesuitSouth Salem, 3:15 p.m.,
Beaverton-Sheldon, 6:30 p.m.,
Southridge-St. Mary’s Academy,
8:15 p.m., Hillsboro game TBD,
KUIK (1360 AM)
College men’s basketball:
Pac-12 quarterfinals, Las Vegas,
noon, 2:30 p.m., 6 p.m. (OregonOregon State or Colorado), Pac12 Networks, 8:30 p.m., ESPN ...
ACC quarterfinal, 6:30 p.m.,
KFXX (1080 AM) ... La SalleMassachusetts, 9 a.m., NBC
Sports ... West Virginia-Baylor,
9:30 a.m., ESPN2 ... St. John’sProvidence, 11:30 a.m., FS1 ...
Utah State-Wyoming, 2:30 p.m.,
CBS Sports ... Saint Joseph’s-St.
Bonaventure, 3:30 p.m., NBC
Sports ... Northwestern-Indiana,
3:30 p.m., ESPN2 ... Oklahoma
State-Oklahoma, 6:30 p.m.,
ESPN2 ... Xavier-Butler, 6:30
p.m., FS1 ... Fresno StateColorado State, 8:30 p.m., CBS
Sports
NBA: Memphis at Washington,
4 p.m., TNT ... Cleveland at San
Antonio, 6:30 p.m., TNT
NHL: Los Angeles at
Vancouver, 7 p.m., CSNNW
PGA: Valspar Championship,
Palm Harbor, Fla., 9:30 a.m.,
Golf Channel
Blazers: Detroit at Portland, 7
p.m., CSNNW, KPOJ (620 AM),
KKRZ (102.3 FM)
Winterhawks: Portland at
Spokane, 7 p.m., Root Sports,
KPAM (860 AM)
Prep boys basketball:
Southridge of West Linn-South
Eugene or South Salem, 1:30 p.m.,
Jesuit or Lakeridge-Central CatholicNorth Medford, 3:15 p.m.,
Wilsonville game TBD, KUIK (1360
AM)
Prep girls basketball: Hillsboro,
Banks, 6A semifinal games TBD,
KUIK (1360 AM)
College men’s basketball: Pac12 semifinals, Las Vegas, 6 p.m.,
Pac-12 Networks, 8:30 p.m. ESPN,
KXTG (750 AM) ... ACC semifinal,
6:30 p.m., KFXX (1080 AM)
College baseball: Oregon at Cal,
7 p.m., KUIK (1360 AM) ... Oregon
State at Arizona State, 6:30 p.m.,
KPOJ (620 AM) ... MemphisTemple, 11 a.m., ESPN2
Mariners: Seattle-Milwaukee
exhibition, 1 p.m., Root Sports
PGA: Valspar Championship,
Palm Harbor, Fla., noon., Golf
Channel
Jesuit, Lakeridge games TBD, KUIK
(1360 AM)
Prep girls basketball: 6A championship game, 8:30 p.m., KFXX
(1080 AM) ... Banks, Beaverton,
Jesuit, Southridge games TBD, KUIK
(1360 AM)
College men’s basketball: Pac12 championship game, Las Vegas,
ESPN, KXTG (750 AM) ... ACC
championship game, 5:30 p.m.,
KFXX (1080 AM) ... SEC semifinals,
10 a.m., 12:15 p.m., KXTG (750
AM) ... Stony Brook-Albany, 8 a.m.,
ESPN2
College baseball: Oregon at Cal,
6 p.m. ... Oregon State at Arizona
State, 6 p.m., Pac-12 Networks,
KPOJ (620 AM)
College softball: Oregon State
at Oregon, 2 p.m., Pac-12
Networks ... Arizona at Cal, noon,
Pac-12 Networks ... Arizona StateWashington, 4 p.m., Pac-12
Networks
MLB: San Francisco-Los Angeles
Dodgers, 1 p.m., KUIK (1360 AM)
MLS: San Jose at Seattle, 7
p.m., Root Sports
PGA: Valspar Championship,
Palm Harbor, Fla., 10 a.m., Golf
Channel, noon KGW (8)
Sunday, March 15
Saturday, March 14
Winterhawks: Prince George at
Portland, Memorial Coliseum, 7
p.m., KPAM (860 AM)
Prep boys basketball: 6A
championship game, 3:15 p.m.,
KFXX (1080 AM) ... Southridge,
Blazers: Portland at Toronto, 4
p.m., CSNNW, KPOJ (620 AM),
KKRZ (102.3 FM)
Winterhawks: Spokane at
Portland, Memorial Coliseum, 5
p.m., KPAM (860 AM)
Timbers: Los Angeles at
History
Sunday, March 15
Blazers: Portland at Toronto, 4
p.m. (CSNNW).
Winterhawks: Spokane at
Portland, Memorial Coliseum, 5
p.m.
Timbers: Los Angeles at
Portland, 4 p.m. (FS1).
College men’s basketball: NAIA
D-II semifinals, Point Lookout, Mo.
College baseball: Oregon at
Cal, 1 p.m. ... Oregon State at
Arizona State, 1 p.m. (Pac-12
Networks) ... Portland at San
Diego, 1 p.m. ... Pacific at Lewis &
Clark, noon
College softball: Oregon State
at Oregon, 11 a.m. (Pac-12
Networks) ... Portland State-Saint
Mary’s 10 a.m. ... George Fox at
Lewis & Clark, noon doubleheader.
College golf: Lewis & Clark
Pioneer Invitational, Heron Lakes
Golf Club.
Monday, March 16
Blazers: Portland at Washington,
4 p.m. (CSNNW).
Prep baseball: ClevelandMcNary at Volcanoes Stadium,
Keizer ... Roosevelt at The Dalles ...
Benson at Glencoe ... Franklin at
Reynolds ... Central CatholicSprague at Concordia, 4:30 p.m. ...
David Douglas at Sunset, 5 p.m.
Prep softball: Cleveland-North
Salem, Woodstock Park, 4 p.m. ...
Grant-McNary, Wilshire Park, 4 p.m.
.. Madison at McKay.
Prep boys lacrosse: Central
Catholic at Lakeridge, 7:15 p.m.
Prep girls lacrosse: Central
Catholic-Grant, Strasser Field, 7:30
p.m. ... Cleveland at Wilson, 7:45
p.m.
(all times Pacific)
Portland, 4 p.m., FS1, KXTG (750
AM, 102.9 FM)
Mariners: Seattle-Los Angeles
Dodgers exhibition, 1 p.m., Root
Sports
College men’s basketball: Big
Ten championship, noon, KFXX
(1080 AM) ... SEC championship
game, 10 a.m., KXTG (750 AM)
College baseball: Oregon at Cal,
1 p.m., KUIK (1360 AM) ... Oregon
State at Arizona State, 1 p.m., Pac12 Networks, KPOJ (620 AM)
College softball: Oregon State at
Oregon, 11 a.m., Pac-12 Networks
NBA: Chicago at Oklahoma City,
10 a.m., KATU (2), KFXX (1080
AM) ... Houston at Los Angeles
Clippers, 12:30 p.m., KATU (2),
KFXX (1080 AM)
NHL: Detroit at Pittsburgh, 9:30
a.m., KGW (8) ... Boston at
Washington, 4:30 p.m., NBC Sports
MLB: San Francisco-Arizona, 3
p.m., KUIK (1360 AM)
MLS: New England at New York
City, 2 p.m., ESPN2
PGA: Valspar Championship,
Palm Harbor, Fla., 10 a.m., Golf
Channel, noon KGW (8)
NASCAR: Campingworld.com
500, Phoenix International
Raceway, 12:30 p.m., FOX (12)
Monday, March 16
Blazers: Portland at Washington,
4 p.m., CSNNW, KPOJ (620 AM),
KKRZ (102.3 FM)
NBA: Cleveland at Miami, 5
p.m., ESPN ... Los Angeles Lakers
at Golden State, 7:30 p.m., ESPN
Birthdays
March 12-16, 1972
■ The Portland Trailblazers
— nickname spelled as one word
— are struggling through their second NBA season, but not at the
gate. Observers are raving about
the team’s home attendance — an
average of 6,867 fans per game.
The Blazers’ 16-60 record is the
worst in the 17-team league.
General manager — and interim
coach — Stu Inman and the club
are looking for a permanent successor to Rolland Todd, and Inman
says his main job the rest of this
season is to impose some organization and structure among the
players. “This club is extremely
undisciplined,” Inman says. “When I
took over, it was roughly equivalent
to marrying a woman with five children — all of whom had been
allowed to run wild.”
■ UCLA center Bill Walton is
named college basketball player of
the year.
■ Claudia’s, a Portland AAU
basketball team, misses out on a
national tournament berth by losing in the finals of the Northwest
tournament to Information Referral
Center. The game takes place at
Madison High. Claudia’s top players
include Paul Gloden, Dan Beeson,
Willie Stoudamire and Stan Talley.
Stoudamire, a 6-1 guard from
Portland State who led regional
small colleges in scoring with 30.1
points per game, is voted the No. 1
player on the Little All-Northwest
team.
■ Warner Pacific College,
coached by Bob Allord, returns
from the National Little College
Tournament at Albany, N.Y., with the
March 12, 1956
Dale Murphy
(age 59)
The former
Wilson High
and Watco
Electric
American
Legion star
played 18
MURPHY
years (197693) in the big
leagues, winning National
League MVP awards in 1982
and 1983.
March 16, 1965
Cindy Brown (age 50)
Brown was a 6-1 women’s
basketball star at Grant High
before becoming an Olympic
champion on the U.S. team at
the 1988 Seoul Summer
Games.
March 12, 1971
Isaiah Rider
(age 44)
“J.R.” was
the fifth pick in
the 1993 NBA
draft, and the
6-5 guard
launched his
RIDER
pro career with
Minnesota
before spending 1996-99 with
the Trail Blazers.
500324.120214
MainEvents
Prep girls basketball: 6A tournament, Chiles Center, 10:45 a.m.
fourth-place game, 6:30 p.m. thirdplace game, 8:30 p.m. championship game.
College men’s basketball: Pac12 championship game, Las Vegas,
Nev., 8 p.m. (ESPN) ... Big Sky
championship game, Missoula,
Mont., 6 p.m. ... NAIA D-II quarterfinals, Point Lookout, Mo.
College track and field: NCAA
indoor championships, Fayetteville,
Ark. ... Portland, Lewis & Clark,
Concordia, Warner Pacific at Saints
Open, Mt. Hood CC, 10 a.m.
College baseball: Oregon at Cal,
6 p.m. ... Oregon State at Arizona
State, 6 p.m. (Pac-12 Networks) ...
Portland at San Diego, 6 p.m. ...
Pacific at Lewis & Clark, noon doubleheader ... Concordia at Menlo,
11 a.m. doubleheader
College softball: Oregon State
at Oregon, 2 p.m. (Pac-12
Networks) ... Portland State-Saint
Mary’s, 10:30 a.m., Portland StateNevada, 3:30 p.m. PT, Reno, Nev. ...
George Fox at Lewis & Clark, noon
doubleheader ... Southern Oregon
at Concordia, 11 a.m. doubleheader.
College golf: Lewis & Clark
Pioneer Invitational, Heron Lakes
Golf Club.
College men’s tennis: Oregon at
Utah State, noon ... Portland at UC
Irvine, 10 a.m. ... Portland State at
Weber State, 11 a.m.
College women’s tennis: Oregon
at BYU, 11 a.m. ... Portland at
Washington ... Portland State at
North Dakota, 11 a.m.
College women’s soccer:
Portland State at Concordia, 1 p.m.
College gymnastics: San Jose
State, Lindenwood, Seattle Pacific
at Oregon State, 7 p.m.
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p.m., 3:15 p.m. ...
Prep girls basketball: 6A tournament, Chiles Center, 9 a.m.,
10:45 a.m. consolation games,
6:30 p.m., 8:15 p.m. semifinals.
College men’s basketball: Pac12 semifinals, Las Vegas, Nev., 6
p.m. (Pac-12 Networks), 8:30 p.m.,
(ESPN) ... Big Sky semifinals,
Missoula, Mont., 4:30 p.m., 7 p.m.
PT ... NAIA D-II second round, Point
Lookout, Mo.
College track and field: NCAA
indoor championships, Fayetteville,
Ark.
College baseball: Oregon at Cal,
7 p.m. ... Oregon State at Arizona
State, 6:30 p.m. PT ... Portland at
San Diego, 6 p.m. ... Concordia at
Menlo, noon doubleheader.
College softball: Oregon State
at Oregon, 4 p.m. ... Portland StateSaint Mary’s, 1 p.m., Portland
State-Nevada, 3 p.m., Reno, Nev. ...
Oregon Tech at Concordia, 2 p.m.
doubleheader.
College men’s tennis: Portland
at UC Riverside ... Portland State at
Idaho State, 2 p.m.
College women’s tennis: Oregon
at Utah State, 10 a.m. ... PortlandBoise State at Seattle, 2 p.m. ...
Linfield at Lewis & Clark, 4 p.m.
College women’s lacrosse:
Robert Morris at Oregon, 5 p.m.
Mariners: Seattle-Milwaukee
exhibition, 1 p.m.
FREE SHIPPING & RECYCLING
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Tribune’sATHLETESoftheWEEK
Portland
PRO
Blazers
Lewis & Clark
NICOLAS BATUM — The 6-8 F from
France had a consistent week and
several key clutch plays in regulation
and OT. Versus the Clippers, Dallas
and Minnesota, he had 20, 15 and
17 points, 7, 12 and 7 rebounds and
8, 6 and 5 assists.
ALEX HEIMBRODT, baseball — His
points -- 14 in the 2nd half -- and
defense helped spark the balanced
Pilots to a 69-52 upset of Saint
Mary’s in the 1st round of the WCC
tournament.
complete game 4-hitter toppled No.
14 Linfield 5-1 at McMinnville. The
6-1 senior lefty from San Anselmo,
Calif., walked 1 and struck out 1 as
the Pioneers improved to 3-12 overall.
Oregon State
JEFF HENDRIX, baseball — The
leadoff man, a junior CF from
Santiam Christian, went 7-16 with 4
R, 6 RBI, 2 doubles and a HR in a
4-game sweep at home over Fresno
State.
Winterhawks
OLIVER BJORKSTRAND — The
Danish RW broke a Portland franchise record, scoring in his 12th consecutive game (and getting 4 goals)
as the Hawks beat Seattle 7-1.
KEVIN BAILEY, basketball — His 16
Oregon
AARON WISE, golf — The freshman
Timbers
from Lake Elsinore, Calif., claimed
medalist honors for the 2nd time this
season. He posted a 9-under 207 as
the No. 2 Ducks got their 5th team
win, by 12 strokes in the Desert
Mountain Intercollegiate at
Scottsdale, Ariz.
GEORGE FOCHIVE — The 5-9, 170,
22-year-old from UConn helped
shore up the midfield, played strong
defense and had a game-high 5
tackles as Portland began its MLS
season with a 0-0 home draw vs.
Real Salt Lake.
COLLEGE
Portland State
Concordia
MATTHEW CLOWES, track and field
ALEXA MCDONALD, tennis — The
senior from Palm Desert, Calif.,
capped a comeback from a 3-0 deficit, as her 3-set win at No. 6 singles
gave PSU a 4-3 win vs. Northern
Colorado.
— The senior from England earned
the NAIA championships MVP award
and led the Cavaliers men to 4th
with titles in the mile and 3,000
meters and a 1st on the winning distance medley he anchored at the
national meet at Geneva, Ohio.
Warner Pacific
ALYSSA NEAL, track and field
— The sophomore from North Salem
High and Eastern Washington
University took 4th in the indoor long
and triple jump at the NAIA meet in
Geneva, Ohio. She went 18-6 1/2
and 38-7 3/4.
HIGH SCHOOL
ANTHONY CHA, David Douglas
wrestling — The freshman captured
1st place at 106 pounds in the 6A
state tournament, edging Anteneh
Demissie of Cleveland 10-7 in the
finals.
KYLE BEAL, David Douglas wrestling
— Beal, a freshman, took 1st in the
113-pound division of the 6A state
championships, pinning his final
opponent in 3:56.
OSAWARU ODIGHIZUWA, David
Douglas wrestling — Odighizuwa, a
junior, went 45-0 this season and
won the state title in the 6A 285pound class, scoring a fall in 2:49
over Aloha’s Cortez Rodelo.
ANDREW CURRY, David Douglas
wrestling — The Scots senior finished
second at 120 pounds at the 6A state
meet, losing a 12-7 decision to Forest
Grove’s Christian Guerra in the final.
ANTENEH DEMISSIE, Cleveland
wrestling — Demissie, the PIL champion and a Warriors junior, earned
2nd place at 106 pounds in the 6A
state meet.
DYLAN JONES, Lincoln wrestling
— Jones, who claimed the PIL 120pound championship, capped his
prep career with a 3rd at the 6A
state tournament.
TRYNADII ROCHA, Lincoln wrestling
— Rocha, a freshman, earned 2nd
place in the state girls tournament at
106 pounds.
LILY SALISBURY, Cleveland wrestling — Salisbury, a junior, finished
2nd in the state at 120 pounds.
JASIAH WILLIAMS, Jefferson wrestling — The PIL
138-pound champion and Demos junior wound up
with the 2ndplace medal at
state, dropping
a 7-1 match in
the 6A final to
Cole Van Anrooy
of Roseburg.
031215 PT Athletes
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SportsTribune
PAGE B12
THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015
PortlandTribune
UP
steps up
its game
COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY OF PORTLAND
Scott Leykam, in his third year as athletic director at the University of Portland, estimates that 40 to 50 percent of his job is spent on fundraising and community relations.
■ AD Scott Leykam’s fundraising efforts aim
to make Pilot sports programs more competitive
By KERRY EGGERS
The Tribune
Scott Leykam has spent
much of his professional career working in fundraising
— for 13 years at Stanford,
then for four years as senior
association commissioner
for external relations with
the West Coast Conference.
So perhaps Leykam is the
right man in the right place at
the right time as athletic director for the University of Portland.
Leykam, 41, is just completing his third year on the job at
The Bluff, where he oversees 13
varsity programs, 285 studentathletes and an annual budget
of $13.9 million.
“To be competitive, program
by program, the ante is up nationally in Division I athletics,”
says Leykam, a Bay Area native and a 1995 graduate of
WCC member Saint Mary’s. “In
terms of facilities, academics,
housing and the coaching, you
have to be able to offer that
complete package. Recruiting
is getting more competitive by
the day. Being competitive
among our peers in the conference is the most important
thing.”
That means having enough
money to do things right.
Though Leykam’s most visible
duty as athletic director is the
hiring and firing of coaches
and staff members, he estimates that 40 to 50 percent of
his job is spent with fundraising and community relations.
The coaches play a large role in
those endeavors, too, “but the
last thing you want is coaches
to get bogged down in fundraising,” Leykam says. “They have
enough to do. There’s a balance
to that.”
In Leykam’s first year at UP
(2012-13), the Pilots were up
about 45 percent in sponsor-
ships, he says, and the figures
have increased this year to
$1.12 million in trade and
$460,000 in cash sponsorships.
“Those are big numbers for
us,” he says. “Corporate partners are a key revenue.”
Last summer, the Pilots
agreed to an eight-year agreement with Nike to provide footwear and apparel. The company also is a “premier sponsor”
of UP sporting events. “It runs
deep,” Leykam says of the relationship.
Since he took over in July
2012, Leykam has overseen numerous construction and renovation projects, featuring the
Beauchamp Recreation and
Wellness Center, named after a
former UP president, the Rev.
Bill Beauchamp.
Co n st r u c t i o n fo r t h e
78,000-square-foot, two-story
structure — which will serve as
the practice facility for UP basketball and volleyball teams —
is scheduled to finish June 17
and open the third week in August. It also will be available for
use by the general student
body, with cardio and weight
training rooms, two recreational basketball courts, yoga studios, cross-fit rooms and a rock
wall. Leykam estimates the
cost in the mid-to-high $20 millions.
“It’s a huge piece for both
our athletic department and
the school,” Leykam says.
Three of UP’s four existing
athletic structures — Chiles
Center for basketball and volleyball, Joe Etzel Field for baseball, and the Louisiana-Pacific
Tennis Center — have had major remodels. The Pilots are
looking at covering the grandstands at the fourth, Merlo
Field/Clive Charles Soccer
Complex, which has a natural
turf playing surface that is
See LEYKAM / Page 10
COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY OF PORTLAND
Since he took over in July 2012, Portland Pilots athletic director Scott
Leykam has overseen numerous construction and renovation projects,
featuring the Beauchamp Recreation and Wellness Center, named after
a former UP president, the Rev. Bill Beauchamp.
New look starts now for Andersen’s Beavers
S
CORVALLIS —
ome reflections after
watching my first practice of the Gary Andersen era Saturday at Reser Stadium ...
■ The pace of the practice
session was both fast and precise. Every segment of the
workout was timed and,
though it lasted just under two
hours, a lot seemed to get accomplished. Loud music
blared throughout the day —
even during
the seven-onseven and 11on-11 scrimmage sessions. Maybe
COURTESY OF OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY
the crowd
New Oregon State football coach Gary Andersen, talking to his players
noise at Autat a winter workout, already is doing a lot of things differently from
zen or Husky
how they were run in the previous Mike Riley regime.
Stadium won’t
seem like such
of thinking when they’re on
“It’s good,” said Dorian
a distraction
the field. They’re able to go
Smith, who starred for the
on Oregon
out there and just play fast —
Beavers as a defensive tackle
State’s next
ON
line up, see the personnel,
in 2006 and ‘07. The coaches
visit.
SPORTS
down and distance and go.
“bring a new energy, a lot of
■ I asked
“It should turn out well. A
edge, and the guys are retwo of the
grad assistants who played un- sponding to them really well.” new staff breeds competition.
Everybody’s in there looking
Defensive coordinator Kader Andersen’s predecessor,
for a spot. Everybody thinks
lani Sitake and his staff “are
Mike Riley, to describe how it
making it simple for the guys,” he has an opportunity. That
has been working with the
should make the whole team
Smith said. “There’s not a lot
new coaching staff.
Kerry
Eggers
better.”
Lyle Moevao, the OSU quarterback from 2007-09, used the
same word to describe the new
staff.
“A lot of energy,” Moevao
said, “and a lot of good material going in — teaching time,
(video) time, a lot of new
things with the new offensive
system. There’s been a good
reaction from our guys. It’ll be
something to build off of.”
How different will Andersen’s spread offense be from Riley’s pro-style system?
“There are some similarities,” Moevao said, “but for the
most part, you could say it’s
opposite to what we did under
Coach Riley.”
■ The quarterbacks will be
asked to do a variety of things,
sometimes throwing from the
drop-back position, other
times rolling out and throwing
on the run; often performing
the read-option and also running the ball.
There was confusion at
times on the offensive side
during the scrimmages. Once,
tight end Ryan Nall changed
sides three times before the
play was run. Andersen declares a winner between the
tions that has nothing to do
offense and the defense after
with physical situations. It’s all
every practice. No question
mental, and that’s not good.
which side won Saturday.
We want to play with pace at
“The defense clearly won
the day today,” Andersen said. times. Right now, our ability to
get lined up, to see the signals
“It’s all new for the offense
consistently to have any type
right now. I’m hard on them,
of pace — we’re not getting
but I’m not going to be any
that done.”
other way.
Later, when I asked offen“The defense is way ahead
sive coordinator Dave Baldwin
of the offense. We didn’t handle the second part of practice the same question, he had this
very well at all. We acted a lit- response: “We’re installing.
When an offense installs,
tle tired. It wasn’t good. We
you’re going to be a step slow
have a long way to go. There
and you’re not going to look as
were some bright spots ... but
we looked like a team that was good. It takes 11 guys. Today,
putting in a new offense on the we were triggering with nine,
with eight. That’s not
first day of spring
how we need to exepractice, not the
More
online
cute right now.”
third day. That’s disRead other
Why does Andersen
heartening. SomeKerry Eggers
name a winner after
times I’m an over-recolumns during
actor; I hope I am to- the week at portland each practice?
“In football, in life,
day. We’ll see when I tribune.com
you’re either going to
watch the (video).”
win or lose every day,”
When I asked if the
he said. Players have “to undefense is normally ahead of
derstand you don’t just come
the offense early in spring
out to practice. You come out
ball, Andersen nodded.
to get better. There clearly is a
“But our minds wandered
the second half of practice,” he winner and a loser every day.
The offense won practice two,
said. “We did not execute. It’s
not so much the defense being the team won at practice one
ahead; it’s the pre-snap aware- with a kick. Today, the defense
ness in administrative situaSee EGGERS / Page 9