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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2015
CALEDONIANRECORD.COM
ESTABLISHED 1837
SPORTS
75 CENTS
ST. JOHNSBURY
Sox Get
Past Rays
ST. JOHNSBURY
Board Chair Ducks
Manager Questions
PAGE B1
Local Man Horses
Around Town
PAGE A3
PAGE A3
SUPERIOR COURT
ST. JOHNSBURY
HOCKEY PARENTS RESCUE DOG GIVES FACE TO COMPETING CANINE LAWS
CHARGED IN FIGHT
“She’d had three owners by the time I got her when
she was nine months old,” said Anderson. “I put her
in the kitchen and left the cage door open so she could
come and go at will. For six months that’s how we
lived - she didn’t come near me and I left her alone.
Until one day she got up in my lap and said, ‘I love
you.’ And then the bond was made at that point.”
Anderson had already been on the lookout for a
service dog to be her companion through anxiety, depression, and post traumatic stress issues. When she
approached the Vermont Agency on Aging to see if
Koko could become a service animal, everyone was
surprised by the little dog’s natural abilities in that
area. “Most time they’ve got to be trained to do what
she did, but she did it naturally without any training.
See Koko, Page A6
By LEah CarEy
Staff Writer
The state Legislature is going to the dogs – and so is a
local woman.
In the past two months, two competing bills have been
presented to name a state dog in the Vermont Legislature.
Local Sen. John Rodgers, D-Essex/Orleans, has sponsored a bill to make the beagle the state dog. That was
shortly followed by a proposal by Rep. Job Tate, R-Rutland/Windsor, to honor rescue dogs with the state title.
St. Johnsbury resident Beverly Anderson wouldn’t have
a hard time deciding which bill to support – her constant
companion for the last 11 years has been a rescue Chihuahua named Koko.
Dad Accused Of Punching
13-Year-Old, Mom Of Kicking
Intervenors In Groin
By jEnnifEr hErSEy CLEvELanD
Staff Writer
NEWPORT CITY — Parents of
a young hockey player allegedly
continued a battle from the ice to a
Jay Peak Resort hotel complex in
January, with the dad accused of
punching a 13-year-old boy in the
head and the mom accused of kicking men – who tried to break up the
fight – in the groin.
Mother Laurie Parks, 43, of Carp,
Ontario, is also alleged to have encouraged her son to fight teen
hockey players from the U.S. after
her son made racist comments to
one player.
Both Laurie Parks and her husband Shawn Parks, 45, of Carp
pleaded not guilty to misdemeanor
See fight, Page A6
Koko
LOCAL
PHOTOS BY JEN HERSEY ClEvElAND
Laurie Parks
VEC LINEMAN RESCUES CAT FROM POWER LINE
‘Cat Whisperer’ Able To
Rescue Cat From Top Of
High-tension Pole
Shawn Parks
By roBin Smith
Staff Writer
LYNDONVILLE
LED INKS LABOR DEAL
Linemen, Foremen To Get
Three-year Raises
HIGHGATE — Everyone knows that if a cat is
stuck in a tree, you call the fire department.
But who do you call if a cat is stuck on top of an
electric pole?
Your local electric cooperative, of course.
And now, a lineman with Vermont Electric Cooperative, which serves members in Orleans and
Essex counties, is being called the “cat whisperer”
for rescuing one very black, very scared kitty from
the top of a utility pole in Highgate Center on Monday.
It was a close thing, VEC CEO David Hallquist
said Tuesday.
“That cat was so close to the primary line, if it
even stood up, it would have died.”
VEC got the call Monday at about noon in the
Highgate Center area. System Operator Melanie
Butler said a neighbor told her about of a cat
perched precariously on top of a pole connecting
one of the co-op’s high-powered, three-phase electric lines, according to VEC spokesman Lisa Morris.
vEC PHOTO
Vermont Electric Cooperative lineman Shawn Juaire cradles a black cat in his tool bucket that he rescued
Monday from a high-tension power line in Highgate Center. Now they call him The Cat Whisperer.
Butler reached out to the Richford field office
and learned that all their bucket trucks were already
at work in the field, so she contacted VEC’s Grand
Isle field office and reached line worker Shawn
Juaire of Grand Isle, who was in the shop waiting
while his partner finished some training off-site.
Juaire had his bucket truck at the ready but knew
that he needed a partner to operate the bucket. Gerald Gates from Richford arranged to meet him at
the pole at the corner of Gore and Tarte roads in
Highgate Center.
When the linemen arrived there about an hour
See Cat, Page A6
PHOTO BY JAMES JARDINE
Lyndonville Electric Department lineman Justin Lemieux monitors a pole digger as the LED crew prepares to install a new
power line pole in downtown East Burke Tuesday afternoon.
VERMONT
See LED, Page A6
INSIDE
VOL. 177, NO. 182
HEALTH CHIEF: EXCHANGE COST PUSHES $200 MILLION
By DavE Gram
Associated Press
MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — As the state’s
health care reform chief was about to address lawmakers Tuesday on Vermont’s trouble-plagued
health insurance exchange, his computer presentation couldn’t get started.
“Once again, we’re talking about Vermont
Health Connect, so we’re having technical issues,”
joked Lawrence Miller, health care reform chief for
the administration of Gov. Peter Shumlin.
The brief holdup was far less severe than the issues dogging the state’s health insurance exchange
since its launch in October of 2013. Miller’s main
mission Tuesday morning was to affix an updated
TODAY: Mostly cloudy,
possible snow shower late
© T HE C ALEDONIAN -R ECORD
Classifieds. . . . . . . . . . B8
Entertainment. . . . . . . B6
For the Record . . . . . . A2
Opinion. . . . . . . . . . . . A4
Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . B1
Television . . . . . . . . . . B7
HIGH: 43
LOW: 23
Details on Page A2
NATIONAL DEBT CLOCK
$
18,155,668,945,007
Population: 320,160,613
Your share: $56,708.00
“The budget should be balanced; the
treasury should be refilled; public
debt should be reduced; and the arrogance of public officials should be
controlled.” –Cicero, 106-43 B.C.
price tag to a system still lacking key pieces that
would make it fully functional.
As of Dec. 31, the state had spent more than
$126 million of federal dollars on Vermont Health
Connect; by the end of this year, it’s expected to
spend $72 million more, Miller said.
Meanwhile the promise that consumers would
be able to go on the Vermont Health Connect website and file a “change of circumstance” when they
switch jobs, have a child, get married or divorced
and the like has not been met. Currently, consumers
have to call and talk to Vermont Health Connect
staff members, who record the changes manually.
State officials say they believe they’ll have that
problem fixed by the end of May.
But Miller was much less definitive about when
Bodies Recovered From Site Where
Two Helicopters Crashed, Killing 10,
Including French Olympians
–––––
Midday Kidnapping Attempt Caught
On Video In Small Town
–––––
Obama Clamps Down On Federal Student Loan
Servicers, Calls For More Borrower Rights
Page A9 & 10
REGION
Lyndonville Trustees met in executive session during a
Special Meeting Monday night to consider a three-year contract with the Lyndonville Electric workers.
The Trustees emerged from the executive session and approved, 4-0, a three-year contract with the International Brotherhood of Electrical Works, Local 300. The agreement was
approved on Friday, March 6, by the LED workers.
LED’s six lineman will receive an 80 cents per hour raise
each year for three years. The linemen will also receive a three
percent salary increase for each of the next three years.
The four non-union employees that are classified as clerical
and management will receive a three percent pay raise this
year, but the raise only covers this year. The non-union workers do not benefit from the 80- cents per hour pay raise or
from the IBEW three-year contract.
According to LED General Manager Ken Mason, a first
class lineman earns $31.45 per hour while the line foreman
NATION
By jamES jarDinE
Staff Writer
another big problem with the website will be corrected: its inability to allow enrollment by small
businesses that were originally have supposed to
sign up by January of 2014.
That was the start date for businesses with up to
50 employees; in the interim, they’ve been signing
up directly with the two insurance carriers offering
coverage through the exchange, Blue Cross Blue
Shield and MVP Health Care. Miller made clear
that those small businesses still won’t be able to
sign up during the traditional open enrollment period in late fall.
Meanwhile, a state law passed in 2011 says the
next larger block of businesses — those with between 50 and 100 employees — are supposed to be
See Exchange, Page A6
Jury In Boston Bombing Trial
Sees Photos Of Writing In Boat
–––––
Man Arrested In Home Invasion;
93-year-old Woman Tied Up
Page A7 & 8
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A2
THE RECORD • WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2015
FOR THE RECORD
OBITUARIES
LINDA WILLSON CUSHING
1947-2015
Linda L. Cushing of Waterford passed away at home on
Sunday afternoon, March 8,
2015 surrounded by her family.
She was born at home on the
farm in Waterford on Sept. 28,
1947, the daughter of Dean and
Eula (Hall) Willson. Her husband George passed away in
2013.
The Cushings lived in Newbury village from 1965 til 1990
when they built their log cabin in
Waterford on Hale Road. Linda
was active in the Newbury community; she ran the business side of
their Newbury Garage automotive business; she did cleaning at several area homes, worked part-time at the Newbury Post Office and at
the hot lunch program at the school. At Christmas time she baked hundreds of dozens of cookies and banana breads and delivered them all
around the community. Over the years she had a passion for collecting
Coca Cola memorabilia. She loved looking for Coca Cola items and
telling the stories behind each treasure she found or received as a gift.
She is survived by two daughters: Patti Valley of St. Johnsbury,
Christine Tillotson of Waterford; four grandchildren: Christopher Valley of St. Johnsbury; Katie Tillotson of Monroe NH, Samantha Tillotson of Monroe NH,, and Kari Tillotson of Waterford; great-grandson
Camden Tillotson of Monroe NH; sister Dorothy Dodge and husband
Fred of Haverhill NH; sister-in-law Dorothy Willson of Waterford;
brother-in-law Harry Cushing and his wife Sandy; brother-in-law
James Cushing and his wife Rebecca; Sister-in-law Linda Whitehill
and husband Bud; Sister-in-laws Doreen Delano, Katherine Cushing,
Betty Mace, and Patricia Carle, nieces, nephews, her beloved dog
Reba, and her Maple Grove family.
A celebration of Linda’s life will be observed on Saturday March
14th at the Waterford School from 11 am to 2 pm.
In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be directed to the
Newbury Volunteer Fire Department, c/o John Renfrew, PO Box 236,
Newbury VT 05051.
Memories and condolences may be shared privately online at
www.saylesfh.com.
MILDRED A. MORTON
1933-2015
Mildred A. Morton, 81, of
Franklin, Vt., passed away
Thursday, March 5, 2015 at the
Northwestern Medical Center in
St. Albans.
She was born in Newark, Vt.
on July 22, 1933 the daughter of
the late Melvin & Ida (Austin)
Howard.
Mildred was a resident of
Franklin most of her life. She
worked as a cook at the Bowling
Alley Restaurant at Lake Carmi
and as a clerk at the Franklin
General Store for many years. Mildred taught Sunday School and was
the former superintendent of the Sunday School Program at the
Franklin United Church.
Mildred loved to read, go for rides as well as going out to eat. She
especially loved to spend time with her grandchildren.
She is survived by her daughter, Lisa Cornforth and her husband
Bradley of Highgate; her son, Ivan Morton of Sunnyside, Wash.; her
grandchildren, Christopher Cornforth his wife Tanya of Jericho who
are expecting a great grandchild, (an event Mildred was very excited
about), Justin Cornforth of Essex Jct., and Meghan Cornforth of Highgate; Susan & Amy Morton; her daughter-in-law, Dorothy Morton of
Savanah, Ga.; her sister, Evelyn Cryans of Littleton, N.H.; many
nieces and nephews. Besides her parents, Mildred was predeceased
by her husband, Clifford Morton; her son, Richard Morton; her sister,
Alberta Simpson Bushey; her brothers-in-law, Andrew Cryans &
Oscar Simpson.
Besides her parents, Mildred was predeceased by her husband, Clifford Morton; and her son, Richard Morton.
In keeping with Mildred’s wishes there will be no funeral services
at this time. A celebration of life to be held at the Franklin United
Church will be announced at a later date.
For those who wish, contributions in Mildred’s memory may be
made to the Haston Library, P.O. Box 82, Franklin, VT 05457 or to
the Franklin Fire Dept., P.O. Box 172, Franklin, VT 05457.
Messages of condolence may be sent to Mildred’s family on-line
through www.spearsfuneralhome.com.
DOWNER’S FUEL LLC
Call Us & Save
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Senior Citizen and Volume Discounts
NEWS BRIEFS
KATHLEEN B. (BUCKINGHAM) PAIVA
Kathleen B. (Buckingham) Paiva, 85, of Lyndonville and formerly of
Vineyard Haven, Mass., died on Monday, March 9, 2015, at Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital in St. Johnsbury. She was predeceased
by her husband Louis F. Paiva in 1994 and is survived by her daughter,
Patricia Paiva-Vanderhoop, her son-in-law, Edwin Vanderhoop and
grandchildren: Paresa, Mary and Anthony Vanderhoop of West Burke.
Kathleen’s funeral mass will be held on Saturday, March 14, at 10
a.m. in St. Augustine’s Church on Martha’s Vineyard officiated by Fr.
Thomas Lopes with burial following in the Oak Grove Cemetery, Vineyard Haven. Donations may be made in her memory to the Commission
for the Blind, 600 Washington St., Boston, MA 02111.
Arrangements are under the care of the Chapman, Cole and Gleason
Funeral Home, Edgartown Road, Oak Buffs. Visit www.ccgfuneralhome.com for online guest book and information.
Local Forecast
Today: Partly to mostly cloudy, a rain
shower or mountain snow shower
possible. Highs in the low to mid 40s.
West to northwest winds 10 to 15
mph, gusting to 25 mph.
Tonight: Partly cloudy. Lows in the
lower 20s. Northwest winds 10 to 15
mph, gusting to 30 mph.
Tomorrow: Partly sunny. Colder, with
highs in the mid to upper 20s. Winds
continuing from the northwest at 10
to 15 mph, and gusting to 30 mph.
Extended Forecast:
Thursday Night: Mostly clear. Lows
5 below to 5 above.
Friday: Mostly sunny. Highs in the
upper 20s to lower 30s.
Friday Night: Mostly cloudy. Lows in
the lower 20s.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy with snow
likely, possibly mixed with rain. Highs
in the mid 30s.
Saturday Night: Mostly cloudy with
snow likely, possibly mixed with rain.
Lows in the mid 20s.
Sunday: Mostly cloudy with snow
showers likely. Highs in the lower 30s.
Daily Weather Highlights
One more relatively mild day lies
in store, as temperatures make it
back into the 40s today, but a series
of cold fronts dropping through from
the northwest will make things more
like winter than spring by tomorrow,
with windy conditions and highs in
the 20s and 30s, thanks to northwest
flow between low pressure over
Newfoundland and cold high pressure over Ontario. Temperatures
could drop into the single digits tomorrow night – maybe even to
around zero in the cold hollows – as
high pressure drifts overhead. Much
less windy and slightly less cold conditions will follow for Friday. By Saturday, surface low pressure will be
moving northeastward out of the
Ohio Valley. Widespread precipitation will be the likely result. Determining precipitation type at this
stage is more difficult, but it looks
like it will be some kind of rain/snow
mix, with rain more prominent in the
valleys, and snow more prominent in
the mountains, and with the bulk of
the precipitation occurring from Saturday afternoon through Saturday
night, says Lawrence Hayes of the
Fairbanks Museum weather station.
CONDITIONS AT
4 P.M. YESTERDAY
Cloudy
TEMPERATURE
Temp. at 4 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Maximum past 24 hours . . . . . .50
Minimum past 24 hours . . . . . .23
Yesterday’s average . . . . . . . . .37
Normal average . . . . . . . . . . . .28
Maximum this month . . . . . . . . .50
Minimum this month . . . . . . . .-18
Maximum this date (1977) . . . .63
Minimum this date (1939) . . . .-13
HUMIDITY
32%
DEWPOINT
20
WINDS
17 mph, 25 max . . . . . . . . . . .SSE
BAROMETER
30.02 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Falling
PRECIPITATION
New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.00 in.
Total for Month . . . . . . . . .0.20 in.
Normal Total . . . . . . . . . . .0.81 in.
SNOWFALL
Past 24 Hours . . . . . . . . . . .0.0 in.
Monthly Total . . . . . . . . . . . .3.6 in.
Season Total . . . . . . . . . . .86.5 in.
Season Norm To Date . . . .72.5 in.
Snowpack . . . . . . . . . . . . .14.5 in.
ALMANAC
Sunrise today . . . . . . . . .7:08 a.m.
Sunset today . . . . . . . . .6:48 p.m.
Length of day . . . .11 hrs. 40 min.
DEGREE DAYS
Average temp. difference below
65°
Yesterday* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
To date since July 1 . . . . . . .6627
To date last year . . . . . . . . . .6610
* calculated for the day before yesterday
PUBLIC MEETINGS
East HavEn
Select board, Thursday, March
12, 7 p.m., town clerk’s office.
Elect chair, highway matters, animal control, recommend fire warden, appointed officers, select
newspaper, other.
A109. Reorganize board, public
comments, financial report, superintendent’s report, old, new, other
business, executive session if
needed.
st. JoHnsbury
Select board, Wednesday,
Morgan
March 11, 5:30 p.m., Pomerleau
School board, Thursday, March bldg. Public comments, town man12, 5 p.m., NCSU office, room ager search update, other business.
In Memoriam
The Numbers
In Memory of
LUCKY FOR LIFE (Monday)
6-18-23-31-43; lucky Ball: 6
DAILY PICKS (Tuesday)
Day Draw:
Pick 3: 9-4-5; Pick 4: 1-6-2-1
Evening Draw:
Pick 3: 1-8-1; Pick 4: 6-4-2-6
JASON WEBBER, JR.
December 22, 1995 ~ March 11, 2002
Must Have Cash, Credit Card or Good Check
603-747-2865 or 603-667-3055
ALSO OFFERING OFF-ROAD FUEL
Owner: Gary Downer
Love your family
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Black Cyan Magenta Yellow
Police looking for driver that
struck pedestrian, kept going
LYNDONVILLE — Police are looking for a driver of a Jeep that
struck a pedestrian and didn’t stop in Lyndonville.
Police said 25-year-old Joel Boucher of Lyndonville was walking south
on the edge of the northbound lane of Broad Street in front of Passumpsic
Bank. The dark-colored Jeep, which was traveling north, struck him at
about 12:15 a.m. Tuesday.
Boucher suffered injuries to the left side of his body.
State Police ask anyone with any information regarding this incident
to call the Vermont State Police 802-748-3111 or NEK Crime Stoppers
at 748-2222.
Sutton woman charged with
embezzlement at convenience store
LYNDON — Vermont State Police say a
Sutton woman stole $4,000 from the M&M
Beverage Store in Lyndon last month.
Catherine Manchester, 40, a former employee at the store, was cited into court on a
charge of embezzlement after state police investigators discovered the money was missing
on Feb. 14. Manchester is scheduled to answer
the charge in Caledonia Superior Court on May
11.
Catherine
Manchester
Police investigating
St. Johnsbury Subway burglary
ST. JOHNSBURY — Police are investigating a burglary at the St.
Johnsbury Subway restaurant at 189 Railroad St. this past weekend.
St. Johnsbury Police said the burglary occurred in the early morning
hours of Sunday and that employees of the store arrived at 7:30 a.m. and
found that someone had entered the store through a window and removed
safes and cash.
Police are asking anyone with information about the case to contact
Detective Sgt. Lester Cleary at 748-2314 or call the Crime Stoppers tip
line at 748-2222.
Skier and snowmobiler rescued
after separate North Country incidents
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — New Hampshire Fish and Game officials
say a hiker and snowmobiler were rescued after separate requests for assistance came in at about the same time.
Officials say crews were called to the Avalon Trail in Crawford North
at about 10:45 a.m. Tuesday after receiving a report a skier had passed
out.
Personnel from Twin Mountain Fire and Rescue hiked about a third
of a mile into the woods and transported the skier, 59-year-old Steven
Leavitt, of Intervale, out of the woods. He was taken to a Littleton hospital
for treatment of a medical condition.
Meanwhile, a second call came in at about the same time for a snowmobile crash along the Base Road at Bretton Woods. The 58-year-old
snowmobiler, Yin Wong, of Boston, suffered an arm injury.
Vt. House gives energy bill final passage
MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — The Vermont House has passed and sent
on to the Senate a bill that could resolve criticism that a current state program used to promote renewable energy double counts its results.
The measure passed Tuesday by the House ends a current program
that has allowed power from Vermont wind projects and other renewable
sources to be both counted as meeting state goals and then to sell renewable energy credits out of state.
The bill calls for Vermont to set up its own requirement that utilities
get a specific percentage of their power from renewable sources — increasing to 75 percent by 2032.
It also allows utilities to help customers weatherize their homes and
install cold-weather heat pumps to reduce carbon emissions tied to heating.
Green Mountain Power solar
project honored by industry
RUTLAND, Vt. (AP) — Green Mountain Power says a Rutland solar
project it is helping to build has been honored by the solar power industry.
Vermont’s largest electric utility says the Stafford Hill Solar Farm has
been awarded the 2015 Project of Distinction Award from the Solar Energy Industries Association and the Solar Electric Power Association
The award for GMP and the company groSolar was presented recently
at a trade show.
The Stafford Hill Solar Farm is said to be the first project to establish
a micro-grid powered solely by solar and battery storage, with no fossil
fuels.
GMP says Stafford Hill power can be stored and used to power an
emergency shelter at Rutland High School in the event of weather-related
power outages.
Police: Man steals $5,000 guitar,
leaves another behind
BURLINGTON, Vt. (AP) — Police in Burlington are looking for a
man who walked out of a music store with a guitar worth over $5,600,
leaving behind another guitar.
Police believe the man left Advance Music with a black guitar case
containing a Taylor acoustic guitar Monday afternoon.
The guitar left behind appears to a pink, red and white paint-splatter
design with this message on the back: “We have fought a long and bitter
war. Together, forever, our souls will soar. Forever my love, C.”
The man was described as being in his late 20s to early 30s with
medium-length brown hair and beard. He’s about 6-foot-1 and 180 to 200
pounds. He was wearing sunglasses and a black and red beanie. Anyone
with knowledge of the guitar owner is asked to contact police.
New York man gets 4 years in
Vermont heroin conspiracy case
BURLINGTON, Vt. (AP) — Federal prosecutors say a 37-year-old
New York man is going to spend four years in prison after pleading guilty
to a charge of conspiracy to distribute heroin and cocaine base in Vermont.
Prosecutors say Joe Young of the Bronx was sentenced Friday by U.S.
District Court Judge Christina Reiss.
Prosecutors say that federal agents searched a Winooski home a year
ago and arrested Young after he was found to be in possession of heroin
and crack cocaine that he and others intended to sell.
Prosecutors say the drugs had been brought to Winooski by a courier
hired by Young who took a bus to Plattsburg, New York. The courier was
transported to Winooski at Young’s direction.
Young pleaded guilty in November.
CALEDONIAN Black Cyan Magenta Yellow
THE RECORD • WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2015
A3
LOCAL
EVIDENCE LOCK-UP BREAK-IN SUSPECT DENIES MORE BURGLARIES
Bail Raised To
$50,000
By jEn hErSEy CLEvELanD
Staff Writer
NEWPORT CITY — The suspect in the theft of guns and drugs
from the evidence storage room at
the Newport City Police Department is facing a total of 12 felonies
and four misdemeanors after being
arraigned on several counts related
to a string of burglaries in Lowell
and Troy in Nov. and a burglary in
Newport City in Feb.
On Tuesday, Mikeal Rivers, 19,
of Newport City saw his bail raised
to $50,000 after pleading not guilty
to three counts of burglary of an occupied dwelling, three counts of
burglary, two counts of unlawful
trespass into an occupied residence,
and two counts of unlawful mischief.
That’s in addition to the charges
related to the Feb. 8 break-in at the
police station, in which Rivers is accused of stealing two handguns and
52 bags of heroin. In that case
Rivers pleaded not guilty to counts
of burglary, obstruction of justice,
grand larceny, possession of heroin,
providing false information to police and narcotics possession.
Newport officers were unaware
of the break-in of their evidence
room, which is located in the basement of the municipal building,
until field supervision unit officers
found evidence bags at the home of
probationer Tyler Glodgett, 19, of
Newport.
In requesting increased bail,
Deputy State’s Attorney Christopher
Moll noted the added danger in burglarizing places when people are
home, “such as it engenders use of
lethal force.”
Moll said the state is seeking substantial jail time, upwards of 80
years if the sentences were served
consecutively.
Rivers’ attorney Gertrude Miller
said Rivers would like to be released
into a drug treatment facility, but
Moll said the state would oppose
that unless the facility is secure
enough to prevent Rivers from fleeing.
The new offenses allegedly took
place on Nov. 23 on the Cross Road
and Rt. 100 in Lowell and Troy and
on Feb. 8 in Newport.
In the string of burglaries in Low-
ell, Rivers allegedly confessed to
police that he and Tyler Benoit, 19,
of Newport City, broke into a fix-it
shop and one residence while riding
in a stolen car. In that case, the suspects made investigating the string
of burglaries much easier on police
by leaving either physical evidence
or items stolen from earlier burglaries at each crime scene.
Benoit and Rivers became the
main suspects after citizens identified them from surveillance video
from a break-in at Flash’s Fix-it in
Lowell, a business owned by Andre
Tetreault.
“… you got me,” Rivers allegedly said to police after viewing
the video himself.
Rivers allegedly left his own
blood behind at burglary scenes as
well as at the police station after cutting himself during the commission
of the crimes. A subsequent buccal
swab from Rivers’ mouth confirmed
that the blood collected from the fixit shop matched his DNA.
Benoit is being held on $25,000
bail as well after pleading not guilty
to attempted burglary, burglary of an
occupied residence, aggravated operation of a motor vehicle without
the owner’s consent, and violating
conditions of release.
the affidavits
In February - the same day as the
evidence theft - Kardena Chilafoux
returned from work, heard a noise in
her bedroom, and saw a young man
run across her bed and dive through
a window, according to officer
Richard Wells’ affidavit.
Glodgett was standing outside,
but said he didn’t recognize the burglar.
Sgt. Sean Selby followed tracks
in the snow to a Second St. home,
where he located Glodgett, John
Duprey, 20, and Rivers.
Glodgett was questioned on Feb.
9 about a different matter and confirmed that the man who’d run out
of Chilafoux’s home was Rivers.
Glodgett has not been charged in relation to this case.
In Lowell, Tetreault reported that
$700 in cash had been stolen from
his business and had the suspects on
video breaking a window to enter
the building, where Rivers allegedly
cut himself on glass.
Just down the street, Calvin Allen
and Juanita Tetreault reported that
when they awoke Nov. 23, they discovered that someone had stolen an
iphone 5, three packs of Pall Malls,
an expensive watch, $300 worth of
electric cigarettes, a purse, a wallet
ST. JOHNSBURY
and a back pack. The stolen items as well as cash - is worth approximately $4,000.
Sgt. Andrew Jensen responded to
a complaint from Alanna Whittier in
Troy regarding a suspicious car
abandoned in a back yard. Leah
Frost reported the vehicle stolen
from Newport City on Nov. 19.
Whittier said two her of ATVs,
which would be recovered at the
Newport Town School and at the
junction of Highland and West End
Avenues, had been stolen from her
garage.
From the stolen car, Jensen collected a blood sample as well as
items stolen from Juanita Tetreault
and chewing tobacco taken from
Merle Crawford’s home.
Someone broke into two homes
belonging to Crawford, but one was
unoccupied and there was nothing
to take. At the second, however,
Crawford was missing $100 worth
of items, but was now in possession
of a pink notebook with Frost’s entries recorded.
And Kenneth Dufour was now in
possession of Crawford’s empty
prescription bottle, but was missing
a $100 pair of binoculars.
Sgt. Michael LaCourse investigated a complaint at Clifton Willis’
house, where Willis said someone
took gasoline out of his Jeep and left
blood on his garage door jamb.
The following day, Anthony
Brault from Brault’s Meat Market
said someone had rummaged
through a truck in his parking lot,
leaving behind a pack of Pall Mall’s
matching the ones stolen from
Juanita Tetreault.
HORSING AROUND TOWN
Tim Roberts of West Burke rides his horse, Sid, along Main Street (above) and Railroad
Street (below) in St. Johnsbury Tuesday (photos by Michael Beniash and Taylor Reed).
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BOARD CHAIR DODGES QUESTIONS
ABOUT TOWN MANAGER SEARCH $
More Secret Meetings Held In Process
By tayLor rEED
Staff Writer
Following a secret session held
during their regular meeting Monday, the select board scheduled a
special meeting for Wednesday at
5:30 p.m. in the Pomerleau Building
in order to issue a “town manager
search update.” The agenda also includes “public comment” and
“other business.”
The special meeting’s precise
purpose, though, is unclear.
Selectman Kevin Oddy, board
chairman, won’t talk about it. He
declined Tuesday to detail the meeting’s intent and whether or not selectmen plan to appoint a new
manager.
“You know I can’t answer those
questions,” Oddy said. “All of them
need to be answered in a public session. That is what Wednesday is
about, answering questions.”
Selectmen initiated the manager
search process last year by contracting with the Vermont League of
Cities and Towns for services like
advertising, applicant ranking and
background checks. The league collected about 30 resumes and submitted them to selectmen.
Selectmen turned over resumes to
the St. Johnsbury Town Manager
Search Committee, which pinpointed 10 finalists for recommendation to selectmen. The search
committee included resident Dan
Kimbell, resident Cindy Robillard,
Selectman Jamie Murphy, outgoing
Town Manager John Hall, and former selectman Alan Ruggles.
Selectmen narrowed the applicant pool to four finalists and conducted interviews.
The successful applicant will be
paid $65,000 to $85,000 depending
on experience, according to selectmen. The current town manager,
Hall, earns about $75,000 annually.
Hall is scheduled to vacate the
manager’s position when his contract expires in April. He started in
2013 but served in the late 1990s
too.
Hall is also a Caledonia County
Side Judge. He was elected to that
position in November.
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A4
THE RECORD • WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2015
Todd M. Smith, Publisher
OPINION
Dana Gray, Executive Editor
Editorial Comment …
Right of Fools
Last week a small group of undergraduates at the University of
California Irvine voted to ban the American flag from the lobby of
student government offices. On a 6-4 vote the “Associated Students”
group removed the flag because, they said, it was a symbol of “colonialism and imperialism.”
They wanted to foster a “culturally inclusive” space and the flag,
according to resolution leader Matthew Guevara, “not only serves as
symbols of patriotism or weapons for nationalism, but also constructs
cultural mythologies and narratives that in turn charge nationalistic
sentiments.”
Guevara explained the flag “has negative and positive aspects that
are interpreted differently by individuals,” and that “freedom of
speech, in a space that aims to be as inclusive as possible can be interpreted as hate speech.”
Sure it can. Which is why it’s so good that smart people like Guevara are around to ban potentially offensive symbols and/or censor
speech that might hurt someone’s feelings.
Or… just a thought here… maybe Guevara could learn to appreciate the idea of personal freedom - for which the flag actually stands.
In that case, he might come to consider himself blessed to live in a
country that tolerates his misguided antics and provides him the freedom to say childish, inflammatory things without fear of reprisal
from his government.
At any rate, on Saturday the publicly-funded school overrode the
vote following a tsunami of angry comments from alums, students,
legislators, administrators and veterans.
And we doubt we’ll hear from Guevara again until Bernie Sanders
hires him to handle propaganda for his Presidential campaign.
In My Opinion…
MAKING PROGRESS
IN MONTPELIER
strengthen Vermont’s
As we head into the
energy
innovation
second half of this year’s
leadership, create over
Legislation session, it’s a
1,000 jobs, save Vergood time to evaluate the
monters a net of $275
progress that has been
million on our energy
made in the two months
costs, and reduce our
since the session began.
In January, I laid out a By Gov. PEtEr greenhouse gas emissions at the same
number of priorities to
ShumLin
time.
keep Vermont moving
I am pleased that
forward that included
cleaning up Lake Champlain and the legislation being considered
other waterways, investing in by the House Health Care Comclean energy to create jobs and mittee contains priorities that
save people money, addressing align very closely with the ones I
the Medicaid cost shift to save in- laid out in January. There is broad
dividuals and businesses on ris- consensus that we need to
ing health care premiums, strengthen primary care to imworking to reduce school spend- prove health care quality and acing to relieve the property tax cess for Vermonters, and that we
burden on hard working Vermon- must address the Medicaid cost
ters, passing economic develop- shift to begin to fix a broken sysment initiatives to help Vermont tem that drives up private insurbusinesses continue to grow jobs, ance premium rates on Vermont
and developing a balanced businesses and individuals. These
budget that sets the state on a are not easy tasks, but we must
sound fiscal footing going for- do them if we are to have a more
ward. While we still have lots of affordable, accessible health care
work ahead, I am encouraged by system going forward.
The House Education Comthe progress we have made on
mittee has made an important
these priorities thus far.
Already, two House commit- start by passing a bill that intees have approved a comprehen- cludes many of the ideas that I
sive proposal to help clean up put forward in January and those
Lake Champlain and its tributar- of other lawmakers that will be
ies. Combined, the House and debated in the months ahead.
Senate have taken hours of testi- Lawmakers of all parties have
mony on this subject, and the made good on the promise to adLegislature has already made un- dress rising property taxes by lisprecedented, tri-partisan progress tening to all ideas and creating an
to provide the appropriate tools atmosphere of collaboration that
and resources to improve the will be key to making progress
state’s water quality. We know on this issue. Together, I am
our economic vitality and quality hopeful that we will pass legislaof life are inextricably linked to tion to help districts control eduthe health of our natural environ- cation spending, strengthen
ment, and I am very encouraged academic offerings, and ensure
that all parties are collaborating their schools are able to provide
to make real progress on this the best education for our children at a price taxpayers can afproblem that affects us all.
When it comes to clean en- ford.
When it comes to economic
ergy, the House last week gave
overwhelming initial approval to development, we are working tolegislation that will grow jobs, re- gether to build upon the innovaduce energy costs for Vermon- tive Vermont Economic Growth
ters, and make tremendous Incentive (VEGI) program by
progress in our efforts to fight cli- broadening participation and
mate change. We’ve made in- making it easier for businesses to
credible progress growing a clean expand and create jobs. Just last
energy economy in Vermont, year VEGI awarded $4.7 million
which currently supports over that will help create 708 new full15,000 jobs. The legislation the time jobs, generate $15.3 million
House is set to pass will
See Progress, Page A5
Letters to the Editor…
Not again!
to the Editor:
While practicing dentistry in New
Jersey for 40 years I became very involved in the fluoridation issue at
both the local and state levels. I am
dismayed to see that after 70 years of
drinking water fluoridation followed
by volumes of scientific support, the
dental profession still has to defend
the truth about this health issue.
First, fluoride is a commonly occurring element in nature. Antifluoridationists
have
convinced
themselves that this fluoride is different than what is added to water supplies. Totally impossible!
Second, critics like to point out
that the fluoride compound added to
your water is rat poison. True! It is!
HOWEVER, at the dilution of approximately 1 part per 1,000,000 as
recommended, it no longer exists as
a compound (freshman chemistry.)
The sodium ions and the fluoride
ions are happily flying around by
themselves. The fluoride ions are
picked up and added to the hard tissues like teeth, making them far more
resistant to acids whose source is all
that sugary stuff you eat.
Third, the critics claim that the rat
poison accumulates in the body.
Through the years I have repeatedly
asked for some evidence of rat poison anywhere in bodies of people
who drink fluoridated water. Never
got a straight answer. Only deflecting
comments.
Fourth, warfarin is an anticoagulant that thins the blood to prevent
clot formation in people who have
had a stroke or heart attack, for instance. Guess what? Warfarin is a
powerful RAT POISON!
My question: How many antifluoridationists take lifesaving warfarin
(Coumadin) with no objection?
Frank Landry, DDS
St. Johnsbury, Vt.
Not embarassed
to the Editor:
I write in reply to the Editorial of
Thursday, March 5, 2015, which
stated that “we” are embarrassed by
our two Senators who chose not to
attend the speech by Benjamin Ne-
tanyahu to the joint session of Congress. I disagree with the Editorial
opinion, and am in no way embarrassed by our Senators, Leahy and
Sanders. In fact, I am embarrassed by
the actions of John Boehner and his
Republican minions who chose to act
completely outside the boundaries of
our governmental system. Most of
what they do and/or have done since
President Obama took office has
been done to politicize, divide, and
only contribute negativity so that
Obama is seen, in their eyes, as a
failed President.
I think their action in subverting
the Executive Branch is reprehensible. Netanyahu should also be held
accountable for accepting to speak in
such a divisive, subversive setting. It
accomplished nothing to help the
volatile and difficult mid-east situation.
I respect and fully support the actions of our Senators Leahy and
Sanders.
Edward Ryan
Barnet, Vt.
East Haven
School budget
to the Editor:
The front page story of Friday,
March 6th regarding the East Haven
School Budget stated that the 2010
budget was $250,000.00 more then
the recently defeated budget. While
this is true it doesn’t give the complete picture. One might wonder if
the implication of that budget fact
was that this year’s budget therefore
should have passed since it was
lower. The residential tax rate in
2010 was $1.4908. This included the
school, town and highway tax rate.
Thus a property with a Grand List of
$1,057.00 had a tax bill in 2010 of
$1,575.78. In 2014 this same residential property with the combined
tax rate of $1.6811 had a tax bill of
$1,776.92. With the most recent
budget of $677,526.00 taxes on this
same property would be $2,171.29
with the projected tax rate jumping
37 cents to $2.0542, an increase of
almost $400.00 in one year. Some
taxpayers with a higher Grand List
would see an increase of doubling or
even tripling this increased amount.
Yes you read that correctly—doubled or even tripled. It is recommended that all taxpayers take the
time to multiply their Grand List figure times the total projected tax rate
to get an estimate of what they could
be facing for a tax bill when it arrives
this year. Remember, absentee-early
ballots will be available as usual.
One does not have to give a reason
why they chose to vote absentee.
Franklin R. Higgins
East Haven, Vt.
Lincoln’s
Ice Castle
to the Editor:
I own commercial properties on
the Main Street and have been doing
business in Lincoln, NH since 1986.
I would like to commend the
Clark Family, owners of the Hobo
railroad and the Town of Lincoln.
They have successfully attracted a
world class attraction called the Ice
Castle. It’s a huge facility made entirely out of ice.
It’s a perfectly located at the Hobo
Railroad directly off Interstate 93.
The Hobo Railroad has a massive
parking lot and is well maintained
and organized.
The Ice Castle attracts tourist other
than skiers, hikers, and campersfolks who have never stepped foot
before in Lincoln! These tourists also
visit our local gas stations, restaurants and retail stores. Furthermore,
the Ice Castle is something that people of all ages can enjoy.
Can a Sand Castle be built for the
summertime!?
Sincerely,
Herbert Lahout
Sugar Hill, N.H.
those who have served or are now
serving our country in the Armed
Forces by asking them to stand and
be recognized for their sacrifices in
defense of our nation’s freedom.
Ask those present to come forward or remain standing to lead their
town meeting in the Pledge of Allegiance to our Flag.
Give special thanks and recognition to our aging population of WWII
Veterans and to the Korean and Vietnam era Veterans, many of whom
were never properly thanked when
returning home.
My hope is that towns will make
this recognition an annual tradition.
Thank you to those who have recently done so. I urge more towns to
do the same in 2015. A thank you for
their service will make their day. We
can’t thank them enough.
John O’Brien
Orford, N.H.
Big banks
in Vermont
to the Editor:
The State of Vermont has a $112
million deficit in large part because
they won’t stop paying Wall Street.
Wall Street is no different than the
mob. As the Bank of England admits
in a new paper entitled, “Money Creation in the Modern Economy”,
money is nothing more than an IOU,
and it is created by the banks, not
from the substance of deposits. I may
be quoting exaggerated numbers or
possibly understating them, but a
substantial portion of our state
budget currently goes to paying the
interest on the debt service to Wall
Street. A few years ago I heard that
number floated as 80 million per
annum.
What is a conservative? Does the
meaning of a Vermont conservative
describe the political will to thieve
from the working people and send
their value to the Big Banks? Conservatives here in Vermont who
to the Editor:
value the prosperity of their neighDear Town Moderators,
bors and hard workers, ought to stop
Town meeting day presents a enabling theft through sending intergolden opportunity to recognize the est payments to Wall Street year after
service men and women in our year rather than instructing our local
Towns. Please consider honoring
See Letters, Page A5
Honoring our
Veterans on Town
Meeting Day
Michael Reagan
Do citizens
have a lobby?
I’m beginning the sympathize
more and more with the average
man who thinks the system is
rigged against him.
The current unemployment rate
in California, where I live, is 5.4
percent. This is almost a full percentage point higher than the unemployment rate for the nation as
a whole. So you can imagine how
the average unemployed Californian feels when he reads that the
state Employment Development
Department in Sacramento has
hired citizens of India to process
Golden State unemployment
claims.
According to News10, “with the
exception of two managers, everyone inside the office is from outside of the U.S. They are employed
by Deloitte, a major U.S.
IT company hired by the
state to create and manage its Unemployment
Insurance Modernization
project. The mostly Indian nationals are allowed to work here under
a visa program called H-1B.”
Computerworld reports “Information technology workers at
Southern California Edison (SCE)
are being laid off and replaced by
workers from India. Some employees are training the H- 1B visa
holding replacements, and many
have already lost their jobs.”
That’s really pouring salt in the
wound. First the company makes
you train the foreign workers replacing you then, after you’re
fired, more foreign workers
process your unemployment claim.
It’s no wonder that millions of
Black Cyan Magenta Yellow
unemployed Americans
have simply given up
and stopped looking for
a job.
In these two instances
STEM workers (science,
technology, engineering
and mathematics) have
been displaced by H–1B visa holders. By law these visa holders are
only supposed to be used to fill
jobs that can’t be filled by US citizens. Instead in many instances
they replace US citizens. In reality
the only law that influences H–1B
visa holders is the economic law of
supply and demand.
The more of these workers US
companies can import, the lower
the wage scale for STEM workers
will be. That’s why News10 points
out tech companies spent $14 million in 2013 lobbying Congress for
more low–paid foreign workers.
Microsoft is laying off 20,000
employees, yet Bill Gates demands
Congress increase the number of
STEM workers allowed to come to
the U.S.. Even the Prime Minister
of India is getting into the act. PM
Narendra Modi asked President
Obama during his trip to India to
“loosen the restrictions on the H1B program.”
Maybe that’s why Sen. Jeff Sessions (R–AL) points out that 75
percent of the US citizens with
STEM degrees aren’t working in
STEM jobs.
The average American competing against lower–priced imported
labor doesn’t have anyone lobbying for him. And unfortunately taking care of your citizens first and
dealing fairly with domestic workers doesn’t seem to be a priority
with Congress or business.
©2015 MICHAEl REAgAN
CALEDONIAN Black Cyan Magenta Yellow
THE RECORD • WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2015
LOWELL: CELL TOWER IN VILLAGE
CENTER GETS ACT 250 PERMIT
Neighbor ‘Disgusted’ At Decision
By roBin Smith
Staff Writer
LOWELL — A cell tower will be
erected in the middle of Lowell village over the objections of several
neighbors.
The District 7 Environmental
Commission issued an Act 250 permit Monday for the T-Mobile Northeast LLC tower.
The 140-foot “monopole” tower
and nine antenna will be located off
Route 100 in the town center. The
permit includes the tower itself and
the supporting access road, fencing,
cables and equipment.
One of the neighbors, G. Ashton
Warner Sr., called it “disgusting” and
“unbelievable” that a cell tower will
be built in the center of Lowell.
The commission noted that T-Mobile sought other sites and looked at
shorter towers, but none would provide the coverage area needed. The
Lowell mountain wind project site
was not an option, the commission
stated.
The commission found, using the
so-called “Quechee” standards for
development, that the cell tower
would not have an “undue adverse
impact” on the rural residential area,
clearing the way for the permit approval.
The town center is strung out
along Route 100. The 450-foot wind
turbines are not visible from the proposed cell tower site.
The commission stated in the
findings of fact that the tower will
have an adverse impact because
some people, including neighbors
Warner and Ed Wesolow, would find
it shocking. They both were parties
under aesthetics in the commission’s
hearing.
However, the commission stated,
the tower “is not shocking and offensive to other people, namely the
commission, the applicant, and the
Letters
Continued from Page A4
banking experts to get a banking license and keep that interest home for
the public.
Chris Dehlia is the face of the big
banks in Vermont. He’s a familiar
and friendly-looking face always
present in the halls of our legislature,
however he is the personification of
Wall Street’s vacuum siphon firmly
lodged in the Vermont’s State budget.
Of course he represents the local
banks too, but they are struggling,
selling out, shutting down. Gee, do
you need to wonder?
Remember, the world’s population has 2.5 % on average of psychopaths at any given moment. By
psychopaths one means persons with
zero capacity for compassion, zero
inclination towards selfless acts for
the good of all, zero ability to feel the
volunteer representatives from the
municipal fire department.”
“The project will have an adverse
effect on the scenic or natural beauty
of the area, however the adverse effect on the scenic or natural beauty is
not undue,” the commission stated in
its findings.
Signing the decision were Chairman Eugene Reid and commissioners Keith Johnson and Nicole
Davignon.
“This is an unbelievable decision,” Warner stated in an email
Tuesday.
He hoped to retire in a house he is
renovating near the fire station property and where the cell tower will be
erected.
“Just imagine building a 140-foot
cell tower in the middle of your
town. Act 250 is supposed to protect
Vermont landscape,” he wrote. “Disgusting.”
The project site was chosen because it enables T-Mobile to provide
customers service from one tower.
Company officials, in testimony to
the commission, stated they have
tried to co-locate antenna on other
towers or site a tower on a silo. However, in Lowell that is not available.
And Moose Mountain Forestry,
the owner of the Lowell wind project
where 21 turbines are located on
Lowell Mountain, rejected the idea
of having the cell tower there.
Another alternative site, proposed
by Warner, does not provide the coverage area that T-Mobile needs, according to the commission.
A shorter tower won’t provide the
coverage either.
The tower will be wholly or partially visible from the properties of
Warner and Wesolow, although landscaping will soften the visibility, the
commission stated.
Warner and Wesolow could appeal the permit to the Superior Court,
Environmental Division.
pain or heartache of others, zero interest in the welfare of others. A psychopath can appear happy, be
gorgeous, be obviously intelligent
and charmingly suave. They can be
infused and surrounded by the sleek
trappings of wealth and likely they
wear a suit with style.
Political and economically powerful people are known to be self-serving and ruthless, the world’s
psychopaths have found a natural fit
in the halls of power. They are smart
enough to speak the script suggesting
that they look out for working people. Elizabeth Warren now opposes
auditing the Fed, showing that she
too plays the game without altering
the outcome.
VEDA pegs a living wage at 21
dollars an hour. Why isn’t everyone
making it? Ask a psychopath. Are we
too stupid to see that everyone can
have enough money for personal dignity (as soon as we replace our psy-
A5
Orleans Superior Court
All information is taken from
Orleans Superior Court files.
Pierre Capron, 40, of West
Charleston pleaded not guilty to a
felony count of aggravated assault
and a misdemeanor count of simple assault. He was released on
several conditions Feb. 24, including one forbidding contact with
victims Holly Fields and Jody
MacFarlane.
Fields and MacFarlane had
been celebrating New Year’s Eve
at the Lake House Saloon in Barton and were just about to leave
when out of nowhere, Capron
punched Fields in the head, continuing to punch him on the floor,
and knocking him unconscious,
according to Trooper Debra Munson’s affidavit.
When MacFarlane tried to pull
Capron off Fields, Capron
punched her in the head, leaving
her dizzy and with a lump on her
head, Munson wrote.
Both suffered concussions, and
MacFarlane was also diagnosed
with a facial contusion.
Fields believed Capron attacked
him because Capron owes him
$800. Capron said he didn’t wish
to speak with Munson, but asked
her to make sure his injuries scratches on his head - were photographed.
Capron is facing a count of possession of heroin and had been
convicted in the past of burglary,
prohibited sexual acts and sexual
assault of a minor.
The state dismissed a count of
possession of cocaine against
Jamil scott, 34, of Bridgeport,
Conn.
Jeffrey Ellam, 35, of North
Troy pleaded guilty Feb. 18 to
leaving the scene of an accident
with property damage resulting
and received a suspended sentence
of six to 18 months. Ellam must
serve 15 days on a work crew,
complete the reparative board
process, engage in substance
abuse screening and treatment if
needed, and abide by a curfew established by his probation officer.
At 5:30 a.m. on May 18, 2014,
Troopers Callie Field and Amy
Borsari responded to a crash on
Bear Mt. Rd. in Newport Center,
where they found a truck in a hay-
field. The truck smelled of burnt
marijuana, Field wrote.
Complainant Charles Hammond said he’d heard the crash at
2:30 a.m. but didn’t report it until
he noticed that the truck took out
his fencepost and cow fence and
damaged his field. The truck also
damaged Francis Chaput’s hayfield.
The troopers went to the home
of the registered owner of the
truck, and when Christian Thomas
opened the door, “the odor of
burnt marijuana came wafting out
of the apartment.”
Ellam was in bed and admitted
crashing the truck, but said he didn’t know what caused the crash.
He also had no clue where the
truck had crashed. Ellam said he’d
been drinking since the crash.
When Borsari asked what he’d
been drinking, he replied, “from a
bottle,” Field wrote.
Ellam had cuts on his face and
hands. When the troopers asked
why he didn’t report the crash,
Ellam replied, “I have 72 hours.”
Ellam paid both farmers back
for their losses.
amanda russin, 37, of
Burlington pleaded guilty Feb. 17
to petty larceny and received a
sentence of four to five days on the
work crew.
On Oct. 5, 2014, Kevin Hayes
purchased cigarettes, lottery tickets, and food - for a total of $27.50
- from Cumberland Farms in
Newport, forgot his bag after fixing himself a hot dog, and found
the bag missing when he returned.
Video footage showed Russin taking it, according to Newport City
Police officer Nicholas Rivers’ affidavit.
bradford Earnest, aka Ernest,
41, of Newport City pleaded not
guilty Feb. 13 to a felony count of
escape from furlough. Bail was set
at $50,000.
According to Newport Probation and Parole officer Tyrel
Kerr’s affidavit, Earnest had been
released on conditional re-entry
status after being convicted of
grand larceny, possessing a regulated drug, and burglary. Despite
attempts to locate him, Earnest
had not been seen since Nov. 10,
2014.
ST. JOHNSBURY
NVRH CEO PAUL BENGTSON NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED
Paul Bengtson, NVRH CEO has
been nationally recognized by receiving the 2015 Grassroots
Champions Award. The award is
given through the American Hospital Association in conjunction
with each state’s hospital association. One hospital leader from each
state is honored for his or her work
over the previous year in effectively delivering the hospital message to elected officials, helping to
broaden the base of community
support for hospitals and tirelessly
advocating on behalf of patients,
hospitals and communities.
“Paul has been a strong voice
for Vermont’s hospitals and for his
community in Northeastern Vermont for more than two decades,”
said Bea Grause, President and
CEO of the Vermont Association
of Hospitals and Health Systems
(VAHHS). “His intense dedication
to collaborating with healthcare
and community organizations in
the Northeast Kingdom to improve
Vermonters’ quality of life is impressive. This dedication, combined with his compelling and
enthusiastic ability to communicate the importance of that work to
elected leaders, have made him an
effective and respected grassroots
leader.”
Jim Newell, Chair of the NVRH
Board of Trustees said, “There is
no more deserving recipient of this
award than Paul. He works endlessly on behalf of patients, hospitals and communities, both
nationally and locally. We thank
him for his devotion to improving
the health of the population we
serve, and his dedication to our
hospital’s mission.”
Bengtson will receive the award
at an upcoming state hospital association event.
chopathic monetary system with a
humane one)? What are you afraid
of, the psychopaths? I’m not. I am
afraid of stupidity, yours to be exact.
Our socio-economic health outcomes can only be improved when
the monetary system we use rewards
the joyousness we are capable of,
rather than the psychopaths amongst
us.
C’mon, Earth deserves our imagination.
(Links to substantiate the letter:
Money creation in the modern economy from the Bank of England:
www.bankofengland.co.uk/publications/Documents/quarterlybulletin/2014/qb14q102.pdf
Regarding psychopathism:
www.washingtonsblog.com/2012/
08/as-many-as-12-million-americans-are-sociopaths.html
www.cognitivepolicyworks.com/bl
og/2012/07/24/how-will-the-99deal-with-70-million-psychopaths/
According to Wikipedia, the DSM
IV-TR gives the prevalence of psychopathy as 3% in males and 1% in
females. (http://en.wikipedia.org
/wiki/Ant…) The DSM IV-TR was
published in 2000, but I have no reason to think the numbers have
changed much since then. The DSM
is produced by the American Psychiatric Association, and I believe their
prevalence numbers are for the U.S.
population. Regarding E Warren’s
non support of audit the fed bill from
the wall Street Journal:
http://blogs.wsj.com/economics/2
015/02/10/sen-warren-opposesaudit-the-fed-bill/ )
Emily Peyton
Putney, Vt.
Progress
FARM • BUSINESS • HOME • AUTO
Paul Bengtson
Continued from Page A4
in new payroll, and $136 million in
investment in Vermont. Making it
so more Vermont entrepreneurs can
access this program will grow jobs
and economic opportunity for all.
Lastly, as we face one of the most
difficult budgets in recent memory,
we are working closely with the
Legislature to craft a balanced approach to align Vermont’s spending
with revenue growth so we are not
back here year after year facing the
same problem. This will not be easy
and it will require us all to make difficult decisions, but I am committed
to balancing the budget thoughtfully
and in a way that does not simply
raise more money to fix this year’s
gap without real, long-term cuts to
put us on a more stable fiscal footing going forward.
On these and other issues, we’re
making strong progress on priorities
that will grow jobs and make Vermont a more affordable place to
live. While it has been an encouraging start to this year’s Legislative
session, the real work and difficult
choices start now. I look forward to
continuing to work with the Legislature to make the tough choices required to continue moving Vermont
forward.
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THE CALEDONIAN-RECORD
A6
FIREFIGHTER INJURED IN STUBBORN OVERNIGHT FIRE
By roBin Smith
Staff Writer
NEWPORT CITY — Firefighters battled an apartment building
fire on tiny Cottage Street early
Tuesday morning not knowing if
everyone was out of the building.
Luckily, the sole tenant was not
at home, but it took a few hours for
firefighters to discover that, Newport City Fire Chief Jamie LeClair
said.
One firefighter was injured
slightly during the fire, when a
wall collapsed and debris caused
scrapes on his shoulder and legs.
The firefighter did not want to be
identified, LeClair said.
The cause of the fire is undetermined, the chief said.
The fire department was called
out at 1 a.m. and arrived to find the
two-story wooden building fully
engulfed in flames. It took about
two hours before the fire was
knocked down enough for firefighters to gain entrance into the
apartment to the rear of the building where they believed someone
was living.
No one was found, LeClair said.
Newport Police Department officers helped firefighters track
down the owner, who is Alice Kelley, and the tenant, who was not at
home at the time of the fire. The
apartment in the front of the building was not occupied and has not
been for a while, LeClair said.
It was stressful to fight a big fire
not knowing if anyone was inside,
LeClair said.
“We were relieved to find out,”
he said.
The fire was stubborn and hard
to put out, having got into the
walls and the attic. The firefighters
tried to get in to see if anyone was
there, but could not, LeClair said.
“The fire pushed us out.”
The injury came when the building began to collapse in on itself,
LeClair said. The first and second
floors have collapsed into the cellar.
Responding to the fire were 21
firefighters, the Newport Ambulance Service and local American
Red Cross officials, who provided
drinks and help for firefighters.
Newport did not call out any
other departments. Cottage Street,
near St. Mary Star of the Sea
Roman Catholic Church on
Prospect Street, is very narrow,
and there was barely room for the
department’s four trucks.
The fire was hard to put out.
Firefighters had to stay on Cottage
Street to make sure the fire was out
until 10 a.m.
LeClair said he spoke with the
state fire marshal who after hearing
about the damage decided not to
come and inspect the building. No
one was at home at the time and
there is so much damage that it
would be very difficult to narrow
down the cause, LeClair said.
It is not suspicious in any way,
he said.
LeClair believes that the owner
has insurance.
LITTLETON VOTERS OK GARAGE, REJECT BOARD EXPANSION
By roBErt BLEChL
Staff Writer
LITTLETON, N.H. — Littleton
voters approved a new $1.3 million public works garage, said ‘no’
to expanding the selectboard, and
narrowly rejected the $500,000 article for the river district.
Although the numbers were unofficial Tuesday night, the river
district article asking voters to
raise $500,000 in bonds to match
at least $2 million in state and federal grants to upgrade infrastructure in the river district mustered
584 votes in favor and 396 against,
making for a 59.5-percent majority
vote, but failing to reach the 60percent super-majority it needs to
pass.
It was undetermined Tuesday if
the article will go to a recount.
The $500,000 would not be
used until the town secured at least
four times that amount in grants.
After the ballots were counted,
River District Redevelopment
Commission member Dave Ernsberger said, “This was an important vote. A lot of people worked
hard on this and it’s an important
project for the continued success
of the town.”
The commission and town will
come back at it again, if that’s
what’s needed, and hope the project still has encouragement from
state and federal agencies, he said.
The article asking for the new
highway garage, which also
needed a 60-percent super-majority, passed with 64 percent of the
vote, at 627-351.
Rejected in a 310-629 vote, was
the article asking residents to expand the current three-member
board of selectmen to five members.
Also failing, in a 408-561 vote,
was the article asking voters to
raise $34,449 to restore a permanent full-time librarian position at
the Littleton Public Library.
The article asking voters to increase patrol officer staffing was
rejected, too, with 418 in favor and
544 opposed.
By a 784-196 margin, voters approved an ordinance banning the
sale and possession of synthetic
marijuana, a mix of chemicals police officials said pose health concerns. Anyone found in violation
of the ordinance will be fined
$5,000, with each day a violation
occurs constituting a separate offense.
In a 611-352 vote, residents
passed a town operating budget of
$8.064 million, which carries an
estimated tax rate impact of $6.56
per $1,000 of assessed valuation.
Voters also approved the four articles asking them to raise several
hundred thousand dollars for the
reconstruction of portions of High
Street, Grove Street and Knight
Avenue and also authorized the
town to accept a $559,080 grant to
repair the sidewalk along Cottage
and Pleasant streets.
The article asking residents to
raise $40,000 for river district land
acquisition passed 548-423.
And while voting down a restored librarian position, voters did
vote to raise $17,500 for library
restroom and sewer repairs.
Selectman Milton Bratz, facing
no challenger, is now embarking
on his second term.
On the Littleton School District
warrant, voters, by a 817-123 margin, approved a 2015-2016 school
year operating budget of $16.337
million.
They also approved a two-year
collective bargaining agreement
for support staff that carries a
$4,854 increase in the 2015-2016
fiscal year and $35,131 increase in
the 2016-2017 year.
After no one signed up before
the candidacy filing deadline to put
their name on the ballot for the one
vacant seat on the Littleton School
Board, former school board members Alan Moberly and Millie Nelson launched write-in campaigns.
A total of 278 write-in votes
were cast, but had to be counted
separately and it was undetermined
at press time which of the two candidates emerged the winner.
NEW HAMPSHIRE LOCAL TOWN MEETING ROUNDUP
Lisbon votes to hire
town administrator
budget” to account for the reductions. The initial voice vote was inconclusive, leading to the first hand
vote, which was tied at 41.
After some procedural confusion,
a second hand vote was called. That
vote resulted in a 40-40 tie. The
paper ballot came down at 45 yes, 44
no, prompting moderator Bill Mead
to say the paper ballot was the right
way to go.
The reduced budget passed easily.
Lisbon voters approved a general
operating fund budget of $1,963,690
which will be offset by a surplus
$150,000. The approved budget includes funding to hire a part-time
town administrator.
“What we’re hoping for is three
days a week,” said selectman
Stephen Knox of the new position.
Lisbon previously had a town administrator but transitioned away
from that in 2012 when it hired an
outside firm to handle administrative
Lyman voters passed the town’s
duties.
proposed $383,547 municipal budget
and $220,390 highway budget Tuesday as well as agreed to put $50,000
into a highway equipment capital reserve fund and $25,000 into a highway bridge replacement and repair
The Franconia town meeting had capital reserve fund.
barely gotten off the starting blocks
They also created a $5,000 continwhen it ground to a halt thanks to two gency fund and funded $3,000 totied hand votes and a one-vote vic- ward a property revaluation capital
tory by paper ballot.
reserve fund, $2,500 toward and ofAt issue was a 3.5% ($54,000) re- fice equipment reserve fund.
duction to the town’s budget proThe town did not pass a resolution
posed by a group of citizens who had calling on the New Hampshire Govcreated what they called a “shadow ernor and Legislature to reform edu-
Lyman voters pass
all budgets
Franconia voters
conduct tightly
contested meeting
LED
Continued from Page A1
earns $33.45 per hour.
According to Mason, by the end
of the three-year contract, the LED
crew will be brought up to the level
of the other small utilities in Vermont, but the LED crew will continue to be paid less than electric
crews for the state’s larger utilities.
Mason pointed out that the LED
crew have many years of service
with LED. The Chief of the linemen
has worked at LED for 25 years. The
newest 1st class linemen started at
LED six or seven years ago. Most of
the LED work force has been with
LED for 10 years or more, Mason
added.
David Rivers, the IBEW Local
300 shop steward said Tuesday
morning, “the negotiations went
well.” He said “it was a fair agreement for both sides,” adding that the
contract was an effort “to try and get
ourselves up in line with other utilities.” Rivers added LED pay puts
LED linemen “in the low one third
cation funding to lower property
taxes.
James Trudell was reelected selectman, Les Poore and Brian
Wohlleb were both reelected to the
planning board, Michael O’Brien
and Patricia Slavtcheff were both reelected to the board of adjustment,
Sandra Moscicki was reelected to as
trustee of funds along with newly
elected Nancy Landry
Haverhill passes
money articles
Haverhill voters Tuesday at annual town meeting overwhelmingly
voted to approve the proposed
$3,995,817 general budget despite
opposition from Selectman Roderick
Ladd.
Residents also approved every
special appropriation request and
voted 10-122 against gating Airport
Road. Residents also approved setting aside $150,000 for a highway
construction fund.
Staff Writers Todd Wellington,
Leah Carey, and Andrew McGregor
contributed to this report. See complete coverage in Thursday’s edition.
of utilities in Vermont.”
A spokesperson for Green Mountain Power, the state’s largest utility,
said a first class lineman at GMP
earns $38.33 per hour.
Mason, who represented the Village of Lyndonville during contract
negotiations, was joined by Bill
Humphrey representing LED management. Mason said all other components of the contract, such as
health care and retirement, remain
largely unaffected by the new contract.
Koko
Continued from Page A1
And she wanted to, no one made
her,” Anderson said. “Whenever I’d
get upset and crying, she would
come and console me and she
wouldn’t leave my side until she did
something funny to make me laugh.
And then she’d come get in my lap
and look at me to make sure I was
okay. And then she would lick me
on the nose to say, it’s okay, I love
you. She wouldn’t stop until she had
achieved that goal.”
Sadly, after 11 years together,
Koko developed cancer. She went
through two major surgeries at
Western Avenue Veterinary Clinic in
St. Johnsbury to remove growths,
but they continued to return.
During one of those surgeries her
heart stopped. But even in the midst
of a life-threatening situation, the little rescue dog had a thirst for life.
“She was dead for up to two minutes without breathing,” Anderson
said. “They gave up. They were trying to decide who was going to give
me the news when suddenly one of
the nurses felt her breathe. They
said, ‘No way! It’s been over two
minutes!’”
Despite the vet’s warning that
Koko would probably have brain
damage after two minutes without
oxygen, Anderson said she was just
as sharp and spunky as ever. “They
said it was nothing short of a miracle.”
Koko’s luck finally ran out when
she passed away on Dec. 9, 2014.
Anderson still gets very emotional
when she speaks of it now, three
months later. “She meant everything
to me,” Anderson said. “I don’t care
Cat
Continued from Page A1
later, they saw the black cat still
crouched on the center of the pole.
A move in any direction could have
meant electrocution or a deadly fall
for the little critter, and they knew
that they would need to approach
the cat – not to mention the electricity – cautiously, Morris said. Juaire
put on his protective gear, and Gates
sent him up in the bucket.
First, Juaire needed to secure the
line, so he put some rubber on the
Exchange
Continued from Page A1
able to sign up through the website
beginning next year.
Miller appeared to leave open the
possibility that if funds run short,
businesses may never sign up
through the Vermont Health Connect website, and instead continue
dealing directly with Blue Cross and
MPV.
Fight
Continued from Page A1
counts of simple assault and were
released on conditions forbidding
contact with victim B.H. Shawn
Parks is also forbidden from consuming alcohol.
The couple was cited to appear
for arraignment two weeks ago, but
“waived” their arraignments.
“Where are your clients?” Judge
Timothy Tomasi asked.
Attorney Jordan Handy, who was
filling in for Mark Kaplan, said his
clients had waived all court appearances, given that they live nine
hours away.
“That’s not exactly how it
works,” Tomasi said.
Without a stipulation from the
state - which there was not – defendants must show up for arraignments, Tomasi said.
On Tuesday, Deputy State’s Attorney Christopher Moll asked
Tomasi to impose $1,000 bail in
each case since they are Canadian
citizens. Kaplan said his client, Laurie Parks, is a school teacher. A conviction for failing to appear for a
court hearing could have disastrous
effects on her employment, he said.
Shawn Parks is a union sheet
metal worker, and does not have the
same motivation to appear for hearings as his wife, Moll said. But his
attorney, Bradley Stetler, said he’s
reviewed the video of the incident
and believes the evidence is weak.
“My client did not commit an assault,” he said.
Tomasi declined to impose bail in
either case.
Black Cyan Magenta Yellow
WedneSday, MaRCh 11, 2015
A tale of two bills
Sen. John Rodgers, D-Essex/Orleans, presented bill S.25 to
name the beagle as the state dog on Jan. 20. The bill was
referred to the Committee On Natural Resources & Energy.
According to VT Digger, Rodgers received a petition with
over 200 signatures asking him to sponsor the bill. He credits Craftsbury residents Stuart and Sheila LaPoint as the inspiration for the bill. He told the LaPoints that the bill may
be a tough go because there are so many other breeds that
people might love.
“Most of [my colleagues] were sort of shaking their heads
… really … the beagle? Those yappy little things?” he said.
“It’s been a source of amusement if nothing else.”
Rep. Job Tate, R-Rutland/Windsor, presented bill H.466
shortly before town meeting. As of Monday, he did not
know which committee it was being referred to.
“Things feel pretty divisive in the state, but I think this is
something we could all rally behind,” Tate said. “[The bill]
serves the purpose of reminding Vermonters that we’re a
state of second chances and coming from behind.”
Tate said that he was prompted to honor the rescue dog
because he and his wife are both big dog lovers. “It’s man’s
best friend and we need to be a friend back.”
about anything as much as I cared
about my little Koko. My little
angel.”
But even in death, Koko’s spirit
of giving lives on.
Anderson lives on a limited income and the vet on Western Avenue has been, in her words, “a
god-send and blessing.” They donated pain medication during
Koko’s illness and then helped Anderson with arrangements to pay off
Koko’s cremation charges over
time.
“They said, ‘There’s nothing we
won’t do to support you with
Koko,’” Anderson said, her eyes
welling up with gratitude.
Last week, on the day before Anderson’s birthday, an anonymous
donor paid off the remaining $100
for Koko’s cremation.
“I don’t know who it was,” Anderson said. “I just don’t know what
to make of it. It doesn’t sound like a
lot of money to most people, but to
me it’s a lot, lot of money. … I want
to let other people know that there’s
lots of good people in the world and
not to give up on each other. And to
say thank you - even if they don’t
want me to know who they are.”
While Anderson hopes that another rescue/service dog will find its
way into her home and her heart, for
now she’s still focused on Koko.
“When I get cremated and I’m
going in the ground, she’s going in
the ground with me,” Anderson said
of her little rescue dog. “I promised
her a forever home and a forever
home she’s going to have.”
center phase. He didn’t know how
the cat would react when he approached it, but it stayed still, clinging to the pole for dear life – one
smart cat, said Morris.
Juaire was able to wrap it in a
shirt and stick it in a tool bag for the
ride back down to safety.
Once on the ground, Gates took
over and walked the cat to the closest house to see if it lived there. It
did not.
Without a collar there wasn’t
much more they could do to find its
owner, so they shooed it into a
nearby barn to recuperate and hope-
fully find its way home, Morris said.
No one knows why that cat decided to climb the pole or how long
it had been up there, Morris said.
But lucky for it, Gates and “The Cat
Whisperer” Juaire were able bring it
down safely.
All in a day’s work for VEC line
workers, Morris and Hallquist said.
They handle tough challenges all
the time without fanfare, Hallquist
said.
But Hallquist said this was a story
worth telling, about the lineman and
the cat.
Rep. Peter Fagan, R-Rutland,
pressed him on whether there would
be enough money to get businesses
signed up.
“If we were out of funding then
we would not be finishing that
work,” Miller said.
Betsy Bishop, president of the
Vermont Chamber of Commerce, a
group that was supportive of the
state exchange as it was being set up
in 2013, said in an interview after
the hearing that the state’s busi-
nesses had grown “incredibly frustrated” with the continuing inoperability of the website.
She reiterated a longstanding objection the Chamber has had: that
Vermont is the only state that mandates businesses get their health insurance through the state exchange.
“We are mandated to use this,”
Bishop said. “They have closed the
private market. They are adding another 1,000 businesses next year,
and it still doesn’t work.”
State Trooper Debra Munson
wrote in her affidavit that she responded to a complaint from a father who said an adult man had
punched his son in the head at Jay
Peak Jan. 24.
William Harnett said his son’s
team played a team from Ontario
and it had gotten rough, with one
player from Ontario requiring medical treatment at a hospital.
Banter – known as “chirping” went on between the two teams
back at the hotel. Harnett did not observe what happened, but told Munson his son’s account.
The U.S. boys were leaving the
water park when they were confronted by R.P., the Parks’ son. R.P.
made racist comments to one of the
U.S. boys, and B.H. stood up for his
friend. The U.S. boys left the area
and went to the second floor.
R.P. and his parents showed up
and R.P. once again made racist
comments, Munson wrote, and B.H.
again stood up for his friend.
Laurie Parks kept encouraging
her son to fight B.H., Munson
wrote, and eventually shoved her
son into B.H. The boys began fighting, and Shawn Parks punched B.H.
in the head, Munson wrote.
A few college-aged boys – Joel
Devlin, Nathaniel Jones, and Adrian
Boskovic - saw what was happening
and restrained Shawn Parks to stop
the fight. That’s when Laurie Parks
“went crazy” and started attacking
the college boys, according to witness accounts.
Boskovic, Jones and Devlin
backed up B.H.’s account with similar statements to Munson, as did
E.M., Coach Richard McLeod’s
son.
Boskovic said he saw Laurie
Parks provoke the fight and push her
son and saw Shawn Parks punch
B.H. Boskovic said when he and his
friends stepped in, Laurie Parks
choked and scratched him and
Shawn Parks bit his thumb. Laurie
Parks dug her fingernails into
Boskovic’s neck, drawing blood,
then kicked him in the groin, Munson wrote.
Both were very drunk, the college boys told police.
Jones said Laurie Parks kicked
him in the groin as well and
“ripped” at his neck and body.
Witnesses said the Parks had
ample opportunity to extricate
themselves from the situation but
instead continued to escalate the
problem with the youngsters.
Munson spoke with the Parks in
their hotel room, where she noticed
that they appeared to be drunk.
Shawn Parks claimed he was attacked by a group of people, but
didn’t know who. He denied punching B.H.
Laurie Parks said the collegeaged boys were provoking a fight all
night and a group of hockey players
followed them to the pizza place at
the hotel, where the mother of one
boy accused her of eating her pizza.
Laurie Parks told Munson they
were “swarmed” and she told her
son to defend himself but didn’t
shove him or encourage a fight. She
said she tried to walk away but was
followed.
R.P. blamed the entire situation
on the U.S. hockey players and denied making any racist comments.
CALEDONIAN Black Cyan Magenta Yellow
THE RECORD • WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2015
A7
NEW ENGLAND
This undated forensics
photograph made by the
FBI, provided by the U.S.
attorney’s office and
presented as evidence
during the federal death
penalty trial of Boston
Marathon bombing
suspect dzhokhar
Tsarnaev Tuesday in
Boston, shows
handwriting on the
bullet-riddled, bloodstained wall of a boat.
The prosecution
presented the photo as
evidence of the
handwritten note found
inside the boat where
Tsarnaev was captured
april 19, 2013 in
Watertown, Mass., four
days after the bombings.
MASSACHUSETTS
Jury In Bombing Trial Sees Photos Of Writing In Boat
By DEniSE LavoiE
AP legal Affairs Writer
BOSTON — Jurors in the trial
of Boston Marathon bomber
Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on Tuesday
saw photographs of a bloodstained, hand-scrawled note speckled with bullet holes inside the
boat he was captured in days after
the deadly 2013 attack.
Prosecutors consider the note a
confession and say it refers to the
motive for the attack carried out by
Tsarnaev and his late brother,
Tamerlan.
In the note, written in pencil on
the inside walls of the boat, Tsarnaev appears to decry U.S. actions
in Muslim countries and says he is
jealous of his brother because he is
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PAVING
body, you hurt one you hurt us all.
…”
“Now I don’t like killing innocent people it is forbidden in Islam
but due to said (bullet hole) it is allowed.”
Judge George O’Toole Jr. is still
trying to decide whether to allow
prosecutors to cut out and bring to
court the panels of the boat to
show jurors or whether to bring the
intact boat to the courthouse to be
viewed outside by the jury, as requested by lawyers for Tsarnaev,
who is now 21.
The judge ended court early
Tuesday so he could go see the
boat, accompanied by representatives of the prosecution and defense teams. The judge rejected a
See trial, Page A8
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dead and now in paradise.
Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, died following a violent confrontation
with police during a getaway attempt four days after the bombings. Dzhokzar, then 19, was found
hiding in a boat parked in a yard in
Watertown.
“I do not mourn because his
soul is very much alive. God has a
plan for each person. Mine was to
hide in this boat and shed some
light on our actions,” he wrote, according to the photos shown to the
jury by prosecutors.
The note also said: “The U.S.
Government is killing our innocent
civilians but most of you already
know that. As a M (bullet hole) I
can’t stand to see such evil go unpunished, we Muslims are one
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ST. JOHNSBURY, VT
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REAL ESTATE AGENCY
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Fax:
E-mail:
79 Union Street
Littleton, NH 03561
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David Lussier 802-626-8482
Paul Lane 802-626-8472
Steve Young 802-274-1275
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Black Cyan Magenta Yellow
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CALEDONIAN Black Cyan Magenta Yellow
NEW ENGLAND
A8
Judge denies Town Meeting
ballot challenge
REGION BRIEFS
GRAFTON, N.H. (AP) — A New Hampshire judge has denied a lastminute attempt by Free State Project members to challenge Town Meeting ballots in Grafton.
The Free State Project is a libertarian movement that seeks to attract
20,000 people to New Hampshire. The Valley News reports
(http://bit.ly/1D0jquo) that four members who live in Grafton and got
19 questions on the Town Meeting ballot later challenged the ballots because they included the Selectboard’s recommendation against passing
each article.
The articles include instructing the police chief not to prosecute marijuana crimes, forcing officials to reduce the operating budget by 10 percent for the next three years and forbidding town officials from
cooperating with the National Security Agency.
A judge rejected the group’s challenge on Monday, clearing the way
for Town Meeting voting Tuesday.
“bedrock principle of our democracy” that partisan politics stops at the
water’s edge. She called the letter a “dangerous attempt” to undermine
the negotiations.
The letter, signed by 47 of the Senate’s 54 Republicans, warned Iran
that unless Congress approved it, any deal the nation cuts with Obama
could expire when he leaves office.
Man sentenced to prison
for sexually assaulting girl, 6
WedneSday, MaRCh 11, 2015
of $5.8 billion.
Council President Tom Horgan says he appreciates the effort state
lawmakers are making to restore funding for higher education, but he
also hopes they will find money in the next budget for scholarships to
encourage New Hampshire students to stay in their home state for college.
“We need to start thinking about ways to help advance our higher education institutions and assist New Hampshire students in funding their
college experience,” he said.
New Hampshire is the only state that doesn’t pay for such scholarships from its general fund, and it ranks last in state funding for higher
education in general. State money makes up less than 10 percent of the
operating budgets at the four public institutions that make up the University System of New Hampshire. After the Legislature slashed funding
for the university system several years ago, Gov. Maggie Hassan has
made restoring the money a priority. The funding she proposed in January for the university system, however, is $24 million less than it requested.
According to the council’s report, colleges and universities contribute
to the state’s economy in a variety ways, including as major employers,
as visitor destinations and as leaders of high-level construction projects.
The report also notes that unlike most not-for-profit organizations, the
state’s nonprofit schools are not exempt from property taxes. Together,
they paid more than $13 million in taxes on non-educational properties
in 2012-2013, mostly on dining halls and dormitories.
The 22 schools have combined operating budgets of $2.2 billion, and
pay $1.2 billion in salaries, wages and benefits. In addition to the 17,800
direct jobs, they indirectly support an additional 8,800 jobs, the report
said.
BRENTWOOD, N.H. (AP) — A man has been sentenced to eight to
16 years in prison for sexually assaulting a 6-year-old girl in New Hampshire.
The Portsmouth Herald reports 38-year-old James Nolan, formerly of
Newmarket, was found guilty of two counts of aggravated felonious sexual assault in December. He was sentenced Monday.
Nolan will have to register as a sex offender and undergo a counseling
program.
Police said they were notified of the sexual assault in 2010. The girl
BENNINGTON, Vt. (AP) — The Vermont Supreme Court says po- told her mother, and police were notified after the girl was brought to
lice were wrong to pull over a driver for having an air freshener dangling the hospital. The girl, who now lives out of state with her mother, atfrom his rearview mirror but the resulting drunken driving charge will tended the trial to testify against Nolan.
stand.
The Bennington Banner (http://bit.ly/1KQm0ap ) reports the judges
ruled a state law that says a driver’s vision can’t be obstructed didn’t intend to include small objects such as the tree-shaped freshener hanging
in Robert Hurley’s car when police pulled him over in June 2013.
HOLLIS, N.H. (AP) — A man faces charges in connection with a
He was charged with driving under the influence and is still fighting
home
invasion in Hollis, New Hampshire, in which a 93-year-old
the charge, saying strictly interpreting the law would ban things like
woman and her caretaker were tied up.
parking permits or a garage door opener clipped to a visor.
KEENE, N.H. (AP) — Aspiring filmmakers have the opportunity to
Danny Le of Nashua was scheduled to be arraigned Tuesday on conThe court ruled last week the DUI charge stands because officers may
get
their short film featured at the Monadnock International Film Festival
spiracy
charges
stemming
from
the
September
burglary.
It
could
not
be
make a mistake of law if there’s reasonable suspicion to investigate
next
month in Keene.
verified
whether
he
had
a
listed
phone
number
or
an
attorney.
someone.
New Hampshire students in grades 9-12 are encouraged to submit
Police said several men stole some items, including a vehicle.
their best short film to the Cave Light Scholarship Fund by April 1. The
The woman, identified as Lillian Alpaugh, has since died.
winner gets $1,000 and will have their film featured during the 3rd annual Monadnock festival April 16-18.
The film will also be featured on the festival’s website and social
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — New Hampshire’s U.S. senators are at
media pages.
odds over a letter Senate Republicans sent to Iran regarding negotiations
Films must be under 5 minutes, 1 second in length and can be on any
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — New Hampshire’s colleges and universi- theme or topic. Work will be judged on the quality of the story, overall
about that country’s nuclear program.
Sen. Kelly Ayotte, a Republican who signed the letter, says a nuclear- ties say their latest report shows that they are major contributors to the production, lighting and audio, editing techniques, performances and
armed Iran is a serious threat to the world. She said in a statement that state’s vibrant economy.
more. Send entries via email in a secure, private YouTube or Vimeo link
The New Hampshire College and University Council estimates that to: monadnockiffgmail.com.
she was “deeply concerned” the agreement the Obama administration
is pursuing would allow Iran to continue acts of “regional terrorism.” its 22 public and private nonprofit institutions directly supported 17,800
Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen says Republicans violated a jobs in fiscal year 2012-13 and generated an estimated economic impact
Vermont court: Air freshener not an
offense, but OUI stands
Man arrested in home invasion;
93-year-old woman tied up
New Hampshire’s senators split
on Senate letter to Iran
Film festival asks high schoolers
to submit short films
New Hampshire colleges emphasize
economic impact
Man gets 20 years for beating infant
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — A man has been sentenced to 20 years in
prison after pleading guilty to beating his girlfriend’s baby daughter.
The Concord Monitor reports the girl, now 2, has permanent brain
damage. Doctors indicated her injuries were caused from blows to the
head and attempted suffocation or smothering.
Police said 26-year-old Scott Diberto was babysitting the girl in January 2014 and told her mother she had fallen on a toy box, but was fine.
He later said the child had fallen down the stairs and then suggested she
had been attacked by an intruder when he went out to buy cigarettes.
Diberto was indicted on more than a dozen felony assault charges; he
pleaded guilty to four.
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Man pleads not guilty to shaking baby
NEWPORT, N.H. (AP) — A man accused of shaking his 3-monthold son twice, allegedly out of aggression toward a video game system,
has pleaded not guilty and is being held on $200,000 bail.
Jerry Carrier faces charges of first- and second-degree assault.
The Eagle Times reports the infant was first hospitalized on Jan. 5;
the 26-year-old Carrier allegedly shook him three times after expressing
frustration while playing “Call of Duty.” The infant went limp and was
non-responsive. Police said he has been hospitalized several times, including the discovery of a brain hemorrhage on Jan. 19.
Police arrested Carrier on Feb. 6 because of an active arrest warrant.
Carrier was ordered Friday to have no contact with his son; the judge
allowed him to have contact with his wife after his lawyer requested it.
Suspect in supermarket robbery
arrested in bank robbery
PORTSMOUTH, N.H. (AP) — Police in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, say a man suspected of robbing a supermarket last month has been
arrested in Las Vegas on a bank robbery charge.
Police said 35-year-old Gerald Bickford was arrested March 5 following the bank robbery in Boulder City, Nevada, and a pursuit that
ended in a crash. Police identified that vehicle as the same one used to
flee the Market Basket robbery in Portsmouth on Feb. 2.
Bickford, formerly of Wells, Maine, is jailed in Nevada and awaits
extradition. It could not be verified whether he had an attorney.
Continued from Page A7
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NEW HAMPTON, N.H. (AP) — Biologists in New Hampshire and
Maine are teaming up on a five-year study to better understand why
moose populations are declining.
WMUR-TV (http://bit.ly/1xajArL ) reports that Maine’s estimated
population of 60,000 moose has fared better than New Hampshire’s herd
of about 4,000 but both states are seeing a decline, largely blamed on
more winter ticks.
Lee Kantar of Maine’s Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife
and Kristine Rines of the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department
are collaborating on the study.
Despite a harsh winter, where long stretches of cold and deep snow
make it harder to survive, Maine’s only lost two of its 68 collared moose.
New Hampshire has recorded no deaths among its collared moose.
The next two months will provide a better picture of how the herds
fared.
trial
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Black Cyan Magenta Yellow
request from the media to allow a
pool reporter and photographer to
also see the boat.
Three people were killed and
more than 260 were injured April
15, 2013, when two bombs exploded near the marathon finish
line.
During opening statements at
his trial, Tsarnaev’s lawyer admitted he participated in the bombings
but said Tamerlan Tsarnaev was
the mastermind and recruited his
younger brother to help him.
Todd Brown, a Boston police
bomb technician, testified that he
saw the writing inside the boat
when he was sent to check it to
make sure there were no explosives or booby traps on board.
During cross-examination of
Brown, Tsarnaev’s lawyers established that all the bullet holes were
from shots coming into the boat
when police fired. The officer said
no bombs, guns or weapons of any
kind were found inside the boat.
Several FBI agents also testified
Tuesday about the collection of
bomb components and other evidence from the scene of the two
bombings. One agent said shrapnel
from the two pressure-cooker
bombs was found on the ground,
inside buildings and the rooftops
of buildings, including a four-story
hotel.
CALEDONIAN Black Cyan Magenta Yellow
THE RECORD • WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2015
A9
NATION & WORLD
Hillary Clinton: I should have used
government email as secretary of state
UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Breaking her silence, Hillary Rodham Clinton conceded Tuesday that she should have used government email as secretary of state and acknowledged she had destroyed tens of thousands of
emails in her private account that she described as personal in nature.
In the face of a growing controversy over her use of a private email address
and server, Clinton was defiant in insisting she had not violated any federal
laws or Obama administration rules.
“I fully complied by every rule I was governed by,” Clinton said in a 20minute news conference that marked her first comments on the matter.
The controversy has upended Clinton’s careful blueprint for the rollout of
her 2016 presidential campaign. The clear front-runner for the Democratic
nomination, Clinton had planned to spend March touting her work on
women’s issues and giving a handful of paid speeches before announcing
her candidacy in early April.
Clinton tried to stick to that plan in the days after details of her email use
became public. But as criticism from Republicans mounted and Democratic
allies started publicly pushing Clinton to address the matter, her team hastily
arranged Tuesday’s brief news conference.
Jury finds Pharrell, Thicke copied Gaye song for
‘Blurred Lines,’ awards nearly $7.4 million
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A jury awarded Marvin Gaye’s children nearly
$7.4 million Tuesday after determining singers Robin Thicke and Pharrell
Williams copied their father’s music to create “Blurred Lines,” the biggest
hit song of 2013.
Marvin Gaye’s daughter Nona Gaye wept as the verdict was being read
and was hugged by her attorney, Richard Busch.
“Right now, I feel free,” Nona Gaye said after the verdict. “Free from …
Pharrell Williams and Robin Thicke’s chains and what they tried to keep on
us and the lies that were told.”
The verdict could tarnish the legacy of Williams, a reliable hit-maker who
has won Grammy Awards and appears on NBC’s music competition show
“The Voice.”
An attorney for Thicke and Williams has said a decision in favor of Gaye’s
heirs could have a chilling effect on musicians who try to emulate an era or
another artist’s sound.
Video of fraternity’s racist chant threatens
University of Oklahoma’s long path to progress
WORLD BRIEFS
Boren, a former Oklahoma governor and U.S. senator with 20 years at the
helm of the state’s flagship university, acted swiftly. He immediately severed
ties with the fraternity and ordered members to vacate their house. On Tuesday, he expelled the two students who appeared to be leading the chant for
creating a hostile educational environment and promised others involved
would face discipline.
“I have emphasized that there is zero tolerance for this kind of threatening
racist behavior at the University of Oklahoma,” Boren said in a statement.
The video was taken on a bus going to a Founder’s Day event at a country
club. The person who recorded it has cooperated with the investigation, Boren
said Tuesday ahead of a Board of Regents meeting.
Bodies recovered from site where 2 helicopters
crashed, killing 10, including French Olympians
VILLA CASTELLI, Argentina (AP) — Argentine Investigators plucked
cellphones, bits of paper and other mostly charred and unrecognizable items
on Tuesday from the ruins of two helicopters that collided while carrying
prominent French athletes, an accident that left the European nation in
mourning and had Argentine experts struggling to understand how two experienced pilots lost control.
The helicopters crashed and burst into flame shortly after taking off Monday afternoon near the remote settlement of Villa Castelli in the Andean
foothills in northwest Argentina.
Officials said all aboard — eight French nationals and two Argentine pilots
— were killed.
Among them were Olympic champion swimmer Camille Muffat,
Olympic bronze-medalist boxer Alexis Vastine, and pioneering sailor Florence Arthaud. They had been among the contestants in the reality TV show
“Dropped,” which was being shot in the sparsely populated region.
Expressions of grief poured in from French athletes and officials, including
President Francois Holland, who said he felt “immense sadness.” The International Olympic Committee announced it would fly its flag at half-staff for
three days.
New low in relations between Obama,
congressional GOP as both sides
pessimistic of improvement
NORMAN, Okla. (AP) — Almost a generation ago, the University of
Oklahoma set out to raise its profile, seeking to build a regional school that
WASHINGTON (AP) — Relations between President Barack Obama and
served mostly students from the Southwest into a leading institution that at- congressional Republicans have hit a new low.
tracted top scholars.
There has been little direct communication between Obama and the GOP
President David Boren made striking progress, achieving a reputation that leadership on Capitol Hill since Republicans took full control of Congress
now extends well beyond the Sooners football team that once defined the
campus. But those improvements seem in peril after members of a fraternity
were caught on video chanting a racial slur. The chant referenced lynching
and indicated black students would never be admitted to OU’s chapter of
Sigma Alpha Epsilon.
Catamount Film and Arts, Inc. will hold a public
meeting on its current application to the United
States Department of Agriculture – Rural Development department, for a series of energy efficient upgrades and conversions for its community arts center
at 10:00 am Monday, March 23, at the arts center
at 115 Eastern Avenue, St. Johnsbury, VT 05819.
The public is invited to attend.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE
TO THE VOTERS OF
PROFILE SCHOOL DISTRICT
The Profile School District Annual Meeting will be held
on Thursday, March 19, 2015 at the Profile School at
7:30 PM. (Polls to be open from 7:00 PM until all have
voted.)
NOTICE
TO THE VOTERS OF THE LISBON
REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT
The Lisbon Regional School District Annual Meeting will be
held on Wednesday, March 18, 2015 in the gymnasium of the
Lisbon Regional School at 7:30 P.M. (Polls to be open from 7:00
P.M.).
PUBLIC NOTICE
DEVELOPMENT REVIEW BOARD
TOWN OF ST. JOHNSBURY, VERMONT
The St. Johnsbury Development Review Board hereby gives notice that it will hold
a public hearing on Thursday, March 26, 2015 at 7:00 p.m. in the Conference Room
of the St. Johnsbury Public Safety Building, 1187 Main Street, St. Johnsbury,
Vermont to consider the following items of business:
1. Application of the Town of St Johnsbury, 51 Depot Square Suite 3, pursuant to
Section 315 of the St. Johnsbury Zoning By-Laws, for approval of a Permit to construct a handicap accessible fishing access on property located at Fred Mold Park
on Concord Street. Said land and premises are located in districts designated
Conservation on the St. Johnsbury Zoning Map and are located in a Floodway.
(reference 150306-001)
2. To conduct any other business which may properly come before the Board,
(dated at St. Johnsbury, County of Caledonia and State of Vermont on this 11th
day of March 2015).
Respectfully submitted,
Richard F. Lyon, Chairman
St. Johnsbury Development Review Board
VERMONT AGENCY OF TRANSPORTATION
PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION FUNDING
ANNOUNCEMENT
The Vermont Agency of Transportation anticipates the availability of 24 V.S.A. Section 5091 State
Public Transportation Funds, Federal Transit Administration 49 U.S.C. Section 5310, Section 5311,
Section 5311(b)(3), and Section 5339 funds for State Fiscal Year 2016 & 2017 public transportation
projects.
These funds may be made available to a transit authority, transit district, municipal transit system,
or a public non-profit transit system managing or operating general public transportation services
through a competitive application process.
FTA 49 U.S.C. Section 5310 funds – eligible projects include capital replacement or expansion vehicles or operating funds for the purpose of transporting elders and persons with disabilities.
FTA 49 U.S.C. Section 5311 Non-urbanized Transportation funds - eligible projects include capital
(vehicle and non-rolling stock items), marketing, preventive maintenance, administrative, and
operating assistance to operate general public transportation services, including persons who are
elderly and/or with disabilities or low income, but specifically excludes such services as single-ride
taxi, charter or exclusive school bus transportation.
FTA 49 U.S.C. Section 5311(b)(3) (RTAP) – eligible projects include training, technical assistance
or related services to meet the needs of rural public transportation operators and their subcontractors.
FTA 49 U.S.C. Section 5339 Bus & Bus Facilities Capital funds – eligible projects include vehicle
and non-rolling stock capital items.
Applications must be submitted by 4:00pm on April 24, 2015
To request a copy of the application, or if you have any questions, please contact the following
person in writing:
Barbara Donovan, Public Transit Administrator
Policy, Planning, and Intermodal Development Division
Vermont Agency of Transportation
One National Life Drive – Montpelier, VT 05633-5001
Phone: (802)828-2828; Fax: (802)828-3983
E-mail: [email protected]
PUBLIC NOTICE
The State of Vermont has available for review the State’s 2014 Edward Byrne
Memorial Justice Assistance Formula Grant (JAG) Program Application. The
JAG Formula Grant award is in the amount of $483,863.00 to the Vermont
Department of Public Safety, Vermont State Police and local governments by
the Bureau of Justice Assistance to combat violent and rural drug crimes in
the State of Vermont.
More information is available online at
http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/BJA/grant/jag.html
Any citizen, neighborhood, and or community groups who are interested
may receive a copy of the State’s grant application for review and comment
by contacting:
Susan Blain
Vt. Department of Public Safety
103 South Main Street, Waterbury, VT 05671
Tel: 802-241-5360 • [email protected]
STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE
SCHOOL WARRANT ARTICLES
To the qualified voters of the Lisbon Regional School District consisting of the Preexisting Districts of Lisbon and Lyman, qualified to vote in District affairs.
You are hereby notified to meet at the gymnasium of the Lisbon Regional School in
the Town of Lisbon on Wednesday, March 18, 2015 at seven o’clock in the Evening
(polls to be open from 7:00 p.m. until all have voted, business meeting for consideration of the articles of the warrant will be called to order at 7:30 p.m.) to act upon
the following subjects:
ARTICLE 1: To choose all necessary officers for the School District for the ensuing
year.
ARTICLE 2: To hear the reports of agents, auditors, committees, or officers heretofore
chosen, and to pass any vote relating thereto.
ARTICLE 3: To see if the District will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Five
Million, Nine Hundred Eleven Thousand, One Hundred Ninety-Eight
Dollars ($5,911,198.00) for the support of schools, for the payment of
salaries for school District Officials and Agents, and the payment of
statutory obligations of the District. This article does not include appropriations voted in other Warrant Articles.
Recommended by the Lisbon Regional School Board.
ARTICLE 4: To see if the District will vote to raise and appropriate up to the sum of
Twenty Thousand Dollars ($20,000) to be placed in the School Building
Maintenance Expendable Trust Fund, established March 10, 2004, such
sum to be funded from the June 30 unreserved fund balance available
for transfer on July 1. No Amount to be raised from taxation.
Recommended by the Lisbon Regional School Board
ARTICLE 5: To see if the District will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Twenty
Five Thousand Dollars ($25,000.00) to be placed in the School Building
Maintenance Expendable Trust Fund, established March 10, 2004.
Recommended by the Lisbon Regional School Board
ARTICLE 6: To see if the District will vote to authorize, indefinitely until rescinded, to
retain year-end unassigned general funds in an amount not to exceed,
in any fiscal year, 2.5 percent of the current fiscal year’s net assessment,
in accordance with RSA 198:4-b, II. Such fund balance retained may
only be used to reduce the tax rate or for emergencies to be approved
by the Department of Education under RSA 32:11.
Recommended by the Lisbon Regional School Board
ARTICLE 7: To transact any other business that may legally come before this
meeting.
LISBON REGIONAL SCHOOL BOARD
Robert Adams, Chairman
Beth Hubbard
Robert Bruce
Rochelle Cascio
Audrey Champagne
Stephen Morrison
Scott Champagne
Stephen Sherry
Owen Clark
Black Cyan Magenta Yellow
in January. Obama has threatened to veto more than a dozen Republicanbacked bills. And House Speaker John Boehner infuriated the White House
by inviting Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to address Congress
without consulting the administration first.
But the dispute over Obama’s high-stakes nuclear negotiations with Iran
has put the relationship perhaps beyond repair.
The president and his advisers are seething over Republican efforts to undermine the sensitive discussions with Iran, most recently by sending an
“open letter” to the country’s leaders warning that any nuclear deal could expire the day Obama walks out of the Oval Office. “I cannot recall another
instance in which senators wrote directly to advise another country — much
less a longtime foreign adversary — that the president does not have the constitutional authority to reach a meaningful understanding with them,” Vice
President Joe Biden, who spent nearly four decades in the Senate, said in an
unusually harsh statement.
For their part, Republican lawmakers call their outreach to a hostile nation
a reasonable response to an administration they say has spurned Congress
and ignored its prerogatives at every turn. It’s the starkest sign yet that Republicans see an adversary, not a potential partner, in Obama’s White House
— even on foreign policy issues where partisan differences have traditionally
been somewhat muted.
Ukrainian town of Debaltseve struggles to come
back to life after month of fierce fighting
DEBALTSEVE, Ukraine (AP) — When the wind picks up, the rattle of
the corrugated iron roof of a destroyed gas station can sound like artillery.
Four charred tanks sit stranded nearby, machine oil splattered on the ground,
while a pick-up truck lies on its side surrounded by shrapnel.
Debaltseve, the center of one of the fiercest battles of Ukraine’s war, lies
in ruins three weeks after it was captured by Russia-backed separatists.
The struggle for the strategic rail hub — a sleepy town with a pre-war
population of 25,000 people — became one of the darkest pages in the ongoing conflict in eastern Ukraine, which has already killed more than 6,000
people. The town is crucial because it provides a direct link between the two
See Briefs, Page A10
PLANNING BOARD
TOWN OF LISBON, NH
There will be a Lisbon Planning Board hearing on Thursday, March 19,
2015 at 6:00 p.m. at the Lisbon Town Office regarding an
Application for a Lot Line Adjustment by Soukup and Brooks at
Lots R4-5 and R4-5A.
Information regarding the proposed Lot Line adjustment application
may be reviewed at the Town Office, 46 School Street, Lisbon, NH prior
to the meeting date.
You are invited to appear in person or by agent or counsel and state
reasons why the request should or should not be granted.
INVITATION TO BID
WHITE MOUNTAINS SCHOOL ADMINISTRATIVE UNIT #35
FUEL OIL SUPPLIES
White Mountains School Administrative Unit #35 is seeking vendor bids to deliver
43,900 gallons of #2 fuel oil to the School Districts of:
Bethlehem, Lafayette Regional, Landaff, Lisbon Regional and Profile
Bid Specifications and general information may be obtained by contacting:
Tina D. Peabody, School Business Manager
260 Cottage Street, Suite C
Littleton, NH 03561
Phone (603) 444-3925 ~ Fax (603) 444-6299
e-mail [email protected]
Sealed proposals must be submitted in accordance with applicable specifications by
4:00 PM on April 1, 2015 and clearly marked “FUEL BID”.
Bids will be opened at that time. Bids will be awarded by EACH district school board
at their next monthly board meeting.
THE SCHOOL DISTRICTS RESERVE THE RIGHT TO ACCEPT OR REJECT ANY OR ALL
BIDS, EITHER IN PART OR IN WHOLE.
STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE
SCHOOL WARRANT
To the inhabitants of the Towns of Bethlehem, Easton, Franconia, and Sugar Hill
qualified to vote in Profile School District affairs:
You are hereby notified to meet at the Profile School in the Town of Bethlehem on
Thursday, March 19, 2015, at seven o'clock in the evening (polls to be open from 7:00
P.M. until all have voted). Business meeting for consideration of the Articles of the
Warrant will be called to order at 7:30 P.M. to act upon the following subjects:
ARTICLE 1: To choose a Moderator for the term of one (1) year.
ARTICLE 2: To choose Three (3) School Board Members: One (1) School Board
Member from the pre-existing District of Bethlehem for a term of three
(3) years; One (1) School Board member from the pre-existing District
of Lafayette for a term of three (3) years; and, One (1) School Board
Member from the pre-existing District of Lafayette for a term of one (1)
year.
ARTICLE 3: To see if the District will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Six
Million, Seven Hundred Twenty Five Thousand, Five Hundred Twelve
Dollars
($6,725,512.00) for the support of schools, for the payment of salaries
of School District Officials and Agents and for the payment of statutory
obligations of the District, exclusive of appropriations voted in other
Warrant Articles.
Recommended by the Profile School Board
ARTICLE 4: To see if the District will vote to raise and appropriate up to the sum of
One Hundred Twenty One Thousand, Eight Hundred Fifty Dollars
($121,850.00) to be placed in the School Building Maintenance and
Repairs Fund established March 18, 2006 with such amount to be funded from the June 30 unreserved fund balance available for transfer on
July 1. No amount to be raised from taxation.
Recommended by the Profile School Board
ARTICLE 5: To see if the District will vote to raise and appropriate up to the sum of
Twenty Five Thousand Dollars ($25,000.00) to be placed in the Special
Education Capital Reserve Fund established March 24, 1994 under the
provisions of RSA 35:1-b with such amount to be funded from the June
30 unreserved fund balance available for transfer on July 1. No amount
to be raised from taxation.
Recommended by the Profile School Board
ARTICLE 6: To see if the District will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One
Hundred Seventy Three Thousand, Six Hundred Fifty Dollars
($173,650.00) for the purpose of constructing four tennis courts, such
sum to be funded from any June 30 unreserved fund balance available
for transfer on July 1. No amount to be raised by taxation.
Recommended by the Profile School Board
ARTICLE 7: To see if the District will vote to authorize, indefinitely until rescinded, to
retain year-end unassigned general funds in an amount not to exceed,
in any fiscal year, 2.5 percent of the current fiscal year’s net assessment,
in accordance with RSA 198:4-b, II. Such fund balance retained may
only be used to reduce the tax rate or for emergencies to be approved
by the Department of Education under RSA 32:11.
Recommended by the Profile School Board
ARTICLE 8: To transact any other business that may legally come before this meeting.
PROFILE SCHOOL BOARD
Kim Shillieto, Chairman
Steve Chardon, Vice Chairman
Christine Ash
Alice Rocke
Carol Carlson-Cunningham
Lynn Terres
Julie Seely
CALEDONIAN Black Cyan Magenta Yellow
NATION & WORLD
A10
briefs
Continued from Page A9
main rebel cities of Donetsk and Luhansk. So vital was the prize that the
cease-fire deal brokered by Russia, Ukraine and Western powers did nothing
to slow the rebel onslaught.
At least 179 Ukrainian troops were killed in the battle, along with uncounted hundreds of civilians.
Heavy artillery rained down on Debaltseve for a month beginning in midJanuary. Those four weeks wreaked such devastation that the whole town
has become one heap of rubble. Today it is as unrecognizable as the streets
next to the Donetsk airport where fighting raged for nine months. Entire
blocks of flats in Debaltseve are deserted, the sun shining through the upper
floors as if the roof had been blown away by a tornado.
Obama clamps down on federal student loan
servicers, calls for more borrower rights
ATLANTA (AP) — Issuing a clarion call to Americans saddled by
student debt, President Barack Obama urged student borrowers Tuesday
to stand up for their rights, and announced a medley of modest steps to
WedneSday, MaRCh 11, 2015
bring some order to a notoriously chaotic system.
Obama unveiled his “student aid bill of rights” before a gymnasium
packed with nearly 10,000 students at Georgia Tech, where he said the
nation must mobilize to bring about deeper changes to student loans.
Not only should every American be able to afford college, Obama said,
they also should be able to afford the loan payments that kick in with a
vengeance once they graduate.
“We’re trying to tackle this problem from every angle,” Obama said.
“We want to make this experience more affordable, because you’re not
just investing in yourselves, you’re investing in your nation.”
In the Oval Office ahead of his brief visit to Atlanta, Obama signed a
presidential memorandum with policy tweaks that don’t require new legislation from Congress — a plus as far as the White House is concerned.
The memo targets third parties like Navient — formerly Sallie Mae —
that contract with the government to collect on loans. Those companies
will be required to better inform borrowers about repayment options and
notify them when they are delinquent, the White House said.
Obama also called for a single website where students can see all their
federal loans in one place — a major problem for students with multiple
loans or debt that’s been sold from lender to lender. He also called for a
website where borrowers can file complaints.
Secret Service to test drones over DC,
looking at ways to stop rogue flights
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Secret Service is conducting middle-of-thenight drone flights near the White House in secret tests to devise a defense
against the unmanned aircraft, The Associated Press has learned.
The government-controlled drones will be flown between 1 a.m. and 4
a.m. during the next several weeks over parts of Washington —airspace that’s
usually off limits as a no-fly zone, according to a U.S. official briefed on the
plans.
The official said the Secret Service is testing drones both for its own use
in law enforcement and protection, and to identify how to defend against
hostile drones. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because this
person was not authorized to publicly discuss the plans. The Secret Service
has said details are classified.
Among the tests is the use of signal-jamming technology to thwart control
of a remotely piloted aircraft, the official said.
Researchers at the Homeland Security Department, which oversees the
Secret Service, have been testing methods to combat drones at remote sites.
But testing in a real-world environment around the White House will help
understanding of how radio waves are affected by buildings, monuments and
even tall trees.
Midday Kidnapping Attempt Caught On Video In Small Town
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SPOKANE, Wash. — Authorities
on Tuesday were searching for a
man caught on surveillance video
running down a sidewalk with a toddler in his arms, with the boy’s two
young siblings screaming and chasing behind him, in what officials in
the tiny town of Sprague, Washington say was a failed kidnapping.
The dramatic scene ended after a
pair of teenagers also chased after
the man and he set the boy down and
ran off Sunday, authorities said. The
22-month-old child wasn’t hurt, said
Lincoln County Sheriff Wade
Magers.
Authorities said they don’t believe the man is a resident of
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LOS ANGELES — Scientists are
virtually certain that California will be
rocked by a strong earthquake in the
next 30 years. Now they say the risk
of a mega-quake is more likely than
previously thought.
The chance of a magnitude-8
quake striking the state in the next
three decades jumped to 7 percent
from 4.7 percent, mainly because scientists took into account the possibility that several faults can shake at
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once, releasing seismic energy that results in greater destruction.
While the risk of a mega-quake is
higher than past estimates, it’s more
likely — greater than 99 percent
chance — that California will be rattled by a magnitude-6.7 jolt similar in
size to the 1994 Northridge disaster.
The chance of a Northridge-size
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— 95 percent versus 93 percent, according to a report released Tuesday
by the U.S. Geological Survey.
“California is earthquake country,
and residents should live every day
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Giddings said she realized what
was happening and sent her teenage
grandson, Andrew Crane, 15, and
his friend, Isaac Yow, 16, to chase
the man.
As the older boys approached, the
kidnapper put the child down in a
vacant lot and fled, the sheriff’s office said.
“He went around a corner and disappeared,” Giddings said. “Somehow he disappeared from the face of
the earth.”
No vehicle was seen with the kidnapper, who is described by the sheriff’s office as about 30 years old,
6-foot to 6-foot-2, with a thin build,
brown hair and a mustache.
“We are leaning on somebody
coming through town,” which sits
along Interstate 90, a major eastwest artery, Magers said.
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which runs from central California to
the Salton Sea near the U.S.-Mexico
border — remains the greatest threat
because it hasn’t ruptured in more
than three centuries.
The report found there is a 19 percent chance in the next 30 years that
a Northridge-size quake will unzip
the southern section compared to a
6.4 percent chance for the northern
section, partly because it last broke in
1906.
The southern San Andreas is
“ready to have an earthquake because
it’s really locked and loaded,” Field
said.
The report is a forecast, but it is not
a prediction. Experts still cannot predict exactly where or when a quake
will hit anywhere in the world.
In recent years, the USGS and several universities have been testing an
early warning system designed to detect the first waves of a jolt and send
out an alert before the slower-moving
damaging waves. Proponents have
said a few seconds of notice can allow
trains to slow down, utilities to shut
off gas lines and people to duck for
cover. The public alert system — still
in pilot phrase — needs more funding
before it can be rolled out statewide.
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like it could be the day of a big one,”
USGS geophysicist and lead author
Ned Field said.
The latest seismic calculations
largely mirror previous findings issued by the USGS in 2008. Back
then, scientists also determined that
California faced an almost certain risk
of experiencing a Northridge-size
quake.
The new report included newly
discovered fault zones and the possibility that a quake can jump from fault
to fault. Because of this knowledge,
the odds of a catastrophic quake —
magnitude 8 or larger — in the next
30 years increased.
There is a 93 percent chance of a
magnitude 7 or larger occurring over
the same period and a 48 percent
chance of a magnitude 7.5 — similar
to previous estimates.
Thousands of quakes every year
hit California, sandwiched between
two of Earth’s major tectonic plates,
the Pacific and North American
plates. Most are too small to be felt.
Of the more than 300 faults that
crisscross the state, the southern segment of the San Andreas Fault —
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near the sitter’s house, he told the television station.
Sheriff’s deputies said a man
talked with the children for a few
minutes, then scooped the toddler
out of his stroller and ran down the
street. Surveillance video from a
grocery store showed the kidnapper
running, child in arms, with Delicia
chasing and Brenden not far behind.
Delicia’s screams alerted Dorothy
Giddings, who was working at her
antique store downtown.
“I said there is something wrong,”
Giddings recalled Tuesday.
“Then this man busts out and runs
across the street and he’s got a baby
and a little girl right behind him
screaming,” Giddings said. “The girl
said, ‘That man got my baby
brother! That man got my baby
brother!’”
Report: Chance 0f Mega-quake Hitting California Increases
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Sprague, a wheat farming town of
about 500 people located 40 miles
west of Spokane.
“We don’t believe him to be a
local at this point,” Magers said.
“We’d recognize him if he was
local.”
Magers said authorities have no
leads in the case.
The boy’s father, Michael Wright,
said he was horrified by the incident.
“I can’t explain the feeling, the
anxiety and everything that goes into
finding out your children is missing
or something has happened to
them,” Wright told KXLY-TV of
Spokane.
Wright left his three children with
a baby sitter Sunday while he went
to work. The children — Brenden,
10, Delicia, 8, and the boy — were
playing unsupervised in a city park
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