Newsletter - Fireside Story League

March• 2015
Fireside Storytellers’ League of Tacoma
A service organization comprised of both men and women who are interested in the art of storytelling.
Next Meeting
Our next meeting will be Monday, March 9th at 6:30-pm and will be held at the Puyallup
Public Library, 324 South Meridian, Puyallup, WA 98371. Kathleen Benoun has
volunteered to be the designated storyteller, and Maggie Jehn, the Refreshment Host.
Stories begin at 7-pm. Guests are welcome.
Fireside’s Officers:
President, Earl Brydson
Vice-Pres. (Vacant)
Secretary, Penny Tennison
Treasurer, Kathleen Benoun
Service Coordinator,
Eileen Beckowitz
Editor, Penny Tennison
www.firesidestoryleague.org
Fireside is a member of
National Storytellers League
March…
2nd “Read Across America
Day” marks the
Birthday of ‘Dr. Seuss’
17th St Patrick’s Day
20th Spring Begins
20th “World Storytelling
Day”
World Storytelling Day, March 20, 2015. The
event originated in Sweden in 1991 as a national day for
storytelling. It has since become is a global celebration of
the art of oral storytelling. On this day people share stories
for inspiration, to learn from each other, to create international contacts, and to raise people’s awareness of storytelling as an art form. The World Storytelling Day logo,
shown at right, was designed by artist and international
storyteller, Mats Rehnman. Each year, many of the individual
storytelling events that take place around the globe are linked by a common theme that
is agreed upon by storytellers from around the world using the WSD listserve--This year
the theme is “Wishes.”
Stories come in all variety: myths, legends, fairy tales, trickster stories, fables, ghost
tales, hero stories, and epic adventures, these stories were told, retold over the ages.
The oldest surviving tale in the storytelling history is the epic, Gilgamesh, which dates to
2100 BC and tells of the deeds of a famous Sumerian king. The story was found
inscribed on stone tablets.*
Scheherazade is one of the most famous storytellers. According to legend, she told
stories to the sultan, who, if he was displeased with anybody, would have their head
removed. Scheherazade, in order to please the sultan, keep him interested, and to keep
her own head, told him a story a night for 1001 nights. She entertained the sultan with
Persian, Arabian and Indian folk tales, handed down through generations. She cleverly
stopped at the most exciting part of the story and thus kept the Sultan interested and
waiting until the next night to hear the rest of the story. The Sultan was enchanted by
her abilities and granted Scheherazade her life. Her stories, such as Ali Baba and the
Forty Thieves, Sinbad, and Aladdin and his Magic Lamp, are still read and told today.
Celebrate the occasion. You do not need to know 1001 stories—just one good
story. Invite friends or family to dinner and treat them to a story with dessert. Perhaps
you could tell a story while sharing lunch with your co-workers. Maybe there is a group
of youngsters in your life, Scouts or sports car-pool, or such, that you could tell a story
to. Maybe you know someone at a care facility that would enjoy a story. Maybe, if
asked, they could tell you a story and share some family history that you might
otherwise have never known. Everyone, Share a Wish; Tell A Story!
Fireside Story League’s Fireside Log
*Editor’s Note: Much of the background information in the preceding
article was gleaned from Wikipedia, to which I have donated. If you
also use this resource, please consider donating.
February’s Meeting was held at University Place
Library: The FSL name badges were available to
members at this meeting. The hope is that the namecard badges will allow new members and guests to more
quickly become acquainted with each other.
Treasurer’s Report: Treasurer, Kathleen Benoun,
reported that the checks for donations to the Friends of
University Place Library, to Franciscan Hospice in
Memory of Elsie Hilton, and to PowellsWood Storytelling
Festival, had all been mailed.
Service Report: Service Coordinator, Eileen Beckowitz,
asked for a volunteer to tell at the People’s Retirement
Community Center on February 20th. Earl volunteered;
Betsi said she would accompany him. Steve Groves has
volunteered to tell stories at L’Arche Home, date to be
determined.
Stories:
o Earl started the stories rolling with “The Little Red
Box.”
o Larry, with his guitar, treated us to new verses he
has added to his Sasquatch ballad.
o Penny told “The Hack Driver,” by Sinclair Lewis
o Eileen told, “A Treasure in Time”, by Judy Walker.
Eileen also shared a short poem about “Susie Lee.”
o Judy Urschel followed with “Just and Unjust,” a short
poem about how the rain really “doth fall.”
o Rosemary, Lula, and Jessica, together, told a true
tale about Bob, the Bob-tail cat, and Bob-the-Dog,
inseparable friends who miraculously survived
Katrina’s devastation and found a new home.
o Penny closed with “Pink Ties,” by Alexander King.
February Storytelling Services
By, Eileen Beckowitz, Service Coordinator
19th--Penny: King's Manor Assisted Living, Lutheran
Home Care Center
20th--Earl: Peoples Retirement Community
21st--Penny: Franke Tobey Jones Care Center
26th--Penny responded to a short notice request from the
Federal Way Green Gables Elementary School for a
Multi-Cultural Diversity Parent/Student Event.
March • 2015
**We have made contact with Amanda Schappler of
L'Arche Tahoma Hope, where Steve Groves has
volunteered for sharing his talents with their residents.
March 6th is to be the first gathering. Thanks, Steve!
Eileen.....
Global Griot: stories & music
from around the world
Sundays, 9 - 11 a.m.
Radio KSER-90.7FM:
A message from Host, Mary Dessein:
Changes are afoot for Global Griot: Global has
aired live on KSER 90.7-FM, www.kser.org, for 16
years. March 29 will be the last live broadcast.
Starting either the first or second week of
April, Mary will be doing the "Conversations"
segments and a revamped Global for one hour.
They will not be broadcast in the regular line-up on
KSER, but put on the “SoundCloud,” accessible
from the KSER webpage. A regular time slot may
occur later.
The plan is that Mary will pre-produce a threeminute 'short spot' to be aired during the week
prior, to describe what her show that week will be.
At the end of the 'short spot' will be the info on
how to find the show/podcast. The info will also be
on Mary's website, www.marydessein.com.
Bill Harley has signed on for one of these, but
catching him in one place long enough is a
challenge! Upcoming writers include Bernadette
Pajer, Erica Bauermeister, and Tracy Wilen, PhD.
Global revamped also means a new name:
“Tales Well Told.” You can reach Mary at:
[email protected], [email protected] or 425879-4650,
Also, I invite all who want to tell ‘live’ in the
broadcast studio on Sunday March 22, to please
wander up to Everett, and I also invite all, on
March 29, to a roundup of storytelling to celebrate
and closeout the last live program! The address is
2623 Wetmore Ave, Everett 98201, which is right
in downtown Everett.
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Fireside Story League’s Fireside Log
National Storytellers League
A Letter from NSL President, MaryAnn Zimmerman
Dearest Storytellers,
March, 2015
It has been a while since I touched base with all of our
wonderful storytellers.
I am very sorry about how long it has taken to put
Story Art into your hands. I have been reassured that
they will be in your hands very shortly. If you have
anything interesting to say about your league, you can
send it to Denise or myself and it will be appreciated
very much. Thank you for all the information you
sent to me after you received my letters. It is great to
know that storytelling is not a lost art yet.
I want you to know that I am praying that each of
you is well and happy. God Bless!!!
Sincerely,
March • 2015
Pierce County Library’s choice for its 8th Annual
Pierce County Reads program is The Boys in the
Boat. This non-fiction work describes how, eighty years
ago, a nine-man rowing team from University of
Washington, comprised of students from impoverished
families suffering through the Great Depression, won the
Gold Medal at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin. It is about the
triumph of the underdog, the rewards of persistence, and
the atmosphere of an approaching war. Author Daniel
James Brown said: It is a metaphor for what that
generation did. It is about trust, teamwork.
Mr. Brown is a Northwest author. The settings are in
Seattle and Berlin. The book was on the New York Times
best-seller list. During March and April, PCL is planning
sixty-three events and discussions based on Mr. Brown’s
book. FMI, piercecountyreads.org
(Snipped from Tacoma’s News Tribune, Sunday, March 1, 2015,
section B, pages 1 & 5)
MaryAnn Zimmerman, President of NSL
P.s.: You know that I feel laughter is the best medicine
so here goes…
Our teacher in my first grade class asked what my
favorite animal was, and I said, “Fried chicken.” She
said I wasn’t funny, but she couldn’t have been right,
because everyone laughed. My parents told me to
always tell the truth. I did. Fried chicken is my
favorite animal.
I told my dad what happened, and he said my
teacher was probably a member of P.E.T.A. He said
they love animals very much.
I do too, especially chicken, pork and beef.
Anyway, she sent me to the principal’s office. I
told him what happened. He laughed too. Then he
told me not to do it again.
The next day in class my teacher asked me what
my favorite live animal was. I told her it was a
chicken. She asked me why, so I told her it was
because you could make them into fried chicken. She
sent me to the principal’s office. He laughed, and told
me not to do it again.
I don’t understand. My parents taught me to be
honest, but my teacher doesn’t like it when I am.
Today, my teacher asked me to tell her what famous
person I most admired. I told her, “Colonel Sanders.”
Guess where I am now!
Anonymous
Up-coming Storytelling Events
March
March 20th--Seattle Storytellers Guild’s Haller Lake World
Storytelling Day. Paul Currington tells personal stories as
featured teller. 7:30pm. Open mike follows, donations
welcome. FMI, seattlestorytellersguild.org
March 28--Drunken Telegraph: Live Stories told by real
people. “Bringing people together to share stories that
build community--or at least make for a damn fine
evening.” 7:30-pm. Studio 3, Broadway Center, Tacoma.
$8. FMI www.broadwaycenter.org. Tickets at 253-5915894.
April 17, 18, 19th: Fanning the Embers: Northwest
Storytelling Retreat. St. Andrews Retreat House, Hood
Canal, Union, WA.—Sponsored by South Sound Story
Guild each year, www.Fanningtheembers.org or email
Rebecca Hom at [email protected]
July 24-25--The Fourth Annual, Powellswood Garden
Storytelling Festival, Federal Way, Washington. This
year’s tellers will be: Antonio Rocha, Kevin Kling, Motoko,
Lyn Ford, and Donald Davis.
On Friday there are workshops: Kevin Kling-Stories of Healing, 9-am to 12-pm, $60; Antonio Rocha-Transitions in Eloquence, 1-pm to 3:30-pm, $55. Donald
Davis--Personal/Family Story Intensive, 9-am to 3:30pm, $115. Also on Friday, Tea with the Tellers, $15.
Continued on page 4
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Fireside Story League’s Fireside Log
The Saturday concerts begin at 10-am and continue
until 5-pm. The ticket price for all this entertainment on
Saturday is, $15 for adults; $30 for a family pass. FMI, or
to register, http://powellswoodfestival.com
On-Going Storytelling
Third Tuesdays
Story People of Clallam County. 7-pm. Pt. Angeles
Public Library. FMI, contact Alice Susong, 360-683-8630.
http://www.clallamstorypeople.org.
Second Wednesdays
South Sound Story Guild--Featured teller at 7 and a
story swap/open mike at 8. Find them in the lobby of the
Olympia Center, 222 N Columbia in downtown Olympia.
FMI: www.southsoundstory.org or Billie Mazzei,
[email protected]
March • 2015
First Fridays
Storynight at BLTC (Better Living Through Coffee)
Event includes featured storytellers and an open mike 7-9
p.m. 100 Tyler St., Port Townsend, WA 98368.
Suggested donation is $10. FMI, [email protected]
Stories at the Bridge: A Story Swap--First Fridays from
7 to 9 p.m. The Bridge Coffee House, 2150 N. 122nd St.,
Seattle. FMI, contact [email protected]
Third Fridays
Seattle Storytellers Guild’s Friday Evenings at Haller
Lake. Stories begin at 7:30.
Bring your own story to share after break for visiting
and enjoying snacks (provided). Donations for the
featured teller and snacks are requested. Haller Lake
Community Club, 12579 Densmore Ave. N., Seattle.
First Thursdays
Moth Story Slam open-mic. Doors open at 7-pm, stories
at 8-pm. Fremont Abbey Arts Center, Seattle, $8; $16
premium tickets. Info: themoth.org/events
Or Listen, on Radio or Internet
Last Thursdays
Auntmama's Storycorner—7-pm- 8:15-pm. Madison
Ave Starbucks, 4000 E Madison Ave, Seattle, WA 98112.
Ph. 206 329 3736. Free. FMI, www.auntmama.com
Vinyl Café, Sundays at 12-noon. KUOW-94.9 fm. Host,
Stuart Mclean. The program includes fictional stories,
written by Mclean, that can be humorous or nostalgic.
There are also personal, true, short stories that are sent
in by listeners. The rest of the show includes essays,
music and descriptions of the many communities that the
show is broadcast from when on the road—a sort of
Canadian travelog. It offers excellent examples of the
personal story.
Sundays. Storyteller Auntmama on 91.3 FM or kbcs.fm,
8:30 a.m., in “Walkin’ the Floor” program. Also on
Modays at 3:20-pm.
Fireside is on the web:
www.firesidestoryleague.org
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