SOCA1040 - University of Newcastle

Faculty of Education and Arts
School of Humanities & Social Science
http://www.newcastle.edu.au/school/hss/
Newcastle Campus
University Drive,
Callaghan 2308
Room: MC127 McMullin Building
Phone: +61 2 4921 5213
Office hours: 9:00am – 5:00pm
Fax: +61 2 4921 6933
Email: [email protected]
Web: http://www.newcastle.edu.au/school/hss/
SOCA1040
Constructions of Childhood, the Family
and Society
Semester 1 2010
Course Co-ordinator: Dr Peter Khoury
Room: HO 1.62 Humanities Building, Ourimbah Campus
Ph: 43 484071 Fax: 43484075
Email: [email protected]
Consultation hours: Thursdays 12.00 to 2.00 pm
Course Outline Issued and Correct as at: Week 1, Semester 1 - 2010
CTS Download Date: 18.1.10
2
Course Overview
SOCA1040
Constructions of Childhood, the Family and Society
Units:10 at 1000 level
Course Availability: Semester 1 2010 Callaghan and Ourimbah Campus
Faculty: Faculty of Education and Arts
School: School of Humanities and Social Science
Replacing Course(s): Not applicable
Transition: Not applicable
Modes of Delivery: Internal Mode
Assumed Knowledge: None
Teaching Methods: Lecture, Tutorial
Contact Hours: Tutorial: for 1 hour per Week for Full Term
Lecture: for 2 hours per Week for Full Term
Description:
The course provides an introduction to the study of children and families within a social and
political context. The course encourages a critical perspective by examining debates about the
historical and sociocultural constructions of childhood in relation to families. The diversity of family
forms in contemporary Australia will be examined in the context of class, gender and sexuality,
race and ethnicity. There will be a particular focus on how those constructions impact upon young
children and how young children understand them. An analysis of the role of the family in liberal
democracy and the policing of families will form the foundation for a critical understanding of
current policy debates.
Course Objectives:
On successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate:
1. An understanding of a sociological approach to children in Australian families.
2. Ability to understand the complexity and diversity of family life in Australia.
3. Ability to analyse and deal critically with different viewpoints on family policy, especially
concerning child protection issues.
4. Skills in writing an academic essay, reading critically and doing research.
Course Content:
1. The history of the family and childhood.
2. Sociological theories of the family.
3. Families in multicultural Australia and Aboriginal families.
4. Family types, sexualities and the construction of gender.
5. Gender, power and the family in Australia.
6. Children, risk and child protection.
7. The family, social policy and the nation state.
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Assessment Items:
Minor Essay
Examination
Tutorial
participation and
contribution
Presentations
due the week following the tutorial presentation and based on the
tutorial question. 1,500 words, worth 20%
Formal 2 hour formal examination, worth 50%.
Tutorial participation and attendance, worth 10%
based upon evidence of completion of assigned reading tasks,
informed discussion on weekly topics, ability to present opinions
relevant to critical analysis of the reading set for each week. 500 words
equivalent
Tutorial presentation: due throughout semester and worth 20%.
A 500 word summary and handout is expected as part of the
presentation.
------------------------- End of CTS Entry --------------------------
Textbook:
Students are required to purchase a ‘Book of Readings’ which is available from the
Co-Op Bookshop at the Ourimbah campus or from the United Campus Bookshop
Shortland Building, Callaghan campus. .
Teaching Team
Course Co-ordinator and lecturer at Ourimbah campus:
Dr Peter Khoury, Email: [email protected]
Lecturer at Callaghan campus:
Dr Anna Bennett, Email: [email protected]
Course Timetable for SOCA1040 Semester 1 2010
Callaghan Campus
Activity
Lecture
Tutorial 1
Tutorial 2
Tutorial 3
Tutorial 4
Tutorial 5
Tutorial 6
Tutorial 7
Tutorial 8
Tutorial 9
Tutorial 10
Tutorial 11
(Tutorials commence in week 2)
Day
Tuesday
Wednesday
Wednesday
Wednesday
Wednesday
Wednesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Thursday
Thursday
Thursday
Thursday
Time
3.00 PM - 5.00 PM
10.00 AM - 11.00 AM
11.00 AM - 12.00 PM
12.00 PM - 1.00 PM
1.00 PM - 2.00 PM
2.00 PM - 3.00 PM
3.00 PM - 4.00 PM
10.00 AM - 11.00 AM
11.00 AM - 12.00 PM
11.00 AM - 12.00 PM
12.00 PM - 1.00 PM
1.00 PM - 2.00 PM
School of Humanities and Social Science
Room
[MCTH]
[HA122]
[HA110]
[HA110]
[HA110]
[HA68]
[HA55]
[HA116]
[HA116]
[HA58]
[HA145]
[HC02]
4
Ourimbah Campus
(Tutorials commence in week 2)
Activity
Day
Time
Room
Lecture
Tutorial 1
Tutorial 2
Tutorial 3
Tutorial 4
Tutorial 5
Tutorial 6
Tutorial 7
Tutorial 8
Thursday
Wednesday
Wednesday
Wednesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Thursday
Thursday
Thursday
2.00 PM - 4.00 PM
10.00 AM - 11.00 AM
12.00 noon - 1.00 PM
1.00 PM - 2.00 PM
2.00 PM - 3.00 PM
10.00 AM - 11.00 AM
11.00 AM - 12.00 PM
1.00 PM - 2.00 PM
4.00 PM - 5.00 PM
O_LT2]
[O_CN2112]
[O_CN2106]
[O_CN2111]
[O_CN2111]
[O_CN2111]
[O_CS206]
[O_CN2111]
[O_CN2111]
Essential Assessment Criteria
This course contains compulsory components or assessment items that must be satisfactorily
completed in order for a student to receive a pass mark or better for the course. These essential
elements are described in the CTS. Refer - http://www.newcastle.edu.au/policylibrary/000648.html
Tutorial presentation: due throughout semester and worth 20%.
Tutorial
Presentations
-Each student will be allocated a tutorial question which they will
prepare a brief 5 to 10 minute presentation on.
-Each presentation should be accompanied by a 1 page handout to all
students in your tutorial class. The handout can be a summary of your
presentation, or key points, or a table, or newspaper article, or any
other relevant information pertaining to your topic.
-The handout represents the 500 word summary that is expected as
part of the presentation.
Minor Essay
Due the week following the tutorial presentation and based on the
tutorial question. 1000 to 15000 words, worth 20%
-The week after your tutorial presentation you will be required to hand
in a 1000 to 1500 word essay based on your tutorial presentation.
-The essay must include at least two additional references to the ‘Main
Tutorial Reading’ for that week. They can be taken from the ‘Further
Reading’ list or you can independently find two additional references
from the library.
-The essay should be properly referenced using the Harvard system of
referencing.
-The essay should include a bibliography.
Important Notice
-Tutorial essays must be handed in to your tutor in the tutorial
class on the due date and not at the student Hub.
Tutorial
participation and
contribution
Tutorial participation and attendance, worth 10%
Based upon evidence of completion of assigned reading tasks,
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informed discussion on weekly topics, ability to present opinions
relevant to critical analysis of the reading set for each week.
All students must read and reflect on the ‘Main Tutorial Reading’ each
week regardless of whether they are presenting or not. You need to
come to class each week with something to contribute about the main
readings.
Examination
Formal 2 hour examination, worth 50%.
At the end of the Semester, in the Examination period, there will be a 2
hour multiple choice exam based on the material covered in the ‘Book
of Readings’ and lectures.
Online Tutorial Registration:
Students are required to enrol in the Lecture and a specific Tutorial time for this course via the
Online Registration system. Refer - http://www.newcastle.edu.au/study/enrolment/regdates.html
NB: Registrations close at the end of week 2 of semester.
Studentmail and Blackboard: Refer - www.blackboard.newcastle.edu.au/
This course uses Blackboard and studentmail to contact students, so you are advised to keep your
email accounts within the quota to ensure you receive essential messages. To receive an
expedited response to queries, post questions on the Blackboard discussion forum if there is one,
or if emailing staff directly use the course code in the subject line of your email. Students are
advised to check their studentmail and the course Blackboard site on a weekly basis.
Important Additional Information
Details about the following topics are available on your course Blackboard site (where relevant).
Refer - www.blackboard.newcastle.edu.au/
 Written Assignment Presentation and Submission Details
 Online copy submission to Turnitin
 Penalties for Late Assignments
 Special Circumstances
 No Assignment Re-submission
 Re-marks & Moderations
 Return of Assignments
 Preferred Referencing Style
 Student Representatives
 Student Communication
 Essential Online Information for Students
Written Assignment Presentation and Submission Details
Students are required to submit assessment items by the due date. Late assignments will be
subject to the penalties described below.
Hard copy submission:
 Type your assignments: All work must be typewritten in 2 point black font. Leave a wide
margin for marker’s comments, use 1.5 or double spacing, and include page numbers.
 Word length: The word limit of all assessment items should be strictly followed – 10% above
or below is
acceptable, otherwise penalties may apply.
 Proof read your work because spelling, grammatical and referencing mistakes will be penalised.
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 Staple the pages of your assignment together (do not use pins or paper clips).
 University Assessment Item Coversheet: All assignments must be submitted with the
University
coversheet available at: http://www.newcastle.edu.au/study/forms/
All Essays for SOCA1040 should be submitted directly to your tutor in the tutorial class and will be
returned to you by your tutor in the tutorial class.
 Do not fax or email assignments: Only hard copies of assignments will be considered for
assessment. Inability to physically submit a hard copy of an assignment by the deadline due to other
commitments or distance from campus is an unacceptable excuse.
 Keep a copy of all assignments: It is the student’s responsibility to produce a copy of their work
if the assignment goes astray after submission. Students are advised to keep updated back-ups in
electronic and hard copy formats.
Online copy submission to Turnitin
 In addition to hard copy submission, students are required to submit an electronic version of
their essay to Turnitin via the course Blackboard website available @
www.blackboard.newcastle.edu.au/
Prior to final submission, all students have the opportunity to submit one draft of their assignment to
Turnitin to self-check their referencing. Assignments will not be marked until both hard copy and
online versions have been submitted. Marks may be deducted for late submission of either version.
Academic Integrity
Integrity, honesty, and a respect for knowledge and truth are the bases of all academic endeavours in
teaching, learning and research. To preserve the quality of learning, both for the individual and for
others enrolled, the University imposes severe sanctions on activities that undermine academic
integrity.
There are two major categories of academic dishonesty:
(A) Academic Fraud, in which a false representation is made to gain an unjust advantage by, for
example,
- the falsification of data
- reusing one’s own work that has been submitted previously and counted towards another course
(without permission)
-misconduct in Examinations
(B) Plagiarism, which is the presentation of the thoughts or works of another as one's own.
Plagiarism includes
- copying, paraphrasing, or using someone else’s ideas without appropriate acknowledgement
- failure to identify direct quotation through the use of quotation marks
- working with others without permission and presenting the resulting work as though it were
completed independently.
Please note that aiding another student to plagiarise (e.g. by lending assignments to other students) is
also a violation of the Plagiarism Policy and may invoke a penalty.
For further information on the University policy on plagiarism, please refer to the Policy on Student
Academic Integrity at the following link - http://www.newcastle.edu.au/policylibrary/000608.html
Penalties for Late Assignments
Assignments submitted after the due date, without an approved extension of time will be penalised
by the reduction of 5% of the possible maximum mark for the assessment item for each day or
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part day that the item is late. Weekends count as one day in determining the penalty. Assessment
items submitted more than ten days after the due date will be awarded zero marks.
Refer - ‘Guide to the Assessment Policies and Procedures of the University of Newcastle Guideline 000779’ available @ http://www.newcastle.edu.au/policylibrary/000779.html (section
6.8.2.ix)
Refer - ‘Rules Governing the Administration of Assessment Items - Rule 000113’ available @
http://www.newcastle.edu.au/policylibrary/000113.html (section 18)
Special Circumstances
Students wishing to apply for Special Circumstances or Extension of Time should apply online.
Refer - ‘Special Circumstances Affecting Assessment Items - Procedure 000641’ available @
http://www.newcastle.edu.au/policylibrary/000641.html
No Assignment Re-submission
Students who have failed an assignment are not permitted to revise and resubmit it in this course.
However, students are always welcome to contact their Tutor, Lecturer or Course Coordinator to
make a consultation time to receive individual feedback on their assignments.
Re-marks & Moderations
A student may only request a re-mark of an assessment item before the final result - in the course
to which the assessment item contributes - has been posted. If a final result in the course has been
posted, the student must apply under ‘Procedures for Appeal Against a Final Result’ (Refer http://www.newcastle.edu.au/study/forms/).
Students concerned at the mark given for an assessment item should first discuss the matter with
the Course Coordinator. If subsequently requesting a re-mark, students should be aware that as a
result of a re-mark the original mark may be increased or reduced. The case for a re-mark should
be outlined in writing and submitted to the Course Coordinator, who determines whether a re-mark
should be granted, taking into consideration all of the following:
1. whether the student had discussed the matter with the Course Coordinator
2. the case put forward by the student for a re-mark
3. the weighting of the assessment item and its potential impact on the student’s final mark or
grade
4. the time required to undertake the re-mark
5. the number of original markers, that is,
a)
whether there was a single marker, or
b)
if there was more than one marker whether there was agreement or disagreement on
the marks awarded.
A re-mark may also be initiated at the request of the Course Coordinator, the Head of School, the
School Assessment Committee, the Faculty Progress and Appeals Committee or the Pro ViceChancellor. Re-marks may be undertaken by:
1. the original marker; or
2. an alternate internal marker; or
3. an alternate external marker (usually as a consequence of a grievance procedure).
Moderation may be applied when there is a major discrepancy (or perceived discrepancy)
between:
1. the content of the course as against the content or nature of the assessment item(s)
2. the content or nature of the assessment item(s) as against those set out in the Course Outline
3. the marks given by a particular examiner and those given by another in the same course
4. the results in a particular course and the results in other courses undertaken by the same
students.
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For further detail on this University policy refer - ‘Re-marks and Moderations - Procedure 000769’
available @ http://www.newcastle.edu.au/policylibrary/000769.html
Preferred Referencing Style
In this course, it is recommended that you use the use the Harvard in-text referencing system
(similar to the APA system) for referencing sources of information used in assignments.
Inadequate or incorrect reference to the work of others may be viewed as plagiarism and result in
reduced marks or failure.
An in-text citation names the author of the source, gives the date of publication, and page
number(s), in parentheses (eg, Smith 2005: 41). At the end of the paper, a list of references
provides publication information about the source; the list is alphabetised by authors' last names
(or by titles for works without authors). For further information on referencing and general study
skills refer - ‘Infoskills’ available @
www.newcastle.edu.au/services/library/tutorials/infoskills/index.html
Student Representatives
Student Representatives are a major channel of communication between students and the School.
Contact details of Student Representatives can be found on School websites.
Refer - ‘Information for Student Representatives on Committees’ available @
http://www.newcastle.edu.au/service/committees/student_reps/index.html
Student Communication
Students should discuss any course related matters with their Tutor, Lecturer, or Course
Coordinator in the first instance and then the relevant Discipline or Program Convenor. If this
proves unsatisfactory, they should then contact the Head of School if required. Contact details can
be found on the School website.
Essential Online Information for Students
Information on Class and Exam Timetables, Tutorial Online Registration, Learning Support,
Campus Maps, Careers information, Counselling, the Health Service and a range of free Student
Support Services is available @ http://www.newcastle.edu.au/currentstudents/index.html
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Lecture and Tutorial Overview
Date
Week
Week
Commencing
Topic
1
March 1
Introduction to Course
2
March 8
The Family and the Social Construction of Childhood in an Historical
Perspective
3
March 15
Key Sociological Perspectives on the Family
4
March 22
Gender, Socialisation and the Social Construction of Childhood
5
March 29
Australian Family Trends: Divorce, Fertility, Population and the
Distribution of Labour
University Recess 1 Week
6
April 12
Family Violence
7
April 19
Gay and Lesbian Families
8
April 26
Aboriginal Families
9
May 3
Multicultural Families
10
May 10
Children, Families and the Spectre of Economic Rationalism
11
May 17
Children, The family, Social Policy and the State
12
May 24
13
May 31
Future Visions: Families, Intimacies and Social Change
Revision
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Tutorial Outline
Week 1:
No Tutorial
Week 2:
Introduction and allocation of topics
In this tutorial you will meet your tutor and discuss the course expectations and reading requirements for
each week.
-Each student will be allocated a tutorial question which they will prepare a brief 5 to 10 minute presentation
on. Please refer to the Tutorial Assessment on page 4 of this course guide.
*All students must read and reflect on the ‘Main Tutorial Reading’ each week regardless of whether they are
presenting or not. You need to come to class each week with something to contribute about the main
readings.
If time is available in the first tutorial you might want to think about the following discussion questions:
1.How do you define the term ‘family’?
2.What factors have shaped your definition?
3.How is the ‘ideal’ family defined?
4.What issues regarding the family are currently being discussed in the media?
5.What is your opinion on these issues?
Week 3:
A Sociological View of the Family
Main Tutorial Readings:
Poole, M. (2005) ‘Understanding The Family: Ideals and Realities’ in M, Poole (ed) Family: Changing
Families, Changing Times, Sydney, Allen and Unwin.
Gilding, M. (1998) Australian Families: A Comparative Perspective, Melbourne, Longman,
pp 18-42.
Tutorial Questions:
1. Critically evaluate the functionalist view of the family?
2. What are the central tenets of the feminist perspectives on the family?
3. Following Gilding (1998) what are the three main ways in which sociologist have defined the family?
4. Assess the materialist perspective on the family?
Further Reading:
Lindsay, J and Dempsey, D., (2009) Families, Relationships and Intimate Life,
Melbourne, Oxford University Press, chapters 1 and 4.
Bernardes, J (1997) Family Studies, An Introduction, London, Routledge, chapter 2, ‘Theorising Family
Lives’.
Baker, M. (2001) Families, Labour and Love, Sydney, Allen and Unwin, chapter 4,
‘Conceptualising Families’.
Leeder, E. (2004) The Family in Global Perspective: A Gendered Journey, London, Sage, chapter 3,
‘Theories of the Family’.
Poole, M. (2005) ‘Understanding The Family: Ideals and Realities’ in M, Poole (ed) Family: Changing
Families, Changing Times, Sydney, Allen and Unwin.
Van Krieken, R. et al (2005) Sociology: Themes and Perspectives, 3rd edition, Sydney, Pearson.
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Week 4
Gender, Socialisation and the Social Construction of Childhood
Main Tutorial Reading:
Connell, R. (2002) Gender, Cambridge, Polity Press, pp1-11.
Wearing, B. (1996) Gender, The Pain and Pleasure of Difference, Melbourne,
Longman, chapter 5, ‘Socialisation’.
Tutorial Questions:
1. Discuss some of the key issues as outlined by Connell in understanding Gender.
2. What is meant by Simone de Beauvoir’s famous phrase, ‘One is not born, but rather becomes a woman’?
3. If the above quote by Simone de Beavoir is true, can we say the same about men. That is, we are not
born but become men. Discuss this idea in reference to the ways in which masculinity and manhood are
socially and culturally learned.
4. Discuss any two of the agents of socialisation outlined by Wearing. (ie, The family, the education system,
the peer group, the workplace, the media, leisure).
Further Reading:
James, A, Jenks, C and Prout, A. (1998) ‘The sociological child’ in Theorizing
Childhood, Teacher’s College Press, Columbia University: New York, Chapter 2.
Farrell, B. (2004) ‘Childhood’, in Family and Society: Classic and Contemporary
Readings, S. Coltrane (ed.), Thomson/Wadworth: California.
Gillis, John (2003) ‘Childhood and family time’ in Children and the Changing
Family, A. Jensen & L. McKee (eds), RoutledgeFalmer: London & New York, chapter 10.
Kinder, M. (1999) ‘Introduction’, Kid’s Media Culture, M. Kinder (ed.), Duke
University Press: Durham, NC.
Loolan, P. (2004) ‘Crybabies and damaged children’ in P. Holland (ed) Picturing
Childhood: The Myth
of the Child in Popular Imagery, Tauris: London.
Week 5:
Australian Family Trends: Divorce, Fertility, Population
of labour
and the Distribution
Main Tutorial Readings:
Baker, M. (2001) Families, Labour and Love, Sydney, Allen and Unwin, pp 14- 25,
and pp148-154.
Lindsay, J and Dempsey, D., (2009) Families, Relationships and Intimate Life,
Melbourne, Oxford University Press, chapter 11, ‘Separation, Divorce and Reconstituted Families’.
Tutorial Questions:
1. Discuss the significance of the following family trends: rising life expectancy and fertility? What factors do
you think contribute to the declining birth rate?
2. What factors have led to the increase of female participation in the workforce?
3. Discuss the impact of divorce and separation on mothers, fathers and children?
4. What social factors have contributed to divorce rates?
Further Reading:
Poole, M. (2005) ‘Changing Families, Changing Times’ in M, Poole (ed) Family: Changing Families,
Changing Times, Sydney, Allen and Unwin.
De Vaus, D. (2004) Diversity and Change in Australian families, Statistical Profiles,
Melbourne, Australian Institute of Family Studies, chapter 15, ‘Divorce and Separation’.
Summers, A (2003) ‘The Breeding Creed’ in The End of Equality: Work, Babies and Women’s Choices in
21st Century Australia, Sydney, Random House.
Sarantakos, S (1996) Modern Families: An Australian Text, Melbourne, Macmillan, chapter 3, ‘Family
Diversity’ and chapter 11, ‘Divorce’.
Baker, M (2001) Families, Labour and Love, Sydney, Allen and Unwin, chapter 8, ‘Separation, Divorce and
Remarriage’.
Clarke-Stewart, A. and Brentano, C (2006) Divorce: Causes and Consequences, New
Haven, Yale University Press.
Day Sclater, S. and Pipe, C (1999) Undercurrents of Divorce, Aldershot, Ashgate
Publishers.
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Week 6 Family Violence
Main Tutorial Reading:
Poole, M. (2005) ‘Violence’ in M, Poole (ed) Family: Changing Families, Changing Times, Sydney, Allen and
Unwin
Tutorial Questions:
1.What are the features of family violence?
2.How do different theories explain the causes of family violence?
3. Discuss the impact of domestic violence on children?
Further Reading:
Kovacs, K and Tomison, A (2003) ‘An analysis of current Australian program
Initiatives for children exposed to domestic violence’ Australian Journal of Social Issues, Vol 38,
No 4.
Lindsay, J and Dempsey, D., (2009) Families, Relationships and Intimate Life,
Melbourne, Oxford University Press, chapter 12 ‘Violence and Intimate Relationships’.
McKie, L (2005) Families, Violence and Social Change, Berkshire, Open University
Press.
Sarantakos, S (1996) ‘Family Violence: spouse abuse’ in Modern Families: An Australian Text. Melbourne,
Macmillan.
Hague, G. and Malos, E. (2005) (Eds) Domestic Violence: Action For Change, Cheltenham, New Clarion
Press.
Crawford, V. and Neville, M. (2004) (eds) Domestic Violence, Sydney, Legal Information Access Centre.
Mullender, A, (2002) (ed) Children's Perspectives on Domestic Violence, London,
Sage.
Edleson, J. (2006) Emerging Responses to Children Exposed to Domestic Violence,
VAWnet, The national Online Resource Centre on Violence Against Women.
Available @ http://new.vawnet.org/category/Main_Doc.php?docid=585
Kitzinger, J. (1997) ‘Who are you kidding? Children, power and the struggle against
sexual abuse, in Constructing and Reconstructing Childhood: Contemporary
Issues in the Sociological Study of Childhood, A. James and A. Prout (eds),
Routledge/Farmer: London. [Chap.8]
Week 7 Gay and Lesbian Families
Main Tutorial Readings:
Vivien, R. and Gregory, R. (2001) ‘School Experiences of the Children of Lesbian
and Gay Parents’, Family Matters, No 28.
Weeks, J., Heaphy, B., and Donovan, C (2001) Same Sex Intimacies: Families of
Choice and other Life Experiments, London, Routledge, pp1-6, 156-179.
Tutorial Questions:
1. Discuss some of the issues identified by Vivien and Gregory (2001) concerning
children of gay and lesbian families?
2. Discuss some of the issues concerning parenting in non heterosexual relationships?
3. What is meant by the terms ‘heterosexism’ and ‘heterosexual privilege’? In what ways do they reinforce
the discrimination and marginalisation of gay and lesbian people?
Further Reading:
Millbank, J. (2003) ‘From here to maternity: a review of the research on lesbian and gay families’, Australian
Journal of Social Issues, Nov 2003, Vol 8, No. 4.
Kendall, C (2004) ‘Homophobic Bullying in Schools: Is there a Duty of Care?’
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Law and Education, Vol 9, No 1, 71-93.
Bozett, W. and Sussman, M. (Eds) (1990) Homosexuality and Family Relations,
New York, Harrington Park Press.
Garner, A. (2004) Families Like Mine: children of gay parents tell it like it is, New
York, Harper Collins.
Robinson, K. (2002) ‘Making the Invisable Visable: Gay and Lesbian Issues in Early
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Childhood’ in Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood, Vol 3, No e, 415-434.
Lehmann, J. (Ed) (2001) The Gay and Lesbian Marriage & Family Reader, Nebraska, University of Nebraska
Press.
Goss, R., et al (eds) Our Families, Our Values: Snapshots of Queer Kinship, New York, The Hawthorn
Press.
Lindsay, J and Dempsey, D., (2009) Families, Relationships and Intimate Life,
Melbourne, Oxford University Press.
Week 8:
Aboriginal Families
Main Tutorial Readings:
Edwards, C.(1982) ‘Is The Ward Clean?’ in B, Gammage and A, Markus (Eds) All
That Dirt, Aborigines 1938, Canberra, ANU History Project Incorporated.
Haebich, A (2000) Broken Circles: Fragmenting Indigenous Families 1800-2000,
Fremantle, Fremantle Arts Centre Press, pp37-64.
Tutorial Questions:
1. Discuss the life of Jane King against a backdrop of assimilation policies? How did assimilation policy
shape her identity and life course?
2. What historical lessons can be illuminated by an examination of the life and death of Warren Braedon?
3. What is the difference between individual and institutional racism? How has racism effected the family life
of Indigenous Australians?
Further Reading:
Haebich, A (2000) ‘A Boy’s Short Life’ in Broken Circles. Fremantle, Fremantle Arts
Centre Press.
Mellor, D. and Haebich, A. (Eds) (200) Many Voices: Reflections on Experiences of
Indigenous Separation, Canberra, National Library of Australia.
Link Up (NSW) and Wilson, T, J. (1997) In The Best Interest Of The Child? Stolen
Children: Aboriginal pain/ White shame, Canberra, Aboriginal History Monograph 4.
Lindsay, J and Dempsey, D., (2009) Families, Relationships and Intimate Life,
Melbourne, Oxford University Press.
Bessarab, D. (200) ‘Working With Aboriginal Families’ in W, Weeks & M, Quinn
(eds) Issues Facing Australian Families, 3rd edition, Melbourne, Longman
Kociumbas, J. (1997) ‘”Where are my first-born?” Aboriginal children’ in Australian
Childhood, a History, Allen & Unwin: St Leonards [Chap. 1]
Scheppers, A. (1994) ‘Working with Aboriginal children and their families’, in
Children and Families: Australian Perspectives, F. Briggs (ed.), Allen & Unwin: St Leonards. [Chap.
4]
Week 9:
Multicultural Families
Main Tutorial Readings:
Quinn, M. (2001) ‘Working with Australian Families: Towards Anti-Racist and Culturally Affirming Practices’
in W, Weeks & M, Quinn (eds) Issues Facing Australian Families, 3rd edition, Melbourne, Longman.
Hollinsworth, D (1998) Race and Racism in Australia, 2nd edition, Sydney, Social
Science Press, chapter 7, ‘Post-War Immigration and Racism’.
Tutorial Questions:
1. Multiculturalism can be viewed at a number of levels: a) as government policy, and b) as population reality
of contemporary Australian Society. Discuss.
2. What is meant by racism, culture and ethnicity? Are Australians of English, Irish, Scottish heritage an
ethnic group?
3. Discuss the concepts of ‘anti-racism’ in policy and practice?
4. What is meant by the concept of ‘white privilege’? How does it perpetuate the ‘otherness’ of non AngloSaxon Australians?
Further Reading:
Lindsay, J and Dempsey, D., (2009) Families, Relationships and Intimate Life,
School of Humanities and Social Science
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Melbourne, Oxford University Press.
J. Docker & G. Fisher (2000) (eds) Race, Colour and Identity in Australia and New
Zealand. Sydney, UNSW Press.
Vasta, E. and Castles, S (eds)(1996) The Teeth Are Smiling: The persistence of racism in Multicultural
Australia, Sydney, Allen and Unwin.
Penny, J & Khoo, S (1996) Intermarriage: A Study of Migration and Integration.
Canberra, AGPS.
Said, E. (1978) Orientalism, New York, Vintage Books.
Jupp, J.(1996) Understanding Australian Multiculturalism, Canberra, Bureau of
Immigration, Multicultural and Population Research, AGPS.
Week 10
Children, Families and the Spectre of Economic Rationalism
Main Tutorial Readings:
Zajdow, G. (2005) ‘Families and economies: What counts and what doesn’t?’ in M, Poole (ed) Family:
Changing Families, Changing Times, Sydney, Allen and Unwin.
Pusey, M (2003) The Experience of Middle Australia The Dark Side of Economic Reform. Cambridge,
Cambridge University Press, pp76-83.
Tutorial Questions:
1.What pressures have economic reforms placed upon families?
2.How do experiences of these economic changes differ on the basis of social class, gender, and
generation/age?
3. What view of the family is advocated by economic rationalism?
st
4. Why are children in the 21 century referred to as the ‘consumer generation’?
Further Reading:
Pusey, M (2003) The Experience of Middle Australia The Dark Side of Economic Reform, Cambridge,
Cambridge University Press, in particular chapter 4, ‘Working Families: struggling with the costs of
reform’.
Bittman, M.. And Pixley, J. (1997) The Double Life Of The Family, Sydney, Allen
and Unwin, chapter 7, ‘Economics, breadwinning and family relations’.
Pusey. M (1999) ‘The impact of economic restructuring on women and families’ in L. Hanncock. (Ed)
Women, Public Policy and the State, Melbourne, Macmillan.
Langer, B. (2005) ‘Children: The Consumer Generation’ in M, Poole (ed) Family: Changing Families,
Changing Times, Sydney, Allen and Unwin.
Week 11
Children, The family, Social Policy and the State
Main Tutorial Readings:
st
nd
Jamrozik, A (2005) Social Policy in the Post-Welfare State: Australian Society in the 21 Century, 2 edition,
Sydney, Longman, pp 7-11, 114-121, 129-134.
Saunders, P. (2005) The Poverty Wars, Sydney, UNSW Press, chapter 5, ‘The
Consequences of Poverty’.
Tutorial Questions:
1. What is meant by the post-welfare state?
2. Discuss the dimensions of inequality in Australia. How do they impact on poverty?
3. According to Saunders (2005) what are the consequences of living in poverty? How do they effect children
and family life?
Further Reading:
Taylor, J. (2002) ‘Unemployment and Family Life’ in Saunders, P. and Taylor, R.
(eds) The Price of Prosperity, The Economic and Social Costs of Unemployment, Sydney, UNSW
Press.
Weeks, W, and Quinn, M, (eds) (2000) Issues Facing Australian Families, 3rd edition, Melbourne, Longman.
School of Humanities and Social Science
15
Fincher, R, and Nieuwenhuysen, J. (1998) Australian Poverty: Then and Now, Melbourne, Melbourne
University Press.
Fincher, R and Saunders, P. (Eds) (2001) Creating Unequal Futures? Rethinking Poverty, Inequality and
Disadvantage, Sydney, Allen and Unwin.
Bittman, M.. And Pixley, J. (1997) The Double Life Of The Family, Sydney, Allen and Unwin, chapter 9, ‘The
greatest welfare system ever devised’.
st
Jamrozik, A (2005) Social Policy in the Post-Welfare State: Australian Society in the 21 Century, Sydney,
Longman, chapter 10, ‘Families and Children’.
Week 12:
Future Visions: Families, Intimacies and Social Change
Main Tutorial Readings:
Lindsay, J and Dempsey, D., (2009) Families, Relationships and Intimate Life,
Melbourne, Oxford University Press, chapter 14, ‘Conclusion: New families, New Relationships’
Baker, M (2001) Families, Labour and Love, Sydney, Allen and Unwin, chapter 10,
‘The Future of Family Life’.
Jamieson, L (2002) ‘Intimacy Transformed?’ in S. Jackson & S. Scott, Gender: A
Sociological Reader, London, Routledge.
Tutorial Questions:
1. Discuss the future trends in families as outlined by Baker in reference to any three of the following,
‘intimate relationships outside marriage’, ‘the future of marriage’, ‘the future of gender relations’, ‘the future of
parenting’ and ‘Midlife’? How conceivable do you think these suggested trends might be?
2. Discuss some of the issues of the ageing population and its impact on family life.
3. How might we define ‘pure relationships’ and in what ways has intimacy been transformed in the 21
Century?
Further Reading:
Lindsay, J and Dempsey, D., (2009) Families, Relationships and Intimate Life,
Melbourne, Oxford University Press, chapter 13, ‘Ageing, Care and Intergenerational Relationships’.
Duncombe, J & Marsden, D (1999) ‘Love and Intimacy: The Gender Division of
Emotion and ‘Emotion Work’: a neglected aspect of sociological discussion of heterosexual
relationships’ in G. Allan (ed) The Sociology of the Family: A Reader, Oxford, Blackwell Publishers.
Dozier, R. And Schartz, P. (2001) ‘Intimate Realtionships’ in J. Blau (ed) The Blackwell Companion to
Sociology, Oxford, Blackwell Publishing.
Giddens, A. (2005) ‘The Theory and Practice of the Pure Relationship’ in A, Cherlin
(ed) Public and Private Families: A Reader, New York, McGraw Hill.
Jamieson, L. (1998) Intimacy, Cambridge, Polity Press.
Giddens, A. (1997) The transformation of intimacy: sexuality, love and eroticism in modern societies,
Cambridge, Polity Press.
Baker, M. (2001) Families, Labour and Love, Sydney, Allen and Unwin, pp 90-117.
Bittman, M.. And Pixley, J. (1997) The Double Life Of The Family, Sydney, Allen
and Unwin, chapter 3, ‘The Rise Of Intimacy’.
Week 13
Revision
School of Humanities and Social Science
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Grading Guide
Fail (FF) (0-49)
This mark will be given if the work does not represent an acceptable effort (including non completion).
Students will receive this grade if the work done is clearly inadequate. That is that the student has not
understood the basic principles of the subject-matter and/or has been unable to express her/his
understanding in a comprehensible way.
Pass (P) (50-64)
This is a pass grade which indicates the work is sufficient. The assignment shows a grasp of the basic
principles of the subject-matter and knowledge of the required readings. The information presented is
accurate and the assignment is comprehensive and adequately referenced.
Credit (C) (65-74)
This is a credit grade. The assignment shows clear understanding of the basic principles. An ability to
integrate the material is evident and there is, additionally, evidence of an appreciation of various
perspectives relating to the topic. There is also evidence of additional reading and/or research. The work is
coherent and accurate. A deficiency in any of the above may be compensated to some extent by evidence
of independent thought.
Distinction (D) (75-84)
This is a distinction grade. The assignment shows a more than adequate understanding of the subjectmatter and substantial additional reading and/or research. There is evidence of an ability to generalise and
integrate the principles and develop the argument in an informed and even original manner. The work is well
organised, clearly expressed and shows the student has a capacity for critically evaluating the topic and
literature.
High Distinction (HD) (85-100)
This is a high distinction grade. The assignment shows a thorough understanding of the subject-matter and
substantial additional reading and/or research. The work reflects a high level of independent thought,
presents an insightful and informed discussion of the topic, is well organised and clearly expressed, and
shows the student can critically evaluate the literature at a very high standard.
School of Humanities and Social Science
17
Websites
Australian Bureau of Statistics, Children and Youth
http://www.abs.gov.au/Websitedbs/c311215.nsf/20564c23f3183fdaca25672100813ef1/35f3e8efed
45ce47ca256de2008194bd!OpenDocument
Australian Bureau of Stataitics, Family and Comminity Statitics
http://www.abs.gov.au/websitedbs/c311215.nsf/22b99697d1e47ad8ca2568e30008e1bc/f01de14b
31b9fc0dca2568f2001fcdb2!OpenDocument
Australian Centre for the Study of Sexual Assault
http://www.aifs.gov.au/acssa/index.html
Australian Domestic and Family Violence Clearing House
http://www.austdvclearinghouse.unsw.edu.au/
Australian Government, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare: A Picture of Australia’s Children
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/index.cfm/title/10127
Australian Government, Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous
Affairs (FaHCSIA)
http://www.facsia.gov.au/
Australian Institute of Family Studies
http://www.aifs.gov.au/institute/research/researchplan2008.html
http://www.aifs.gov.au/institute/pubs/fammats.html
Children’s Rights International
http://www.childjustice.org/html/index.htm
Children’s Services, NSW
http://www.csnsw.org.au/
Communities and Families Clearinghouse Australia
http://www.aifs.gov.au/cafca/index.html
Family Assistance Office
http://www.familyassist.gov.au/
Family Court of Australia
http://www.familycourt.gov.au/
Family Planning NSW
http://www.fpahealth.org.au/
Family Relationships Online
http://www.familyrelationships.gov.au/
Murdoch Children’s Research Institute
http://www.mcri.edu.au/
National Child Protection Clearinghouse
http://www.aifs.gov.au/nch/index.html
New South Wales Commission for Children and Young People
http://www.kids.nsw.gov.au/
Northern Territory Government, Inquiry into the Protection of Aboriginal Children from Sexual
Abuse
http://www.nt.gov.au/dcm/inquirysaac/
Raising Children Network
http://raisingchildren.net.au/
School of Humanities and Social Science