House shoots down anti

Press
THE SHERIDAN
WEDNESDAY
February 25, 2015
129th Year, No. 236
Serving Sheridan County,
Wyoming
Independent and locally
owned since 1887
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75 Cents
Standards
require new
curriculum,
expenses
BY ALISA BRANTZ
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Following the state
Board of Education’s adaptation of
the Wyoming Content and
Performance Standards — new
standards in math and English language arts originally presented as
the Common Core State Standards
— in 2012, Wyoming school districts
began the process of updating and
aligning their curriculum.
Standards are statements of
expectation; they define the minimum knowledge students are
expected to have upon the completion of each level of education. The
curriculum includes the many
resources used by a teacher to
deliver desired content including
activities, lessons, units, textbooks
and sometimes assessments.
Though the standards are set at a
statewide level, Wyoming prohibits
the adoption of statewide curriculum and leaves the development of
instructional resources under local
control.
As such, when the rigor of the
expectations was raised, the lessons and resources to meet those
standards required reworking at a
local level.
In Sheridan County School
District 2, the larger staffing numbers allow for this process to be
managed in-house utilizing the
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A fresh look
at a vegetable
staple. B1
Professional Learning Community
groups already in place.
PLCs are groups of educators,
often from similar content areas or
grade levels, committed to working
collaboratively in ongoing processes of collective inquiry and action
research to achieve better results
for the students they serve.
While the PLCs meet regularly to
discuss daily improvement of class
instruction, during periods of curriculum development they also
meet to discuss the implementation
of new books and materials as well
as how to organize those resources
into units and lessons.
SEE STANDARDS, PAGE 7
House shoots down
anti-discrimination bill
CHEYENNE. (AP) — A bill to prohibit
discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity died Tuesday
in the Wyoming House of
Representatives.
The House voted 33-to-26 against the
bill, which already had cleared the
Wyoming Senate.
Supporters have included Wyoming
business groups, which have said enacting an anti-discrimination law would help
the state recruit new corporations and
help existing businesses attract good
employees.
Opponents included several church
groups, including the Roman Catholic
Diocese of Cheyenne. They maintained
that the bill would crimp the right of people to make decisions about hiring and
also infringe on freedom of speech.
Rep. Ruth Ann Petroff, R-Jackson, introduced the bill and emphasized it wouldn’t
provide any cover for unqualified workers.
“This does not in any way diminish our
strong right-to-work laws in this state,”
Petroff said. “The bill simply says that we
are fair, we are fair people and that we
judge people based on their performance
and their actions.”
House Speaker Rep. Kermit Brown, RLaramie, spoke in favor of the bill, saying
sexual orientation is not a matter of
choice.
“Some people are hardwired differently,
I don’t know why. But they’re here,
they’re among us,” Brown said. “They’re
our friends. We all know somebody, a
friend, an acquaintance, a business associate.”
Brown said the issue comes down to
whether an employee can do the job. “And
if they can do the job, then what possible
justification can there be for saying to
them, ‘You know, I’m going to let you go
because you have certain characteristics
that I don’t approve of.’”
‘This bill is not needed, it aims to
fix problems that don’t exist. I ask you
to defeat this bill.’
Rep. Mark Jennings
R-Sheridan
Rep. Mark Jennings, R-Sheridan, said
the bill was being promoted as a way to
improve Wyoming’s image. However, he
said the state should have no concerns
along those lines.
“This bill is not needed, it aims to fix
problems that don’t exist,” Jennings said.
“I ask you to defeat this bill.”
Rep. Nathan Winters, R-Thermopolis,
said the problem with the anti-discrimination bill is that it removes all discretion
from individuals as to how they choose to
exercise their freedom of conscience.
“And it enshrines forever in law something that is detrimental to the First
Amendment,” he said.
Speaking after the vote, Rep. James
Byrd, D-Cheyenne, said the bill’s defeat
sends the wrong message about Wyoming.
“It just reaffirms the opinion and
impression of the rest of the country that
we do not like people of alternative sexual orientation — gays,” Byrd said.
Calling for
cooperation,
Obama
engages in
confrontation
WASHINGTON (AP) —
Amid appeals for bipartisanship, President Barack Obama
in just three days has provoked Republicans on issues
as disparate as immigration,
Wall Street and the Keystone
XL pipeline — a combative
mix of defense and offense
that underscores a political
realignment.
Sensing a Republican
retreat, Obama is headlining a
Miami town hall on
Wednesday, enlisting his
Latino base of support to increase
pressure on GOP
lawmakers who
want to tie spending on the
Homeland Security
Obama
Department to
repeal of his immigration executive actions.
On Tuesday, he vetoed GOP
legislation that would have
forced construction of the
Keystone XL oil pipeline. And
on Monday he proposed
tougher rules on financial brokers who help manage retirement accounts, over Wall
Street objections.
Three days, three hardball
plays. Such aggressive
activism delights his supporters but irritates the
Republicans who now control
both chambers of Congress.
It’s not as if Republicans
didn’t see it coming. But it
unfolds as Obama insists he is
willing to find common
ground with GOP leaders on
such issues as trade and fixes
to the criminal justice system.
Indeed, Obama on Tuesday
summoned a bipartisan group
of lawmakers to the White
House for a private meeting
on how to address modernizing juvenile justice, sentencing and incarceration policies.
And on Thursday, Obama
planned to draw attention to
the economic benefits of trade
and exports in a series of
interviews at the White
House.
SEE COOPERATION, PAGE 7
Mercantile meant to ‘spruce up’ Ranchester
BY TRAVIS PEARSON
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
RANCHESTER — Ranchester
leadership has worked for years
toward attracting businesses and
shoppers to its downtown as part
of a long-term revitalization program.
If all goes according to plan,
Main Street Mercantile will bring
both.
“It’s on the east end of town, so
it acts as an entryway project,”
Mayor Peter Clark said. “We’re
hoping it’ll maybe stop people as
they go through town on the way
to the mountains and Yellowstone
National Park.”
Slated for construction this
spring, the mercantile will offer
businesses the opportunity at one
of three retail spaces within a
6,300-square-foot building at the
corner of Main Street and U.S.
Highway 14 across the street from
the information center.
The plans also include a 6,000square-foot outdoor farmers market space with a canopy covering
and a 15,000-square-foot parking
lot with 35 spaces.
Upon completion of the project,
the town will own the structure
and lease it to interested parties.
While Ranchester has received
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smartphone for
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letters of interest from various
companies, it has not yet entered
into any contracts. Town representatives do not expect to finalize
deals until project completion.
The building will include two
1,738-square-foot spaces and one
2,087-square-foot area.
Ace Builders continues to work
on establishing bonding in the
town. Representatives with
Ranchester and the construction
company are scheduled to meet in
the next week or two, the mayor
said, to discuss expectations and
finalize plans.
SEE RANCHESTER, PAGE 7
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Officials in the town of Ranchester are moving forward with a mercantile
meant to lure businesses to the community north of Sheridan.
The Sheridan Press
144 Grinnell Ave. Sheridan, WY 82801
307.672.2431
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
Today’s edition is published for:
Carla Ash
of Sheridan
OPINION
PEOPLE
PAGE SIX
ALMANAC
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5
6
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TASTE
SPORTS
COMICS
PUBLIC NOTICES
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THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2015
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
Testimony begins in felony fraud trial
SHERIDAN — Testimony
in the Miranda Mraz trial
being held in 4th Judicial
District Court Tuesday
focused on employees of the
Firewater Grill, amid issues
with jury members and witnesses.
Before the jury was
brought into the courtroom,
the judge was informed that
a jury member had spoken
to the bailiff Monday after
court had recessed for the
day. The juror suggested
that he/she already had an
opinion about whether
Mraz was innocent despite
hearing only 15 minutes of
testimony. Prosecutor
Christopher LaRosa said he
felt the juror should perhaps be addressed on the
matter while defense attorney Chris Wages said the
juror should be stricken.
Judge John Fenn opted to
keep the juror, saying there
had not been a patent
expression of opinion, but
he did remind the jury of
its duty to remain
impartial
when they
returned to
the courtroom.
LaRosa called Officer Dan
Keller of the Sheridan
Police Department to testify
Tuesday. Keller said he had
been in the Firewater Grill
Feb. 19, 2014, for an alcohol
compliance stop when Rob
Green, who manages several of his brother’s businesses including the Firewater
Grill, mentioned a possible
problem with an employee.
Keller told the court that he
advised Green to file a
report with the police.
Keller said he checked
two days later to see if
Green’s complaint had been
filed and that it had not.
When Keller later spoke to
general manager Rob
Romeo, he turned every-
thing over to then Det. Sgt.
Travis Koltiska.
Green was then called to
the stand. Green told the
court he manages his brother’s company Greenland
Hospitalities in Sheridan,
and that part of that business is the Trail’s End Hotel
and the Firewater Grill. He
said that Mraz was a good
worker who advanced
quickly from housekeeper
to manager by Dec. 19, 2013.
Green said Romeo had
brought some customer
complaints to his attention,
and that he told Romeo to
quietly conduct an in-house
investigation. That investigation, Green said, turned
up two employees of concern. He said Mraz had several receipts that looked
like they’d been altered and
the other employee had one.
Green said the other
employee confessed to what
he’d done and was made to
pay the ticket. Green told
the court that the employee
still works at the Firewater
Grill.
He said that when he
talked to Mraz, she became
hysterical and denied stealing and told him “the whole
city was out to frame me.”
Green said he did not fire
her at that time but had
Romeo continue the
investigation.
After a few more
weeks, Green said
the investigation
turned up more
questionable
transactions and
he made the
decision to fire
Mraz. He said
she again
became hysterical and asked
him, “How do
we get out of this?” He said
he told her “there is no we”
and that he was firing her
and reporting the situation.
Green said at that point,
Mraz stopped crying,
became “very cold” and
walked out of the office.
On cross examination,
Robinson questioned
Green’s credibility and
asked how his brother
trusted him to run the business in light of Green’s convictions in 2007 and 2010 for
mail fraud and check fraud.
“My problem is not with
managing people,” Green
told Robinson. “My problem
is with writing checks.”
Robinson also questioned
Green’s management skills.
During a short break,
Green spoke briefly to
Romeo who was waiting his
turn to testify. Green apologized and told the court he
didn’t realize he’d done anything wrong. Fenn admonished counsel to make sure
their witnesses understood
sequestration. The court
determined the statement
made to Romeo did not warrant a mistrial, and the trial
moved forward.
‘My problem is not with
managing people. My
problem is with writing
checks.’
Rob Green
Firewater Grill business manager
Stormy Redman, the
restaurant manager at the
time of Mraz’s employment
at Firewater Grill, was the
state’s final witness of the
day. Her testimony primarily described the workings of
the point-of-sale system
used by the restaurant and
how the cash tickets were
recorded as opposed to how
the credit and debit card
tickets were recorded.
During cross examination, Robinson asked about
a link to a Sheridan Press
news article concerning the
trial Redman had shared on
Facebook during the lunch
recess and demanded to
know if other witnesses in
the hallway were also
accessing Facebook. The
court adjourned for the day
before addressing the situation.
The Mraz trial is expected
to last through the rest of
the week.
FIND US
BY KELLI HEITSTUMAN-TOMKO
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Sheely promoted to digital
content editor; Pearson joins
Sheridan Press news team
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan Press recently promoted
government reporter Hannah Sheely to digital content editor.
Sheely has worked for the newspaper reporting primarily
on local government for two years.
Her new position will include management
and updating of the Press’ website, thesheridanpress.com, as well as the website that pairs
with the news organization’s three annual magazines — destinationsheridan.com.
The move was made, in part, to increase the
viability and timeliness of the news organizaSheely
tion’s digital products.
“This is really exciting for The Press,” managing editor Kristen Czaban said of the
changes. “The creation of this position will
help our news organization enhance our digital
offerings and keep area citizens up to date on
happenings in the community.”
In conjunction with the new position, The
Press also plans to increase the number of
videos produced for the websites and the level
Pearson
of audience engagement.
Travis Pearson began working for The Sheridan Press on
Monday and will take over the news organization’s coverage of local government.
Pearson moved to Sheridan from Torrington, where he
had been the managing editor of the Torrington Telegram
since October 2012.
Prior to working in Torrington, Pearson was a general
assignment reporter for the Pinedale Roundup.
“Travis brings a lot of maturity and knowledge to our
already talented newsroom,” Czaban said. “He has the ability to hit the ground running with coverage of local government affairs, which will only serve to benefit our readers.”
(ISSN 1074-682X)
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QUOTABLE |
Giuliani versus Obama
T
Against that background of strife and dangers on
the world stage, it may seem as if Barack Obama's
feelings, or Rudolph Giuliani's opinion about those
feelings, should not matter so much, especially when
it is hard to know with certainty how anyone feels.
Yet when someone is the leader of a great nation at a
historic juncture, it is more than idle curiosity to
know what drives him.
It is not clear what the basis was
for so much outrage at Mayor
Giuliani's opinion about President
Obama. Was it that what Giuliani
said was demonstrably false? Was
it that Barack Obama is supposed
to be considered innocent until
proven guilty?
Anyone who simply looks at the
THOMAS
factual evidence as to whether
SOWELL
Obama loves America, or does not,
|
will find remarkably little to suggest love and a large amount of evidence, over a long period of years,
showing his constant close association with people
fiercely hostile to this country. Jeremiah Wright was
just one in a long series of such people.
Barack Obama's campaign promise to "fundamentally change the United States of America" hardly
suggests love. Nor did his international speaking
tour in 2009, telling foreign audiences that America
was to blame for problems on the world stage.
President Obama's record in the White House has
been more of the same. Among his earliest acts were
offending our oldest and closest allies, Britain and
Israel, and betraying the country's previous commitments to provide anti-missile defenses to Poland and
the Czech Republic.
Obama's refusal to let Ukraine have weapons with
which to defend itself from Russian invasion was
consistent with this pattern, and consistent with his
whispered statement — picked up by a microphone
that was still on — to tell "Vladimir" that, after the
2012 election was over, he would be able to "have
more 'flexibility.'"
Conceivably, these might all have been simply blunders. But such a string of blunders would require
someone very stupid, and Barack Obama is by no
means stupid. The net effect is that in Europe, the
Middle East and Asia, America's allies and America's
interests face far more setbacks and dangers today
than when Obama took office.
His policies have been publicly criticized by two of
his own former Secretaries of Defense, by two
retired four-star generals who served during his
administration, and a retired four-star admiral who
also served in the Middle East during the Obama
administration has called his policies "antiAmerican."
Some people who are denouncing former mayor
Rudolph Giuliani seem to be saying that it is just not
right to accuse a President of the United States of
being unpatriotic. But when Barack Obama was a
Senator, that is precisely what he said about
President George W. Bush. Where was the outrage
then?
If all else fails, critics of Mayor Giuliani can say
that a man is entitled to be considered "innocent
until proven guilty." But that principle applies in a
court of law. Outside a court of law, there is no reason to presume anyone innocent until proven guilty.
It is especially dangerous to presume a President of
the United States — any president — innocent until
proven guilty.
Whoever is president has the lives of hundreds of
millions of Americans, and the fate of a nation, in
his hands. It is those millions of people and that
nation who deserve the benefit of the doubt. We need
to err on the side of safety for the people and the
country. Squeamish politeness to an individual cannot outweigh that.
We need to keep that in mind for the next president, and for all future presidents. We might have
been better off if the question of Obama's patriotism
had been raised before he was first elected. Never
should we ignore so many red flag warnings again.
There is little that can be done about President
Obama now, no matter what he does. Impeachment,
even if it succeeded, would mean Joe Biden as president and riots across the country. It is hard to know
which would be worse.
THOMAS SOWELL is an American economist, social theorist and Senior Fellow on Public
Policy at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. He is a syndicated columnist for Creators
Syndicate and has authored more than 30 books.
Press
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Office Manager
Mark
Blumenshine
Production
Manager
“To every woman who gave birth, to every taxpayer and
citizen of this nation: We have fought for everybody else’s
equal rights. It’s our time to have wage equality once for
all. And equal rights for women in the United States of
America.”
— Academy Award best supporting actress winner
F
Letters must be signed and include an
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will not be published – for verification
purposes. Unsigned letters will not be
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“Maybe next year the government will inflict immigration restrictions. Two Mexicans in a row. That’s suspicious, I guess.”
— Filmmaker Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, on his
win for this year’s Academy Award for best director and
last year’s winner Alfonso Cuaron, also from Mexico.
Harry Reid takes the stage in the DHS fiasco
or Harry Reid and his Senate
Democrats, revenge is a dish best
served bold. For years, they com-
plained that the Republican
minority had tied the chamber in
knots. But now, just weeks into their
stint in the minority, Democrats are
brazenly using the same knot-tying
procedures.
Four times, they used filibusters to
block the majority from bringing up a
Department of Homeland Security
funding bill that would undo
President Obama’s
executive orders on
immigration. And
even after Majority
Leader Mitch
McConnell essentially surrendered on
Monday — splitting
the immigration
proposal from the
DANA
funding bill —
Democrats continMILBANK
ued grandstanding
|
gleefully on Tuesday,
confident that if
parts of the Homeland Security
department shut down in the coming
days Republicans will be to blame.
And so Reid (Nev.) led about 30
Senate Democrats and a couple of
uniformed firefighter chiefs into a
basement room in the Capitol complex Tuesday afternoon for a pep rally
daring Republicans to let funding run
out for DHS and essentially declaring
the GOP majority soft on terrorism.
“With terrorists threatening to attack
America, we must fund Homeland
Security and fund it now,” said Reid,
who, wearing Wayfarer sunglasses
and sporting ghastly facial bruises
because of a recent accident, seemed
downright scary as he invoked terrorist beheadings.
Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.) asked
of the Republicans: “Are they going to
prioritize politics? Or are they going
DROP US A LINE |
The Sheridan Press welcomes letters to
the editor. The decision to print any submission is completely at the discretion of
the managing editor and publisher.
Patricia Arquette during her acceptance speech.
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
he firestorm of denunciation of former New York
mayor Rudolph Giuliani, for having said that he
did not think Barack Obama loved America, is in
one sense out of all proportion to that remark —
especially at a time when there are much bigger issues,
including wars raging, terrorist atrocities and a nuclear
Iran on the horizon.
THE SHERIDAN
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2015
to prioritize national security?”
And Sen. Amy Klobuchar of
Minnesota, where the Mall of
America is the target of a new terrorist threat by the Somali group alShabab, told Republicans “to get these
firefighters funded, to fund our security and not to send a message to alShabab that we’re just going to shut
down Homeland Security.”
All of this must make McConnell
wonder why he wanted so much to
become majority leader. The
Kentucky Republican is making a
good-faith effort to keep his promise
not to have a shutdown. But he is finding out that the Senate is just as
ungovernable under his Republican
control as it was under the previous
management.
For his troubles, McConnell is the
target of carping by conservatives
and is so far receiving no assistance
from House Speaker John Boehner (ROhio). He’s also an easy mark for mischief-making Democrats, who are now
enjoying the advantage Republicans
did for years: It’s easier to stop things
from happening than to make them
happen.
On the Senate floor Tuesday morning, McConnell described his proposed surrender. “My preference
remains with the legislation that’s
already passed the House,” he said,
referring to the plan to make homeland-security funding conditional on
the demise of Obama’s immigration
orders. But “I’m ready to try another
way. I hope our friends across the
aisle will demonstrate similar flexibility.”
In a news conference in the afternoon, he further unfurled the white
flag. “I’ve indicated to the Democratic
leader that I’d be happy to have his
cooperation to advance the consideration of a clean DHS bill which would
carry us through to September 30th,”
he said. Even before a vote on the
now-decoupled proposal to eliminate
Obama’s immigration plan? “I would
be happy to do that,” McConnell said,
asking for “cooperation from the
Democrats in going forward to pass
what they have said for two months
they wanted to pass.”
His problem is Democrats don’t have
a lot of incentive to take yes for an
answer just yet. McConnell’s decision
to split the immigration legislation
from the funding has fired up conservatives such as Rep. Steve King (RIowa), who tweeted that Obama would
simply veto the immigration piece,
asking, “Think we were born yesterday?” Some House conservatives have
even urged McConnell to abolish the
filibuster in order to pass legislation
tying the immigration proposals to
DHS funding — an incendiary but
pointless gesture because Obama
would veto the bill even if it passed.
If and when Democrats finally do
accept the terms of McConnell’s surrender, the conservatives’ wrath will
turn against Boehner, who will have
little choice but to go along with the
concession or to be blamed for the
shutdown.
Democrats on Tuesday acted as if
they would rather enjoy the political
benefits a shutdown would bring
them. “It appears to me that the ideologues are still running the
Republican Party,” Reid taunted, listing various conservative voices that
have warned against a shutdown.
“The burden is on the Republicans.
What they’re doing is wrong for the
country. And they not only will be
blamed, they should be blamed.”
Power without responsibility: Such
are the perverse pleasures of being in
the minority in today’s Washington.
DANA MILBANK is a political reporter for The Washington Post
and has authored two books on national political campaigns and
the national political parties.
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President Barack Obama Rep. Cynthia Lummis
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PEOPLE
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
Tongue River Child’s Place benefit set for Saturday
FROM STAFF REPORTS
RANCHESTER — The Tongue River Child’s Place annual benefit dinner and dance will be held Saturday at the
Ranchester Town Hall.
Doors will open at 5:30 p.m.
The event will include a beef dinner, silent auction, live
music by The Craft Brothers, raffle baskets and kids activities.
BHHS
announces
school
honor roll
FROM STAFF REPORTS
BIG HORN — Big Horn
High School officials recently announced the school’s
second-quarter honor rolls.
Those students on the
school honor roll received at
least a 3.0 grade point average and had no grade lower
than a C.
The following students
were named to the honor
rolls.
Alcohol will also be served at the event.
Tickets to attend are $20 for individuals, $30 per couple
and $7 for kids.
For additional information or to purchase tickets in
advance, call 655-2226. Tickets will also be available at the
door for an increased cost.
Ranchester Town Hall is located at 145 Coffeen St. in
Ranchester.
Artist reception planned for
SC employee art exhibit
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan College
annual employee art exhibit will open
Tuesday in the Martinsen Gallery at the
Edward A. Whitney Academic Center.
The show features photography, painting, quilting, ceramics, metalwork, fashion and folk art.
Awards will be given for people’s
choice and best in show.
An opening reception will be held
from 4:30-5:30 p.m. Tuesday. Hors d’oeuvres will be served.
In addition, a raffle drawing will be
held at 5 p.m. for a $100 gift certificate to
Frackelton’s.
The exhibit will be on display through
April 17.
Sheridan College is located at 3059
Coffeen Ave.
School Honor Roll
12th grade
Zachary Blaney, Kayla
Crouse, Parker
Hendrickson, Christian
Iberlin, Seth Kite, Zackery
Soule, Lana Tormanen
11th grade
Mollie Caiola, Cricket
Cunningham, McKenzie
Greenelsh, Mark Haile,
Kristopher Hall, Ashton
Koltiska, Joely Mueller,
Steven Nicholson, Lauren
Passini, Evan Redinger,
Charles Ringley, Tyler
Stanley
10th grade
Emily Blaney, Madeline
Craig, Rocky Donaldson,
Augustus Dow, Tristen
Geist, Starrla Heatley,
Emmy Ilgen, Wylan Lee,
William Nicholson, Alena
Simonson, Adrienne
Swaney, Halley Tracy,
Jessica Tracy, Robert
Watson, Colton Williams,
Wheaton Williams
Ninth grade
Amanda Anderson,
Sydney Atkinson, Baylee
Clemens, Emily Kidneigh,
Aidan McCurry, Makayla
Morris, Trinity St. John,
Kyler Weigum
EDITOR’S NOTE: The BHHS Principal’s Honor
Roll published in the Feb. 24 edition of The
Sheridan Press.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Cowboy Classic at the YMCA
Frankie Shields, of Butte, Montana, left, and E.J. Panetta of Sheridan compete in a game of handball
during the Cowboy Classic Saturday at the Sheridan YMCA. Thirty-two players from Montana,
Colorado and Wyoming came to compete in the annual tournament.
K-Life to host dodgeball event
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Sheridan K-Life will
host a day of dodgeball fun for all ages
Saturday at the Sheridan High School
gym.
The event will run from 2-9 p.m. It is
open to anyone age 8 or older.
The cost is $15 per person, with the
chance to purchase extra lives for $5.
Dodgeball teams should consist of six
to eight players.
Pre-registered teams should plan to
sign in between 2-2:45 p.m. Teams signing up Saturday should register at 2:45
p.m.
The Super K Tournament will begin at
3 p.m., followed by the junior high
school tournament at 4 p.m., the high
school tournament at 5:30 p.m. and the
adult tournament at 7:30 p.m.
The event will benefit K-Life.
For additional information or to register, see sheridan.klife.com or call 6558110. Sheridan High School is located at
1056 Long Drive.
TEDxBroadway urges theater professionals to be bold
NEW YORK (AP) — A conference on how to make the
Broadway experience better for audiences and performers
alike has come up with some prescriptions — be open,
inclusive but, above all, be true.
“There’s great value for telling the truth in art,” said
Benjamin Scheuer, who wrote and stars in his autobiographical solo show “The Lion.” A cancer survivor, he
gave perhaps the most heart-felt endorsement of honesty
in theater: “Tell the truth in art about bad things. You’ll be
doing something good.”
The fourth TEDxBroadway conference on Monday
brought together 19 speakers — producers, marketers,
entrepreneurs, academics and artists — to try to answer
the question: “What is the best Broadway can be?”
TEDx events are independently organized but inspired
by the nonprofit group TED — standing for Technology,
Entertainment, Design — that started in 1984 as a conference dedicated to “ideas worth spreading.” Video of the
Broadway event will be made available to the public.
The conference, held in the off-Broadway complex New
World Stages, included speakers with no theater experience but with interesting insights on the human experi-
ence, including atmospheric scientist Adam Sobel and cognitive psychologist Laurie Santos.
One speaker was Leslie Koch, who has helped turn onceempty Governors Island into a popular 150-acre space for
festivals and art by being inviting and accommodating.
“What I’ve learned from working on an island in the
middle of the harbor for several years is be truly open,
improvise, be radically welcoming,” she said.
Kirsten Sabia, vice president of marketing services for
the PGA Tour, explained how she grew her niche sport:
allow cellphones on the course, serve alcohol, increase
public access to the golfers, have better food and throw
concerts.
“We strive to provide the ideal setting, the ideal talent
and allow the fans to have the experience for themselves,”
she said.
Set designer Kacie Hultgren showed what the future
might look like with 3-D printing, which she uses to make
miniature models of the designs that will later be on
Broadway. She said printing costs have come down and the
flexibility of design sharing makes the work collaborative
and exciting.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
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A6
PAGE SIX
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2015
TODAY IN HISTORY |
10 things to
know today
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Your daily look at latebreaking news, upcoming
events and the stories
that will be talked about
today:
1. EX-MARINE FOUND
GUILTY IN ‘AMERICAN
SNIPER’ TRIAL
Eddie Ray Routh, 27,
faces life in prison without parole in the deaths
of Chris Kyle and his
friend, Chad Littlefield.
2. PRESSURE MOUNTS
ON GOP ON HOMELAND
SECURITY BILL
The ball is in the House
Republicans’ court as
their fellow senators
agree to fund the department without linking it
to rolling back the president’s immigration
action.
3. CRIMINAL JUSTICE
ADVOCATE HAS CRIME
HISTORY
Sean Hosman, whose
company is a key player
in the national movement
to overhaul the incarceration system, is a repeat
offender himself.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Creating bowls to benefit community
A student paints a ceramic bowl with glaze during art class last week at Big Horn Middle School. The class is making bowls for
the Empty Bowl fundraiser to support the VOA Community Shelter set for March 12 at 5 p.m. at the Sheridan YMCA.
LOCAL BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
4. WHERE OVERFISHING
IS BREEDING SLAVE
LABOR CONDITIONS
Thailand’s seafood
industry is using migrant
laborers who are sold
onto boats that trawl
international waters following a decline in the
local fish population.
5. WHO IS FAVORED TO
WIN BRITAIN’S VOTE
No one, really. Voter
disillusionment with the
two major political parties means the May poll
is truly a “lottery election.”
6. OBAMA VETOES
KEYSTONE OIL PIPELINE
Boehner says
Republicans are “not
even close” to giving up
the fight for the $8 billion
project.
7. WHY SAGGING OIL
PRICES ARE SENDING
COLOMBIANS PACKING
Thousands of people
who were employed by a
thriving petroleum industry in the Latin
American country are
now facing a harsh new
reality.
8. GEORGE ZIMMERMAN
WON’T FACE FEDERAL
CHARGES
The Justice Department
says there isn’t enough
evidence to prove the former neighborhood watch
volunteer killed Trayvon
Martin, a black teen, on
account of his race.
9. EMANUEL FACES
RUNOFF IN CHICAGO
The mayor of the
nation’s third largest city
is facing a stiff challenge
from a commissioner
who has the backing of
teachers, unions and
many residents.
10. STUDY DETAILS
CHALLENGES FACING
LGBT HOMELESS YOUTH
A unique federal survey finds that many lesbian, gay and transgender teens resort to earning money through “survival sex” to find shelter.
SC to offer tax help
SHERIDAN — It’s almost tax
season and students and faculty
in the Sheridan College business
department will offer the free
Volunteer Income Tax
Assistance program again this
year.
The program, which is a
branch of the Wyoming Free Tax
Service, will meet at Sheridan
College’s Griffith Memorial
Building, room 10. The scheduled times include Feb. 27,
March 7, March 13, March 28,
April 10 and April 11, from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m.
Drop-ins are welcome, however, appointments take priority.
Call 674-6446 for an appointment.
The program offers assistance
with relatively simple tax
returns, including itemized
deductions, interest, dividends,
small businesses (under $10,000
of expenses), unemployment,
tuition and fees, earned income
credit, educational credits and
much more. Generally, the
income limit is $65,000 or less,
but if the returns are simple, the
amount can be expanded.
Participants are required to
bring the following: all Social
Security cards for taxpayer and
all dependents, photo ID for taxpayer and spouse, all W-2s, 1099s,
1098-Ts, mortgage interest statements, real estate tax statements, medical expenses
receipts, any charitable contributions receipts, proof of insurance if you have it, and any
other document pertaining to
taxes.
Clients without Social Security
cards or photo IDs will be turned
away.
For more information, contact
Tracy Dearinger at 674-6446 ext.
3202.
Sheridan College is located at
3059 Coffeen Ave.
Rodeo tickets
go on sale Friday
SHERIDAN — Tickets for the
2015 Sheridan-WYO-Rodeo will
go on sale at 7 a.m. Friday
through the WYO Theater box
office.
Performance dates for this
year’s rodeo, a Professional
Rodeo Cowboys Association
rodeo, will be July 8-11.
Internet ticket sales, in addition to purchases made by phone
will begin at 12:01 p.m. Friday.
Purchases may be made at
sheridanwyorodeo.com or at 6729084.
Ticket prices will be as follows:
Reserved seating for
Wednesday and Thursday will be
$16.50 in advance and $18.50 at
the gate.
Reserved seating for Friday
and Saturday nights will be
$18.50 in advance or $20.50 at the
gate.
Tickets for children 12 and
younger will be $7 for the
Wednesday performance.
In addition, if you purchase
tickets for all four nights, the
cost will be $16.50 per ticket per
night.
This year’s Sheridan-WYORodeo will include the World
Championship Indian Relay
Races and wild pony races.
This is also the sixth year that
the rodeo is sanctioned as a
Million Dollar Silver Tour
Rodeo.
For additional information,
contact Jeff Wells at 461-3553.
The WYO Theater box office is
located at 42 N. Main St.
WWA seeking
applicants for Young
Ambassadors program
SHERIDAN — The Wyoming
Wilderness Association is
launching its second year of the
Young Ambassadors for
Wilderness program.
The WWA is currently accepting applications from youth
between 12-18 years of age.
With a curriculum geared
toward young adults who are
interested in becoming the next
generation of wilderness leaders, in this program students
will learn about the work that
goes into protecting wild lands
for future generations.
Students will be presented
with unique opportunities to
work with professionals in the
field, learn about the wilderness
in their own backyards and complete a capstone project to present at the culmination of the
program.
For additional information,
contact Lily Bliss at 672-2751 or
[email protected] Applications
must be submitted by March 20
and can be found online at wildwyo.org.
THURSDAY EVENTS |
• 3:30 p.m., Tween Takeover challenge — marble maze, Sheridan County Fulmer Public Library, 335 W.
Alger St.
• 5-7 p.m., artist reception for David Jones exhibit, Sagebrush Community Art Center, 201 E. Fifth St.
• 7 p.m., Tribute to Glen Campbell, WYO Theater, 42 N. Main St.
TIPPED OVER |
Longtime Coke executive Donald
Keough dies at 88
NEW YORK (AP) — Donald Keough, who steered
Coca-Cola through the “cola wars” of the 1980s,
died Tuesday in Atlanta, the company said. He
was 88.
Keough served as the company’s president and
chief operating officer from 1981 to 1993. He is
credited with building Coca-Cola into a more global company.
During his tenure, Coca-Cola introduced “New
Coke” as it was fighting off efforts by PepsiCo to
take market share. Coke fans protested. A song
called “Coke was It,” mocking the company’s
“Coke Is It” slogan, was popular on radio stations,
according to the book “Secret Formula” by
Frederick Allen.
Coca-Cola dumped New Coke, bringing back the
old formula as “Coca-Cola Classic.”
During a press conference at the time, Keough
focused on the upside of the company’s error, noting that the response showed the “passion” people
have for Coca-Cola.
“Some critics will say Coca-Cola made a marketing mistake. Some cynics will say that we planned
the whole thing. The truth is we are not that dumb
and not that smart,” Keough said, according to
“Secret Formula.”
In a memo posted online Thursday, Coca-Cola
CEO Muhtar Kent said Keough “brought a steady
hand to the wheel in challenging times,
unmatched operating skill that strengthened and
expanded the Coca-Cola system and an expansive
vision that helped make Coca-Cola a truly international brand.”
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On Feb. 25, 1940, a
National Hockey League game
was televised for the first time
by New York City station
W2XBS as the New York
Rangers defeated the Montreal
Canadiens, 6-2, at Madison
Square Garden.
On this date:
In 1836, inventor Samuel
Colt patented his revolver.
In 1901, United States Steel
Corp. was incorporated by J.P.
Morgan.
In 1905, the Upton Sinclair
novel “The Jungle” was first
published in serial form by the
Appeal to Reason newspaper.
In 1913, the 16th
Amendment to the U.S.
Constitution, giving Congress
the power to levy and collect
income taxes, was declared in
effect by Secretary of State
Philander Chase Knox.
In 1922, French serial killer
Henri Landru, convicted of
murdering 10 women and the
son of one of them, was executed in Versailles.
In 1943, Allied troops reoccupied the Kasserine Pass
after clashing with German
troops during World War II.
In 1950, “Your Show of
Shows,” starring Sid Caesar,
Imogene Coca, Carl Reiner and
Howard Morris, debuted on
NBC-TV.
In 1964, Eastern Airlines
Flight 304, a DC-8, crashed
shortly after taking off from
New Orleans International
Airport, killing all 58 on
board. Muhammad Ali (then
known as Cassius Clay)
became world heavyweight
boxing champion as he defeated Sonny Liston in Miami
Beach.
In 1973, the Stephen
Sondheim musical “A Little
Night Music” opened at
Broadway’s Shubert Theater.
In 1986, President
Ferdinand Marcos fled the
Philippines after 20 years of
rule in the wake of a tainted
election; Corazon Aquino
assumed the presidency.
In 1991, during the Persian
Gulf War, 28 Americans were
killed when an Iraqi Scud missile hit a U.S. barracks in
Dhahran, Saudi Arabia.
In 1994, American-born
Jewish settler Baruch
Goldstein opened fire with an
automatic rifle inside the
Tomb of the Patriarchs in the
West Bank, killing 29 Muslims
before he was beaten to death
by worshippers.
Ten years ago: Municipal
employee and church leader
Dennis Rader was arrested for
the BTK (“bind, torture, kill”)
serial slayings that had terrorized Wichita, Kansas. (Rader
later pleaded guilty and was
sentenced to 10 life prison
terms.) A suicide bombing
killed four Israelis outside a
Tel Aviv nightclub, shattering
an informal truce. Amnesty
International founder Peter
Benenson died in Oxford,
England, at age 83. Hall of
Fame basketball coach John
Chaney was suspended for the
rest of the regular season by
Temple for ordering rough
play by one of his players during a game against Saint
Joseph’s.
Five years ago: President
Barack Obama convened a
health care summit with
Democrats and Republicans;
after a day of debate and disagreement, the president concluded the talkfest with a
bleak assessment that an
accord might not be possible.
One year ago: In a blunt
warning to Afghan President
Hamid Karzai, President
Barack Obama threatened to
withdraw all U.S. troops from
Afghanistan by the end of 2014
if a crucial security pact wasn’t signed. (U.S. and Afghan
officials signed the pact in
Sept. 2014.)
Thought for Today: “He
who never leaves his country
is full of prejudices.” — Carlo
Goldoni, Italian playwright
(born this date in 1707, died
1793).
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
COOPERATION : Obama seeks new legislation on trade
FROM 1
“Let’s try to focus on some of the
things that we have in common and
deliver real results,” he told governors
of both parties who attended a White
House luncheon Monday.
But can the confrontational Obama
exist alongside Obama the accommodator?
Among those attending the criminal
justice session at the White House on
Tuesday were Republicans who have
been among the most high-profile critics of Obama on other issues, such as
Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky, a potential presidential candidate, Sen. Mike
Lee of Utah and Reps. Jason Chaffetz
of Utah and Trey Gowdy of South
Carolina.
On trade, Obama is seeking legislation that will give him the authority to
negotiate international trade deals
that Congress can only approve or
reject but not amend. A majority of
Democrats oppose such “fast track”
authority, which means Obama must
rely on mostly Republican votes to get
his way.
“I think we’re in synch with the
administration,” said Republican
House Ways and Means Committee
Chairman Paul Ryan of Wisconsin,
who is leading the pro-trade drive in
the House.
Such efforts at bipartisanship occur
against a steady effort by Republicans
to undo or roll back Obama actions on
immigration, health care and financial regulation.
Obama has promised to use his veto
to reject those, as he did the Keystone
bill.
“He’s looking at this as showing he
still can be king of the hill, because
we don’t have the votes to override,”
Republican Sen. Jim Inhofe of
Oklahoma, a vocal opponent of
Obama’s climate change agenda, said
after the Keystone veto. “If he vetoed
this, he’s going to veto many others
that are out there.”
So far, both sides have demonstrated
an ability to place confrontation on
one track and cooperation on another.
“The bluster over the veto-bait bills
that Republicans are trying to pass is
mostly fake — everyone knows that he
can’t sign them,” said Matt Bennett of
the centrist Democratic group Third
Way. “So when it comes time for the
trade bills, on which most
Republicans, many Democrats and the
White House are all aligned, there
won’t really be any hangover from
these battles.”
Of the current fights with Congress,
the one over immigration is the most
bitter.
Conservative Republicans maintain
that Obama exceeded his constitutional authority when he took steps to
shield more than 4 million immigrants from deportation and make
them eligible for work permits. But
GOP attempts to tie repeal of those
actions to legislation that funds the
Homeland Security Department have
stalled in the face of procedural obstacles from Democrats.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A7
Now
online...
www.DestinationSheridan.com
STANDARDS: Aid in curriculum development process
FROM 1
From time-to-time, SCSD2
will bring in content area
experts to aid in this
process, Assistant
Superintendent for
Curriculum Tom Sachse
said.
“These jobs are really
quite complex, and I don’t
think people fundamentally
understand everything that
goes into it,” Sachse said.
“When you need expertise,
a wise person goes out and
finds it, and sometimes you
have it in-house and sometimes you have to bring it
in.”
The latter is the case in
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Sheridan County School
Teacher Jesse Hinkhouse, right, looks up from evaluating a student’s writing during a Professional
District 1, where district
Learning Community meeting Tuesday afternoon at Tongue River Elementary School.
officials have hired the
Curriculum Leadership
Institute to aid in the develteacher quality. It cannot be expressed was that the disthis process, we’ve trained
opment process.
trict already pays a full-time
our staff on how this works, spent on salaries.
SCSD1 also utilizes PLC
As for the added workload, curriculum director, Sara
so the idea is that CLI trains
groups, but due to the disMcGinnis, and some
administrators say it is a
trict’s smaller staffing num- themselves out of a job.
employees felt that having
necessary evil that will be
They help us through the
bers and differing weekly
both her salary and the CLI
schedule adding curriculum process in the first year, the diminishing soon.
“The state board just went expense was redundant
next year we use them for
development to the groups
spending.
through a complete adopduties at times requires that less days and the fee goes
“Our curriculum director
down and the following year tion of standards, and you
substitute teachers be utihas multiple duties: not
can’t just keep doing what
they go away.”
lized in order for the PLC
only does she help with curyou’ve done before; you
During recent SCSD1
members to have a common
riculum writing she also
have to adapt,” Smith said.
time to meet for curriculum meetings, including school
“There are lots of alterna- manages our professional
board meetings and budget
development.
development, handles all of
discussions, employees have tives when it comes to curMaking the most of the
our assessments and testexpressed concerns over the riculum development, but
teachers’ involvement, the
ing, oversees record keeping
when it comes to CLI what
amount of money being
CLI firm provides
process on all students and
we know is this method is
paid to CLI while teachers
researched and field-tested
analyzing where they are at
embedded in research,”
are simultaneously not
processes for the developlocally and nationally,”
Kobza said.
receiving raises. In addiment of curriculum,
Kobza said.
instruction and assessment tion, concerns were raised
“We’ve also looked for
As the curriculum direcas well as staff developabout the amount of addiother options, for example,
tor for SCSD2, Sachse said
ment, long-term planning,
tional work that is being
where teachers of various
he believes SCSD1 does a
progress monitoring and
created for the teachers to
subject areas could meet
great job of utilizing expertoutcome analyzation.
rework a curriculum that
during the summer and we
could pay them to come in
ise at the right times.
“It’s a framework for deci- they feel is working just
and do it then,” he added.
“There are a number of
sion-making and a framefine.
other districts within the
work for action taking, a
SCSD1 Business Manager “Unfortunately, that hasn’t
worked because they couldstate who use the same curmodel that is used to hang
Jeremy Smith said the
n’t coordinate their calenriculum development firm,”
our curriculum on,”
firm’s contract for approxiSachse said. “It’s a wise perSuperintendent Marty
mately $45,000 is paid using dars or get everyone to buy
son who knows when to
Kobza said. “We’ve in
federal grant money — Title into that option. …We did
recognize that this would
bring in talent, and I think
essence gone back through
2A — that is restricted for
take time and effort, so we
Sara does a great job of that
and rebuilt our programs in usage in the areas of curdid try to carve out time for in district 1.”
all of our core areas now,
riculum development, staff
that.”
and that effort will start to
development and other
Another concern
go away this year. Through
aspects in the area of
RANCHESTER: Downtown development
FROM 1
Clark said the building will match the
information center’s railroad station
theme.
“I think it’s going to spruce up the town,”
Clark said. “We’re trying to attract businesses, and we don’t have a lot of open
spots.”
Once construction begins, contractors
will have 180 days — weather and other
extenuating circumstances permitting — to
complete the work.
In January 2014, the State Loan and
Investment Board approved a $977,500
Community Readiness grant for the project, with the town responsible for a 15 percent cash or in-kind match. For the cash
portion, Clark said Ranchester would use
Optional One-Cent Sales Tax money. Inkind work will include groundwork, engineering and other assistance toward the
project.
The Ranchester Town Council awarded
the construction bid to Ace Builders for
$1,056,000 at its meeting on Feb. 17.
‘I think it’s going to spruce up
the town. We’re trying to attract
businesses, and we don’t have a lot of
open spots.’
Peter Clark
Ranchester mayor
Main Street Mercantile is an offshoot of
Ranchester’s 2009 Downtown Development
Plan. This project is part of Phase 2. Phase
1 involved purchasing and remediating the
properties where the information center
sits and the mercantile will eventually be
located.
Ever dream of having your principal or teacher
prepare dinner for you and your schoolmates?
Now’s your chance to assign the
HOMEWORK!
Join family and friends at your neighborhood McDonald’s
and enjoy great food and the chance to help your school!
Stop by and support
Coffeen
Elementary
February 26, 2015
5 pm - 8 pm
2146 Coffeen Ave. • Sheridan, WY
A8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2015
Lessons
in history
Students Jayden Harris, left, and
Brayden Williams take a look at
calvary soldiers presented by local
artist Kim Fuka, right, Tuesday
afternoon at Slack School in
Parkman. Fuka is painting figures
for Tom Warnke’s diorama depicting the Connor Battlefield in 1865.
The diorama is set to be complete
in August. Fuka has been making
presentations on Warnke’s work to
bring awareness to the richness of
history in the Sheridan area.
Send us your
photos of
community
happenings!
Email them to
[email protected]
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Allegiant Air to offer year-round Casper-Las Vegas flights
CASPER (AP) — Allegiant Air will continue service between Casper and Las
Vegas through the summer this year
because of increasing demand.
The Casper Star-Tribune reports the airline usually stops flights between the cities
during the hot summer months, ending
service in August and resuming in
November. Last year, the seasonal stoppage
was reduced to just five weeks.
Glenn Januska, director of
Casper/Natrona County International
Airport, credited the change to high
demand. Since 2008, 83,000 people have
flown Allegiant on the Las Vegas-Casper
service.
Bill to eliminate writing test goes to Gov. Matt Mead
CHEYENNE (AP) —
Legislation that would
eliminate a writing test
now given in Wyoming
schools has passed the
Legislature.
The Senate voted 16-14 on
Tuesday to approve House
Bill 159. It now goes to Gov.
Matt Mead’s desk for his
signature or veto.
The Wyoming Tribune
Eagle reports that the
Student Assessment of
Writing Skills is taken by
third-, fifth- and seventh-
graders each spring.
Democratic Rep. Mary
Throne, of Cheyenne, says
the assessment is a
“flawed” test that wastes
time and money.
She sponsored the bill to
eliminate it.
ALMANAC
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A9
SERVICE NOTICE |
Kristen Elaine (Ellefson) Madson
Kristen Elaine (Ellefson) Madson, 52, of Ranchester,
passed away on Monday, February 23, 2015, at the Sheridan
Memorial Hospital.
A Celebration of Life will be held at 10:00 am on Saturday,
February 28, 2015 at Kane Funeral Home with Chaplain
Derek Schultz officiating, with full Military Honors.
Online condolences may
be
written
at
www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
2146 Coffeen Ave. • 673-1100
2590 N. Main • 672-5900
Coffee
Here are the results
of Tuesday’s
Mega Millions
lottery drawing:
Winning numbers:
15-23-26-45-66;
Mega Ball 4
Megaplier 3X
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Planning a new curriculum
Kindergarten teachers Tamie Simmons, left, and Laurie Hammett evaluate a student’s writing during a Professional Learning Community meeting Tuesday afternoon at Tongue River Elementary School.
Estimated jackpot:
$127,000,000
REPORTS |
SHERIDAN
FIRE-RESCUE
Tuesday
• Rocky Mountain
Ambulance assist, 2200
block West Fifth Street, 3:45
p.m.
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
AMBULANCE
Monday
• Medical, Highway 345,
1:04 a.m.
• Fire standby, 300 block
Canby Street, 5:41 p.m.
• Medical, 11 block Avon
Street, 7:17 a.m.
• Trauma, 100 block
Beaver Drive, 7:59 a.m.
• Medical, 1100 block
Emerson Street, 9:18 a.m.
• Trauma, 400 block Blue
Sky Court, 1:48 p.m.
• Medical, 1400 block Fifth
Street, 3:28 p.m.
• Medical, 1400 block Fifth
Street, 4:10 p.m.
• Medical, 1800 block Fort
Road, 5:23 p.m.
• Medical, 1800 block Fort
Road, 6 p.m.
• Medical, 1800 block
North Heights Place, 7:57
p.m.
• Medical, 100 block South
Linden Street, 7:40 p.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
Fifth Street, 7:57 p.m.
• Medical, 100 block West
6th Street, 10:49 p.m.
Tuesday
• Trauma, 1500 block
Sugarland Drive, 3:07 a.m.
• Medical, 400 block
Airport Road, 10:46 a.m.
• Trauma, 500 block Avoca
Avenue, 3:32 p.m.
• Medical, 2200 block West
Fifth Street, 3:45 p.m.
SHERIDAN MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL
Tuesday
• No admissions or dismissals reported.
SHERIDAN POLICE
DEPARTMENT
Information in the police
reports is taken from the
SPD website.
Tuesday
• Burglar alarm, Coffeen
Avenue, 5:49 a.m.
• Noise complaint, North
Main Street, 8:19 a.m.
• Filthy premises, North
Gould Street, 8:34 a.m.
• Dog at large, South
Linden Avenue, 9:36 a.m.
• Hit and run, Coffeen
Avenue, 9:46 a.m.
• Accident, Burkitt Street,
9:57 a.m.
• Suicidal subject, East
Sixth Street, 10:29 a.m.
• Suspicious person,
South Brooks Street, 11:05
a.m.
• Animal welfare,
Mydland Road, 11:07 a.m.
• Welfare check, North
Main Street, 12:01 p.m.
• Accident, East Burkitt
Street, 12:32 p.m.
• Animal incident, North
Heights Avenue, 12:56 p.m.
• Cat trap, Kennedy Street,
1:07 p.m.
• Accident, Fifth Street,
THURSDAY
SHERIDAN COUNTY
SHERIFF’S OFFICE
Tuesday
• Warrant service, Fort
Road, 8:56 a.m.
• Found property, Wyarno
Road, 12:46 p.m.
• Parking complaint, West
15th Street and Omarr
Avenue, 6:16 p.m.
• Tobacco violation, Lane
Lane, 7:54 p.m.
• Suspicious vehicle, H
Street, Ranchester, 9 p.m.
ARRESTS
Names of individuals
SATURDAY
FRIDAY
6
Mostly cloudy
and cold
16
Sunny and cold
0
25
Almanac
8
Mainly cloudy
and cold
Mostly sunny
and cold
20
29
0
3
Temperature
High/low .........................................................51/24
Normal high/low ............................................41/16
Record high .............................................72 in 1995
Record low ............................................. -20 in 2003
Precipitation (in inches)
Tuesday .......................................................... 0.00"
Month to date................................................. 1.14"
Normal month to date .................................... 0.46"
Year to date .................................................... 1.59"
Normal year to date ....................................... 1.02"
The Sun
Rise
Set
Today
Thursday
Friday
6:53 a.m.
6:51 a.m.
6:50 a.m.
5:50 p.m.
5:51 p.m.
5:52 p.m.
The Moon
Today
Thursday
Friday
First
Rise
Set
11:01 a.m.
11:48 a.m.
12:38 p.m.
12:59 a.m.
1:57 a.m.
2:50 a.m.
Full
Last
9a 10a 11a Noon 1p
2p
3p
4p
5p
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection. Shown is the highest
value for the day.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High;
11+ Extreme
SHERIDAN
Big Horn
15/26
Basin
14/26
6/16
Feb 25
Mar 5
Mar 13
Mar 20
For more detailed weather
information on the Internet, go to:
www.thesheridanpress.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2015
Clearmont
4/15
Story
3/11
Worland
13/24
Gillette
0/13
Buffalo
7/12
Wright
1/14
Kaycee
3/14
Thermopolis
11/22
Weather on the Web
UV Index tomorrow
Cody
9/18
Ranchester
7/16
New
Big Horn Mountain Precipitation
24 hours through noon Tuesday ..................... 0.00"
Shown is Thursday's weather.
Temperatures are tonight's lows
and Thursday's highs.
Hardin
9/19
Parkman
8/16
Dayton
8/17
Lovell
11/22
Regional Cities
City
Billings
Casper
Cheyenne
Cody
Evanston
Gillette
Green River
Jackson
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
18/4/pc
14/-5/sn
15/3/sn
18/5/sn
30/16/sn
13/-1/pc
30/10/sn
27/6/sn
Charter the
Sheridan Trolley!
Add a touch of nostalgia to your event!
Just $110 an hour (2 hour minimum) gets you and
30 of your friends and family to your destination.
Call 672-2485 to reserve your trolley today!
National Weather for Thursday, February 26
Broadus
-1/17
Sun and Moon
Sheridan County Airport through Tuesday
JAIL
Today
Daily inmate count: 63
Female inmate count: 8
Inmates at treatment
facilities (not counted in
daily inmate count): 0
Inmates housed at other
facilities (not counted in
daily inmate count): 3
Number of book-ins for
the previous day: 3
Number of releases for
the previous day: 1
SUNDAY
Billings
10/18
Much colder
with snow, 1-3"
arrested for domestic violence or sexual assault will
not be released until those
individuals have appeared
in court.
Tuesday
• Shane Chesson, 43,
Sheridan, out of county
warrant, out of county
court, arrested by SCSO
• Michael Francis Merill,
57, Sheridan, larceny
$1000+, circuit court, arrested by SCSO
• James Paul Newkirk, 44,
Apache Junction, Arizona,
out of county bench warrant (contempt of court),
out of county court, arrested by SCSO
• Jonathan Robert
Melville, 21, Dayton, probation violation/revocation,
circuit court, arrested by
SCSO
• Xavier Donovan
Bradshaw, 38, Sheridan, out
of county warrant (failure
to appear), out of county
court, arrested by SPD
Regional Weather
5-Day Forecast for Sheridan
TONIGHT
1:53 p.m.
• Attempt to locate,
Sheridan area, 3:09 p.m.
• Drugs (scheduled surrender), West 12th Street,
4:10 p.m.
• Hit and run, Coffeen
Avenue, 4:28 p.m.
• Dog at large, Eighth
Street, 5:33 p.m.
• Illegal parking, Sheridan
area, 5:40 p.m.
• Barking dog, East
Nebraska Street, 6:52 p.m.
• Welfare check, Avon
Street, 7:56 p.m.
• Burglar alarm, West
Brundage Street, 8:11 p.m.
• Suspicious circumstances, Parker Avenue, 8:14
p.m.
• Removal of subject,
North Main Street, 8:15 p.m.
• Bar check, North Main
Street, 9:21 p.m.
• Welfare check,
Gladstone Street, 10:08 p.m.
Fri.
Sat.
Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W
24/12/s
21/5/c
23/0/s
19/-1/sf
19/3/sn 21/8/sf
26/12/s
20/2/sf
32/18/sf 32/11/c
24/1/s
20/-3/c
35/15/sn 33/11/sf
27/6/sn 29/2/sf
City
Laramie
Newcastle
Rawlins
Riverton
Rock Springs
Scottsbluff
Sundance
Yellowstone
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
13/-3/sn
15/-5/s
22/2/sn
19/2/sn
27/10/sn
21/6/sn
11/-6/s
21/-9/sn
Fri.
Hi/Lo/W
19/1/sn
24/3/s
29/11/pc
20/8/s
31/15/pc
26/11/pc
21/3/s
24/4/sn
Sat.
Hi/Lo/W
17/1/sf
26/4/pc
27/5/sf
20/4/sf
27/7/sf
31/11/sf
20/2/pc
20/-9/sf
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Shown are
Thursday's noon
positions of
weather systems
and precipitation.
Temperature
bands are highs
for the day.
A10
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2015
TASTE
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
Go guilt free with lettuce
H
B1
A fresh look at a vegetable staple
Carrot salad
satisfies
with flavor
ave you noticed how many people who order a
sandwich these days order it without the
bread or bun? Those high-carbed cradles of
goodness seem superfluous.
That is why I’ve always loved these lettuceleaved wraps. No guilt-ridden
carbs to worry over, just the
savory Asian seasonings that
make chicken easy to cook and
glorious to eat.
KOREAN CHICKEN LETTUCE
WRAPS
2 1/2 tablespoons low-sodium soy
sauce
SUSAN
2 tablespoons dark brown sugar
WOODY
1 1/2 tablespoons dark sesame oil
1 tablespoon gochujang sauce
|
1 tablespoon minced fresh garlic
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 pound skinless, boneless chicken breast halves, thinly
sliced
1 cup uncooked long-grain brown rice
2 teaspoons canola oil
1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds
12 Bibb lettuce leaves
24 English cucumbler slices
4 green onions, diagonally sliced
BY SUSAN NICHOLSON
UNIVERSAL UCLICK
FRESH CARROT SALAD
In a medium bowl, whisk
together 2 tablespoons
extra-virgin olive oil, 2
tablespoons fresh lemon
juice, 1 clove minced garlic,
3/4 teaspoon ground coriander, 1/8 teaspoon cinnamon,
1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika, 1/2 fresh red jalapeno
pepper (seeded and very
thinly sliced) and 1/2 teaspoon coarse salt. Toss the
salad with 8 ounces grated
carrots and 1/2 cup chopped
cilantro. (Add cilantro just
before serving.)
(Adapted from "Date Night
In," Ashley Rodriguez;
Running Press, 2014.)
Serve with whole-grain
bread.
1. Combine first six ingredients in a large zip-top plastic
bag. Place 2 tablespoons soy sauce mixture in a small bowl;
set aside. Add chicken slices to remaining sauce mixture in
bag; seal. Refrigerate two hours.
2. Cook rice according to package directions.
3. Remove chicken from bag; discard marinade. Heat a
large skillet over medium-high heat. Add oil to pan; swirl to
coat. Add chicken; cook two minutes on each side or until
done. Sprinkle sesame seeds over chicken. Place 3 tablespoons rice in each lettuce leaf with 1/3 cup chicken mixture,
2 cucumber slices, and about 1 1/2 teaspoons green onions.
Serve with reserved 2 tablespoons soy sauce mixture.
Serves 4.
(Source: Cooking Light)
Impress your dinner guests with
this fresh carrot salad.
SUSAN WOODY has been a food writer for more than 20 years and is a member of the
Association of Food Journalists.
I
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
COURTESY PHOTO | UNIVERSAL UCLICK
Considered wealthy? Sometimes it is a matter of perspective
n a recent column, I was discussing our
household’s budget and mentioned that I
do not consider our family “wealthy.”
Several readers wrote to correct me and
encourage me to consider a different appreciation of that term.
“Dear Jill,
I am not the type to write in response to
articles, but your statement that you don’t consider yourself wealthy
struck a chord with me.
Although I understand
that you might feel like
you could always use
more money, you — like
me — are wealthy. I am
sure that your family
JILL
household income is in
the top 5-20 percent of
CATALDO
incomes for the U.S. That
|
is wealthier than over 99
percent of the world.
Whether you feel it or not, you are
wealthy.
Bree U.”
“Dear Jill,
Being ‘average’ or ‘middle-class’ in the
United States is ‘wealthy’ elsewhere in the
world. We are not living in huts made from
plants and washing our clothes in a
stream. We aren’t hunting and gathering
our meals. You, Jill, are wealthy. And so am
I.
Eric D.”
A 2013 Forbes article compared quality of
life and economic advantages in the United
States to other countries using a variety of
economic and quality-of-life studies. The
study noted that being in the bottom 10 percent of the financially poor population in
the United States meant that you had a
standard of living comparable to the “normal” populations of Finland and Denmark.
Taking it a step further, Americans living
in the poorest 5 percent income bracket are
still richer than 68 percent of people in the
rest of the world.
The 2013 United States Census also noted
that even for the poorest Americans, dayto-day life is pretty good. A family of four
living on less than $23,550 would be considered to be living below the poverty line.
That’s definitely a tight budget for any family.
However, more than 80 percent of households living below the poverty line have
cell phones. More than 96 percent of them
have a television and more than 58 percent
have a home computer. More than 65 percent of these households own a washer and
dryer.
We may not consider our home appliances to be “luxuries,” but again, compared to the living standards of the rest of
the world, they certainly are. More than 96
percent of households below the poverty
line in the U.S. have a refrigerator and a
stove. More than 93 percent own a
microwave. More than 83 percent have air
conditioning.
The Heritage Foundation notes that if
“living in poverty” meant lacking in food,
adequate housing and clothing, “relatively
few” Americans would be considered to be
living at this level. A typical “poor”
American has a larger living space in the
home than most “normal” Europeans do.
Their report also notes that the average
person who is statistically poor lives in a
three-bedroom residence with one-and-ahalf bathrooms and a garage.
The Heritage Foundation’s study also
explains that while poor families “certainly struggle to make ends meet,” in most
cases they are struggling to pay home bills
and buy groceries.
While this week’s column is not directly
coupon-related, I hope that it has given you
a renewed appreciation for the lifestyle
that most of us enjoy. We have faucets in
our homes that provide clean and safe
drinking water whenever we need it. We
are able to easily and quickly cook food at
home. We’re able to store food and keep it
fresh in our homes. We’re not washing all
of our clothing by hand. We have the ability to keep our homes warm in the winter
and cool in the summer.
Each night at bedtime, my children share
what they are thankful for that day. My
youngest son always has a humorous element to his “thankfuls” – “Today I am
thankful for dogs, snow, and … spaghetti!”
My oldest son is 10, and he’s such a
thoughtful, reverent young man. Not a
night goes by in which he does not say he
is thankful for our home. As houses go,
ours might be considered “average” or
unremarkable – there are hundreds of onelevel ranches like it in our town. To him, it
is our castle.
I am grateful. And yes, I am wealthy.
JILL CATALDO is a coupon workshop instructor, writer and mother of three.
B2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Chicago’s
painful night:
Rose, Kane out
with injuries
SPORTS
www.thesheridanpress.com
CHICAGO (AP) — First, Blackhawks star Patrick
Kane went crashing into the boards. Then the Bulls
announced Derrick Rose was headed for another
knee surgery.
And just like that, Chicago’s cold winter had taken
another chilly turn.
The Windy City lost two of its biggest sports stars
Tuesday night when Kane left the Blackhawks’ 3-2
shootout victory over Florida with an upper-body
injury, and the Bulls said Rose had a medial meniscus tear in his right knee. It was a pair of crunching
blows in a matter of minutes for two of the city’s
most successful teams in recent years.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2015
“You can’t replace Kaner. He’s a special talent,
somebody who’s really irreplaceable,” Blackhawks
forward Kris Versteeg said. “It’s going to have to be
by committee. Guys are going to have to step up and
find ways to get the job done.”
That likely will be the same message in the coming
days for the Bulls, who have plenty of experience
when it comes to playing without Rose. The 2011 NBA
MVP appeared in only 10 games last season before he
had surgery for the same injury in November 2013,
shelving him the rest of the way.
The Bulls said a timetable for his return this time
will be determined after the operation.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Preparing for state competitions
Presley Felker practices Tuesday afternoon at the Sheridan Junior High School pool. The Broncs swim team will compete at the state meet in Gillette Thursday and Friday.
Busch crash
leading to
additional
barriers
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) —
International Speedway
Corp. is developing a plan
for the installation of additional SAFER barriers at
Daytona and Talladega, and
will review the safety standards at its other racetracks.
The renewed focus
announced Tuesday by ISC
President John Saunders
comes three days after
NASCAR star Kyle Busch
broke his right leg and left
foot in a crash into a concrete wall at Daytona
International Speedway.
Busch left a Daytona
Beach, Florida, hospital on
Tuesday and was transferred to another facility in
North Carolina for further
treatment.
Busch was injured
Saturday in the seasonopening Xfinity Series race
when his car hit an interior
wall that did not have a
Steel and Foam Energy
Reduction barrier.
After his accident,
Daytona president Joie
Chitwood III vowed to cover
every inch of the speedway
with SAFER barriers.
SEE BARRIER, PAGE B3
18 months in prison for chemist in steroids case
MIAMI (AP) — A chemist working out of his suburban South Florida garage was sentenced
Wednesday to 18 months in prison for supplying
banned performance-enhancing substances to a
clinic whose customers included professional baseball players such as New York Yankees star Alex
Rodriguez.
Paulo Berejuk had hoped for probation and home
confinement after pleading guilty in December to
conspiracy to distribute testosterone. But U.S.
District Judge Cecilia M. Altonaga agreed with
prosecutors that Berejuk’s role in the case was too
vital and his cooperation with investigators too
limited to warrant such a sentencing break.
“I cannot in good faith sentence Mr. Berejuk to
probation,” Altonaga said at a hearing. “This
involved a serious crime. I have to consider deterrence to others.”
Investigators said Berejuk was the key drug
Signing day for a
Big Horn athlete
Big Horn's Mason Lube, seated, officially committed to continue his football career at the University of St.
Thomas (Minnesota) next season.
Lube recorded 99 tackles and a sack
last season and was an all-state selection. Mason is pictured with, back row
from left, father Matt Lube, mother
Leslie Lube and brother Max Lube.
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
source for Anthony Bosch, who ran the now-closed
Biogenesis of America clinic in Coral Gables that
sold steroids to baseball players and other athletes,
some only in high school. Berejuk admitted in
court documents that between 2007 and 2013 he supplied up to 10,000 units of steroids to Bosch and
others for as much as $20,000 a month.
“This defendant is one of the most important people in the conspiracy,” said Assistant U.S. Attorney
Sharad Motiani.
The doping scandal resulted in suspensions last
year for 14 professional baseball players and criminal convictions for Bosch and others. Rodriguez,
who got the stiffest Major League Baseball suspension at a full season, recently apologized to Yankee
fans in a written statement and previously admitted in interviews with U.S. Drug Enforcement
Administration agents that he used Bosch-supplied
steroids.
Long live the
court storm
A
fter Kansas State
defeated Kansas on
Monday, the mass of
Kansas State students
in the bleachers left their
seats and made their way to
the court at Bramlage
Coliseum. It was a party, a celebration after defeating the
eighth-ranked team in the
country and the crosstown
rival.
But there was something
wrong with Monday’s court
storming.
Kansas State upset Kansas
on that same floor a year
ago. They stormed the
court.
Before
that, fans
rushed the
court after
Kansas
State’s victory over
Kansas in
2011.
MIKE
Just a
PRUDEN
night later,
|
Maryland
fans, albeit
much more
casually, rushed the floor
after “upsetting” Wisconsin.
Despite Wisconsin’s No. 5
ranking, Maryland is
ranked 14. Was it even an
upset?
Now the court storm is
back in the limelight for all
the wrong reasons.
Here are my proposed
rules of the court storm:
1. If you are a ranked
team, you can’t rush the
court. Maryland, congrats
on the win. Big win.
Wisconsin is one of the
toughest teams in the country. But you’re second in the
Big Ten, and you were playing on your home floor.
Impressive, yes, but not surprising.
2. If you beat the opponent
within the last three years,
stay in your seats. Your win
is less impressive when you
just beat the same team a
year ago. The win, and the
storm, lose their appeal if
you do it all the time.
There are some exceptions
to these rules, though.
1. You’re unranked, and
you beat the No. 1 team in
the country. I don’t care if
you’ve already rushed the
court six times this year.
When you take down
Kentucky, get your butt on
that hardwood. Immediately.
High five everyone. Cry. It’s
awesome. Just ask Christian
Watford.
2. The win earns your
team something significant.
Conference title, undefeated
season, whatever, it
deserves a celebration.
3. You’re a significant
underdog and you win on a
buzzer beater. Buzzer beaters are equally as awesome
as court storming, so when
you get the chance to combine them, take full advantage. You’re probably
already out of your seat
spilling beer all over your
buddies. You might as well
take it to the court.
4. Establish yourself as a
student section with zero
rules. You’re a bunch of
heathens that doesn’t care
about anything. Outlaws.
This one is the favorite of
Grantland journalist Mark
Titus. He suggests rushing
the court if your team is
winning at halftime. Rush
the court after EVERY. SINGLE. WIN. It’s like a WWE
match that makes its way
backstage. No count outs, no
mercy.
Now that we have these
rules in place, there are no
excuses.
The court storm shall live
on forever.
MIKE PRUDEN is the sports editor at The
Sheridan Press.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B3
BARRIER: One of the many initiatives that came about after Earnhardt’s death
FROM B2
Daytona is owned by ISC, the
sister company of NASCAR.
Saunders said ISC is “developing a significant plan” for more
impact-absorbing technologies
that will not be limited to SAFER
barriers for Daytona and
Talladega.
ISC will also immediately
review Phoenix International
Raceway and Auto Club Speedway
in Fontana, California, as both
tracks host NASCAR races in
March.
“We will utilize all available
tools to ensure the safety of the
drivers and our fans. It will
remain our top priority,”
Saunders said in a statement. “ISC
is working very closely with
NASCAR and industry experts to
identify areas for additional safety
protections.”
SAFER barriers were one of the
many safety initiatives that came
about after Dale Earnhardt’s
death in 2001 in an accident on the
last lap of the Daytona 500.
The soft walls were developed by
Dr. Dean Sicking at the University
of Nebraska, and although they
debuted in 2002 at Indianapolis
Motor Speedway, they are currently installed in some form at every
track used by NASCAR’s top
series.
The barriers, a combination of
steel and foam, cost about $500 a
foot. But, the cost has proven
worth it as the walls absorb the
energy during impact and have
repeatedly lessened injuries sustained to a driver.
Still, they have not been placed
everywhere around the racetracks. Tracks only install SAFER
barriers where NASCAR recommends to them they should be
placed. NASCAR, meanwhile,
cites evaluations of high-impact
areas in deciding where the material should be placed.
There have been numerous hard
hits over the years in areas that
were not protected with SAFER
barrier, and it often has been rectified by the time the series
returns. In 2013, Denny Hamlin
hit an unprotected section of wall
in Fontana, California, that
caused a fractured vertebra.
NASCAR had Auto Club
Speedway install SAFER barrier
where Hamlin hit before the
series returned last year. Las
Vegas Motor Speedway did the
Utah at Denver, 9 p.m.
San Antonio at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Milwaukee at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
Washington at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Colorado at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
No. 1 UConn vs. Memphis, 2 p.m.
No. 3 Baylor at Iowa State, 4 p.m.
No. 7 Oregon State vs. California, 6 p.m.
No. 14 Princeton vs. Brown, 6 p.m.
No. 18 Chattanooga vs. ETSU, 2 p.m.
No. 21 Florida Gulf Coast vs. Jacksonville, 7 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
No. 2 South Carolina at No. 13 Kentucky, 5 p.m.
No. 4 Notre Dame at N.C. State, 2 p.m.
No. 5 Maryland at No. 25 Northwestern, 1 p.m.
No. 6 Tennessee vs. Vanderbilt, 5 p.m.
No. 8 Louisville at Virginia, 1 p.m.
No. 9 Florida State at Miami, 3 p.m.
No. 10 Arizona State vs. Colorado, 4 p.m.
No. 11 Mississippi State vs. Mississippi, 2 p.m.
No. 12 Texas A&M at LSU, 2 p.m.
No. 15 North Carolina at No. 16 Duke, 3 p.m.
No. 17 Iowa vs. Minnesota, 3 p.m.
No. 19 Stanford at Oregon, 4 p.m.
No. 20 Rutgers vs. Indiana, Noon
No. 22 George Wash. vs. George Mason, 2 p.m.
same following a hard Jeff
Gordon hit in 2008.
Reigning Sprint Cup champion
Kevin Harvick hit the same wall
Busch did in last year’s Daytona
500, and was critical of the lack of
SAFER barrier immediately following his own accident. He was
pleased that Daytona was reacting
after Busch’s injury, but felt it was
a bit late.
“The racetracks have to be
proactive and they have to look
ahead of an accident,” Harvick
said. “We know what fixes these
walls, and that’s to put a wall in
front of them.”
SCOREBOARD |
NBA |
National Basketball Association
By The Associated Press
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Toronto
37
20
.649
—
Brooklyn
23
31
.426
12½
Boston
21
33
.389
14½
Philadelphia
12
44
.214
24½
New York
10
45
.182
26
Southeast Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Atlanta
44
12
.786
—
Washington
33
24
.579
11½
Miami
24
31
.436
19½
Charlotte
22
32
.407
21
Orlando
19
39
.328
26
Central Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Chicago
36
21
.632
—
Cleveland
36
22
.621
½
Milwaukee
31
25
.554
4½
Detroit
23
34
.404
13
Indiana
23
34
.404
13
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Memphis
41
14
.745
—
Houston
38
18
.679
3½
Dallas
39
20
.661
4
San Antonio
34
22
.607
7½
New Orleans 29
27
.518
12½
Northwest Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Portland
36
19
.655
—
Oklahoma City 32
25
.561
5
Utah
21
34
.382
15
Denver
20
36
.357
16½
Minnesota
12
43
.218
24
Pacific Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Golden State 44
10
.815
—
L.A. Clippers 37
20
.649
8½
Phoenix
29
28
.509
16½
Sacramento
19
35
.352
25
L.A. Lakers
14
41
.255
30½
___
Tuesday’s Games
Golden State 114, Washington 107
Cleveland 102, Detroit 93
Oklahoma City 105, Indiana 92
Dallas 99, Toronto 92
Wednesday’s Games
Miami at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
New York at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Brooklyn at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Charlotte at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Washington at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Houston, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Denver, 9 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Utah, 9 p.m.
Memphis at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
San Antonio at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
Golden State at Cleveland, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.
Friday’s Games
Washington at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Orlando at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Golden State at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.
New York at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Brooklyn at Houston, 8 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Memphis, 8 p.m.
NHL |
National Hockey League
By The Associated Press
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP
W
L
Montreal
60
39
16
Tampa Bay
62
37
19
Detroit
59
33
15
Boston
60
29
22
Florida
60
26
21
Ottawa
57
24
23
Toronto
60
24
31
Buffalo
61
18
38
Metropolitan Division
GP
W
L
N.Y. Islanders 62
40
20
N.Y. Rangers 59
37
16
Pittsburgh
60
34
17
Washington
61
33
18
Philadelphia
61
26
24
New Jersey
60
25
26
Columbus
59
26
29
Carolina
59
22
30
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP
W
L
Nashville
61
41
13
St. Louis
60
38
18
Chicago
61
36
20
Winnipeg
62
31
20
Minnesota
60
31
22
Dallas
61
27
25
Colorado
61
26
24
Pacific Division
GP
W
L
Anaheim
61
38
16
Vancouver
60
35
22
Los Angeles 59
29
18
Calgary
60
32
24
San Jose
61
30
23
Arizona
61
20
34
Edmonton
62
18
34
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point
loss.
Tuesday’s Games
Chicago 3, Florida 2, SO
Vancouver 2, Boston 1
N.Y. Islanders 5, Arizona 1
N.Y. Rangers 1, Calgary 0
Carolina 4, Philadelphia 1
Buffalo 4, Columbus 2
Montreal 5, St. Louis 2
Nashville 5, Colorado 2
Edmonton 2, Minnesota 1
Winnipeg 4, Dallas 2
Los Angeles 1, Detroit 0
Wednesday’s Games
Calgary at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Washington, 8 p.m.
Ottawa at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
Vancouver at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Arizona at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Nashville, 8:30 p.m.
Ottawa at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Detroit at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Friday’s Games
Boston at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Calgary at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
NCAA MEN’S BASKETBALL |
OT
5
6
11
9
13
10
5
5
Pts
83
80
77
67
65
58
53
41
OT
2
6
9
10
11
9
4
7
Pts
82
80
77
76
63
59
56
51
OT
7
4
5
11
7
9
11
Pts
89
80
77
73
69
63
63
OT Pts
7 83
3 73
12 70
4 68
8 68
7 47
10 46
for overtime
Top 25 College Basketball Schedule
By The Associated Press
All Times EST
Wednesday’s Games
No. 1 Kentucky at Mississippi State, 7 p.m.
No. 2 Virginia at Wake Forest, 7 p.m.
No. 4 Duke at Virginia Tech, 9 p.m.
No. 10 Northern Iowa vs. Evansville, 9 p.m.
No. 11 Wichita State at Indiana State, 7:05 p.m.
No. 12 Iowa State vs. No. 19 Baylor, 9 p.m.
No. 22 VCU at Richmond, 7 p.m.
No. 23 Butler vs. Marquette, 8 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
No. 3 Gonzaga vs. San Diego, 11 p.m.
No. 7 Arizona at Colorado, 9 p.m.
No. 13 Utah vs. Arizona State, 10:30 p.m.
No. 21 SMU at Memphis, 9 p.m.
Friday’s Games
No games scheduled
Saturday’s Games
No. 1 Kentucky vs. No. 18 Arkansas, 4 p.m.
No. 2 Virginia vs. Virginia Tech, 4 p.m.
No. 3 Gonzaga vs. BYU, 10 p.m.
No. 4 Duke vs. Syracuse, 7 p.m.
No. 6 Villanova at Xavier, 2 p.m.
No. 7 Arizona at No. 13 Utah, 9 p.m.
No. 8 Kansas vs. Texas, 5 p.m.
No. 10 Northern Iowa at No. 11 Wichita State, 2
p.m.
No. 12 Iowa State at Kansas State, 4 p.m.
No. 14 Maryland vs. Michigan, Noon
No. 15 North Carolina at Miami, 2 p.m.
No. 16 Oklahoma vs. TCU, 2 p.m.
No. 17 Louisville at Florida State, Noon
No. 19 Baylor vs. No. 20 West Virginia, 4 p.m.
No. 22 VCU vs. Dayton, 2 p.m.
No. 23 Butler at DePaul, 2 p.m.
No. 24 San Diego State vs. Boise State, 8 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
No. 5 Wisconsin vs. Michigan State, 4 p.m.
No. 21 SMU at UConn, 2 p.m.
No. 25 Providence vs. Marquette, 3:30 p.m.
NCAA WOMEN’S BASKETBALL |
Women’s Top 25 Basketball Schedule
By The Associated Press
All Times EST
Wednesday’s Games
No. 3 Baylor at Oklahoma, 8 p.m.
No. 21 Florida Gulf Coast at North Florida, 7 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
No. 2 South Carolina vs. No. 11 Mississippi State, 7
p.m.
No. 4 Notre Dame vs. Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
No. 5 Maryland vs. Indiana, 7 p.m.
No. 6 Tennessee at Georgia, 9 p.m.
No. 7 Oregon State vs. No. 19 Stanford, 9 p.m.
No. 8 Louisville vs. Boston College, 7 p.m.
No. 9 Florida State vs. N.C. State, 7 p.m.
No. 12 Texas A&M vs. Missouri, 8 p.m.
No. 13 Kentucky at Arkansas, 8 p.m.
No. 15 North Carolina vs. Virginia, 7 p.m.
No. 16 Duke at Georgia Tech, 7 p.m.
No. 17 Iowa vs. Wisconsin, 8 p.m.
No. 20 Rutgers at No. 25 Northwestern, 8 p.m.
No. 22 George Washington at Richmond, 7 p.m.
No. 23 Syracuse at Clemson, 7 p.m.
No. 24 California at Oregon, 9 p.m.
Friday’s Games
No. 10 Arizona State vs. Utah, 8:30 p.m.
No. 14 Princeton vs. Yale, 7 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
consultant and Kevin Youkilis scouting and player
development consultant and Daniel Carte, Kevin
Ellis, Greg Hopkins and Alex Levitt area scouts.
Promoted Tim Adkins to midwest/northeast crosschecker and Trey Forkerway to central crosschecker, Terry Kennedy to major league scout and Jason
Parks professional/amateur scout.
American Association
JOPLIN BLASTERS — Signed OF Oscar Mesa.
KANSAS CITY T-BONES — Signed OF Kyle
Robinson.
LAREDO LEMURS — Released RHP Caleb
Graham.
SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS — Traded LHP Lars
Liguori to Lincoln to complete an earlier trade.
Atlantic League
SUGAR LAND SKEETERS — Signed C-1B Travis
Scott, LHP Daniel Meadows and LHP Cory
VanAllen.
Can-Am League
QUEBEC CAPITALES — Released LHP Tom
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A few laps before Gillette
Zach Ahlstrom practices the back stroke Tuesday afternoon at the Sheridan
Junior High School pool. The Broncs swim team will compete at the state meet
in Gillette Thursday and Friday.
TRANSACTIONS |
Tuesday’s Sports Transactions
By The Associated Press
BASEBALL
American League
DETROIT TIGERS — Agreed to terms with RHP
Joba Chamberlain on a one-year contract.
Designated RHP Chad Smith for assignment.
TEXAS RANGERS — Claimed LHP Edgar Olmos
from Seattle off waivers. Placed INF Jurickson
Profar on the 60-day DL.
National League
CHICAGO CUBS — Named Josh Lifrak directormental skills program, Rey Fuentes Latin coordinator-mental skills program, Dr. Ken Ravizza consultant-mental skills program, Manny Ramirez hitting
Vessella.
Frontier League
GATEWAY GRIZZLIES — Signed RHP Alex
Boshers.
LAKE ERIE CRUSHERS — Signed RHP Zach
Gordon to a contract extension. Signed RHP
Brandon Jackson.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
CLEVELAND CAVALIERS — Signed C Kendrick
Perkins.
LOS ANGELES CLIPPERS — Signed F Jordan
Hamilton to a 10-day contract.
PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Claimed F Thomas
Robinson off waivers. Released G Tim Frazier from
his second 10-day contract.
UTAH JAZZ — Signed F Jack Cooley to a 10-day
contract.
B4
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BABY BLUES® by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman
COMICS
www.thesheridanpress.com
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2015
DRS. OZ & ROIZEN
Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen
MARY WORTH by Karen Moy and Joe Giella
BORN LOSER® by Art and Chip Sansom
When the Golden State
Warriors' Klay Thompson
scored a record-breaking 37
points in one quarter, no one
watching the game thought,
"Geez, maybe he shouldn't
take those shots."
But that sentiment seems
more widespread than ever
before when it comes to vaccinations, and that's a shame.
If parents were as eager to
have their kids take shots to
prevent measles as fans are
to watch Thompson sink his
shots, we wouldn't be experiencing an outbreak that
threatens to reverse the declaration, made just 15 years
ago, that "measles has been
eradicated in the U.S."
Since the Disneyland
measles outbreak started
with 42 cases, the problem
has continued to spread.
(California's unvaccinated
rate is 13 percent; Ghana's is
11 percent.) Unfortunately,
people have listened to faulty
info about vaccinations causing harm and NOT to just
how dangerous measles are
to those who are unvaccinated, especially infants who
don't get the first measles
vaccine until they're 12-15
months old. (Expanded recommendations: Kids 6
months to 12 months heading
abroad should get the vaccine.)
But now a 12-year study
shows that the measles vaccine, as part of measlesmumps-rubella-varicella
(MMRV) vaccine or separately administered as part of
MMR + V vaccines, has
greater benefits than risk,
even for children 12 months
to 23 months. Although
researchers found that 1 in
1,000 1-year-olds could experience febrile seizures a week
or so after getting the shot,
getting these shots is more
likely to prevent a serious
problem than cause one by
more than 4,000 to 1. You
should only be so lucky in
Las Vegas. Just get the shots.
Mehmet Oz, M.D. is host of
"The Dr. Oz Show," and Mike
Roizen, M.D. is Chief
Wellness Officer and Chair of
Wellness Institute at
Cleveland Clinic. To live your
healthiest, tune into "The Dr.
Oz Show" or visit www.sharecare.com.
DEAR ABBY
Pauline Phillips and Jeanne Phillips
GARFIELD by Jim Davis
FRANK & ERNEST® by Bob Thaves
REX MORGAN, M.D. by Woody Wilson and Tony DiPreta
ZITS® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
DILBERT by S. Adams
ALLEY OOP® by Dave Graue and Jack Bender
DEAR ABBY: I'm in my 40s
and my boyfriend of three
years is 12 years older. We are
in love and our relationship
is great. He travels for work
and lives in another state, so
he flies in to see my daughter
and me every other week.
Because he is older, he uses
Viagra, and it's kept at my
place in a drawer. I assumed
that's where it was always
kept.
Abby, when he left for his
trip yesterday, he took his
Viagra with him! He says he
grabbed the bottle without
thinking and that I'm overreacting. The rest of his things
are kept in his travel bag, so
it's not like he just gathered
up all of his pills. They were
the only ones. Now he's upset
with me because "I don't trust
him."
Can you help me get my
thinking straight? I caught
him lying about something
when we first started dating,
so he's not all squeaky clean
like he acts. -- SUSPICIOUS
IN VIRGINIA
DEAR SUSPICIOUS: Unless
your boyfriend was prescribed the Viagra for a condition other than ED, I'd say
you have a right to be suspicious. Because his little blue
pills were kept apart from his
other medications, it took
special effort for him to pack
them. Talk with him further
because he may have been
contemplating a "party of
one" during his travels and
not have been looking for
adventure.
DEAR ABBY: I'm in the
middle of a situation that I'm
not sure how to deal with. My
mother's husband made a
pass at my boyfriend. My
boyfriend thinks I should tell
her.
Abby, my mother and her
husband are in their 70s, and
I don't want to cause problems in their marriage. I'd
like to write it off as a "misunderstanding," but my stepdad has a history of doing
things like this. -- ANONYMOUS IN OREGON
DEAR ANONYMOUS: If
your boyfriend didn't already,
he should tell your stepfather
the pass was unwelcome and
he doesn't want it to happen
again. If it does, you and
your boyfriend should talk to
your mother about it and
explain why she'll be seeing
less of you unless she visits
you -- alone. Because this
isn't the first time your stepfather has acted inappropriately, it won't be news to her.
And because she has tolerated his behavior in the past, I
doubt it will cause problems
between them now.
DEAR ABBY: My husband's
family gave us a large painting that is not our taste at all.
We would love to get rid of it,
but of course we feel obligated to keep it and hang it in
order to not hurt their feelings.
They live nearby and visit
often, so putting the painting
away doesn't seem realistic.
We live in a small apartment
and there is nowhere "discreet" to hang it. Plus, it is
too large to take to our
offices.
Other than staging a robbery, are there any options
that would keep everyone
happy? -- GRINNING &
BEARING IT
DEAR GRINNING:
Another option would be to
level with your in-laws. Tell
them you are grateful for
their generosity, but the artwork is not your taste, and
then ask if they would mind
if you exchanged it.
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips.
Contact Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
CLASSIFIEDS
Phone: (307) 672-2431
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2015
Fax: (307) 672-7950
www.thesheridanpress.com
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THE SHERIDAN PRESS
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B5
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Email : [email protected]
Wednesday ............................................................Tuesday 2:30 PM
Visit : 144 Grinnell Street, Downtown Sheridan
Thursday........................................................... Wednesday 2:30 PM
Mail : P.O. Box 2006, Sheridan, WY, 82801
Friday...................................................................... Thursday 2:30 PM
Include name, address, phone, dates to run and payment
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We reserve the right to reject, edit or reclassify any advertisement accepted by us for publication. When placing an ad in person or on the phone, we will read all ads back to you for
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Phone: (307) 672-2431 Fax: (307) 672-7950
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Hot Tub, Sauna, Pool
CONNIE GOODWIN
674-9050
Stop by the Sheridan
Press for your
free tickets to
Centennial Theatres
For Lease
Rail Road Land
& Cattle Co.
Buildings
for lease, Shop
space,
Warehouse
space, Retail
space, &
office space.
673-5555
Furnished Apts for Rent
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
NEWER 2 BR.
$950/mo Water/heat
paid.
1000 SF. 818 E. 7th St.
752-7704
RANCHESTER
STUDIO apt.,
$450/mo.+ heat & dep.,
util. pd. No smk. Pets?
Laundry rm. incl.
751-4060
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
3 BR/2 Ba. Nice
neighborhood.
Ref's
req'd. $800/mo + $800
dep. 307-351-4856.
3 BR/ 2 Ba. $1000/mo +
util. $1000 dep. No
smoking/pets. New
paint & carpet. Call
674-7155.
NEWLY RENOVATED
1BR cottage in
Sheridan. No smk/pets.
W/D hookups. $700/mo.
$500 dep. Call
655-9753.
Duplexes, Unfurn. for
Rent
HUGE 1 BR/1 Ba in Big
Horn. Carport.
$800/mo. All util. incl.
No smkg/
no pets. 307-751-7718.
LGE 2 BR/1 Ba in Big
Horn. $750/mo. W/S/G
& lawn care provided.
W/D Hookups. 1 dog
allowed. 307-751-7718.
1 BR. No smk/pets.
$650 + elec. Coin-Op
W/D. 307-674-5838.
1 UPSTAIRS BR in
house near Kendrick
Park. No smk/pets
$400/mo. + elec. & dep.
Call Phil 307-286-7015.
1BR. NO smk/pets.
Mobile Hm. Space for
$575 + elec + dep.
Rent
Coin-Op W/D.
MT. VIEW Estates,
307-674-5838.
811 Ponderosa
ROCKTRIM. $600 / mo.
accomodates double or
Wi-Fi/Cable. 763-2960.
single $265/mo
WKLY
FR
$210.
excludes utilities.
Monthly
fr
$630.
307-672-2658
Americas Best Value
RV SPACE, Big Horn.
Inn. 672-9757.
By day, month or year.
Unfurnished Apts for
674-7718.
Rent
COZY 2BR. Off street
parking. Washer/Dryer.
Oak Hardwood floors.
$600 + Dep + Elec. No
smkg/pets. Lease/ref's.
Call for appt. 752-4735.
TONGUE RIVER
APARTMENTS
901 W. Halbert • Ranchester, WY
655-9470 • TDD#711
Taking Applications for 2 bedroom
Apartments. Coin-op Laundry
facility, play area, Rental
assistance depending on eligibility
and availability. This institution is
an equal opportunity provider
and employer.
Equal Housing Opportunity
www.bosleymanagementinc.com
Broadway Apts.
2 bdrm, 1 bath
townhouse
Available in
Dayton, WY.
Rent based on
income.
Please call
307-751-1752 or
1-888-387-7368
Toll-Free for application
Equal Housing
Opportunity
3 BR/2 Ba town home.
Single car garage. All
appliances incl. W/D.
$950/mo + util. Call:
Grimshaw Investments
307-672-2810.
2 BR. 463 Coffeen
Ave. $650/mo.
Water/heat paid.
752-7704.
Hay, Grain, Feed
Help Wanted
HAY FOR SALE. 15001600 lb. bales.
Alfalfa & grass mixture.
Call 306-267-5711
or 306-267-4548.
Storage Space
CIELO STORAGE
752-3904
DOWNER ADDITION
STORAGE 674-1792
INTERSTATE
STORAGE. Multiple
Sizes avail.
No deposit req'd.
752-6111.
E L D O R A D O
STORAGE Helping you
conquer space. 3856
Coffeen. 672-7297.
CALL BAYHORSE
STORAGE 1005 4th
Ave. E. 752-9114.
WOODLANDPARK
STORAGE.COM
5211 Coffeen
Call 674-7355
New Spaces
Available!
$300/MO. 30' x 30'
room.
10'
ceiling.
Dock. Overhead door.
307-256-6170.
$150/MO. 13' x 31'
room. Dock. Overhead
door. 307-256-6170.
Child Care
ENERGETIC
AND
OUTGOING
NANNY
needed for 3 children
(ages 5, 5 & 8) for
8hr/day M-F for months
of June, July & Aug.
Previous exp. needed
w/references.
Must
have own transportation
w/valid DL. CPR cert
preferred. Must pass
background check. $10$12hr depending on
exp. Send reply to Box
225, c/o The Sheridan
Wanted to Rent
Press, PO Box 2006,
OLDER COUPLE w/ Sheridan, WY 82801.
housebroke 18 yr old
Work Wanted
cat, looking to rent 2-3
PAINTING,
BR/2 Ba & 2 car HOUSE
garage, or pole barn. general labor, cleaning
Ground
floor
W/D & cleanup. New Ref's.
hooks. Excellent ref's. 683-7814 (cell).
Help Wanted
Current lease expire
April 30, 2015. Would R E W A R D I N G
like to be outside city of EMPLOYMENT awaits
Sheridan, but not too you at Emeritus at
far. Leave msg 307- Sugarland
Ridge,
655-5481 or write to: Retirement
and
Rental Needed P.O. Assisted Living! We are
Box 6103, Sheridan, currently looking for
WY 82801
motivated,
loving
Office Space for Rent
associates to join our
Housekeeping
and
FOR LEASE:
Dining Services team.
2,630 SF of new,
executive, ground level Housekeeping position
is part time Mondaysoffice space, just two
blocks from South Main Fridays and the Dining
Services position is full
Street, Sheridan,
Wyoming on the corner time evenings. So what
are you waiting for,
of Loucks and Scott
come see us to fill out
Street. Includes
an application at 1551
reception area, large
Sugarland Drive. EOE.
conference room, six
separate offices, and
NOW TAKING
private entrance, with
applications for Line
shared break room,
cooks, Servers w/ exp.
restrooms, and tech
& Host/ hostesses.
room. Air conditioned
Morning & eve. shifts
and HC accessible.
avail. Apply in person at
Office furnishings are
1373 Coffeen Ave or
optional. Off street
online at www.
employee and visitor
pleaseapplyonline.com/
parking. $3,200 a
sugarlandenterprises.
month, utilities and
FT POSITION.
custodial included.
For more info
Contact Maria Laursen,
www.landscapingservic
TSP, Inc.:
esinc.com
(307) 672-6496
Subscribe online today!
YMCA
EVENING/OVERNIGHT CUSTODIAL
POSITION
Sheridan County
YMCA has part or fulltime opening for teamoriented
janitorial/housekeepin
g staff person. Must
have eye for detail
and experience with
floor waxing and
cleaning. Shift is late
evening/overnight.
Applications available
at YMCA Front Desk.
QDOBA NOW HIRING
cooks & line servers.
Flexible scheduling.
Great Pay. DOE.
References.
Positive upbeat attitude.
Apply in person
2112 Coffeen Ave.
SCSD #1 has the
following extra duty
positions available.
*BHHS
Volleyball
Head Coach
*TRHS
Volleyball
Head Coach
Please complete the
extra-duty application
(found
on
district
website) and return it
to Brandi Miller b m i l l e r @
sheridan.k12.wy.us
If you have position
specific
questions
please
call
the
perspective
HS
Principal.
www.sheridan.k12.wy.
us. Positions are open
until filled. E.O.E.
Help Wanted
Subscribe online today!
***$1,000***
SIGN-ON BONUS
Immediate Opening
Blue Rhino Driver
Blue
Rhino,
a
nationwide leader in
the propane industry,
is looking for a Full
Time
Driver
in
Sheridan, WY.
Requirements:
• 1+ year driving
experience
• Class A CDL w/
Hazmat & Tanker
Endorsements
• At least 21 yrs of age
• Ability to meet DOT
requirements
• Ability to lift up to
75 lbs.
www.thesheridanpress.com
Questions, call
303-289-9126
Apply online at:
www.ferrellgas.com
EOE/AAP/TMP/D/V
RODEWAY INN &
Suites is looking for
front desk &
housekeepers.
Apply in person at
1704 N. Main,
Sheridan.
www.thesheridanpress.com
BARTENDER
WANTED at the Mtn
Inn Bar. Part time
starting out. Great
wages & flexible
hours. 751-5175
Now Hiring
Maintenance
Cocktail
Server
*Wage DOE
Apply in person at the
Front Desk.
1809 SUGARLAND DRIVE
SHERIDAN, WY
IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS Housekeeping.
Experience
preferred. Top
wages. Apply in
person at Motel 6 &
Hampton Inn.
TRUCK DRIVER
WANTED
Looking for an
experienced Truck
Driver for loading and
unloading farm
equipment. Must have
a CDL. Qualified
candidate send resume
to Ed DeTavernier
Service Manager
[email protected]
pment.com or stop in at
Sheridan County
Implement 2945 West
5th Street Sheridan
JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).
Rating: BRONZE
Solution to 2/25/15
© 2015 Janric Enterprises Dist. by creators.com
Household Goods
FOR SALE: **Vintage
Tin Turtle Top Trunk
19"Wx34"Lx24"H. $120.
**Rowing Machine
Nordic Row TBX by
Nordictrack w/ Total
Body Workout Monitor.
$60.
752-5064 - Leave msg.
2/26/15
CLASSIFIEDS
B6 THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Help Wanted
IS SEEKING laborers,
carpenters and
carpenter helpers for
temporary summer
employment from May
to September. Must
be 18 yrs of age.
Possibility of
permanent
employment with
benefits based on
performance. Apply at
1866 South Sheridan
Avenue or online at
www.
fletcherconstruction
.com. No phone calls
please. EOE.
BUSY HEALTHCARE
OFFICE in need of
EXPERIENCED
MANAGER. Salary w/
benefits. Send reply to
Box 226, c/o The
Sheridan Press, PO
Box 2006, Sheridan,
WY 82801.
PICKLES
TOWN OF Ranchester
is hiring seasonal, P/T
position (4/15-10/15) @
Ranchester Information
Center. Mon-Sat (3
days wk per employee
TBD,
9am-3pm.
General knowledge of
local & state history
including
State
of
Wyoming historical sites
& locations; ability to
give accurate directions
&
offer
recommendations
on
points of interest or
traveling
needs.
Potential candidates will
communicate a positive
experience
to
all
travelers & visitors.
Some light cleaning.
Contact
Ranchester
Town Hall, P.O. Box
695, Ranchester, WY
82839 or call 307-6552283 for app and/or
additional job duties
info. Closing March 10,
2015.
NON SEQUITUR
Hints from Heloise
Dear
Heloise: A
number of
years ago, I
purchased
a good
amount of
food,
canned
goods, etc.
(a stockpile
in case of an emergency). A review indicates that many have
a "use by" date that has EXPIRED. Should I throw these in
the dump, or can they be safely
used by some organization? -R.B. McArdle, Hot Springs,
Ark.
It all depends on how long beyond the expiration date, storage conditions and the type of
food. I defer to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the source
on this one.
Indicator 1: If the cans (meats
and vegetables) have no dents,
no bulging or are not leaking,
it's a "go" to use or donate in
two to five years' time.
Indicator 2: If they have been
stored safely away in a cool,
dry place (NOT a damp basement or hot or freezing garage),
then it's a "go."
Heloise
Indicator 3: High-acid foods,
like tomatoes or pineapple,
have a much shorter shelf life
of 12-18 months. These are a
maybe/maybe not.
-- Heloise
GRABBING FILTERS
Dear Heloise: I always love
the hints I get from your column. I had a problem separating stacked coffee filters when
making coffee. I attempted to
retrieve one while my finger
was wet from another duty.
The filter popped right out with
a slight pinch upward. Now I
moisten my finger before
reaching for the filters. It
makes the procedure so much
easier. -- Scottie in Little Rock,
Ark.
Hey, Scottie, a simple hint
can make the morning go well.
Do say "hi" to my friends in
your city! I enjoyed my visit
and a stop at the newspaper
when I last gave a speech there.
-- Heloise
Dear Heloise: Wintertime is
soup and stew time. My freezer
space is at a premium. I had an
"aha" moment when it occurred
to me to add only some of the
required liquid, making a "condensed soup" for storage. I then
add the rest of the liquid when
reheating. Some things seem so
obvious after I figure them out!
-- M.B., Mount Vernon, Va.
The best hints come during
those unexpected -- as you say,
"aha" -- moments! Don't you just
love soup? It's easy to make, is
low-cost and such a comfort
food during the cold months. I
wrote my Heloise's Spectacular
Soups pamphlet to share favorite family and friends'
recipes. To order one, please
send $5 and a long, self-addressed, stamped (70 cents) envelope to: Heloise/Soups, P.O.
Box 795001, San Antonio, TX
78279-5001. When cooking soup,
add less salt than normal and
let individuals salt their portion. You taste less sodium in
hot foods than cold. Also, use
up the last of a bag of pretzels
for a crunchy topping. -Heloise
MEASURING-SPOON DUTY
Dear Heloise: I bought a new
set of measuring spoons. I decided to keep using the old set. I
keep one spoon in my sugar
bowl, one in my baking-soda
container, one in my coffee canister, etc. -- Ashley M., Springfield, Mo.
Help Wanted
NOW HIRING CNA's.
Call Bruce at
307-674-4416.
FULL TIME C.N.A.s$500 Sign On Bonus
Day shift (6a-2p) and
Evening shift (2p-10p),
C.N.A.spositions
available immediately.
Our full time team
members
enjoy
employment
which
offers
access
to
medical, dental, vision
insurance, paid time off,
flexible
scheduling,
c o m p u t e r i z e d
continuing
education
system,
opportunities
for
growth
and
advancement, as well
as, a warm, family-like
atmosphere. $500 Sign
on Bonus! If you are
energetic, caring and
enjoy giving excellent
care to seniors, then we
want you to join our
family. Apply in person
at
1551
Sugarland
Ridge.
EXPLORE A CAREER
in a NAEYC accredited
early childcare center!
First Light Children's
Center
desires
dependable, nurturing,
and
energetic
individuals to join our
team. Seeking an infant
teacher as well as part
and full time toddler
positions. Please review
our website for more
information, download
an application and drop
off at First Light.
Positions to be filled by
March 6, 2015 to
support
our
spring
semester
growth!
http://www.
firstlightsheridan.com/
employment.html
Help Wanted
Autos-Accessories
EXPERIENCED
ROOFING installers
wanted. U.A. required.
P.D.O.E. Call for
interview:
307-672-7643.
NEED EXTRA
CASH? PRIME RATE
MOTORS will buy
your clean vehicle.
Stop by 2305 Coffeen
to get an appraisal or
call 674-6677.
Help Wanted, Medical
RNs, LPNs & CNAs
Join our staff for a
rewarding career in
our busy skilled
nursing care facility.
Sign-on bonuses and
relocation
reimbursement may
apply for some
positions. For
immediate
consideration,
apply online at
cchwyo.org/careers.
Human Resources
Campbell County
Health, P.O. Box 3011
Gillette, WY 82717
307.688.1501 or
307.688.1504
E.O.E.
Autos-Accessories
1989 JEEP
CHEROKEE. $1500.
105K miles. 672-7628.
Bridge
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Remember to appreciate your friends and most
devoted partners, but at the
same time try to stand on
your own two feet. Taking
the good will of others for
granted may put you in a
poor position.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Sometimes you're challenged by a choice that's a
case of feast or famine. By
making it your priority to
not give up, no matter the
cost, you may be able to arrive at a very satisfying
compromise.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Don't say anything you
aren't willing to have circulated in public. Keep your
pennies in your pocket, as
you're likely to waste them.
A good friend might put
things in proper perspective.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You're in wholehearted
agreement with a special
someone. You may need to
break with tradition in
order to move on to bigger
and better things. Changes
that are for the best will
benefit everyone.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Wear your heart on your
sleeve. Even the appearance
of a lack of trust could undermine even the best partnerships. A little
understanding and sensitivity can keep love shining
brightly.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Buying expensive things
might make you feel better
or let you show off your success, but may waste re-
HARD TO FIND 2008
Chrysler Aspen. Fully
Loaded.
Excellent
Condition. 1 owner.
71,000 miles. Asking
$17,000 FIRM. Call
307-461-3464.
Real Estate
DRIVE BY 1301 Pine
Dr.
&
enjoy
the
spectacular view! Pick
up flyer at front door to
see pictures & floor plan
of this COZY 2BR/2Ba
Patio Home w/ 2 car
garage. Home Owner's
Association incl. snow
removal & yard work.
$235,000. Ideal for
seniors. 307-752-2399.
Phillip Alder
Rex Stout,
the creator of
Nero Wolfe,
said, "To
read of a detective's daring finesse or
ingenious stratagem is a
rare joy."
A bridge player
should not be taking daring finesses. However, to
watch an expert's ingenious stratagem is a rare
joy.
Before we get to
the play of today's deal,
though, what should
South bid after West
opens one diamond,
North makes a takeout
double, and East passes?
Next, plan
South's stratagem in
four spades after West
cashes his two top diamonds and shifts to a
heart.
In the auction, if
South bids one spade, it
shows 0-8 points; if he
jumps to two spades, it
indicates 9-11 points.
With more than that, he
starts with a two-dia-
mond cue-bid. The auction continues two
hearts - two spades - four
spades - pass.
South can afford
one trump loser, but not
two. Strangely, the best
play is the same even if
East and West have
passed throughout.
Here, West is marked
with the spade
king from his
opening bid. So
first playing low
to the queen cannot be right. The
second-best play
is low to the 10,
planning, if it
loses to the jack,
to cash the ace
next. But even
better is immediately to cash the
ace. When the
king comes
down, South can
gain an overtrick by finessing East out of
his spade jack.
In isolation against
passing oppo-
Omarr’s Daily Astrological
Forecast
BIRTHDAY GAL: Actress
Erinn Bartlett was born in
Longmeadow, Mass., in this
day in 1973. This birthday
gal has had roles in such
movies as "The Benchwarmers," "Pumpkin" and
"Shallow Hal." More recently, she's appeared on
episodes of "Rules Of Engagement," "NCIS" and
"How I Met Your Mother."
Bartlett has been married to
actor Oliver Hudson since
2006 and is the daughter-inlaw of actress Goldie Hawn.
ARIES (March 21-April
19): You may be circumspect about relationships,
and there's an air of the formal business interview in
every encounter. Test the
waters before jumping in
headfirst and use your
diplomatic skills.
PRIME RATE
MOTORS is buying
clean, preowned
vehicles of all ages.
We also install B&W
GN hitches, 5th Wheel
Hitches, Pickup
Flatbeds, Krogman
Bale Beds. Stop by
2305 Coffeen Ave. or
call 674-6677.
nents, if the ace dropped
the jack, South would
continue with the queen
to drive out the king. Or,
if the ace collected only
the four and nine, declarer would cross to the
dummy with a club and
lead a spade toward his
queen-10. He would have
no guesswork.
Jeraldine Saunders
sources. Under these celestial conditions, someone
could offer to sell you the
Brooklyn Bridge.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Climb every mountain.
You can surmount all obstacles. Just remember that
sometimes it's lonely at the
top. Where ambitions are
concerned, you're a winner,
but social sensitivity could
be lacking.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): If conversations
seem to center on your appearance, don't worry that
other people are picking
you apart. Maybe you simply need a new outfit or a
fabulous haircut to lift your
spirits.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Your guardian angel
will keep you out of harm's
way where love and money
are concerned. Use common
sense; don't get swept away
by sudden whims and passions that might not last.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Make an effort to make
yourself known. Network
with a congenial circle of
important friends and add
luster to your reputation.
You can overcome minor
setbacks by trying something different.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Give an inch to gain a
mile. Minor arguments or
disagreements can have a
happy ending if you work
hard to cooperate. Those in
authority might be unyielding if push comes to shove.
IF FEBRUARY 26 IS
YOUR BIRTHDAY: You
may find your groove dur-
ing the next 6-8 weeks.
You're more sensitive to
your surroundings and can
find ways to improve your
health, as well as your outlook. Get your finances, career, or business into apple
pie order in March while
you're more perceptive
about the material world.
With your popularity at an
all-time high in April, it's
easy to make new friends.
You're more romantic than
usual in July, but don't just
settle for the first person or
thing that shows up. October could bring a major opportunity for advancement.
Buckle down to pursue your
ambitions in November,
and if you meet your obligations head on you'll be rewarded.
YOUR ELECTED
OFFICIALS |
CITY
John Heath
Mayor
307-675-4223
Public Notices
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
WHY PUBLIC NOTICES ARE IMPORTANT |
Kristin Kelly
Councilor
307-673-4751
Shelleen
Smith
Councilor
307-461-7082
Thayer
Shafer
Councilor
307-674-4118
Alex Lee
Councilor
307-752-8804
Jesus Rios
Councilor
307-461-9565
Kelly Gooch
Councilor
307-752-7137
COUNTY
Pete Carroll
Treasurer
307-674-2520
Eda
Thompson
Clerk
307-674-2500
Nickie Arney
Clerk of District
Court
307-674-2960
John Fenn
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
Shelley
Cundiff
Sheridan
County Circut
Court Judge
307-674-2940
William
Edelman
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
P.J. Kane
Coroner
307-673-5837
Mike
Nickel
Chairman
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Terry
Cram
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Tom
Ringley
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Steve
Maier
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Public notices allow citizens to monitor their government and make sure that it is
working in their best interest. Independent newspapers assist in this cause by
carrying out their partnership with the people’s right to know through public
notices. By offering an independent and archived record of public notices,
newspapers foster a more trusting relationship between government and its
citizens.
Newspapers have the experience and expertise in publishing public notices and
have done so since the Revolutionary War. Today, they remain an established,
trustworthy and neutral source that ably transfers information between
government and the people.
Public notices are the lasting record of how the public’s resources are used and are
presented in the most efficient and effective means possible.
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed proposals will be received by the City of
Sheridan, Wyoming, at the office of the City Clerk until
2:00 PM Mountain Daylight Savings Time, March 6,
2015 for furnishing the following equipment:
ONE(1)New Ten Man Recycling Sorting Station.
ONE(1)New 90 Degree Feed Conveyor. ONE(1)New 90 Degree Transfer Conveyor. One(1)New Cross-Belt Magnet, in
accordance with specifications and bid documents on
file at the City Service Center, 1148 KROE Lane, Sheridan
Wyoming 82801.
At a meeting on the above date and promptly
thereafter, all written proposals that have been duly
received will be opened and publicly read.
All proposals must be submitted in sealed opaque
envelopes and clearly marked as per item bid.
Delivery dates listed in Bid Documents.
The City of Sheridan reserves the right to reject any and
all bids and to waive all informalities or minor defects in
the bids, to accept or reject any qualified or conditional
bid, and to accept any item or combination of items in
bid.
Preference shall be given to responsible Wyoming
bidders as
defined by Wyoming Statutes, 1990, Section 16-6-102 in
the amount
of five percent (5%) higher than responsible nonresident bidders.
CITY OF SHERIDAN
/s/ Nicholas Bateson
Nicholas Bateson, Public Works
Publish: February 25, March 5, 2015.
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed proposals will be received by the City of
Sheridan, Wyoming, at the office of the City Clerk until
2:00 PM Mountain Daylight Savings Time, March 6,
2015 for furnishing the following equipment:
ONE(1)New 2015 or Current Production Automated Two-Arm side Loading Refuse Collection Vehicle,
in accordance with specifications and bid documents on
file at the City Service Center, 1148 KROE Lane, Sheridan
Wyoming 82801.
At a meeting on the above date and promptly
thereafter, all written proposals that have been duly
received will be opened and publicly read.
All proposals must be submitted in sealed opaque
envelopes and clearly marked as per item bid.
Delivery dates listed in Bid Documents.
The City of Sheridan reserves the right to reject any and
all bids and to waive all informalities or minor defects in
the bids, to accept or reject any qualified or conditional
bid, and to accept any item or combination of items in
bid.
Preference shall be given to responsible Wyoming
bidders as
defined by Wyoming Statutes, 1990, Section 16-6-102 in
the amount
of five percent (5%) higher than responsible nonresident bidders.
CITY OF SHERIDAN
/s/ Nicholas Bateson
Nicolas Bateson, Public Works
Publish: February 25, March 5, 2015.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
GLOSSARY OF TERMS |
Default: Failure to fulfill an obligation, especially the obligation to
make payments when due to a lender.
Encumbrance: A right attached to the property of another that may
lessen its value, such as a lien, mortgage, or easement.
Foreclosure: The legal process of terminating an owner’s interest in
property, usually as the result of a default under a mortgage.
Foreclosure may be accomplished by order of a court or by the
statutory process known as foreclosure by advertisement (also
known as a power of sale foreclosure).
Lien: A legal claim asserted against the property of another, usually
as security for a debt or obligation.
Mortgage: A lien granted by the owner of property to provide
security for a debt or obligation.
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed proposals will be received by the City of
Sheridan, Wyoming, at the office of the City Clerk until
2:00 PM Mountain Daylight Savings Time, March 6,
2015 for furnishing the following equipment:
New, 96 Gallon Residential Recycle Carts, in accordance
with specifications and bid documents on file at the City
Service Center, 1148 KROE Lane, Sheridan Wyoming
82801.
At a meeting on the above date and promptly
thereafter, all written proposals that have been duly
received will be opened and publicly read.
All proposals must be submitted in sealed opaque
envelopes and clearly marked as per item bid.
Delivery dates listed in Bid Documents.
The City of Sheridan reserves the right to reject any and
all bids and to waive all informalities or minor defects in
the bids, to accept or reject any qualified or conditional
bid, and to accept any item or combination of items in
bid.
Preference shall be given to responsible Wyoming
bidders as
defined by Wyoming Statutes, 1990, Section 16-6-102 in
the amount
of five percent (5%) higher than responsible nonresident bidders.
CITY OF SHERIDAN
/s/ Nicholas Bateson
Nicholas Bateson, Public Works
Publish: February 25, March 5, 2015.
Public Notice of Applications for New Retail Liquor
License
Notice is hereby given that Lou's LLC dba Lou's, at 201
Broadway Street, dispensing rooms 24' X 72' Room NW
Corner 1st Floor and 16' X 27' Room Center SE Side of
Bldg 1st Floor, Good 2 Go Stores LLC dba Good 2 Go
Store #18, at 1229 Brundage Ave, dispensing room 3000
SQ FT Room Entire NE Side of Bldg, Powder River Pizza
Co, Inc dba Powder River Pizza Co, at 803 N Main St,
dispensing room 36' X 24' Room SW Corner of Bldg, El
Tapatio Dos, LLC dba El Tapatio Dos at 1125 North Main
St, dispensing room 4' X 5' Room NE Corner Main Floor,
David Harbor dba TBD at 331 Broadway St, dispensing
room 1900 SQ FT Room Entire Basement , Warehouse
Market Inc at 1062 Brundage Lane dba Killy's
Smokehouse Deli, dispensing room 1020 SQ FT Room E
Side of Bldg, Derek Gilbert dba TBD, no physical address
or dispensing room at present, have filed an application
for New Retail Liquor License #21, effective in the office
of the Clerk of the City of Sheridan and protests, if any
there be, against the issuance of the New Retail Liquor
License #21 to one of the above applicants, will be
heard at the hour of 7:00 P.M., on the March 16, 2015,in
the City Hall Council Chambers, 3rd Floor, 55 Grinnell
Plaza, Sheridan, WY 82801.
Dated this 20th day of February, 2015.
/s/Brenda KWilliams ,
Brenda K Williams, Deputy City Clerk
Publish: February 25, March 4, 2015
Notice of Publication
You are hereby notified that a petition has
been filed on behalf of Millard Cyril Rosselott, Jr. in the
Power of Sale: A clause commonly written into a mortgage
authorizing the mortgagee to advertise and sell the property in the
event of default. The process is governed by statute, but is not
supervised by any court.
Probate: The court procedure in which a decedent’s liabilities are
settled and her assets are distributed to her heirs.
Public Notice: Notice given to the public or persons affected
regarding certain types of legal proceedings, usually by publishing
in a newspaper of general circulation. This notice is usually
required in matters that concern the public.
Disclaimer: The foregoing terms and definitions are provided merely as a guide to the
reader and are not offered as authoritative definitions of legal terms.
District Court in and for Sheridan County, Wyoming, Civil
Action No. CV2015-38, the object and prayer of which is
to change the name of the above-named person from
Millard Cyril Rosselott, Jr. to MC Rosselott.
Any objection must be filed in the District
Court, 224 S. Main, Suite B-11, Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
in writing , on or before April 6th, 2015 or the prayer of
the Petitioner shall be granted.
DATED this 5 day of February, 2015.
BY:/s/ Lela F. Chapman
Deputy Clerk
Publish: February 11, 18, 25, and March 4, 2015.
Your Right
To Know
and be informed of
government legal
proceedings is
embodied in public
notices. This
newspaper urges
every
citizen to read and
study these
notices.
We strongly advise
those seeking
further information
to exercise their
right of access to
public records and
public meetings.
LEGAL NOTICE POLICY
The Sheridan Press publishes Legal
Notices under the following schedule:
If we receive the Legal Notice by:
Monday Noon –
It will be published in
Thursday’s paper.
Tuesday Noon –
It will be published in
Friday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Saturday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Monday’s paper.
Thursday Noon –
It will be published in
Tuesday’s paper.
Friday Noon –
It will be published in
Wednesday’s paper.
• Complete information, descriptions
and billing information are required
with each legal notice. A PDF is
required if there are any signatures,
with a Word Document attached.
• Failure to include this information
WILL cause delay in publication. All
legal notices must be paid in full
an
"AFFIDAVIT
OF
before
PUBLICATION" will be issued.
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Dave
Hofmeier
Sheriff
307-672-3455
Bob
Rolston
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Paul
Fall
Assessor
307-674-2535
Matt
Redle
County
Attorney
307-674-2580
STATE
Matt
Mead
Governor
307-777-7434
Rosie
Berger
Representative
House Dist. 51
307-672-7600
Mark
Jennings
Representative
House Dist. 30
307-461-0697
John
Patton
Representative
House Dist. 29
307-672-2776
Mike
Madden
Representative
House Dist. 40
307-684-9356
Dave
Kinskey
Senator
Senate Dist. 22
307-461-4297
307-278-6030
Bruce
Burns
Senator
Senate Dist. 21
307-672-6491
B7
This photo is labeled "3 on
donkeys" and with no identification of the people. Note
the elk horns loaded on back
of the middle horse. Both
women are pictured riding
side-saddle and wearing long
dresses. The photo is from
the Campbell collection in
the Sheridan County
Museum's Memory Book
collection.
B8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2015