SOCIAL WORK IN THE CITY

NASW-NYC is a NY State Approved Provider of
Continuing Education for Licensed Social Workers
Earn 6 CEUs at This Conference
SOCIAL WORK IN THE CITY
Dreams and Realities of Life in New York
Wednesday, April 8, 2015
8:00AM to 5:30PM
BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center
199 Chambers Street, NYC
National Trends and Policies Influencing
Communities in New York City
Afternoon Plenary
Featured Guest Speaker
Charles Blow, New York Times OP-Ed Columnist
Charles Blow’s columns focus on national developments in the areas of poverty, inequality, racism,
immigration, and domestic violence. In his recent book, Fire Shut Up In My Bones, he shares his
compelling personal story of growing up in the South and struggling with bullying and sexual
identity.
The Social Determinants of Health
Morning Plenary
Mindy Fullilove, MD
Mindy Thompson Fullilove, MD, is a research psychiatrist at New York State Psychiatric Institute and
a professor of clinical psychiatry and public health at Columbia University. Dr. Fullilove’s research
focuses on the health problems caused by inequity. She is the author of Root Shock: Tearing Up City
Neighborhoods Hurts America, and What We Can Do About It.
National Association of Social Workers New York City Chapter Continuing Education Conference
Conference Objectives
• To launch an inaugural conference for the social work profession in NYC.
• To enable licensed social workers to obtain continuing education credits while sharing in a
collective
experience with a large gathering of colleagues, peers and leaders in the field.
• To provide opportunities to enhance the capacity of social workers to serve the residents of
New York City through relevant and important educational offerings.
• To address trends and policies that are shaping our work, that inform practice for today’s demands, and that draw out the implications for clients and communities, using a social justice
and racial equity lens.
Important Information about the Conference
1.In order to provide 6 CEUs for the conference, we must start on time. It is essential that
everyone arrive by 8 AM to help us expedite registration and move everyone along as quickly
as possible.
2.You must bring photo identification to enter the premises.
3.You will be given a name tag with a bar code which will allow you to be scanned into the
breakout sessions. Scanning will allow us to track attendance and to prepare your certificate for
CEUs, reflecting what
you attended.
4.To comply with the state’s stringent regulations, if you arrive late or leave any session before it
is over, you may not receive credit for that session.
5.Certificates will be available several days after the conference and you will be notified by
email.
6.Lunch will be on your own. A listing of the many restaurants and take out places will be provided when you arrive.
2
National Association of Social Workers New York City Chapter Continuing Education Conference
Conference Schedule
8:00 AM
Registration
9:00 AM to 9:15 AM Welcome:
Sandy Bernabei, LCSW
President, NASW-NYC
9:15 AM to 10:45 AM Plenary Session (1.5 CEUs)
The Social Determinants of Health
Mindy Fullilove, MD
10:45 AM to 11:10 AM
Exhibitor Booth and Networking
11:15 AM to 12:45 PM
Morning Workshop, as selected
12:45 PM to 2:00PM
Lunch/Break (on your own)
2:00 PM to 3:30 PM Afternoon Workshop, as selected
3:30 PM to 3:45 PM Exhibitor Booth and Networking
4:00 PM to 5:30 PM Featured Plenary Session
(1.5 CEUs)
(1.5 CEUs)
(1.5 CEUs)
National Trends and Policies Influencing
Communities in New York City
Charles Blow
Total CEUs
(6.0 CEUs)
3
National Association of Social Workers New York City Chapter Continuing Education Conference
Plenaries and Workshops at-a-Glance
Morning Plenary
9:15 a.m - 10:45 a.m
Afternoon Plenary
4:00 p.m - 5:30 p.m
The Social Determinants of Health with
Mindy Fullilove, MD
National Trends and Policies Influencing
Communities in New York City with
Charles M. Blow
Morning Workshops
11:15 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
Afternoon Workshops
2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
1. Social Work and Mass Incarceration
2.
The Role of the Supervisor in a Changing
Service Delivery Environment
3.
Immigrants in New York City – Criminalization, Practice and Advocacy
4.
Tools for Social Workers: The Community Loss
Index and the Racial Equity Analysis for
Undoing Racism
5.
Behavioral Health Integration and
Health Homes
1. When Trauma Doesn’t Stop: Adapting Trauma
Therapies for Clients in Chronically Stressful
Environments
2. Reflective Supervision Across Race, Diversity,
& Intersectionality
3. The Transition to Medicaid Managed Care
for Behavioral Health in New York
4. Trends in Child Welfare: Implications for Policy
and Practice
5. Adolescents: Mental Health, Primary Care,
and Positive Youth Development
6. Current Issues in Health Care Social Work
7.
6. Getting Unstuck: Techniques to Navigate
Therapeutic Impasses & Client Resistance
The Use of Functional Family Therapy in Child
Welfare Practice
7. Beyond Words: Using Sand Tray Therapy
with Traumatized Children
8. Retooling Mental Health Models for Racial
Relevance
8. Hospital to Home and End of Life Decision Making
9. Perspectives, Trends and Issues in Aging
9. Focus on Fathers: Misconceptions about
African American and Minority Fathers
10. Culturally Competent Counseling and
Wellness Practices for Survivors of Domestic
Violence, Trafficking and Sexual Assault
11. Transgender Issues and Social Work Practice
10. Positive Psychology and Strenght-Based Experiental Group Techniquies for People with
Intellectual Disabilities
12. What do we do with all this Data? The Role of
Data in Program and Clinical Decision-Making
11. Translating Best HIV Prevention Interventions
into Action in an Era of Biomedicalization
12. Ethics and Risk Management in the New Era
of Social Work
4
National Association
Social Workers
New
ork CC
ity
Chapter E
Cducation
ontinuingCE
ducation Conference
National of
Association
of Social
WY
orkers
ontinuing
onference
Morning Plenary 9:15 a.m. ― 10:45 a.m.
The Social Determinants of Health
Presenter: Mindy Fullilove, MD
The purpose of this workshop is to examine links between the environment and mental health. The workshop will address
research health epidemics, while examining the close link between health and place of residence. Under the rubric of the
psychology of place, Dr. Fullilove will examine the mental health effects of such environmental processes as violence,
rebuilding, segregation, urban renewal, and mismanaged toxins.
Morning Workshops 11:15 a.m. ― 12:45 p.m. (Select One)
1. Social Work and Mass Incarceration
3. Immigrants in New York City – Criminalization,
Practice and Advocacy
Presenters: Nick Malinowski, LMSW,
Kassandra Frederique, MSW, Cameron Rasmussen, MSW
This presentation will examine social work’s connection to incarceration in the US. The perspective will be presented that, historically, social workers have participated in cultural work that
has racialized criminality. This connection has often put social
workers in conflict with the Code of Ethics and larger notions of
Human Rights as they work within a system of punishment that
is increasingly understood in terms of brutality, racism, exploitation and unfairness. The profession’s emphasis on working with
individuals has limited its ability to integrate social and political
concerns, allowing social paradigms – such as racialized mass
incarceration – to go unchallenged. An understanding of the impact of mass incarceration and related policies on communities
of color will be presented, and a case study will be presented on
the group Social Workers Against Mass Incarceration to draw
out how organized advocacy can address these critical issues.
2. The Role of the Supervisor in a Changing
Service Delivery Environment
Presenters: Alicia Fry, LMSW, Alexis Cibrano, LMSW,
Frances C. Brennan, LCSW, Mary Hume, LCSW,
Hanon Simhon,
In today’s service delivery environment, there is a decreased emphasis on supervision and an increased focus on “results”. Given
developments in funding, contracting and other requirements of
service provision, supervisors and agency administrators must be
results oriented. Supervision, to a well-trained supervisor, is providing guidance at the moment in a crisis, ongoing assessment of
the supervisee’s needs, with the long-range goal of having the supervisee integrate knowledge and skills for autonomous practice.
However, even the most seasoned practitioner (including supervisors) needs ongoing consultation to be effective, especially in
today’s environment. This workshop will share the experiences
of new and experienced practitioners who have been trained in
supervision, focusing on the tools for supervising and how they
can be utilized in challenging agency based work.
5
* This breakout consists of two workshops. You must stay for both
workshops to receive CEU credit.
A. The Criminalization of Immigrants: The Social Work
Role in Removal Defense Proceedings
Presenters: Maria-Monica Andia Escalante, BSW, Sarah Knight,
MSW, Brittany Larson, MSW
In recent years deportations have been occurring at unprecedented numbers, in large part due to increased cooperation
between local law enforcement agencies and Immigration and
Customs Enforcement and to the increasing criminalization
of immigrants. This workshop will present an overview of the
relationship between the Criminal Justice and Immigration systems and the consequences of this relationship for communities.
Given that our ethics as social workers call us to recognize the
dignity and worth of every person, to understand the person
in their environment, and to work at both micro and macro
levels to address injustices that have disproportionate effects on
oppressed communities, this workshop will provide social workers with an understanding of the legal issues facing immigrants,
will show them how they can become participants in the legal
representation of immigrants and empower them to be a part of
positive systemic change.
B. Using the Culturagram to Engage, Understand, and Plan
Interventions for Immigrants
Presenter: Elaine Congress, DSW, LCSW
As the number and diversity of immigrants in the United States
have increased rapidly in the last decade and will continue to
grow in the years ahead (Hispanic Research Center, 2014), it
is especially timely that social workers increase their knowledge
and skills in working with immigrants. This workshop will include three main parts, first an overview of immigration trends in
the United States and the need for cultural competent practice,
second a discussion of the culturagram and how to apply this
family assessment tool in work with culturally diverse families,
and thirdly a case example that illustrates its use.
National Association of Social Workers New York City Chapter Continuing Education Conference
Morning Workshops 11:15 a.m. ― 12:45 p.m.
4. Tools for Social Workers: The Community
Loss Index and the Racial Equity Analysis for
Undoing Racism
oped to address integration. The social policy goals of integrating health and behavioral health care will be clarified, and will
focus on how a health care team approaches and treats typical
patient problems.
Presenters: Mimi Abramovitz, DSW,
Kimberley Richards, EdD, Joyce James, LMSW-AP
6. Current Issues in Health Care Social Work
Social workers know that poor neighborhoods suffer many social problems, but it is harder to explain why. Some link the
concentration of problems to local resident’s behaviors, while
others point to poverty but often cannot explain why poverty
yields negative outcomes. The Community Loss Index (CLI) is
part of a larger study that “unpacks poverty” by exploring the hypothesis that stress acts as a pathway between adverse conditions
such as community loss and the local concentration of social
problems. The CLI consists of 6 losses: incarceration, foster care
placement, sudden death, long-term hospitalization, job loss
& foreclosure. This workshop will provide tools to help social
workers work with impoverished clients and will highlight variations in the loss experience and the racial composition within
and among these high poverty neighborhoods. The CLI and the
racial equity analysis will provide social workers with tools to
“unpack” poverty and advance racial equity, including strategies
for positive social change
Presenters: Tom Sedgwick, LCSW, ACSW, CCM ,
Marta Victoria Colon, LMSW, Kimberly Garrett, LCSW,
Christine Hamilton, PhD, LCSW, MPH
This workshop will focus on current issues impacting the provision of health care social work services. The presenters will
review how the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care
Act has transformed the way health care is delivered. A review
of care coordination efforts and the role of social work in Accountable Care Organizations will be provided as background.
Initiatives to reduce readmissions will be reviewed along with
implicit consequences of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ Readmissions Reduction Program on underserved
ethnic and racial minority communities. Successful outcomes
from a social work-lead emergency department demonstration
project to reduce unnecessary acute care admissions of older
adults will be reviewed as a best practice.
7. The Use of Functional Family Therapy in Child
Welfare Practice
5. Behavioral Health Integration and Health
Homes
Presenter: Folusho Otuyelu, PhD, LCSW
* This breakout consists of two workshops. You must stay for both
workshops to receive CEU credit.
A. The Impact of Health Reform and the Health Homes
Model on Clients with Substance Use and Co-Occurring
Disorders
Presenter: Joy Demos LMSW, CASAC-T
As health homes become a mechanism for organizing behavioral
health services, this workshop will take an exploratory approach
to understanding the impact that Health Home Care Coordination has had on a community of members living with Substance
Use Disorders and Co-occurring Medical and Mental Health
Disorders. The workshop will enable social workers to understand how Health Homes serve a high risk, high cost Medicaid
population with the goal of improving clinical outcomes and
reducing preventable hospitalizations and ER visits. The role of
the social work will be clarified.
This workshop will describe Functional Family Therapy (FFT),
how it works and when it can be used. FFT is an evidence-based
model that has documented effectiveness with the treatment of
violent, criminal, behavioral, school, and conduct problems. Requirements for implementation will be reviewed, including clinical assessment, intervention skills and the need to be comfortable
working in the family’s natural environment. There will be a focus
on the intersection of issues in child welfare and mental health
that often put children at risk of placement. Key issues relating
to domestic violence, substance use, truancy, trauma, child abuse
and neglect, and mental health will be included.
8. Retooling Mental Health Models for Racial
Relevance
Presenters: Gail K. Golden, LCSW, Ed.D,
Eva Hernandez-Goley, LMSW, Vanessa Green
With increasing understanding about the impact of racism on
B. Behavioral Health Integration and Models for Practice
our clients’ and our own lives, this workshop looks at models
of treatment with a new lens. Generally, treatment models were
Presenters: Charlotte Elkin, LCSW, Jennifer Benetato, LMSW designed by people who are white for people who are white,
without consideration of the experience of race and racism on
Given the growth of integrated primary care practices and the the lives of people in need of mental health services or the asrole for social workers, this workshop will introduce the “what, sumptions about race and racism that the practitioner brings to
why and how” of integration using an integrated medical home the therapeutic encounter. This workshop will explore: if and
in NYC as an example. Efforts to unify medical and mental how Western methods of psychotherapy incorporate the experihealth care will be presented, along with the models being devel- ences of other cultures and races, how attendees can rethink the
6
National Association of Social Workers New York City Chapter Continuing Education Conference
Morning Workshop 11:15 a.m. ― 12:45 p.m.
way they work, and consider questions that a clinician needs to
ask oneself in order to ensure that daily assaults, whether overt
or subtle, against people of color are being perpetuated in their
offices.
9. Perspectives, Trends and Issues in Aging
Presenter: Agnes K. Halarewicz, LMSW
The first of the Baby Boomers earned Medicare eligibility by
turning 65 in 2011. By 2030, the older adult population in the
US is expected to be at approximately 72 million, and in New
York City, at about 1.3 million, a 35% increase since 2010. This
workshop will focus on global and NYC trends and will address
the unique challenges facing the older adult population, including poverty, decreasing health status, discrimination, isolation
(up to 28% live alone) and elder abuse. It will also address the
challenges faced by caregivers, social service and healthcare organizations as well as city, state and federal systems. Attention
will also be given to the diversity of the aging population and
what the practitioner needs to understand to be effective with
different groups.
10. Culturally Competent Counseling and
Wellness Practices for Survivors of Domestic
Violence, Trafficking and Sexual Assault
Presenters: Larry Lee, DCSW, LMSW,
Yasmeen Hamza, LMSW, Aditi Bhattacharya, LMSW,
Alena Victor, LMSW
This workshop will discuss an evidenced based model of practice provided to survivors of domestic violence, human trafficking and sexual assault – to adult women, children, and older
adults. The experience of the New York Asian Women’s Center (NYAWC) will be presented, and although the services are
Asian-centric, the model is applicable to individuals of all races
and ethnicities needing counseling, especially people who are
poor and immigrants. The model of practice includes Asian
culture-based counseling plus a series of wellness practices including acupuncture, trauma sensitive yoga, meditation and tai
chi exercise, called Qi Gung. The counseling relationship under
this model, called MAP (Moving Ahead Positively), has more
flexible boundaries than with traditional counseling. The model
can be provided in a wide-range of settings including mental
health clinics, child welfare programs, health and hospital facilities, etc.
11. Transgender Issues and Social Work Practice
* This breakout consists of two workshops. You must stay for the
entire breakout to receive CEU credit
A. Social Work with Gender Non-conforming and SelfIdentify Transgender Youth
Presenter: Joyce Hunter, DSW, LMSW
7
Many lesbian and bisexual female adolescents are dealing with
and expressing gender role non-conformity. While there is an
increasing number who identify as transgender, it is important
to know what this self-identification means to them and the
resulting issues these youth are facing. Transgender, an umbrella term, defines a broad range of gender identity experiences
and challenges the boundaries of sex and gender. Youth who
self- identify as gender non-conforming and transgender face
complex issues in coping with their own self-concept relating to
gender, while dealing with other aspects of their personal identity development and sexual orientation, essential to their healthy
growth and development
B. Overcoming Barriers to Emergency Domestic Violence
Shelters for Transgender Survivors of Intimate Partner
Violence
Presenters: Carla Smith, Ed.D,
Catherine Shugrue dos Santos, MSW
Emergency domestic violence shelters are considered a life-saving tool in the arsenal of resources against intimate partner
violence. Despite the availability of shelters in the state of
New York, transgender identified survivors face barriers that
affect their ability and willingness to engage with mainstream
domestic violence shelters. This presentation will provide an
overview of study findings related to the above identified problem from the perspective of transgender identified survivors of
intimate partner violence. The presentation will also present
promising practices in providing safe spaces for transgender and
gender non-conforming survivors of intimate partner violence
in domestic violence shelter.
12. What do we do with all this Data? The Role of
Data in Program and Clinical Decision-Making
Presenters: Micaela Mercado, Ph.D, Priya Gopalan, LMSW
The purpose of this workshop program is to provide foundational knowledge on data collection through program evaluation and it’s applications to clinical practice and program decision-making. Program directors and clinicians will learn to apply
a framework for using data to inform program implementation
and practice. Example case studies will be used to illustrate the
relevance of data, and examine how to use data in day-to-day
program delivery.
National Association of Social Workers New York City Chapter Continuing Education Conference
Afternoon Workshops 2:00 p.m. ― 3:30 p.m. (Select one)
1. When Trauma Doesn’t Stop: Adapting Trauma
Therapies for Clients in Chronically Stressful
Environments
prepare for this transition, will clarify how the transition to managed care fits in with other initiatives and the broader changing
health care landscape.
Presenters: Janelle Stanley, LMSW, Sarah Strole, LMSW
4. Trends in Child Welfare: Implications for Policy
and Practice
Presenters: James Purcell, MA, Meredith Lafave, LMSW
The first part of this workshop will focus on the most current
trauma informed interventions being implemented in New
York State, including implications of the Adverse Childhood
Experiences study. The focus will also include the neuroscience
of trauma and how this impacts development, and what the
current practices and programs are. Part two will address new
developments in policy, including 1) finance reform, 2) requirements for the State Registry to provide a family’s history of prior
calls and 3) the need for ACS to produce information regarding
youth aging out of care. The presenter will address what these
policies will mean for agencies and individual social workers.
The meaning of data trends for children, families, agencies and
social workers will be included.
Evidence-based trauma therapies assume a basic establishment
of safety before working to resolve trauma symptoms. When
clients continue to live in unsafe environments, however, trauma
therapy can be ineffective or harmful. This workshop will explore best practices for work with clients residing in chronically
stressful and traumatic environments. An overview of trauma
and PTSD symptoms will be reviewed, the differences between
acute and chronic trauma, along with major theories and practices. The limitations of current modalities for clients living
in chronically traumatizing and/or stressful environments will
be reviewed, including adaptations of the models. Approaches
will be drawn from evidence-based trauma practices and the
harm-reduction framework common in addiction counseling.
The presenters will explore how social workers can work with
these clients, strengthening existing coping skills, and enhancing
client resilience.
2. Reflective Supervision Across Race,
Diversity, & Intersectionality
Presenter: Candida Brooks-Harrison, LCSW
Reflective Supervision Across Race, Diversity, and Intersectionality is an approach for increasing the understanding and efficacy of
social work and supervision in working with diverse populations.
This process begins with one’s professional self in order to deepen
and expand reflective processes and self assessment as they relate
to positive client outcomes. Through structured and experiential
discussion and activities, participants will become more reflective
and will develop a practice lens that takes into consideration the
understanding of race and diversity. Beyond this, there will be
a focus on the concept of “intersectionality” in which a client,
family, group or community can be understood along multiple dimensions, including race and diversity as well as issues of poverty,
gender, sexual identity, disabilities, religion, immigration status,
etc. How the supervisor can help the supervisee incorporate these
dimensions into practice will be the key to the workshop.
3. The Transition to Medicaid Managed Care for
Behavioral Health in New York
Presenters: Andrew Cleek, PsyD, Daniel Ferris, MPA.,
Meaghan Baier, LMSW, Peter Campanelli, PsyD,
Anthony Salerno, PhD
As New York State transitions into Medicaid managed care in
early 2015, it is essential that social workers be well prepared
for the changes taking place within their settings and be aware
of the implementation dimensions of this shift to a new model
of funding services. The workshop will include a review of integrated healthcare models, the impact on provider organizations
and development of program models within various settings.
The presenters, widely recognized experts in helping providers
8
5. Adolescents: Mental Health, Primary Care,
and Positive Youth Development
* This breakout consists of two workshops. You must stay for
both workshops to receive CEU credit.
A. Providing Mental Health Care to At-Risk Adolescents in
a Primary Care Setting
Presenters: Catherine Calhoun, LCSW,
Matthew Oransky, PhD
This workshop will focus on successful efforts in integrating
mental and behavioral health services into the primary care
setting at Mount Sinai Adolescent Health Center (MSAHC).
The presenters will review the clinic model that emphasizes close
collaboration between medical and mental health providers and
how it is used to serve traditionally underserved, high-risk, and
often traumatized adolescents who are difficult to engage due to
numerous psychosocial stressors and histories of marginalization
(dually diagnosed adolescents, homeless and undocumented
youth, LGBT youth of color, and commercially sexually exploited youth). Included will be clinical tools used to engage and
facilitate change. Current research and clinical literature that
support the use of behavioral and primary health care integration will be reviewed.
B. Positive Youth Development: An Approach in Step-Up
Presenters: Priya Gopalan, LMSW, Kelly Conover, LMSW ,
Kassia Ringell, LMSW, Christian Villatoro, LMSW
Step-Up is a program model that can be used by social workers
National Association
Social Workers
New
ork CC
ity
Chapter E
Cducation
ontinuingCE
ducation Conference
National of
Association
of Social
WY
orkers
ontinuing
onference
Afternoon Workshops 2:00 p.m. ― 3:30 p.m.
that focuses on “positive youth development” (PYD), a strengths
based approach effective for youth development and providing
support for high school students experiencing academic and
social-emotional challenges. Interventions cut across multiple
domains to address social emotional development, academic
achievement and on-time high school graduation of students
from poverty impacted communities. Step-Up uses strategies to
facilitate groups and one-to-one mentoring to help youth overcome challenges. PYD theory will be reviewed, including the
importance of acknowledging strengths within the community,
the school, and the family, and identifying within these strengths
the resources that may be used to promote positive outcomes.
6. Getting Unstuck: Techniques to Navigate
Therapeutic Impasses & Client Resistance
Presenter: Lynne Spevack, LCSW
As health reform incentives and penalties add pressure on hospitals to reduce length of stay, end of life decisions need to be
made more quickly, yet the options available to patients and
families are getting more difficult to understand. While 85%
of people want to die at home, only 45% do, pointing to a role
for social workers to advocate for the their preferences through
non-directive counseling about care continuum options and
their implications. An innovative approach to advance care
planning will be outlined that involves identifying, communicating, and incorporating personal preferences and priorities
into decisions about care. This will include a focus on advocacy,
ethics, community resources, legal and regulatory implications,
as well as how social workers can educate patients and families
about disease trajectories, treatment options and resources to
improve quality of life.
9. Focus on Fathers: Misconceptions about
This workshop will address the “Testing Empathy Agenda setting African American and Minority Fathers
Methods” (TEAM) approach to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, in- Presenter: Keston Jones, MHS, David Peters, LMSW
corporating classic CBT techniques with an innovative, cutting edge
method that specifically targets client motivation. TEAM Therapy is This workshop will examine the prevailing stereotypical myths
designed to help clients who are typically resistant to CBT and other about African American and minority fathers; the stages of grief
treatments, and provides faster relief for the easy-to-treat “motivat- that fathers go through when separated from their children;
ed” client. The workshop will focus on the motivational techniques and the importance of developing new and effective strategies
used to dissolve client resistance to change, including a new way to designed to promote positive paternal engagement. The presenconceptualize types of resistance. TEAM Therapy was developed by tation will draw from The Focus on Fathers Project, developed
David Burns, an early student of Aaron Beck, and has been built on to assist African American and minority fathers in family and
decades of research and broad clinical experience. This workshop is criminal court proceedings to deal with the social, economic
appropriate for clinicians in a variety of settings with clients experi- and self-esteem struggles that occur as a result of racial systemic
barriers.
encing a broad range of problems.
10. Positive Psychology and Strenght-Based
Experiental Group Techniquies for People with
Intellectual Disabilities
7. Beyond Words: Using Sand Tray Therapy with
Traumatized Children
Presenter: Roberta Shafter, PhD, LCSW
This workshop will teach social workers how to use Sand Tray
Therapy for traumatized children. Children who have experienced trauma, abuse, or neglect often have difficulty talking
about what has happened to them, and may not immediately
be ready for more structured cognitive interventions. Nonverbal
modalities like sandtray work provide the therapist with a window to thoughts and feelings that these youngsters are unable
to express through words alone. In sandtray work, miniatures
representing virtually everything in the universe-real and imaginary people and animals, structures, objects, and elements of the
natural world-are placed on a tray filled with clean white sand.
The “worlds” thus created can reveal profound inner realities
even when few words are spoken, and the communication and
healing that occur can be profound.
8. Hospital to Home and End of Life Decision
Making
Presenter: Eileen Zenker, LCSW, CCM
9
Presenters: Andrea Szucs, LMSW, RDT Candidate,
Daniel J. Tomasulo, PhD, MFA, MAPP
The first half of the workshop will discuss Positive Psychotherapy
(PPT), a strengths-based approach that offers a comprehensive
perspective of clients and their life circumstances. This evidence-based approach explores both strengths and weaknesses
moving from looking at what is wrong --to what is strong. The
model’s theoretical underpinnings, as well as many of its techniques, are drawn directly from psychodrama. This workshop
will review adaptations to the model that enhance its efficacy
with the intellectually disabled population. Part two will demonstrate techniques to be used in group sessions integrating group
psychotherapy, strengths-based positive interventions, drama
therapy, socio drama, role-play, psychodrama & expressive arts
therapy principles. How to design groups unique to your own
strengths, your clients’ needs and strengths, blending methods
of psychotherapy, expressive art therapy, social work principles,
and improvisational theater games will be included.
National Association of Social Workers New York City Chapter Continuing Education Conference
Afternoon Workshops 2:00 p.m. ― 3:30 p.m.
11. Translating Best HIV Prevention Interventions
into Action in an Era of Biomedicalization
12. Ethics and Risk Management in the New Era
of Social Work
Presenters: Bernadette Hadden, PhD, MSSW,
Fabienne Snowden, MSW
Presenter: Carole Mae Olson, ACSW, LCSW
The workshop will begin with a discussion of the CDC’s Compendium of Best and Promising HIV Prevention interventions,
followed a break out into discussion groups. Next, behavior
change with regard to HIV risk and prevention will be described
with a focus on the Social Determinants framework in addressing issues of social and economic justice and HIV vulnerability,
followed by further discussion. Lastly, the presenters will examine how social workers can remain relevant in HIV/AIDS
prevention and care, particularly with regard to Pre-Exposure
Prophylaxis Treatment (PrEP) and the biomedicalization of
HIV prevention. This section will include a discussion of practitioners’ experiences with educating clients about PrEP and will
engage participants in a discussion about the role of behavioral
interventions in a changing climate.
This session, sponsored by NASW Assurance Services (ASI), will
describe the most significant malpractice risks and methods of
mitigating and reducing one’s risk of being sued for malpractice.
This is intended for social workers in all settings and positions,
not just the clinical, therapeutic mental health setting. Key
concepts in risk management will be covered, such as confidentiality and its exceptions, duty to warn, and informed consent.
The seminar will reveal the reasons why social workers are sued
and what you can do about those risks. We will define what constitutes malpractice and discuss recordkeeping issues, guidelines
for supervision, special tips for clinical and private practitioners,
and brief you about malpractice insurance and implications for
practice. A free toolkit will be distributed, containing resources
for managing your malpractice risk, insurance FAQs, and more.
Afternoon Plenary 4:00 p.m. ― 5:30 p.m.
National Trends and Policies Influencing Communities in New York City
Presenter: Charles Blow
Charles Blow will draw from his op-ed column in the New York Times, making connections from social work to widespread trends and policies that affect clients in New York City. He will cover the following developments: racism; white
privilege; police misconduct; domestic violence; immigration and boarder children; poverty and inequality, as well as the
life experiences of struggle with bullying and sexual identity. Implications for the social work profession and social work
practice will be drawn out.
10
National Association
Social Workers
New
ork CC
ity
Chapter E
Cducation
ontinuingCE
ducation Conference
National of
Association
of Social
WY
orkers
ontinuing
onference
REGISTER NOW
How to Register
•
It is necessary to register on-line for this conference.
•
Registration fees:
○
Registration for NASW members: $120
○
Registration for social workers who are not currently members of NASW: $200
○
Registration for MSW student members:of NASW $70.
•
•
Registration will close at 5 PM on Wednesday, April 1 or sooner if we reach capacity prior to that.
There will not be any on-site registration the day of the conference.
Not a Member? Join Now and Save $80 on Registration
•
Go to https://www.socialworkers.org/join.asp or call 800-742-4089.
Selection of Workshops
•
When you register, you will be prompted to select a morning and afternoon workshop.
○
Rooms for workshops vary by size, and many will be limited to 30 participants. When a workshop
reaches capacity, please make another selection.
○
Several workshops will be held in larger rooms and able to accommodate more participants.
•
You must attend the workshop you registered for in order to receive CEUs. Admittance into all workshops
will be restricted to those who registered for it.
Confirmations
•
Confirmations will be sent automatically to everyone who registers.
Continuing Education
•
All attendees will have a barcode on their name tags that will be scanned to permit entry into workshops
and to record attendance for the certificate. •
You will be notified via email of the availability of certificates several days following the conference and
can be printed out.
Refunds
• To cancel your registration, notification must be received via email to [email protected]
Notification must be received by Wednesday, April 1; no refunds after that date.
• There will be a $20 processing charge. Please allow 30 days for us to process the request.
Special Accommodations
• Requests for special accommodations need to be received by Friday March 13.
• The auditorium and conference in general are equipped to accommodate wheelchairs.
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER
11
`