When visiting family means English Royalty

SHERIDAN DROPS TWO GAMES TO GILLETTE TO END REGULAR SEASON, B1
WEEKEND
Saturday, February 28, 2015
129th Year, No. 239
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Color of the year
for 2015 makes
a mark. C1
When visiting family
means English Royalty
TR teachers excel
in and out of the
classroom, C3
Film site for ‘Downton Abbey’ has local ties
BY ALISA BRANTZ
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
DAYTON — On the surface, boot camp and bands
might not appear to have
much in common, but the
diverse talents of the
Tongue River High School
teaching staff bring together these elements and more
as the educators use their
personal lives to advance
their classroom skills.
SHERIDAN — Tomorrow night, TV watchers across the
nation and the United Kingdom will gather to watch the final
episode of season five of the hit show on Masterpiece Theater
“Downton Abbey.”
Many questions are poised to be answered as the 8 million
viewers of the most popular series in PBS history tune in:
Will Anna remain in jail for the murder of her rapist? Will
Tom Branson really leave England (and the show) to help his
cousin in America with his farm implement business? Will it
be Dowager Countess or Isobel who receives a romantic marriage proposal? And, will a shooting outing with Anna’s new
in-laws go terribly wrong?
For some local residents watching the show, however, the
questions on their minds may be, “Will they show the room
where we opened our Christmas presents that one year after
college?”
Though the Crawleys are a fictitious family and the Earl of
Grantham is not a real title, Highclere Castle — where the
show is filmed — is a real place with a rich history that
includes family ties to Big Horn, Wyoming.
The Carnarvon family has lived at Highclere since 1679 and
the current Lord — George Herbert, the 8th Earl of
Carnarvon — is the son of Big Horn native Jean Wallop.
Jean Margaret Herbert Wallop, the Countess of Carnarvon,
was born in 1935 in Big Horn, the daughter of English royalty,
though they were far down the line of succession to the
throne.
Wallop's grandfather, Oliver Wallop, was the Earl of
Portsmouth and after moving to the United States he also
served in the Wyoming Legislature.
Former three-term U.S. Sen. Malcom Wallop, R-Wyoming,
was Jean’s brother.
DSA to host wine
fest March 6, C5
SEE ROYALTY, PAGE 7
SHERIDAN — The event
hosted by the Downtown
Sheridan Association will
include tastings of more
than 100 wines, beers and
spirits.
Crow game warden seeks positive in Wyoming poaching citation
Agreement close on
dispatch, jail, A3
SHERIDAN — Nearly a
year and a half after a contract between the city and
county for cooperative funding of the jail and dispatch
lapsed, leadership on both
sides feels an agreement
may be close.
BILLINGS (AP) — As a game warden for the
Crow Tribe, Clayvin Herrera has cited poachers — mostly nontribal members — as one of
his duties.
But now he has found himself on the opposite side of the law.
Last year, Herrera and two other Crow tribal
members were charged by a Wyoming Game
and Fish Department warden for killing three
bull elk without licenses.
Now Herrera finds himself embroiled in a
147-year-old treaty rights quarrel.
“We just needed food that day,” Herrera said.
“It’s evolved since then into this craziness,
and it’s started to get political, and I don’t like
politics at all.”
Herrera has been a game warden for the
Crow Tribe since 2012, working for a couple of
years before that as a cop for the Bureau of
Indian Affairs. So the reservation is a place
he’s familiar with.
He grew up just north of Fort Smith — a
town of 160 folks that sprang up when
Yellowtail Dam was built in the early 1960s.
Fort Smith gets its name from an even earlier
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establishment, a U.S. Army fort built in 1866
to defend immigrants from Sioux Indian
attacks as they traveled the Bozeman Trail to
gold mines in Virginia City and Bannock.
‘We just needed food that day. It’s
evolved since then into this craziness, and
it’s started to get political, and I don’t like
politics at all.’
Clayvin Herrera
Game warden for the Crow Tribe
Decades later, the town has become the headquarters for fly-fishing companies that pan for
a new kind of gold — money paid out by
anglers seeking brown and rainbow trout that
inhabit the legendary Bighorn River.
Not far from this recent history, Herrera’s
childhood home still stands. Although it’s now
tattered and used for storage, the home shel-
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ters and supports links to ancient times.
Weathered, gray tepee poles that are used during the annual Crow Fair celebration lean
against the eaves outside the house. Inside the
padlocked door are collections of peeled pine
sticks for ceremonial fires and evergreen
boughs hung from lines to dry for smudging.
“This is where I learned how to hunt, walking down Soap Creek hunting whitetails and
shooting birds,” said Herrera, 33, gesturing
out the window to the golden grasses of a
nearby field, the Bighorn Mountains rising in
the background highlighted by a fresh smear
of bright snow.
Back when Herrera was a youngster, when a
family member shot an elk or deer, his grandmother would telephone her sisters, who
would arrive to help butcher the meat while
the group chatted in Crow, the only language
Herrera knew until he started grade school.
“When you bring an elk home and you don’t
tell anybody, pretty soon the calls and texts
start coming in,” Herrera said.
Today’s edition is published for:
Kara Lorraine
of Sheridan
SEE POACHING, PAGE 2
OPINION
VOICES
PAGE SIX
ALMANAC
4
5
6
9
SPORTS
COMICS
HONE & GARDEN
FAITH
B1
B4
C1
C4
A2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
POACHING: Debate over hunting treaty continues
SEE US
ONLINE
FROM 1
That’s just the way the
tribe operates, he said.
When tribal members are
hungry — which can be
often at the depressed reservation — other Crows pitch
in to help feed them. On a
reservation with a 30 percent poverty rate and a 46
percent unemployment
rate, such acts of sharing
are not uncommon.
“By the time I got done
handing out meat from my
deer, all I had is a little
backstrap,” said Ronnie
Fisher, a fellow tribal member who was also cited in
the elk poaching incident,
along with Herrera and his
brother, Colton Herrera.
The hunt that has landed
the three men in court
occurred on Jan. 28, 2014.
They had driven into a
southwestern corner of the
reservation, at the base of
the Bighorn Mountains, in
search of elk when they
spotted a herd on a ridge
above Eskimo Creek.
With up to 3 feet of snow
on the ground in some
places, they slowly trudged
closer, following the moving
herd for about two miles
before finally seeing three
bulls within shooting range.
In the process of hiking,
though, the men had left the
Crow Reservation and
moved into the state of
Wyoming’s Bighorn
National Forest.
“Grandma always told sto-
Debate continues over Crow hunting rights.
ries about the mountains
and how we can hunt,”
Herrera said. “‘Never let
anyone tell you what you
can’t do,’” he said she told
him, always speaking in
Crow.
So the men knew, when
they each pulled the trigger,
that they were no longer on
the reservation.
Herrera said it took eight
hours for the men to pack
out the elk meat and heads.
He bristled at the accusation that they left any of the
meat behind.
“We took all the meat,” he
said. “It was Ronnie’s and
my brother’s first elk, otherwise we would’ve left the
heads.”
The meat from his elk fed
Herrera and his three
daughters — he’s a single
father — for a month with
lots of spaghetti with meat
sauce and Hamburger
Helper.
A Wyoming Game and
Fish Department official
refused to comment on the
case since it is ongoing.
Trouble came about eight
months later when the three
men were cited for poaching
by a Wyoming Game and
Fish warden. Herrera was
also charged as an accessory after the fact. An accessory after the fact is someone
who knows that a crime has
been committed but still
helps to conceal it. Herrera
said he told the warden
everything when he was
first interviewed because
“he had nothing to hide.”
The Sheridan Press
reported in a Feb. 6 story
that when the tribal members attended a pretrial conference in Sheridan County
Circuit Court, Colton
Herrera asked for a change
of plea hearing and Fisher
and Clayvin Herrera told
the judge they intended to
represent themselves and
would use a tribal rights
defense.
With the new information
the judge decided to schedule a new change of plea
hearing for Colton Herrera
on March 9. Clayvin
Herrera and Fisher have
status conferences set for
March 12.
At the root of Herrera’s
assertion of Crow treaty
rights to hunt in Wyoming’s
Bighorn Mountains are two
federal treaties: the 1851
and 1868 Fort Laramie
treaties.
In 2013, the Crow tribal
government adopted a resolution that called for the
tribe to “exercise fully its
treaty right to hunt on all
unoccupied lands of the
United States which are
located within the traditional Crow homeland.”
The tribe defined the
region as stretching from
the Bears Paw Mountains in
northern Montana, west to
the Absaroka and Beartooth
mountains, south to the
Wind River Range in
Wyoming and east to the
Black Hills of western
South Dakota and northeastern Wyoming.
In 2013, the tribe also said
it would develop regulations
for off-reservation hunting
and a licensing process,
which has not occurred,
COURTESY GRAPHIC |
according to Conrad
Stewart, chairman of the
tribe’s Natural Resources
Committee, although he
said the tribe has had conversations with Montana
officials.
Still, Stewart had a public
notice drawn up, dated Feb.
12, in support of the
Herreras and Fisher to exercise their treaty hunting
rights in Wyoming.
“It is the position of this
Committee this activity is
protected by the Crow
Tribe’s agreement with the
United States Government;
and, that such activity will
be rigorously enforced
under this supreme law,”
the notice states, in part.
“It’s kind of an issue of
what’s the bigger crime,”
Stewart said.
“We’re talking about a
treaty,” he added. “We’re not
going to let a state dictate to
a sovereign nation.”
History doesn’t seem to be
in the Crow Tribe’s favor on
this issue. A 1995 ruling by
the 10th U.S. Circuit Court
of Appeals sided with
Wyoming in a similar case.
Tyrone Ten Bear was cited
by Wyoming Game and Fish
for killing an elk in the
Bighorn National Forest
without a license.
Although Ten Bear’s attorneys asserted a treaty right
to hunt on the land, the
court said that right was
lost when Wyoming became
a state in 1890.
The Crow Tribe appears to
be hanging its new hopes on
a later court decision. A
1999 ruling by the U.S.
Supreme Court acknowledged that hunting and fishing treaty rights for the
Mille Lacs Band of
Chippewa in Minnesota
were still valid off the reservation. That treaty dated
back to 1837.
At first, Herrera said he
was offended by the poaching charges and upset. He
said the incident has provoked more racism, including name-calling.
“It’s still here and still
alive 100 percent, and it
affects us every day,” he
said.
But he’s been able to put
the issue behind him to
some extent, finding peace
while sitting under the cottonwood tree outside his
childhood home.
Now he’s trying to look
for a bright side to the incident. Herrera is hoping that
the charges may lead to better communication between
the Crow Tribe and the
state of Wyoming. It may
also promote more talk
between tribal members
about poaching and waste.
Herrera would like to see
the tribe integrate a hunter
safety course into the
schools to be proactive.
Maybe the situation will
even be a place to start talking about enforcing hunting
regulations on tribal members. Right now, there is no
hunting season on the
reservation. Consequently,
big game like deer and elk
are often hard to find.
“You can get sucked into
that negativity easy,”
Herrera said. “So I’m moving forward as a Crow
Indian in a modern society.
We still have our own ways
and our culture. So we’re
lucky we still have a lot of
the things we had before —
including our hunting
rights.
“From our perspective,
it’s a right we’ve always
had.”
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A3
Sheridan man pleads not guilty to child endangerment
BY KELLI HEITSTUMAN-TOMKO
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — A Sheridan man pleaded not
guilty Thursday to charges of child endangerment that stemmed from his call to police
Wednesday to report the death of a woman in
his home.
Joshua Barber, 30, called police at about 3:30
p.m. According to an affidavit of probable cause
on file with the Sheridan County Circuit Court,
police arrived and found the woman dead in the
bedroom. Barber told police the woman was his
girlfriend, Jessica Allred.
During the interview, Barber told police he
had to use the bathroom and left the room
abruptly. Authorities said Barber was heard to
be coughing and spitting before the toilet was
flushed, and it was assumed he was sick to his
stomach.
Barber admitted, though, that he had been
flushing pills. He told police he and Allred had
injected morphine and opana, both of them controlled substances, the previous night. Opana is
an oxymorphone. Barber also told police that he
had thrown drug paraphernalia into the dumpster outside the home. Police checked the dumpster and found spoons with residue and needles.
Barber told police he had a 4-year-old son of
whom he had primary custody. Police noted a
garbage can in the bedroom contained uncapped
needles. The garbage can was about 18 inches
tall and had no cover. Barber was arrested and
charged with interference with an officer based
on his disposal of the drugs in addition to a
charge of child endangerment. Both offenses
are misdemeanors.
The child was at school at the time Allred was
found deceased and has been placed in the custody of his grandparents.
Barber initially pleaded guilty to both charges
but changed his plea on the charge of child
endangerment, insisting that neither he nor
Allred used drugs while his son was in the
home. Barber has no significant criminal history and was released on a $2,000 unsecured bond
despite concerns about his drug use. His bond
conditions include drug testing and an evaluation. He is allowed supervised visits with his
son, and the grandparents are allowed to be
those supervisors.
(ISSN 1074-682X)
Published Daily except Sunday
and six legal holidays.
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SHERIDAN NEWSPAPERS, INC.
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EXECUTIVE STAFF
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Mark Blumenshine
Office Manager
Production Manager
Jake Mahar makes a mark on a
fillet weld during welding class
Wednesday at the Sheridan
College Technical Center. The
welding class is full with more
than 90 students enrolled. The
welding instructors have been
using an application process for
the past three years to screen
for career-minded students.
Instructor Kevin Fox hopes to
see the welding space expand
in the coming years along with
other courses at the tech center.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
City, county working toward agreement on dispatch, jail
BY TRAVIS PEARSON
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Nearly a
year and a half after a contract between the city and
county for cooperative funding of the jail and dispatch
lapsed, leadership on both
sides feels an agreement
may be close.
Through a series of private meetings, Mayor John
Heath and County
Commission Chairman
Tom Ringley have worked
on a contract they said
could be taken back to the
City Council and County
Commission within the
next couple weeks.
In April 2014, city and
county representatives
began hosting public meetings to negotiate 14 issues
— seven from the city and
seven from the county — of
concern to both sides
including annexation of
roads, court responsibilities
and more. Taking on that
number of issues during
short public meetings was
inefficient, Ringley said,
leading to closed-door meetings over time.
“The bottom line is this is
an issue between the city
and the county that needs
to be resolved since the last
agreement expired … about
a year and a half ago or two
years ago,” he added. “To
put it bluntly, the (previous)
talks kind of stalled out.
Except recently, the mayor
of Sheridan and I have
agreed to have a one-on-one
and try to come up with a
meeting of the minds on
what an agreement should
look like and take them
back to our respective parties.”
Heath and Ringley
declined to divulge details
or say what either side is
asking for, only insisting
talks are going well.
“It’s just between the two
of us at the moment,”
Ringley said. “We’re negotiating. I’d prefer not to say
what either of us is talking
about. I will say [Heath] and
I agree that it should be as
simple an agreement as possible.”
“The county commissioners and the mayor’s office
here are working diligently
to work on all matters that
affect our communities,”
Heath said. “We’re engaged;
I just don’t have any news
yet.”
‘The bottom line is this
is an issue between the
city and the county that
needs to be resolved since
the last agreement expired
… about a year and a half
ago or two years ago.’
Tom Ringley
Commission Chairman
In July 2013, the city
decided not to renew a contract specifying county and
city fiscal responsibilities
at dispatch and the jail.
“A revised contract proposal was submitted to
county staff on June 12,
2013, by the Sheridan Police
Department. We await
county response,” an April
2014 memorandum from
Sheridan Police Chief
Richard Adriaens stated.
County Sheriff Dave
Hofmeier said prior to 2013
the city paid $65,000 annually for prisoners at the
Sheridan County Detention
Center, regardless of how
many were housed there.
The county is statutorily
required to run the jail, he
added. And it’s not cheap,
with an annual budget of
$2.5 million. Law enforcement costs make up about
one-third of the county’s
$16 million budget.
While the city has not
paid a lump sum for prisoners the last 18 months, the
memorandum does point to
several contributions,
including $1.5 million for
the $7.2 million jail addition
in 2006. The city owns
approximately 10,000 square
feet of the jail through its
participation in the Law
Enforcement Joint Powers
Board. This area was
appraised at $489,000 in
2005.
The municipality also
provides water/sewer, use
of its firearms range and IT
support and mapping.
In the April 2014 document, Adriaens suggested
the city pay the county
about $150,000 per year
toward the jail, a price he
said represents the cost of
each jail day for those
incarcerated for violating
city ordinances. He also
asked that the entities work
together to figure out how
the city could be compensated for the parts of the
jail it owns, providing utilities, etc.
Meanwhile, the other side
of any agreement would
deal with the city-run dispatch center, which carries
an annual budget of about
$565,000.
The county does contribute to dispatch via E911
funds collected from phones
in Sheridan County. All cellphones and landlines pay a
monthly tax of 75 cents earmarked for emergency dispatch services that goes to
the county.
The county pays the city
about $270,000 annually,
which Hofmeier said provides funding for four dispatchers and material items
like paper and chairs within the dispatch center.
But, again, the city memo
seeks to change this setup.
Under “staff recommendation,” Adriaens proposed
altering the E911 funding
model so that that money is
split between the city and
county based on the number of phones in each.
This would result in a 7030, city-county split of
approximately $322,000 in
capital reserves and another $285,000 in annual
income.
Then the city feels the
county should pay its share
of dispatch services, which
Adriaens puts at 25 to 35
percent of the city’s law
enforcement budget, or
$325,000 to $455,000 annually.
The county’s 25 percent
share of dispatch services
includes the six county fire
districts and any ambulance calls outside city limits as well as 51 percent of
radio traffic and 31 percent
of traffic stops, according
to the memo.
Ringley admits to some
fiscal differences of opinion
between the city and county
regarding the jail and dispatch but, despite the lapse
of the old contract, the
facilities have operated normally since July 2013.
“What I’d like to emphasize is, even though there
are some differences of
opinion about how we operate, there aren’t any services that aren’t being done,”
he said. “The sheriff is running the jail and the chief
of police is running dispatch. Everybody’s getting
served; there are just some
slight differences of opinion on whether or not that
should be compensated.”
Forever Remembered
Even after life is gone
In our hearts your love lingers on
Even after you have left our sight
In our thoughts
your light shines bright
Even after you are gone
In our memories
You forever live on
In Loving Memory
Robert Goodman
February 28, 2010
Deeply loved and sadly missed by
wife, children, grandchildren and great granddaughter
A4
OPINION
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
SHERIDAN PRESS EDITORIAL |
It may be
another Netflix
weekend
Bill failure isn’t
funny; it’s
embarrassing
H
i, my name is Kristen
and I’m a Netflix-aholic.
Well, not really, but I’m
seriously considering
becoming one this weekend.
We don’t watch a lot of TV
in our house. Yes, we have
cable — but it’s mostly so I
can watch the cable news
channels. Otherwise, my husband and I watch the occasional episode of “The Big
Bang
Theory” or a
movie when
the weather
is just too
crummy to
go outside.
I do have a
Netflix subscription
EDITOR’S
though. But
even my use
COLUMN
of that is
|
pretty lame.
Kristen Czaban
I like watching old reruns of “The West
Wing” and every once and
awhile I turn on a movie. But,
for the most part even Netflix
gets bored with me.
The darn thing keeps trying
to suggest new shows to
watch. I don’t want new
shows. I like my old ones.
But last year, one of my coworkers urged me to watch
“House of Cards.” He told me
it was like “West Wing” but
better.
Really? Better than “West
Wing,” no way. But, I was
curious. So last spring while I
was home sick with the flu I
turned it on. Then continued
to watch it — in between trips
to the kitchen to make tea and
then to the bathroom to load
up on some more Tamiflu —
for about 10 hours straight.
I know. How lame. But I was
sick, I couldn’t sleep and I
was intrigued. Plus my husband was out of town. So
there was nobody around to
judge me for being so incredibly lame.
I’ve seen every episode now,
but I still chuckled when last
year, people spent the entire
Valentine’s Day weekend
watching the show. I’m not
that extreme.
On Friday, season three was
released. That’s right, not just
the season premiere, but the
entire season. What?!
The old school TV fan didn’t
understand. Don’t you have to
wait a week to watch the next
episode? Don’t you have to
wait on pins and needles for
the resolution of a cliff hanger? Nope. You get it all right
now. Well, at least over the
next 12 or so hours as you
make your way through each
episode.
So while I’m not typically
much of a TV person or
obsessed enough to watch an
entire season of a show in
one sitting — it’s incredibly
tempting this weekend.
Too bad the weather isn’t
supposed to be unbearable,
there are chores to do,
errands to run and a GMAT
to study for; a “House of
Cards” marathon sounds like
way more fun.
S
ome states have a knack
for making a spectacle.
Florida nearly always has
some weird story or crime
that goes viral on social media.
California is full of left-wing
movie stars. Mississippi is full
of rednecks and everyone in
New York talks funny.
TRENDING ON THE WEB |
Nytimes.com
1. Leonard Nimoy, Spock of
‘Star Trek,’ dies at 83.
2. Is that dress white and gold
or blue and black?
3. A white and gold (no, blue
and black!) dress melts the
internet.
4. Shooting Film and TV Sex
Scenes: What Really Goes On
5. ISIS onslaught engulfs
Assyrian Christians as militants destroy ancient art.
6. Op-Ed Contributor:
Nothing is wrong with your sex
drive.
7. Paul Krugman: What
Greece won.
8. Move to ban a bullet adds to
its appeal.
9. Exxon Mobil settles a $9 billion environment case in New
Jersey for $250 million.
Is Twitter really America’s conscience?
D
enizens of social media were rankled during
Sunday night’s Academy Awards telecast
when actor Sean Penn made a crack about
Mexican director Alejandro González
Iñárritu and green cards.
Or so we are told by the minders of buzz.
Penn, just before announcing
Iñárritu’s award for Best
Picture, the director’s third
Oscar of the evening, quipped:
“Who gave this son of a bitch
his green card?”
Cue the sound of tweeters
gasping.
But of course it was a quip.
Do people really think it was
KATHLEEN
xenophobic? Indeed, many —
PARKER
with the notable exception of
|
Iñárritu — were offended.
I won’t explain the joke, since
this would render it absolutely
un-funny. Not that Penn’s line was a knee-slapper, but it was obvious (at least to me and apparently to Iñárritu) that it was a joke, not a slur.
Iñárritu, who says he and Penn have had a
“tough” joke friendship dating back to 2003’s “21
Grams,” a film they worked on together, said he
thought it was “hilarious.” It certainly didn’t
inhibit his acceptance remarks, which included
his prayer that his fellow Mexicans “can be
treated with the same dignity and respect of the
ones that came before and built this incredible
immigrant nation.” His emphasis.
One might even view Penn’s comment as a
backhanded compliment. As in, this director is
so amazing, who let him come in here to make
the rest of us feel like chopped liver? There, I
went and explained the joke anyway.
I’ll concede that Penn’s delivery had all the
warmth of a basilisk’s gaze. Then again, what
would one expect from Penn? He has mastered
the expression of one who would rather be anywhere else. His default countenance is of a man
trapped between existential angst and disgust —
or rather like someone who knows what’s really
going on.
Had almost any comedian — Jay Leno, David
Letterman, Jon Stewart — delivered the same
line, the effect would have been much different
and doubtless found inoffensive if not charming.
It’s all in the delivery.
Must everyone always be happy? And more
concerning, will our uber-sensitivity eventually
render us humorless robots uttering preapproved giblets of meaningless verbiage?
Any attempt at humor that relies as its basis
on race, sex or any other distinction to which an
“-ist” may be added is verboten. This is com-
mendable on its face, but there are fine lines and
shades of gray between funny and offensive.
Often, a good joke is both. Oversensitivity, meanwhile, can have a stifling effect not just on
humor but on public discourse and free expression.
A non-Twitter example is the recent decision
by a theater group at Mount Holyoke College to
cancel its annual production of “The Vagina
Monologues.” Any reason would do as far as I’m
concerned, except perhaps for this one: The Eve
Ensler creation isn’t inclusive enough (even at
an all-women’s college) because, stand back, it
excludes women who are “trans.” That is, those
who may not (yet) have vaginas.
This is stupefyingly funny in a strange way,
but it’s not a joke.
The underlying principle of such extreme sensitivity, whether on social media or college campuses, is the idea that no one should ever be
offended. This is a noble goal (I guess), but
where does such absolutism fit into a free society? And whither goest humor, which relies on
irreverence and the formerly justified assumption that God shared his sense of humor with
his most perplexing creation — human beings?
Kidding aside. Social media, especially Twitter,
have appropriated the role of national conscience. When Tweety Bird is upset, the whole
world is upset — or at least that portion of the
world that pays attention to such things. As of
2014, only 23 percent of online adults (18 and
older) use Twitter, according to the Pew
Research Center.
The broader media, however, pay attention to
and report on buzz as though these online snippets were the last word on public opinion. But
buzz, like all gossip through time, is meaningless
without contextual analysis. Buzz, in other
words, doesn’t necessarily suggest a conclusion,
such as Americans have lost their sense of
humor, and we have become mind-numbingly
politically correct.
This may be our future, heaven forbid. But
meanwhile, we can find some comfort in the following: Many Americans couldn’t care less
about the Oscars, what Penn said, or what
Twitter buzzed about it. Only 36.6 million
watched the Academy Awards this year, down 16
percent from last year, according to Nielsen ratings.
Context is, as always, everything. But we’ll see
what Twitter has to say about that.
KATHLEEN PARKER is a syndicated columnist of The Washington Post, a regular
guest on television shows like The Chris Mathews Show and The O’Reilly Factor, and is
a member of the Buckley School’s faculty. She won the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for
distinguished commentary.
But Wyoming is no stranger
to being the butt of a joke.
On Stephen Colbert’s show
on Comedy Central in 2009, a
few laughs were had at U.S.
Rep. Cynthia Lummis’ expense
when she missed a reference
to cougars — a pejorative term
used for older women who like
much younger men.
In 2008, on The Daily Show
with Jon Stewart, the host
poked fun at our state for our
lack of diversity. The segment
references that state’s “rugged
outdoorsmen,” “grizzled old
coots” and “ornery drifters” as
voting blocks. No gay cowboy
vote here, they point out.
Last year, Wyoming made the
late night shows again. This
time, Sheridan’s own state
Sen. Bruce Burns, R-Sheridan,
was featured. Death penalty
drugs are running short, so
Wyoming legislators offered a
bill that brought the firing
squad back. Colbert again took
a shot at the Cowboy State.
“Luckily, some states out
there who understand this
problem, like Wyoming, know
that all morally complex
issues have the same answer,”
Colbert said. “More guns.”
It’s easy to get offended by
the late night commentary. It’s
also fairly easy to laugh it off.
Wyoming residents know who
they are and what they stand
for, no matter how they are
portrayed elsewhere.
But, this week, our
Legislature struck down a bill
that isn’t funny. The Wyoming
Legislature voted against a bill
that would have extended protections in the workplace,
schools and other aspects of
life to gay and transgender
individuals.
(Insert “Brokeback
Mountain” joke here.)
It was reported that Rep.
Mark Jennings, R-Sheridan,
said the bill was being promoted as a way to improve
Wyoming’s image. He said that
the state should have no concerns along those lines.
“This bill is not needed,” he
said. “It aims to fix problems
that don’t exist.”
But even in Sheridan County
lawsuits have been filed alleging discrimination based on
civil rights. In the early 2000s,
two former SCSD2 administrators alleged that they had been
fired because they were lesbians.
No problem here though,
right?
While the late night shows
may crack jokes about
Wyoming’s lack of support for
the anti-discrimination bill,
the failure of the bill isn’t
funny. It’s embarrassing.
IN WYOMING |
DROP US A LINE |
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ters are those that stay on a single topic and are brief.
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Letters should not exceed 400 words. The best-read let-
Write: Letters to the Editor
The Sheridan Press
P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyo. 82801
Representative
House Dist. 51
307-672-7600
Email: [email protected]
The 1st Amendment: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free
exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of
the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble,
and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Stephen Woody
Becky Martini
Publisher
Office Manager
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Mark
Blumenshine
Phillip Ashley
Production Manager
Marketing Director
Rosie Berger
Mark Jennings
Representative
House Dist. 30
307-461-0697
John Patton
Representative
House Dist. 29
307-672-2776
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Mike Madden
Senator Dave Kinskey
Senator Bruce Burns
Representative
House Dist. 40
307-684-9356
[email protected]
Senator
Dist. 22
307-461-4297
[email protected]
Senator
Dist. 21
307-672-6491
[email protected]
COMMUNITY
VOICES
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A5
COMMUNITY PERSPECTIVES |
What’s wrong with being personal? Business is, should be, personal
“
It’s not personal, it’s
just business.”
Michael Corleone
from “The
Godfather” said it, and it
has been repeated so
many times it has
become truth to many
people. However, in my
RYAN
experience, albeit limited, I would be more apt to
KOLTISKA
agree with Meg Ryan
|
(yes, I am quoting Meg
Ryan…don’t judge me)
when she said in the movie “You’ve Got
Mail” to Tom Hanks, “What’s so wrong
with being personal, anyway. Whatever
else anything is, it ought to begin by being
personal.”
I spend more awake time per day with my
coworkers than I do with my family. I will
spend roughly 100,000 hours of my life
working. I’m significantly connected to my
work if I only count the time, not to men-
tion the physical and emotional energy
spent during the day. For those of us who
actually like what we do, we are even more
connected to our work. Business is personal, and if you haven’t caught on to that, it’s
time to turn off “The Godfather.”
Think about some of the ways you do
business: who do you recommend to people
for doctors, for plumbers, for child care, for
a good haircut? I know I recommend people
who I know and trust and have built a relationship with over years of doing business
with them. I do business with those I have
built relationships with, and that is personal.
Just this week I had a Chamber board
member tell me about a great story about
how important relationship is in business.
He told me about a shoe salesman that he
got to know quite well over the years. This
salesman was the type of guy that knew
your name, your family, your shoe size and
he knew everything there was to know
about shoes and how they were supposed to
fit. This board member bought shoes from
the salesman for years and learned to trust
him and knew that he would always be
treated right and be given an honest deal
and a good product. One day he came home
with a new pair of shoes and his wife
asked him how much the shoes cost. He
said he didn’t know. He just paid for them
and didn’t ask how much because he trusted and had built a relationship with the
salesman. He knew he would be treated
fairly. Relationship trumped price.
I guess business doesn’t have to be personal, but GOOD business does.
I know several people who I can call right
now and know that if I asked for their
product or service I wouldn’t have to even
worry about price. I bet you do, too.
What does this mean for you? Well, for
the consumer, promote those businesses
and their employees who have gained your
trust and do good business. They deserve
it. For the business and the employee, stop
worrying about the competition and their
pricing, offer value in how you do business. Make it personal and you’ll gain a
customer for life.
Tom Reilly, in his seminars on valueadded selling, expands on this topic and
has helped salesmen and businesses for
over 30 years trump price with value. He
teaches about adding value to your relationship, your business and your product,
and then price no longer becomes the
issue. The Sheridan County Chamber of
Commerce and Manufacturing Works are
bringing Tom Reilly here April 22 for an
all-day seminar on value-added selling.
Want a customer that just pays without
asking the price? Come hear what Tom has
to share. Find out more on www.sheridanwyomingchamber.org.
RYAN KOLTISKA is the director of marketing and communications for the
Sheridan County Chamber of Commerce.
LETTERS |
No more knee-jerk
reactions
Re: Second Amendment rights,
HB114
Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner is out to emancipate the Land of Lincoln
T
he most portentous election of 2014,
which gave
the worst-governed state its first
Republican governor in 12 years,
has initiated this
GEORGE
century’s most
WILL
intriguing political experiment.
|
Illinois has
favored
Democratic presidential candidates
by an average of 16 points in the past
six elections. But by electing businessman Bruce Rauner it initiated a
process that might dismantle a form
of governance that afflicts many
states and municipalities.
Rauner, 58, won his first elective
office by promising to change
Illinois’s political culture of oneparty rule by entrenched politicians subservient to public-sector
unions. This culture’s consequences include:
After more than a dozen creditrating downgrades in five years,
Illinois has the lowest rating
among the states. Unfunded public
employees’ pension liabilities are
estimated, perhaps conservatively,
at $111 billion, the nation’s largest
such deficit as a percentage of state
revenue. Currently, public pensions
consume nearly 25 percent of general state revenues. The state owes
vendors $6.4 billion in unpaid bills,
and more than 1 million people
have left Illinois for less dysfunctional states in the last 15 years.
Debt per resident is about $24,989,
compared with $7,094 in neighboring Indiana.
Four of the previous nine governors went to prison, so, Rauner
says, “people know we’ve had bad
people in charge.” Bad but routine
practices are astonishing. Some
legislators practice law, specializing in real estate tax appeals: They
are paid a portion of what they
save clients by reducing the clients’
bills under the laws the legislators
have written.
Rauner says previous governors
from both parties have been complicit in the unionization of about
93 percent of government employees. Unionization began during the
14 years (1977-1991) of Republican
Gov. Jim Thompson. Gov. Rod
Blagojevich (D), now an inmate,
instituted “card- check” unionization. Rauner says union organizers
would tell individuals: Sign the
card or else — we know where your
wife works and your children go to
school.
Rauner is a tall, confident,
relaxed man with a powerful voice
and a plan to break “a totally
rigged system.” The plan includes
structural reforms necessary to
enable lasting policy reforms.
By executive order, Rauner has
stopped the government from collecting “fair share” fees for unions
from state employees who reject
joining a union. This, he says, violates First Amendment principles
by compelling people to subsidize
speech with which they disagree.
The unions might regret challenging this in federal court: If the case
reaches the Supreme Court and it
overturns the 1977 decision that
upheld “fair shares,” this would
end the practice nationwide.
Rauner hopes to ban, as some
states do, public employees unions
from making political contributions, whereby they elect the
employers with whom they negotiate their compensation. Rauner
notes that an owner of a small firm
that does business with Illinois’s
government is forbidden to make
political contributions. Rauner also
hopes to enable counties and local
jurisdictions to adopt right-to-work
laws, thereby attracting businesses
that will locate only where there
are such laws.
He hopes the legislature will
empower voters to ratify changes to
the state constitutional provision
that says public pensions can never
be “diminished or impaired.” He
also proposes shifting state employees from unaffordable defined-benefit plans to a more affordable plan
for the state. Furthermore, he
hopes to end practices that now
have more than 11,000 retirees
receiving six-figure pensions.
Another 2016 referendum would
impose term limits on state legislators, ending the careerism on
which the corrupt system depends.
This would rile Democrat Michael
Madigan, who was elected to the
legislature in 1970 and has been
speaker of the House for all but
two years since 1983. But Madigan
might want the state’s crisis tamed
in case his daughter Lisa, currently
Illinois’s attorney general, chooses
to run for governor.
Democrats have veto-proof
majorities in both houses of the
legislature, and redistricting has
entrenched incumbents. Democrats
do, however, fear being challenged
in primaries by unions punishing
anyone disobedient. A question is
whether reform-minded
Democratic donors might protect
Democrats.
By allowing a temporary tax
increase to actually be temporary
— to lapse — Rauner increased his
leverage with the legislature,
which lusts for revenue not swallowed by pensions. Chicago’s parlous fiscal condition also gives
Rauner leverage with his friend
Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who has
leverage with many Democratic
legislators.
An Illinois governor (Adlai
Stevenson) once said, “Cleanliness
is next to godliness, except in the
Illinois legislature, where it is next
to impossible.” If Rauner emancipates Illinois from government
organized through its employees
unions as an interest group that
lobbies itself for perpetual growth,
so can other states. And the nation.
GEORGE WILL writes on politics, law and social character.
Will began writing for The Washington Post in 1974.
I think that the only way to
ensure the safety of people in
this great state of Wyoming is
to quit taking away our constitutional rights. Knee-jerk
response to emotionally
charged issues such as school
shootings is claiming our
rights at an alarming rate.
Any citizen who has gone
through the vetting process of
getting a concealed carry permit should be allowed to carry
anywhere in the state with no
restrictions. The dangers in
this society do not end just
because a person enters a
place such as a church, bar,
bank, school or a government
building, where guns are prohibited. It is the outlaw who
will disobey the law in any
event that you need to watch
out for, not the law abiding citizen who went to the trouble of
getting a permit to carry.
Please pass HB114 with no
amendments gutting it of its
intent; we do not need gun free
zones. They have been proven
to be some of the most inviting
places for outlaws to wreak
havoc in our country.
An armed society is a polite
society. Let’s keep it that way.
Pass the Bill.
John K. Lundberg Jr.
Sheridan
Failure of Great Lakes
result of service
Re: Surveys needed
A Feb. 24 article in The
Sheridan Press read, “Great
Lakes, the only airline serving
Sheridan, is losing money on
the flights, adding the airport
won’t reach the 10,000-passenger mark this year.”
If Great Lakes will not reach
the 10,000 mark (approximately
14 departures and 14 returns
per day), I contend this is
mainly due to lousy and expensive service.
Sheridan city government
and/or the Chamber of
Commerce should survey to
determine the number of area
residents that fly every year. I
suspect that this number far
exceeds the number that take
flights out of or into Sheridan.
The reason being Great Lakes
flights are unreliable, expensive, infrequent and only go to
Denver. Billings would be a
desirable additional destination — a flight serving Denver
to Sheridan to Billings and
back should increase passengers.
Undoubtedly, others do as I
do and drive to Billings or even
to Denver to bypass our airline. The possibility of missing
a connection, the frequent
requirement of needing to layover for hours (or overnight)
in Denver and the need to fly
south to go north is a discouragement.
As an aside, back in the old
days I believe Sheridan was
serviced by Frontier and
Western. In 1966 or so, I did
put my wife and two children
on a morning plane at Los
Angeles International Airport
and that very same plane landed in Sheridan later that day
(albeit after a few en route
stops).
My main point is the need
for statistics on how many and
often Sheridan area residents
fly, how they fly and maybe
how they would like to fly.
Richard Kuzara
Sheridan
A6
PAGE SIX
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
HEALTH WATCH |
TODAY IN HISTORY |
Rx laughter
— it’s good
for you
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
W
e all enjoy a good, hearty
laugh. Guess what? As it turns
out, laughter on a regular
basis is really good for us, too!
It is considered one of the most natural
ways we can treat ourselves to a greater
level of happiness.
Adding a little humor to each day
can improve our lives — body, mind
and soul — encouraging optimal health
and wellbeing by
creating better balance and enhancing
a sense of calmness.
Laughter is an
important element
of emotional health,
and part of what is
TEDDY
referred to as our
ARAAS
“psychosocial
|
dimension of wellness,” essential for
healing and quality
of life.
Psychosocially healthy people possess a zest for life, are internally
healthy and thrive intellectually. Such
individuals enrich the lives of others;
overall, they are energetic, resilient,
focused and open-minded. They feel
good about themselves, so they are
comfortable around others and meet
daily demands with a hopeful outlook.
Cherishing experiences that bring a
smile to the day, they adapt to change
easily and maintain sensitivity
toward others.
The components of psychosocial
health are emotional (feeling), social
(relating), mental (thinking) and spiritual (being). They are essential
aspects of our wellbeing, especially
when dealing with stress. Each of us
experience occasional “dips,” downturns during our lives, yet those who
utilize sound coping skills are capable
of giving and receiving affection and
love, working continuously to employ
strengths to improve weaknesses.
Laughing:
1. enhances “aerobic activity,”
increasing breathing and heart rate,
blood pressure and circulation.
2. increases oxygen delivered to cells
throughout our body.
3. clears mucus from the lungs.
4. strengthens our heart muscle (20
seconds of laughter = 3 minutes of
rowing!).
5. boosts immune cells and immunerelated hormones, decreases stress
hormones.
6. breaks pain/spasm cycles through
muscular relaxation.
7. decreases inflammation, assisting
with sleep.
What a phenomenal list — but wait,
there’s more! The psychological benefits of laughter are significant, too.
Stress relief actually lasts long after
laughing, bolstering “stress immunity.” A new perspective can emerge,
altering our perception of discomfort
and distress, and enabling greater
resilience and stress management
abilities.
Laughter is contagious and the mere
anticipation of a good chuckle makes
us feel terrific. A big smile from someone nearby can catch our eye, with
the likelihood of laughter, which stimulates one-on-one bonding. Research
even tells us that, overall, women prefer a man with a sense of humor; men
prefer women who laugh at their wit.
Clearly, a daily dose of laughter is
valuable, so exercise your skills today.
1. Make a pledge to laugh out loud
every day.
2. Set aside time to call someone
who adds fun to your life at least once
a week.
3. Start a humor collection (jokes,
clippings, cartoons, cards, mugs,
books, videos).
4. Watch funny movies.
5. Do something silly each day.
As one of the most natural and beneficial gifts we can give ourselves,
laughter is the perfect prescription to
include in our daily diet. Go ahead …
let it be the self-induced prescription
that spices up your life. Laughing is
good for you. … Just do it!
TERESA (TEDDY) E. ARAAS, PhD, CHES, CYT-700, RYT-500
owns local businesses Balanced Living Health & Wellbeing
Consultants, LLC and Santosha Yoga. She teaches doctoral courses
in health promotion and wellness in the Department of Health
Sciences, Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions, Provo,
Utah.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Mischief achieved
The Cat in the Hat’s Thing 1 and Thing 2 live up to their reputations by pranking Principal Brett Dahl’s office
during the Dr. Seuss-themed celebration “Seuss and Excellence We Cheuss (choose)” Thursday afternoon at
Sagebrush Elementary School. Pictured from left are first-grade teacher Amy Willson as Thing 2 and fourthgrade teacher Meg Muth as Thing 1. The annual event was a pre-PAWS celebration, which involved music and
dancing by the students. Faculty also played roles as the Cat from Dr. Seuss’ “Cat in the Hat” and Horton from
“Horton Hears a Who!”
LOCAL BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Next ‘Jentel Presents’ set for
Tuesday
SHERIDAN — Jentel Artist Residency
Program is pleased to present this month’s
residents in an event open to the public.
“Jentel Presents” will take place Tuesday
from 5:30-7 p.m. at the Sagebrush
Community Art Center, on the corner of
Fifth and Broadway streets.
“Jentel Presents” is a community outreach program that features visual presentations and readings by the visual artists
and writers at the residency.
Tuesday’s presenters include fiction
writer Branden Boyer-White of Long
Beach, California; painter and printmaker
Mariana Escribano of Wichita, Kansas;
acrylic and graphite painter Jennifer Day
of Tucson, Arizona; narrative non-fiction
writer Todd Weeks of Brooklyn, New
Jersey; fiber artist Lisa Kriner of Berea,
Kentucky; and sculptor Yong Soon Min of
Los Angeles, California.
There is no admission charge for “Jentel
Presents” and refreshments are available.
For more information please visit
www.jentelarts.org or call Jentel at 7372311.
The Sagebrush Community Art Center is
located at 201 E. Fifth St.
SC to host employee art exhibit
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan College
annual employee art exhibit will open
Tuesday in the Martinsen Gallery at the
Edward A. Whitney Academic Center.
The show features photography, painting,
quilting, ceramics, metalwork, fashion and
folk art.
Awards will be given for people’s choice
and best in show.
An opening reception will be held from
4:30-5:30 p.m. Tuesday. Hors d’oeuvres will
be served.
In addition, a raffle drawing will be held
at 5 p.m. for a $100 gift certificate to
Frackelton’s.
The exhibit will be on display through
April 14.
Sheridan College is located at 3059
Coffeen Ave.
Reading series continues
at local libraries
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan Fulmer
Library will offer the series “Nature,
Animals, People and Their Interactions,”
which will be moderated by Katie Curtiss.
Story Branch Library and Tongue River
Branch Library will offer the series
“Remembrance of Things Past: Exploring
the Ghosts and Dreams of Family
Memories,” which will be moderated by
Norleen Healy. The books include powerful
memoirs that explore complex family relations.
The Claire Yorks Reading and Discussion
series is funded by an endowment established at the Sheridan County Fulmer
Public Library. Claire Yorks’ husband, Sam
Yorks, was the first moderator of adult
reading and discussion groups at the
Fulmer Library in Sheridan.
The books are available for checkout at
the front desk of each library. Patrons are
welcome to attend one or more of the discussions at any of the libraries.
The schedule is as follows:
Sheridan County Fulmer Public
Library:
March 17: “Ordinary Wolves” at 6:30 p.m.
April 21: “We Are All Completely Beside
Ourselves” at 6:30 p.m.
May 19: “The Light Between Oceans” at
6:30 p.m.
Story Branch Library:
March 2: “This Boy’s Life” at 6:30 p.m.
April 6: “Glass Castle” at 6:30 p.m.
May 4: “All Over But the Shoutin’” at 6:30
p.m.
Tongue River Branch Library:
March 10: “Cocktail Hour Under the Tree
of Forgetfulness” at 4:30 p.m.
April 14: “This Boy’s Life” at 4:30 p.m.
SUNDAY & MONDAY EVENTS |
Sunday
• 2 p.m., auditions for “Laughter — Always the Best Medicine,” Carriage House Theater,
419 Delphi Ave.
Monday
• 7 p.m., auditions for “Laughter — Always the Best Medicine,” Carriage House Theater,
419 Delphi Ave.
TIPPED OVER |
Leonard Nimoy leaves legacy
beyond science-fiction
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Leonard Nimoy didn’t just leave a lasting impression on the science-fiction genre, he also did so on science
itself.
After news spread of the 83-year-old actor’s
passing Friday, remembrances poured in from
beyond the entertainment spectrum, sent by
the likes of NASA, Virgin Galactic, Intel,
Google and other organizations motivated by
Nimoy and his “Star Trek” role as truth-seeking science officer Spock.
“Farewell, Leonard Nimoy,” tweeted the
technology company Intel. “You inspired us
to always keep reaching for the final frontier.”
NASA said “so many of us at NASA were
inspired by ‘Star Trek’” and sent out a photo
taken in 1976 of Nimoy and his “Trek” cast
mates in front of NASA’s space shuttle
Enterprise, parked outside the agency’s manufacturing facilities in Palmdale, California.
Samantha Cristoforetti, an Italian astronaut
aboard the International Space Station, similarly tweeted her condolences from space.
“Live Long and Prosper, Mr. #Spock!” she
wrote.
Nimoy’s commitment to astronomy warped
from beyond the starship Enterprise and into
the real world. He and his wife, Susan, donated $1 million to the renovation of the iconic
Griffith Park observatory complex overlooking Los Angeles. The observatory’s theater is
named after Nimoy.
The actor, director and photographer also
narrated several films about astronomy,
including a 2012 short film about NASA’s
Dawn mission and the 1994 IMAX documentary film “Destiny in Space,” as well as such
video games as “Civilization IV” and
“Seamen.”
Today’s Highlight in History:
On Feb. 28, 1940, the first televised college basketball games
were broadcast by New York City
station W2XBS as Pittsburgh
defeated Fordham, 57-37, and New
York University beat Georgetown,
50-27, at Madison Square Garden.
On this date:
In 1844, a 12-inch gun aboard
the USS Princeton exploded as
the ship was sailing on the
Potomac River, killing Secretary
of State Abel P. Upshur, Navy
Secretary Thomas W. Gilmer and
several others.
In 1861, the Territory of
Colorado was organized.
In 1915, actor-comedian Zero
Mostel was born in Brooklyn,
New York.
In 1942, the heavy cruiser USS
Houston and the Australian light
cruiser HMAS Perth were
attacked by Japanese forces during the World War II Battle of
Sunda Strait; both were sunk
shortly after midnight.
In 1953, scientists James D.
Watson and Francis H.C. Crick
announced they had discovered
the double-helix structure of
DNA.
In 1960, a day after defeating
the Soviets at the Winter Games
in Squaw Valley, California, the
United States won its first
Olympic hockey gold medal by
defeating Czechoslovakia, 9-4.
In 1972, President Richard M.
Nixon and Chinese Premier Zhou
Enlai issued the Shanghai
Communique, which called for
normalizing relations between
their countries, at the conclusion
of Nixon’s historic visit to China.
In 1975, 42 people were killed
in London’s Underground when a
train smashed into the end of a
tunnel.
In 1986, Swedish Prime
Minister Olof Palme (PAHL’-meh)
was shot to death in central
Stockholm. (The killing remains
unsolved.)
In 1993, a gun battle erupted at
a religious compound near Waco,
Texas, when Bureau of Alcohol,
Tobacco and Firearms agents
tried to arrest Branch Davidian
leader David Koresh on weapons
charges; four agents and six
Davidians were killed as a 51-day
standoff began.
In 1995, Denver International
Airport opened after 16 months of
delays and $3.2 billion in budget
overruns.
In 2013, Benedict XVI became
the first pope in 600 years to
resign, ending an eight-year pontificate. (Benedict was succeeded
the following month by Pope
Francis.)
Ten years ago: In Santa Maria,
California, the prosecution and
defense gave opening statements
in the sexual molestation trial of
Michael Jackson, who was later
acquitted. A U.S. District Judge,
Joan Humphrey Lefkow, discovered the bodies of her husband
and mother inside her Chicago
home. (An unemployed electrician confessed to the murders in
a suicide note.) A suicide car
bombing targeted at security
recruits killed 125 people in
Hillah, Iraq. Lebanon’s proSyrian prime minister, Omar
Karami, resigned amid large antiSyria street demonstrations in
Beirut.
Five years ago: Sidney Crosby
scored the winning goal in overtime to give Canada a 3-2 victory
over the United States in the final
event of the Vancouver Olympics.
Canada earned its 14th gold
medal, the most by any country
at any Winter Olympics. The
American silver was the 37th
medal won by the United States
at these games, also the most by
any country at any Winter
Olympics. (The U.S. won the
medals race for the first time
since 1932.)
One year ago: Delivering a
blunt warning to Moscow,
President Barack Obama
expressed deep concern over
reported military activity inside
Ukraine by Russia and warned
“there will be costs” for any
intervention.
Thought for Today: “Who will
give me back those days when life
had wings and flew just like a
skylark in the sky.” — Marceline
Desbordes-Valmore, French
actress and poet (1786-1859).
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
Governor submits commission, board nominees
FROM STAFF REPORTS
CHEYENNE — Gov. Matt Mead sent
his list of nominees for state offices,
boards and commissions to the
Wyoming Senate on Thursday, and
several Sheridan County residents
were nominated for the first time or
tapped for reappointment.
“Boards and commissions play a significant role — from licensing doctors
to overseeing highway budgets,” Mead
said. “Those who serve on these
boards and commissions commit their
time and expertise. Their work makes
a difference in Wyoming. They do a
great job, and I appreciate their willingness to serve.”
The Senate has five days to approve
or reject the recommendations.
To view all appointments, see the
governor’s website at http://governor.wyo.gov.
The following is a list of Mead’s
nominations from Sheridan County.
• Peter Schoonmaker, Aeronautics
Commission — reappointment
• Thomas Scott, Wyoming Business
Council — reappointment
• Sue Belish, Board of Education —
reappointment
• Val Burgess, Board of Medicine —
new appointment
• Bernadeane Roth, pharmacist,
Board of Pharmacy — new appointment
• Mandy Moody Phillips, Board of
Tourism — new appointment
• Michelle Sullivan, University of
Wyoming Board of Trustees — new
appointment
• Sheridan Little, Water
Development Commission: Division
II, adjudicated water right — reappointment
The governor also chose agency
directors for Senate confirmation:
• Wyoming Business Council —
Shawn Reese, CEO
• Wyoming Oil and Gas
Conservation Commission — Mark
Watson, supervisor
• Department of Agriculture —
Doug Miyamoto, director
• Department of Insurance — Paul
Thomas Glause, insurance commissioner
• Public Service Commission —
Alan Minier, commissioner
• Board of Equalization — Robin
Sessions Cooley
• Board of Equalization — Martin
Hardsocg
ROYALTY: Big Horn ranch still owned by Wallop family
COURTESY PHOTO |
Big Horn native Jean Wallop, center, sits
with her children, from left, Malcolm, baby
Margaret and John, in 1935. Malcolm later
went on to be a U.S. Senator representing
Wyoming and Jean later went on to live at
Highclere Castle, where "Downton Abbey"
is filmed.
COURTESY PHOTO |
Queen Elizabeth II, center, holds her godson baby George Herbert, son of Henry
Herbert, the 7th Earl of Carnarvon, left,
and Jean Wallop, a Big Horn native.
FROM 1
While visiting cousins in Europe in
1956, Jean Wallop met and married
Henry Herbert, the 7th Earl of
Carnarvon, a longtime friend of the
British royal family and the manager
of Queen Elizabeth II's racing stables.
After marriage, the couple moved
into Highclere Castle where they
remained until Herbert’s death in
2001.
Jean Wallop still lives at the
Highclere estate in a smaller castle
called The White House, but she visits her hometown of Big Horn often
and is even a member of the Big
Horn City Historical Society.
Queen Elizabeth II is George
Herbert’s godmother due to his
father’s long-time friendship with the
queen.
In the fall of 1984, the Queen visited
Wyoming and stayed at the Wallop
family ranch in Big Horn — the
Canyon Ranch — still owned and
operated by the Wallop family today.
To Paul Wallop, who currently runs
the Canyon Ranch, the Countess of
Carnarvon is Aunt Jeanie and the 8th
Earl of Carnarvon, beloved godson to
the Queen, is his cousin.
Wallop has visited Highclere on a
number of occasions including a
summer after graduating high school
when he farmed on the estate.
“I went over and trained with their
head game keeper when we were
beginning to set up our driven bird
hunt operation here,” he said. “We
now have a game shoot, much like
they do in England, so I went over
and studied with them on how they
raise their pheasants and such.”
Wallop’s other stays at Highclere
have included his honeymoon, family
vacations and his most recent trip to
see his cousin just last summer.
To him, while the show is interesting and he occasionally watches it,
“Downton Abbey” is not what makes
Highclere Castle special.
The historical connections of the
Herbert family are immense and
many of them are reflected in the castle.
The 5th Earl of Carnarvon,
Herbert’s great-grandfather, is the
man who discovered King
Tutankhamun’s tomb, funding the
exploration of Howard Carter in 1922.
He was the first person to ever step
foot in the tomb, and is thought to
have lost his life due to that fact.
“When they first opened the tomb,
he was bitten by a mosquito on the
neck and he died shortly after of septicemia and there was always a story
of the curse of the man who would
disturb the tomb,” Wallop said,
adding that it was later discovered
that his dog, who was in the care of
someone else while the Earl was on
the expedition, died at the exact same
time of the same thing.
Now, the castle is home to an
Egyptian museum in the basement,
something that Wallop’s cousin and
Colorado’s marijuana
businesses growing
less than they could
DENVER (AP) — A new state report shows Colorado’s
marijuana industry is producing a lot less than it could.
Laws limit how many plants a business can cultivate.
According to the annual update released Friday by the
marijuana enforcement division of the Department of
Revenue, the monthly average for medical marijuana businesses last year ranged from a third to about half of what
they could have produced. The division estimates retail
cultivation averaged 40 percent or less of the production
limit.
State officials say in the report that growers may have
been under-reporting as they shifted to a new computer
system for tracking inventory.
Mason Tvert, who was instrumental in Colorado’s marijuana legalization campaign, says businesses are simply
determining how much they can sell, and producing more
doesn’t make economic sense.
his wife created when they took over
the castle.
“The museum has pieces that they
collected over time but it shows
Egyptology and their connection to
Egypt through their discoveries,”
Wallop said.
Though the family does have a historical connection to the TV show,
Wallop does not endorse the rumors
that the characters are based on
members of his family.
Julian Fellowes, who writes and
produces the show, is a longtime family friend of the Wallops of England,
and the Fellowes and the Wallops
were actually related a long time ago
by marriage.
“I don’t necessarily believe there is
a specific connection or they draw
from specific people for characters. I
think that it’s an amalgamation of all
the good stories over time,” Wallop
said. “Sometimes the stories overlap
— they talk about having an
American wife and obviously my
uncle did — but if you go back far
enough in history a lot of people are
related.”
Wallop said the best part of the
show, to him, is seeing familiar places
and knowing that the income from
the show is helping his family keep
the castle going.
“It’s a grand building, an amazing
place, and with a big place like that
they use it now and again for family
events and such but most of the time
it is being used by people who are
paying to use it in order to be able to
afford to keep it up,” Wallop said.
“You know how expensive it is to
keep up your own house, imagine trying to keep a place like that up.”
He added that no one is living in the
castle any longer, saying that when
you are running TV programs and
public tours and all the things that
are required to keep a place like that
successful, it is not a convenient place
to live.
“The building is spectacular and
then the program is something else,
but it’s an important thing to recognize that the building is the place
they film the program, but the program is someone’s writing and creativity, it’s not our family,” he said.
The British drawing-room drama is
already renewed for a sixth season.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A7
Workplace safety probe of Cheyenne
plant fire that burned 3
CHEYENNE (AP) — Wyoming workplace safety
officials say they’re investigating a fire that burned
three men at a chemical plant that manufactures
explosives near Cheyenne.
The fire happened Thursday morning at the Dyno
Nobel plant a couple miles west of town.
Wyoming Department of Workforce Services
spokeswoman Hayley McKee said Friday three men
ages 28, 29 and 40 are being treated at the Western
States Burn Center at the North Colorado Medical
Center in Greeley, Colorado.
McKee says the flash fire happened during work on
a compressor system.
Dyno Nobel officials, including company safety representative Eric Smith, did not return messages
Friday seeking comment.
Workplace safety officials say they also investigated
the Dyno Nobel plant last year after a man inhaled
ammonia gas through a malfunctioning respirator.
2015 Adult CoEd Volleyball League
Trying to find a way to kick start your Spring Fitness Routine? What
about something that’s fun and gets you out off the couch? Sheridan
Recreation District is taking Registrations for Co-Ed Volleyball
starting February 9th through March 6th. Divisions are
Co-Recreation “Upper” and Co-Recreation “Lower” with games
being held on either Tuesday or Thursday nights (depending on
league) thru the month of May. Upper will have a league end
tournament and awards, where as the Lower will only have a season
end champion with awards with no tournament. The cost for Upper
is $210.00 and cost for Lower is $160.00. There will be a Managers
Meeting February 25th at 6:00pm at Sheridan Jr. High School. All
teams that are represented will receive a $10.00 discount on their
team fees.
Contact Robbie Spencer at the Sheridan Recreation District
office at 674-6421 for more information.
Penrose Place Apartments
Great News for Seniors 62 yrs of Age or Older
Comfortable & Affordable Apartments
Accepting Applications for Seniors
CALL 763-4690 • TTY (800) 877-9965
• Rent Based on Income,
HUD 202 PRAC Program
• On-Site Community Administrator
• Off Street Parking
• Mailboxes on Premises
• Laundry Facility
• Electric, Gas, Water, Sewer & Trash
Pickup Paid by Penrose Place
• Community Room Available for
Social Gatherings and Meetings
For More Information or Application:
667 East 6th St. • Sheridan, WY 82801 • 307-763-4690
A8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Last outdoor show
Elizabeth Winnop puts on a dramatic program during Sheridan Ice’s sixth annual Ice Show Wednesday night
at Sheridan Ice. This was the last ice show to be featured in the outdoor ice rink. Construction of the indoor
ice facility begins this spring.
Congress tries 1-week bill to keep
Homeland Security open
WASHINGTON (AP) — On a day of high
drama, the Republican-controlled Congress
struggled into the night Friday to pass
emergency legislation to keep the
Homeland Security Department in full
funding for one week and avert a partial
shutdown threatened for midnight.
Acting without fanfare, the Senate
cleared the measure less than four hours
before the deadline that would have triggered a partial shutdown at the federal
agency with anti-terrorism responsibilities.
‘There are terrorist attacks all over
world and we’re talking about closing
down Homeland Security. This is like
living in world of crazy people.’
Tweet by Peter King
Rep. of New York
That sent the bill to the House, where
only a few hours earlier, 52 rebellious
Republicans unexpectedly joined with
Democrats to vote down a three-week funding bill. The vote was 224-203.
Conservatives were furious that the leadership had dropped provisions repealing
Obama administration directives that
shield immigrants from deportation.
Democrats demanded longer-term funding
as their price for passage.
“You have made a mess,” House
Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi said
accusingly to Republicans as the vote
neared.
In the aftermath, even some Republicans
agreed.
“There are terrorist attacks all over
world and we’re talking about closing down
Homeland Security. This is like living in
world of crazy people,” tweeted Rep. Peter
King of New York, a former chairman of
the Homeland Security Committee.
The debacle in the House set a chain of
events in motion.
First, Homeland Security officials circulated a lengthy contingency plan indicating
that about 30,000 employees could expect to
be furloughed without passage of funding
legislation.
Then the White House announced
President Barack Obama had spoken with
Pelosi and Senate Democratic Leader
Harry Reid. Moments later, Majority
Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky
strode onto the Senate floor and swiftly
gained approval for the seven-day measure.
Taken together, the day’s roller-coaster
events at the Capitol underscored the difficulty Republicans have had so far this year
in translating last fall’s election gains into
legislative accomplishment — a step its
own leaders say is necessary to establish
the party’s credentials as a responsible,
governing party.
Republicans gained control of the Senate
in November’s balloting, and emerged with
their largest House majority in more than
70 years.
A combination of conservative, tea partybacked Republicans on one side of the
political aisle and Democrats on the other
brought down the funding measure.
The first group was upset because the legislation had been stripped of changes to
Obama administration directives policy
that shielded millions of immigrants from
the threat of deportation. Democrats
opposed it in overwhelming numbers
because it lacked full-year funding for the
sprawling department.
Pelosi and other Democrats urged
Republicans both before and after the vote
to allow debate on legislation to keep the
department in funds through the Sept. 30
end of the budget year — a step the GOP
high command has so far refused to take.
That might get enough Democratic votes
to pass the bill, but at the same time had
the potential to drive away Republicans.
“It does not make any difference whether
the funding is for three weeks, three
months or a full fiscal year. If it’s illegal,
it’s illegal,” said Rep. Mo Brooks, R-Ala.
Further demonstrating GOP woes, House
GOP leaders abruptly called off a vote on a
major education bill that had attracted significant opposition from conservatives as
well as Democrats and the White House.
Aides attributed that decision to the need
to work separately on rounding up enough
votes to pass the measure that would prevent a partial shutdown at Homeland
Security.
Across the Capitol, the Senate waited all
day to add its assent after playing out a
series of acts in the Republicans’ effort to
use the measure to wring concessions on
immigration from the White House.
A largely symbolic attempt to advance
legislation that would repeal Obama’s
immigration directive of last fall failed on
a vote of 57-42, three short of the 60
required.
That separate proposal was “commonsense legislation that would protect our
democracy from the egregious example of
executive overreach we saw in November,”
said Senate Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell of Kentucky, who successfully
led his rank and file in recent days to a
decision to pass Homeland Security legislation without immigration-related provisions.
The day’s developments occurred against
a midnight deadline for funding the department, an agency with significant responsibilities in the nation’s fight against terrorism.
An early, 240-183 test vote in the House
indicated ample support for the spending
bill, but a short while later the House was
gaveled into recess while the search went
on for support to pass the legislation itself.
Some House Republicans said the entire
strategy of passing a short-term measure
and seeking negotiations on a longer-term
bill that included changes in Obama’s
immigration policy was flawed. They noting that Senate Democrats had demonstrated their ability to block any challenges to
Obama’s immigration policies, and that the
president had vowed to veto them in any
event.
“Some folks just have a harder time facing political reality than others,” said Rep.
Charlie Dent, R-Pa., speaking of other
Republicans.
Obama’s first immigration directive, in
2012, lifted the threat of deportation from
many immigrants brought to the country
illegally as youngsters. Another order last
fall applied to millions more who are in the
United States unlawfully.
ALMANAC
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A9
AGENDAS |
Sheridan County Commission
9 a.m. Tuesday
Second floor boardroom
Sheridan County Courthouse addition
224 S. Main St.
10) with EBMS allowing Sheridan County to
receive services from MultiPlan, Inc
K. Affirm request for service at
Elevated Pressure with Montana Dakota Utilities
Co for Sheridan County Fairgrounds Exhibit Hall
L. General County Vouchers, February;
M. General Airport Vouchers,
February.
• Consider Agenda
• Announcements
• Public comments on matters not on the
agenda
• Consider Road Annexation MOU with the city
(Postponed 2/17/15)
• Consider Cooperative Agreement with the
city for Holloway Ave. (11th-15th Street)
• Consider S-14-002M: Whispering Hills Estates
Minor Subdivision
• Consider Base Bid/Alternate 1
Award/Contract for West Burkitt Street Parking
Lot Project
• Consider Cooperative Funding Agreement
with the city for Bid Alt. 1, Parking Lot Project
• Consider MOU with WYDOT for purchase of
reclaimed asphalt pavement
• Consider Fair Board appointment
• Call to Order and Pledge
• Consent Agenda:
A. Minutes from special session, Feb.
12, 2015;
B. Minutes from staff meeting, Feb. 17,
2015;
C. Minutes from regular session, Feb.
17, 2015;
D. Minutes from staff meeting, Feb.
23, 2015;
E. License agreement with
CenturyLink to cross Brinton Road, County Road
#103 for placement of fiber cable, (fee paid)
F. Affirm letter of support to legislators for local government budget amendment
G. Affirm authorization letter to One
Call of Wyoming and WyGISC re: Road Mapping
Project
H. Affirm free landfill weekends and
Trees for Trash schedule/reimbursement with the
city
I. Affirm letter of support to
Department of the Interior re: Extension Request,
Oil & Gas Reform
J. Affirm joinder agreement (Exhibit
Sheridan County Commission
8:45 a.m. Monday
Second floor commission library, #216
Sheridan County Courthouse addition
224 S. Main St.
D. Set a work study meeting to review
the 2015-2016 budget
• Citizen communique
• Council comments/requests for future agenda items
• Junior Council comments/requests for future
agenda items
• Adjourn to executive session to discuss personnel
• Call to order
• Voucher review
• Reports from staff/elected officials
• Adjourn
Dayton Town Council
7:30 p.m. Monday
Dayton Town Hall
Sheridan County Planning and Zoning
Commission
5:30 p.m. Thursday
Second floor commissioners boardroom
Sheridan County Courthouse addition
224 S. Main St.
• Call to order
• Pledge of Allegiance
• Approval of agenda
A. Additions
B. Deletions
• Approve minutes of the Feb. 18, 2015 secondary council meeting
• Reports — utility clerk/building permits, fire
department, law enforcement, engineering,
employees, planning committee, Tongue River
Valley Joint Powers Board, Council
• Approve warrants
• Old business updates
• Announcements/correspondence
• New business
A. Mayor to appoint Council president
B. Mayor to appoint Council committees
C. Dayton Benefit Club representatives to discuss roof project
• Call to order and pledge
• Roll call
• Approval of agenda
• Approval of minutes — Feb. 5, 2015
• Matters from the public not on the agenda
• New business
A. CU-15-001: Born in a Barn private
event venue conditional use permit
B. Proposed resolution to initiate
amendments to the rules and regulations governing zoning and tules and regulations governing division of land, Sheridan County, Wyoming
• Matters from staff
A. WYOPASS annual conference, May
14-15, Riverton
B. Upcoming Planning and Zoning
expirations on June 30, 2015 (Audrey Brown and
Mike Schumacher)
C. Action taken at March 3 Board of
County Commissioners meeting concerning planning item (Whispering Hills Estates minor subdivision)
• Matters from commissioners
• Adjounment
Sheridan County School District 1
Recreation District board
5:30 p.m. Tuesday
SCSD1 central office
1127 Dayton St., Ranchester
• Call to order
• Roll call
• Approval of agenda
• Approval of past meeting minutes
• Approval of treasurer’s report
• Old business
1. Discussion of land purchase and
mortgage
2. Discussion of book funding questions — Big Horn Elementary library fund request
• Public communications
• Adjournment
Obama, Kerry
condemn killing of Russian
opposition figure
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama and
Secretary of State John Kerry on Friday condemned
the killing of prominent Russian opposition figure
Boris Nemtsov.
Obama said in a statement that Nemtsov was brutally murdered. He called on Russia’s government to
“conduct a prompt, impartial and transparent investigation into the circumstances of his murder and
ensure that those responsible for this vicious killing
are brought to justice.”
Nemtsov is a former deputy prime minister who
later became a prominent opposition leader and a
sharp critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin. The
55-year-old was shot and killed early Saturday in
Moscow just outside of the Kremlin.
Obama called Nemtsov a “tireless advocate” for
Russia and for the rights of Russian citizens, and
praised Nemtsov for fighting corruption. Obama and
Nemtsov met in Moscow in 2009.
In a separate statement, Kerry said Nemtsov “sought
to reform and open Russia, and to empower the
Russian people to have a greater say in the life of their
country. His absence will be deeply felt in Russia and
around the world.”
The killing comes as the U.S. and Russia are at odds
over Russia’s actions in eastern Ukraine.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Here are the results
of Friday’s
Mega Millions
lottery drawing:
What’s in the hat?
Kindergarteners Mallorie Akers, left, Tristan Sampson and Alex Eisenman play with their Cat in the Hat themed hats during the Dr. Seuss themed
celebration “Seuss and Excellence We Cheuss (choose)” Thursday afternoon at Sagebrush Elementary School. The annual event was a pre-PAWS
celebration, which involved music and dancing by the students.
WASHINGTON (AP)
— An Orthodox rabbi
who pleaded guilty to
videotaping nude
women in a ritual bath
in Washington has
resigned from his post
at Towson University
in Maryland.
WJZ-TV reports that
Barry Freundel, who
pleaded guilty to 52
counts of voyeurism
and admitted to secretly videotaping women
Rabbi accused of
videotaping
women resigns
from university
SUNDAY
TUESDAY
MONDAY
19
-1
Cold with plenty
of sunshine
26
Mostly sunny
4
35
Almanac
7
Much colder
with snow, 1-3"
12
-4
The Sun
Temperature
High/low ....................................................... 19/-13
Normal high/low ............................................42/17
Record high .............................................70 in 1992
Record low ............................................. -18 in 1960
Precipitation (in inches)
24 hours through 5 p.m. Friday ...................... 0.00"
Month to date................................................. 1.28"
Normal month to date .................................... 0.52"
Year to date .................................................... 1.73"
Normal year to date ....................................... 1.08"
23
Today
Sunday
Monday
Rise
Set
6:48 a.m.
6:46 a.m.
6:45 a.m.
5:54 p.m.
5:55 p.m.
5:56 p.m.
The Moon
Today
Sunday
Monday
Full
Rise
Set
1:32 p.m.
2:27 p.m.
3:24 p.m.
3:37 a.m.
4:19 a.m.
4:55 a.m.
Last
New
9a 10a 11a Noon 1p
2p
3p
4p
5p
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection. Shown is the highest
value for the day.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High;
11+ Extreme
National Weather for Saturday, February 28
Shown is today's weather.
Temperatures are today's highs
and tonight's lows.
Hardin
23/7
Parkman
17/0
Dayton
19/0
Lovell
23/7
Cody
18/1
Ranchester
18/0
SHERIDAN
Big Horn
26/9
Basin
26/7
19/-1
Mar 13
Mar 20
Mar 27
For more detailed weather
information on the Internet, go to:
www.thesheridanpress.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2015
Gillette
18/2
Buffalo
15/2
Worland
24/8
Wright
17/2
Kaycee
16/2
Thermopolis
22/6
Mar 5
Clearmont
18/1
Story
15/-1
First
Weather on the Web
UV Index tomorrow
www.thesheridanpress.co m
Broadus
20/3
7
Big Horn Mountain Precipitation
24 hours through noon Friday ........................ 0.00"
GO ONLINE!
Clouds and sun;
not as cold
Sun and Moon
Sheridan County Airport through 5 p.m. Fri.
Big
Breakfast
WEDNESDAY
Billings
19/7
Mainly cloudy
and cold
2146 Coffeen Ave. • 673-1100
2590 N. Main • 672-5900
Regional Weather
5-Day Forecast for Sheridan
TODAY
in the changing room
of a ritual bath in a
Washington synagogue for years,
turned in his resignation letter to Towson
University on
Thursday.
Freundel was an
adjunct professor at
both Towson and
Georgetown universities.
His resignation is
effective March 27.
Regional Cities
City
Billings
Casper
Cheyenne
Cody
Evanston
Gillette
Green River
Jackson
Today
Hi/Lo/W
19/7/c
17/-2/sf
21/5/sf
18/1/sf
31/13/sf
18/2/c
30/9/sf
29/1/sf
Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
28/15/s
23/10/pc
22/10/sn
26/12/s
32/20/c
24/11/s
33/14/c
30/9/c
Estimated jackpot:
PENDING
Winning numbers:
7-49-53-60-64;
Mega Ball 4
Megaplier 2X
Mon.
Hi/Lo/W
39/7/c
41/10/pc
37/20/sn
38/10/s
36/18/sn
37/7/s
39/20/sn
32/10/pc
City
Laramie
Newcastle
Rawlins
Riverton
Rock Springs
Scottsbluff
Sundance
Yellowstone
Today
Hi/Lo/W
20/2/sf
24/3/pc
26/3/sf
18/4/sf
26/7/sf
30/12/c
16/1/pc
23/-16/sf
Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
21/12/sf
24/8/s
28/15/c
21/7/pc
30/15/c
31/15/c
23/9/s
26/4/s
Mon.
Hi/Lo/W
38/15/sn
37/7/pc
40/17/c
31/12/s
37/18/sn
43/19/c
34/2/s
29/-3/pc
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Shown are
today's noon
positions of
weather systems
and precipitation.
Temperature
bands are highs
for the day.
A10 HINN FULL 0228.qxp_A Section Template 2/27/15 2:49 PM Page 1
A10
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
SPORTS
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B1
Generals fall
to Central
Wyo. College
Friday
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Friday’s
Scores
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOYS BASKETBALL
Campbell County 69,
Sheridan 57
Star Valley 39, Jackson
Hole 31
Wheatland 47,
Torrington 41
2A East Regional
Consolation Semifinal
Burns 66, Wright 61
Tongue River 59,
Moorcroft 49
Semifinal
Lusk 61, Big Horn 51
2A West Regional
Consolation Semifinal
Shoshoni 41, Big Piney
38
Wind River 71,
Thermopolis 51
Semifinal
Rocky Mountain 60,
Wyoming Indian 43
1A East Regional
Consolation Semifinal
Normative Services 57,
Hanna-Elk Mountain 53
Rock River 72, Hulett 54
1A West Regional
Consolation Semifinal
Cokeville 85, Ten Sleep
54
Dubois 62, Farson-Eden
41
Semifinal
Burlington 77,
Encampment 47
St. Stephens 65, Little
Snake River 64
GIRLS BASKETBALL
Campbell County 59,
Sheridan 56
Casper Natrona 75,
Green River 36
Cheyenne East 65,
Laramie 22
Cheyenne South 47,
Cheyenne Central 33
Lovell 43, Lander 34
Rock Springs 48, Casper
Kelly Walsh 47
Star Valley 61, Jackson
Hole 21
2A East Regional
Consolation Semifinal
Big Horn 48, Lusk 40
Wright 55, Sundance 42
Semifinal
Burns 47, Tongue
River 43
Southeast 49, Pine Bluffs
40
2A West Regional
Consolation Semifinal
Greybull 49, Rocky
Mountain 27
Shoshoni 46, Big Piney
23
Semifinal
Lyman 43, Kemmerer 41
Wyoming Indian 55,
Thermopolis 50
1A East Regional
Consolation Semifinal
Hulett 59, GuernseySunrise 33
Rock River 43, Midwest
31
Semifinal
Hanna-Elk Mountain 43,
Kaycee 41
Upton 50, Lingle-Fort
Laramie 47
1A West Regional
Consolation Semifinal
Burlington 63, Dubois 26
Ten Sleep 30, FarsonEden 28
Semifinal
Cokeville 64,
Encampment 41
St. Stephens 64, Little
Snake River 44
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Sheridan’s Coy Steel drives the ball against Camels’ Eli Voigt during the game Friday night at Sheridan High School. The
Broncs dropped to Gillette 69-57 to end their regular season.
Sheridan drops two games to
Gillette to end regular season play
BY MIKE PRUDEN
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — It was a tough end to the regular
season for both Sheridan High School boys and girls
basketball teams last night, dropping two games
with Gillette on senior night.
The girls kicked off the evening at Sheridan High
School. Well, most of the girls. The Lady Broncs’
leading scorer, Robbi Ryan, wasn’t kicking anything
as she had to sit out with a sprained ankle. That
meant that the rest of the Lady Broncs roster had to
pick up the slack.
Things started off slowly for both sides, with not
much offensive production early in the first quarter.
Then, things exploded in the final minute when
Megan Myers dropped back-to-back 3-pointers for
Sheridan. Gillette was able to squeeze a deep ball of
their own in between Myers’, and the Lady Camels
held a 16-10 lead after the first eight minutes.
Those two things lit a spark for the Lady Broncs,
and the offense finally hit its stride. An Emily
Julian layup gave Sheridan their first lead of the
game at 25-24 with just under two minutes left in the
quarter, and they took an eventual 27-26 lead into
halftime.
It was Kaycen Townsend who really stepped up in
Ryan’s place last night, though. Townsend hit a
rhythm in the second half, and her teammates kept
finding her. She ended with 17 points to lead all scorers. To help, Myers and Dylan Wright added 10
apiece. Julian was in control at point guard, finishing with nine points, 11 rebounds and six assists.
Townsend and her teammates’ numbers weren’t
quite enough, though, as a back-and-forth secondhalf battle ended 59-56 in favor of the visiting Lady
Camels.
SEE BRONCS, PAGE B2
Eagles take down
Wolves 59-49
Broncs swimmers
take seventh
at state meet
BY MIKE DUNN
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
DAYTON — The Tongue River Eagles live to fight
another day after beating the Moorcroft Wolves 59-49 in a
loser-out game during the 2A East regional tournament
Friday.
The game was fairly tight for the entire four quarters
of play. Nabbing six offensive rebounds in the first quarter, the Eagles jumped out to a 10-point lead after the
first quarter. But the turnover bug once again bit Tongue
River’s offense. Coughing the ball up seven times in the
second quarter, the Eagles let the Wolves back in the
game and headed into the half with a narrow 26-25 lead.
Tongue River lived and died by their full-court press in
the early part of the second half — Moorcroft maneuvered around the trap for an easy score on one possession, then turned around and gave the ball away on the
next possession. Still, the Eagles kept shooting themselves in the foot with the turnovers, throwing the ball
away nine times in the second half.
SEE EAGLES, PAGE B2
SHERIDAN — The
Sheridan College Generals
had a good start in their
NJCAA Region IX tournament game against
Central Wyoming College
in Riverton Friday — but
it wasn’t quite enough to
pull out a win.
The 82-77 loss means the
Sheridan College men’s
basketball team is out of
the tournament. The
Rustlers will advance to
Northwest College in
Powell for the remaining
tournament action.
The Generals went into
the game with a 17-13
record.
Head Coach Matt
Hammer said his team
came out and had a good
start.
“We shot well in the first
half,” Hammer said.
“Then we started getting
lazy on defense.”
The Rustlers got a few
transition buckets early in
the first half and the
Generals struggled to keep
them off the glass, allowing eight offensive
rebounds in the first half.
The team came out
stronger after halftime.
“They played hard, did
better in their transition
defense,” Hammer said.
With just a few minutes
left in the second half,
Sheridan was up by five
points.
But they just couldn’t
hold onto that lead no
matter how hard they
tried.
“A couple turnovers, a
couple of defensive
rebounds and a couple of
dumb fouls” led to the
Generals’ demise,
Hammer said.
Kyi Thomas scored 27
points, Jamir Andrews
pulled in 21 and Terrell
Butler added 17 to the
total.
Although the team was
obviously frustrated by
the loss, Hammer said
they talked about the
importance of continuing
to be good teammates and
supporting each other
while working to take care
of classroom studies and
working to become better
players in the gym this
spring.
“We’ve got some good
freshmen who will be
coming back and a good
nucleus to build around,”
Hammer said about looking toward next season.
“We just need to get to
work this spring and get
ready for next year.”
FROM STAFF REPORTS
MIKE DUNN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Jay Keo drives to the hoop in last night's victory
against Moorcroft.
SHERIDAN — Sheridan
Broncs swimmers found
themselves in seventh
place with a team score of
83 after the 4A boys state
swim meet in Gillette
wrapped up Friday afternoon.
Kelly Walsh High School
won the meet with 253
team points. Rock Springs,
Campbell County, Laramie
and Cheyenne East rounded out the top five teams. A
total of 12 teams competed.
Several Sheridan swimmers had strong showings
in the meet.
SEE SWIMMERS, PAGE B2
B2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Rams lose to Niobrara County 61-51 Friday
BY MIKE DUNN
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BIG HORN — The Big Horn Rams
let the regional championship slip
out of their grasp last night in their
61-51 loss to the Niobrara County
(Lusk) Tigers in the semi-finals.
After both teams were held scoreless in the first two minutes of the
game, offenses began to erupt.
Trying to keep pace with the quick
Niobrara County offense, Big Horn
exchanged buckets and the lead with
the Tigers. The high-octane first
quarter began with a small 13-14
Lusk lead after the first quarter.
The Rams’ big men got to work
early. Collin Powers grabbed seven
rebounds and Seth Kite picked up
six off of the glass in the first half.
But despite their efforts, the Rams
were still letting the Tigers get the
best of them on the boards. Lusk
capitalized on five offensive
rebounds resulting on six secondchance points. The Rams went into
the half trailing 24-28.
Everything fell apart for the Rams
in the second half. The Tigers came
out with a 7-0 run giving them their
largest lead of the night. Big Horn
couldn’t hang onto the ball in the
third quarter. One bad pass after
another lead to seven turnovers in
the quarter for the Rams, but Big
Horn managed to at least keep pace
with the phenomenal Tiger shooting. The Rams went into the fourth
quarter with an eight-point deficit.
Even though they were able to
limit their turnovers in the fourth
quarter, the Rams’ shooting became
their next worst enemy. Big Horn
eventually ran out of time to stage
any kind of comeback and fell out of
contention for the 2A East crown.
The Rams were led by Colton Bates
who had a 13-point, four steal performance for his team. Powers finished with 12 points and 12
rebounds.
It will be do or die for the Rams in
their game against the Tongue River
Eagles. A win will send the Rams
into the state tournament while a
loss ends their season. The Eagles
and Rams split their season series 1-
1.
Still in the hunt are the Big Horn
Lady Rams, who won an early-morning, loser-out game against the Lusk
Lady Tigers.
With both teams on the verge of
elimination, the 48-40 victory was a
dogfight for the Lady Rams.
However, the difference in the game,
head coach Justin Kidneigh said,
was the Lady Rams’ ability to limit
the offensive performance of
Niobrara County’s Lexie Dockery.
Dockery, who scored 21 points in
their previous meeting, was limited
to five points in yesterday’s victory.
The Lady Rams were lead by
Bailey Bard who put up a 21-point
performance.
Big Horn will have another earlymorning matchup when they take
on Wright at 9 a.m. Kidneigh said
his team getting a full 24 hours to
rest up before their next game
should play a key factor in their contest with the Lady Panthers. Big
Horn has lost to Wright in both of
their previous meetings this season.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
EAGLES: Physical defense
Both teams traded baskets
in the first half — the Lady
After Moorcroft got within Eagles relied primarily on
two points of taking the
their game inside the paint
lead near the beginning of
while Brurns drained buckthe fourth quarter, the
ets from behind the arch.
Eagles buckled down. With
Eryn Aksamit terrorized
their season on the line,
both sides of the court for
Tongue River played downthe Lady Eagles in the secright tough and physical
ond quarter, grabbing five
defense through the senior
rebounds, one assist and
leadership of Wyatt
two steals to go along with
Schumacher.
her four points. But the rest
Cody Buller had a fantasof the team could not mirtic 20-point five-steal game
ror her performance.
for the Eagles. Wyatt
Things went from bad to
Schumacher scored 13
worse for the Lady Eagles.
points, seven rebounds and
Tongue River turned the
grabbed five steals while
ball over four times in the
Austen Scammen knocked
game due to the 10-second
down 13 points and tallied
half court violation.
four rebounds.
Additionally, the Lady
The Eagles still need one
Eagles turned the ball over
more win to get to the state
11 times in the second half.
tournament, and in their
Late-minute efforts were
way is a familiar foe. A win too little, too late for the
against county rival Big
Lady Eagles.
Horn Saturday morning
Aksamit had a stellar perwill guarantee a spot at
formance with 18 points and
state. A loss will end their
13 rebounds. Amanda Buller
season. Big Horn and
trailed with 11 points and
Tongue River have both beat four steals.
each other once this year.
The Lady Eagles take on
The Tongue River Lady
Wright today. If they win,
Eagles were left with a sour the defending state champs
taste in their mouths after
will be able to defend their
being defeated by the Burns crown at the state tournaLady Broncs 47-43 in the
ment. A loss will eliminate
semi-final game of the 2A
Tongue River from the tourEast regional tournament.
nament. The Lady Eagles
Tongue River played well; swept Wright in their two
Burns simply played better. previous matchups.
FROM B1
SWIMMERS: Many events
FROM B1
Junior Presley Felker
placed in two individual
events and two relay
events. He took sixth in the
200-yard freestyle with a
final time of 1:51.46 and
10th in the 100-yard butterfly with a time of 56.91.
Freshman Oscar Patten
placed in two individual
events and two relay
events. In the 200-yard
freestyle, he took ninth
with a final time of 1:53.50.
In the 500-yard freestyle his
final time of 5:09.01 earned
him a fourth place finish in
the finals.
Junior Jakob Eckard
placed fifth in the 100-yard
butterfly with a time of
55.36.
Sheridan’s relay teams
also swam their way to
some good finishes.
Felker, Patten, sophomore Jacob Ahlstrom and
Freshman Noah Hodges
took sixth in the 200-yard
freestyle relay with a final
time of 1:35.04, a full second faster than the team’s
preliminary time of 1:36.36.
Felker, Eckard, Patten
and Ahlstrom teamed up
for the 400-yard freestyle
relay and took sixth with a
time of 3:30.59.
Eckard, Hodges, sophomore Drew Reed and senior
Zach Ahlstrom found an
eighth place finish with a
time of 1:49.28 in the 200yard medley relay.
BRONCS: Hard work ahead
FROM B1
With the loss, Sheridan
and Gillette finish tied for
first atop the conference.
The two schools will break
the tie with a coin toss.
The Sheridan boys had
luckily already locked up
the top seed in the conference before last night’s
matchup, as a big thirdquarter rally by Gillette
ended up downing the
Broncs 69-57.
After both teams traded
blows for the first 16 minutes, a three-point Gillette
halftime lead blew up right
away in the third quarter,
and the Broncs were in a
hole they could never quite
dig out of.
Gillette was all over the
offensive glass, getting easy
put-pack layups as they
stretched their lead. The
momentum continued to
shift in the Camels’ favor
when a turnover led to a
fast-break and-1 that resulted in a flagrant foul on
Sheridan’s Kris Clark. The
Camels converted another
and-1 on their next possession to open the quarter on
a 16-2 run.
“It was evident after that
game that there’s really two
things we need to work on,”
Sheridan head coach Gale
Smith said after the game.
“One of them is defensive
rebounding. That’s really
where we let the game get
away from us in the third
quarter.
“We made a couple good
runs in the second half,”
Smith added. “But again,
once we got some momentum going, we gave it back
by giving up some offensive
rebounds.”
The other thing Smith
noticed was his team’s
struggles from the wings.
As Gillette put pressure on
Sheridan’s guards, they had
a tough time moving and
cutting away from the ball.
Dylan Daniels finished with
20 points, but most of his
baskets came on drives
through the lane.
Sheridan was able to cut
the lead to 10 after the third
quarter, but the hole was
too deep.
The bright note for Smith,
though, was how his team
hung in despite the early
third quarter deficit. With
Sheridan taking the 1-seed
into next weekend’s
Regional Tournament,
Smith hopes his team can
carry some of that fight
with them.
“This is all coachable and
it’s all correctable, so I’m
not hitting the panic button,” Smith said. “Hopefully
the kids are willing to work
hard in practice and fix
these things, so we can have
a good first night of basketball next weekend.”
The Broncs and Lady
Broncs will host the 4A East
Region Tournament next
weekend at Sheridan High
School. Stay tuned to The
Sheridan Press and follow
@PressSports_WY on
Twitter for updates on seeding and matchups.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B3
SCOREBOARD |
AHL |
American Hockey League
By The Associated Press
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP
W
L
OL SL
Manchester
53
33
13
5
2
Worcester
53
30
17
4
2
Providence
56
28
20
7
1
Portland
54
28
22
3
1
St. John’s
58
26
24
6
2
East Division
GP
W
L
OL SL
Hershey
54
33
14
5
2
Wilkes-Barre/Sc 54 30
18
2
4
Lehigh Valley 53
24
22
6
1
Binghamton
54
22
26
5
1
Norfolk
55
22
27
3
3
Northeast Division
GP
W
L
OL SL
Syracuse
55
32
15
8
0
Springfield
56
31
19
6
0
Hartford
55
30
18
4
3
Albany
55
24
22
4
5
Bridgeport
54
21
27
5
1
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
GP
W
L
OL SL
32
17
5
1
Grand Rapids 55
Rockford
55
31
18
4
2
Milwaukee
54
29
17
4
4
Chicago
53
27
20
5
1
Lake Erie
53
24
21
5
3
North Division
GP
W
L
OL SL
Utica
54
32
16
5
1
Hamilton
55
27
21
7
0
Adirondack
52
27
20
4
1
Toronto
54
24
21
9
0
Rochester
58
24
29
5
0
West Division
GP
W
L
OL SL
Oklahoma City 54
33
15
3
3
San Antonio
54
31
18
5
0
Texas
55
25
17
12
1
Charlotte
55
20
29
5
1
Iowa
58
19
37
1
1
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point
for an overtime or shootout loss.
Friday’s Games
Springfield 5, Bridgeport 3
Manchester 4, Hartford 2
Adirondack 4, Utica 0
Albany 7, Syracuse 6
Toronto 4, Rochester 3, OT
Hershey 5, Binghamton 1
Hamilton 4, Charlotte 0
Iowa 2, Lake Erie 1, OT
Providence 2, Norfolk 1
Worcester 6, St. John’s 3
Grand Rapids 4, Milwaukee 0
San Antonio 4, Oklahoma City 2
Rockford 4, Texas 3, OT
Saturday’s Games
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton at Hartford, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Hamilton, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Adirondack, 7 p.m.
Albany at Hershey, 7 p.m.
St. John’s at Worcester, 7 p.m.
Utica at Syracuse, 7 p.m.
Bridgeport at Springfield, 7 p.m.
Manchester at Portland, 7 p.m.
Iowa at Lake Erie, 7 p.m.
Binghamton at Lehigh Valley, 7:05 p.m.
Providence at Norfolk, 7:15 p.m.
Grand Rapids at Chicago, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Rockford at Texas, 8 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Binghamton at Albany, 3 p.m.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton at Bridgeport, 3 p.m.
Worcester at Manchester, 3 p.m.
Springfield at Portland, 3 p.m.
Milwaukee at Chicago, 4 p.m.
Hamilton at Utica, 4 p.m.
Lehigh Valley at Hershey, 5 p.m.
NBA |
National Basketball Association
By The Associated Press
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W
L
Pct
GB
d-Atlanta
46
12
.793
—
d-Toronto
37
21
.638
9
d-Chicago
37
22
.627
9½
Cleveland
37
23
.617
10
Milwaukee
32
25
.561
13½
Washington
33
26
.559
13½
Miami
25
32
.439
20½
Indiana
24
34
.414
22
Charlotte
23
33
.411
22
Boston
23
33
.411
22
Brooklyn
23
33
.411
22
Detroit
23
35
.397
23
Orlando
19
41
.317
28
Philadelphia
13
45
.224
33
New York
11
46
.193
34½
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W
L
Pct
GB
d-Golden State 45
11
.804
—
d-Memphis
41
16
.719
4½
Houston
40
18
.690
6
d-Portland
37
19
.661
8
Dallas
39
21
.650
8
L.A. Clippers 38
21
.644
8½
San Antonio
34
23
.596
11½
Oklahoma City 32
26
.552
14
New Orleans 31
27
.534
15
Phoenix
31
28
.525
15½
Utah
21
35
.375
24
Sacramento
20
35
.364
24½
Denver
20
37
.351
25½
L.A. Lakers
15
41
.268
30
Minnesota
13
44
.228
32½
d-division leader
___
Thursday’s Games
Cleveland 110, Golden State 99
Phoenix 117, Oklahoma City 113, OT
Friday’s Games
Philadelphia 89, Washington 81
Indiana 93, Cleveland 86
Atlanta 95, Orlando 88
Golden State 113, Toronto 89
New York 121, Detroit 115,2OT
Boston 106, Charlotte 98
L10
6-4
4-6
7-3
7-3
7-3
2-8
4-6
7-3
4-6
7-3
5-5
5-5
4-6
3-7
2-8
L10
8-2
6-4
7-3
5-5
6-4
5-5
4-6
8-2
5-5
3-7
5-5
4-6
1-9
3-7
5-5
New Orleans 104, Miami 102
Chicago 96, Minnesota 89
Houston 102, Brooklyn 98
L.A. Clippers 97, Memphis 79
Utah at Denver, 9 p.m.
San Antonio at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Milwaukee at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Detroit at Washington, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Toronto at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Memphis at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Brooklyn at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Milwaukee at Utah, 9 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
L.A. Clippers at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Houston, 3:30 p.m.
Portland at Sacramento, 6 p.m.
Charlotte at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Philadelphia at Indiana, 6 p.m.
Golden State at Boston, 6 p.m.
Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, 6:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Denver, 8 p.m.
TRANSACTIONS |
Friday’s Sports Transactions
By The Associated Press
BASEBALL
American League
OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Claimed OF Alex
Hassan off waivers from Baltimore. Placed RHP
A.J. Griffin on the 60-day DL.
TEXAS RANGERS — Agreed to terms with LHP
Alexander Claudio; RHPs Lisalverto Bonilla, Jon
Edwards, Jerad Eickhoff, Spencer Patton, Anthony
Ranaudo and RHP Nick Tepesch; Cs Jorge Alfaro
and Tomas Telis; INFs Hanser Alberto, Rougned
Odor and Jurickson Profar; and OFs Michael
Choice, Delino DeShields, Ryan Rua and Jake
Smolinski on one-year contracts.
American Association
FARGO-MOORHEAD REDHAWKS — Traded
INFs Frank Salerno and Jared Schlehuber, RHP
Brian Ernst and cash to New Jersey (Can-Am) for
OF Joe Dunigan.
LINCOLN SALTDOGS — Signed LHP Lars Liguori.
WICHITA WINGNUTS — Signed RHP Jake
Negrete and LHP Jhonathan Ramos.
Can-Am League
NEW JERSEY JACKALS — Released OF Jorge
Cortes and RHP Jeff Shields.
TROIS-RIVIERES AIGLES — Released OFs
Michael Hernandez and Drew Miller, INF Brandon
Newton and C Elvin Millan.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
DETROIT PISTONS — Assigned F Quincy Miller to
Grand Rapids (NBADL).
NBA Development League
IDAHO STAMPEDE — Claimed F Quan Prowell
from the available player pool.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFL — Named Nicole Gustafson vice president for
public policy and governmental affairs.
ARIZONA CARDINALS — Released DT Darnell
Dockett.
ATLANTA FALCONS — Released WR Harry
Douglas, OL Justin Blalock and DE Jonathan
Massaquoi.
BALTIMORE RAVENS — Terminated the contract
of DE Chris Canty.
CHICAGO BEARS — Signed TE Zach Miller to a
one-year contract extension.
CINCINNATI BENGALS — Teminated the contract
of DE Robert Geathers and WR Greg Little.
DETROIT LIONS — Re-signed LS Don Muhlbach
to a one-year contract.
MIAMI DOLPHINS — Released WRs Brian
Hartline and Brandon Gibson.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Released G Charlie
Johnson.
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — Released OL Todd
Herremans.
WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Re-signed OT Tom
Compton. Suigned DE Ricky Jean Francois.
Released DE Stephen Bowen and DL Barry Cofield
Jr.
Canadian Football League
EDMONTON ESKIMOS — Released DB Eric
Samuels.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
NHL — Fined San Jose F Logan Couture $5,000
for slew-footing.
ANAHEIM DUCKS — Reassigned G Jason
LaBarbera to Norfolk (AHL). Recalled G Igor
Bobkov from Utah (ECHL) to Norfolk.
BOSTON BRUINS — Recalled G Adam Morrison
from South Carolina (ECHL) to Providence (AHL).
DALLAS STARS — Assigned G Henri Kiviaho from
Texas (AHL) to Idaho (ECHL).
LOS ANGELES KINGS — Assigned D Derek
Forbort to Manchester (AHL).
MONTREAL CANADIENS — Assigned D Jarred
Tinordi to Hamilton (AHL) and F Stefan Fournier
from Hamilton to Wheeling (ECHL).
PITTSBURGH PENGUINS — Assigned F JeanSebastien Dea and D Harrison Ruopp from Wilkes-
Barre/Scranton (AHL) to Wheeling (ECHL).
American Hockey League
ADIRONDACK PHANTOMS — Recalled F Taylor
Vause from Colorado (ECHL).
IOWA WILD — Assigned F Ryan Walters to Alaska
(ECHL).
LAKE ERIE MONSTERS — Returned D James
Martin and F Shawn Szydlowski to Fort Wayne
(ECHL).
ROCHESTER AMERICANS — Returned D
Cameron Burt to Florida (ECHL).
ROCKFORD ICEHOGS — Recalled D Justin Holl
from Indy (ECHL).
TORONTO MARLIES — Returned D Bryce
Aneloski to Orlando (ECHL). Recalled F Brett
Findlay from Orlando.
ECHL
ELMIRA JACKALS — Signed F Dan Turgeon.
ORLANDO SOLAR BEARS — Released G Kris
Kavanagh as emergency backup.
QUAD CITY MALLARDS — Released F Evan
Haney.
SOUTH CAROLINA STINGRAYS — Added G John
Davidson as emergency backup.
TOLEDO WALLEYE — Loaned F Justin Mercier to
Rochester (AHL).
UTAH GRIZZLIES — Added G Justin Masterman
as emergency backup.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
MLS — Fined Real Salt Lake investor-operator Dell
Loy Hansen $150,000 for comments made during a
radio interview.
COLLEGE
FLORIDA — Reinstated F Dorian Finney-Smith to
the men’s basketball team.
MEMPHIS — Named Troy Reffett cornerbacks
coach.
MORGAN STATE — Named Mike Fanoga defensive coordinator.
WOFFORD — Named Shane Calvert men’s assistant soccer coach.
Favors has 21 points,
10 rebounds for Jazz
DENVER (AP) — Derrick Favors had 21 points, 10 rebounds and
three blocks, Trey Burke came off the bench to score 19 points
and the Utah Jazz beat the struggling Denver Nuggets 104-82 on
Friday night.
Gordon Hayward added 15 points and Rudy Gobert had 10
points and eight rebounds for the Jazz. Utah has won five of its
last seven.
Will Barton had 22 points for the Nuggets. They have lost nine
straight at home and 18 of 20 overall. Denver was in the playoff
conversation after a five-game winning streak in mid-January,
but has fallen into 13th place in the Western Conference.
USSA Grand Prix to air on NBCSN on Saturday
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALL TIMES EST
Saturday
ATHLETICS
4 p.m.
NBCSN — USA Indoor
Championships, at Boston
AUTO RACING
9 a.m.
FS1 — NASCAR, XFINITY
Series, pole qualifying for
Hisense 250, at Hampton, Ga.
10:30 a.m.
FS1 — NASCAR, Truck
Series, pole qualifying for
Hyundai Construction
Equipment 200, at Hampton, Ga.
Noon
FS1 — NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
"Happy Hour Series," final practice for QuikTrip 500, at
Hampton, Ga.
2 p.m.
FS1 — NASCAR, XFINITY
Series, Hisense 250, at Hampton,
Ga.
5:30 p.m.
FS1 — NASCAR, Truck
Series, Hyundai Construction
Equipment 200, at Hampton, Ga.
GOLF
1 p.m.
TGC — PGA Tour, The Honda
Classic, third round, at Palm
Beach Gardens, Fla.
3 p.m.
NBC — PGA Tour, The Honda
PICKLES
Classic, third round, at Palm
Beach Gardens, Fla.
1 a.m.
TGC — Honda LPGA
Thailand, final round, at
Chonburi
5 a.m.
TGC — European PGA Tour,
Joburg Open, final round, at
Johannesburg
MEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
Noon
CBS — Georgetown at St.
John's
ESPN — Michigan at
Maryland
ESPN2 — Louisville at Florida
St.
ESPNEWS — East Carolina at
UCF
ESPNU — Missouri at Georgia
12:30 p.m.
NBCSN — Rhode Island at La
Salle
2 p.m.
CBS — North Carolina at
Miami
ESPN — N. Iowa at Wichita St.
ESPN2 — Dayton at VCU
ESPNEWS — Cincinnati at
Tulane
ESPNU — TCU at Oklahoma
FOX — Villanova at Xavier
4 p.m.
CBS — Arkansas at Kentucky
ESPN2 — Iowa St. at Kansas
St.
ESPNEWS — Oklahoma St. at
Texas Tech
ESPNU — West Virginia at
Baylor
5 p.m.
ESPN — Texas at Kansas
6 p.m.
ESPN2 — Tennessee at
Florida
ESPNU — Iowa at Penn St.
7 p.m.
ESPN — Syracuse at Duke
8 p.m.
ESPN2 — Boise St. at San
Diego St.
ESPNU — Tulsa at Memphis
9 p.m.
ESPN — Arizona at Utah
10 p.m.
ESPN2 — BYU at Gonzaga
ESPNU — New Mexico at
Fresno St.
12 Mid.
ESPN2 — UC Irvine at UC
Santa Barbara
ESPNU — CIAA, championship, teams TBD, at Charlotte,
N.C. (same-day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE HOCKEY
6 p.m.
NBCSN — Boston College at
Notre Dame
NHL
8 p.m.
NBC — N.Y. Rangers at
Philadelphia
SOCCER
7:40 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League,
Crystal Palace at West Ham
10 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League,
Sunderland at Manchester
United
WINTER SPORTS
2:30 p.m.
NBCSN — USSA Grand Prix,
at Park City, Utah
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
4 p.m.
FSN — Baylor at Iowa St.
Sunday
ATHLETICS
4 p.m.
NBCSN — USA Indoor
Championships, at Boston
AUTO RACING
1 p.m.
FOX — NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
QuikTrip 500, at Hampton, Ga.
GOLF
1 p.m.
TGC — PGA Tour, The Honda
Classic, final round, at Palm
Beach Gardens, Fla.
3 p.m.
NBC — PGA Tour, The Honda
Classic, final round, at Palm
Beach Gardens, Fla.
MEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
2 p.m.
CBS — SMU at UConn
3:30 p.m.
FS1 — Marquette at
Providence
4 p.m.
CBS — Michigan St. at
Wisconsin
6:30 p.m.
ESPNU — Pittsburgh at Wake
Forest
7 p.m.
FS1 — Oregon at Stanford
8:30 p.m.
ESPNU — Arizona St. at
Colorado
9:30 p.m.
FS1 — Washington St. at
UCLA
NBA
1 p.m.
ABC — L.A. Clippers at
Chicago
3:30 p.m.
ABC — Cleveland at Houston
6:30 p.m.
ESPN — Oklahoma City at
L.A. Lakers
NHL
8 p.m.
NBCSN — Anaheim at Dallas
SOCCER
7 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League,
Manchester City at Liverpool
9 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League,
Everton at Arsenal
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
1 p.m.
ESPN2 — Texas at West
Virginia
3 p.m.
ESPN2 — North Carolina at
Duke
4 p.m.
JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).
Rating: GOLD
© 2015 Janric Enterprises Dist. by creators.com
Solution to 2/27/15
NON SEQUITUR
2/28/15
0228_A Section Template 2/27/15 4:18 PM Page 1
B4
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BABY BLUES® by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman
COMICS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
DRS. OZ & ROIZEN
Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen
MARY WORTH by Karen Moy and Joe Giella
BORN LOSER® by Art and Chip Sansom
GARFIELD by Jim Davis
If you've ever given up on a
New Year's resolution, said
"yes" to junk food (again and
again) or whispered to yourself, "I can't do it," this column is for YOU, because you
can have a healthier, happier
life. We've seen proof.
We have met amazing folks
through Dr. Mike's work at
The Cleveland Clinic
Wellness Center and Dr. Oz's
work with his patients and
guests on "The Dr. Oz Show."
They've accepted the do-over
challenge and are living
proof that ANYONE can turn
his or her life around and
stick with it! The most
important thing they've
learned: A health do-over
doesn't take superhero
willpower. There are sciencebased, real-world-tested
strategies that can get you
past the rough spots.
So here are four of our
favorite people who were able
to overcome physical and
mental challenges (by using
those real-world-tested strategies) to achieve successful doovers. We'd like you to meet
them and be empowered by
them -- so you can do it too!
VAL: BREAKING FOOD
ADDICTION
When Val's weight soared
from 135 to 215 after two pregnancies, she developed Type 2
diabetes. She was scared
she'd lose her health and her
marriage to her loving, fit
husband Calvin.
The do-over strategy that
made the difference: Getting
a buddy. Val contacted her
best friend and asked her to
be her daily supporter using
email, texts and phone calls.
Every day, Val let her know
when she'd completed her 30
extra minutes of physical
activity and sent her a daily
diary of her meals and
snacks. "It kept me from
lying to myself, because I
couldn't lie to my friend!"
And sharing your daily
achievements with a buddy
creates a natural high that
helps you construct new
brain pathways to replace the
old, addictive ones.
ROCCO: BOUNCING BACK
FROM A BACKSLIDE
We'll never forget Rocco, a
270-pound man with diabetes
and serious cardiovascular
disease. He appeared on the
show and agreed to let Dr.
Mike coach him through a
major do-over. Rocco shed
plenty of pounds, and in the
process got his diabetes, high
blood pressure and arthritis
under control.
The do-over strategy that
made the difference: Having
a purpose. Like all humans,
Rocco backslid now and then.
Dr. Mike would step in to
help him get right back on
track, with a simple
reminder: "Rocco, think
about your grandchildren."
Having a "why" is a huge
incentive to stick with
healthy habits: Rocco was
determined to stick around to
see them grow into happy,
healthy adults with kids of
their own.
GRANDMA: EVERY LITTLE STEP COUNTS
Dr. Mike met this grandma
who wanted to drop pounds
and clear up a laundry list of
health issues. The challenge?
She was in a wheelchair
almost all the time, taking
just 64 steps on her own in a
typical day.
The do-over strategy that
made the difference: Small
changes. Dr. Mike suggested
she add a few more steps
every day. Over two years,
she made it to 10,000 a day -the number recommended for
great health and weight control. She got rid of her wheelchair after two years, and her
walker after that. She
dropped 40 pounds, virtually
eliminated her arthritis pain
and got better control of her
diabetes.
JANELLE: STAY INSPIRED
Janelle was plagued with
gastrointestinal problems
and other nagging health
issues. So she overhauled her
diet, got a buddy, started
walking and logged every
bite of food she put into her
mouth.
The do-over strategy that
made the difference: Staying
inspired. She taped this
motto to her bathroom mirror: "We simply have two
choices each day: Make
excuses or make something
happen. The choice is yours."
These may seem like simple
tricks, but they have complex, profound effects on your
willpower. So enlist a buddy,
identify your purpose, set
realistic goals and get
inspired! Your do-over can
start today.
DEAR ABBY
Pauline Phillips and Jeanne Phillips
FRANK & ERNEST® by Bob Thaves
REX MORGAN, M.D. by Woody Wilson and Tony DiPreta
ZITS® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
DILBERT by S. Adams
ALLEY OOP® by Dave Graue and Jack Bender
DEAR ABBY: My best
friend from school is pregnant. Her baby's father is
practically nonexistent, and
she has no other friends
besides me and one other person. I am the only one so far
who knows about her preg-
nancy. She hasn't told her dad
and her grandparents
because she's scared they'll
kick her out. She has
nowhere to go. My parents
have told me to cut her off.
What should I do? -- UNSURE
IN TEXAS
DEAR UNSURE: Because
your friend is afraid to tell
her family, she should talk to
a counselor at school. The
family will have to know
soon because her pregnancy
will become obvious, and she
will need prenatal care so her
baby will be born healthy.
I don't agree with your parents that you should "cut her
off." She needs friends right
now -- and you can learn
much from watching this scenario from the sidelines.
Stress to her how important
it is that she graduates from
high school, because if she
keeps her baby, she will need
to be able to support it. Your
state department of social
services should also be contacted for guidance.
DEAR ABBY: I am engaged
to a man, "Keith," who has
numerous female "friends." I
suspect they are something
more. Recently, during my
second pregnancy, one of his
"friends" decided to follow
me, but would never say a
word to me.
When I tell Keith I am
uncomfortable with these
women, he says I have "no
right to dictate his personal
life."
I want to know if I'm
wrong for not wanting to
have to deal with these
"friends," even if they were
his friends before we got
together. -- ADRIFT IN LOS
ANGELES
DEAR ADRIFT: Listen to
your gut. If one of Keith's
"friends" was stalking you,
your feelings about her are
probably accurate.
You have already had at
least one child with your
fiance. Recognize that Keith
won't change much if you
manage to drag him to the
altar. If he is telling you now
that your feelings don't matter ("you have no right to dictate his personal life"), I hope
you realize this is how his
attitude will be forever.
Personally, I wouldn't wish
a life with someone this selfabsorbed on anyone I cared
about. But if more of the
same is what you are prepared to settle for, then all
anyone can do is wish you
luck.
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips.
Contact Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
CLASSIFIEDS
Phone: (307) 672-2431
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
Household Goods
FOR SALE: **Vintage
Tin Turtle Top Trunk
19"Wx34"Lx24"H. $120.
**Rowing Machine
Nordic Row TBX by
Nordictrack w/ Total
Body Workout Monitor.
$60.
752-5064 - Leave msg.
Boats
LARGEST SELECTION
ANYWHERE!!
Surf/Wakeboard boats,
Fishing boats, Family
boats! New and preowned! Warranty and
Free delivery!
lovell.midwayautoandm
arine.com,
307-548-7571
Hay, Grain, Feed
HAY FOR SALE.
1500-1600 lb. bales.
Alfalfa & grass mixture.
Call 306-267-5711
or 306-267-4548.
www.thesheridanpress.com
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
NEWER 2 BR.
$950/mo Water/heat
paid.
1000 SF. 818 E. 7th St.
307-752-7704
CLEAN/QUIET
1BR
$625mo. incl. h/w/s,
garage. No smk/pets.
307-752-4066.
TIDY 1BR upstairs.
$600/mo
inc.
everything.
No
smk/pets. 752-4066.
COZY 2BR. Off street
parking. Washer/Dryer.
Oak Hardwood floors.
$600 + Dep + Elec. No
smkg/pets. Lease/ref's.
Call for appt. 752-4735.
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
NEWLY RENOVATED
1BR
cottage
in
Sheridan. No smk/pets.
W/D hookups. $700/mo.
Pets & Supplies
$500 dep. Call
PUREBRED GOLDEN 307-655-9753.
Duplexes, Unfurn. for
retriever pups: $375/F
Rent
$350/M. 307-655-9146.
LGE
2
BR/1
Ba in Big
Rummage Sale
Horn. $750/mo. W/S/G
CLOCK REPAIR.
& lawn care provided.
All types, cuckoo,
W/D Hookups. 1 dog
mantle, grandfather,
allowed. 307-751-7718.
etc. Pick up & delivery
Mobile Hm. Space for
avail. Call American
Rent
Radio. Located at the
Powder Basin Shopping RV SPACE, Big Horn.
By day, month or year.
Center, 2610 S.
Douglas Hwy. Suite 235 307-674-7718.
Storage Space
in Gillette. Ask for Jerry
307-685-1408.
CIELO STORAGE
For Lease
Rail Road Land
& Cattle Co.
Buildings
for lease, Shop
space,
Warehouse
space, Retail
space, &
office space.
673-5555
Furnished Apts for Rent
307-752-3904
DOWNER ADDITION
STORAGE 674-1792
INTERSTATE
STORAGE. Multiple
Sizes avail. No
deposit req'd.
307-752-6111.
E L D O R A D O
STORAGE Helping you
conquer space. 3856
Coffeen. 307-672-7297.
CALL BAYHORSE
STORAGE 1005 4th
Ave. E. 752-9114.
1BR. NO smk/pets.
WOODLANDPARK
$575 + elec + dep.
STORAGE.COM
Coin-Op W/D.
5211 Coffeen
307-674-5838.
Call 674-7355
New Spaces
ROCKTRIM. $600 / mo.
Available!
Wi-Fi/Cable. 763-2960.
WKLY
FR
$210.
$300/MO. 30' x 30'
Monthly
fr
$630.
room.
10'
ceiling.
Americas Best Value
Dock. Overhead door.
Inn. 307-672-9757.
307-256-6170.
Unfurnished Apts for
$150/MO. 13' x 31'
Rent
room. Dock. Overhead
COZY 2BR. Off street door. 307-256-6170.
parking. Washer/Dryer.
Child Care
Oak Hardwood floors.
$600 + Dep + Elec. No
ENERGETIC AND
smkg/pets. Lease/ref's.
OUTGOING NANNY
Call for appt. 752-4735.
needed for 3 children
(ages 5, 5 & 8) for
8hr/day M-F for months
Broadway Apts.
of June, July & Aug.
2 bdrm, 1 bath
Previous exp. needed
townhouse
w/references. Must
Available in
have own transportation
Dayton, WY.
w/valid DL. CPR cert
Rent based on
preferred. Must pass
income.
background check. $10Please call
$12hr depending on
307-751-1752 or
exp.
Send reply to Box
1-888-387-7368
225, c/o The Sheridan
Toll-Free for application
Press, PO Box 2006,
Equal Housing
Sheridan, WY 82801.
Opportunity
Work Wanted
HOUSE
PAINTING,
general labor, cleaning
& cleanup. New Ref's.
683-7814 (cell).
Help Wanted
2 BR, clean, quiet,
charming,
2nd
flr.
duplex.
$650.
incls
gas/cbl. No pets/smk.
Excel. ref's. req'd.
307-672-0077
Fax: (307) 672-7950
FT POSITION.
For more info
www.landscapingservic
esinc.com
RODEWAY INN &
Suites is looking for
front desk &
housekeepers.
Apply in person at
1704 N. Main,
Sheridan.
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
YOUTH SERVICES
SECURITY OFFICER,
Wyo. Girls School,
Sheridan; Class Code
SOYS04-02572,
Target Hiring Range:
$2417-$3021. General
Description: Conduct
the operations of the
Risk Management
Department, ensuring
the safety and security
of the juvenile
correctional facility,
serving a potential 60
adjudicated female
delinquents, ages 1221; for the purpose of
changing their thinking
and behavior of
delinquency and
dysfunction to become
a more productive
member of their
community and a less
threat to re-offend upon
their release. For more
info or to apply online
go to: http://www.
wyoming.gov/loc/06012
011_1/Pages/default.as
px or submit a State of
Wyo. Employment App.
to the HR Division,
Emerson Building, 2001
Capitol Ave.,
Cheyenne, WY 820020060,
Phone: (307)777-7188,
Fax: (307)777-6562,
along w/ transcripts of
any relevant course
work. The State of Wyo.
is an Equal Opportunity
Employer & actively
supports the ADA &
reasonably
accommodates
qualified applicants w/
disabilities.
1 TEMP POSITION:
Equipment
Ag.
Operator, guaranteed
03/20/15from
11/15/15. We offer
$14.00 p/hr at time
work is performed.
Housing provided, 48
p/wk.
3/4
hrs.
g u a r a n t e e .
and
Transportation
subsistence expenses
to worksite paid upon
50% completion of
Tools,
contract.
equipment provided at
no cost. DUTIES:
operate tractors to
cultivate, till, fertilize,
plant, harvest, store
grain; operate spray
rigs; repair & maintain
equip; incidental crop
work; lift 100 lb.
Minimum 1 month
experience.
Bliss
Farms
Partnership,
located in Conrad,
MT. Interested? Apply
at
nearest
State
Workforce Agency or
call 406-627-2260, MT
Job order #10098789
SIMON
CONTRACTORS, a
major road and bridge
contractor in WY, NE,
SD & CO, has
immediate openings in
our Highway
Division for the
following positions:
*WATER TRUCK
DRIVER
*FINISH BLADE
OPERATOR
*HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
Extensive travel
required; per diem
included. Commercial
licensing requirements
may apply. Please
visit our website for
full job descriptions.
Top wages with an
excellent benefits
package including
health, dental, vision,
401k with company
match, vacation,
holidays, life & more!
Visit our website at
www.
simoncontractors.com
to apply online or any
of our office locations
to apply in person.
Simon Contractors is
an Equal Opportunity/
Affirmative Action,
Gender/Race/
Disabled/Veteran,
Drug Free Workplace
Employer.
R E W A R D I N G
EMPLOYMENT awaits
you at Emeritus at
Sugarland
Ridge,
Retirement
and
Assisted Living! We are
currently looking for
motivated,
loving
associates to join our
Housekeeping
and
Dining Services team.
Housekeeping position
is part time MondaysFridays and the Dining
Services position is full
time evenings. So what
are you waiting for,
come see us to fill out
an application at 1551
Sugarland Drive. EOE.
TRUCK
DRIVER
WANTED
Looking
for
an
experienced
Truck
Driver for loading and
unloading
farm
equipment. Must have
a
CDL.
Qualified
candidate send resume
to Ed DeTavernier
Service
Manager
[email protected]
pment.com or stop in at
Sheridan
County
Implement 2945 West
5th Street Sheridan
Help Wanted
YMCA
EVENING/OVERNIGHT CUSTODIAL
POSITION
Sheridan County
YMCA has part or fulltime opening for teamoriented
janitorial/housekeepin
g staff person. Must
have eye for detail
and experience with
floor waxing and
cleaning. Shift is late
evening/overnight.
Applications available
at YMCA Front Desk.
NWCCD
JOB OPENINGS
Sheridan College
• Server Administrator
• Computer Science
Instructor (SC)
• Director of Business
Education (SC)
• Nursing Instructor
(SC)
• Math Tutor (PT)
Gillette College
• Computer Science
Instructor (GC)
• Director of Business
Education (GC)
• Nursing Instructor
(GC)
FT positions
include outstanding
employee benefits.
On-line postings and
application at: https://
jobs.sheridan.edu
EOE.
QDOBA NOW HIRING
cooks & line servers.
Flexible scheduling.
Great Pay. DOE.
References.
Positive upbeat attitude.
Apply in person
2112 Coffeen Ave.
NOW TAKING
applications for Line
cooks, Servers w/ exp.
& Host/ hostesses.
Morning & eve. shifts
avail. Apply in person at
1373 Coffeen Ave or
online at www.
pleaseapplyonline.com/
sugarlandenterprises.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Help Wanted
SCSD #1 has the
following extra duty
positions available.
*BHHS Volleyball
Head Coach
*TRHS Volleyball
Head Coach
Please complete the
extra-duty application
(found on district
website) and return it
to Brandi Miller [email protected]
sheridan.k12.wy.us
If you have position
specific questions
please call the
perspective HS
Principal.
www.sheridan.k12.wy.
us. Positions are open
until filled. E.O.E.
Now Hiring
Maintenance
Cocktail
Server
*Wage DOE
Apply in person at the
Front Desk.
1809 SUGARLAND DRIVE
SHERIDAN, WY
IS SEEKING laborers,
carpenters and
carpenter helpers for
temporary summer
employment from May
to September. Must
be 18 yrs of age.
Possibility of
permanent
employment with
benefits based on
performance. Apply at
1866 South Sheridan
Avenue or online at
www.
fletcherconstruction
.com. No phone calls
please. EOE.
Help Wanted
TECHNICAL
OPERATIONS
Technician II –
Sheridan
Class Code:
TNTO07-02509
Department of
Transportation
Support safe traffic
operations through
installation and
maintenance of all
electrical and
electronic devices
within the district on
state highway and
road systems
including rest areas.
Work independently
and make a difference
in public safety by
becoming part of an
elite Traffic Safety
Operations Team.
Successful applicants
must be able to obtain
a Class A Commercial
Driver's License with
appropriate
endorsements within
30 days of
employment.
Hiring Range:
$3,214.00 - $4,018.00
Monthly.
For more information
or to apply online go
to:
http://agency.governm
entjobs.com/wyoming/
default.cfm
or submit an official
application to A&I
Human Resources
Division, Emerson
Building, 2001 Capitol
Avenue, Cheyenne,
WY 82002-0060.
(307)777-7188, Fax
(307)777-6562 along
with transcripts of any
relevant course work.
Open Until Filled
EEO/ADA Employer
B5
Help Wanted
***$1,000***
SIGN-ON BONUS
Immediate Opening
Blue Rhino Driver
Blue Rhino, a
nationwide leader in
the propane industry,
is looking for a Full
Time Driver in
Sheridan, WY.
Requirements:
• 1+ year driving
experience
• Class A CDL w/
Hazmat & Tanker
Endorsements
• At least 21 yrs of age
• Ability to meet DOT
requirements
• Ability to lift up to
75 lbs.
Questions, call
303-289-9126
Apply online at:
www.ferrellgas.com
EOE/AAP/TMP/D/V
EXPLORE A CAREER
in a NAEYC accredited
early childcare center!
First Light Children's
Center desires
dependable, nurturing,
and energetic
individuals to join our
team. Seeking an infant
teacher as well as part
and full time toddler
positions. Please review
our website for more
information, download
an application and drop
off at First Light.
Positions to be filled by
March 6, 2015 to
support our spring
semester growth!
http://www.
firstlightsheridan.com/
employment.html
EXPERIENCED
ROOFING installers
wanted. U.A. required.
P.D.O.E. Call for
interview:
307-672-7643.
CLASSIFIEDS
B6 THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.thesheridanpress.com
Hints from Heloise
Homemade Trail Mix
Editor's Note: The accompanying photo for this and future
Saturday Heloise pet columns
will be available to newspapers
that receive the column through
the website. If you receive the
column by APwire or U.S. mail
and would like to receive the
photo at no extra charge, you
can download it. Call Reed
Brennan Media Associates Customer Service at (800) 708-7311,
ext. 236.
Dear Readers: I make my own
Heloise Trail Mix and save a lot
of money, as well as use up the
last of certain foods. Nuts and
dried fruit are the base, then I
add whatever may be in the
kitchen. Some commercial
mixes can be healthy, some not
so healthy (lots of candy, other
sweets or salt) and very expensive! So save money with my
HELOISE STARTER TRAIL
MIX recipe.
The "basic" mix is low-sugar
cereal, broken pretzels, popcorn
and crackers. Then add the last
of the bag of various chips and
one or two crumbled-up cook-
Bridge
WITH NO GOOD SPOTS,
LEAD TO THE HONORS
April Bloomfield, an English chef best known for
holding a Michelin star at
two New York City restaurants, The Spotted Pig and
The Breslin, said, "Food's
delicate. You have to handle
it with finesse. You can't
just be a big ogre."
Many bridge contracts require handling with finesse.
This can involve taking a finesse or two. Alternatively,
declarer might have to get
the timing just right -which is also arguably the
number-one factor in cooking.
This week, we have been
looking at deals in which a
tempting finesse is not the
right play. Here is a last example that is slightly different because there is no
finesse available. South is
in three no-trump, and West
ies.DRIED FRUIT, such as cranberries, raisins, apricots, etc.,
adds a touch of sweetness. I cut
these into smaller bite-size
pieces to spread the flavor.
Broken pieces of chocolate,
candy or mints get added. Sometimes I crush up peppermint or
butterscotch candies with a
hammer and sprinkle the "dust"
into the container.
I scoop a cup or two into small
plastic zip bags and am ready to
hit the road. Cheaper, easy to
carry and won't spoil! -- Heloise
ROLLER SKATING
Dear Heloise: Recently, I took
my grandchildren to a rollerskating rink! It was so fun to
show the kiddos something my
husband and I used to go to almost every weekend. Your readers might consider this as a
fairly inexpensive outing. -Joan in Waco, Texas
Joan, talk about a "flashback"
memory for me -- a fun family
outing! If someone doesn't skate,
they still can watch the hilarity.
Check rinks for prices and specials -- most are pretty reasonable. -- Heloise
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
TOWN OF Ranchester
is hiring seasonal, P/T
position (4/15-10/15) @
Ranchester Information
Center. Mon-Sat (3
days wk per employee
TBD, 9am-3pm.
General knowledge of
local & state history
including State of
Wyoming historical sites
& locations; ability to
give accurate directions
& offer
recommendations on
points of interest or
traveling needs.
Potential candidates will
communicate a positive
experience to all
travelers & visitors.
Some light cleaning.
Contact Ranchester
Town Hall, P.O. Box
695, Ranchester, WY
82839 or call
307-655-2283 for app
and/or additional job
duties info. Closing
March 10, 2015.
THE CITY of
SHERIDAN is looking
for a Landfill
Equipment Operator
to join our Landfill
team. This position is
responsible for
performing equipment
operation duties in
support of landfill
operations. Interested,
qualified applicants,
with ability to obtain a
Wyoming CDL, should
submit a completed
City of Sheridan
application to 55
Grinnell Plaza,
Sheridan, WY 82801.
This is a fully
benefited position
including health,
dental, vision, and life
insurance, state
pension retirement,
tuition reimbursement,
paid time off and a
wellness program.
The hiring range of
$16.35 - $19.93 hr
DOE. Full job
description &
job application can be
found at
www.sheridanwy.net.
The deadline for
applications is
3/13/15. The City of
Sheridan is a drug
free workplace.
THE CITY of
SHERIDAN is
currently accepting
applications for the
position of
FINANCE &
ADMINISTRATIVE
SERVICES
DIRECTOR.
As part of the City’s
executive team, the
person in this position
plans, organizes,
directs & manages the
Clerk & Treasurer's
Departments including
financial management,
budget administration,
clerk central files, &
purchasing. This
position also oversees
IT services. Qualified
applicants should
have a Bachelor’s
degree in finance,
accounting, public
administration,
business
administration, or a
closely related field, a
minimum of 5 years of
administrative and
supervisory
experience and 3
years of increasingly
responsible
professional finance
experience. The
salary range for this
position is
$86,893 - $132,561/yr
DOE.
The City offers a
comprehensive benefit
package including
health, dental, vision
and life insurance and
state pension
retirement. Interested
applicants should
submit a completed
City of Sheridan job
application to City
Hall, 55 Grinnell Plaza
by 3/2/15. A complete
job description and
application can be
found at
www.sheridanwy. net.
The City of Sheridan
is a drug-free
work place.
NOW HIRING CNA's.
Call Bruce at 307674-4416.
Phillip Alder
leads the spade queen. What
should declarer do?
This auction is surely the
most common in the game.
Declarer starts with six
top tricks: two spades, three
hearts and one club. He
does not have time to establish dummy's club suit because he will lose three
spades, one diamond and
two clubs.
Instead, South must collect three diamond tricks;
regular readers will have no
trouble finding the right
line. Declarer should lead
twice toward the hand with
the two honors. So, after
winning the first trick with
dummy's spade king, South
should play a low diamond
to his king. When he wins
the trick, he crosses to the
dummy with a heart and
leads another diamond toward his hand. Here, East's
ace pops up and declarer
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
has his nine winners.
If, though, West takes the
trick with his ace or South
wins the second diamond
trick in his hand, he would
have to hope that the diamonds are splitting 3-3.
BUSY HEALTHCARE
OFFICE in need of
EXPERIENCED
MANAGER. Salary w/
benefits. Send reply to
Box 226, c/o The
Sheridan Press, PO
Box 2006, Sheridan,
WY 82801.
LOST
PET?
Place an ad
in The Press!
Call 672-2431
Help Wanted, Medical
RNs, LPNs & CNAs
Join our staff for a
rewarding career in
our busy skilled
nursing care facility.
Sign-on bonuses and
relocation
reimbursement may
apply for some
positions. For
immediate
consideration,
apply online at
cchwyo.org/careers.
Human Resources
Campbell County
Health, P.O. Box 3011
Gillette, WY 82717
307.688.1501 or
307.688.1504
E.O.E.
This is a good week to ingratiate yourself to those
who can help you earn
money.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): To
win at Bingo you must pay
attention to all the calls.
You could miss out on a
beneficial opportunity by
taking people or things for
granted in the week ahead.
Affairs of the heart require
more than just empty promises.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
You can be lucky as a
leader. You possess a knack
for making wise business
decisions and following
through on any project or
idea that interests you. This
week, focus on dedication
and commitment.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Don't lose your momentum.
Taking care of your home
and family can be both a
source of aggravation and a
source of motivation. Circulate and network to gain
new friends in the week to
come.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): You won't win the lottery unless you buy a ticket.
You'd like to have the best
of everything, but will be
disappointed by results if
you don't put forth the effort. Put your shoulder to
the wheel this week.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Friends are like
rainbows that show up after
a storm. You might find out
just who you can trust and
count on this week. Take
well-considered steps to
protect the health of your
piggy bank.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Reap the benefits of
your hard work. This week,
you may realize that your
passion to succeed can pay
off if you simply keep at it.
Stay in touch with trusted
partners and advisors.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Balance your act. You
want people to like you so
you may go overboard to
impress them with your
generosity and good humor.
This week, you should consider when to be gregarious
and when to be reserved.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Opportunity is like
lightning and seldom
strikes twice. With this in
mind, don't hesitate to take
advantage of whatever is offered in the week ahead.
You may permanently improve your income.
IF MARCH 1 IS YOUR
BIRTHDAY: Your aura of
friendliness shines brightly
and people may find you
fascinating during the next
8-10 weeks. Stretch your
wings by trying something
new or making changes. In
late April and early May,
you're at your best when
dealing with financial and
business matters. Late May
through early June is a fine
time to launch key projects
that depend on the good will
of others, seek a promotion
or new career, or finalize a
romantic commitment. Any
opportunity that comes to
you without effort should be
embraced with open arms
because it could lead to bigger and better things. Stay
out of the limelight in Au-
SATURDAY
February 28th
PRICE REDUCED
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
613 Mountain
Shadows Blvd
$509,500
Hosted by
Matt Westkott
Autos-Accessories
NEED EXTRA
CASH? PRIME RATE
MOTORS will buy
your clean vehicle.
Stop by 2305 Coffeen
to get an appraisal or
call 674-6677.
PRIME RATE
MOTORS is buying
clean, preowned
vehicles of all ages.
We also install B&W
GN hitches, 5th Wheel
Hitches, Pickup
Flatbeds, Krogman
Bale Beds. Stop by
2305 Coffeen Ave. or
call 674-6677.
306 N. Main St.
Sheridan, WY
(307) 672-8911
Office Hours
Sat 9am-2pm
www.eracrc.com
Real Estate
DRIVE BY 1301 Pine
Dr.
&
enjoy
the
spectacular view! Pick
up flyer at front door to
see pictures & floor plan
of this COZY 2BR/2Ba
Patio Home w/ 2 car
garage. Home Owner's
Association incl. snow
removal & yard work.
$235,000. Ideal for
seniors. 307-752-2399.
Omarr’s Daily Astrological
Forecast
BIRTHDAY GUY: Producer and director Zack
Snyder was born in Green
Bay, Wis., on this date in
1966. This birthday guy has
directed such hit films as
"Man of Steel," "Watchmen"
and "300." He's also produced the sequel "300: Rise
of an Empire," as well as
writing, directing, and producing the 2011 movie
"Sucker Punch." Snyder
will next direct the upcoming blockbuster "Batman vs.
Superman: Dawn of Justice" in 2016.
ARIES (March 21-April
19): New ideas and attractions could be much like
eating truffles. Truffles are
exotic and tasty, but you
probably wouldn't want a
steady diet of this expensive
treat. Don't make drastic
changes this week.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): You reap what you sow.
Escaping from duties can be
enjoyable but is unproductive. When partnered with
the right person this week
you can make progress on a
project or can build something worthy.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Face the future with frankness. Honesty is the best
policy where your job and
health are concerned. You
may be overly optimistic
about your ability to complete tasks on time in the
week to come.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Remain poised and
practical. You can earn
brownie points by actively
bringing everyone together
through a compromise.
Real Estate
Jeraldine Saunders
gust when you're more
gullible and less appealing
than usual.
BIRTHDAY GAL: Actress
Heather McComb was born
in Barnegat, N.J., on this
day in 1977. This birthday
gal played the recurring
role of Patty on "Ray Donovan" and has appeared on
episodes of "Castle," "Bones"
and "Rizzoli and Isles." On
the big screen, McComb's
film resume includes "Stay
Tuned," "All the Real Girls"
and "Apt Pupil." McComb
will next produce an upcoming film called "Battle
Scars."
ARIES (March 21-April
19): As soon as you stop
chasing the prize, the prize
may start chasing you.
Your friendly overtures
could meet their match.
This may be a good time to
put your ambitious ideas
into play.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): You may be faced with
crucial choices during the
next several days. You can
be polite and reach a compromise, or become carried
away by your desire for personal power.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Honest communication is
crucial. Good judgment or
advice is there for the taking if you merely pick up
the phone or ask the right
question. A helpful friend
might give you a valuable
hint.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Partners or friends may
urge you to try something
new. Your first reaction
might be to err on the side
of caution. There could be
something worthy of your
attention if you cautiously
experiment.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Let
your true colors come shining through. People will see
your talents through a
prism of positive light. This
is a good time to put money
to work for you or to give
your most important ambitions free rein.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
There's much more going
on than meets the eye. Unleash your imagination and
let it work overtime. You
can visualize the results of
your hard work and that
will act as an incentive to
raise the bar.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Both romantic and professional partnerships thrive
under these celestial conditions. Count on others to
provide just what you need
to achieve goals. Mutual respect is a key to material
success.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Keep on working like a
dog and you'll earn all the
bones. Be advised, however,
that on some level you're
wearing blinders. You're
easily led down the garden
path so you may not notice
a problem.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): The drawbacks to
an idea can draw you out of
your shell. Dealing with a
problem could help you
prove just how resourceful
you are. You may be embarrassed by a blind spot in
your knowledge.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Find your place in the
sun. You shine brightest
when engaged in business
activities and social events.
Family members can
brighten your life and perhaps even help you with
business decisions.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Birds of a feather flock
together. You're able to
show your friendly side and
can get along with people
from all walks of life. When
you head home to the roost
you'll want a partner with
similar values.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Use your powerful
charm to disarm detractors.
Friends may try to indoctrinate you with radical viewpoints. Using good taste
that reflects traditional values will prove the most satisfying in the end.
IF MARCH 2 IS YOUR
BIRTHDAY: You're the star
of your own show during
the next 6-8 weeks. You
might grab the attention of
a desirable new love interest with permanent compatibility in mind. If you're
looking for a career change,
this is a fabulous time to
strut your stuff as people
are more aware of your talents and less likely to notice
your flaws. In late April and
early May, you have especially solid business sense
and can make shrewd financial and career decisions.
Don't be concerned if you
lose traction in August because your popularity soars
again between September
and November.
022815Legals_Layout 1 2/27/15 4:20 PM Page 1
YOUR ELECTED
OFFICIALS |
CITY
John Heath
Mayor
307-675-4223
Public Notices
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
WHY PUBLIC NOTICES ARE IMPORTANT |
Kristin Kelly
Councilor
307-673-4751
Shelleen
Smith
Councilor
307-461-7082
Thayer
Shafer
Councilor
307-674-4118
Alex Lee
Councilor
307-752-8804
Jesus Rios
Councilor
307-461-9565
Kelly Gooch
Councilor
307-752-7137
COUNTY
Pete Carroll
Treasurer
307-674-2520
Eda
Thompson
Clerk
307-674-2500
Nickie Arney
Clerk of District
Court
307-674-2960
John Fenn
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
William
Edelman
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
Shelley
Cundiff
Sheridan
County Circut
Court Judge
307-674-2940
P.J. Kane
Coroner
307-673-5837
Terry
Cram
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Tom
Ringley
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Mike
Nickel
Chairman
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Steve
Maier
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Dave
Hofmeier
Sheriff
307-672-3455
Bob
Rolston
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Paul
Fall
Assessor
307-674-2535
Public notices allow citizens to monitor their government and make sure that it is
working in their best interest. Independent newspapers assist in this cause by
carrying out their partnership with the people’s right to know through public
notices. By offering an independent and archived record of public notices,
newspapers foster a more trusting relationship between government and its
citizens.
Newspapers have the experience and expertise in publishing public notices and
have done so since the Revolutionary War. Today, they remain an established,
trustworthy and neutral source that ably transfers information between
government and the people.
Public notices are the lasting record of how the public’s resources are used and are
presented in the most efficient and effective means possible.
BUFFALO SENIOR CENTER – NEW BUS SHELTER
PROJECT
BID ADVERTISEMENT
Project Category: Construction
Project Name: Buffalo Senior Center – NEW BUS
SHELTER
County/City/State: Johnson, Buffalo, Wyoming
Directions to Site: The Buffalo Senior Center is located in
Buffalo, WY at 671 W. Fetterman, Buffalo, WY 82834.
Bids Close: March 30, 10:00 AM MDT
Bids Received by: AJ Mock, Buffalo Senior Center, 671 W.
Fetterman St., PO Box 941, Buffalo, WY 82834.
All bids shall be made in accordance with forms
referenced to and/or made a part of the proposed
contract documents. Bids shall be submitted in a sealed
envelope with annotation “Buffalo Senior Center Bus
Shelter”.
Project Completion Date: Substantial Completion – May
15, 2015
Pre-Bid Meeting Information: A RECOMMENDED Pre-Bid
meeting for all Prime Contractors will be conducted at
10:00 a.m. MDT followed by a site tour on March 16,
2015 at the Buffalo Senior Center, 671 W. Fetterman,
Buffalo, WY 82834
Project Description: The project will consist of
constructing a three sided bus shelter. This project will
also include excavation of existing trees, an approach
from the parking lot, and gravel as the surface under the
shelter.
Owner: Buffalo Senior Center, 641 West Fetterman St.
PO Box 941, Buffalo, WY 82834. Phone: 307-684-9551
Soliciting Agent: Buffalo Senior Center, 671 W.
Fetterman, Buffalo, WY 82834. Contact: AJ Mock,
Executive Director. Phone: 307-684-9551
END OF BID ADVERTISEMENT
Publish: February 28, March 7, 14, 21, 28, 2015.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
WHEREAS, default in the payment of principal and
interest has occurred under the terms of a promissory
note dated May 28, 2010 executed and delivered by
Gerald Lee Tyson, to Lender, First Interstate Bank, a
Montana Corporation and a real estate mortgage of the
same date securing the Note, which Mortgage was
recorded in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration
Systems, Inc., (“MERS”), as Mortgagee acting solely as
nominee for Lender and Lender’s successors and
assigns, recorded on May 28, 2010 as Rec. No.670543,
Book 770, Page 0062 in the public records in the office
of the county clerk of Sheridan County, Wyoming; as
assigned to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National
Association, as Mortgagee, recorded on March 11, 2013
as Rec. No. 2013-703269, Book 856, Page 6, in the public
records in the office of the county clerk of Sheridan
County, Wyoming. The premises that are described in
the Mortgage are as follows:
THE SOUTH 95 FEET OF LOT 6,
BLOCK 31, OF SHERIDAN LAND
COMPANY’S SECOND ADDITION TO
THE TOWN, NOW CITY OF
SHERIDAN, SHERIDAN COUNTY,
WYOMING.
with an address of 1229 Spaulding
St., Sheridan, Wyoming, 82801
JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., has served a written Notice
of Intent to Foreclose the Mortgage by Advertisement
and Sale pursuant to the terms of the Mortgage to the
record owner or party in possession in accordance with
the statute ten (10) days prior to the first publication of
the sale.
The amount due and owing on the date of the first
publication is $153,520.01 which includes the unpaid
principal and accrued but unpaid interest. Interest
continues to accrue on the unpaid balance at the rate of
$8.30 per day.
The property being foreclosed upon may be subject to
other liens and encumbrances that will not be
extinguished at the sale and any prospective purchaser
should research the status of title before submitting a
bid.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to W.S.§ 34-3-101 et
seq., (1977 Republished Edition) that the above
described property will be at public venue sold by the
Sheriff of Sheridan County, to the highest bidder at the
hour of 10:15 o’clock A.M. on the 20th day of March,
2015, on the courthouse steps of Sheridan County.
DATED this 21st day of January, 2015.
BY: Greg B. Asay
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
GLOSSARY OF TERMS |
Default: Failure to fulfill an obligation, especially the obligation to
make payments when due to a lender.
Encumbrance: A right attached to the property of another that may
lessen its value, such as a lien, mortgage, or easement.
Foreclosure: The legal process of terminating an owner’s interest in
property, usually as the result of a default under a mortgage.
Foreclosure may be accomplished by order of a court or by the
statutory process known as foreclosure by advertisement (also
known as a power of sale foreclosure).
Lien: A legal claim asserted against the property of another, usually
as security for a debt or obligation.
Mortgage: A lien granted by the owner of property to provide
security for a debt or obligation.
Associated Legal Group, LLC
1807 Capitol Ave Suite 203
Cheyenne, WY 82001
(307) 632-2888
Attorney for JPMorgan Chase Bank,
National Association
Publish: February 7, 14, 21, and 28, 2015.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
WHEREAS, default in the payment of principal and
interest has occurred under the terms of a promissory
note dated July 13, 2006 executed and delivered by
Kent G. Bourbon, to Lender, Countrywide Bank, N.A., and
a real estate mortgage of the same date securing the
Note, which Mortgage was recorded in favor of
Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc.,
(“MERS”), as Mortgagee acting solely as nominee for
Lender and Lender’s successors and assigns, recorded
on July 18, 2006 as Rec. No. 546586, Book 639, Page
0118 in the public records in the office of the county clerk
of Sheridan County, Wyoming; as assigned to Bank of
America, N.A., as successor by merger to BAC Home
Loans Servicing, LP, as Mortgagee, recorded July 28, 2011
as Rec. No. 2011-689562, Book 802, Page 722, in the
public records in the office of the county clerk of
Sheridan County, Wyoming; as assigned to Green Tree
Servicing LLC, by Corrective Assignment of Real Estate,
as Mortgagee, recorded March 3, 2014 as Rec. No. 2014710783, Book 879, Page 173, in the public records in the
office of the county clerk of Sheridan County, Wyoming.
The premises that are described in the Mortgage are as
follows:
Lot 26 and a tract of land in Lot 27,
Block 1, Colony South Addition to
the City of Sheridan, Sheridan
County, Wyoming, more particularly
described as follows:
Beginning at the SE corner of Lot
27; thence N.18°24’10”W., 22.00
feet along the back line of said Lot
27 to a point; thence
S.88°32’38”W., 70.40 feet to a
point; thence S.76°08’00”W., 79.64
feet to the point of beginning.
LESS a parcel in Lot 26, beginning at
the NW corner of said Lot 26;
thence S.76°08’00”E., 26.53 feet to
a point; thence S.88°32’28”W.,
24.41 feet to a point; thence along
a curve to the left having a radius of
60 feet and a chord bearing of
N.11°01’32W, 7.11 feet to a point;
said point being the point of
beginning.;
with an address of 19 Davis Tee,
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801.
The Mortgage and Note have been duly assigned for
value to Green Tree Servicing LLC, which has served
written Notice of Intent to Foreclose the Mortgage by
advertisement and sale pursuant to the terms of the
Mortgage to the record owner or party in possession in
accordance with the statute ten (10) days prior to the
first publication of the sale.
The amount due and owing on the date of the first
publication is $254,998.11, which includes the unpaid
principal and accrued but unpaid interest. Interest
continues to accrue on the unpaid balance at the rate of
$37.35 per day.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to W.S. §34-3-101 et
seq., (1977 Republished Edition) that the above
described property will be at public venue sold by the
Sheriff of Sheridan County, at the hour of 10:05 o’clock
A.M. on the 20th day of March, 2015, on the courthouse
steps of Sheridan County.
The property being foreclosed upon may be subject to
other liens and encumbrances that will not be
extinguished at the sale and any prospective purchaser
should research the status of title before submitting a
bid.
DATED this 21st day of January, 2015.
BY: Greg B. Asay
Associated Legal Group, LLC
1807 Capitol Ave Suite 203
Cheyenne, WY 82001
(307) 632-2888
Attorney for Green Tree Servicing LLC
Publish: February 7, 14, 21, 28, 2015.
Power of Sale: A clause commonly written into a mortgage
authorizing the mortgagee to advertise and sell the property in the
event of default. The process is governed by statute, but is not
supervised by any court.
Probate: The court procedure in which a decedent’s liabilities are
settled and her assets are distributed to her heirs.
Public Notice: Notice given to the public or persons affected
regarding certain types of legal proceedings, usually by publishing
in a newspaper of general circulation. This notice is usually
required in matters that concern the public.
Disclaimer: The foregoing terms and definitions are provided merely as a guide to the
reader and are not offered as authoritative definitions of legal terms.
Your Right
To Know
and be
informed of
government
legal
proceedings is
embodied in
public notices.
This
newspaper
urges every
citizen to read
and study
these notices.
We strongly
advise those
seeking
further
information to
exercise their
right of access
to public
records and
public
meetings.
LEGAL NOTICE POLICY
The Sheridan Press publishes Legal
Notices under the following schedule:
If we receive the Legal Notice by:
Monday Noon –
It will be published in
Thursday’s paper.
Tuesday Noon –
It will be published in
Friday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Saturday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Monday’s paper.
Thursday Noon –
It will be published in
Tuesday’s paper.
Friday Noon –
It will be published in
Wednesday’s paper.
• Complete information, descriptions
and billing information are required
with each legal notice. A PDF is
required if there are any signatures,
with a Word Document attached.
• Failure to include this information
WILL cause delay in publication. All
legal notices must be paid in full
before
an
"AFFIDAVIT
OF
PUBLICATION" will be issued.
• Please contact The Sheridan Press
legal advertising department at
672-2431 if you have questions.
Matt
Redle
County
Attorney
307-674-2580
STATE
Matt
Mead
Governor
307-777-7434
Rosie
Berger
Representative
House Dist. 51
307-672-7600
Mark
Jennings
Representative
House Dist. 30
307-461-0697
John
Patton
Representative
House Dist. 29
307-672-2776
Mike
Madden
Representative
House Dist. 40
307-684-9356
Dave
Kinskey
Senator
Senate Dist. 22
307-461-4297
307-278-6030
Bruce
Burns
Senator
Senate Dist. 21
307-672-6491
B7
This early picture of
Piney Inn (later to
become the Wagon Box
Inn) at a bend in the road
on the outskirts of Story
is from the Loucks
collection in the
Sheridan County
Museum's Memory Book
project. One of the
area's oldest businesses,
it changed ownership a
number of times.
B8 Buffalo Realty FULL 0228.qxp_A Section Template 2/27/15 2:50 PM Page 1
B8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
nside: Deep clean carpets and rugs. Rent or
buy a carpet cleaner. If you have wool rugs
or carpet, or any that are valuable or delicate, hire a professional for cleaning.
Take advantage of warm days to open the
windows and air out the house.
Clean ceiling fans. Stand on a sturdy ladder and wipe the fans with a soft cloth
dampened with household cleaner. If the fixture has an attached light, use a glass cleaner to gently clean off dust.
Dust motor housing with a
dry cloth. To keep blades
dust free between cleaning
use a Swiffer cleaner on an
extension pole.
Vacuum and steam-clean
curtains or have them drycleaned. If you’ll be replacing heavy curtains with
SUSAN
lighter ones as the weather
WOODY
gets warmer, it is especial|
ly important to remove
dust and dirt before putting the curtains away in
storage. Blinds and shades should also be
cleaned. Don’t forget to wash windows
before replacing curtains.
Continue fertilizing houseplants. To be
sure plants on windowsills get an even
amount of light, rotate the pots a quarter of
a turn every few days. Place heavier plants
on Lazy Susans to make it easier.
Spring cleaning is just around the corner.
Restock homekeeping supplies now. You will
need all-purpose cleaner and glass cleaner,
specific products for problem spots such as
mildew in tile grout, as well as natural
cleaners such as baking soda and vinegar.
Outside:
Rake the lawn and clear away fallen
branches or other debris left behind by winter storms.
This is one of the best months to plant or
rearrange trees, shrubs and perennials. Set
out bare-root plants and perennial vegetables such as asparagus, horseradish and
rhubarb.
Apply dormant oil to landscape plants and
fruit trees to kill adult insects and eggs that
have lived over winter. Dormant oil acts by
suffocating the insects, which breathe
through their skins. Be sure to spray the
trunk, branches, stems and both sides of
foliage thoroughly. Follow label directions
and do not spray if the temperature is
expected to drop below freezing within 24
hours.
Overseed an old lawn or plant a new one
late this month. For overseeding, rough up
the soil and sow with the same kind of grass
that is growing. Otherwise the texture and
color of the new grass will contrast with the
old. For a new lawn, till 2 inches of organic
matter into the top 8 inches of soil before
you sow. Keep newly sown areas well
watered until grass is tall enough to mow.
Never cut off more than one-third of grass
height at one time. And remember, the taller
you let your grass remain after mowing, the
deeper the roots will grow allowing the
grass to better tolerate hot weather and
drought.
Don’t be quick to prune, but do have a
plan. If you have doubts don’t just cut back
all limbs. Pruning is an art; when it is done
poorly it is a tragedy. Find a book, or better
yet, call the local Extension Office for accurate, reliable information. Prune spring
flowering shrubs for shape after they have
bloomed.
SUSAN WOODY has been a home and gardener writer for more than 20
years and is a master gardener.
C1
2015’s color of the
year makes a mark
Things to
do for March
I
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BY ELAINE MARKOUTSAS
UNIVERSALUCLICK
Color trends come and go,
but certain hues are perennial hangers-on. Take red, for
example.
Chicago interior designer
Alessandra Branca is a
known red lover. When she
designed a collection of fabrics for Schumacher, red
played a starring role.
Sometimes her approach is
playful, like pairing red-andwhite ticking stripe lampshades with antique gilt
bronze candlestick lamps.
Google her work, and the
rooms that pop up are laced
with the fiery hue that seems
to explode in every shot. She
mostly likes it on the coral
side, and the fact that she's
pretty passionate about
Pompeian shades speaks to
her Italian heritage.
New York-based designer
Alexa Hampton knows how to
shake things up with red.
While most of the furnishings she designs for Hickory
Chair are classic, quiet neutrals with occasional bursts
of color, she wowed High
Point, North Carolina, furniture marketgoers when she
rolled out several entire
spaces in ravishing red. On
the walls, in upholstery, as
accessories — and, for ultra
drama, as a kind of racing
ribbon stripe down the backside of a zebra-patterned
chair.
"Red wakes you up," says
Hampton. "When you paint a
room red, you have a point of
view, so don't use it if you
want to hedge."
Like red lipstick, we love
the stroke of sass. It's bold.
It's sexy. Like a lightning bolt,
it instantly grabs your attention. It's loaded with energy.
It evokes passion and love,
which is why it will be much
talked about this month, with
all those cliches of hearts and
red roses, the color of valentines. But perhaps especially
because the Pantone Color of
the Year for 2015 is not red,
but Marsala.
Pantone describes the color
as a "robust and earthy wine
red and says Marsala "enriches our minds, bodies and
souls."
While the chip appears to
be a milky, chocolatey rose,
interpretations run from
maroon to burgundy, dusty to
dark. There are subtle differences in all reds from wine-y
to bright, and designers seem
to be tap dancing to find the
part of the spectrum that
works for them.
"I've seen way too many
burgundy dining rooms ... to
love this color again anytime
soon," opined Maria Killam,
author of the Color Me
COURTESY PHOTO | UNIVERSAL UCLICK
Even more traditional shapes like Windsor chairs assume a modern
flair when they're shown in red. Hooker Furniture added a sleek edge
with an Ultra True Red finish to its Sanctuary collection dining lineup.
Happy blog.
Designer and TV personality Courtney Cachet was a bit
more blunt. "I am not feeling
this year's color at all. It's a
little confining as it relates to
coordinating (elements) ...
and kind of blah. Marsala
feels like Oxblood's sister
who's late to the party wearing the same -- on sale -- outfit. Maybe in fashion -- for
home it kind of sucks."
Ouch. But she goes on to
explain: "Red is so much richer, prettier. It's a color you
can work with," she says, noting that in her own dining
room, which has navy walls
and white moldings, she
chose cranberry red velvet
chairs for pop. "You don't
have to perk up red with gold
or metallic," she says.
Are voles damaging your plants, trees and lawn?
I
noticed with the nice weather we recently had — with
the snow gone — that there
is some vole damage. Voles
are mouse-looking rodents that
can damage or consume flower
bulbs, garden
plants, vegetables and
field and forage crops.
Voles can
scar lawns
by constructing runways
and clipping
SCOTT
grass very
HININGER
close to the
|
roots.
Though the
damage done
usually is not permanent, it
may detract from the appearance of a well-kept lawn.
They also eat leaves, shoots,
roots, tubers and seeds of
most grasses and broadleaved plants. The damage
may be severe enough to prevent self-seeding of annual
landscape plantings.
Hostas are a good indicator
plant since they can be especially hard hit. While you can
use baited mouse traps placed
under overturned pots, there
are other options available.
When planting new bulbs or
perennials, place them inside
quarter-inch wire mesh cages
that go at least 6 inches into
the ground. The cages prevent
voles from being able to reach
your plants. You can also add
coarse material such as sharp
gravel to your soil when
planting. Voles prefer soft
organic material and they
won't dig through the sharp
objects. Don't forget you can
pick plants that voles do not
like such as wood hyacinth,
fritillaria and daffodils.
Vole populations often are
cyclic and can increase from
10 to 250 voles per acre. In
North America, vole populations peak about every four
years. These cycles are not
necessarily regular or coupled with dramatic increases
in numbers. Occasionally,
high vole populations last
about a year before crashing.
These peaks occasionally
result in severe damage to
crops and landscapes.
Repellents made with thiram and capsaicin are registered for controlling vole
damage on ornamental
plants.
Trapping is an effective
method for controlling voles if
the damage is over a limited
area (less than an acre) and a
sufficient number of traps
are used (two to three per
runway and/or hole). Set single mouse snap traps perpendicular to vole runways with
the triggers in the runways,
or set two traps together within the runways with the triggers facing away from each
other. Bait is generally not
required. If you prefer to use
bait, smear peanut butter
mixed with oatmeal on trap
triggers. Baited traps should
be covered with a box with a
1-inch hole cut in it, to reduce
attractiveness and access to
birds and squirrels. Make
sure boxes are securely positioned and of sufficient size
to allow free action of the
snap traps. Good enclosures
can be made of PVC pipe and
cardboard milk cartons.
Large vole populations can be
reduced most efficiently with
toxic baits. Be sure to read all
pesticide product labels thoroughly and comply with all
directions given.
If your perennials or bulbs
did not come up this spring or
your shrubs died, check at
ground level to see if the bark
is missing or the plants have
been eaten.
The weather the last couple
of years has taken a very
heavy toll on our trees, especially this winter. We will see
how things wintered this
spring.
Even the wildlife are looking forward to spring this
year.
SCOTT HININGER is with the Sheridan County
Extension office.
C2
SENIOR
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
Scoundrels, rapscallions and
rascals – protect your identity
FROM THE SHERIDAN SENIOR CENTER
SHERIDAN — Debt collection is one of
the top three fraud scams in Wyoming. Do
you know how to tell the difference
between a legitimate claim and a scam?
How is this behavior a threat to your identity?
“Scoundrels, rapscallions and rascals —
how to spot and avoid being scammed” is
the title of a free community presentation
on how to protect yourself from identity
theft on Tuesday from 5:30-7 p.m.
Les Engelter and Nancy Drummond of
AARP will share the most common fraud
trends and behavior in Wyoming including
fraudulent debt collection tactics and share
protection strategies to use.
The presentation is hosted by the
Sheridan Senior Center through the
Center’s “When I’m 64 or more” life plan-
ning lecture series offered on the first
Tuesday evening of each month. The series
was launched in 2014 with the vision to
help residents make informed decisions on
topics that can or may be affecting them.
Although hosted by the Senior Center,
the presentation is available to all ages and
not restricted to those who are age 60 or
older. No advance sign-up is required.
Refreshments will be served. There is no
charge for the presentation or the refreshments.
Each week, the Senior Center receives numerous
alerts on scams and frauds in Wyoming.
Diligence on how to protect yourself is important. The Senior Center is offering a free community presentation for all ages on fraud
trends, scam behavior and protection strategies
on Tuesday evening at the Center.
COURTESY PHOTO | SHERIDAN SENIOR CENTER
SENIOR CENTER HAPPENINGS |
• Monday nights are support group nights at the Senior
Center. The following community groups meet at the
Center on Mondays after work: Parkinson’s Support
Group (call 675-1978 for details), Cancer Support Group
(call Renae at 674-6022) and Family Caregiver Support
Group (call 675-1978).
• So fun, we’re doing it again! The Senior Center is planning another group trip this time to the Medora Musical
in Medora, North Dakota. Medora has been referred to as
the “Branson of North Dakota.” For more information
join us at one of two informational meetings at the
Senior Center: March 20, 4:30 p.m. (and stick around for
the Center’s popular Third Friday Pasta Night) and a second meeting on March 28 at 9:15 a.m. (come early that
Saturday for breakfast at the Senior Center before coming to the meeting). Can’t make either date? There will be
more group meetings on this trip or you can call Lois Bell
at 672-2240 for trip details. The trip is Aug. 5–7 and
includes lodging at the Roughrider Hotel, roundtrip
coach bus, two breakfasts, the famous 12 oz. ribeye
Pitchfork Fondue dinner, a backstage tour and the outstanding Medora Musical and more.
• Natural Stone Jewelry class with Jessie will be offered
March 9 and March 16, 1-2:30 p.m. in the art studio.
Supplies provided. The cost is $5 per person registered
with the Senior Center and $8 per person for those not
registered with the Senior Center. Sign up in advance by
calling 672-2240. Pay the instructor at the class.
• “Love a Book” with Jackie McMahon begins March 10
at 10 a.m. in the Sheridan Senior Center Community
Room. Love a good book? Treat yourself to Jackie reading aloud. McMahon will begin with some of John
Erickson’s stories. Erickson is the author of “Hank, the
Cowdog.” Reading will be offered at no charge.
• Free One-Stroke Painting class at the Senior Center
will be offered March 11 from 9:30-11:30 a.m.in the art studio. Supplies provided.
• “Wyoming, the railroad state: the impact of an indispensable industry,” will be held March 11 at the Senior
Center with historian Greg Nickerson presenting. The 70
p.m. presentation is free to the community under a grant
from the Wyoming Humanities Council.
• A spaghetti dinner will precede the “Wyoming, the
railroad state” presentation on March 11. The dinner is
scheduled for 6 p.m. at a cost of $10 per person. Advance
registration by calling 672-2240 is required for the dinner.
You may come for the $10 dinner and free presentation,
just the dinner or just the presentation. Just remember:
sign up in advance for dinner and pay at the door that
evening.
Test your fraud IQ
A simple test to see how vulnerable you are to scammers
SOURCE: AARP BULLETIN/REAL POSSIBILITIES MARCH 2014
Online, have you ever:
1. Clicked on a pop-up ad?
2. Played solitaire or other games?
3. Opened an email from someone you don’t know?
4. Read a newspaper?
5. Signed up for a free trial offer?
6. Kept in touch with family members on Facebook or Twitter?
7. Sold some merchandise in an auction?
8. Checked out the weather report?
9. Sent funds through an Internet money transfer service?
10. Watched a TV show?
11. Posted your home address, phone number, vacation plans, names
of children or grandkids on social media?
If you checked only even-number activities, congratulations. You’re among Internet users who are least likely to
be duped by a fraudster who is after your money. If you
checked any of the odd-numbered choices, “you may be
putting yourself in the scammer’s sights, “said Doug
Shadel, AARP Washington state director and author of
Outsmarting the Scam Artists.
Shadel directed an AARP Fraud Watch Network survey
of nearly 12,000 Internet users to figure out the differences
between online fraud victims and nonvictims.
One surprising discover: Age doesn’t matter. What does?
Nonvictims rarely engage in certain online behaviors
(such as the odd-numbered examples above”. Victims often
have recently experienced a stressful event, such as job
loss, illness or relationship problems.
“Scammers target people who are emotionally vulnerable because it’s easier to force them into a bad decision,”
Shadel said.
Reprinted with permission from AARP.
CENTER STAGE |
Knowledge is key when dealing with Parkinson’s
W
e know that living with any chronic illness can be
difficult, and it’s normal to feel angry, depressed or
discouraged at times. According to the Mayo Clinic,
support groups offer a place for you to find people
who are going through similar situations and can support
you.
Parkinson’s disease presents special problems because it
can cause chemical changes in your
brain that make you feel anxious or
depressed. Parkinson’s disease can be
frustrating, as walking, talking and even
eating become more difficult and timeconsuming.
Although friends and family can be
your best allies, the understanding of
people who know what you’re going
through can be especially helpful. For
DONNA
many people with Parkinson’s disease
LECHOLOT
and their families, support groups can be
a good resource for practical information
|
about the disease.
We have re-introduced a Parkinson’s
support group on Monday nights at the
Senior Center to add professional information to support families dealing with
Parkinson’s. The group meets at 5:30 p.m.
at the Center.
Although you may think it would be difficult to come to a support group when
you have so much going on, we encourage you to try it at least once. We will do
anything we can to support you where
DANI
you are and make your time away worthNICHOLS
while.
|
If caring for your loved one is an issue,
we can explore options to finding someone who can be with your loved one
while you attend the support group.
The Senior Center is striving to make Monday nights
support group nights. There are various support groups
that meet that evening.Their attendance is testimony to
the value that caregivers find in coming to a support
group. Other support groups that meet on Monday
evenings at the Senior Center are cancer support and an
evening family caregiver support group.
If you are caring for a loved one with specific needs — or
need support because you are going through a tough time
— we hope you will consider coming to one of the support
groups at the Senior Center on Monday nights. There are
other support groups that meet at other times of the week
at the Senior Center including a multiple sclerosis support
group that meets the last Saturday of each month.
If you are uncertain about coming to the Parkinson’s
support group or want more information, please feel free
to call the Senior Center and ask for Donna or Stella. The
best number to reach either is 675-1978 Mondays through
Fridays. If they are not available, leave a message and one
of them will call you back. If you would like to schedule
an appointment to talk in person — outside of the Monday
evening support group meeting — call that number to
make an appointment.
You will find that knowledge is power. After attending
support groups, many caregivers are known to say “I wish
I had known that sooner” and “I have gotten so many good
tips and knowledge from being part of a support group.”
We invite you to join us — if even only once — to the
Parkinson’s support group so that you may have the opportunity to say “I’ve gotten so much good information and
tips from this group!” Let us reach out to support you.
DONNA LECHOLOT, RN from the Sheridan Senior Center, and DANI NICHOLS, OT from Westview
Healthcare Center/Saddle Ridge Therapy are co-facilitators of the Parkinson’s Support Group at the
Senior Center. Center Stage is written by friends of the Senior Center for the Sheridan Community. It is a
collection of insights and stories related to living well at every age.
YOUTH
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
C3
Academics for All names Joe
Shassetz as this week’s
Summit Award recipient
A
cademics for All proudly honors Joe Shassetz,
the son of Jim and Jenifer Shassetz, with this
week’s Summit Award.
ANDEE ANDERSON | TONGUE RIVER HIGH SCHOOL
History teacher Steve Hanson uses what he learned serving in the U.S. military to better his teaching practices at Tongue River High
School.
Tongue River teachers excel in and out of the classroom
BY LIBBY HEIMBAUGH
TONGUE RIVER HIGH SCHOOL
DAYTON — On the surface, boot
camp and bands might not appear to
have much in common, but the
diverse talents of the Tongue River
High School teaching staff bring
together these elements and more as
the educators use their personal lives
to advance their classroom skills.
English teacher Andee Anderson
loves capturing images for her second
job as a photographer just as she loves
capturing and trying to focus her students’ minds every day in the classroom.
“An exceptional photograph, in its
purest form, tells the viewer a story,”
Anderson said. “It isn't just about
pushing a small button; it is about
seeing things from a different perspective, and that’s the part which
intrigues me.”
Media assistant Brenda Nixon uses
lessons from her community service
to teach TRHS students the importance of giving back. Nixon leads
Bible studies and runs the
Community Cupboard and Clothes
Closet at the Ranchester Community
Church.
“I believe that we should love our
neighbors as ourselves,” Nixon said.
“Being able to show compassion for
your fellow man without being judgmental is one of Christ's characteristics I strive for each day.”
Nixon tries to pass this feeling of
generosity on to the next generation
each day by instructing students on
the importance of giving. For her, it
comes naturally because it is a part of
her daily life.
For some, passions become hobbies,
but for at least one teacher, his passion became his legacy. Many more
people have heard Dave Munsick
croon “Buckaroo Ball” than have listened to him lecture in science class.
When not in school, Munsick works
and travels as a musician, singing by
himself and with his sons. He has produced several albums, and while he
hasn’t written any science textbooks,
he knows how to unify singing and
teaching.
“Teaching and playing music both
require a person to have a heightened
ability to communicate,” he said,
adding that whether he is singing in
front of a large crowd or teaching in
front of a small number of students,
he is communicating through song
and word.
Moving from this professional
crooner to a hardened military man,
it may be hard to picture both types of
people being effective teachers. But
for ex-military history teacher Steve
Hanson, any task is conquerable.
Hanson served in the military for
five years, beginning in 2001, and
began teaching part-time in 2013
before becoming a full-time teacher
last year.
While 6-foot-5 Hanson can seem pretty intimidating, his classroom is a far
cry from boot camp. He believes that
the most rewarding part of teaching
is helping students realize their full
potential, something the military
allowed him to achieve.
A camera, guitars, Bibles and combat boots may have more in common
than one might realize. While all of
these passions led each teacher down
a different personal path, these trails
manage to converge at the love that
they all share: teaching.
Districts in Orlando, Atlanta split school prize
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — School districts in Atlanta and
Orlando have won the largest education award of its kind
in the United States.
In a first for the prestigious $1 million Broad Prize for
Urban Education, two districts are splitting the award.
The announcement of the winners was made Monday.
The winners are Gwinnett County Public Schools in
metro Atlanta and Orange County Public Schools in
Orlando.
The 12-year-old prize rewards school districts for improving achievement among disadvantaged students.
The two winners were picked from a pool of 75 eligible
districts.
The prize is sponsored by a foundation run by Edythe
and Eli Broad, who made his fortune in home construction
and insurance.
Shassetz maintains a perfect 4.0 GPA while taking
a difficult schedule that includes challenging college prep courses, such as Advanced Placement calculus, AP U.S. history, AP government, AP biology
and AP chemistry.
Shassetz was recognized for his academic success
by being inducted into the Sheridan High School
branch of the National Honor Society, for which he
serves as treasurer. Shassetz has also spent a great
deal of time serving the community by helping
with event set up during rodeo weekend, serving
lunch to seniors at the senior center and shoveling
snow for the elderly in the community.
Shassetz’s desire to serve has been noted by
Rhonda Bell of SHS.
“As a teacher I have found Joe to have
exceptional ethical standards, he is
forthright and always willing to help,”
Bell said. “He will step in and help without being asked. He is a super role
model for other students and he gets
along well with his peers.
Shassetz
Shassetz has nominated SHS biology
teacher, Beth Harman, for Outstanding
teacher.
“She (Harmon) makes the class super fun and
school super fun,” Shassetz said. “I enjoy being in
her class and she makes it very easy to learn.”
Shassetz has also been recognized for many athletic accomplishments. Shassetz is already a threetime letter winner in soccer and a three-time letter
winner in football. This past season, he was named
All-State football at three positions: wide receiver,
cornerback and returner. He was also named to the
Super 25 football team for the state of Wyoming. In
soccer, Shassetz has been named to the AllConference team.
However, Shassetz’s extracurricular exploits are
not limited to athletics. This past summer, Shassetz
was a part of the state champion “We the People”
team. The “We the People” competition judges students’ knowledge of constitutional principles and
their ability to apply that knowledge to historical
and current constitutional issues. By winning the
state competition, Shassetz and his teammates qualified to compete at the national competition in
Washington, D.C. When asked about the best parts
of the experience, Shassetz said “I really enjoyed
meeting everyone else in the competition. The competition itself made me a better public speaker.”
In his free time, Shassetz enjoys the outdoors.
While he also enjoys camping and hiking,
Shassetz’s favorite outdoor activity is fishing.
Shassetz can often be found at local ponds in the
evening, relaxing and “always trying to get the big
fish.”
Shassetz plans to continue exploring the outdoors
while he studies at the University of Wyoming in
the fall. Shassetz plans to study pharmacy and cites
his love of chemistry as his reason for pursuing the
subject.
Academics for All congratulates Joseph Shassetz
for his academic and extracurricular success.
Summit Award
Academics for All is an all-volunteer
group of individuals and donors who
support academic excellence in
Sheridan County School District 2.
Members of the committee include
Beth Bailey, Mary Brezik-Fisher,
Anne Gunn, Ryan Maddux, Tempe
Murphy, Bill Patton, Doug Raney and
Gina Thoney.
C4
FAITH
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
A prayer more often prayed
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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
“
Thy Kingdom come; Thy will be done on earth as it is in
heaven.”
I find myself praying this prayer more
frequently and more fervently these
days. You know the reasons why.
Internationally, there is no end to the
torment and abuse and exploitation and
cruelty that we are made aware of on a
daily basis. Nationally we continue to be
trapped in political polarization which
serves no one well. Locally and personally there are those who have suffered
GARY
great loss and grief, who are struggling
KOPSA
to make sense out of their lives, who
|
wonder how they can possibly carry on
another day.
In praying this prayer…in praying the
very words of Jesus, God’s Son…I am called, I believe, not
just to wait around and wonder when all this will come to
pass, but to engage as an agent of that very Kingdom of
God for which I am praying.
Yes, I am among those who do believe in the ultimate
return of the resurrected Jesus Christ who will make all
things new. But I also am among those who believe His
words: “I am the Light of the world; he who follows Me
shall not walk in darkness but shall have the light of life;
let your light shine; you are the salt of the earth; go, therefore, into all the world; as the Father has sent Me, so send I
you; in the world there will be tribulation, but be of good
cheer for I have overcome the world.” All this tells me that
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there is Kingdom work and opportunity going on this very
moment.
So I pray, “Thy Kingdom come; Thy will be done on earth
as it is in heaven.” But I also pray, “Lord God (Father, Son,
Holy Spirit) help me to be and do whatever You would have
me be or do in order to bring about in some small but eternal way Your Kingdom today.”
I realize as I write this that it may seem presumptuous
or self-delusional. Who does he think he is? Indeed, there
is always this danger. However, God has so often taken the
weak things of this world to do what He desires. In terms
of all that our world struggles with in these early months
of 2015, I am not only weak, but truly of no consequence.
But God…But God…He has chosen to use even folks like
you and me (the “inconsequential”) to be Kingdom emissaries, ambassadors, ministers, healers and bringers of
“glad tidings” and hope today.
Person by person, situation by situation, day by day, year
by year, from one earthly kingdom to another, the “good
news” of The Kingdom of God — the news of God’s
Incarnation in Jesus Christ, the news of His forgiveness of
sin, the news of His redeeming love, the news of a new
start, the news of life eternal in the midst of life temporal
— this “good news” of His Kingdom is alive and operative.
This news, this light, shines in the darkness and the
darkness does not and will not overcome it. So may the
Lord help you and me — today — not only to prayerfully
yearn for and anticipate His Kingdom, but also, as He
enables us, to bring it.
WAREHOUSE MARKET
Management & Employees
WYOMING ELECTRIC INC.
Dave Nelson & Staff
125 N. Sheridan Ave.
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK
46 W. Brundage St.
SHERIDAN COMMUNITY FED. CREDIT
UNION
141 S. Gould 672-3445
COTTONWOOD CENTER, LLC
Sheridan’s foremost office complex
Proudly serving since 1992
THE WOODS
Ron Wood & Staff
CONNIE’S GLASS, INC.
Bill Stanbridge & Staff
GARY KOPSA is chaplain of Volunteers of America Northern Rockies.
Church Calendar
ARVADA COMMUNITY CHURCH (nondenominational)
223 Main St., Arvada, 758-4353. Pastor Bob
Moore. Sunday: 11 a.m. service, 11:30 a.m. children’s Bible study.
BAHA’I FAITH OF SHERIDAN
673-4778. The Baha'i Faith for Devotional
Programs from the sacred writings of all religions and Study Circles.
BETHESDA WORSHIP CENTER
5135 Coffeen Ave., 673-0023, www.bethesdaworship.com. Pastor Scott Lee. Sunday: 10:30
a.m. service, children’s ministry, nursery.
Wednesday: 6 p.m. service, youth ministry,
children’s ministry, nursery.
BIG HORN CHURCH
115 S. Third St., Big Horn, 751-2086 or 655-3036.
Pastor Sherman Weberg. Sunday: 9:15 a.m.
prayer time, 10 a.m. worship service, 5 p.m.
Bible study. Wednesday: 7 p.m. youth and
adult Bible study.
BUDDHIST MEDITATION FELLOWSHIP
1950 E. Brundage Lane. Sunday: 7-8 p.m.
Sessions include discussion of the dharma
reading, sitting and walking meditation. For
information call Victor at 672-3135 or email
[email protected]
CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1660 Big Horn Ave., 672-3149. Pastor Terral
Bearden. Sunday: 9:30 a.m. Sunday school,
10:45 a.m. worship service, 6 p.m. Bible study.
Wednesday: 7 p.m. prayer meeting. Thursday:
6 p.m. youth group.
CALVARY CHAPEL SHERIDAN
606 S. Thurmond, 751-2250,
www.ccsheridan.org, email: [email protected] Pastor Nels Nelson. Sunday: 10 a.m.
non-denominational worship service, teaching
through the Bible verse by verse.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1769 Big Horn Ave., 763-8347. Rev. Rick Sykes.
Sunday: 9:30 a.m. Bible classes, 10:30 a.m.
worship and communion. Wednesday: 6:30
p.m. Bible study. Community carol sing Dec. 14
at 3 p.m. Christmas Eve candlelight service
Dec. 24 at 7:30 p.m.
THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER
DAY SAINTS
Ranchester branch, 1066 Big Horn Ave.,
Ranchester, 655-9085. President James
Boulter. Sunday: 10 a.m. Sacrament meeting,
11:20 a.m. Sunday school and primary meetings, 12:10 p.m. Priesthood and Relief Society
meetings.
THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER
DAY SAINTS
Sheridan 1st Ward, 2051 Colonial Dr., 672-2926.
Bishop Kim Anderson. Sunday: 9:30-10:40
a.m. Sacrament meeting, 10:30-11:30 a.m.
Sunday school meeting, 10:40 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. Primary meeting, 11:40 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Priesthood, Relief Society and Young
Women’s meetings.
THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER
DAY SAINTS
Sheridan 2nd Ward, 2051 Colonial Dr., 672-6739.
Bishop David Bailey. Sunday: 1:30-2:40 p.m.
Sacrament meeting, 2:50-4:30 p.m. Primary
meeting, 2:50-3:30 p.m. Sunday school meeting, 3:40-4:30 p.m. Priesthood, Relief Society
and Young Women’s meetings.
THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER
DAY SAINTS
Sheridan 3rd Ward, 2051 Colonial Dr., 673-7368.
Bishop Charles Martineau. Sunday: 9-9:50
a.m. Priesthood, Relief Society and Young
Women’s meetings, 9-10:40 a.m. Primary
meeting, 10-10:40 a.m. Sunday school meet-
ing, 10:50 a.m. to noon, Sacrament meeting.
THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER
DAY SAINTS
Sheridan College Branch, 2051 Colonial Dr., 6739887, Branch President Bradley G. Taylor.
Sunday: 1 p.m. Priesthood meeting and Relief
Society, 2 p.m. Sunday school, 2:50 p.m.
Sacrament meeting.
CHURCH OF THE HOLY TRINITY
2644 Big Horn Ave., 751-5238. Father Lewis
Shepherd. Sunday: 10 a.m. prayer and mass.
CLEARMONT COMMUNITY CHURCH
Across from gymnasium in Clearmont, 7584597. Pastor James P. Stark. Sunday: 9 a.m.
worship service, 9:45 a.m. children’s church.
CORNERSTONE CHURCH
4351 Big Horn Ave., 672-8126, www.cornerstoneofsheridan.org, email:
[email protected] Pastor Tony
Forman. Sunday: 8:30 a.m. worship service,
10:30 a.m. worship service with children’s
church. Call the church for youth group,
Women of the Word and B.O.O.M. (for kids
grades 1-5) schedules.
DAYTON COMMUNITY CHURCH
318 Bridge St., Dayton, 655-2504. Pastor Dennis
Goodin. Sunday: 9 a.m. worship service, 10:30
a.m. Sunday school.
FAMILY LIFE CENTER (Foursquare Gospel
Church)
118 W. Fifth St., 674-9588, familylifecenter.biz.
Pastor Scott Orchard. Sunday: 9 a.m. Sunday
school; 10 a.m. worship service. Wednesday: 7
p.m. adult Bible study.
FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
1045 Lewis St., 674-6372, email: [email protected] Pastor Jay Littlefield.
Sunday: 9 a.m. Sunday school, 10 a.m. worship, 6 p.m. evening fellowship.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
3179 Big Horn Ave., 674-6693, www.fbcsheridanwy.org, email: [email protected]
Senior pastor John Craft, Associate Pastor of
Community Life Falk Alicke, Associate Pastor
of Youth Ministries Shane Rosty. Sunday: 9:30
worship service, Sunday school classes for all
ages and nursery; 10:50 a.m. worship service,
adult class, children’s programs and nursery, 6
p.m. senior high youth group. Wednesday: 6
p.m. junior high youth group, children’s program and adult Bible study. Small group Bible
studies meet throughout the week.
FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH (Disciples of
Christ)
102 S. Connor St., 674-6795, www.sheridandisciples.org. Pastor Doug Goodwin. Sunday: 8 a.m.
worship, 9 a.m. Sunday school, 10 a.m. worship. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thrift Store
open. Wednesday: 10 a.m. Bible study.
Saturday: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thrift Store open.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST
(Christian Science Church)
455 Sumner St., 672-2041. Sunday: 11 a.m.
church and Sunday school (10 a.m. June-Aug).
Wednesday: 7:30 p.m. testimony meeting.
Reading Room: 45 E. Loucks St., Suite 015,
open weekdays except holidays 1:30-4 p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
907 Bellevue Ave., 672-2505, Pastor Jody
Hampton. Sunday: 9:45 a.m. Sunday school
for all ages, 10:45 a.m. worship and children’s
church, 6:30 p.m. praise and Bible study.
Wednesday: 7 p.m. Bible study and prayer
meeting for all ages.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
(UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST)
100 W. Works St., 672-2668, www.sheridanfirstcongregationalucc.wordpress.com, email: god-
[email protected] Sunday: 11 a.m. worship
service. Monday through Friday: noon to 12:45
p.m. Lunch Together.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
2121 Colonial Drive, Sunday, 8 am – Worship, 10
am – Worship, Communion, 3 pm- Battle of
the Marias, 4:30-6:30 pm Confirmation class.
Monday, Lunch Together all week, 7 pm- Bell
practice. Wednesday- Noon- PW Luncheon,
4:30/6:00- LOGOS. Thursday, 6:30 amBreakfast Study, 9:30 am- Women’s study,
5:30 pm- soup supper, 6 pm- Lenten Study, 7
pm- choir practice.
FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
First United Methodist Church for: Sunday: 8:15
a.m. Hand Bell Practice, 9:30 a.m. Praise
Singing, 9:45 a.m. Worship Service, 10:00 a.m.
Children’s Sunday School, 10:45 a.m.
Fellowship, 11:15 a.m. Native American
Ministry; Tuesday: 9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. The
Closet is Open; Wednesday: 1:00 UMW
General Meeting, 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Financial Peace University Class; Thursday
12:00 p.m. Lent Lunch & Study, 5:30 p.m.
Building Committee Mtg., 7:00 p.m. Choir
Practice;
GRACE ANGLICAN CHURCH
1992 W. Fifth St., 307-461-0237, email: [email protected], Facebook: Grace Anglican
Church. Pastor Kevin Jones. Sunday: 10 a.m.
church service, 6 p.m. church service at Java
Moon Coffee Shop, 176 N. Main St.
GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH (IndependentFundamental)
1959 E. Brundage Lane (one-fourth mile east of
Interstate 90 on Highway 14), 672-7391,
www.gracebaptistsheridan.org. Pastor
Stephen Anderson. Sunday: 10 a.m. Sunday
school for all ages, 11 a.m. worship service with
children’s church and nursery provided, 6 p.m.
worship service with nursery provided.
Tuesday: 6:30 a.m. men’s Bible study, 9 a.m.
women’s Bible study (every other week).
Wednesday: 7 p.m. Bible study and prayer,
Bible club for children and youth.
GRACE CHAPEL
Story. Pastor Philip Wilson. Sunday: 10 a.m.
Sunday school, 11 a.m. worship.
HOLY NAME CATHOLIC CHURCH
260 E. Loucks St., 672-2848, www.holynamesheridan.org, email: [email protected] Pastor: Father Jim Heiser,
Associate Pastors: Father Brian Hess and
Father Michael Ehiemere. Sunday: 8 a.m.,
Mass; 10 a.m., Mass; 5:30 p.m., Mass. Monday
through Thursday: 7 a.m., Mass. Friday: 8:20
a.m., Mass. Saturday: 8 a.m., Mass; 4-5 p.m.
(or by appointment), Sacrament of
Reconciliation; 6 p.m., Vigil Mass.
IMMANUEL LUTHERAN CHURCH (LCMS)
1300 W. Fifth St., 674-6434, email: [email protected] Pastor Paul J.
Cain, email: [email protected] Home of
Martin Luther Grammar School (K-5 Classical
Christian Education,
www.SheridanMLGS.blogspot.com, email:
[email protected], accredited by NLSA
and CCLE). Sunday: 8:05 a.m. The Lutheran
Hour on KWYO 1410 AM, 9:15 a.m. Sunday
school and Bible class, 10:30 a.m. Divine service. Wednesday: 7 p.m. service. Monday-Friday:
9:05 a.m. By the Way on KROE 930 AM.
JOY JUNCTION CHILDREN’S CHURCH
Interdenominational ministry for ages 4 through
high school. Vans are available to pick up and
deliver children. Co-directors and pastors: Karl
Hunt, 672-8145 and David Kaufman, 307-4611506, email: [email protected]
Sunday: 10 a.m. to noon, worship service at
YMCA, 417 N. Jefferson St. Wednesday: 5:307:30 p.m. youth meeting for junior high and
high school, First Assembly of God basement,
1045 Lewis St.
LANDMARK INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
CHURCH
Sheridan Holiday Inn, Sheridan Room, 307-4610964, email: [email protected]
Pastor Clayton Maynard. Sunday: 10 a.m.
Sunday school, 11 a.m. worship service.
Wednesday: 6 p.m. Bible study.
MOUNTAIN ALLIANCE CHURCH
54 W. Eighth St., 6732-6400, www.mountainalliance.com. Pastor Ron Maixner. Sunday: 9
a.m. worship service, 6 p.m. youth group.
MOUNTAINVIEW FELLOWSHIP BAPTIST
CHURCH (SBC)
54 W. Eighth St., 673-4883. Pastor Jim Coonis.
Sunday: 9:45 a.m. Sunday school, 11 a.m. worship service. Call for mid-week Bible study
information.
NEW COVENANT PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
24 Grinnell Ave., 672-5790, www.newcovenantwy.org. Pastor Ron Ellis. Sunday: 10
a.m. worship, 11:30 a.m. Sunday school.
OLD APOSTOLIC LUTHERAN CHURCH
111 Metz Road. Sunday service 11 a.m. Sunday
school follows the morning service. Everyone
welcome.
OUR LADY OF THE PINES CATHOLIC
CHURCH
34 Wagon Box Road, Story, 672-2848. Saturday:
5:30 p.m. reconciliation, 6 p.m. mass served by
Holy Name Catholic Church.
PRAIRIE DOG COMMUNITY CHURCH
Prairie Dog Community Clubhouse, southeast of
Sheridan at intersection of Highway 14 East
and Meade Creek Road (County Road 131),
672-3983. Pastor Terry Wall. Sunday: 9 a.m.
non-denominational worship service.
QUAKER WORSHIP SHARING (Religious
Society of Friends)
Second and fourth Sundays. Call Gary Senier,
683-2139, for time and place.
RANCHESTER COMMUNITY CHURCH
1000 Highway 14, Ranchester, 655-9208. Pastor
Claude Alley. Sunday: 9 a.m. Sunday school, 10
a.m., worship service, 10:15 a.m. children’s
church. Wednesday: 6:30 p.m. Bible study.
Thursday: 9 a.m. to noon, 1-3 p.m. Community
Cupboard and Clothes Closet open.
THE ROCK CHURCH
Non-denominational, contemporary Christian
church. 1100 Big Horn Ave., 673-0939,
www.bighornrock.com. Pastor Michael
Garneau and Pastor Rod Jost. Sunday: 9 and
10:45 a.m. worship.
ST. EDMUND CATHOLIC CHURCH
310 Historic Highway 14, Ranchester, 678-2848.
Mass: Sunday 10 a.m.. Reconciliation: The first
Sunday of the month immediately following
mass. Served by Holy Name Catholic Church.
ST. PETER’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
1 S. Tschirgi St., 674-7655, email: [email protected] Pastor John Inserra — Rector,
Family Minister Dr. John Milliken. Sunday: 7:30
a.m. Quiet Holy Eucharist with traditional language and no music, 10 a.m. choral Holy
Eucharist with hymns and choir. Tuesday: 10
a.m. healing service. Lent Soup Suppers begin
at 6:00 p.m. followed by a study on Prayer.
Lent Super Dates: Feb. 25th; March 4, 11, 18 &
25th.
THE SALVATION ARMY
150 S. Tschirgi St. 672-2444 or 672-2445.
Captain Donald Warriner, Lieutenant Kim
Warriner. Sunday: 10 a.m. Sunday school, 11
a.m.,worship.
SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH
345 S. Main St., 672-5969,
www.sheridan23adventistchurchconnect.org.
Pastor Gary Force, 303-882-7601. Saturday:
9:30 a.m. lesson study, 11:15 a.m. church service. Call for time and location of home prayer.
SHERIDAN WESLEYAN CHURCH
404 W. Brundage Lane, 672-0612, www.sheridanwesleyan.org. Pastor Darrell White.
Sunday: 8:30 a.m. worship with children’s
church and nursery available, 9:45 a.m.
Connection Hour for all ages, 11 a.m. worship
with children’s church and nursery available.
Wednesday: 6:30 p.m. Splash for children 4years-old through 5th grade, 6:30 p.m.
transFORMED Youth for 6-12 grades. Call
office for weekly connection groups schedule.
STORY COMMUNITY CHURCH
4 Ponderosa Drive, Story, 683-3018, Facebook:
Story Community Church. Pastor John
Constantine. Sunday: 9:45 a.m. Sunday
school, 11 a.m. worship, 5:30 p.m. youth group.
Wednesday: 6:30 p.m. Bible study.
SUNRISE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
570 Marion St., 674-8424. Pastor John Jackson.
Sunday: 10 a.m. Sunday school, 11 a.m. worship, 6 p.m. worship. Wednesday: 7 p.m. worship and adult Bible study.
THEE CHURCH OF CHRIST
45 E. Loucks St. (Old Post Office Building), Suite
19. 672-2825. Richard Snider 672-2825, Scott
Osborne 672-8347. Sunday: 10 a.m. Bible class,
11 a.m. worship and communion. Wednesday:
7 p.m. Bible study.
TONGUE RIVER BAPTIST CHURCH
(Southern Baptist)
305 Coffeen St., Ranchester, 752-0415, email:
[email protected] Pastor Granger
Logan. Sunday: 9:45 a.m. Sunday school, 11
a.m. worship, 6:30 p.m. worship. Wednesday:
6:30 p.m. prayer service and Bible study.
TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH
135 Crescent Drive, 672-2411,
[email protected] Pastor Phil Wold.
Sunday: 8:30 a.m., Worship with Holy
Communion; 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for All
Ages, Coffee Fellowship, Trinity Choir; 11:00
a.m., Worship with Holy Communion
(BASICS). Monday: 7:00 p.m., Scouts and
Webelos. Tuesday: 1:30 p.m., Ministerial
Association Meets; 7:00 p.m., Stewardship
Committee Meets. Wednesday: 6:00 p.m.,
Lenten Soup Supper, Church Council Serves;
7:00 p.m., Lenten Mid-Week Worship; 7:45
p.m., Trinity Choir Rehearsal. Thursday: 7:30
a.m. Women’s Early AM Study at the Holiday
Inn; 5:15 p.m., Worship & Music Committee
Meeting; 6:00 p.m., BASICS Practice at
Greenhouse for Living; 7:00 p.m., Missional
Outreach Committee Meeting.
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP
1950 E. Brundage Lane, 672-3325, www.sheridanuu.org. President Bill Bradshaw. We are a
welcoming, nondogmatic and spiritually liberal fellowship. Weekly Sunday service and
Montessori-based religious education for ages
3 years to fifth grade at 10 a.m., followed by a
time for coffee and fellowship. Meditation
pratice every Sunday 7-8 p.m.
VALLEY LUTHERAN CHURCH (WELS)
Meets at 1981 Double Eagle Drive, Suite B, 6727599, www.valleylutheran.com. Pastor Gary
Schult. Sunday: 9 a.m. Bible class, 10:15 a.m.
worship.
WAGON WHEEL BAPTIST CHURCH
Pastor Terry White. 325-207-1407. Meets at the
YMCA in the Whitney Room. Sunday:1:30p.m.
PEOPLE
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
C5
Big Horn Middle School
announces second-quarter
honor roll
FROM STAFF REPORTS
BIG HORN — Big Horn Middle School officials recently
announced the school’s second-quarter honor rolls.
Those students on the principal’s honor roll earned at
least a 3.5 grade point average and had no grade below a B.
Those students on the school honor roll received at least
a 3.0 grade point average and had no grade lower than a C.
The following students were named to the honor rolls.
Teaming up to evaluate students
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Music and art teacher Leora Wildberger, left, and fifth-grade teacher Pete Mohseni score a student’s writing sheet during a Professional
Learning Community meeting Tuesday afternoon at Tongue River Elementary School. In this week’s PLC meeting, TRE teachers assessed
writing assignments from students. The teachers discussed students’ work, shared ideas and explained how each teacher evaluates student writing. Principal Deb Hofmeier said that the meetings benefit the teachers — it’s better to share ideas than to isolate each one in
their classroom to figure things out on their own.
STUDENT NEWS |
Osborn named to
Carroll College
fall 2014 Dean’s List
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Dawn Osborn of
Sheridan was recently named to the
Carroll College fall 2014 Dean’s List.
To be included on the dean’s list, a
student must receive a 3.5 grade
point average or better for the
semester while taking at least 12
credits.
DSA to host wine fest March 6
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Downtown
Sheridan Association will host
the 2015 Wild West Wine Fest on
March 6.
The event to be held at the
Elks Lodge will include tastings
of more than 100 wines, beers
and spirits with heavy hors
d’oeuvres all evening.
General admission tickets cost
$50 and include admission to the
event from 6-9 p.m.
Tickets will be available online
at downtownsheridan.org.
The event raises funds for the
Downtown Sheridan
Association.
For additional information,
contact the DSA at 672-8881.
Principal’s Honor Roll
Eighth grade
Ellie Bard, Elliot Boley, Cameron Brown, John Chase,
Reata Cook, Shyan Davidson, Kade Eisele, Dalton Gregory,
Nathan Hecker, Kade Koltiska, Jess Leysath, Seth
Mullinax, Jack Nance, Kaylie Redinger, Georgina Ringley,
Jovenai Rosselott, Sydney Schmidt, Leah Schuster, Chelsey
Swaney, Delaney Walker, Samuel Walker, Hunter Weiss
Seventh grade
Joel Bailey, Sheridan Blackburn, Madison Blaney, Cutler
Bradshaw, Carly Craig, Bailey Cunningham, Quinn
McCafferty, Anna Melin, Carley Motsick, Bode Neeson,
Mary Nicholson, William Pelissier, Elijah Phillips, Casey
Prior, Courtney Wallach, Shayla Wrenn
Sixth grade
Carson Bates, Jacob Carter, Luke Daniels, Bode Dunham,
Aleyah Eisele, Elizabeth Foley, Porter Gardiner, Sam
Gregory, Cassandra Guelde, Brodie Juergens, Deena Lee,
Bryce Lydic, Bridger Michaud, Robert Morton, Luke
Mullinax, Kennady Myers, Dalton Nelson, Chrysanthi
Paninos, Ayden Phillips, Kendall Redinger, Christian
Walker
School Honor Roll
Eighth grade
Kobie Cummins, William Greenelsh, Christopher Guelde,
Talon Heatley, Ryan Johnson, Katherine Lambert,
Nathaniel Lydic, Blake Staben, Mollie Watson
Seventh grade
Ahlexa Bradshaw, Paige Fort, Jackson Gould, Reese
Hendrickson, Ashlyn Ibach, Dugan Irby, James Kitterman,
Haydon Mullinax, Nolan Rader, Xavier Soule, William
Watson
Sixth grade
Netalya Bronstein, Brandon Cummins, Garrett Custis,
Jersey DeHaven, Libby Franklin, Will Huckeba, Connor
Isakson, Winfield Loomis, Bridget McCurry, Matthew
Melin, Joshua Walker
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
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THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Welcome to
D1
DAYTON
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A sculpture of a bull elk is displayed near the entrance of the town of Dayton.
One family’s history speaks to Parkman’s past
BY ALISA BRANTZ
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Nestled in northern Sheridan County just south of
the Montana border, the area
referred to as Parkman is home to
157 people and doesn’t even qualify
as an official town: the formal name
of the area is the Parkman Census
Designated Place.
In this community — which features a one-room schoolhouse, a bar
and a post office — lives are often
intermingled and family histories
run deep. As such, the story of any
one family can also be the general
story of Parkman, which is the case
with Alice and Dana Kerns.
Alice Kerns is the current schoolmaster at the Slack School where
she teaches kindergarten through
fifth-grade. She currently only has
one student from each grade. But
this teacher’s connection to the
school, and Parkman, is much
stronger than her first year (back)
at the school would suggest.
Kerns was the teacher at Slack
School 30 years ago, back in the
days, she says, when she had to
shovel coal for heat and energy
before they installed propane.
Before her, her grandmother
taught at the school, and before her,
her husband’s grandmother taught
there as well. In fact, the school bell
Kerns uses to bring the kids in from
recess — which in the remote location near the mountains often
includes animal tracking, snowshoeing and cross-country skiing —
is the bell that was issued to her
grandmother when she was
assigned to the school in the early
1900s.
Kerns’ in-laws date back in
Parkman history to 1886 when her
husband’s maternal grandmother
homesteaded at Pass Creek.
“My grandmother and my husband’s grandmother were best
friends,” Kerns said. “My grandfather was an Eaton dude the first
year they were Eatons, my parents
homesteaded here, my father-in-law
went to school here, so yeah, this is
just home to me.”
Kerns’ grandparents became part
of the entire state’s history when
they put in the first phone lines on
Pass Creek and became a communication post.
“Because we lived on the border of
the states, my grandmother had a
phone in the kitchen that was for
Wyoming and then she had one on
the back porch for Montana, so if
someone in Wyoming wanted to get
a message to Montana they often
called her and she would walk back
and forth between the phones and
relay messages,” Kerns said, adding
that while times have certainly
changed, some things are reminiscent of days bygone. “Not that I get
cell reception at the school; I don’t.
But if I stand out on the cattle
guard and face the right direction at
a certain time of day...”
Outside of school, the Kernses
run a cattle ranch in Pass Creek,
and though they don’t operate as a
year-round dude ranch they do
allow vacationers to join them on
their five or six cattle drives per
year to experience being a true cowboy.
“Ours is a little different because
we’re in tents all the time and we’re
generally fairly isolated, so people
get to see what it was like moving
cattle 100 years ago,” Kerns said.
“My in-laws were putting cattle on
the mountain before it was a national forest. My family started putting
cattle on the mountain about 100
years ago and it’s done the same
way now: on horseback and pushing
cows through the canyon.”
SEE PARKMAN, PAGE D6
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
School master Alice Kerns rings her bell to round up the students during afternoon
recess at Slack School.
A place to explore
the wild outdoors
BY HANNAH SHEELY
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
DAYTON — Wrapped in the foothills of the Bighorn
Mountains with the Tongue River passing through like a
shiny ribbon, Dayton could be called a gift to just about
anyone seeking access to the great outdoors.
Right in town and up into Tongue River Canyon, the
Tongue River provides fishing for brown trout, rainbow
trout and white fish and fun for kayakers, rafters and
tubers.
Tongue River Canyon, just
four miles from town, has
rock walls for climbing, caves
for spelunking, trails for hiking or mountain biking, views
for photographing and plenty
of starry skies for backpackers looking for a getaway that
feels much more remote than
it actually is.
Within 30 miles of Dayton
up U.S. Highway 14, adventurers will find even more outdoor gifts.
Sand Turn, located just 15
Johann Nield
miles up the highway, is a
Dayton public works director
renowned launch site for
hang gliding and paragliding.
Steamboat Point and Black
Mountain offer easy day hikes with rewarding views.
Sibley Lake teems with fishers and boaters. Campgrounds
dot the Bighorn National Forest. There are areas to snowmobile and four-wheel, groomed trails for cross-country
skiing and snowshoeing, a well-loved sledding hill and
access to pristine wilderness for those willing to trek a bit.
Many Dayton residents have become residents because of
the ready access to outdoor pursuits. And many visitors
have come yearly after falling in love with this hospitable
town and its access to year-round beauty and adventure.
“When we came up here to see the rolling hills and the
beauty, and the green and the trees and everything, this
was the part of Wyoming that we wanted to stay in,”
Dayton Public Works Director Johann Nield said.
‘When we came up
here to see the rolling
hills and the beauty, and
the green and the trees
and everything, this was
the part of Wyoming that
we wanted to stay in.’
SEE OUTDOORS, PAGE D6
D2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Art Badgett Pool provides safe place for families to cool off
BY MIKE PRUDEN
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
DAYTON — In the warm Wyoming summer
months, it’s not uncommon to drive over the
bridge into Dayton and see heads bobbing up
and down in the Tongue River. As you set up a
picnic in Scott Bicentennial Park, the voices
of children come from the river and carry
throughout the park.
But the Tongue River isn’t the only place to
swim in Dayton, and it’s not the safest, either.
Art Badgett Pool, named after the former
beloved Dayton mayor, has been a fixture in
Dayton since 1980.
Although the town boasts a small population
of just under 800 people, many of them spend
time at the pool in the summer.
Chad Aksamit is the program director at the
Tongue River Valley Community Center in
Dayton, so he spends most of his time with
kids and families.
Aksamit was named the Art Badgett Pool
manager last spring, and after his first summer at the pool, he knew why the pool was a
popular location for Dayton families. It begins
with safety.
“(The pool) gives kids and families a place to
go with certified lifeguards,” Aksamit said. “It
offers great opportunities outside of the river,
and the pool is a safer place.”
Weather permitting, the pool is open from 15 p.m. daily for open swim. From 5 to 6:30 p.m.,
the pool offers adult classes, something
Aksamit says he’s trying to do more of to
accommodate older swimmers. They offer lap
swimming and Zumba classes, among others.
But, again, the main focus of the pool is
safety.
With some help from the YMCA aquatics
director, the Art Badgett Pool hosted a total of
140 children last year for swimming lessons.
The pool held three separate sessions to teach
four levels of swimming.
This year, Aksamit plans to incorporate
Wild and
Scenic Trail
Run lives
up to its
name
BY MIKE PRUDEN
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Eight-year-old Tavis Aksamit talks to another swimmer as they hang on the pool edge during swim lessons
last summer at the Art Badgett pool in Dayton.
more safety instruction into the lessons.
“There are a lot of kids that swim in the
lakes and rivers,” he said. “We want to integrate more safety aspects for rivers and lakes,
stuff that they can carry over with them.”
Art Badgett Pool saw more than 2,200 visits
last summer, a number Aksamit was happy
with. He expects nothing less this summer
and hopes the new classes and opportunities
will bring even more fresh faces.
Admission to the pool is $1.75 for children 12
and younger, $2.50 for adults and $2 for students 13-17 and senior citizens. Season and
family passes are also available. If weather
allows, the pool will open in June with swim
lessons scheduled for early that month.
TRVCC offers more than a place to play for Dayton residents
BY HANNAH SHEELY
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
DAYTON — It is a space that has
space for everyone.
Young hunters, dancers in training, pickleball enthusiasts, school
sports teams, cooks seeking some
kitchen tips and senior citizens
looking for a meal or a supportive
place to exercise all pass through
the doors of the Tongue River
Valley Community Center in
Dayton and find exactly what the
name implies they will find: community.
“It’s amazing to see the number
of people who come through our
facility and exercise and recreate
with friends and family,” TRVCC
Executive Director Erin Kilbride
said. “It’s so rewarding to see that
the people out here have a place to
go and recreate and socialize and
learn.”
TRVCC has two locations, one in
Dayton and one in Ranchester.
More than 900 members visit the
centers an average of 2,500 times
per month, and in January visits
spiked to more than 4,000.
“The number of people who
come here to work out, they
wouldn’t be driving to Sheridan to
work out,” Kilbride said. “It’s fun
to see the healthy lifestyle that
people are living because of this
community center.”
Ranchester resident Jackie
Allen uses both the Dayton and
Ranchester centers. She does a
senior stretch class three times a
D3
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Youngsters sit at a table by the window during a “Friendship 101” course at the
Tongue River Valley Community Center in Dayton.
week in Dayton, and also pops
over at least once a week for some
cribbage and a lunchtime meal.
The center partners with the
Sheridan Senior Center to provide
lunches for seniors at the center
or delivered to their homes.
This winter, Allen joined a contest to virtually trek around the
Bahamas in 90 days. Participants
try to average 5 miles a day of
walking to reach a total of 450
miles, the distance it would take
to trek the real-life Bahamas.
“I’m getting in better shape,
that’s for darn sure,” Allen said,
noting that since her retirement a
few years ago, she has lost 95
pounds thanks in large part to
having a nearby place to exercise
and find support and motivation.
Allen is headed toward her 70th
birthday, but youngsters — and all
those in between — also find a
variety of ways to make friends
and stay active at TRVCC.
“I come here to shoot hoops
because there’s a gym,” 11-yearold Ryan McCafferty said.
When asked if he came every
day, he nodded his head: “Pretty
much.”
McCafferty is home-schooled
and is also part of a physical education class for home-schooled
students.
When he’s not shooting hoops,
playing ping-pong or using the
computers, he and his dad can be
found learning how to tie flies.
McCafferty said he will learn how
to fly fish this summer and he is
also taking a hunter safety class
this winter at the center.
TRVCC originated in
Ranchester and expanded to
Dayton in 2005 when the School
Facilities Commission decommissioned the old Tongue River High
School to build a new facility.
“The other big thing that drove
this is the community assessment,” Kilbride said. “Dayton did
a community assessment and one
of the big topics was, ‘we want a
community center, a recreation
center, a place where people can
come and be active and learn and
socialize.’”
The community’s voice was
heard, and youth, adult and senior programming continues to
grow in this space that has space
for everyone.
For more information on programs, activities and exercise
options for children, youth,
adults and seniors at the
Tongue River Valley
Community Center, call 6559419, see trvcc.org or stop by
1100 U.S. Highway 14 in
Dayton.
DAYTON — There’s a reason the Bighorn Mountain
Wild and Scenic Trail Run is
one of the summer’s most
popular events in Sheridan
County. It’s all in the name.
Ultrarunning has become
one of the nation’s fastestgrowing sports. According
to UltraRunning Magazine,
the number of races in the
U.S. and Canada jumped
from 293 in 2004 to 1,300 in
2014. The sport, which considers any race longer than
a traditional 26.2-mile
marathon as an ultramarathon, forces competitors
to test the limits of the
human body against the elements.
As ultrarunning becomes
more and more popular, the
creators of the Bighorn
Mountain Wild and Scenic
Trail Run were ahead of the
curve. This summer will
mark the 23rd year of the
event and the 14th anniversary of the 100-mile race.
Last year’s race featured
more than 1,000 competitors
in four different races: a
30K, a 50K, a 50-mile and the
ever-popular 100-mile.
Nearly every state and 16
different countries were represented in the event.
But what attracts these
runners to Dayton every
summer?
It’s scenic. Beginning at
the base of the Bighorn
Mountains in Tongue River
Canyon, the 100-mile and 50mile races take competitors
up and down the Bighorns,
reaching elevations higher
than 8,000 feet. The mountains provide a breathtaking
backdrop while simultaneously creating a rugged terrain and sometimes treacherous running conditions.
Ultrarunner Luke Nelson
chose the local trail run as
his first ever 100-miler last
year, and the results exceeded even his own expectations. Nelson’s two goals
were to have fun and to finish. He had fun, and he finished…in first place.
“Bighorn is one of the old,
mountain hundreds,” he
said of what attracted him
to the trail run. “That’s
what draws me, is a good
challenging course in the
mountains.”
It took Nelson just under a
day to finish the race, but
Co-Race Director Michelle
Maneval does most of her
work during the other 364
days in the year.
SEE RUN, PAGE D5
D4
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
Dayton Days draws crowd from other communities
BY KELLI HEITSTUMAN-TOMKO
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Eight-year-old Natalie Gilbert runs to the finish line with Cole Jolovich during
the Dayton Days Mile Run last year on Main Street.
Tongue River
offers ample
opportunity
for various
recreation
BY KELLI HEITSTUMAN-TOMKO
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — For the outdoor individuals who find
themselves in Dayton, the
Tongue River is a place of
opportunity. Whether it’s
fishing, kayaking or floating
the river, there’s a little
something for everyone.
Fishing
Several areas near Dayton
offer fishing opportunities.
The Tongue River and Sibley
Lake are two of the most
popular.
The Wyoming Game and
Fish Department offers a day
license that costs just $6 for
in-state residents and $14 for
out of state residents.
The Tongue River can also
be fished from a floating
boat. Not all of the land the
river passes through is public and those hoping to fish
this way should contact an
outfitter or guide to identify
privately owned land along
the river. Fishers floating the
river need to stay in their
boats when floating through
private land unless they
have the permission of the
landowner to be on shore.
The WGFD offers a fishing
guide with information on
stream access restrictions,
floating restrictions and
guidelines for catch and
release. This guide and other
fishing information can be
downloaded from the WGFD
site at wgfd.wyo.gov.
Kayaking, canoeing
and floating
For those wanting to float
the river from Dayton, it is
necessary to understand that
the Tongue River is not a
lazy river float, and some
experience is necessary.
Local outdoorsmen recommend consulting a guide or
outfitter and to understand
the necessary experience
level before attempting a
float along any particular
stretch. Depending on the
level of the water, there may
be areas with diversion
dams or blockage where a
boat has to be taken from the
water and put back in downstream.
SEE RIVER, PAGE D6
SHERIDAN — Mark your calendars for the last full
weekend in July when the town of Dayton will celebrate its annual Dayton Days, commemorating the
town’s incorporation in 1909.
This year marks the 39th year of Dayton Days, and
Dayton Mayor Norm Anderson has been present for
all but the first few years.
“We draw a crowd of about 1,000 people every year,”
Anderson said. “On election years we might get a few
more because the event draws in candidates, but it’s
usually about 1,000 people.”
For a town with a population of fewer than 800 people, that number is evidence the event, which lasts
about a day and a half, draws in people from other
towns, and not just on those election years.
Dayton Days is a traditional small-town celebration
with some tried and true events people love. The Cow
Pie Classic has been a part of the fun for around a
dozen years and this year will mark the eighth year
of the Dayton Mile Run.
“Dayton Days used to run through Sunday,”
Anderson said. “But people were ready to call it quits
after Saturday, so we cut it down to just the two
days.”
The celebration starts July 24 this year with the
Cow Pie Classic golf tournament, an event that
involves one golf club and, yes, cow pies.
Friday night will also feature a pet parade and tal-
ent show for the children and a movie in the park.
Things will get off to an early start the morning of
July 25 with the Rotary Pancake Breakfast, an event
Anderson has been active with for years.
“We probably feed 250 to 300 people every year at
that breakfast,” he said.
After fueling up on pancakes, festival goers can
loosen up with a one-mile race before the parade that
marches down Main Street. After the parade is the
fair in the park with vendor booths, food and fun
activities for participants of all ages.
One highlight is the duck race on the Tongue River.
Those wanting to participate in the duck race need
only to buy a ticket. The number of their ticket will
correspond to a rubber duck, hundreds of which will
be dumped into the Tongue River. Cash prizes will be
awarded to those holding tickets for the first-, secondand third-place ducks.
Music is a part of the festivities with the Drum and
Bugle Corp performing as well as showings by local
talent. The day also features a three-on-three basketball tournament.
The celebration ends with a fire department water
fight. Firefighters face off, each group spraying water
from fire hoses at a suspended barrel in an effort to
push it past a designated point.
The town of Dayton plans each celebration with an
eye toward what the community wants, and planning
may reflect necessary or desired changes.
“We’d eventually like to maybe do something more
for the kids,” Anderson said.
Dayton rich with history — some of it alive and well
BY ALISA BRANTZ
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — In the town of Dayton, history is so alive that looking at a picture of Main
Street from the late 1800s and early 1900s you
will see many features and facades that have
not changed.
The Dayton Church was erected in 1895. The
Dayton Mercantile is still present and recently
reopened under new management.
The Dayton Benefit Club, the Hans Kleiber
Cabin, the old bell tower and the town itself
all have histories that affect their places in the
community today.
“Anytime you have those historical things, it
gives you a connection to the past and a
respect for that and a respect to take care of
all of these facilities we have,” town of Dayton
clerk Linda Lofgren said. “It takes a lot of
effort whether it is a group of citizens who
own the Dayton Benefit Club or a private person who owns the Mercantile. If they are
doing well and looking well the rest of the
town does well also; so we work together to
support it.”
Dayton was named in 1882 after Joe Dayton
Thorne, one of the founding fathers of the
community.
The town has the distinction of electing the
first female mayor in Wyoming, Susan Wissler.
In the early 1890s, Dayton held Wyoming's first
rodeo.
Today the town is home to nearly 800 people
and endless ways to explore the history of the
West.
The Dayton Benefit Club
Originally the Dayton Community Hall, the
building was constructed during the Great
Depression after the Dayton Town Council
recognized a need for a community gathering
place and a place to hold its town meetings.
In 1950, the school board gave the Dayton
Community Hall, which was being used regularly for school and community activities, to
the Dayton School Benefit Club.
The hall is presently used as a meeting place
and for many community activities. It is one
of the oldest and best maintained community
centers in the state of Wyoming.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
The historic Kleiber cabin and studio is still in Dayton, honoring the famous artist.
The Dayton Bell Tower
Now located in Scott Park, the bell tower
may have moved but its significance has
remained the same.
It was used as a watchtower for fires on
Main Street after being erected in 1911.
It featured a warning bell at first, and later
stairs, phones and windows were added allowing the tower to be used by the Ground
Observer Corp. of the U.S. Air Force to spot
aircraft.
The Hans Kleiber Cabin and
Studio Museum
The cabin is open to guests less than a mile
from where Kleiber originally built it behind
his home. The museum commemorates the life
and work of the famous artist who lived and
created in Dayton as early as 1907.
Kleiber, known as the "Etcher Laureate of
the Bighorns" remained active in community
affairs around Dayton and worked in his studio until his death on Dec. 8, 1967.
In his small book of poems, "Songs of
Wyoming," Kleiber expressed his genuine love
for the Bighorn Mountain country.
* The information for this article was furbished by the records of Dayton Town Hall.
Officials at the town hall recently finished
an eight-month project to scan and digitally
preserve all the historical documents in their
keeping.
Interested parties can learn more online at
daytonwyoming.org or by visiting the Dayton
Town Hall.
Local family farms through even the coldest winter months
BY MIKE DUNN
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
DAYTON — Given the short season and
unpredictable weather, growing fruits and
vegetables in Wyoming is not an easy task.
But not for Brad Holliday — inside his
complex located just outside of Dayton,
fresh off the vine produce is available even
during the most unforgivable climates. The
crops within his greenhouses at Holliday
Family Farms provide residents around the
region with organic locally grown food.
“When you get into northern climates like
this, we have to figure out ways to fool
mother nature,” Holliday said. “We have
such a short growing period, to think we
can grow everything outside — it’s impossible.”
It began simply enough. Holliday’s purpose behind starting the operation was just
to be able to eat a good-tasting tomato in
February. The store-bought vegetables
didn’t cut it for Holliday and he was tired of
produce running low in the winter, especially during storms.
Through help of friends and family,
Holliday constructed a greenhouse in 2011
and has been providing residents fresh
foods ever since. Though he admits the last
four years have been a learning curve, his
farm is constantly expanding.
His produce varies with the season.
Holliday grows tomatoes, cherry tomatoes,
peppers, cucumbers, kale and chard during
the winter months. In the summer, he raises
poultry and grows raspberries and strawberries.
They are not certified organic, but the
food that comes from Holliday Family
Farms is as natural as can be. Holliday uses
many organic techniques with his farm —
weeding by hand, using natural biological
control to fight pests and utilizing bumblebees to pollinate his plants.
Tomatoes tend to be his largest seller. On
average, Holliday will grow around 300
pounds of tomatoes a week. The number
fluctuates with the seasons — higher numbers are grown during warmer months.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SEE FARM, PAGE D6
Brad Holliday stands among a row of tomato plants inside
the greenhouse at Holliday Family Farms near Dayton.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
RUN: Wild, scenic, tough
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
D5
SCENES
FROM
AROUND
DAYTON
Musicians talk to each other after finishing a song during the bluegrass jam session at the Tongue River
Valley Community Center in Dayton.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Tim Cahhal, of Buffalo, sprints down the path in the 50-mile race
during the Bighorn Mountain Wild and Scenic Trail Run on June 15,
2013, at Tongue River Canyon near Dayton.
FROM D3
Registration for the event typically fills in less than a
week. Maneval and her crew begin prepping the course
once the first blade of grass peaks through the snow.
“There are all kinds of trees that have to be cut out,”
Maneval said in preparing for last year’s race. “The park
has to be rented a year in advance. It’s really a year-round
event.”
Then, there’s the wild. In a 2009 race, Karl Meltzer hit an
unsuspected roadblock at the halfway point. A disturbed
moose chased Meltzer down the trail, kicking him in the
hand and shin along the way. Luckily, Meltzer avoided any
serious injuries and shook the moose on his way to a firstplace finish.
There was also a marriage proposal. Don Padfield carried the ring with him the entire race and dropped to a
knee at the finish line — part fatigue and part proposal.
As ultrarunning steadily gains popularity, the already
attractive Bighorn Mountain Wild and Scenic Trail Run
will only tighten its grasp as one of the highest rated races
in the country.
This year’s race will start on June 19.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A shed with a painting of the national flag and the words “Give Me Liberty” is seen on Dayton East Road outside of Dayton.
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THE SHERIDAN PRESS
FARM:
Greenhouse
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
OUTDOORS: Opportunities to explore, find adventure abound
FROM D4
Holliday sells directly to
the community, many stores
and restaurants throughout
Dayton and Sheridan
County. Additionally,
Holliday spends plenty of
time at farmers markets in
the area selling to individuals.
“There’s that old saying
‘know your farmer, know
you food.’ It’s kind of
cliche, but it is true,”
Holliday said. “People can
come out here and see how
we grow everything — they
talk to us and they know
us.”
Greenhouses like his are
still a rare sight in
Wyoming. However,
Holliday projects locally
grown operations are likely
to increase due to a regional demand for fresh produce.
“There is kind of a movement to try to create more
food independence in
Wyoming,” Holliday said.
“It’s a ways off, but I think
it’s growing.”
RIVER:
Easy access
FROM D4
A float on the Tongue
River can run from 6 to 35
miles and take from two to
15 hours depending on the
whim of those floating. The
run ends just north of
Sheridan.
Just as with fishing from
a floating boat, it is important to be aware of private
property.
For the adrenaline junkie,
the Tongue River offers
world-class white water
rapids for kayaking. One
stretch runs from Sheep
Creek to the Tongue
Canyon Trailhead, just 4
miles from Dayton. The run
features Class IV to V+
rapids over 2.34 miles.
Another run starts at the
Tongue River trailhead 5
miles from Dayton. The
rapids there are Class III+
or IV.
Information on both of
these runs can be found on
the American Whitewater
website. The site not only
gives class ratings for the
runs, but it also informs
kayakers if the river is running too high or too low to
be reasonable for kayaking
or boating.
Other runs near Dayton
are Shell Creek and
Paintrock Creek. Both runs
are for experienced kayakers, and both offer camping
areas for those hoping to
take more than just a day
on the river.
Whitewater classes
of difficulty
Class I: Easy
Fast water with ripples
and small waves.
Class II (II- to II+):
Novice
Straightforward rapids,
clear channels, rocks, medium-sized waves.
Class III (III- to III+):
Intermediate
Moderate and irregular
waves, complex maneuvers,
tight passages, strong currents.
Class IV (IV- to IV+):
Advanced
Intense, powerful and predictable rapids, turbulent
water, unavoidable waves,
holes and passages.
Class V (V- to V+):
Expert
Long, obstructed or violent rapids, unavoidable
waves or holes, steep, congested chutes. High level of
fitness required.
Class information from
americanwhitewater.org.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Dayton Public Works Director Johann Nield takes flight in his hang glider last spring from Highway 14 west of Dayton in the Bighorn Mountains.
FROM D1
Nield moved to Dayton from Casper in 1978
for two reasons: to avoid working the oil field
again and to open a hang gliding and ski shop
on Main Street with his brother-in-law. He
found the thermals rising below the mountains to be a flier’s best friend.
“There’s times I’ve launched off Sand Turn
here, and you could have thrown a Mack truck
off and it would have flown,” Nield said.
On Memorial Day weekend and Labor Day
weekend, hang gliders and paragliders from
around the region flock to Sand Turn for its
renowned flights that have put Nield as far up
as 15,000 feet and as far away as Hardin,
Montana. Nield still runs Wyoming Wings,
which offers lessons in hang gliding and
paragliding.
While Nield prefers the air or dabbling in
fishing on the Tongue River, his children
found great delight in the nearby canyon and
caves, he said.
“Tongue River Canyon is one of the premiere, un-commercialized caves and canyons
in the area. It’s untamed, basically,” Nield
said. “This is paradise.”
Marshall and Lea Hood own Foothills
Campground along the Tongue River at the
entrance to Dayton. They bought the business
that features tent sites, RV sites and cabins in
1984 and have played host to visitors seeking
access to the great outdoors ever since.
“Over time we’ve had people who come here
for years and years and years, enough so that
we even have the ‘Thompson Site,’” Marshall
Hood said about annual visitors who request
the same site to call home.
The Hoods have seen the same hunters year
after year and the same retired couple from
Florida who stayed longer and longer as they
aged but still wanted time in the Bighorn
Mountains. They have seen the same Bighorn
Mountain Wild and Scenic Trail Run competitors for 20 years and the same Peter Fonda
who would stop on his way to Sturgis and rave
about the motorcycle ride over the mountains
and the pie in Dayton.
The Hoods keep maps and information at the
ready for any visitor, new or old, who comes to
Dayton knowing they will join the locals who
are exploring the ribbon of the Tongue River
or unwrapping the gift of adventure found out
the backdoor in the Bighorn Mountains.
PARKMAN: Community maintains deep connection to outdoors
here,” Kerns said. “So when a storm is coming
we have to make sure we have buckets of
At home, Kerns says she loses power often as water ready so we have water for drinking and
a result of high winds or storms. With only
cooking and flushing the toilets.”
two houses supplied by the power line she is
Between ranching families where the kids
on, they are unstable to say the least.
help with cattle daily, expanded outdoor learn“What people in town don’t realize is that
ing opportunities of a smaller school commuwhen we lose electricity we also lose plumbnity and the scenic location of Parkman,
ing, because we’re not on the same system out Kerns said the people there are more connectFROM D1
ed to nature.
“Staying connected with nature is extremely
important for everyone to do and if vacations
are the only way to do that than do it,” Kerns
said. “At the cattle drive business we’ll have
people come out for a week at a time and say,
‘this has changed my whole life.’ They need it
in their soul; I think that’s the way humans
are made.”
Downtown serves as gateway to the Bighorn Mountains
BY MIKE DUNN
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
DAYTON — Resting in the shadows of the Bighorn Mountains,
downtown Dayton has something
for everyone.
It serves as a gateway.
Businesses host the migration of
travelers heading to or from
Yellowstone during the summer. In
the fall, hunters looking to cash in
on the elk and deer populations
can head back to Dayton for supplies. Snow machine enthusiasts
pack the diners and the bars after
a long day’s ride during the winter. Even the local ranchers will
drive their cattle through the middle of the town from time to time.
Residents say downtown Dayton
has everything a person needs —
if you can’t get it downtown, you
probably don’t need it.
“There is a lot more here than
you think,” Dayton resident Jean
Anderson said.
Drive by too fast, though, and
you might miss everything it has
to offer. It holds everything from a
grocery store and a diner to salons
and gift shops — serving both
locals and tourists alike.
The past comes alive downtown.
The Dayton Mercantile sits in a
building originally constructed in
1882. Now, it’s home and business
to Craig Boheler and Elaine
Stevens who run the newest store
in town. For Boheler, never know-
ing who you are going to meet is
what makes working in downtown
Dayton a one-of-a-kind experience.
“It’s been fun,” Boheler said.
“We met people from 22 countries
last year. … I like visiting people
as they come from Yellowstone or
with their travels. There’s just
some interesting people here.”
Stevens loves the small-town
atmosphere of downtown Dayton.
A former Cheyenne resident,
Stevens said she enjoys the friendliness everyone — from the locals
to the tourists —bring into the
shop.
“It’s like Mayberry out here in
the summertime,” Stevens said.
“There are kids riding their bike
in the street, climbing trees. You
just don’t see that often anymore.”
Gina Donnor said there is
always something new in downtown Dayton. The 19-year Dayton
resident and business owner said
new businesses are always sprouting up to create a thriving downtown.
“Downtown is just so well rounded,” she said. “We have just a little
bit of everything here.”
Spring, summer, fall or winter —
no matter what time of year, the
vistas from downtown are almost
second to none.
“You look outside and the mounJUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
tains are right there,” store owner
and Dayton resident Glenn
A child rides his bike past the Dayton Mercantile in Dayton. The building is
“Weegie” Sheeley said. “It just
among the oldest and most recognizable in the community.
doesn’t get any better than that.”
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015
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THE SHERIDAN PRESS
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THE SHERIDAN PRESS
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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2015