Master of Public Health Program | Boonshoft School of Medicine

Air Force Research Laboratory
711th Human Performance Wing
Human Effectiveness Directorate
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, OH
Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, TX
Looking for a Challenging Summer?
As the Chief Scientist for all of the U.S. Air Force’s human-centered research at Air Force
Research Laboratory, I invite you to join other science and engineering students from around
the country in applying for participation this summer for one of the challenging research
projects listed in this brochure. If selected for one of the projects, you will have temporary
summer employment through a contract to participate in our Dr. Daniel Repperger Research
Intern Program. You will work under the mentorship of a renowned Air Force scientist for
human performance research at one of our two research locations in Dayton, Ohio or San
Antonio, Texas. Each of these scientists has been hand-selected as mentors because of their
technical knowledge, experience and willingness to help science and engineering students
enhance their learning experience through participation in an actual Air Force research
project. Along with gaining first-hand research experience, you’ll learn the inner workings of
an operational laboratory and develop contacts and friendships that will last a lifetime. Please
review the information in this brochure carefully so you’ll know all of the specifics of the
program before you apply. I look forward to reviewing your application and wish you the best
of luck in the selection process.
MORLEY O. STONE, PhD
Chief Scientist
711th Human Performance Wing
Leading Human-Centered Research For The U.S. Air Force
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WHO WE ARE
Air Force Research Laboratory
711th Human Performance Wing
Human Effectiveness Directorate
AIR FORCE
RESEARCH LABORATORY
AFRL leads the discovery, development and integration of affordable
warfighting technologies for America's
aerospace forces. It is a full-spectrum
laboratory, responsible for planning
and executing the Air Force' science
and technology program. AFRL leads a
worldwide government, industry and
academic partnership in the discovery, development and delivery of a
wide range of revolutionary technologies. The laboratory provides leading
edge warfighting capabilities keeping
our air, space and cyberspace forces
the world's best. Operating from over
40 sites worldwide, AFRL focuses on
technologies for air vehicles, human
performance, materials and manufacturing, sensors, propulsion, space
vehicles, directed energy, information
and weapons. The lab employs approximately 5,800 government people, including about 1,400 military and
4,400 civilian personnel. It is responsible for the Air Force's science and
technology budget of nearly $2 billion
including: basic research, applied research, advanced technology development and an additional $1.7 billion
from AFRL customers.
711TH
HUMAN PERFORMANCE WING
The 711th Human Performance Wing
advances human performance in air,
space, and cyberspace through research, education, and consultation,
accomplished through the synergies
created by the wing’s three distinct but
complementary entities: the U. S. Air
Force School of Aerospace Medicine
(USAFSAM), the Human Performance
Integration Directorate, and the Human
Effectiveness Directorate. USAFSAM is
an internationally renowned center for
aerospace medical learning, consultation, aerospace medical investigations
and aircrew health assessments. The
school trains approximately 6,000
students each year.
The Human
Performance Integration Directorate's
focus areas are human performance
optimization and sustainment through
human systems integration. The directorate is the bridge among the acquisition communities and lead integration agent for the promotion, guidance,
consultation, and implementation of
human systems integration. Research
to improve human performance and
effectiveness is the primary mission of
the Human Effectiveness Directorate.
HUMAN EFFECTIVENESS
DIRECTORATE
The Human Effectiveness Directorate
is composed of a diverse group of
scientists and engineers studying and
developing technologies specific to
the human element of warfighting
capability. It leads the Air Force in its
human-centered research, and integrates biological and cognitive technologies to optimize and protect the
Airman's capabilities to fly, fight, and
win in Air, Space, and Cyberspace.
The Directorate is headquartered at
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, near
Dayton, OH, with additional research
facilities at Fort Sam Houston, San
Antonio, TX. Its focus is on research
and development of technologies for
decision making, training, human
performance and forecasting. The
Directorate provides human-centered
research and development through a
strong in-house research program and
extensive research partnerships with
industry and academia.
Leading Human-Centered Research For The U.S. Air Force
This document has been cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
Air Force Research Laboratory
711th Human Performance Wing
Human Effectiveness Directorate
REPPERGER RESEARCH INTERN PROGRAM
The Repperger Research Intern Program honors the life and works of
Dr. Daniel W. Repperger (1942-2010) as a scientist and mentor of
many young engineers and scientists. As a researcher at Air Force
Research Laboratory’s Human Effectiveness Directorate for 35 years,
Dr. Repperger’s mathematical and scientific innovations have
revolutionized image and network complexity analysis. He received
international recognition in haptic controllers, human-machine interface
performance enhancement, and mathematical methods development.
While Dr. Repperger’s significant research accomplishments helped
advanced the performance of Air Force airmen and the field of humancentered research, his most significant accomplishment may well be the
impact he had as a kind and caring mentor of many young Air Force
scientists and science and engineering students.
Dr. Daniel W. Repperger
1942-2010
Dr. Repperger received a BS and MS in Electrical Engineering from
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a PhD in Electrical Engineering from
Purdue University. He was a David Ross Research Fellow at Purdue from 1971-1973 and a National Research
Council Post-Doctoral Fellow at Wright-Patterson AFB from 1973-1975. A member of Eta Kappa Nu, Tau Beta Pi
and Sigma Xi, Dr. Repperger was a Registered Professional Engineer in Ohio and on the Board of Trustees of the
Ohio Academy of Sciences. He was a Fellow of the IEEE, Air Force Research Laboratory, American Institute of
Medical and Biological Engineering and the Ohio Academy of Sciences and Aerospace Medical Association. Dr.
Repperger authored over 400 technical journal articles, reports and conference publications, was selected as
Associate Editor of five international journals and obtained 14 U.S. patents and 28 Air Force invention
registrations. His honors and awards include the Harry G. Armstrong Scientific Excellence Award, Human
Effectiveness Directorate Mentor of the Year, IEEE Third Millennium Medal Winner and the IEEE Dayton Fritz Russ
Award. Dr. Repperger is listed in Who's Who in Science and Engineering and American Men and Women of
Science.
Leading Human-Centered Research For The U.S. Air Force
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REPPERGER RESEARCH INTERN PROGRAM
INFORMATION AND APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS
Program Dates:
Program Hours:
Stipend:
Lodging:
Research Locations:
Number Positions:
Requirement:
Final Report:
Application
Deadline:
Application:
Proof of U.S
Citizenship
(submit 1 of the items
shown on list with
application)
Proof of Legal
Residence (submit with
application)
Application
Submission
Instructions
June 3 – August 9, 2013 (arrive June 2 – depart August 10)
40 hours per week Monday-Friday (actual hours set by adviser)
$12,000
Student’s expense – recommendations and options will be provided to
students selected to participate
Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH or Ft Sam Houston, San Antonio, TX
8-10 students will be selected for participation
Graduate students and undergraduate juniors and seniors.
Must be U.S. citizen or legal resident.
PowerPoint presentation or poster at end of internship
March 29, 2013 at 5:00 p.m. EST
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
•
•
•
•
•
Application form (last page of brochure)
Curriculum Vitae
Copy of Transcript (unofficial is okay)
Copy of proof of U.S. citizenship or legal residence
Letter of recommendation from current faculty adviser
Copy of U.S. Passport
Copy of Certified birth certificate issued by the city, county or state
of birth
Copy of Consular Report of Birth (of U.S. citizen) Abroad or
Certification of Birth
Copy of Naturalization Certificate
Copy Certificate of Citizenship
A copy of the front and back of Green Card
Send: (1) application form, (2) Curriculum Vitae, (3) copy of transcript,
(4) copy of proof of U.S. citizenship or legal residence, and (5) signed
letter of recommendation from adviser by email to: 711th HPW Chief
Scientist’s Office at [email protected] NOTE: Be
sure to indicate on the application the project for which you are applying. If
more than one, please indicate your priority by entering either the number
1, 2 or 3 in the box next to the research project number.
Computer Access
Notification:
For More Info:
Students selected will be required to undergo a National Agency Check prior to
being granted access to government computer systems.
Students selected for the program will be employed under contract to perform
intern duties in the Human Effectiveness Directorate.
Mike Griffin, 937-255-7629, [email protected]
The information in this document is cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
NOTE TO APPLICANTS: If selected for participation in this program, you will be offered temporary summer employment through a contract
to perform work for AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate. This is not a U.S Government position. If selected, you will be required to
undergo a National Agency Check before being granted access to government computer systems.
Human Effectiveness Directorate
Repperger Research Intern Program
RESEARCH PROJECT #: 13-01
COMPUTATIONAL MODELS
OF HUMAN INFORMATION PROCESSING
PROJECT SYNOPSIS: The specific activities for this project will be based on the particular skills and
interests the intern brings to the position. The research activities may range from the development of
mathematical models of response time distributions, to model development, to data analysis.
BACKGROUND: This research focuses on basic cognitive science research to improve our understanding
of human information processing, behavior, and performance. The long-term goal is to develop
psychologically valid models of human cognition that can be used in a variety of ways to improve the
effectiveness and efficiency of training (e.g., as synthetic teammates or instructors to support training,
or as training analysis tools). We are pursuing this long-term objective through the use of computational
cognitive modeling, focused on (1) spatial information processing and (2) changes in cognitive
performance resulting from sleep loss and extended time on task. We utilize a variety of research
methodologies, including empirical research studies with human participants, eye tracking, cognitive
model development using a cognitive architecture, validation of model performance through careful
comparison to empirical human data, and development of quantitative theoretical mechanisms to
account for important psychological phenomena. We seek interns with experience and expertise in
computational and mathematical modeling as well as knowledge and/or interest in spatial cognition or
fatigue to contribute to the development of formal, quantitative accounts of human performance. Some
relevant publications can be found at: http://actr.psy.cmu.edu/people/index.php?id=10. See also
http://mindmodeling/org/palmlistings.html for a complete listing of research being pursued by the
Cognitive Models and Agents Branch at AFRL.
EDUCATION LEVEL / DISCIPLINE NEEDED: PhD or Master’s Student in one of the following:
Cognitive Science; Mathematics; Computer Science
RESEARCH LOCATION: Warfighter Readiness Research Division, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH
RESEARCH ADVISER: Glenn F. Gunzelmann
DEGREE: PhD, Cognitive Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, 2003
Dr. Gunzelmann is a Senior Research Psychologist and the Science and Technology
Advisor for the Air Force Research Laboratory's Cognitive Model's and Agents
Branch (711 HPW/RHAC). The branch pursues basic and applied research to (1)
understand the foundational information processing mechanisms of human
cognition, and (2) develop technologies and formalisms that allow those
mechanisms to be leveraged in understanding human cognition and performance
in complex, dynamic tasks. Dr. Gunzelmann currently leads research efforts
focused on (A) understanding how individuals encode 3-D spatial location information from 2-D
retinotopic perceptual inputs, and (3) developing a computational theory to account for the effects of
sleep loss and time on task on cognitive functioning.
The information in this document is cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
NOTE TO APPLICANTS: If selected for participation in this program, you will be offered temporary summer employment through a contract
to perform work for AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate. This is not a U.S Government position. If selected, you will be required to
undergo a National Agency Check before being granted access to government computer systems.
Human Effectiveness Directorate
Repperger Research Intern Program
RESEARCH PROJECT: 13-02
LEARNING AND COLLABORATION USING
GAME-BASED TECHNOLOGIES AND TOOLS
PROJECT SYNOPSIS: This research project will focus on examining, evaluating, and recommending
alternative tools and technologies to support distributed collaboration and planning for such mission
areas as fighter operations and Air and Space Operations Center operations. There are three major
objectives for this research topic. The emphasis on one or another of these objectives by a specific
researcher is negotiable. First, identify and elaborate the current and potential future conditions and
drivers for distributed planning and collaboration, and the mission areas and decision processes most
directly impacted. Second, review current Government-off-the-shelf and commercial-off-the-shelf tools
and technology and methods that could be leveraged to improve the quality of the planning and
collaboration process and outcomes for the identified areas and processes. Third, design evaluation
studies to be conducted both at the Wright-Patterson AFB team research testbeds and potentially in our
Gaming Research Integration for Learning Laboratory at the Tech Edge also in Dayton Ohio to baseline
processes and outcomes and changes to process and outcomes that result from the integration of new
technologies and methods. Experimentally evaluated recommendations would then be provided to
relevant communities of interest.
BACKGROUND: As the military moves to more distributed collaboration for planning and for day-to-day
operations, the current generation of planning and collaboration tools has not kept pace. Moreover,
there has been limited leveraging of advances in commercial-off-the-shelf technology and tools to
support this distributed operations and planning migration.
EDUCATION LEVEL / DISCIPLINE NEEDED: PhD or Master’s Student in one of the following:
Psychology; Computer Science; or Operations Research
RESEARCH LOCATION: Warfighter Readiness Research Division, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH
RESEARCH ADVISER: Winston “Wink” Bennett, PhD
DEGREE: Industrial Organizational Psychology, Texas A&M University, 1995
Dr. Winston “Wink” Bennett, Jr. is a Senior Research Psychologist and Technical
Advisor for continuous learning and performance assessment. He is a Fellow of the
Air Force Research Laboratory and is also a Fellow of the American Psychological
Association. His team is actively involved in research related to performance
evaluation, personnel assessment, training requirements identification, and
quantifying the impact of organizational interventions - such as interactive, high
fidelity immersive simulation environments and job redesign/restructuring and
training systems impacts on individual, team, and organizational learning and effectiveness. He has
published over 90 research articles, textbooks, chapters, and technical reports.
The information in this document is cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
NOTE TO APPLICANTS: If selected for participation in this program, you will be offered temporary summer employment through a contract
to perform work for AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate. This is not a U.S Government position. If selected, you will be required to
undergo a National Agency Check before being granted access to government computer systems.
Human Effectiveness Directorate
Repperger Research Intern Program
RESEARCH PROJECT: 13-03
PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGIES
FOR ANALYST AND ANALYST TEAMS
PROJECT SYNOPSIS: This research topic will focus on developing performance assessment criteria for
individuals and teams performing intelligence analysts’ tasks for Air Force mission areas. This includes
researching existing approaches, identifying shortfalls, and recommending new methodologies for
automatically assessing individual analyst and analyst teams. A three phase effort is envisioned. First, a
survey of current methods and best practices used for subjective and objective performance assessment
would be accomplished by reviewing the foundational literature, as well as recent applied research (e.g.,
Mission Essential Competency studies with analyst teams). Second, identify a comprehensive set of
performance assessment criteria for analysts teams based on lessons learned in the first phase of the
effort. Third, design evaluation studies to be conducted both at the Wright-Patterson AFB team
research testbeds and the Advanced Technical Intelligence Center facility in Dayton, Ohio, to identify
subjective and objective performance measures to assess training outcomes and readiness and to
determine which factors account for the largest proportion of variance in team performance.
Experimentally evaluated recommendations would then be provided to relevant communities of
interest.
EDUCATION LEVEL / DISCIPLINE NEEDED: PhD or Master’s Student in one of the following:
Experimental Psychology; Psychology; or
Human Factors Psychology
RESEARCH LOCATION: Warfighter Readiness Research Division, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH
RESEARCH ADVISER: Lisa Marie Tripp
DEGREE: PhD, Experimental Psychology, Washington State University, 2011
Lisa Tripp is a Research Psychologist at the Air Force Research Laboratory's
Warfighter Readiness Research Division where she performs training and
readiness research to improve human effectiveness for Air Force Members
assigned to work in Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance.
The information in this document is cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
NOTE TO APPLICANTS: If selected for participation in this program, you will be offered temporary summer employment through a contract
to perform work for AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate. This is not a U.S Government position. If selected, you will be required to
undergo a National Agency Check before being granted access to government computer systems.
Human Effectiveness Directorate
Repperger Research Intern Program
RESEARCH PROJECT: 13-04
COGNITIVELY-ENHANCED COMPLEX EVENT PROCESSING
IN A LARGE-SCALE INTELLIGENT SENSOR
PROJECT SYNOPSIS: This project will contribute to researching new agent specification languages and
execution frameworks allowing ARFL scientists to capture and synthesize inference and sense making in
an intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) context. The project will extend and refine the
agent specification languages and integrate agents into a large-scale intelligent sensor application.
BACKGROUND: Used as aids in an ISR context, these agents help analysts reason about and
comprehend large amounts of sensor data by assuming some of the “data-to-information” processing
burden. Many state-of-the-art sensor systems intentionally avoid processing data. Designers of such
systems have separated the concerns of acquiring data and analyzing data by adopting a paradigm in
which little if any “data-to-information” processing occurs in the actual sensor. While the paradigm has
catalyzed the development of high-performance sensor systems, it has neglected the human operator.
ISR analysts using such systems are being overwhelmed by data.
EDUCATION LEVEL / DISCIPLINE NEEDED: PhD Student in one of the following:
Cognitive Science; Computer Science; or Psychology
RESEARCH LOCATION: Warfighter Readiness Research Division, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH
RESEARCH ADVISER: Scott A. Douglass
DEGREE: PhD, Cognitive Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, 2007
Dr. Scott A. Douglass is Research Psychologist with the 711/HPW Cognitive Models and
Agents Branch (RHAC), US Air Force Research Lab, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio.
He holds a Ph.D. (2007) in cognitive psychology from Carnegie Mellon University.
Working with John R. Anderson at CMU, he acquired expertise in cognitive architectures
and the modeling and simulation of complex situated cognitive processes. His research
interests include large-scale cognitive modeling, artificial intelligence, knowledge
engineering, multi-formalism modeling, and intelligent tutoring systems. He is a member
of the Society for Modeling and Simulation International (SCS).
The information in this document is cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
NOTE TO APPLICANTS: If selected for participation in this program, you will be offered temporary summer employment through a contract
to perform work for AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate. This is not a U.S Government position. If selected, you will be required to
undergo a National Agency Check before being granted access to government computer systems.
Human Effectiveness Directorate
Repperger Research Intern Program
RESEARCH PROJECT: 13-05
HEURISTICS FOR ROBUSTNESS AND TRUST IN INTEGRATED
HUMAN-MACHINE DECISION SYSTEMS
PROJECT SYNOPSIS: The specific research activities for this project will be based on the particular skills
and interests the intern brings to the position. Likely research activities involve summative and
integrative reviews seeking to bridge the literature on trust dynamics with the literature on robust
systems and statistics, extending our existing mathematical operationalization of robustness to analysis
and visualization in high-dimensional spaces, quantifying the relationships among dimensions of
variation, and/or development of computational process models of human decision processes.
BACKGROUND: The idea of integrated human-machine decision systems is rapidly progressing from a
vision of a possible future to a picture of our present reality. We need a better understanding of the
basic science of mixed human - machine decision making, and we need to make use of this science to
develop increasingly robust, automated knowledge-extraction tools and intelligent, trusted machinebased decision aids that improve and adaptively adjust inference, prediction, and decision processes.
We are interested in new metrics, models and methods for objective, rigorous assessment of robustness
and trust, as well as mathematical and computational models of heuristic-based decision processes that
are demonstrably robust and trusted in dynamic, uncertain, non-stationary environments.
EDUCATION LEVEL / DISCIPLINE NEEDED: Bachelor’s, Master’s or PhD Student in one of the following:
Cognitive Science; Computer Science or Mathematics
RESEARCH LOCATION: Warfighter Readiness Research Division, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH
RESEARCH ADVISER: Kevin Gluck
DEGREE: PhD, Cognitive Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, 1999
Kevin Gluck is a Senior Cognitive Scientist with the Air Force Research Laboratory
at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. His research interests focus on
computational and mathematical models of cognitive processes to improve our
understanding of human performance and learning, with emphasis on: learning
and forgetting, fatigue, decision heuristics, and robustness. Kevin is leading the
expansion of the Human Effectiveness Directorate’s in-house investments in
cognitive modeling personnel and research lines. He is also the Chair of AFRL’s
Robust Decision Making Strategic Technology Team, which is a multi-disciplinary, cross-Directorate team
of scientists and engineers working on measuring, modeling, and ensuring high quality in complex
decision processes and outcomes.
The information in this document is cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
NOTE TO APPLICANTS: If selected for participation in this program, you will be offered temporary summer employment through a contract
to perform work for AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate. This is not a U.S Government position. If selected, you will be required to
undergo a National Agency Check before being granted access to government computer systems.
Human Effectiveness Directorate
Repperger Research Intern Program
RESEARCH PROJECT: 13-06
MODELING HUMAN INTERACTIONS
WITH TABLET AND PORTABLE COMPUTING DEVICES
PROJECT SYNOPSIS: The goal of this project is to conduct a series of experiments to assess the
applicability of Fitts’ and Steering Laws to performance on small, portable touchscreen devices, including
tablets and/or smartphones. This research will involve developing the software to measure performance
on these devices and conducting the data collection with human participants for the evaluation of speed
and accuracy performance.
BACKGROUND: In order to use tablets, smart phones and other portable touchscreen computing
devices in psychology research, it is critical to understand their image display, timing, and input response
characteristics in order to account for additional variation in our measurements introduced by the
devices themselves. This research will incorporate a series of direct device measurements for the
specific devices used in the Fitts’ and Steering Law experiments for Air Force applications, and general
recommendations may be made regarding the use of tablets in empirical psychology research.
EDUCATION LEVEL / DISCIPLINE NEEDED: Bachelor’s or PhD student in one of the following:
Human Factors; Cognitive Science; Electrical Engineering;
Psychology or Mechanical Engineering
RESEARCH LOCATION: Decision Making Division, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH
RESEARCH ADVISER: Leslie M. Blaha
DEGREE: PhD, Psychology – Cognitive Science, Indiana University, 2011
Mathematical psychologist Dr. Leslie Blaha completed her joint Ph.D. in Psychology and
Cognitive Science in 2010, working with Dr. Jim Townsend and Dr. Tom Busey at Indiana
University. Her dissertation focused on characterizing the human information processing
mechanism changed by extended perceptual learning and developing a non-linear,
dynamic systems model of perceptual learning in an interactive parallel systems model.
She joined the Battlespace Visualization Branch of AFRL in 2010, where she is currently the
principal investigator for in-house basic research initiatives. Her current research is aimed
at developing robust models of visual cognitive efficiency under changing workload
demands, as well as deriving metrics for finding spatial representations of asymmetric
proximity data.
The information in this document is cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
NOTE TO APPLICANTS: If selected for participation in this program, you will be offered temporary summer employment through a contract
to perform work for AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate. This is not a U.S Government position. If selected, you will be required to
undergo a National Agency Check before being granted access to government computer systems.
Human Effectiveness Directorate
Repperger Research Intern Program
RESEARCH PROJECT: 13-07
EFFECTIVELY CONVEYING COMPLEX INFORMATION
THROUGH INTUITIVE VISUALIZATIONS
PROJECT SYNOPSIS: The goal of this project is to use a novel computational tool that calculates the
information match between the information necessary to perform a particular task and the information
contained in various user interfaces. The user interfaces in this case are graphical presentations of data
that are used to make decision with varying levels of risk. This research project involves the following
tasks: 1) becoming familiar with various ways to graphically present risk, 2) learning how users of these
visualizations think through risk-related decisions, 3) using the computational tool to assess the
information match between the user’s task and various visualizations, 4) suggesting alternative
visualizations for representing risk, 5) designing a study to compare user performance when using the
visualizations to make decisions, and 6) documenting the results of these activities.
BACKGROUND: This project is one of a series of studies building on the human cognition theory of
information visualization. Effective interfaces are key to understanding complex information, but
designing an effective interface can be challenging. Oftentimes, an interface is difficult or confusing to
use. This may lead to poor performance by the user.
EDUCATION LEVEL / DISCIPLINE NEEDED: Bachelor’s, Master’s or PhD student in one of the following:
Human Factors; Experimental Psychology; Cognitive
Science; Psychology; or Computer Science
RESEARCH LOCATION: Decision Making Division, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH
RESEARCH ADVISER: Kristen K. Liggett
DEGREE: PhD, Engineering, Wright State University, 2000
Kristen Liggett has been conducting research in the Air Force Research Laboratory
for the past 25 years and is currently a Senior Human Factors Engineer in the
Battlespace Visualization Branch. This branch conducts research in scientific
visualization, information visualization, 3D displays, and novel ways to interact
with visualizations. Kristen recently became interested in the field of visual
analytics (analytical reasoning facilitated by interactive visualizations) and her
current research focuses on designing and testing information visualizations for
cyber domain applications. Also, Dr. Liggett and a team of colleagues recently developed a human
cognition theory of information visualization and the branch is engaged in conducting a series of studies
that relate to this theory.
The information in this document is cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
NOTE TO APPLICANTS: If selected for participation in this program, you will be offered temporary summer employment through a contract
to perform work for AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate. This is not a U.S Government position. If selected, you will be required to
undergo a National Agency Check before being granted access to government computer systems.
Human Effectiveness Directorate
Repperger Research Intern Program
RESEARCH PROJECT: 13-08
COMMAND, CONTROL, COMMUNICATIONS & COMPUTER
ACOUSTIC DISPLAYS
PROJECT SYNOPSIS: This research project will involve the generation of auditory representations of
data streams that support effective multisource monitoring by investigating the ability of a listener to
monitor multiple concurrent streams of information in such displays and glean from them useful data.
BACKGROUND: The complexity of current operational systems often requires the presentation of
multiple simultaneous streams of information to an operator (e.g., location and state of multiple
uninhabited air vehicles, integrity of datalinks from multiple communication channels, etc. Such systems
generally benefit from the use of display technologies that exploit multiple sensory modalities. Auditory
displays, in particular, may be useful for representing these complex systems because the auditory
system is uniquely well-suited for monitoring multiple simultaneous streams of information. In an ideal
auditory display, acoustic features associated with the individual sounds, each of which might represent
a display variable of interest (e.g., feeds from multiple uninhabited air vehicles, multichannel datalink
integrity) could be continuously modulated. Such changes attributed to individual sounds can signal
display variables requiring further exploration, and correlated changes across multiple sounds could
indicate trends in overall system states.
EDUCATION LEVEL / DISCIPLINE NEEDED: Bachelor’s, Master’s or PhD student in one of the following:
Cognitive Science or Computer Science
RESEARCH LOCATION: Decision Making Division, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH
RESEARCH ADVISER: Diane Popik
DEGREE: AuD, Salus University, 2008
Dr Popik has been a research audiologist with AFRL for 8 years. Her areas of
expertise include Command and Control (C2) communications and human
systems integration. She currently manages the C2 enhanced tactical displays
program which includes the multi-modal communications (MMC) work unit.
The information in this document is cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
NOTE TO APPLICANTS: If selected for participation in this program, you will be offered temporary summer employment through a contract
to perform work for AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate. This is not a U.S Government position. If selected, you will be required to
undergo a National Agency Check before being granted access to government computer systems.
Human Effectiveness Directorate
Repperger Research Intern Program
RESEARCH PROJECT: 13-09
EVALUATION OF THE WORKLOAD AND FATIGUE
OF NETWORK SECURITY DEFENDERS: CYBER VIGILANCE
PROJECT SYNOPSIS: In addition to examining the performance effectiveness of operators monitoring for
cyber attacks, this study will also evaluate the perceived mental workload and stress of the participant
through subjective measures as well as evaluate objective measures of workload and fatigue with the
use of an eye tracker.
BACKGROUND: The multi-modal communication program is an applied research effort for the
development and evaluation of an advanced multi-modal network-centric communication system. The
research investigates the information processing capabilities of the human to monitor, process, and
respond to high volumes of data, visually and aurally, in a high tempo, stressful environment. Monitoring
effectiveness is evaluated by information detection, comprehension, and timeliness of actions. The
workload and stress of the participants are also assessed with the use of subjective and physiological
measures as well as their ability to interact with the advanced system. Vigilance or sustained attention
focuses upon the ability of observers to detect and respond to unpredictable and infrequent signals over
extended periods of time. The ubiquitous finding in this area of research is the vigilance decrement, in
which signal detection typically decreases over time. This aspect of human performance is an important
concern for human factors specialists due to the critical role that vigilance plays in many operational
settings, such as cyber defense monitoring. Network security defenders are constantly monitoring
displays for signs of cyber attacks thus an understanding of how vigilance affects these operators allows
for better display designs or automation.
EDUCATION LEVEL / DISCIPLINE NEEDED: Master’s or PhD student in one of the following:
Human Factors Psychology; Experimental Psychology
or Psychology
RESEARCH LOCATION: Decision Making Division, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH
RESEARCH ADVISER: Victor Finomore
DEGREE: PhD, Experimental Psychology, University of Cincinnati, 2008
Dr. Victor S. Finomore, Jr. is an engineering research psychologist in the Battlefield
Acoustics Branch in the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force
Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology/Human Factors from the University of Cincinnati in
2008. Dr. Finomore’s current research involves team communication and collaboration
with advanced communication displays, the development and integration of multi modal
technology for dismounted soldiers and neuroergonomics research in performance and
attention.
The information in this document is cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
NOTE TO APPLICANTS: If selected for participation in this program, you will be offered temporary summer employment through a contract
to perform work for AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate. This is not a U.S Government position. If selected, you will be required to
undergo a National Agency Check before being granted access to government computer systems.
Human Effectiveness Directorate
Repperger Research Intern Program
RESEARCH PROJECT: 13-10
EVENT-RELATED CEREBRAL HEMODYNAMICS
IN AUDITORY AND VISUAL VIGILANCE TASKS
PROJECT SYNOPSIS: This project will use transcranial Doppler sonography to help determine if the
elevation in cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) that occurs when signals are detected in a visual
vigilance task also occurs with a comparable auditory vigilance task.
BACKGROUND: Vigilance or sustained attention tasks require observers to monitor displays over
extended periods of time for the occasional occurrence of critical events. Vigilance is a vital component
of human performance in many Air-Force related activities such as, cockpit monitoring, air-traffic
control, UAV control, and cyber and base security. Our laboratory at WPAFB is a national center for the
examination of brain systems underlying vigilance in terms of CBFV using transcranial Doppler
sonography. A recently completed study found that that the successful detection of critical signals was
accompanied by an elevation in CBFV that was not present with missed signals nor with non-signal
neutral stimulus events, indicating that CBFV can serve as a neural index of the cognitive evaluation of
stimulus significance. That study was performed with visual stimuli. However, vigilance tasks can also be
performed in the auditory modality and there are several modality-specific differences in performance
efficiency. The present study will be conducted for that purpose. The finding of similar results in the
auditory and visual modalities will bolster the view of CBFV as an index of the cognitive evaluation of
stimulus significance and strengthen the assertion emerging from psychophysical and neurological
studies that while modality-specific effects do occur in vigilance, within limits, a common neural system
governs vigilance performance in the two sensory modalities.
EDUCATION LEVEL / DISCIPLINE NEEDED: Master’s student in one of the following:
Experimental Psychology; Human Factors or Cognitive
Science
RESEARCH LOCATION: Decision Making Division, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH
RESEARCH ADVISER: Gregory Funke
DEGREE: PhD, Experimental Psychology, University of Cincinnati, 2007
Dr. Gregory Funke is an engineering research psychologist in the Applied
Neuroscience Branch of the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air
Force Base. He received his Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology/Human Factors
from the University of Cincinnati in 2007. Dr. Funke’s current research focus is on
understanding team processes that contribute to team successes or failures, with
an emphasis on neuroergonomic and nonlinear statistical methods. This includes
studies of the physiological and behavioral similarities between co-acting
teammates, team communication analysis, and physiological and subjective
measures of team workload.
The information in this document is cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
NOTE TO APPLICANTS: If selected for participation in this program, you will be offered temporary summer employment through a contract
to perform work for AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate. This is not a U.S Government position. If selected, you will be required to
undergo a National Agency Check before being granted access to government computer systems.
Human Effectiveness Directorate
Repperger Research Intern Program
RESEARCH PROJECT: 13-11
WORKLOAD EFFECTS ON TEAM PHYSIO-BEHAVIORAL SYNCHRONICITY
PROJECT SYNOPSIS: This research project will assist with experimental design, task development, data
collection, data analysis, documentation for publication in a refereed journal to address a gap in the
synchronicity literature. If required, training will be provided to the student on techniques for
acquisition of physiological and behavioral measures of team synchronicity, as well as advanced
statistical approaches to analyze that data.
BACKGROUND: Recent research suggests that synchronicity in physiological and behavioral responses
during team tasks can provide an objective measure of important processes underlying team
performance (e.g., Strang, Funke, Knott, & Warm, 2011). Currently, research in this area has not
addressed if team synchronicity is influenced by task-related factors such as task demands (workload).
While it is likely that task demands will influence synchronicity, the direction of change is unknown. It is
possible that high task demands will reduce team synchronicity, as teammates must focus on completing
their individual taskwork. Conversely, it is possible that high task demands will actually increase
synchronicity, as teammates must coordinate more closely with each other to meet team goals. In either
case, reliable changes in team synchronicity could provide objective, physiologically- and behaviorallyderived measures of teamwork that could be assessed in near-real time, which could provide mission
commanders or adaptive automated systems with a valuable aid when trying to determine team health
and readiness for duty.
EDUCATION LEVEL / DISCIPLINE NEEDED: Bachelor’s or Master’s student in one of the following:
Human Factors Psychology; Neural Science; or Experimental
Psychology
RESEARCH LOCATION: Decision Making Division, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH
RESEARCH ADVISER: Gregory Funke
DEGREE: PhD, Experimental Psychology, University of Cincinnati, 2007
Dr. Gregory Funke is an engineering research psychologist in the Applied
Neuroscience Branch of the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson
Air Force Base. He received his Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology/Human Factors
from the University of Cincinnati in 2007. Dr. Funke’s current research focus is on
understanding team processes that contribute to team successes or failures, with
an emphasis on neuroergonomic and nonlinear statistical methods. This includes
studies of the physiological and behavioral similarities between co-acting
teammates, team communication analysis, and physiological and subjective
measures of team workload.
The information in this document is cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
NOTE TO APPLICANTS: If selected for participation in this program, you will be offered temporary summer employment through a contract
to perform work for AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate. This is not a U.S Government position. If selected, you will be required to
undergo a National Agency Check before being granted access to government computer systems.
Human Effectiveness Directorate
Repperger Research Intern Program
RESEARCH PROJECT: 13-12
STRESS, GENETICS AND BEHAVIOR
PROJECT SYNOPSIS: The goal of this research is to identify novel genetic factors that modulate
performance in stressful environments.
BACKGROUND: Performance under stress determines mission effectiveness. Our work seeks to identify
genetic factors that convey resiliency for cognitive performance in a high stress environment. To
accomplish this, we utilize a behavioral genetics mouse model (BXD mice). Our work involves testing
rodent behavior (attention, anxiety, spatial memory and emotional memory) and examining the
neurobiological changes that occur following treatment. The use of BXD mice, an established genetics
reference population, allows the behavioral outcomes of stress exposure to be mapped onto defined
chromosomal sequences, thereby linking stress-sensitive phenotypes with causative genetic loci.
Genetic mapping of behavioral data will result in the identification of: 1) stress-sensitive loci that impair
cognitive function; and 2) chromosomal loci that convey resilience to stress-induced cognitive deficits.
The goal of this research is to identify novel genetic factors that modulate performance in a stressful
environment.
EDUCATION LEVEL / DISCIPLINE NEEDED: Bachelor’s; Master’s or PhD student in one of the following:
Neural Science, Bioinformatics; Genetics or Psychology
RESEARCH LOCATION: Decision Making Division, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH
RESEARCH ADVISER: Ryan Jankord
DEGREE: PhD, Biomedical Science, University of Missouri, 2006
Dr. Jankord is a research physiologist in the Applied Neuroscience Branch of the Air
Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Dr. Jankord joined
AFRL in 2010 and leads a research team that utilizes rodent models to study the
neurobiological mechanisms of stress and cognitive performance. Dr. Jankord
received his PhD from the University of Missouri in 2006, studied stress
neurobiology as a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Cincinnati and has
published 15 articles in refereed journals.
The information in this document is cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
NOTE TO APPLICANTS: If selected for participation in this program, you will be offered temporary summer employment through a contract
to perform work for AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate. This is not a U.S Government position. If selected, you will be required to
undergo a National Agency Check before being granted access to government computer systems.
Human Effectiveness Directorate
Repperger Research Intern Program
RESEARCH PROJECT: 13-13
OPTICAL INVESTIGATION OF BIOLOGICAL RESPONSE
TO ELECTROMAGNETIC EXPOSURE
PROJECT SYNOPSIS: This project will assist in the development or application of advanced optical
approaches for investigation of biological response to electromagnetic exposure. Current laboratory
efforts are focused on using techniques such as spontaneous and coherent Raman scattering, highspeed imaging, and confocal and multi-photon microscopy, to elucidate effects observed after directed
energy exposure. Of particular interest is exploration of effects or specific information that can be
gained from low-frequency Raman techniques. Candidates with biological or biochemical expertise
seeking to use optical approaches for investigation of their observed phenomenon, as well as those with
demonstrated experience in novel optical sensing and imaging approaches, are desired. The laboratory
offers extensive cell and tissue culture facilities and well as laser equipment across the pulse-duration
and wavelength spectrum with support optical and microscopy equipment.
EDUCATION LEVEL / DISCIPLINE NEEDED: Bachelor’s; Master’s; or PhD student in one of the following:
Biomedical Engineering or Biochemistry
RESEARCH LOCATION: Bioeffects Division, Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, TX
RESEARCH ADVISER: Hope Beier
DEGREE: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, Texas A&M University, 2009
Hope Beier is a principle investigator for efforts in applying optical techniques to
explore the effects of directed energy on biology. She has recently been awarded a
three-year Air Force Office of Scientific Research LRIR grant to study the effects of
THz radiation on biomolecules using low-frequency coherent Raman scattering and
a Venture Fund to use stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy to study
membrane dynamics. Dr. Beier joined the Air Force Research Laboratory in 2010
as a National Research Council Postdoctoral Research Associate and is currently
working as a Research Biomedical Engineer.
The information in this document is cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
NOTE TO APPLICANTS: If selected for participation in this program, you will be offered temporary summer employment through a contract
to perform work for AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate. This is not a U.S Government position. If selected, you will be required to
undergo a National Agency Check before being granted access to government computer systems.
Human Effectiveness Directorate
Repperger Research Intern Program
RESEARCH PROJECT: 13-14
IMPACT OF SHORT PULSE ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS
ON MAMMALIAN CELLS
PROJECT SYNOPSIS: The overarching aim of this research effort is to generate a comprehensive model
that can predict the field distribution and biological impact of high peak power microwave exposures to
ensure soldier safety in the battlefield.
BACKGROUND: Our laboratory’s goal is to understand the biological effects of high peak power
microwaves. Utilizing directly applied nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) as a microwave
surrogate; we study changes in cell plasma membrane structure, morphology and physiological, and
genetic and proteomic expression. To study such changes, we use electrophysiological and optical
microscope systems to record changes in membrane conductance in real time allowing for the
determination of thresholds for effect of various nsPEF exposure parameters. In addition, we study the
impact of such pulses on neurological cells to investigate the impact of electrical pulses on the
conduction of action potentials. Genetic and proteomic techniques are used in conjunction with an
exposure system capable of exposing a population of cells to elucidate stressful and lethal exposure
endpoints. Lastly, we pursue the development of theoretical models that describe and predict the
impact and response of cells exposed to nsPEF.
EDUCATION LEVEL / DISCIPLINE NEEDED: Bachelor’s; Master’s; or PhD student in one of the following:
Biomedical Engineering; Electrical Engineering; or Biology
RESEARCH LOCATION: Bioeffects Division, Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, TX
RESEARCH ADVISER: Bennett Ibey
DEGREE: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, Texas A&M University, 2006
Dr. Ibey began working for the Air Force Research Laboratory in 2007 as the
principal Investigator of high peak power microwaves (HPPM) bioeffects. His
research includes the construction of HPPM microwave systems, the use of patch
clamp to study cellular bio-electric effects, the development of theoretical models,
cellular microscopy, and the measurement of genetic or proteomic effects of
HPPM exposure. Dr. Ibey has published 1 book chapter, 1 patent, and 16 peerreviewed publications. He is a board member of bioelectromagnetics society,
active member of SPIE, and the Direct Energy Professional Society. He was named the AF Junior Civilian
Scientist of the Year 2010 and received an honorable mention for the McLucas Basic Science Award in
2012.
The information in this document is cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
NOTE TO APPLICANTS: If selected for participation in this program, you will be offered temporary summer employment through a contract
to perform work for AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate. This is not a U.S Government position. If selected, you will be required to
undergo a National Agency Check before being granted access to government computer systems.
Human Effectiveness Directorate
Repperger Research Intern Program
RESEARCH PROJECT: 13-15
FUNDUSCOPIC VASCULAR FLOW IMAGING
PROJECT SYNOPSIS: This study will use emerging imaging technology for the investigation of light retina
interactions to measure local changes in metabolic function of the nonhuman primate retina in response
to a variety of light stimuli, spanning the optical spectrum, over a large range of radiant exposure levels.
BACKGROUND: Differences in blood flow and oxygen saturation levels in the microvasculature are
speculated to be among the earliest measurable changes associated with metabolic processes in the
retina. Therefore, measuring localized ocular blood flow and oxygen saturation in the proximity of light
stimuli is an essential first step in mapping the pathways related to both visual function and laser
damage mechanisms. Coherent speckle imaging is a technology which enables measurement of blood
flow in the vasculature of semi-turbid tissue. Spectral reflectance methods (e.g. hyperspectral imaging)
have evolved into useful tools to measure oxygen saturation levels in hemoglobin.
EDUCATION LEVEL / DISCIPLINE NEEDED: Bachelor’s; Master’s; or PhD student in one of the following:
Biomedical Engineering; Optical Engineering; Electrical
Engineering; or Mechanical Engineering
RESEARCH LOCATION: Bioeffects Division, Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, TX
RESEARCH ADVISER: Jeffrey W. Oliver
DEGREE: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 2003
Jeffrey W Oliver, Ph. D. is the team lead for the Ophthalmic Imaging and Laser
Damage group within the Optical Radiation Branch at the Air Force Research
Laboratory Human Effectiveness Directorate. Prior to joining AFRL as a Research
Biomedical Engineer, he served as Director of Research and Development for
NeurOptics Inc. in Irvine, CA where he led a team of scientists and engineers in the
development of opto-electronic devices used in neurophthalmic applications. He
has served as Principal Investigator on numerous Air Force projects in support of
Maximum Permissible Exposure limits for lasers. Dr. Oliver is a member of the American National
Standards Institutes Z136 Bioeffects and Medical Surveillance Technical Subcommittee (TSC -1) and the
Standards Subcommittee for the Safe Use of Lasers (SSC -1).
The information in this document is cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
NOTE TO APPLICANTS: If selected for participation in this program, you will be offered temporary summer employment through a contract
to perform work for AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate. This is not a U.S Government position. If selected, you will be required to
undergo a National Agency Check before being granted access to government computer systems.
Human Effectiveness Directorate
Repperger Research Intern Program
RESEARCH PROJECT: 13-16
COMPUTATIONAL LASER BIOPHYSICS
PROJECT SYNOPSIS: This project will address one of a number of standing research problems relevant
to describing and directing (through predictions in on-going experimental programs) research within our
laboratory. Depending upon the applicant's interest and background, the research will be guided to
focus on one of the following problems: (1) acceleration of electromagnetic simulations through the use
of graphical processing units and other high-performance computing algorithm improvements, (2) the
molecular-level interaction of lasers with protein-ligand systems to examine photo-induced electron
transfer (3) molecular dynamics to describe the resultant protein conformational changes induced by
this mechanism, and (4) multi-physics simulations relating material response from short pulse lasers to
unify acoustic, thermal, photo-ablative, photochemical, and other responses.
EDUCATION LEVEL / DISCIPLINE NEEDED: Master’s or PhD student in one of the following:
Physics, Biomedical Engineering; Mathematics; Biochemistry;
Computer Science; or Biology
RESEARCH LOCATION: Bioeffects Division, Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, TX
RESEARCH ADVISER: Robert Thomas
DEGREE: PhD, Physics, University of Missouri, 1994
Robert Thomas is a Physicist with the Air Force Research Laboratory where he has
served for the past 18 years. He currently leads a wide variety of modeling and
simulation activities from study of laser-tissue interactions at the molecular level,
to multi-physics simulations in bio-photonics, to scenario-based studies relevant
to the applications of lasers in USAF technologies. With a wide-range of
interests, his current focus is the improvement of algorithms for simulating laser
beam propagation within biological structures and making a number of longstanding, non-linear response simulations tractable. In addition, his work has the goal of coupling, with
these propagation algorithms, the material and molecular-level response of the system with the laser or
its effects.
The information in this document is cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
NOTE TO APPLICANTS: If selected for participation in this program, you will be offered temporary summer employment through a contract
to perform work for AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate. This is not a U.S Government position. If selected, you will be required to
undergo a National Agency Check before being granted access to government computer systems.
Human Effectiveness Directorate
Repperger Research Intern Program
RESEARCH PROJECT: 13-17
MILITARY & NON-MILITARY PERSONNEL'S THREAT PERCEPTION OF A
DEPLOYMENT OF A DIRECTED ENERGY WEAPON DURING IRREGULAR AND
REGULAR WARFARE SCENARIOS
PROJECT SYNOPSIS: This research project will develop an experimental design to obtain quantifiable
data to see how the use of directed energy (DE) systems will affect threat perception. The project will
measure red/blue and green force personnel’s threat perception of a DE system. The initial phase of the
research we will design a set of experiments that test the participant's threat perception (Feelings)
about the use of DE systems and their willingness to fight an opponent that uses DE vice an opponent
that uses more conventional weapons. This will enable us to start understanding combatants’ reactions
as a first order principled model, and enable improved fidelity and realism in simulation and other
modeling of behaviors as a result of the potential future deployment of such DE systems.
EDUCATION LEVEL / DISCIPLINE NEEDED: Master’s or PhD student in one of the following:
Social Psychology; Experimental Psychology; or Psychology
RESEARCH LOCATION: Bioeffects Division, Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, TX
RESEARCH ADVISER: Robert Thomas
DEGREE: PhD, Physics, University of Missouri, 1994
Robert Thomas is a Physicist with the Air Force Research Laboratory where he has
served for the past 18 years. He currently leads a wide variety of modeling and
simulation activities from study of laser-tissue interactions at the molecular level,
to multi-physics simulations in bio-photonics, to scenario-based studies relevant
to the applications of lasers in USAF technologies. With a wide-range of interests,
his current focus is the improvement of algorithms for simulating laser beam
propagation within biological structures and making a number of long-standing,
non-linear response simulations tractable. In addition, his work has the goal of coupling, with these
propagation algorithms, the material and molecular-level response of the system with the laser or its
effects.
The information in this document is cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
NOTE TO APPLICANTS: If selected for participation in this program, you will be offered temporary summer employment through a contract
to perform work for AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate. This is not a U.S Government position. If selected, you will be required to
undergo a National Agency Check before being granted access to government computer systems.
Human Effectiveness Directorate
Repperger Research Intern Program
RESEARCH PROJECT: 13-18
MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR LASER EXPOSURE
PROJECT SYNOPSIS: The research thrust of this project will be the design, fabrication and testing of
microfluidic devices for the purpose of achieving uniform laser exposure of a population of human cells
(retinal pigmented epithelium and Jurkat T-lymphoma) in tissue culture. To do this, the student will be
required to grow mammalian cells in tissue culture and perform some fluorescent dye-based assays for
cell killing (calcein/ethidium homodimer) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene expression
(GFP-Hsp 70 and GFP-NFκB). Work done last summer by an American Society for Engineering Education
summer faculty fellow and his graduate student established the boundary specifications for a
microfluidic device, e.g., number of channels, channel size, channel length, presence/absence of a filter,
fluid pump rate, fluid/buffer composition, etc., and eventually did got one gene expression data point
for each of two heat shock proteins (Hsp-H1 and Hsp-A1A) following exposure to a 2 μm laser. However,
the system is not yet optimized, and that is the principal task for this project.
BACKGROUND: Optical radiation creates damage in tissue by photothermal, photochemical, and
photomechanical mechanisms, and the results of laser exposures are heterogeneous outside the beam
spot. Also, there is no reliable way of isolating a particular sub-population of exposed cells, making it
impossible to associate any type of biochemical event with a specific level of exposure. A method is
needed to administer to each cell in a population, precisely and reproducibly, exactly the same exposure
and then collect them in numbers sufficient to perform biochemical or molecular biological analyses.
EDUCATION LEVEL / DISCIPLINE NEEDED: Bachelor’s; Master’s or PhD student in one of the following:
Mechanical Engineering; Biomedical Engineering; Physics or
Biochemistry
RESEARCH LOCATION: Bioeffects Division, Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, TX
RESEARCH ADVISER: Jeffrey Wigle
DEGREE: PhD, Radiation Biophysics, University of Rochester, 1982
Dr Wigle is a Research Biological Scientist in the Optical Radiation Branch of the
Bioeffects Division. After completing the Ph.D., Dr Wigle did a Postdoctoral
Fellowship in Genetic Toxicology, then joined the USAF, where he served primarily
in research management positions. After leaving the USAF in 1999 he worked as
an in-house contractor for the Laser Eye Protection Advanced Development
Program, and then was hired as a civilian scientist. His overarching research
interest is molecular mechanisms of bioeffects from light-tissue interactions. One
thrust is killing of human retinal pigmented epithelial cells, in vitro, by lasers, and the other is red-light
induced photobiomodulation and how one might exploit those pathways towards enhancing
performance and protection of the warfighter.
The information in this document is cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
NOTE TO APPLICANTS: If selected for participation in this program, you will be offered temporary summer employment through a contract
to perform work for AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate. This is not a U.S Government position. If selected, you will be required to
undergo a National Agency Check before being granted access to government computer systems.
Human Effectiveness Directorate
Repperger Research Intern Program
RESEARCH PROJECT: 13-19
BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF TERAHERTZ RADIATION
PROJECT SYNOPSIS: The terahertz (THz) region of the electromagnetic (EM) spectrum is defined as
frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 10 THz. Historically, few technologies have been available for the THz
region; however, in recent years, numerous THz technologies have been developed. Using these new
tools, several research groups have shown that THz radiation exhibits many rich and unique properties
that are unavailable at other EM frequencies. For instance, THz radiation can be directly coupled to
cellular constituents and biomolecules (e.g., lipid membranes, DNA, and proteins). Interestingly, THz
coupling has been shown to trigger rapid changes in membrane permeability, permitting stimulation and
suppression of action potentials in neuronal cells. In addition, evidence suggests that THz radiation may
couple to DNA causing both genotoxic and epigenetic effects. Theoretical models postulate that these
“DNA un-zipping” effects may be a result of THz waves oscillating on the same time-scale (~46 ps) as the
breathing modes of DNA. Furthermore, these models contend that several THz frequencies may be able
to create persistent spatially-localized “bubbles” between DNA strands, causing instabilities which
influence gene expression. Interestingly, our laboratory has demonstrated that human cells differentially
express several “THz-specific” genes when exposed to 2.52 THz radiation. Finally, in addition to lipid
membranes and DNA, THz radiation has also been shown to impact intracellular proteins and enzymatic
processes. Taken together, these compelling findings warrant future efforts to elucidate the precise
nature of these underlying coupling mechanisms.
EDUCATION LEVEL / DISCIPLINE NEEDED: Bachelor’s; Master’s or PhD student in one of the following:
Biomedical Engineering; Electrical Engineering or Biology
RESEARCH LOCATION: Bioeffects Division, Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, TX
RESEARCH ADVISER: Gerald Wilmink
DEGREE: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, 2007
Dr. Gerald “Jerry” Joseph Wilmink currently serves as the Principle Investigator of
the Terahertz (THz) research laboratory. The THz research lab has conducted
pioneering research in the area of THz bioeffects, and this team was the recipient
of the AFRL Scientific and Technical Team award in 2010. Dr. Wilmink has several
U.S. and international patents pending worldwide, has published 40 peerreviewed manuscripts, book chapters, and invited review articles, and has
delivered more than 25 invited, keynote, or plenary presentations at scientific
conferences. Current research interests include THz nerve stimulation, THz spectroscopy, and biological
effects at advanced device interfaces.
The information in this document is cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
NOTE TO APPLICANTS: If selected for participation in this program, you will be offered temporary summer employment through a contract
to perform work for AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate. This is not a U.S Government position. If selected, you will be required to
undergo a National Agency Check before being granted access to government computer systems.
Human Effectiveness Directorate
Repperger Research Intern Program
RESEARCH PROJECT: 13-20
BIOLOGICAL INTERACTION OF ENGINEERED NANOMATERIALS
PROJECT SYNOPSIS: This project will seek to understand the fundamental mechanism of interaction of
engineered nanomaterials based on their unique physiochemcial characteristics including, dimensional
size, structure, shape and surface chemistries that can interact with cultured cell components and cause
novel molecular events such as membrane receptor modulation, enhanced endocytosis dynamics and
subcellular signal activation. Understanding the interaction between biological systems and engineered
nanomaterials will aid in the development of novel material-based biosensors for military applications.
Further studies will be conducted to understand interface between nano and electromagnetic field Laser
to understand biological implications and application associated with co-exposure to electromagnetic
field and Nanoparticles
BACKGROUND: Engineered nanomaterials (NM), possessing dimensions ranging between 1-100 nm in
size, possess novel physical and chemical properties that can be used to create unique devices. Unique
quantum characteristics can confer unique electrical, optical and magnetic nanosystem attributes not
present in corresponding bulk materials. Nano-scale prepared materials are useful for military
applications such engineering aspects important for a portable battlefield remote monitoring devices.
EDUCATION LEVEL / DISCIPLINE NEEDED: Bachelor’s or Master’s student in one of the following:
Bionanotechnology; Chemistry; Biomedical Engineering
RESEARCH LOCATION: Bioeffects Division, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH
RESEARCH ADVISER: Saber Hussain
DEGREE: PhD, Zoology, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, 1991
Saber Hussain, Senior Scientist and Nanotoxicology Group Lead, Molecular
Bioeffects Division, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. Dr. Hussain began
(1987) his scientific career as a toxicology research fellow at the Indian Institute
of Chemical Technology (IICT) and received his doctorate degree in 1991. Here,
his novel exploration of heavy metal biotransfer between different proteins in
complex biological environment led to a series of prestigious research fellowships
in Italy, Switzerland, and the U.S. Dr. Hussain joined the Air Force Research Laboratory at WrightPatterson AFB in 1999, where his research interests transitioned into evaluating potential toxicity arising
from the physicochemical properties of nanoscale structures. His research addressing nanomaterial
toxicity and biomolecular interaction of nanomaterials has resulted in author/co-authorship of 100 peerreviewed publications, 9 book chapters, and 200 technical abstracts. He is currently an Associate Editor
of Toxicological Sciences and serves as an editorial member of several other toxicology journals. He is a
Fellow of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences.
The information in this document is cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
NOTE TO APPLICANTS: If selected for participation in this program, you will be offered temporary summer employment through a contract
to perform work for AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate. This is not a U.S Government position. If selected, you will be required to
undergo a National Agency Check before being granted access to government computer systems.
Human Effectiveness Directorate
Repperger Research Intern Program
RESEARCH PROJECT: 13-21
BIOLOGICAL AND NANOMATERIAL SENSOR DEVELOPMENT
FOR HUMAN PERFORMANCE
PROJECT SYNOPSIS: Potential research opportunities for this fellowship include the development of
sensing elements in biofilm-forming cellular systems and the determination of the effects of biological
matrices on signal output from these various sensor platforms.
BACKGROUND: Biological systems have innate abilities to detect small concentrations of molecules in
highly complex backgrounds. These natural sensing elements found offer sensitive and specific binding
to these target molecules and provide tools to enhance sensor design. The Human Effectiveness
Directorate addresses the Air Force mission with respect to enhancing human performance. This
research involves selection of these sensing elements as well as incorporation of these sensing elements
into various detection systems; specifically various cell types, nanoparticles, and transistors. These
sensing elements can be composed of oligonucleotides of either RNA or DNA, known as aptamers or
composed of amino acids in the form of short peptides or antibodies. The characteristics of these
aptamers and peptides are being investigated in order to optimize specificity and sensitivity to mission
relevant targets. In addition, our research team partners with scientists from AFRL, academia, and
industry to develop novel ways to manipulate samples in highly complex backgrounds, such as blood and
saliva, in order to improve target detection and assay performance.
EDUCATIONAL LEVEL / DISCIPLINE NEEDED: Bachelor’s, Master’s; or PhD student in one of the following:
Chemistry; Biomedical Engineering; Biochemistry; or
Electrical Engineering
RESEARCH LOCATION: Human-Centered Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Division
Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton OH
RESEARCH ADVISOR: Nancy Kelley-Loughnane
DEGREE: PhD, Biochemistry, Boston College, 2000
Dr. Kelley-Loughnane is the technical advisor for AFRL’s Human Signatures
Branch. Her dissertation focused on the study of the allosteric mechanism of key
enzymes in gluconeogenesis. After a postdoctoral fellowship at Cincinnati
Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Dr. Kelley-Loughnane joined the Human
Effectiveness as a biochemist involved with developing assays for chemical
detection, including nanomaterials and living systems. She is also the AFRL lead
for the AFRL Bio-X Strategic Technical Team that focuses on two efforts: (1) bio
sentinels for USAF operations, and (2) biotronics which includes investigation of the biotic and abiotic
interface for enhanced performance in electro-optical devices to be used as sensors for human
performance and other military operational needs.
The information in this document is cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
NOTE TO APPLICANTS: If selected for participation in this program, you will be offered temporary summer employment through a contract
to perform work for AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate. This is not a U.S Government position. If selected, you will be required to
undergo a National Agency Check before being granted access to government computer systems.
Human Effectiveness Directorate
Repperger Research Intern Program
RESEARCH PROJECT: 13-22
COGNITIVE AND HUMAN FACTORS OF ANOMALY DETECTION
PROJECT SYNOPSIS: This research project involves hypothesis generation, experimental design, data
analysis, and documentation focusing on the reasons for anomaly detection failures by persons
responsible for viewing routine data input streams and seek methods for improving detection. Students
can research various factors which contribute to anomaly detection and inattention blindness such as (1)
display factors (e.g., number, position, motion, pattern, and complexity of elements, (2) task factors
(e.g., number of tasks, communications, distractions), (3) human factors (e.g. training, workload,
personality, culture, teamwork).
BACKGROUND: Many jobs require a person to detect anomalies in routine data input streams. Tasks
range from those of Air Traffic Controllers and rush-hour traffic reporters who view video-feeds under
real-time pressure; whereas medical researchers and stock market analysts follow large volumes of text
data over days to spot new breakouts and trends. Unfortunately, key signals often go undetected and
planes crash or markets plummet. This research project seek to answer three questions: (1) how
prevalent are failures to detect both "obvious" and subtle items; (2) why do detection failures occur;
and (3) how do we improve and aid human monitors? Perceptual and cognitive research shows that
people, even when actively looking for anomalies that they have been forewarned about, often miss
glaring oddities in dynamic events when they are engaged in information gathering tasks.
EDUCATION LEVEL / DISCIPLINE NEEDED: Bachelor’s; Master’s or PhD student in one of the following:
Psychology; Social Psychology; or Mathematics
RESEARCH LOCATION: Human-Centered Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Division
Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton OH
RESEARCH ADVISOR: Rik Warren
DEGREE: PhD, Experimental Psychology, Cornell University, 1975
Dr Warren is a National Research Council Post-Doctoral Advisor and has mentored
numerous NRC post-docs and graduate students. He is a perceptual psychologist
and currently is interested in failures of perception to detect critical items in rich
natural environments, for example, inattention and change blindness. He is also
developing statistical methods for finding anomalies in large and small datasets.
The role of cultural factors in perception and mis-perception is also central. He
serves on three journal editorial boards and is on the program committees of several social dynamics
and complex systems conferences.
The information in this document is cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
NOTE TO APPLICANTS: If selected for participation in this program, you will be offered temporary summer employment through a contract
to perform work for AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate. This is not a U.S Government position. If selected, you will be required to
undergo a National Agency Check before being granted access to government computer systems.
Human Effectiveness Directorate
Repperger Research Intern Program
RESEARCH PROJECT: 13-23
UNDERSTANDING & PREDICTING HUMAN-CENTRIC THREATS
FOR INTELLIGENCE, SURVEILLANCE & RECONNAISSANCE APPLICATIONS
PROJECT SYNOPSIS: This project will focus on providing actionable information concerning human
borne threats on the basis of human size, shape and motion. Such signatures as gait, anthroprometric
differences, and the presence of a carried object are of interest. The program contains many areas of
research including traditional gait analysis, computer vision techniques, engineering optimization, and
signals processing. Projects will be assigned on the basis of current need and fit within the larger
program and may include conducting experiments in a motion capture laboratory, conducting software
development, and building models of realistic human activity. Interns may process raw data, develop or
implement computer vision or machine intelligent algorithms, design new laboratory capabilities, or
assist in the development of new signatures through statistical analysis, pattern recognition, or first
principles models. Interns would work on a team with several doctorate level researchers to provide
novel capabilities that augment current research efforts.
EDUCATION LEVEL / DISCIPLINE NEEDED: Master’s or PhD student in one of the following:
Computer Science; Mechanical Engineering; Biomedical
Engineering; Operations Research; Electrical Engineering;
Mathematics or Industrial Engineering
RESEARCH LOCATION: Human-Centered Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Division
Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton OH
RESEARCH ADVISER: Darrell Lochtefeld
DEGREE: PhD, Engineering (Operations Research), Wright State University, 2011
Dr. Lochtefeld studied machine learning techniques used in solving pattern
recognition problems and difficult optimization problems. His doctorate
decomposed problems in novel ways and then solved those problems using Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithms - methods modeled after Darwin's survival of
the fittest. Dr. Lochtefeld currently oversees a broad set of research using human
size, shape, and motion to track, identify, and characterize humans observed from
aerial platforms. From an applied perspective, Dr. Lochtefeld is interested in computer vision, human
movement science, human modeling in software, and large scale data analysis, pattern recognition, and
machine learning.
The information in this document is cleared for public release – 88ABW-2013-0126, 14 Jan 13
NOTE TO APPLICANTS: If selected for participation in this program, you will be offered temporary summer employment through a contract
to perform work for AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate. This is not a U.S Government position. If selected, you will be required to
undergo a National Agency Check before being granted access to government computer systems.
REPPERGER RESEARCH INTERN PROGRAM
APPLICATION
Application Deadline: March 29, 2013
Email completed form with Curriculum Vitae, copy of transcript, copy of proof of citizenship
or legal residence, and signed recommendation letter to [email protected]
PERSONAL INFORMATON
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EDUCATION INFORMATION
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(put “X” in all applicable boxes)
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RESEARCH PROJECT SELECTON
(enter the project number for up to 3 project choices)
Project #:
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Complete the Following:
1. I am applying for this intern position because: Maximum 1200 characters
2. My career plans after school are: Maximum 600 characters
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