book here - Cambridge Latin Course Unit 1 Stage 8

Tourism, Travel and Hospitality
Training Package
Volume II of V
Cross-Sector Units of Competency
This work has been produced with the assistance of funding provided by the Commonwealth Government through the
Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations.
DRAFT THREE
Table of Contents
Administration ....................................................................................................................... 4
SITXADM501Prepare and present proposals .......................................................................... 4
Client and Customer Service .............................................................................................. 12
SITXCCS101 Provide information and assistance ............................................................... 12
SITXCCS201 Provide visitor information ............................................................................ 15
SITXCCS202 Interact with customers .................................................................................. 20
SITXCCS301 Provide lost and found services ..................................................................... 24
SITXCCS302 Provide club reception services ..................................................................... 28
SITXCCS303 Provide service to customers ......................................................................... 32
SITXCCS401 Enhance the customer service experience ..................................................... 39
SITXCCS501 Manage quality customer service .................................................................. 47
Communication and Teamwork ......................................................................................... 53
SITXCOM101 Source and present information ................................................................... 53
SITXCOM201 Show social and cultural sensitivity ............................................................. 56
SITXCOM202 Provide a briefing or scripted commentary .................................................. 60
SITXCOM301 Address protocol requirements .................................................................... 63
SITXCOM401 Manage conflict............................................................................................ 67
Computer Operations and ICT Management ................................................................... 72
SITXICT401 Build and launch a small business website ..................................................... 72
Crisis Management .............................................................................................................. 77
SITXCRI401 Respond to a customer in crisis ...................................................................... 77
SITXCRI601 Manage a business continuity crisis ............................................................... 83
Finance .................................................................................................................................. 91
SITXFIN201 Process financial transactions ......................................................................... 91
SITXFIN401 Interpret financial information ........................................................................ 95
SITXFIN402 Manage finances within a budget ................................................................... 99
SITXFIN501 Prepare and monitor budgets ........................................................................ 104
SITXFIN601 Manage physical assets ................................................................................. 109
SITXFIN602 Manage revenue ............................................................................................ 114
Food Safety ......................................................................................................................... 118
SITXFSA101 Use hygienic practices for food safety ......................................................... 118
SITXFSA201 Participate in safe food handling practices .................................................. 124
SITXFSA202 Transport and store food .............................................................................. 131
SITXFSA401 Develop and implement a food safety program ........................................... 135
Governance and Legal Compliance.................................................................................. 142
SITXGLC501 Research and comply with regulatory requirements ................................... 142
Human Resource Management......................................................................................... 150
2
DRAFT THREE
SITXHRM301 Coach others in job skills ........................................................................... 150
SITXHRM401 Roster staff ................................................................................................. 154
SITXHRM402 Lead and manage people ............................................................................ 159
SITXHRM501 Recruit, select and induct staff ................................................................... 164
SITXHRM502 Manage volunteers ..................................................................................... 171
SITXHRM503 Monitor staff performance ......................................................................... 176
Inventory ............................................................................................................................. 180
SITXINV201 Receive and store stock ................................................................................ 180
SITXINV202 Maintain the quality of perishable supplies ................................................. 185
SITXINV301 Purchase goods ............................................................................................. 191
SITXINV401 Control stock ................................................................................................ 198
SITXINV601 Establish stock purchasing and control systems .......................................... 204
Languages other than English .......................................................................................... 211
SITXLAN21__ Conduct basic oral communication in a language other than English ....... 211
SITXLAN22__ Conduct routine oral communication in a language other than English .... 216
SITXLAN31__ Conduct oral communication in a language other than English ................ 222
SITXLAN32__ Conduct complex oral communication in a language other than English . 227
SITXLAN33__ Read and write information in a language other than English ................... 232
SITXLAN34__ Read and write documents in a language other than English .................... 237
Management and Leadership ........................................................................................... 242
SITXMGT401 Monitor work operations ............................................................................ 242
SITXMGT501 Establish and conduct business relationships ............................................. 246
SITXMGT502 Manage projects ......................................................................................... 250
Marketing and Public Relations ....................................................................................... 255
SITXMPR401 Coordinate production of brochures and marketing materials ................... 255
SITXMPR402 Create a promotional display or stand ........................................................ 260
SITXMPR403 Plan and implement sales activities ............................................................ 264
SITXMPR404 Coordinate marketing activities .................................................................. 268
SITXMPR405 Participate in cooperative online marketing initiatives for the tourism industry
.............................................................................................................................................. 273
SITXMPR501 Obtain and manage sponsorship ................................................................. 277
SITXMPR502 Develop and implement marketing strategies............................................. 281
Work Health and Safety .................................................................................................... 286
SITXWHS101 Participate in safe work practices ............................................................... 286
SITXWHS301 Identify hazards, assess and control safety risks ........................................ 293
SITXWHS401 Implement and monitor Work Health and Safety practices ....................... 299
SITXWHS601 Establish and maintain a Work Health and Safety system ......................... 307
3
DRAFT THREE
Administration
SITXADM501Prepare and present proposals
SITXADM501
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Prepare and present proposals
New unit.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to prepare and present tenders, proposals or bids either as
a response to a tender brief or as a proposal created and offered. It
requires the ability to analyse client tender specifications or needs,
determine organisational ability to meet those requirements and to
prepare and present information that is relevant to client criteria or
needs.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, travel, hospitality and event sectors
and the tender proposals or bid may be for a one-off event, a series
of events or for an extended contract to deliver products and
services.
It applies to senior personnel who operate independently or with
limited guidance from others and who are responsible for making a
range of financial and operational decisions.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Administration
Cross sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Analyse tender
requirements.
2. Determine ability to
meet tender
requirements.
3. Develop details for
inclusion in proposal.
1.1. Analyse client tender brief, product specifications or
needs.
1.2. Seek clarification of product and service requirements from
the organisation requesting or requiring the tender.
1.3. Determine a plan of action to submit a proposal.
2.1. Complete an assessment of organisational capacity to
provide products and services.
2.2. Determine the viability of submitting a proposal or bid.
2.3. Seek assistance from others to prepare the proposal or bid
and coordinate group input.
3.1. Prepare a budget for the provision of products and services.
3.2. Develop a quotation for the products or services to be
provided.
3.3. Consider competitor pricing structure and make reasonable
cost adjustments to ensure a price-competitive quote.
3.4. Collect and collate operational information for analysis and
4
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
4. Prepare written
proposal.
5. Submit the proposal
and seek feedback.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
inclusion in the proposal.
3.5. Develop specifications for products and services to be
provided.
3.6. Access and prepare supporting information for inclusion in
the proposal or bid.
3.7. Seek support for the proposal or bid from relevant
individuals and agencies.
4.1. Use clear and concise language according to organisational
style for proposals.
4.2. Present information relevant to client criteria or needs clearly
and comprehensively.
4.3. Use a writing style that promotes a quality view of the
organisation.
4.4. Incorporate all supporting information.
4.5. Present materials according to organisational style
preferences and in a format that maximises use of creative
and promotional techniques.
4.6. Evaluate the finished proposal and make adjustments.
4.7. Maintain copies of all tender documents according to
organisational procedures.
5.1. Lodge all materials at the designated location and within
designated deadlines.
5.2. Provide additional information as requested.
5.3. See feedback on tender outcomes to inform future
proposals.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to liaise with colleagues, external specialists and the client
organisation to collect information for the proposal
critical thinking skills to analyse the organisational capacity to provide products and services
subject to the tender
initiative and enterprise skills to:
◦ select and include a range of useful supporting information with the proposal
◦ seek feedback on the tender outcome to assist future work
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret client product and service specifications which deal with complex
ideas and concepts
◦ research operational issues for synthesis within the proposal
◦ write comprehensive and creative proposals which promote the organisation
numeracy skills to interpret and analyse financial information and use complex calculations
to develop budgets and quotations
planning and organising skills to access and sort all information required for tender
preparation and to write and submit proposals within designated deadlines
problem-solving skills to:
◦ identify times when assistance is required from colleagues and external specialists
◦ identify deficiencies in the proposal and make adjustments
5
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
self-management skills to take responsibility for tender development
teamwork skills to invite and coordinate the input of others in the organisation
technology skills to use computers, word processing, presentation and accounting software
packages.
Required knowledge
for the specific industry sector:
◦ role and nature of tender, proposal or bid processes
◦ sources of specialist advice and expertise for the development of proposals and bid
materials
◦ a range of formats for and inclusions of tenders proposals or bids
◦ presentation techniques for proposal and bid materials, including current technology
options
for the specific organisation:
◦ full details of organisational products, services and facilities
◦ operational requirements and production logistics for delivering the products and
services subject to tender, proposal or bid
◦ sources of costs for products, services and fees
◦ sources of organisational information to be included in tender proposals
◦ standards of presentation and contents of style guides
methods to manage intellectual property of product and service concepts
features and functions of presentation software packages used to prepare professional and
comprehensive tender information.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Tender brief may detail:
Product specifications may
include:
criteria
details of selection process:
◦ interview
◦ meeting
◦ paper based submission
◦ presentation to selection committee
eligibility for submission of a tender
formatting requirements for the tender:
◦ on-line application
◦ use of a template
lodgement address
lodgement date
questions to be answered
tender specifications.
commencement date for:
◦ one off event
◦ ongoing provision of products and services
◦ series of events
6
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Assessment of organisational
capacity may include:
Viability may involve:
Others may include:
customers or audience for products and services
identification of deliverables
indicative cost of supply
insurance requirements
legal requirements
legal responsibilities of the contractor
legal responsibilities of the principal
length of contract
operational and financial management requirements
outline of contractual arrangements
performance standards
products and services required
project management
quality assurance
requirement for management of:
◦ environment
◦ risk
resource requirements; human and physical
specified price or maximum price
style of products and services
timeline for the operation of a particular project.
budgetary constraints outlined in the tender brief
compliance with regulations
diversification from range of products and services
currently offered
geographic constraints
likely profit
other conflicting projects
resource capacity of organisation to provide scope of
products and services
risk assessment of providing the products and
services.
ability to meet the lodgement deadline
ability to meet the tender criteria and provide full
information required
competition and prospect of winning the tender
cost of preparing the tender.
artists
financial specialists
graphic designers
industry association personnel
joint venture partners
legal representatives
managers
multimedia specialists
outsourced consultants
peers
7
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Operational information may
include:
Supporting information may
photographers
professional writers
supervisors.
capacity of facilities to produce products
facilities management requirements
environmental sustainability policies and procedures
event management services
event specifications:
◦ business program
◦ entertainment
◦ general concepts and themes
◦ social program
◦ staging, theming and styling
◦ travel and touring arrangements
event technical equipment, specifications and
services:
◦ audio-visual
◦ pyrotechnics
◦ rigging
◦ sound and lighting
◦ special effects
◦ stage design and construction
◦ venue styling
policies, procedures and practices to manage:
◦ crowds
◦ environmental impacts
◦ impacts on local community
◦ risk to tourism, hospitality or event participants
◦ work health and safety
product specifications:
◦ accommodation
◦ coach, car, aircraft, river and sea vessel details
◦ guiding services
◦ meal plans
◦ menus
◦ style of service, theme and decor
◦ touring equipment details
◦ touring itineraries
resources that will be utilised:
◦ physical
◦ human
suppliers, supply and cost specifications
special, new or hired equipment required to produce
products or provide services
stock control
transport.
awards won by the organisation
8
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
include:
Relevant individuals and
agencies may include:
Additional information may be
provided:
copies of:
◦ business registration
◦ industry accreditations
◦ insurance policies
◦ licences
◦ membership of organisations
◦ qualifications
details of current client base
organisational and individual employee profiles
photographs of current or previous products and
services
plans, drawings, job specifications
product and service manuals
references and details of other successful
undertakings
sample promotional materials
samples of work
structure of organisation
testimonials.
community agencies
government agencies
high profile
local businesses
sponsors
statutory authorities.
by:
◦ face-face conversation
◦ formal meeting
◦ telephone
in:
◦ a presentation
◦ writing.
9
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
prepare multiple proposals in response to diverse
tender specifications or client needs
effectively analyse client tender specifications or
needs and clearly and comprehensively present
information that is relevant to client criteria or needs
present professional and creative proposals which
promote the organisation
integrate knowledge of organisational products,
services and facilities and operational logistics for
delivering the products and services subject to tender
complete proposals within commercial time
constraints and nominated deadlines.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry business operation or activity for which
tender, proposals or bids are prepared
computers, printers and software programs currently
used by the tourism, hospitality and event industry to
prepare proposals
tender briefs and specifications for tourism,
hospitality or event products and services
financial and operational data used to prepare
tenders for tourism, hospitality and event products
and services.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
evaluation of a complete tender proposal, prepared
by the individual, for the provision of products
evaluation of reports produced by the individual
detailing the processes undertaken to prepare a
proposal
activities that allow assessment of the individual’s
ability to:
◦ analyse the content of different tender brief,
product specifications or client needs
◦ prepare budgets and quotations for the provision
of different products and services
◦ write proposals that present information relevant
to client criteria or needs
direct observation of the individual delivering a
presentation of a tender, proposal or bid
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
the role and nature of tender, proposal or bid
processes; details of organisational products,
10
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Guidance information for
assessment
services and facilities, and a range of formats for and
inclusions of tender proposals
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITHKOP404 Plan catering for events or functions
SITXEVT401 Plan in-house events or functions
SITXEVT602 Develop event concepts
SITXFIN501 Prepare and monitor budgets
SITXMGT501 Establish and conduct business
relationships.
11
DRAFT THREE
Client and Customer Service
SITXCCS101 Provide information and assistance
SITXCCS101
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Provide information and assistance
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITTVAF001A Provide venue
information and assistance.
Title changed to better reflect the intent and content of the unit and
re-categorised to Customer and Client Service. Broadened from
venue context to capture any service environment.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to provide customers with information and assistance on
facilities and services.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to frontline service personnel working in a range of
tourism, travel, hospitality, entertainment and cultural contexts.
Provision of information and assistance is often face-to-face but may
be by telephone or other remote mechanism. Customer service
personnel working under supervision undertake this function, but the
unit is also relevant to those working in operational roles where
customer service may not be the main focus of work, e.g. animal
handlers in a zoo or technicians in a theatre.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Client and Customer Service
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Access and update
information.
2. Assist customers.
1.1. Source and access information on facilities and services.
1.2. Incorporate information into day-to-day working activities.
1.3. Support efficiency and quality of service by sharing information
with colleagues.
1.4. Identify and use opportunities to update and maintain
facility and service knowledge.
2.1. Proactively identify information and assistance needs of
customers, including those with special needs.
2.2. Provide accurate information in a clear, courteous and
culturally appropriate way.
2.3. Where appropriate, assist or instruct customers in the use of
equipment and facilities according to safety requirements, or
refer to relevant colleagues.
2.4. Identify and use opportunities to promote internal products and
services.
12
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Seek feedback on
services.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
3.1. Proactively seek feedback on services from customers.
3.2. Observe customer behaviour to inform future service
developments and follow procedures for formal customer
evaluation.
3.3. Provide information on customer feedback to relevant
colleagues.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ interact in a friendly and courteous way with customers
◦ provide clear and accurate information
literacy skills to:
◦ source information on a predictable range of customer requests
problem-solving skills to identify and respond to situations where referral to others is
required
self-management skills to keep up-to-date with information
teamwork skills to share information with colleagues.
Required knowledge
sources of information on organisational services and facilities
organisational facilities, services and procedures, including for those with special needs,
such as parking, exhibits, show times, retail outlets and special events
sources of advice and referral
safety and emergency procedures for customers, colleagues and self
sources of customers in the relevant industry context.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Information on facilities and
services may relate to:
access
cloaking
direction or location of facilities
facilities for those with special needs
food and beverage
new activities, events or procedures
opening hours
operational changes
pricing
promotional activities
retail
ticket sales
times of activities or events.
13
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Opportunities to update and
maintain facility and service
knowledge may include reference
to:
Feedback may be:
discussions with colleagues
internal newsletters
leaflets and brochures
staff noticeboards
team meetings.
formal, including surveys, interviews and structured
questioning
informal, including observation or casual discussion.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
access information on relevant services and facilities
provide information and assistance in response to
multiple and diverse requests in a courteous and
culturally appropriate manner.
Assessment must ensure use of:
other people to allow for the demonstration of
interpersonal skills.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
direct observation of the individual providing
assistance and information
use of case studies to assess ability to source
different types of information for different purposes
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
information sources and the role of information
systems within the venue
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITTGDE101 Interpret aspects of local Australian
Indigenous culture.
14
DRAFT THREE
SITXCCS201 Provide visitor information
SITXCCS201
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Provide visitor information
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXCCS001B Provide visitor
information.
Re-worked Elements, Performance Criteria, Required Skills and
Knowledge to more fully articulate content.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to access general information on facilities, products and
services available in the local area and to provide this to visitors.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to a range of tourism, travel, hospitality, event,
entertainment and cultural sectors.
It applies to frontline service personnel who routinely respond to
visitor requests for general local area information. They may be
working independently or with guidance from others in restaurants,
hotels, wineries, attractions, entertainment venues, tour operations,
visitor information centres and at tour desks.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Client and Customer Service
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Access and update
visitor information.
2. Provide information
to visitors.
3. Seek feedback on
information
provision.
1.1. Identify and access sources of visitor information.
1.2. Obtain general information on different local facilities, products
and services to meet different customer needs.
1.3. Share information with colleagues to support the efficiency and
quality of service.
1.4. Identify and use opportunities to update and maintain local
area knowledge.
2.1. Identify the specific information and assistance needs of the
customer.
2.2. Provide an appropriate scope and depth of information to meet
customer needs.
2.3. Promote internal products and services.
3.1. Proactively seek visitor feedback to ensure all required
information has been provided.
3.2. Follow procedures for any formal customer evaluation.
3.3. Provide internal feedback on visitor information services.
15
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ interact in a friendly and courteous way with customers
◦ promote local products and services
learning skills to continuously update local area knowledge
literacy skills to:
◦ read and comprehend product and local area information
◦ research, sort and use relevant information
◦ write simple notes on products and local services
problem-solving skills to identify knowledge deficiencies and seek information to satisfy
visitor enquiries
teamwork skills to share local area information with colleagues and provide internal
feedback.
Required knowledge
sources of information on the local area, facilities and general products available
sources of information on organisational products and services
major local attractions and events, transport options and general visitor facilities.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Sources may include:
Visitor information may include:
brochures
library
local council
local people, including local identities with
specialised knowledge
local visitor guide booklets
maps
online reservations systems
organisation information
organisation-designed information systems, e.g.
inventory control database
principal supplier of the product
product library
room directories
social media websites
state or territory government tourism authority
information systems
supplier of the product
the Internet
timetables.
accommodation options:
16
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
◦ backpacker lodges
◦ holiday parks and resorts
◦ hotels
◦ motels
attractions:
◦ animal parks
◦ art galleries
◦ museums
◦ national parks
◦ walks
◦ wineries
◦ zoos
cruises
dining options:
◦ cafes
◦ food halls
◦ food markets
◦ restaurants
vehicle rental
entertainment venues:
◦ cinemas
◦ theatres
◦ performing arts centres
events
local facilities:
◦ airline offices
◦ banks
◦ dentists
◦ doctors
◦ currency exchanges
◦ hairdressers
◦ hospitals
◦ emergency services
◦ post offices
◦ travel agencies
local shopping facilities:
◦ centres
◦ malls
◦ markets
◦ souvenir shops
local transport options:
◦ buses
◦ ferries
◦ taxis
◦ trains
organisation-specific information
17
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Opportunities may include:
Internal products and services
may include:
road conditions
sporting facilities
tours, local outings and trips
travelling routes
weather conditions.
attending team meetings
informal discussions with colleagues
listening to radio
ongoing contact with principal or supplier of the
product or service
participating in local familiarisation tours
reading:
◦ brochures
◦ and internal newsletters
◦ leaflets
◦ local newspapers
◦ staff noticeboards
talking and listening to colleagues and customers
using personal observation or exploration
visiting the local information centre
watching television, videos and films.
accommodation
activities
general retail products and souvenirs
products made by the organisation:
◦ craft items
◦ food
◦ wine
restaurant products
tours.
18
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for assessment Evidence of the ability to:
respond to multiple and diverse customer requests
and evidence required to
and provide local area information to meet their
demonstrate competency in this
needs
unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
source accurate and current information on the local
area
integrate knowledge of the local area when
providing general information.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry environment where visitor information is
sourced and provided to customers
current information on the local area, facilities and
general products available
customers with whom the individual can interact.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
direct observation, using role plays, to assess the
individual’s ability to use local knowledge to answer
a variety of customer questions
projects and activities to source and obtain current,
accurate and relevant local information
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
sources of information on the local area, facilities
and general products available
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITHACS201 Provide porter services
SITHACS303 Provide accommodation reception
services
SITXCCS202 Interact with customers
SITXCCS302 Provide club reception services
SITXCOM201 Show social and cultural sensitivity.
19
DRAFT THREE
SITXCCS202 Interact with customers
SITXCCS202
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Interact with customers
New unit.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to deliver fundamental customer service to both internal
and external customers. It requires the ability to greet and serve
customers and cover a range of customer service enquiries
including routine customer problems.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, travel, hospitality and event sectors.
The unit applies to customer service personnel who operate under
close supervision and with guidance from others. They provide
routine customer service and would not be expected to respond to
complex customer requests or complaints.
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
This includes volunteers in visitor information centres, housekeeping
attendants, assistants in Indigenous cultural centres, assistant
Indigenous guides, office assistants and receptionists for tour
operators and retail travel agencies, retail sales assistants and ride
attendants at attractions.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Client and Customer Service
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Greet and serve
customers.
2. Work with others to
deliver service.
1.1. Make customers a priority over other workplace duties.
1.2. Greet customers in a polite and friendly manner.
1.3. Communicate with customers clearly and concisely.
1.4. Use questions and actively listen to customer responses to
determine their needs.
1.5. Show interest in customer needs and maintain a welcome
customer environment during service delivery.
1.6. Explain and match products and services to customer needs.
2.1. Identify personal limitations in serving the needs of customers
and seek assistance from others.
2.2. Follow the directions of supervisors and managers to deliver
quality service.
2.3. Resolve routine customer problems according to individual
empowerment and organisational policy.
2.4. Refer other service issues to a higher level staff member for
action.
20
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
3. Provide feedback on
customer service.
3.1. Report service issues and customer problems as they arise.
3.2. Provide customer feedback to relevant supervisors or
managers.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ interact with customers in a polite and friendly manner
◦ ask questions and actively listen to customers to determine their needs
◦ provide clear and accurate information
◦ discuss customer problems with colleagues and supervisors
problem-solving skills to recognise customer problems and resolve or refer service issues
teamwork skills to provide customer feedback to relevant supervisors or managers.
Required knowledge
importance of the customer within the service industries
customer service standards and attitudes expected by the service industries
value of customer feedback in improving service delivery
for the particular organisation:
◦ designated response times for acknowledging and greeting customers
◦ customer service policies for resolving routine customer service problems.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Customers may be:
Ways to communicate with
customers may:
external:
◦ business to business
◦ government
◦ retail
internal:
◦ colleagues
◦ managers
◦ members of a team
◦ staff from other departments
◦ staff from other branches or locations
◦ supervisors
new or regular
visitors.
be:
◦ by telephone
◦ electronically
◦ face-to-face
include the use of:
21
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
◦
◦
Others may include:
Routine customer problems may
involve:
Organisational policy may relate
to:
appropriate voice tonality and volume
basic gestures
◦ product information sheets.
colleagues
managers
supervisors.
incorrect pricing of products and services
delays in providing products or services
misunderstanding of customer requests
providing incorrect products or services
requests for refunds or exchanges.
cancellation fees
empowerment of different levels of personnel to
resolve customer problems
exchanges
pricing
product quality
refunds
response times for delivering products and services.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
greet and serve customers on multiple occasions and
cover a range of customer service enquiries including
customer problems
demonstrate knowledge of customer service
standards expected by the service industries
serve customers within designated response times.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry customer service environment where
customers are served
customers with whom the individual can interact.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
direct observation, using role plays, of the individual:
◦ greeting and serving customers
◦ dealing with routine customer service problems
use of problem-solving exercises so the individual
can identify reasons for customer problems and
provide suggested solutions
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of:
◦ customer service standards expected by the
22
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Guidance information for
assessment
service industries
◦ customer service policies for resolving routine
customer service problems
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SIRXSLS201 Sell products and services
SITHACS201 Provide housekeeping services to
guests
SITHFAB206 Serve food and beverage
SITTGDE101 Interpret aspects of local Australian
Indigenous culture
SITTVAF201 Load and unload a ride
SITXCCS201 Provide visitor information
SITXCOM201 Show social and cultural sensitivity.
23
DRAFT THREE
SITXCCS301 Provide lost and found services
SITXCCS301
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Provide lost and found services
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXCCS305A Provide lost and found
facility.
Title changed to better reflect the intent and content of the unit. Reworked Elements, Performance Criteria, Required Skills and
Knowledge to more fully articulate content.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to provide service to customers who have lost and found
items. It requires the ability to determine and record details of items,
investigate lost items, assist claimants and complete documentation.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, travel, hospitality and event sectors.
This unit mainly applies to frontline operations personnel who
operate with some level of independence and under limited
supervision. It does, however, describe a basic operational function
of minimal complexity and individuals who work with very little
independence under close supervision would also use this skill.
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
It applies to a range of people, including club, hotel and venue
receptionists, hotel porters and customer service personnel within
attractions and event facilities.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Client and Customer Service
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Determine and
record details of lost
and found items.
1.1. Obtain and verify descriptions and relevant details of lost or
found items with customers.
1.2. Tag found items and place in a designated location.
1.3. Use the lost and found register to record details of lost and
found items.
2.1. Conduct all communication in a professional, courteous and
sensitive manner.
2.2. Provide customers with details of organisational procedures
and obligations for lost and found items.
2.3. Investigate and trace lost items.
2.4. Investigate ownership of found items.
2.5. Verify claimant identification before releasing found items.
2.6. Obtain claimant signature for collection of items.
2. Assist customers
with lost and claimed
items.
24
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Complete lost and
found documents.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
3.1. Update the lost and found register to reflect investigation and
collection of lost items.
3.2. Complete lost and found reports according to organisational
procedures.
3.3. Recommend improvements to lost and found procedures.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ determine details of lost items using active listening and questioning techniques
◦ discuss details of lost items in a sensitive manner
initiative and enterprise skills to recommend improvements to lost and found procedures
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret organisational lost and found procedures, details within the register
and claimant identification documents
◦ write clear descriptions of lost and found items in the register and write simple reports
problem-solving skills to investigate and find lost items.
Required knowledge
for lost and found items:
◦ organisational procedures
◦ formats for and inclusions of reports
◦ methods to succinctly and clearly record details
◦ methods of investigating
◦ location of storage facilities for found items
◦ requirements for securing items
the layout of the property
formats for lost and found registers and required entries.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Designated locations may include:
Details of lost and found items
may include:
Communication may involve:
locked cupboard
locked storage room
safe facilities.
dates, times and location of loss
where items have been found, dates and times
description of item
customer contact details.
active listening
control of tone of voice and body language
interpreting non-verbal and verbal messages
language, verbal or non-verbal
25
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Lost and found reports may
include:
questioning to clarify and confirm understanding
use of language and concepts appropriate to cultural
differences
use of positive, confident and co-operative language.
daily or weekly reports
logs, journals
verbal reports
manual and computer reports
written reports.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
communicate with the customer, interpret details and
provide efficient and courteous lost and found
services on multiple occasions
record clear descriptions of lost and found items in
the register and write simple reports
complete investigation of lost items within deadlines
determined by the customer or the organisation.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry environment where lost and found services
are provided
secure storage for items
current commercial lost and found registers,
procedures and reporting documents
customers with whom the individual can interact.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
direct observation, using role plays, of the individual
providing lost and found services
review of lost and found registers and reports
completed by the individual
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of:
◦ procedures
◦ location of storage facilities
◦ methods of investigating lost and found items
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
26
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
SITHACS201 Provide porter services
SITHACS303 Provide accommodation reception
services
SITXCCS302 Provide club reception services
SITXCCS303 Provide service to customers
SITXCOM201 Show social and cultural sensitivity.
27
DRAFT THREE
SITXCCS302 Provide club reception services
SITXCCS302
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Provide club reception services
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXCCS004A Provide club reception
services.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to provide reception services within a licensed club
environment. It requires the ability to deliver quality customer service
while assisting customers to comply with club and legislative
requirements.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all types of licensed clubs, including sporting,
entertainment, social, workers’ and Returned and Services League
(RSL) clubs.
It applies to frontline customer service personnel who operate with
some level of independence and under limited supervision. This
includes club receptionists, front desk receptionists and
doorpersons.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Client and Customer Service
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Provide information
on club services and
process
memberships.
1.1. Provide advice and information on club services and
facilities to customers and club members.
1.2. Explain club membership and club rules clearly, correctly and
politely to members and guests.
1.3. Explain membership application forms to applicants and assist
them to complete forms.
1.4. Issue correct membership badges or cards.
1.5. Use club reception technology to assist with the provision of
services to members and guests.
2.1. Check membership badges or cards on entry to the club.
2.2. Assist guests to sign-in according to government and
organisational requirements.
2.3. Check that members and guests comply with dress and age
regulations.
2.4. In a polite manner, inform non-compliant members and guests
that entry is not permitted.
2.5. Refer disputes over club entry to security, supervisor or other
relevant person according to organisational policy.
2. Monitor entry to club.
28
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to deal tactfully and politely with members and guests
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret club membership cards, membership database records, ID cards,
proof of age cards and driver’s licences
◦ write membership application forms, temporary and guest membership forms and issue
membership badges
numeracy skills to calculate and explain membership costs
problem-solving skills to identify non-compliant members and guests and resolve entry
refusal issues
technology skills to access and interpret membership database details and use public
address systems.
Required knowledge
key aspects of club licensing laws covering entry requirements for members and guests
dress regulations for the club
club membership rules, conditions, benefits, entitlements and costs
full details of club services, facilities, current promotions, events and entertainment.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Club services and facilities may
include:
Club reception technology may
include:
allied member clubs and associations
community courses and training programs
computer rooms and Internet facilities
current food, beverage and gaming promotions
customer loyalty programs
games and sporting facilities
gaming facilities
gymnasiums and health facilities
membership benefits
prize nights and special events
raffles
restaurants and cafes
shows and attractions.
internal public address system
membership badge production equipment
membership database
scanning equipment for temporary membership
documents
telephones.
29
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
offer courteous and friendly service to members and
guests
process multiple and diverse customer enquiries
about membership and facilities
monitor the entry of club members and guests and
issue necessary documentation within commercial
time constraints and to allow for the efficient flow of
people through reception to the club facilities
integrate knowledge of club rules and legislative
requirements for entry into the club.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated club reception environment where
customers are served
telephones, public address systems, computers and
information systems currently used by clubs to
manage its membership
current plain English regulatory documents outlining
club entry requirements
current club documents outlining policies,
procedures, club facilities, membership benefits,
costs and dress regulations
customers with whom the individual can interact.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
direct observation, using role plays, to assess the
individual’s ability to:
◦ provide service to members and guests
◦ provide accurate entry information
◦ use club reception technology
activities to allow the individual to process different
types of membership applications and club entry
documents
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of:
◦ club facilities
◦ membership benefits and costs
◦ rules and legislative requirements
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
30
DRAFT THREE
for example:
SITXCCS201 Provide visitor information
SITXCCS301 Provide lost and found services
SITXCCS303 Provide service to customers
SITXCOM201 Show social and cultural sensitivity.
31
DRAFT THREE
SITXCCS303 Provide service to customers
SITXCCS303
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Provide service to customers
N
Replaces but is not equivalent to SITXCOM001A Work with
colleagues and customers.
Title changed to better reflect the intent and content of the unit.
Updated and re-categorised to Client and Customer Service.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to communicate effectively with and provide quality service
to both internal and external customers. It requires the ability to
establish rapport with customers, determine and address customer
needs and expectations and respond to complaints.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, hospitality and event sectors.
It applies to those frontline service personnel who deal directly with
customers on a daily basis and who operate with some level of
independence and under limited supervision. They work in reception
areas, in an office, back-of-house and on tour or on site. This
includes food and beverage attendants, concierge staff, guides, front
office personnel, tour coordinators, event coordinators and retail
travel consultants.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Client and Customer Service
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Communicate with
internal and external
customers.
2. Deliver service
according to defined
standards.
1.1. Communicate with customers in a polite, professional and
friendly manner within designated response times.
1.2. Use appropriate language and tone in both written and spoken
communication.
1.3. Use appropriate non-verbal communication.
1.4. Observe and respond to non-verbal communication of
customers.
1.5. Use active listening and questioning to facilitate effective
two-way communication.
1.6. Select a medium of communication appropriate for the
audience and situation.
2.1. Practise high standards of personal presentation and
hygiene according to organisational requirements.
2.2. Follow organisational customer service policies and
procedures.
32
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Provide service to
customers.
4. Respond to
customer complaints.
5. Provide internal
feedback on
customer service
practices.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
2.3. Adhere to professional standards expected of service industry
personnel.
3.1. Establish rapport with the customer to promote goodwill and
trust during service delivery.
3.2. Identify customer needs and expectations, including
customers with special needs.
3.3. Promptly meet all reasonable customer needs and requests.
3.4. Identify and anticipate operational problems and take action to
minimise the effect on customer satisfaction.
3.5. Recognise and act upon opportunities to deliver additional
levels of service beyond the customer’s immediate request.
4.1. Proactively recognise customer dissatisfaction and take swift
action to avoid escalation to a complaint.
4.2. Respond to customer complaints positively, sensitively and
politely.
4.3. Seek solutions by consulting the customer.
4.4. Resolve complaints according to individual empowerment and
organisational policy.
4.5. Refer complex service issues to a higher level staff member
for action.
4.6. Maintain a positive and cooperative manner at all times.
5.1. Provide ongoing internal feedback on service practices,
policies and procedures, and suggest improvements.
5.2. Identify individual and recurring complaints and provide
internal feedback to avoid future occurrence.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ interact with customers in a polite, professional and friendly manner
◦ develop rapport
◦ respond to customers with diverse and special needs and expectations
◦ discuss customer complaints with colleagues and supervisors
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret messages, notes, emails, letters, online communications and policies
and procedures
◦ write clear and concise messages, notes, emails, faxes letters and online
communications
problem-solving skills to recognise customer dissatisfaction and resolve or refer complaints
self-management skills to deal with customer enquiries in a logical sequence
teamwork skills to provide feedback on service practices, policies and procedures and
suggest improvements
technology skills to use electronic communication media.
Required knowledge
the principles of quality customer service and positive communication
appropriate voice tonality and volume
33
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
appropriate body language for customer service
value of staff and customer feedback in enhancing service delivery
for the specific industry sector:
◦ professional service standards expected of service industry personnel
◦ attitudes and attributes expected by the service industries to work with customers
◦ standards of personal presentation and hygiene
◦ different customer service and communication expectations especially those with special
service needs
for the particular organisation:
◦ types of internal and external customers
◦ designated response times for acknowledging customers and their enquiry
◦ personal presentation and hygiene standards
◦ customer service policies and procedures including those for complaint handling
the essential features, conventions and usage of different types of communication media.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Ways to communicate with
customers may be:
Customers may be:
by telephone
by written format:
◦ handwritten
◦ electronic
◦ hard copy letter
face-to-face
formal
informal using abbreviations
verbal
varied according to the needs of the customer,
including:
◦ use of an interpreter
◦ use of appropriate voice tonality and volume
◦ use of basic gestures
◦ use of languages other than English including
Australian Indigenous languages
◦ use of visual aids:
- photographs
- sketches
- product information sheets.
committees
external:
◦ business to business
◦ corporate
◦ e-business
◦ government
◦ online
34
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Non-verbal communication may
involve:
Medium of communication may
include:
Situation may involve:
Personal presentation may
involve:
◦ the media
◦ retail
internal:
◦ colleagues
◦ managers
◦ members of a team
◦ staff from other departments, branches or
locations
◦ supervisors
new or regular
visitors.
body language
culturally specific communication customs and
practices
dress and accessories
gestures and mannerisms
use of space
voice tonality and volume.
assistive technology, e.g. telephone typewriter (TTY)
email or other electronic communication
face-to-face
fax
simple written messages, such as restaurant
bookings or phone messages
standard forms and pro formas
telephone
through interpreters
two-way communication systems.
access of the sender and receiver to necessary
equipment
degree of formality required
required format
technical and operational features to fulfil the need
technical skills required to use the medium
urgency and timeframes.
attire, shoes and accessories
complying with organisational policy for personal
presentation
hair and grooming
hands and nails
impacts on different types of customers
jewellery
personal hygiene
specific requirements for particular work functions
wearing of:
◦ clothes that do not offend organisation customer
base
35
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
◦
◦
◦
Policies and procedures may
relate to:
Customers with special needs
may include:
Customer complaints may involve:
clothes to suit different work locations
promotional clothing for special events
uniform items within the organisational policy
directives.
acknowledging and greeting customers:
◦ addressing the person by name
◦ modes of greeting and farewelling
complaint and dispute management
empowerment of different levels of personnel to
resolve:
◦ complaints
◦ disputes
◦ service issues
◦ customer compensation
loyalty programs
presentation standards for:
◦ customer environment
◦ customer service personnel
◦ documents and promotional materials
pricing guarantees
product quality
refunds and cancellation fees
response times
service guarantees
training staff for:
◦ customer service
◦ complaint handling
use of standard letters and pro formas.
aged people
parents with young children
pregnant women
those with a disability
those with special cultural or language needs
unaccompanied children.
customers with unmet expectations of products and
services
difficult or demanding customers
incorrect pricing or quotes
other team members or suppliers not providing
special requests
misunderstandings or communication barriers
problems or faults with the product
problems with the service, such as delays or
incorrect orders.
36
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
 provide quality customer service on multiple
occasions and cover a range of diverse customer
service situations, including the resolution of
complaints
communicate effectively with a variety of internal and
external customers including those with special
needs
demonstrate knowledge of professional service
standards expected of service industry personnel
complete service within commercial time constraints
and designated response times so that all customers
are served effectively.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry customer service environment where
customers are served
current commercial customer service policies and
procedures including those for complaint handling
customers with whom the individual can interact.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
direct observation, using role plays, of the individual:
◦ serving customers
◦ dealing with complaints
◦ providing feedback on customer service practices
use of problem-solving exercises so the individual
can identify reasons for complaints and provide
suggested solutions
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of:
◦ professional service standards expected of
service industry personnel
◦ personal presentation standards
◦ customer service policies and procedures
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
37
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Guidance information for
assessment
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITHACS303 Provide accommodation reception
services
SITHFAB307 Provide table service of food and
beverage
SITTGDE401 Coordinate and operate tours
SITTTOP403 Operate tours in a remote area
SITTTSL303 Sell tourism products and services
SITXCCS302 Provide club reception services
SITXCOM201 Show social and cultural sensitivity.
38
DRAFT THREE
SITXCCS401 Enhance the customer service experience
SITXCCS401
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Enhance the customer service experience
N
Replaces but is not equivalent to SITXCCS002A Provide quality
customer service.
Titled changed to better reflect the intent and content of the unit and
its fit within a suite of hierarchical customer service units.
Significant change to Elements and Performance Criteria to better
focus the unit.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to provide professional and personalised customer service
experiences. It requires the ability to determine and meet customer
preferences, develop customer relationships, respond to difficult
service situations and take responsibility for resolving complaints.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, travel, hospitality and event sectors.
It applies to those who deal directly with customers on a daily basis
and who operate independently or with limited guidance from others.
This includes senior frontline sales personnel, supervisors and
managers who use discretion and judgement to provide quality
customer service experiences.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Client and Customer Service
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Provide a quality
service experience to
customers.
1.1. Determine and clarify customer preferences, needs and
expectations.
1.2. Advise customers about appropriate products and services to
meet their needs.
1.3. Anticipate customer preferences, needs and expectations
throughout the service experience.
1.4. Promptly provide products and services which meet individual
preferences.
1.5. Offer extras and add-ons and provide tailored and additional
services and products.
1.6. Check the actioning of special requests before customer
delivery.
1.7. Provide professional and personalised service to provide a
quality service experience.
1.8. Liaise with team members and suppliers to ensure efficient
39
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
2. Proactively respond
to difficult service
situations.
3. Resolve customer
complaints.
4. Develop a customer
relationship.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
service delivery.
1.9. Share customer information with team members to ensure
quality service.
2.1. Identify problems with products and services and take
immediate action to address them before provision to the
customer.
2.2. Anticipate delays in product and service provision and
regularly update customer on expected outcomes.
2.3. Advise customers of alternative products and services.
2.4. Proactively compensate for the service difficulty according to
individual empowerment and organisational policy.
2.5. Provide ongoing internal feedback on service issues and
suggest improvements to avoid customer disappointment.
3.1. Use questioning techniques to establish and agree on the
nature, possible cause and details of the complaint.
3.2. Assess the impact on the customer.
3.3. Use communication techniques to assist with the
management of the complaint.
3.4. Handle the situation sensitively, courteously and discreetly.
3.5. Take responsibility for finding a solution to the complaint.
3.6. Determine options to resolve the complaint and promptly
analyse and decide on the best solution, taking into account
any organisational constraints.
3.7. Take swift action to resolve the complaint and prevent
escalation, in consultation with customer and to customer
satisfaction.
3.8. Use techniques to turn complaints into opportunities to
demonstrate high quality customer service.
3.9. Provide internal feedback on complaints in order to avoid
future occurrence.
3.10. Reflect on and evaluate complaints and solutions to enhance
response to future issues.
4.1. Promote repeat business by the offer of promotional
services according to individual empowerment and
organisational policy.
4.2. Maintain customer profiles to enhance service delivery.
4.3. Develop a rapport with and provide personalised service to
repeat customers.
4.4. Provide tailored products and services based on customer
profile.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ determine customer needs and preferences through observation, questioning and active
listening
◦ discuss service difficulties with team members and suppliers
◦ use probe questioning to gain information, clarify ambiguities and adequately
40
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
understand customer complaints
initiative and enterprise skills to:
◦ offer additional services and products
◦ proactively compensate for service difficulties
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret policies and procedures
◦ write entries into customer service data bases
numeracy skills to calculate the cost of products and services, estimate profitability and
consider the cost of customer compensation
problem-solving skills to identify and resolve difficult service situations and customer
complaints
self-management skills to take responsibility for customer service outcomes
teamwork skills to share customer information with team members to ensure efficient
service delivery
technology skills to use computers and data bases that manage customer profiles and
promotional activities.
Required knowledge
principles and benefits of enhanced customer service experiences and positive
communication
techniques to anticipate customer preferences, needs and expectations throughout the
service experience
conflict resolution techniques
value of staff and customer feedback in enhancing service delivery
for the specific industry sector:
◦ professional service standards expected of service industry personnel
◦ attitudes and attributes expected by the service industries to work with customers
◦ accepted service standards and rituals
◦ different customer service needs and expectations
◦ types of customer loyalty programs
◦ the essential features and usage of the customer data base
for the particular organisation:
◦ designated response times for providing service and resolving complaints
◦ customer service policies and procedures including those for complaint handling
◦ promotional services offered.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Customer preferences, needs and
expectations:
may be determined by:
◦ active listening
◦ observation
◦ questioning
◦ recognition of non-verbal signs
may include:
41
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Customers may include:
Extras and add-ons may include:
◦ assistance
◦ comfort
◦ courtesy
◦ empathy and support
◦ emergency support
◦ friendliness
◦ new experiences
◦ prompt service
◦ special requests
◦ value for money
◦ variations to standard menu items
may be related to:
◦ age
◦ gender
◦ prior knowledge
◦ social and cultural characteristics
◦ special needs.
committees
external:
◦ business to business
◦ corporate
◦ e-business
◦ government
◦ online
◦ the media
◦ retail
internal:
◦ colleagues
◦ managers
◦ members of a team
◦ staff from other departments, branches or
locations
◦ supervisors
new or regular
visitors.
products not requested by the customer but identified
as a good fit, including:
◦ additional destinations
◦ additional tours or cruises
◦ cocktails and liqueurs to enhance the dining
experience
◦ coordination services at events and conferences
◦ entrance to events, festivals and entertainment
scheduled during customer stay at destination
◦ entrance to major attractions at the destination
◦ extra food items such as entrées, desserts and
cheese plates
◦ flight fuel emissions offset fee (“flying carbon
42
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Suppliers may include:
Compensate for the situation may
involve:
Complaint may involve:
neutral”)
◦ local guiding services
◦ optional meals and dining experiences
◦ optional tours
◦ prepayment of baggage charges
◦ prepayment of in-flight meals
◦ pre-travel seat selection
◦ private car transfers in lieu of regular
transportation options
◦ special offers or packages
◦ specialised styling for events
◦ storage for luggage after check-out
◦ travel insurance
◦ upgraded accommodation and flights
◦ wine or boutique beers to match meals ordered.
accommodation providers
attractions
vehicle rental operators
entertainment venues
event organisations
guides
restaurants
tour and cruise operators
tour wholesalers
transport operators.
considering the:
◦ financial constraints of the organisation
◦ profitability of the sale
negotiating with suppliers, on customer behalf, to
gain reduced rates or extra services
provision of some or all services:
◦ free of charge
◦ at reduced rate
provision of:
◦ discount vouchers to attend at a future time
◦ inexpensive add-on products
◦ small gifts
◦ special attention during the service period
◦ special customer service delivery on next
attendance.
customers with unmet expectations of products and
services
difficult or demanding customers
escalated complaints or disputes
incorrect pricing or quotes
other team members or suppliers not providing
special requests
43
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Communication techniques may
involve:
Organisational constraints may
include:
Promotional services may include:
Customer profiles may include:
misunderstandings or communication barriers
problems or faults with the service or product.
ability to speak clearly, be understood and use
appropriate language, style and tone
active listening
asking questions to gain information, clarify
ambiguities and adequately understand requirements
empathising with customer situation while upholding
organisational policy
non-verbal communication and recognition of
non-verbal signs
rephrasing and repeating questions, requests and
statements to confirm that they have been correctly
understood
using communication techniques appropriate to
different social and cultural groups.
costs and budgets
feasibility of providing the solution
own empowerment to resolve the complaint
policy and procedures
profitability of the sale
ultimate responsibility within the organisation.
birthday gifts
customer loyalty programs
newsletters
email notification of:
◦ sales
◦ new product ranges
◦ reminders of forthcoming special occasions, such
as Mother’s day and Valentine’s day
sale of gift vouchers
discount vouchers.
birthdays and anniversaries
comments and feedback provided
details of products and services experienced
names and contact details
preferences and expectations, such as favourite
products, rooms, additional requirements and special
needs.
44
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
provide professional and personalised customer
service experiences on multiple occasions to meet
the expectations of a variety of customers
communicate with a diverse range of customers
including those with special needs to provide a total
quality service experience
resolve difficult service situations and customer
complaints within designated times
demonstrate knowledge of professional service
standards expected of service industry personnel
complete service within commercial time constraints
and designated response times so that all customers
are served effectively.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry customer service environment where
customers are served
computers and data bases that manage customer
profiles and promotional activities
current commercial customer service policies and
procedures including those for complaint handling
customers with whom the individual can interact.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
direct observation, using role plays, to assess the
individual’s ability to:
◦ determine different customer service needs and
expectations
◦ liaise with team members to ensure efficient
service delivery
◦ offer extra and add-on products and services
◦ promote repeat business by the offer of
promotional services
◦ resolve customer complaints
use of problem-solving exercises so the individual
can identify reasons for difficult service situations and
provide suggested solutions
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of:
◦ professional service standards expected of
service industry personnel
◦ types of customer loyalty programs
◦ customer service policies and procedures
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
45
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Guidance information for
assessment
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITHKOP404 Plan catering for events or functions
SITXCOM201 Show social and cultural sensitivity
SITXCOM401 Manage conflict
SITXEVT401 Plan in-house events or functions.
46
DRAFT THREE
SITXCCS501 Manage quality customer service
SITXCCS501
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Manage quality customer service
N
Replaces but is not equivalent to SITXCCS003A Manage quality
customer service.
Re-worked Elements, Performance Criteria, Required Skills and
Knowledge to more fully articulate content. Additional Performance
Criteria and Required knowledge.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to develop, monitor and adjust customer service practices.
It requires the ability to consult with colleagues and customers,
develop policies and procedures for quality service provision and
manage the delivery of customer service.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, travel, hospitality and event sectors
and to any small, medium or large organisation.
It applies to senior managers who operate independently, have
responsibility for others and are responsible for making a range of
operational and strategic decisions.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Client and Customer Service
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Develop quality
customer service
practices.
2. Manage the delivery
of quality service.
1.1. Obtain information on customer needs, expectations and
satisfaction levels using both formal and informal research.
1.2. Provide opportunities for customers and colleagues to provide
feedback on products and services.
1.3. Review changes in internal and external environments and
integrate findings into planning for quality service.
1.4. Provide opportunities for staff to participate in the development
of customer service practices.
1.5. Develop policies and procedures for quality service
provision.
2.1. Communicate policies, procedures and expectations to
colleagues.
2.2. Make policies readily available to customers.
2.3. Monitor customer service in the workplace to ensure
standards are met.
2.4. Initiate internal or external staff training to enhance customer
service.
47
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Monitor and adjust
customer service.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
2.5. Take responsibility for service outcomes and dispute
resolution.
2.6. Act as a positive role model for professional standards
expected of service industry personnel.
3.1. Seek ongoing feedback from staff and customers and use it to
improve performance.
3.2. Identify systematic customer service problems and adjust
policies and procedures to improve service quality.
3.3. Assess the effectiveness of customer service practices.
3.4. Identify and evaluate systematic customer service problems.
3.5. Adjust policies and procedures to improve service quality.
3.6. Develop, document and communicate new approaches to all
those involved in service delivery.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ discuss customer service needs with staff and customers
◦ explain organisational policies and procedures for quality service provision
◦ discuss systemic customer service problems
critical thinking skills to:
◦ allow for a rational and logical evaluation of the characteristics and needs of the
organisation in order to design tailored customer service practices
◦ monitor, evaluate and review practices
initiative and enterprise skills to instigate research on customer service requirements
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret customer service surveys and unfamiliar complex documents on
current industry trends and changes that affect service delivery
◦ research customer service requirements
◦ write comprehensive yet easily accessible policies and procedures that provide service
expectations
numeracy skills to calculate and interpret customer satisfaction statistics
planning and organising skills to plan for, establish and regularly monitor all components of
the customer service system
problem-solving skills to identify systematic customer service problems and adjust policies
and procedures to improve service quality
self-management skills to take responsibility for customer service outcomes
teamwork skills to involve staff in the development of customer service practices and
actively seek their ongoing feedback.
Required knowledge
principles of quality customer service
for the specific industry sector:
◦ professional service standards expected of service industry personnel
◦ attitudes and attributes expected by the service industries to work with customers
roles and responsibilities of management, supervisors and operational personnel for quality
service provision
48
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
sources of information on current service trends and changes that affect service delivery
methods of implementing quality service provision, including:
◦ developing, implementing and monitoring customer service policies and procedures
◦ staff involvement in the development of customer service practices
◦ evaluating staff and customer feedback
methods of monitoring, measuring and evaluating:
◦ customer satisfaction
◦ business performance
industry schemes aimed at improving customer service including accreditation schemes and
codes of conduct
objectives, components and comprehensive details of consumer protection laws that relate
to customer service. These would include the business’ responsibility for:
◦ nominating and charging cancellation fees
◦ providing information on potential price increases
◦ providing refunds
◦ supplying products as described or substituting suitable products when unable
a range of formats for and inclusions of policies and procedures.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Customer may be:
Formal and informal research on
customer needs may involve:
committees
external:
◦ business to business
◦ corporate
◦ e-business
◦ government
◦ online
◦ the media
◦ retail
internal:
◦ colleagues
◦ managers
◦ members of a team
◦ staff from other departments
◦ staff from other branches or locations
◦ supervisors
new or regular
visitors.
analysis of:
◦ competitive environment
◦ industry service trends
◦ customer service surveys
customer focus groups
qualitative or quantitative research
49
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Changes in internal and external
environments affecting quality
service planning may include:
Policies and procedures may
relate to:
Customer service may be provided
in various modes, including:
Feedback may involve:
seeking feedback from service delivery colleagues
talking to customers.
changes in the competitive environment
economic climate
introduction of new technologies
introduction of new equipment
management changes
organisational restructures
recruitment practices
technological changes affecting service delivery
trends in customer service preferences.
acknowledging and greeting customers
complaint and dispute management
empowerment of different levels of personnel to
resolve:
◦ complaints
◦ disputes
◦ service issues
◦ customer compensation
loyalty programs
presentation standards for:
◦ customer environment
◦ customer service personnel
◦ documents and promotional materials
pricing guarantees
product quality
refunds and cancellation fees
response times
service guarantees
staff training for:
◦ customer service
◦ complaint handling
◦ technical skills to ensure quality provision of
products and services.
by telephone
email or written communication
face-to-face
online.
customer service discussions with employees during
the course of each business day
discussions with customers
formal customer interviews
regular staff meetings that involve service
discussions
seeking staff suggestions for content of customer
service policies and procedures
surveys:
50
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Assess the effectiveness of service
practices may involve:
◦ internal customers
◦ external customers
◦ staff
improvements suggested by:
◦ customers involved in complaints or disputes
◦ suppliers
◦ peers
◦ staff
◦ supervisors
◦ managers.
monitoring the ongoing effectiveness of:
◦ staff in meeting customer service standards
◦ policies and procedures in explaining practices
reviewing numbers and nature of:
◦ complaints
◦ disputes
◦ response of customers
survey statistics.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
develop, evaluate and review practices for quality
service provision
manage the delivery of customer service and monitor
the effectiveness of service practices over a period of
time
develop comprehensive policies and procedures for
quality service provision
integrate knowledge of the principles of quality
customer service and consumer protection laws.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry business operation for which tailored
customer service practices are required
current plain English regulatory documents
distributed by the government consumer protection
regulators
codes of practice and standards issued by industry
groups
team members with whom the individual can interact
as leader.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
evaluation of a portfolio, prepared by the individual,
51
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Guidance information for
assessment
incorporating documents used for the management
of customer service:
◦ summary of research into industry service trends
◦ evaluation of the characteristics and needs of the
organisation
◦ policies
◦ procedures
◦ customer surveys
◦ evaluation of systematic customer service issues
and recommendations for change of service
practices
direct observation, using role plays, of the individual
consulting with and briefing key staff members on
customer service practices
use of case studies and problem-solving exercises
so the individual can identify systemic customer
service failures and suggest methods to resolve
these
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of:
◦ customer service principles
◦ consumer protection laws
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
BSBMGT515A Manage operational plan
BSBPMG501A Manage projects
BSBWRT401A Write complex documents
SITXMGT401 Monitor work operations.
52
DRAFT THREE
Communication and Teamwork
SITXCOM101 Source and present information
SITXCOM101
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Source and present information
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXADM002A Source and present
information. Re-categorised to Communication and Teamwork.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to conduct basic research and present information in
response to an identified need.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all industry sectors and to any individual who
needs to use very basic research and presentation skills in the
workplace. People working under supervision would undertake this
role.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Communication and Teamwork
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Source information.
2. Prepare and present
information.
1.1. Identify current information sources appropriate to the
information to be sourced.
1.2. Access information sources and review for relevance.
1.3. Obtain information within designated timelines.
2.1. Review information and select content to suit the specific
need.
2.2. Draft text if required, including appropriate information.
2.3. Express information clearly, concisely and accurately.
2.4. Present information according to organisational guidelines and
in a format appropriate to the circumstances and audience.
2.5. Deliver information to appropriate person within designated
timelines.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to present simple information clearly and logically
◦ literacy skills to read and interpret information on familiar topics
technology skills to use the Internet as a research tool.
Required knowledge
53
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
types of information resources available and how to access them, including the Internet
methods of presenting information in a logical sequence and at an appropriate depth
alternative presentation formats for special needs groups.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Information to be sourced may
relate to:
Information sources may be
electronic or print-based and may
include:
availability of products or services
customer service research, e.g. feedback from
customers about a particular product or service
information from other departments in the
organisation, e.g. about available products or
services
product supplier information, e.g. for sourcing a new
supplier or product
new workplace systems or equipment
product and service styles that would meet certain
customer and market requirements.
customer feedback
general and trade media
industry associations
industry marketing or research bodies
lectures and presentations
other colleagues and personnel
product suppliers
trade shows and exhibitions.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
find and review current information on various topics
related to particular information needs
present information in a logical, well organised and
appropriate manner.
Assessment must ensure use of:
current information and communications technology.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess the practical skills and knowledge required to
source and present information. The following examples
are appropriate for this unit:
use of case studies to research a work-related topic
and deliver the information sourced in a brief
presentation
evaluation of a simple report responding to a
54
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Guidance information for
assessment
research request
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
BSBCMM201A Communicate in the workplace
SITHIND201 Source and use information on the
hospitality industry
SITTIND101 Source information on the tourism
industry.
55
DRAFT THREE
SITXCOM201 Show social and cultural sensitivity
SITXCOM201
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Show social and cultural sensitivity
N
Replaces but is not equivalent toSITXCOM002A Work in a socially
diverse environment.
Titled changed to better reflect the intent and content of the unit and
for simplicity. Some Performance Criteria reordered for logical
sequencing. Additional Performance Criteria and Required
knowledge covering anti-discrimination. Equal employment
opportunity deleted – not relevant to this unit.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to be socially aware when serving customers and working
with colleagues. It requires the ability to communicate with people
from a range of social and cultural groups with respect and
sensitivity and address cross-cultural misunderstandings.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, travel, hospitality and event sectors.
All personnel at all levels use this skill in the workplace during the
course of their daily activities.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Communication and Teamwork
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Communicate with
customers and
colleagues from
diverse
backgrounds.
2. Address
cross-cultural
misunderstandings.
1.1. Value and respect customers and colleagues from different
social and cultural groups and treat them with respect and
sensitivity.
1.2. Consider social and cultural differences in all verbal and
non-verbal communication.
1.3. Respond to others in a non-discriminatory way.
1.4. Make attempts to overcome language barriers.
1.5. Obtain assistance with communication.
2.1. Identify issues that may cause conflict or misunderstanding in
the workplace.
2.2. Address difficulties and seek assistance from others.
2.3. Consider social and cultural differences when difficulties or
misunderstandings occur.
2.4. Make efforts to resolve misunderstandings, taking account of
social and cultural considerations.
2.5. Refer problems and unresolved issues to the appropriate
supervisor or manager for follow-up.
56
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ respond to colleagues and customers with diverse social, cultural and language
characteristics
◦ discuss cross-cultural difficulties with others
literacy skills to read and interpret workplace anti-discrimination policies and plain English
documents produced by government information agencies
problem-solving skills to identify and resolve issues that may cause conflict or
misunderstandings in the workplace
teamwork skills to discuss cross-cultural misunderstandings and difficulties with supervisors,
managers and other team members.
Required knowledge
key principles of fairness and equity
general characteristics of the main social and cultural groups in Australian society, including
Indigenous people, and the key aspects of their cultural and religious protocols
general characteristics of the main inbound tourist markets and the key aspects of their
cultural and religious protocols
different types of disability and implications for the workplace
anti-discrimination policies for the industry and the specific organisation
basic aspects of state, territory and commonwealth laws covering anti-discrimination,
including requirements to:
◦ treat customers and colleagues fairly and equitably
◦ not discriminate, show partiality or grant any special favours on the basis of social and
cultural attributes
◦ not threaten, humiliate or intimidate people because of their social or cultural attributes.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Social and cultural differences
may relate to:
age
colour
criminal conviction
customs, beliefs and values
English language ability
family and social obligations and status
family structure
forms of address
gender
industrial activity or inactivity
language spoken
levels of formality or informality
marital status
57
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Attempts to overcome language
barriers may involve:
Assistance may be obtained from:
national origin
observance of special religious, feasts or other
celebratory days
personal grooming, including dress and hygiene
habits
physical features
physical or mental disability or impairment
physical or mental illness
political belief or activity
race
religious belief or activity
sexual preference
status as a parent or carer
varied cultural interpretation of non-verbal behaviour
work ethics.
communicating through the use of:
◦ gestures
◦ signs
◦ sign language
◦ simple words in English or the other person’s
language
giving simple directions
giving simple instructions.
colleagues
government agencies
diplomatic services
disability advocacy groups
educational institutions
interpreter services
local cultural organisations
reference books.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
communicate with colleagues and customers from
diverse range of social and cultural groups with
respect and sensitivity
integrate knowledge of different cultures and cultural
characteristics when communicating with colleagues
and customers.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or events
industry business activity where communication with
socially diverse customers and colleagues takes
place
58
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
current workplace anti-discrimination policies
plain English documents issued by government
regulators that provide information on
anti-discrimination laws
others with whom the individual can interact.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
direct observation, using role plays, of the individual
interacting with colleagues and customers from
diverse social and cultural backgrounds
exercises and activities to assess the individual’s
ability to recognise the general characteristics of
diverse colleagues and customers
use of problem-solving exercises so the individual
can suggest ways of resolving difficulties or
misunderstandings
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
anti-discrimination laws and workplace policies
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITHACS201 Provide porter services
SITHACS303 Provide accommodation reception
services
SITXCCS101 Provide information and assistance
SITXCCS201 Provide visitor information
SITXCCS202 Interact with customers
SITXCCS301 Provide lost and found services
SITXCCS302 Provide club reception services
SITXCCS303 Provide service to customers
SITXLAN21__ Conduct basic workplace oral
communication in a language other than English.
59
DRAFT THREE
SITXCOM202 Provide a briefing or scripted commentary
SITXCOM202
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Provide a briefing or scripted commentary
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITTVAF002A Provide a briefing or
scripted commentary.
Unit re-categorised to Communication and Teamwork competency
field to better reflect the content of the unit. Added sustainability.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to deliver information to a group using basic group
communication and presentation techniques. Often the information
would have been prepared or scripted by others.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to individuals in all industry sectors who present
information or commentary to a group of people, but who do not
require the complete suite of presentation, commentary or public
speaking skills. This could include those working in museums,
attractions, on aircraft and in any business or community situation
where oral communication to a group is required. They could be
working under supervision or with guidance from others.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Communication and Teamwork
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Present information
to group.
2. Enhance
presentation of
information.
3. Liaise with others.
1.1. Welcome participants to briefing, information session or
tour according to organisational procedures.
1.2. Provide participants with information based on scripts and
other briefing information.
1.3. Outline environmental and health and safety requirements.
1.4. Prepare participants for potential changes to the
environment.
1.5. Answer questions in a courteous and friendly manner.
2.1. Use communication and presentation techniques to enhance
participant experience and make adjustments as needed.
2.2. Show cultural and social sensitivity during the presentation.
2.3. Use technical presentation resources as required.
3.1. Maintain communication with team members and operators to
ensure safe and efficient operations.
3.2. Give correct and accurate signals where appropriate.
60
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ present cohesive and audible group presentations
◦ interact positively with participants and other team members
literacy skills to read and interpret information scripts or other briefing information
numeracy skills to address safety considerations, such as not exceeding numbers in a given
location
problem-solving skills to identify and respond to the need for adjustments to presentation.
Required knowledge
group presentation techniques, including:
◦ voice projection
◦ body language
◦ tonal variety
how to tailor language to meet different group needs
sustainability considerations relevant to the presentation and venue, including those related
to:
◦ conservation of resources
◦ cultural protocols
◦ handling of waste
◦ minimising negative impact
health and safety requirements for specific events and locations
emergency procedures for specific events and locations.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Briefing, information session or
tour may be:
Environmental requirements may
relate to:
Health and safety requirements
may relate to:
crowd information session
demonstration
entertainment session
ride
safety briefing
site familiarisation
tour safety briefing.
conservation of resources
cultural protocols
handling of waste
noise and other disturbance issues
potential physical impacts on the environment.
areas that are off-limits
dress restrictions
emergency procedures
guidance on using equipment
61
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Changes to the environment may
relate to:
Presentation resources may
include:
restrictions on talking or making noise in an area.
change in temperature, e.g. climate controlled facility
possible safety restrictions, e.g. if group is entering a
high risk area
special effects on a tour
warning about extraneous noise or other unusual
activity.
actors presenting a scripted show
digital presentations
loud speaker
microphone
monitors.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
communicate information clearly in a group situation
use group presentation techniques to enhance
briefing or commentary on multiple occasions and for
different groups
demonstrate knowledge of health, safety and
emergency procedures relevant to the venue or site.
Assessment must ensure use of:
an environment where a presentation would take
place, e.g. visitor site or attraction
equipment that supports the briefing or scripted
commentary
a group of people to whom the presentation is
delivered.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
direct observation of the individual providing a
briefing or scripted commentary
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
work health and safety issues and requirements
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITTVAF301 Operate a ride location.
62
DRAFT THREE
SITXCOM301 Address protocol requirements
SITXCOM301
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Address protocol requirements
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXCOM006A Address protocol
requirements.
Re-worked Elements, Performance Criteria, Required Skills and
Knowledge to more fully articulate content.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to source and access information on protocol requirements
to fulfil any sales or operational need. It requires the ability to identify
appropriate information sources, access and interpret specific details
of protocol requirements and to coordinate the use of protocol.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to many tourism, travel, hospitality and event
sectors and is particularly relevant to events, function coordination,
tour operations and tour guiding.
Protocol affects a broad range of business and government activity
and the breadth and depth of protocol knowledge required will vary.
This unit is not about having an in-depth knowledge of protocol
requirements but focuses on the ability to collect and interpret
protocol information.
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
This unit applies to a range of people working independently or with
limited guidance including tour and event coordinators, and
managers; tour guides and front of house or duty managers.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Communication and Teamwork
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Source information
on appropriate
protocol.
2. Coordinate the use
of protocol.
3. Update knowledge of
1.1. Assess the need for protocol to be followed for the particular
situation.
1.2. Identify relevant sources of protocol information.
1.3. Liaise with customers to determine appropriate protocol.
1.4. Interpret relevant protocol information to inform work practice.
2.1. Identify specific work activities that require appropriate use
of protocol.
2.2. Provide protocol briefings to staff and suppliers.
2.3. Coordinate the use of correct protocol for the delivery of
products and services.
3.1. Identify and use opportunities to update protocol
63
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
protocol.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
knowledge.
3.2. Share updated knowledge with customers and colleagues.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ liaise with customers, clients, their agents and personal assistants to ascertain protocol
◦ address dignitaries and officials using appropriate language
learning skills to continually seek information to enhance knowledge of protocol
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret unfamiliar and complex protocol information
◦ research and analyse information on protocol
◦ write correspondence to dignitaries and officials, invitations and team briefing papers
self-management skills to take responsibility for meeting protocol requirements
teamwork skills to share protocol information with team members to ensure protocol is
followed.
Required knowledge
main types of civic functions held in Australia
importance and role of protocol in different business situations
key sources of information on protocol for:
◦ Australian honours system, including order of precedence, ranks and forms of address,
and wearing of honours and medals
◦ involvement of Indigenous Australians and other cultural groups in business activities
◦ correct use of national and state symbols, including flags, anthems and military salutes
◦ forms of address for different VIPs and dignitaries, both for written correspondence and
in oral communication
protocols for different situations, including:
◦ invitations to VIPs
◦ arrival procedures, including for heads of state or government officials
◦ introduction protocols and order of speakers
◦ order of precedence for official guests
◦ seating arrangements
◦ dress styles.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Particular situation may involve:
event organisation, including:
◦ citizenship ceremonies
◦ civic receptions
◦ formal parades
◦ freedom of city ceremonies
64
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Sources of protocol information
may include:
Specific work activities may
involve:
Products and services may
include:
Opportunities to update protocol
knowledge may include:
◦ national day receptions
◦ private functions
general business administration
issuing marketing materials reflecting correct titles of
dignitaries
meeting the requirements of dignitaries and officials
meeting the requirements of entertainers and
masters of ceremony.
Aboriginal Land Councils
Australia Day Councils
customers, clients, their agents and personal
assistants
federal, state or territory, and local government
protocol departments
Internet
libraries
Office of the United Nations.
addressing and introducing dignitaries and officials
correspondence to dignitaries and officials
issuing invitations
liaison with dignitaries and officials
preparing:
◦ briefing papers
◦ marketing materials
◦ running sheets
providing various services during the conduct of an
event, including on-site management and service of
food and beverage.
accommodation
events
functions
meetings
tours.
informal networking with colleagues
Internet research
reading relevant journals.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Evidence of the ability to:
source accurate information on multiple and diverse
protocol requirements
use protocol for diverse oral and written purposes
integrate knowledge of protocol when organising
business activities.
65
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
Assessment must ensure use of:
current protocol information.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
direct observation, using roles plays, of the individual
addressing and introducing dignitaries and officials
activities to assess the individual’s ability to:
◦ source information on protocol
◦ coordinate the use of correct protocol for the
delivery of products and services
evaluation of documents prepared by the individual
which include use of protocol:
◦ briefing papers
◦ correspondence to dignitaries and officials
◦ invitations
◦ marketing materials
◦ running sheets
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
key sources of information on protocol and protocols
for different situations
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITTGDE401 Coordinate and operate tours
SITTTSL201 Operate an online information system
SITXEVT401 Plan in-house events or functions
SITXMPR401 Coordinate production of brochures
and marketing materials.
66
DRAFT THREE
SITXCOM401 Manage conflict
SITXCOM401
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Manage conflict
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXCOM003A Deal with conflict
situations.
Title changed to better reflect the complexity of the unit. Re-worked
Elements, Performance Criteria, Required Skills and Knowledge to
more fully articulate content.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to resolve complex or escalated complaints and disputes
with internal and external customers and colleagues. It requires the
ability to use effective conflict resolution techniques and
communication skills to manage conflict and develop solutions. It
does not cover formal negotiation, counselling or mediation.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, travel, hospitality and event sectors.
The unit applies mainly to senior operational personnel, supervisors
and managers who operate with some level of independence and
use discretion and judgement to resolve conflicts.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Communication and Teamwork
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Identify conflict
situations.
2. Resolve conflict.
1.1. Identify potential for conflict and take swift and tactful action
to prevent escalation.
1.2. Identify situations where personal safety of customers or
colleagues may be threatened and organise appropriate
assistance.
1.3. Identify and use resources to assist in managing conflict.
2.1. Take responsibility for finding a solution to conflict.
2.2. Establish and agree on the nature and details of conflict with
all parties and assess impact.
2.3. Deal with conflict sensitively, courteously and discreetly.
2.4. Minimise impact on other colleagues and customers.
2.5. Use effective conflict resolution techniques and
communication skills to manage the conflict and develop
solutions.
2.6. Encourage all points of view, acknowledge them and treat
them with respect.
2.7. Identify and evaluate the impact of conflict on business
67
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Evaluate conflicts
and resolutions.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
reputation and legal liability.
2.8. Evaluate options to resolve the dispute taking into account any
organisational policies and constraints.
2.9. Implement the best solution and complete required
documentation.
3.1. Communicate with the parties involved to seek and provide
feedback on conflict and its resolution.
3.2. Evaluate and reflect on the situation and effectiveness of the
solution.
3.3. Determine possible causes of workplace conflict and
provide input for workplace enhancement and improvements.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to deal with conflict sensitively, courteously and discreetly through use
of conflict resolution techniques
critical thinking skills to analyse and decide on the best resolution for conflict
initiative and enterprise skills to consider and suggest changes to workplace practices to
avoid future conflict
literacy skills to:
◦ research sources of internal and external assistance to resolve the conflict
◦ write reports, including comprehensive details of the conflict, the parties involved,
discussions with all parties and the resolution
problem-solving skills to identify and resolve conflicts and minimise impact on other
colleagues and customers
self-management skills to take responsibility for conflict outcomes
teamwork skills to discuss and resolve conflicts between team members.
Required knowledge
types of conflict in the tourism, travel, hospitality and event industries, typical causes and
resolutions
conflict theory, including signs, stages, levels, factors involved and results
conflict resolution and communication techniques, including:
◦ assertiveness
◦ active listening
◦ non-verbal communication
◦ language style
◦ negotiation
◦ use of appropriate communication
organisational policies and procedures for complaint, conflict and dispute resolution.
68
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Conflict may relate to:
Situations may involve:
Customers or colleagues may
include:
Resources may include:
Conflict resolution techniques
may include:
Communication skills may include:
customers whose special needs or expectations
have not been met
delays or poor timing of product or service supply
difficult or complex customer complaints
difficult or demanding customers
disputes or arguments among work colleagues
drug or alcohol-affected persons
ejection from premises
escalated customer or staff complaints leading to
disputes
human resource issues:
◦ counselling
◦ incorrect pay
◦ job duties
◦ lack of competence
◦ worker mistakes
◦ rosters
◦ dismissals
misunderstandings or communication barriers
problems or faults with a service or product
refused entry.
customers refusing to leave or be pacified
drug or alcohol-affected persons
people who appear to be violent or are threatening
people involved in physical violence
people with guns or arms
situations where someone has been or may be hurt.
internal or external customers
those from a range of social and cultural
backgrounds
outside contractors
suppliers
workmates.
counsellors
internal security staff
mediators
other staff members
police
senior staff.
negotiation
use of appropriate communication skills.
ability to speak clearly, be understood and use
appropriate language, style and tone
active listening
69
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Policies and constraints may
include:
Causes of workplace conflict may
include:
asking questions to gain information, clarify
ambiguities and adequately understand requirements
assertiveness
empathising with the person’s situation while
upholding organisational policy
non-verbal communication and recognition of
non-verbal signs
questioning techniques, such as asking the right
question to elicit the other parties’ needs
rephrasing and repeating questions, requests and
statements to confirm that they have been correctly
understood
those appropriate to different social and cultural
groups.
complaints
customer service
disputes
exchanges
refunds
staff grievance
costs and budgets
lack of availability of replacement products or
services
organisational policy on refunds or exchange.
changes to practices and procedures
complaints
cultural misunderstanding
lack of empathy
lack of information
poor communication
rostering issues
workplace systems.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
resolve different workplace conflicts using a range of
conflict resolution and communication techniques
demonstrate knowledge of commonly occurring
conflict situations in the workplace and the stages of
conflict.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry environment where conflicts occur
current commercial policies and procedures for
complaint, conflict and dispute resolution
70
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
others with whom the individual can interact to
resolve conflicts.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
direct observation, using role plays, of the individual
resolving conflicts using a range of communication
techniques
use of simulated activities to assess participation in
conflicts involving:
◦ customers refusing to leave or be pacified
◦ drug or alcohol-affected persons
◦ people who appear to be violent or are
threatening
use of problem-solving activities so the individual can
analyse and find solutions for various conflicts arising
in the workplace
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of:
◦ types of conflict
◦ conflict theory
◦ conflict resolution and communication techniques
◦ content of policy and procedures for refunds or
exchange
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
BSBDIV501A Manage diversity in the workplace
SITHACS201 Provide porter services
SITHACS303 Provide accommodation reception
services
SITTGDE303 Lead tour groups
SITTGDE401 Coordinate and operate tours
SITXCCS302 Provide club reception services
SITXCCS303 Provide service to customers
SITXCCS401 Enhance the customer service
experience
SITXHRM503 Monitor staff performance.
71
DRAFT THREE
Computer Operations and ICT Management
SITXICT401 Build and launch a small business website
SITXICT401
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Build and launch a small business website
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXICT001A Build and launch a
website for a small business.
Title simplified.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to build a basic website to meet business needs, including
selecting a hosting service and appropriate web development
software, planning the website structure and undertaking actual
construction of the site. It requires technical skills and knowledge
typically needed by a business that elects to develop its own site
rather than access the services of IT professionals.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all industry sectors, and is particularly relevant to
small businesses that develop their own websites. People
undertaking this role work independently or with limited guidance.
Depending on the business context, this could include owneroperators.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Computer Operations and ICT Management
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Plan website
structure.
2. Develop website
content.
1.1. Develop website style and structure to suit business purpose
and intended target audience.
1.2. Identify and include appropriate features and capabilities in
website structure.
1.3. Determine layout and navigation requirements for appearance,
readability, links and ease of operation.
1.4. Ensure maximum site accessibility.
1.5. Clearly document structure to facilitate efficient development.
1.6. Develop and integrate appropriate interactive forms into
website structure to capture customer data.
1.7. Select authoring tools and software based on website
requirements.
1.8. Identify and integrate website security requirements.
2.1. Select and use business information to create website content.
2.2. Define information for inclusion in interactive forms based on
72
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Create website
pages.
4. Select and use a
web hosting service.
5. Test and critically
evaluate website.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
purpose of the form.
2.3. Adapt information for inclusion to ensure site is clear,
scannable and readable.
2.4. Use language, style and tone suited to business image and
intended target audience.
2.5. Integrate content features according to website structure.
2.6. Check content for accuracy, currency and relevance.
3.1. Create plan for website pages and active links to meet layout
and navigation requirements.
3.2. Select page titles and key words that reflect business purpose
and website content, and to assist access via search engines.
3.3. Improve page presentation by adding features.
3.4. Develop linked web pages according to website plan,
ensuring links are clearly named and unambiguous.
3.5. Use appropriate techniques to create interactive forms.
3.6. Create pages consistent with site design specifications.
4.1. Identify sources of information on web hosting options.
4.2. Evaluate and select web hosting services according to
business and technical requirements.
4.3. Upload files to selected web hosting service according to
technical requirements and business agreements.
5.1. Test website functions, processes and navigation to confirm
operational status, appearance, accuracy and ease of
operation.
5.2. Evaluate effectiveness of interactive forms to ensure that
required sales data is collected for business.
5.3. Evaluate website according to business website strategy to
ensure it projects a business image suited to the e-business
model.
5.4. Identify problems, develop a range of strategies to solve them
and select appropriate and sustainable solutions.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
critical thinking skills to evaluate potentially complex business and technical information
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret a wide range of sometime complex information on unfamiliar topics
◦ develop written and visual website content
numeracy skills to work with numerical features of authoring tools
planning and organising skills to coordinate multiple elements involved in developing a
business website
problem-solving skills to identify and respond to technical website challenges at a nonspecialist level
technology skills to use the features of commercially available authoring tools.
Required knowledge
current e-business environment for a particular business context
73
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
different services and operation systems used by Internet service providers
general principles of website architecture and design
role of a website in the marketing mix and ways in which the marketing effectiveness of a
website can be enhanced
key features of a marketing-oriented website
features of browsers, search engines and web crawlers, including how these impact on
website design, decisions and meta-tags
relationships between content and site design
techniques for using colour and enhancing text within a website
techniques for manipulation of digital images and graphics, including insertion into a website
functions and features of micro-content elements, such as headings, highlighted words and
hyperlink text
underlying impact of Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and cascading style sheets on
site design
features and uses of frames, forms and tables within a website
privacy issues, codes of practice and legislative requirements in relation to website
development, including:
◦ Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Guidelines for
Consumer Protection in the Context of Electronic Commerce
◦ World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) guidelines
◦ copyright laws
◦ defamation laws
◦ privacy legislation and confidentiality requirements
◦ intellectual property considerations
◦ legal and regulatory policies affecting e-business.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Website features and capabilities
may involve:
active links
authentication facility or link
colour, sound, video, images and graphics
customer service requirements
cut down versions of web pages in Wireless Markup
Language (WML) for access by Wireless Application
Protocol (WAP) telephones
downloadable files
electronic payment facilities
facility of user feedback on content and operation of
website
legal requirements
marketing features
navigation buttons
privacy and confidentiality requirements
search facility
74
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Ease of operation may include:
Authoring tools and software may
include a wide range of text editors
and commercial applications, such
as:
Security requirements may
include:
Content features may include:
Page presentation may include:
Features to enhance web pages
may include use of:
Linked web pages may include:
security requirements
shopping cart facilities
text and tags in HTML
thumbnails.
navigation
download time
time to download files.
Adobe Photoshop
Dreamweaver
FrontPage
Notepad
WordPad.
limited downloading of images or image encoding
limited viewing of rates
password protection
payment mechanisms.
business history and profile
catalogues and brochures
client testimonials
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
products and services
published materials
staff profiles
thumbnails.
animated sequences
bulleted or numbered lists
colour
downloadable files
fonts and font sizes
images, e.g. photographs and graphics
interactive forms for bookings or enquiries
movie sequence
plug ins
sound
tables.
colour
frames
graphics
photographic images
text enhancement.
fully qualified Uniform Resource Locator (URL) link to
a page on another website
relative links, between a page and the home page.
75
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
build a website to meet a business need through the
integration and application of appropriate business
and technical skills
demonstrate knowledge of the key features and
functions to be incorporated into a business website.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated operation, product or service for
which the individual can build and launch a website
current information and communications technology,
including software and authoring tools.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess the practical skills and knowledge required to
build and launch a website. The following examples are
appropriate for this unit:
evaluation of a website developed by the individual
through testing of the site against key criteria
oral or written questioning to assess knowledge of
functions, features, security requirements, Internet
service provider (ISP) services and website design
requirements
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
BSBEBUS507A Manage the business aspects of a
website
BSBEBUS604A Develop a business website
strategy.
76
DRAFT THREE
Crisis Management
SITXCRI401 Respond to a customer in crisis
SITXCRI401
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Respond to a customer in crisis
New unit.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to identify the ramifications of a crisis on a customer and to
respond with assistance and support. It requires the ability to identify
and interpret information relevant to the crisis, provide customer
crisis care and organise operational services to assist the customer
in crisis.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, travel, hospitality and event sectors.
It has particular application to accommodation providers, tour
operators, retail travel agencies and inbound tour operators.
The crisis would be significant and could involve the death, injury,
illness or psychological trauma of a customer. It does not cover
more operational circumstances, such as the loss of travel
documents, passports and money.
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
This unit applies to people who operate independently or with limited
guidance from others. This includes senior tour coordinators, senior
retail travel consultants, hotel duty managers, guides, and tour
managers who are able to use significant discretion and judgement
to respond to customer crises.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Crisis Management
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Identify and
acknowledge the
crisis.
2. Provide customer
crisis care.
1.1. Ascertain the scope and severity of the customer crisis.
1.2. Consider impacts on customer ability to continue in service
participation.
1.3. Consider the impacts on other customers.
1.4. Access and interpret information relevant to the crisis.
1.5. Acknowledge the incident as a customer crisis and
communicate details to key people.
2.1. Identify symptoms of customer trauma.
2.2. Monitor and assess the severity of customer trauma.
2.3. Provide sympathetic and sensitive support and reassurance
77
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Organise services to
assist the customer.
4. Evaluate and debrief
customer crisis
management.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
to the customer.
2.4. Avoid pitfalls in crisis care when communicating with
customers.
2.5. Provide recommendations to the customer.
3.1. Develop an action plan to manage the crisis.
3.2. Promptly identify and access sources of assistance.
3.3. Assist the customer to access service providers.
3.4. Minimise disruption to other customers and maintain their
services.
3.5. Organise operational services to assist the customer in
crisis.
3.6. Involve key people in the management of the customer crisis
and integrate their perspective.
3.7. Provide explicit details of progress with and final confirmations
of operational services to the customer and key people.
4.1. Evaluate the crisis management process to determine the
effectiveness of the response.
4.2. Debrief and complete all reports.
4.3. Provide recommendations for improvements to future crisis
management practices.
4.4. Seek assistance to cope with any personal trauma
experienced.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ discuss details of a customer crisis with key internal and external people
◦ provide sympathetic and sensitive support to the customer
critical thinking skills to evaluate the severity of crisis impacts on the customer
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret reports on the customer crisis and customer forward service
arrangements
◦ research sources of assistance for the customer
◦ write succinct action plans and accurate and complex crisis management reports
numeracy skills to calculate immediate costs of service provision to the customer
planning and organising skills to organise operational services to assist the customer while
minimising disruption to other customers
problem-solving skills to identify, acknowledge and immediately respond to customer crises
self-management skills to take responsibility for managing a customer in crisis
teamwork skills to involve key staff members in the management of a customer crisis.
Required knowledge
key symptoms of trauma
sources of medical and counselling assistance
communication techniques for supporting and reassuring customers
pitfalls in crisis care communications
operational services used to manage customer service and repatriation arrangements
78
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
role of key external people and organisations in managing a customer crisis
a range of formats for and inclusions of incident reports
for the specific organisation:
◦ the roles and responsibilities of key staff members
◦ procedures for reporting and managing customer incidents.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Customer may include:
Information relevant to the crisis
may be sourced from:
Customer crisis may include:
Key people may include:
the affected customer
their friends and family
travelling companions.
discussions with:
◦ customer
◦ their friends and family
◦
travelling companions
medical reports
emergency services reports
police reports
staff, contractor, supplier reports on:
◦ accident
◦ assault
◦ death
◦ injury or illness
◦ mugging.
accident, e.g. involvement of a vehicle
assault, e.g. sexual assault
death
family crisis and need for repatriation
major injury or illness
mugging
any incident resulting in psychological trauma
suicide
witnessing a serious incident.
colleagues, including:
◦ managers
◦ operational staff
◦ peers
◦ supervisors
family members
personnel within the controlling office:
◦ event management organisation
◦ inbound tour operator
◦ outbound tour wholesaler
79
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Trauma may involve:
Reassurance may relate to advice
about :
Pitfalls in crisis care may include:
Recommendations may include:
◦ professional conference organiser
◦ retail travel agency
◦ tour operator
personnel from suppliers on an extended tour
travel insurance provider personnel
travelling companions.
behavioural disturbance:
◦ avoidance of thoughts, feelings or conversations
associated with the trauma
◦ detachment from others
◦ efforts to avoid activities, places or people that
arouse recollections of the event
◦ exaggerated startle response
◦ increased smoking or alcohol consumption
◦ irritability or outbursts of anger
◦ markedly diminished interest or participation in
significant tourism activities
◦ response to cues that symbolise or resemble the
event
cognitive ability:
◦ difficulty in concentrating
◦ inability to recall important aspects of the event
◦ inability to make a decision
difficulty in falling or staying asleep
distressing recollections of the event
emotional disturbance:
◦ anxiety and nervousness
◦ fear
◦ grief
◦ guilt
◦ helplessness
◦ resentment
poor interpersonal reactions
physical disability
recurrent distressing dreams.
availability of assistance, advice and support
confidentiality of customer information
customer taking the lead to seek assistance, advice
and support.
making jokes
making promises that cannot be kept
treating the event flippantly
trying to motivate or force customer participation in
touring activities
use of negative or unhelpful statements.
advising the customer to:
◦ cancel the remainder of their touring
80
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
To assist the customer may involve:
Service providers may include:
Operational services may include:
arrangements and return home
◦ contact their travel insurance provider
◦ rebook a replacement holiday
◦ report incidents to the police
◦ seek medical assistance
◦ seek professional counselling.
accompanying customers to service providers
making appointments with service providers
making contact with and seeking options and
recommendations from the:
◦ customer’s retail travel agency
◦ local tour or ground operator
◦ organisation’s controlling office
◦ travel insurance provider
providing customers with phone numbers of crisis
counselling services
providing explicit directions and instructions to assist
customers reach the service provider
providing transport to the service provider.
airlines
consulates
counselling services
funeral directors
high commissions
hospitals
medical and allied health professionals
offices of the local inbound tour or ground operator
police.
accommodation
cancellation of forward travel and tourism services
flights and ticketing to repatriate the customer
repatriation of bodies via:
◦ airlines
◦ consulates
◦ funeral directors
◦ high commissions
◦ travel insurance companies.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Evidence of the ability to:
identify the ramifications of a customer crisis,
respond with customer crisis care and organise
operational services to assist the customer
integrate knowledge of the key symptoms of trauma
and communication techniques for supporting and
81
DRAFT THREE
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
reassuring customers.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry customer service environment where a
customer is in crisis
customer service arrangements or itineraries
customer crisis information
current industry procedures for reporting and
managing customer incidents
customers with whom the individual can interact.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
evaluation of a portfolio, prepared by the individual,
incorporating documents used for the management
of a customer crisis:
◦ summary of customer crisis information
◦ an action plan to manage the crisis
◦ notes on the organisation of operational services
to assist the customer in crisis
◦ reports produced post crisis
direct observation, using role plays, of the individual
supporting and reassuring customers
use of case studies and problem-solving exercises
so the individual can identify and evaluate the
impacts of different types of customer crises and
provide responses
written and oral questioning to assess knowledge of:
◦ the key symptoms of trauma
◦ communication techniques for supporting and
reassuring customers
◦ role of key external people and organisations in
managing a customer crisis
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITHACS303 Provide accommodation reception
services
SITTGDE401 Coordinate and operate tours
SITTGDE402 Manage extended touring programs
SITTTOP403 Operate tours in a remote area
SITTTSL306 Book supplier services.
82
DRAFT THREE
SITXCRI601 Manage a business continuity crisis
SITXCRI601
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Manage a business continuity crisis
New unit.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to identify the ramifications of a crisis on business continuity
and to respond with strategies that ensure the financial viability of
the organisation. It requires the ability to identify and interpret
information relevant to the crisis and the business operation and to
assess and adapt business operations to manage the crisis.
Managing business continuity is a complex process which involves
the use of a range of other interrelated skills, such as financial
analysis, budgeting, developing operational plans and adapting the
provision of products to meet the needs of a market in crisis. These
skills are found within other units.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, travel, hospitality and event sectors
and to any small, medium or large organisation. The crisis could be
of a magnitude that affects the operation of an entire organisation,
department or particular project.
It applies to senior managers and owner-operators who operate with
significant autonomy and are responsible for making a range of
strategic management decisions.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Crisis Management
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Identify and
acknowledge the
crisis.
2. Assess impacts on
the viability of the
business.
1.1. Consider impacts on business operation through early
identification of triggers for a downturn in business.
1.2. Access and interpret information relevant to the crisis.
1.3. Identify and acknowledge internal and external crises.
2.1. Involve key people in the assessment of the crisis.
2.2. Review organisational documents to ascertain current
financial and operational status of the business.
2.3. Produce new financial forecasts based on known information
about the crisis.
83
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Adapt business
operations to
manage the crisis.
4. Monitor and evaluate
business operations.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
2.4. Produce a range of forecast options based on reasonable and
worst case predictions of impacts.
2.5. Monitor the severity of the crisis and adjust forecasts
according to swiftly changing circumstances.
2.6. Ascertain the severity of business impacts and develop
recommendations to ensure financial viability of the
organisation.
3.1. Develop and implement an emergency operational plan to
manage the crisis.
3.2. Involve key people in the management of the business crisis
and integrate their perspective.
3.3. Implement accepted recommendations for changing business
operations.
3.4. Communicate new practices to key people including external
suppliers.
3.5. Re-align staffing arrangements to control wage costs.
3.6. Gain staff confidence in current managerial activity and their
commitment to the business in crisis.
3.7. Re-align products and services to meet current market needs.
3.8. Re-negotiate with suppliers to achieve optimum profitability
during the crisis.
3.9. Implement promotional and public relations activities to assure
consumer confidence.
4.1. Monitor business activity and profitability throughout all stages
of the crisis.
4.2. Seek internal and external feedback on the effectiveness of
emergency business operations.
4.3. Identify and respond to inadequacies in emergency
operational plan to account for changing circumstances.
4.4. Continually adapt business operations to ensure business
continuity.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ consult with others on complex operational, financial and management issues
◦ communicate difficult operational changes
◦ impart confidence to staff throughout a crisis
◦ assure consumer confidence through promotional and public relations activities
critical thinking skills to evaluate the severity of crisis impacts on business operations and to
re-align practices to ensure the financial viability of the organisation
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret complex and unfamiliar reports about external crises and a range of
complex internal business management plans and reports
◦ research the internal and external factors that may impact on business performance
◦ write clear, accurate and complex emergency operational plans
numeracy skills to interpret and analyse financial information, including forecasts and
84
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
previous performance data, and to develop financial estimates and scenarios
planning and organising skills to manage a cohesive and changeable response to crises and
produce reports within tight timelines
problem-solving skills to:
◦ identify, acknowledge and immediately respond to crises
◦ react to swiftly changing circumstances
self-management skills to take responsibility for managing a business in crisis and for the
outcomes of emergency management practices
teamwork skills to involve key staff members in the assessment and management of a
business crisis
technology skills to use accounting software packages.
Required knowledge
for the specific industry sector and organisation:
◦ the key characteristics of internal and external crises
◦ impacts of crises on the provision of products and services and business viability
◦ historical impacts of crises on tourism, hospitality and event operations
◦ the major triggers for a downturn in customer sales
◦ consultative mechanisms commonly used by organisations
◦ promotion and public relations activities commonly used by organisations during a crisis
◦ the role of key external people and organisations in managing a business crisis
◦ techniques to adapt business operations to manage a business in crisis
for the specific organisation:
◦ the roles and responsibilities of key staff members and external consultants
◦ the contents and role of organisational documents in managing the business
a range of formats for and inclusions of emergency operational plans
the features and functions of financial software programs for preparing and monitoring
financial reports.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Triggers may include:
changes in the length and regularity of holidays taken
by the source market
changes in the popularity of:
◦ destinations
◦ style of tourism, travel and hospitality products
◦ budget or premium product
closure of major transport suppliers:
◦ airlines
◦ coach companies
◦ cruise operators
closure of the operation of multiple suppliers in a
destination
downturn in local economic growth
85
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Information relevant to the crisis
may be sourced from:
Internal crises may be:
global financial downturn
impending economic recession or crisis
in destinations used by the business, warnings of
impending:
◦ natural disasters
◦ political and civil uprisings
◦ terrorism acts
◦ wars.
emergency services reports
health advisory notices and vaccination information
issued by local and international bodies
industry associations and organisations
industry journals
informal discussions and networking with internal and
external colleagues
media reports on external crises
press releases and emergency advice notices issued
by:
◦ local, state, territory or federal governments
◦ destination marketing companies
◦ regional, state and national tourism offices
◦ franchisors
staff, contractor, supplier reports on:
◦ accidents
◦ breakdown or complete failure of key equipment
◦ death
◦ injury
◦ major work health and safety incidents
travel warning advice issued by the federal
government for Australian travellers.
breakdown or complete failure of key equipment
customer, tour guide or tour manager:
◦ accident
◦ death
◦ major injury or illness
◦ repatriation
destruction of infrastructure
failure of marketing program
financial loss through:
◦ non-compliance with the law
◦ litigation
key employee:
◦ death
◦ family crisis
◦ fraud
◦ long term illness
◦ professional incompetence
86
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
External crises may be:
Key people may include:
Organisational documents may
include:
media coverage of business’s:
◦ accidents
◦ incidents
◦ impending failure
major work health and safety accident or near miss
incident.
breakdown or complete failure of supplier equipment
for destinations used by the business:
◦ chemical spill
◦ civil uprising
◦ destruction of tourism infrastructure
◦ health epidemics or pandemics
◦ natural disaster (cyclone, earthquake, fire, flood,
tsunami, etc.)
◦ outbreak of war
◦ political coup
◦ radiation leak
◦ terrorism
financial recession or crisis for the source market
global financial crisis
industrial dispute
plane crash.
business accountants
customers and their families
colleagues, including:
◦ managers
◦ operational staff
◦ peers
◦ supervisors
contract tour guides and tour managers
consultants:
◦ crisis management
◦ marketing
◦ public relations
financial controllers
insurance brokers and providers
legal representatives
suppliers
travel insurance providers.
brochures
budgets:
◦ departmental
◦ entire organisation
◦ product specific
◦ project specific
◦ revenue and expenditure items
contracts with:
87
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
◦
Recommendations may include:
Staffing arrangements may
include:
other businesses to whom products and services
are supplied
◦ suppliers
customer surveys
plans:
◦ business
◦ marketing
◦ operations
◦ product development
◦ project
product costings and published tariffs and price lists
reports:
◦ current financial status
◦ financial forecasting
◦ staff feedback
◦ wage cost
tenders, proposals or bids
terms and conditions:
◦ credit provision
◦ provision of products and services to customers.
cancellation of impending departures to affected
destinations
cancellation of unprofitable products or services
closure of particular departments
moving premises to a less costly location
price rises or reductions
re-alignment of product style and pricing to meet
current market needs
reduction of staff hours or staff redundancies
sale of equipment
scaling up or down of promotional activities
temporary cancellation of products within affected
destinations
temporary closure of:
◦ accommodation wings or floors
◦ internal venues:
- cafes
- restaurants
- retail outlets.
non-use of casual staff
re-assigning duties
reducing permanent employee hours
redundancies.
88
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
identify and assess the ramifications of a crisis on
business continuity
assess and adapt business operations to manage a
business continuity crisis
develop clear, accurate and complex emergency
operational plans
implement an emergency operational plan and
monitor, evaluate and adapt the outcomes over a
period of time
integrate knowledge of the key characteristics of
internal and external crises and impacts on business
viability.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry business operation or event facing a
business continuity crisis
computers, software programs, printers and
communication technology used to administer crisis
management
current commercial plans and financial reports
crisis information
a team so that consultative actions can be
implemented.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
evaluation of a portfolio, prepared by the individual,
incorporating documents used for the management
of a business or event crisis:
◦ summary of crisis research material
◦ recommendations for managing the situation
◦ an emergency operational plan detailing
strategies to ensure the financial viability of the
organisation
direct observation, using role plays, of the individual
consulting with and briefing key staff members on
emergency operational practices
use of case studies and problem-solving exercises
so the individual can identify and evaluate the
impacts of different types of crises on tourism,
hospitably and event businesses
written and oral questioning to assess knowledge of:
◦ the key characteristics of internal and external
crises
◦ historical impacts of crises on tourism, hospitality
89
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Guidance information for
assessment
and event operations
◦ the major triggers for a downturn in customer
sales
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
BSBFIM601A Manage finances
BSBMGT515A Manage operational plan
SITHKOP501 Design and cost menus
SITTPPD503 Research and analyse tourism data
SITTPPD601 Develop tourism products
SITXFIN501 Prepare and monitor budgets.
90
DRAFT THREE
Finance
SITXFIN201 Process financial transactions
SITXFIN201
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Process financial transactions
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXFIN001A Process financial
transactions.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to accept and process cash and other payments for
products and services and to reconcile takings at the end of the
service period or day.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, travel, hospitality and event sectors.
This unit mainly applies to frontline sales and operations personnel
who operate with some level of independence and under limited
supervision. It does, however, describe a fundamental operational
function and those people who work with very little independence
under close supervision would also use this skill.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Finance
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Process customer
payments.
2. Reconcile takings.
1.1. Receive, check and record cash float.
1.2. Check customer payments against sale value.
1.3. Provide correct change for cash payments.
1.4. Process and record transactions according to organisational
procedures.
1.5. Prepare and issue accurate receipts including all relevant tax
details.
1.6. Complete transactions using appropriate software
applications.
1.7. Complete transactions within organisation speed and
customer service requirements.
2.1. Balance customer payments at the designated time according
to organisational policy.
2.2. Separate cash floats from takings prior to balancing.
2.3. Determine point-of-sale records of customer payments.
2.4. Accurately count and calculate customer payments.
2.5. Balance cash and other payments with point-of-sale records.
91
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
2.6. Investigate or report discrepancies in the reconciliation.
2.7. Record takings according to organisational procedures.
2.8. Transport and secure cash floats, cash and other payments
according to organisational security procedures.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to discuss payments with customers and discrepancies with
appropriate personnel
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret organisational procedures for processing financial transactions, cash
float documentation, credit card and receipt details and reconciliation information
◦ write receipts and record reconciliations and basic reports about discrepancies
numeracy skills to:
◦ count cash floats
◦ calculate and check the total customer payment required
◦ tender correct change
◦ check and issue accurate receipts including Goods and Services Tax (GST)
◦ calculate total customer payments for the service period or day
◦ complete reconciliations of takings against point-of-sale records
planning and organising skills to process customer payments in a logical sequence and to
complete reconciliations within designated timelines
problem-solving skills to identify and investigate a range of routine reconciliation
discrepancies
technology skills to use point-of-sale equipment and software applications.
Required knowledge
procedures for processing different types of transactions
features and functions of point-of-sale software
role and importance of the reconciliation process to organisational financial management
system
security procedures for transporting and securing cash floats, cash and other payments
the application of GST to different products and services.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Transactions may include:
advance payments
cash
cheques
credit cards
deposits
Electronic Funds Transfer at Point of Sale (EFTPOS)
92
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Organisational procedures for
processing and recording financial
transactions may involve:
Security procedures may relate to:
foreign currency
petty cash for internal customers
refunds
travellers cheques
vouchers.
completing reconciliation records
complying with financial institution documents and
procedures
designated times for completing reconciliations
handling customer claims of short change
how and where large sums of cash should be
counted
maintaining low levels of cash in tills
management of petty cash
process for providing receipts and invoices to
customers
process for taking cash from customers
securing credit card imprints
securing takings in the event of a hold-up.
obtaining receipts or sign off for takings handed over
to financial personnel
separating and securing cash floats
transporting takings to back office areas and internal
cashiers
transporting takings to the bank and obtaining
receipts or sign off.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
process multiple and varied transactions to address
different types of customer payments
integrate knowledge of security and other procedures
when processing financial transactions
process customer payments in a logical and fair
sequence within customer time constraints so that all
customers are served effectively
complete reconciliations within designated timelines.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or events
industry business operation where financial
transactions are processed
point-of-sale equipment and software currently used
by the tourism, hospitality and events industries to
process and reconcile financial transactions
current commercial procedures and documentation
93
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
for the processing of financial transactions
cash and other forms of payments
customers from whom the individual can take
payments and with whom they can interact.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
direct observation of the individual processing
financial transactions and reconciling takings
review of reconciliation documentation prepared by
the individual
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
security and other procedures
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITTTSL303 Sell tourism products and services
SITXCCS302 Provide club reception services
SITXCCS303 Provide service to customers.
94
DRAFT THREE
SITXFIN401 Interpret financial information
SITXFIN401
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Interpret financial information
N
Replaces but not equivalent to SITXFIN003A Interpret financial
information.
Significant changes to Elements, Performance Criteria and Required
Knowledge to refocus the unit.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to interpret financial information and reports used by
organisations to monitor business performance and provide
information on operational or departmental financial activities.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, travel, hospitality and event sectors.
It applies to those people who operate independently or with limited
guidance from others. This includes supervisors and departmental
managers. This unit does not include the skills required to produce
reports for the overall operation of the department or whole
organisation. This would be created by senior managers, financial
specialists or accountants.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Finance
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Access and interpret
financial information.
1.1. Identify and interpret the range of financial information and
reports required for the organisation to monitor business
performance.
1.2. Interpret financial information and reports applicable to
operational or departmental activities.
2.1. Review financial information for impacts on operational
activities and take action according to individual
empowerment.
2.2. Routinely provide information on operational or
departmental financial activities.
2. Use and provide
financial information.
95
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret a wide range of financial documents
◦ write explanatory notes to accompany financial information
numeracy skills to interpret and use financial records and to calculate entries within financial
reports
planning and organising skills to prepare information within designated timelines
problem-solving skills to identify and resolve financial reporting discrepancies
technology skills to use accounting software packages.
Required knowledge
for the specific industry sector and organisation:
◦ financial terminology, including average spend, cover, wastage and nett costs
◦ reporting periods, including different financial years observed by different businesses
◦ the features and functions of accounting software programs used to manage financial
operations
◦ use of financial information and reports in monitoring overall business performance
key elements of financial record-keeping and key terminology, including:
◦ ledgers, subsidiary ledgers and journals
◦ transactions, receipts and disbursements
◦ invoices, accounts payable, debtors and creditors
◦ cash flow
key elements of accounting and how it provides information for business management,
including:
◦ charts of accounts and account categories, such as assets, liabilities, equity, cost of
sales, income and expense
◦ basic rules for double-entry accounting and the concept of debits and credits
◦ accrual versus cash accounting
◦ profit and loss statements and balance sheets as key financial statements used to
measure business performance, including their role; how these reports are generated;
and the format, features and key information
◦ reconciliations, including purpose, different types of reconciliation and the impact of
unpresented cheques, bank charges, direct debits and credits on reconciliations
◦ concept of costing, including fixed and variable costs
◦ accounting for and reporting Goods and Services Tax (GST).
96
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Financial information may include:
Reports may include those for:
Operational or departmental
financial activities may relate to:
account summaries and balances
balance sheets
bank deposit documentation
bank statements
banking summaries
business activity statements
cheque books
credit card transaction statements
invoices
journal entries
merchant statements
merchant summaries
profit and loss statements
trial balance.
budgets
cash flow
covers
expenditure
labour and wages
occupancy rates
purchases
receivables
sales
stock
transactions
transactions exempted
units sold
variance
wastage.
average customer spend
daily, weekly and monthly transactions
departmental expenditure, including:
◦ labour
◦ stock purchased
◦ wastage
departmental income, including:
◦ covers and gross income
◦ commission earnings
◦ occupancy and gross income
◦ sales
outstanding accounts:
◦
payable
◦ receivable
quotations realised to sales
97
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
sales performance
stock levels
variance from budget.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
interpret a diverse range of financial information and
reports used to monitor overall business performance
provide financial information on operational or
departmental financial activities
use correct financial terminology
integrate knowledge of the use of financial
information and reports in monitoring overall
business performance.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry business operation or activity for which
financial information can be interpreted
computers, printers and accounting software
packages currently used by the tourism, hospitality
and event industries
financial data and reports.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
projects and activities that allow assessment of the
individual’s ability to interpret financial information
and reports
review of information, prepared by the individual, on
operational or departmental financial activities
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
accounting concepts and terminology
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
BSBPMG501A Manage projects
SITXFIN402 Manage finances within a budget
SITXMGT401 Monitor work operations.
98
DRAFT THREE
SITXFIN402 Manage finances within a budget
SITXFIN402
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Manage finances within a budget
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXFIN004A Manage finances within
a budget.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to take responsibility for budget management where others
may have developed the budget. It requires the ability to interpret
budgetary requirements, allocate resources, monitor actual income
and expenditure and report on budgetary deviations.
The skills and knowledge for budget development are found in unit
SITXFIN501 Prepare and monitor budgets.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, hospitality and event sectors and the
budget may be for an entire organisation, for a department or for a
particular project or activity.
It applies to those people who operate independently or with limited
guidance from others. This includes supervisors and departmental
managers.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Finance
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Allocate budget
resources.
2. Monitor financial
activities against
budget.
1.1. Allocate funds according to budget and agreed priorities.
1.2. Discuss changes to income and expenditure priorities with
appropriate colleagues prior to implementation.
1.3. Consult with and inform all relevant personnel about resource
decisions.
1.4. Promote awareness of the importance of budget control.
1.5. Maintain detailed records of resource allocation according to
organisational control systems.
2.1. Use financial records to regularly check actual income and
expenditure against budgets.
2.2. Include financial commitments in all documentation to ensure
accurate monitoring.
2.3. Identify and report deviations according to significance of
deviation.
2.4. Investigate appropriate options for more effective management
of deviations.
99
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Identify and evaluate
options for improved
budget performance.
4. Complete financial
and statistical
reports.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
2.5. Advise appropriate colleagues of budget status in relation to
targets.
3.1. Assess existing costs and resources and proactively identify
areas for improvement.
3.2. Discuss desired budget outcomes with relevant colleagues.
3.3. Undertake appropriate research to investigate new
approaches to budget management.
3.4. Define and communicate the benefits and disadvantages of
new approaches.
3.5. Take account of impacts on customer service levels and
colleagues in developing new approaches.
3.6. Present clear and logical recommendations for budget
management.
4.1. Complete financial and statistical reports within designated
timelines.
4.2. Prepare and present clear and concise information to enable
informed decision making.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to discuss budget requirements and to seek and provide feedback
critical thinking skills to analyse resource use and costs
initiative and enterprise skills to proactively identify better resource usage and budgetary
improvements
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret a wide range of business and financial documents
◦ research options for more effective budgetary control
◦ write budget reports and recommendations
numeracy skills to interpret and use budget figures in day-to-day work operations, and to
calculate budget estimates and scenarios for performance improvement
planning and organising skills to produce budgetary reports within designated timelines
problem-solving skills to identify budget deviations and deficiencies and develop options for
improved budgetary performance
self-management skills to take responsibility for budget management
teamwork skills to discuss desired budget outcomes with team members and provide
direction on resource usage
technology skills to use accounting software packages.
Required knowledge
a range of formats for, use and contents of:
◦ budgets
◦ financial reports
◦ statistical reports
budget terminology
for the specific industry sector and organisation:
◦ use of budgets to control costs and enhance profitability
◦ importance of budget control
100
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
◦
◦
◦
techniques for maximising budget performance
financial reporting procedures and cycles
features and functions of accounting software programs used to manage budgets.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Budget may include:
Financial records may include:
Appropriate colleagues may
include:
Research to investigate new
approaches may include:
budgets for micro, small, medium or large
businesses
cash budgets
cash flow budgets
departmental budgets
event budgets
project budgets
purchasing budgets
sales budgets
wage budgets
whole of organisation budgets.
bank deposit documentation
bank statements
banking summaries
business activity statements
cheque books
credit card transaction statements
invoices
journal entries
labour and wages reports
merchant statements
merchant summaries
transaction reports.
internal or external financial specialists
managers
operational staff.
discussions with existing suppliers
evaluating staffing and rostering requirements
potential roster changes
reviewing operating procedures
sourcing new suppliers.
101
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Financial and statistical reports
may relate to:
cash flow
commercial account activity
commission earnings
covers and financial return
daily, weekly and monthly transactions
expenditure
income
occupancy rates and financial return
performance of:
◦ department
◦ project
◦ products and services
sales performance
sales returns
staff costs
stock levels
variance in income and/or expenditure
wastage
yield.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
interpret and manage multiple budgets to meet
specific and differing workplace needs
monitor income and expenditure and evaluate
budgetary performance over a budgetary life-cycle
use correct budget terminology
integrate knowledge of the formats, use and contents
of budgets, financial and statistical reports
complete financial reports within designated
timelines.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry business operation or activity for which
budgets are managed
computers, printers and accounting software
packages currently used by the tourism, hospitality
and event industries
budgets for specific projects, events or operational
activities.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
projects and activities that allow assessment of the
individual’s ability to:
102
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
◦
Guidance information for
assessment
interpret and manage budgets; monitor income
and expenditure
◦ produce financial and statistical reports
◦ report on overall budgetary performance
evaluation of reports produced by the individual
detailing the processes undertaken to manage
finances within a budget
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
budget terminology, format and content
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
BSBPMG501A Manage projects
SITXFIN401 Interpret financial information
SITXFIN501 Prepare and monitor budgets.
103
DRAFT THREE
SITXFIN501 Prepare and monitor budgets
SITXFIN501
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Prepare and monitor budgets
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXFIN005A Prepare and monitor
budgets.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to analyse financial and other business information to
prepare and monitor budgets. It requires the ability to draft and
negotiate budgets, identify deviations and manage the delivery of
successful budgetary performance.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, hospitality and event sectors and the
budget may be for an entire organisation, for a department or for a
particular project or activity.
It applies to senior personnel who operate independently or with
limited guidance from others and who are responsible for making a
range of financial management decisions.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Finance
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Prepare budget
information.
2. Prepare budget.
3. Finalise budget.
1.1. Determine and confirm scope and nature of required budgets.
1.2. Identify, access and interpret data and data sources required
for budget preparation.
1.3. Analyse internal and external factors for potential impact on
budget.
1.4. Provide opportunities for colleagues to contribute to the budget
planning process.
2.1. Draft budget, based on analysis of all available information.
2.2. Estimate income and expenditure and support with valid,
reliable and relevant information.
2.3. Reflect organisational objectives within the draft budget.
2.4. Assess and present options and recommendations in a clear
format.
2.5. Circulate the draft budget to colleagues and managers for
input.
3.1. Negotiate budget according to organisational policy and
procedures.
3.2. Agree on and incorporate modifications.
3.3. Complete final budget in a clear format within designated
104
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
4. Monitor and review
budget.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
timelines.
3.4. Inform colleagues of final budget decisions and their
application within the relevant work area, including reporting
and financial management responsibilities.
4.1. Regularly review budget to assess actual performance against
estimated performance and prepare accurate financial
reports.
4.2. Incorporate all financial commitments into budget and all
budget reports.
4.3. Investigate and take appropriate action on significant
deviations.
4.4. Analyse changes in the internal and external environment and
make necessary adjustments.
4.5. Collect and record relevant information to assist in future
budget preparation.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to liaise and negotiate with colleagues on potential complex and
conflicting budget requirements
critical thinking skills to analyse internal and external factors for potential impact on budget
initiative and enterprise skills to draft budgets that meet organisational objectives
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret information that deals with complex ideas and concepts
◦ research internal and external factors that may impact on budgetary performance
◦ write complex budget reports and recommendations
numeracy skills to interpret and analyse financial information, including forecasts and
previous performance data, and to develop financial estimates and scenarios using complex
calculations
planning and organising skills to access and sort all information required for budget
preparation and to coordinate a timely, efficient and consultative budget development
process
problem-solving skills to:
◦ identify budgetary challenges and develop different options for their resolution
◦ identify budget deviations and deficiencies and develop options for meeting budgetary
requirements
self-management skills to take responsibility for budget development
teamwork skills to invite and coordinate the input of others in the organisation, and provide
direction on budget management
technology skills to use accounting software packages.
Required knowledge
budget terminology
for the specific industry sector and organisation:
◦ role and nature of budgets
◦ a range of budget formats, budget performance and financial reports
◦ financial reporting procedures and cycles
105
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
◦
features and functions of accounting software programs used to prepare and monitor
budgets
budget preparation and monitoring practices and techniques, including:
◦ sources and contents of data required for budget preparation
◦ techniques for making budget estimates
◦ common reasons for deviations and budget deviation management.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Data and data sources required for
budget preparation may include:
Budget may include:
Internal and external factors that
could impact on budget
development may include:
competitor research
customer or supplier research
declared commitments in areas of operation
financial information from suppliers
financial proposals from key stakeholders
income and expenditure for previous time periods
departmental, event or project budgets
grant funding guidelines or limitations
management policies and procedures
organisational budget preparation guidelines
performance information from previous periods.
budgets for micro, small, medium or large
businesses
cash budgets
cash flow budgets
departmental budgets
event budgets
grant funding budgets
project budgets
sales budgets
wage budgets
whole of organisation budgets.
growth or decline in economic conditions
human resource requirements
new legislation or regulation
organisational and management restructures
organisational objectives
scope of the project
shift in market trends
significant price movement for certain commodities or
items
supplier availability and cost.
106
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Financial reports may include:
annual general meeting reports
board reports
funding acquittals in relation to grants received
periodic reports showing budget versus year-to-date
actuals and financial commitments
periodic sales reports
taxation commitments.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
prepare multiple budgets to meet specific and
differing workplace needs
consult on budget components and monitor and
review budgets against performance over a
budgetary life cycle
analyse the factors that impact the budget
integrate knowledge of budget preparation and
monitoring practices and techniques
complete draft and final budgets within designated
timelines.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry business operation or activity for which
budgets are prepared
computers, printers and accounting software
packages currently used by the tourism, hospitality
and event industries
financial and operational data and reports used to
prepare budgets for tourism, hospitality and event
business activities
others with whom the individual can discuss, and
negotiate draft and final budget components.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
projects and activities that allow assessment of the
individual’s ability to:
◦ prepare and monitor budgets
◦ produce reports evaluating actual performance
against estimated performance
◦ produce financial reports related to the budgets
evaluation of reports produced by the individual
detailing the processes undertaken to prepare a
budget
direct observation of the individual negotiating the
107
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Guidance information for
assessment
acceptance of a proposed budget
use of case studies and problem-solving activities
about budget deviations and required actions
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
budget preparation and monitoring practices and
techniques
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
BSBCMM401A Make a presentation
BSBPMG501A Manage projects
SITXFIN401 Interpret financial information
SITXFIN402 Manage finances within a budget
SITXFIN601 Manage physical assets.
108
DRAFT THREE
SITXFIN601 Manage physical assets
SITXFIN601
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Manage physical assets
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXFIN007A Manage physical
assets.
Re-worked Elements, Performance Criteria, Required Skills and
Knowledge to more fully articulate content.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to manage the physical assets of an organisation. It
requires the ability to establish systems and practices for asset
monitoring, maintenance and acquisition.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, hospitality and event sectors.
It applies to senior managers who operate with significant autonomy
and who are responsible for making a range of strategic
management decisions.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Finance
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Develop practices for
systematic
maintenance, repair
and purchase of
physical assets.
1.1. Develop and maintain an accurate and current physical
assets register.
1.2. Develop practices for managing physical assets that reflect
overall business objectives.
1.3. Establish and implement maintenance and repair regimes that
minimise disruption and loss of revenue.
1.4. Integrate practices to support environmental sustainability
into use of physical assets.
1.5. Evaluate current and potential financial ability to acquire
physical assets.
2.1. Establish and implement regular reporting practices to
ensure the effective performance of physical assets.
2.2. Identify physical asset problems promptly and take appropriate
action.
2.3. Assess long term physical asset performance.
2.4. Evaluate need for and access specialist assistance.
3.1. Prepare accurate equipment specifications to guide the
acquisition process.
3.2. Estimate acquisition costs based on evaluation of current,
accurate and relevant data.
2. Monitor the condition
and performance of
physical assets.
3. Coordinate financing
and purchase of
physical assets.
109
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
3.3. Make decisions on the replacement and acquisition of physical
assets.
3.4. Select methods of financing to meet current financial
objectives.
3.5. Finance acquisitions in consultation with financial specialists.
3.6. Keep accurate records of all financial agreements.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to discuss asset deficiencies with team members and to negotiate
purchase and financial arrangements with suppliers
critical thinking skills to evaluate current and future asset needs and financial ability to
update physical assets
initiative and enterprise skills to identify and analyse the utility of enhanced physical assets
to improve business performance
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret complex product specifications and financial contracts
◦ research new physical assets to enhance business performance
◦ write detailed specifications for the supply of physical assets
numeracy skills to analyse financial data and interpret estimates and financial agreements
for physical asset acquisition
planning and organising skills to manage maintenance and repair regimes and plan for the
acquisition of assets
problem-solving skills to identify physical asset problems and to resolve through
maintenance or replacement
self-management skills to take responsibility for the monitoring of physical asset quality,
utility and acquisition
teamwork skills to regularly discuss the condition and utility of physical assets with team
members and take account of their feedback when making acquisitions.
Required knowledge
types of physical assets required by tourism, hospitality and event organisations and the
organisation in particular
maintenance requirements for different types of physical assets
a range of formats for and inclusions of asset registers
features and benefits of different financing options for asset acquisition, including purchase,
rent, lease and hire purchase
depreciation that can be applied to different types of physical assets
practices to support environmental sustainability using different types of physical assets.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Physical assets may include:
buildings
110
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Business objectives may include:
Practices to support
environmental sustainability may
include:
Regular reporting practices may
include a requirement for:
Assess may involve evaluation of:
Specialist assistance may involve:
computer systems
equipment fixtures, fittings and furniture contained
within:
◦ accommodation establishments
◦ commercial kitchens
◦ restaurants and bars
◦ storage areas
◦ tourism, hospitality and event offices
◦ transportation depots
gardens
pools
rides and games
vehicles
vessels.
profitability
growth
provision of quality products and services to
customers
adherence to:
◦ codes of conduct
◦ environmental sustainability philosophies and
practices
◦ industry accreditation schemes.
effective use of consumables
minimising waste
regular maintenance to ensure efficiency of
machinery
systems to reduce resource use:
◦ fuel
◦ power
◦ water.
formal and informal customer and staff feedback
procedures to integrate day-to-day condition reports
scheduled:
◦ internal or external inspections and audits
◦ management reports.
ability to meet business objectives
cost of maintenance over a period of time
customer and staff feedback
input from specialists
operational efficiency
safety.
architects
builders
designers
electronic specialists
information technology suppliers
111
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Specifications may include:
Current, accurate and relevant
data used for estimating costs may
include:
Methods of financing may include:
landscape architects
manufacturers
mechanics
tradespeople
vendors.
budget parameters
environmental sustainability policies for the business
floor plans
numbers and types of required equipment fixtures,
fittings and furniture
operational performance requirements:
◦ efficiency
◦ customer traffic
◦ staff usage
types of products and services offered by the
business.
current maintenance contracts
estimates and quotations from suppliers
previous contracts and costs
published or advertised prices.
hire purchase
lease
purchase
rent.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
plan for and manage the acquisition, maintenance
and replacement of a diverse range of physical
assets
monitor the utility of assets to meet business needs
over a period of time
develop and maintain a current assets register
demonstrate knowledge of the features and benefits
of different financing options for asset acquisition.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry business operation for which physical assets
are monitored and maintained
current commercial purchase specifications, supplier
product and cost information and contractual
documentation used for the purchase of assets
suppliers with whom the individual can interact and
negotiate.
112
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
projects, activities and case studies that allow
assessment of the individual’s ability to:
◦ manage physical assets for specific tourism,
hospitality and event business environments
◦ develop and maintain a physical assets register
◦ evaluate the performance of physical assets and
take actions to address deficiencies
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
financing options
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
BSBWRT401A Write complex documents
SITXFIN401 Interpret financial information
SITXFIN501 Prepare and monitor budgets
SITXMGT501 Establish and conduct business
relationships.
113
DRAFT THREE
SITXFIN602 Manage revenue
SITXFIN602
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Manage revenue
New unit.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to make, implement and monitor pricing decisions to
maximise yield and business profitability.
This unit contains employability skills.
The unit applies to supplier organisations in the tourism, travel and
hospitality industries, in particular to the accommodation, tour
operations and tour wholesaling sectors. It applies to senior
personnel who work autonomously and are responsible for making
strategic business decisions.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Finance
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Analyse and forecast
business activity.
1.1. Analyse existing performance data and budget targets.
1.2. Interrogate and compare sources of business activity from
different distribution channels and market segments.
1.3. Evaluate external market factors, competitor activity and
changing customer demand patterns.
1.4. Develop scenarios and forecasts around future business
performance and revenues.
2.1. Confirm nett delivery costs, both fixed and variable.
2.2. Review and incorporate distributor commissions or mark-ups.
2.3. Set standard and promotional rates for different times, trading
periods and market segments based on analysis of forecasts
and pricing options and optimum yield.
2.4. Assess the need for special conditions and apply as
required.
2.5. Clearly and accurately document pricing structures and
associated terms and conditions with consideration of
consumer protection requirements.
3.1. Communicate pricing initiatives to colleagues and to internal
and external partners and distribution channels.
3.2. Establish mechanisms and collateral to support pricing
decisions in different market segments.
4.1. Monitor revenue results achieved through pricing and
distribution initiatives on a timely basis.
4.2. Adjust initiatives based on results and broader business and
market analysis.
2. Make pricing
decisions.
3. Implement pricing
decisions.
4. Monitor pricing
initiatives.
114
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
4.3. Record performance data for future analysis.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
critical thinking skills to interrogate complex business information and develop business
strategies in response
initiative and enterprise skills to recognise or proactively seek new opportunities
literacy skills to:
◦ interpret complex business performance information
numeracy skills to:
◦ analyse business performance data
◦ calculate a range of different commission and mark-up structures
◦ assess profitability scenarios
◦ develop pricing structures
planning and organising skills to coordinate timely analysis and decision-making
problem-solving skills to develop strategic responses to business performance challenges
technology skills to work with financial and forecasting models and online distribution
channels.
Required knowledge
key principles and terminology of revenue management:
◦ dynamic and static pricing
◦ matching supply and demand
◦ shaping demand through price
◦ perishability
◦ responsiveness and timing
◦ performance metrics
◦ revenue generation index
◦ market penetration index
types of business performance data used in revenue management:
◦ sources of business
◦ financial reports
◦ historical trends
◦ market analysis
◦ occupancy and load reports
◦ no-show reports
◦ supply and demand analysis
mechanisms and collateral that support initiatives in different market segments:
◦ channel management systems
◦ global distribution systems
◦ online requirements – promotions, proprietary websites, third party websites
◦ types of promotions
sector-specific factors that impact revenue management initiatives:
◦ financial:
- fixed and variable operating costs
- profit margin requirements
115
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
- industry commission and mark-up procedures
- cost of distribution networks
◦ external market factors:
- competitor activity
- complementary activity (events)
- travel capacity
aspects of consumer protection law that impact on pricing and distribution:
◦ providing services as advertised
◦ terms and conditions
◦ refund requirements
◦ cancellation fees
◦ credit card surcharges.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Special conditions may include:
Internal and external partners may
include:
block out dates
inclusions
payment requirements
stay controls.
external organisations:
◦ agency networks
◦ global distribution systems
◦ local, state or national tourism organisations
◦ own website managers
third party website managers
internal colleagues:
◦ accounting
◦ front line service
◦ management
◦ sales and marketing.
◦
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Evidence of the ability to:
develop, implement and monitor pricing initiatives for
multiple products, trading periods and market
segments
integrate knowledge of:
◦ revenue management principles
◦ financial factors affecting revenue management
◦ industry distribution and marketing
considerations.
116
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated business operation for which
revenue management initiatives can be developed
current information and communications technology
current industry and business data .
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
evaluation of completed pricing structures for specific
products, trading periods and market segments
use of case studies to assess ability to analyse
business data and develop effective pricing in
response
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of,
industry interrelationships, distribution networks,
mark-up and commission structures and legal
requirements
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITTPPD503 Research and analyse tourism data
SITTPPD601 Develop tourism products.
117
DRAFT THREE
Food Safety
SITXFSA101 Use hygienic practices for food safety
SITXFSA101
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Use hygienic practices for food safety
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXOHS002A Follow workplace
hygiene procedures. Updated and re-categorised to Food Safety.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to use personal hygiene practices to prevent contamination
of food that might cause food-borne illnesses. It requires the ability
to follow predetermined organisational procedures and to identify
and control food hazards.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, hospitality and catering organisations
with permanent or temporary kitchen premises or smaller food
preparation or bar areas.
This includes restaurants, cafes, clubs, hotels, bars, tour operators,
attractions, function, event, exhibition and conference caterers,
educational institutions, aged care facilities, correctional centres,
hospitals, defence forces, cafeterias, kiosks, canteens, fast food
outlets, residential caterers, in-flight and other transport caterers.
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
It applies to food handlers which can be any person who directly
handles food or food contact surfaces food such as cutlery, plates
and bowls. People at many levels use this skill in the workplace
during the course of their daily activities, including cooks, chefs,
caterers, kitchen stewards, kitchen hands, bar and food and
beverage attendants and sometimes room attendants and front
office staff.
Food handlers must comply with the requirements contained within
the Australia New Zealand Food Standards (ANZFS) Code (the
Code).
Competency field
Unit sector
In some states and territories businesses are required to designate a
food safety supervisor who is required to be certified as competent
in this unit through a registered training organisation.
Food Safety
Cross-Sector
118
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Follow hygiene
procedures and
identify food
hazards.
2. Report any personal
health issues.
3. Prevent food
contamination.
4. Prevent
cross-contamination
by washing hands.
1.1. Follow organisational hygiene procedures.
1.2. Promptly report unsafe practices that breach hygiene
procedures.
1.3. Identify food hazards that may affect the health and safety of
customers, colleagues and self.
1.4. Remove or minimise the hygiene hazard and report to
appropriate person for follow up.
2.1. Report any personal health issues likely to cause a hygiene
risk.
2.2. Report incidents of food contamination resulting from personal
health issues.
2.3. Cease participation in food handling activities where a health
issue may cause food contamination.
3.1. Maintain clean clothes, wear required personal protective
clothing and only use organisation-approved bandages and
dressings.
3.2. Prevent food contamination from clothing and other items
worn.
3.3. Prevent unnecessary direct contact with ready to eat food.
3.4. Avoid unhygienic personal contact with food or food
contact surfaces.
3.5. Avoid unhygienic cleaning practices that may cause foodborne illnesses.
4.1. Wash hands at appropriate times and follow hand washing
procedures consistently.
4.2. Wash hands using appropriate facilities.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to verbally report hygiene hazards and poor organisational practice
literacy skills to comprehend workplace documents or diagrams that interpret the content of:
◦ organisational food safety program
◦ hygiene and food safety procedures
◦ Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) practices
problem-solving skills to identify and report hygiene hazards.
Required knowledge
basic aspects of national, state or territory food safety laws, standards and codes. This
would include:
◦ meaning of contaminant, contamination and potentially hazardous foods as defined by
the Code
◦ hygiene actions that must be adhered to by businesses to avoid food-borne illnesses
◦ employee responsibility to participate in hygienic practices
◦ reasons for food safety programs and what they must contain
119
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
◦
◦
role of local government regulators
ramifications of failure to observe food safety law and organisational policies and
procedures
basic aspects of HACCP method of controlling food safety
for the specific industry sector and organisation:
◦ major causes of food contamination and food-borne illnesses
◦ sources and effects of microbiological contamination of food
◦ workplace hygiene hazards when handling food and food contact surfaces
◦ basic content of organisational food safety program
◦ the contents of hygiene and food safety procedures
◦ hygienic work practices for individual job roles and responsibilities.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Hygiene procedures:
Unsafe practices may include:
may cover:
◦ cleaning and sanitising practices to avoid
contamination of food
◦ food storage
◦ handling and disposal of garbage
◦ personal hygiene
◦ regular hand washing
◦ safe and hygienic handling of food and
beverages
◦ safe handling and disposal of linen and laundry
◦ suitable dress and personal protective equipment
and clothing
◦ use of cleaning equipment, clothes and materials
to avoid contamination of food
may be:
◦ covered by staff training programs
◦ documented in the organisational food safety
program
◦ required by the national food safety code.
being asked to participate in unhygienic work
practices
food handling practices that may result in the
contamination of food
ignoring the direction of:
◦ hygiene signage
◦ supervisors
◦ managers
lack of:
◦ required hygiene signage
◦ training in hygiene procedures
120
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Food hazards may include:
Health issues may relate to:
Other items worn may include:
Unhygienic personal contact may
involve:
Food contact surfaces may
include:
outdated practices not in keeping with current
organisational procedures
poor personal hygiene and cleaning practices that
may result in cross-contamination of food and other
items
practices inconsistent with organisational food safety
program
seeing others using unhygienic work practices
use of broken or malfunctioning equipment.
airborne dust
colleagues without appropriate training or
understanding of good hygiene practices, policies
and procedures
contaminated food
contaminated garbage
dirty equipment and utensils
equipment not working correctly, such as fridge and
temperature probes
items, such as linen, tea towels and towels that may
be contaminated with human waste, such as blood
and body secretions
use of practices not in keeping with current
organisational activities
vermin.
airborne diseases
food borne diseases
infectious diseases.
bandages
hair accessories
jewellery
watches.
transferring micro-organisms by:
◦ blowing nose
◦ coughing
◦ drinking
◦ eating
◦ scratching skin and hair
◦ sneezing
◦ spitting
◦ touching wounds
transmitting tobacco products by smoking.
chopping boards
containers
cooking utensils
crockery
cutlery
glassware
121
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Unhygienic cleaning practices
may involve:
Wash hands at appropriate times
might include:
Appropriate facilities for hand
washing may include:
pots and pans
sinks
workbenches
cleaning food contact surfaces with linen, tea towels
and towels that may be contaminated with human
waste:
◦ blood
◦ body secretions
◦ faeces
using dirty:
◦ cleaning cloths
◦ tea towels
spreading bacteria from bathroom or bedroom areas
to mini-bar or kitchen areas in an accommodation
facility.
before commencing or recommencing work with food
immediately after:
◦ handling raw food
◦ smoking, coughing, sneezing, blowing the nose,
eating, drinking, and touching the hair, scalp or
any wound
◦ using the toilet.
designated hand washing sink
liquid soap
single use towels
warm running water.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
integrate the use of predetermined hygiene
procedures and food safety practices within day-today food handling work functions
integrate, into daily work activities, knowledge of the
basic aspects of food safety standards and codes
and the ramifications of disregarding this.
Assessment must ensure use of:
an operational commercial food preparation area, bar
or kitchen with the fixtures, large and small
equipment and workplace documentation defined in
the Assessment Guidelines; this can be a:
◦ real industry workplace
◦ simulated industry environment such as a training
kitchen servicing customers
food ingredients and ready to eat food items
current plain English regulatory documents
122
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
distributed by the national, state, territory or local
government food safety authority
the Code
current commercial food safety programs, policies
and procedures used for the management of food
safety.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
direct observation of the candidate using hygienic
work practices during an integrated assessment of
operative functions, such as cleaning and tidying
bars, cooking at a camp site, preparing meals in a
commercial kitchen, storing unused foodstuffs
use of problem-solving exercises so the individual
can respond to a range of situations where food
hazards exist
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
the content of hygiene procedures and food safety
standards and codes
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITXFSA201 Participate in safe food handling
practices
SITXFSA202 Transport and store food
any commercial cookery, commercial catering,
patisserie, Asian cookery or food and beverage unit
involving food preparation.
123
DRAFT THREE
SITXFSA201 Participate in safe food handling practices
SITXFSA201
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Participate in safe food handling practices
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXFSA001A Implement food safety
procedures.
Prerequisite removed. Minor adjustments to expression of content to
streamline and improve unit. Change to title for greater consistency
across Training Package. Wording adjusted to better reflect
regulatory requirements.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to handle food safely during the storage, preparation,
display, service and disposal of food. It requires the ability to follow
predetermined procedures as outlined in a food safety program.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, hospitality and catering organisations
with permanent or temporary kitchen premises or smaller food
preparation areas.
This includes restaurants, cafes, clubs, hotels, tour operators,
attractions, function, event, exhibition and conference caterers,
educational institutions, aged care facilities, correctional centres,
hospitals, defence forces, cafeterias, kiosks, canteens, fast food
outlets, residential caterers, in-flight and other transport caterers.
Safe food handling practices are based on an organisation’s
individual food safety program. The program would normally be
based on the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP)
method, but this unit can apply to other food safety systems.
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
It applies to food handlers who directly handle food. People at many
levels use this skill in the workplace during the course of their daily
activities, including cooks, chefs, caterers, kitchen hands and food
and beverage attendants.
Food handlers must comply with the requirements contained within
the Australia New Zealand Food Standards (ANZFS) Code (the
Code).
Competency field
Unit sector
In some states and territories businesses are required to designate a
food safety supervisor who is required to be certified as competent
in this unit through a registered training organisation.
Food Safety
Cross-Sector
124
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Follow food safety
program.
2. Store food safely.
3. Prepare food safely.
4. Provide safe single
use items.
5. Maintain a clean
environment.
6. Dispose of food
safely.
1.1. Access and use relevant information from organisational food
safety program.
1.2. Follow policies and procedures in food safety program.
1.3. Control food hazards at critical control points.
1.4. Complete food safety monitoring processes and complete
documents as required.
1.5. Identify and report non-conforming practices.
1.6. Take corrective actions within scope of job responsibility for
incidents where food hazards are not controlled.
2.1. Select food storage conditions for specific food type.
2.2. Store food in environmental conditions that protect against
contamination and maximise freshness, quality and
appearance.
2.3. Store food at controlled temperatures and ensure that frozen
items remain frozen during storage.
3.1. Use cooling and heating processes that support
microbiological safety of the food.
3.2. Monitor food temperature during preparation using required
temperature measuring device to achieve microbiological
safety.
3.3. Ensure safety of food prepared, served and sold to
customers under other conditions.
4.1. Store, display and provide single use items so they are
protected from damage and contamination.
4.2. Follow instructions for items intended for single use.
5.1. Clean and sanitise equipment, surfaces and utensils.
5.2. Use appropriate containers and prevent accumulation of
garbage and recycled matter.
5.3. Identify and report cleaning, sanitising and maintenance
requirements.
5.4. Dispose of or report chipped, broken or cracked eating,
drinking or food handling utensils.
5.5. Take measures within scope of responsibility to ensure food
handling areas are free from animals and pests and report
incidents of animal or pest infestation.
6.1. Mark and keep separate from other foodstuffs any food
identified for disposal until disposal is complete.
6.2. Dispose of food promptly to avoid cross-contamination.
125
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to report food safety hazards
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret food safety program, including policies, procedures and flow charts
that identify critical control points
◦ complete documentation for monitoring food safety
numeracy skills to calibrate and use a temperature probe and calculate timings
problem-solving skills to identify and respond to routine food safety issues
planning and organising skills to coordinate a range of different food handling tasks to take
account of food safety issues
self-management skills to take responsibility for food safety at an operational level.
Required knowledge
key features of federal, state or territory and local food safety compliance requirements as
they impact workers at an operational level, including:
◦ contents of national codes and standards that underpin regulatory requirements
◦ reasons for food safety programs and what they must contain
◦ local government food safety regulations and inspection regimes
◦ consequences of failure to observe food safety policies and procedures
◦ meaning of contaminant, contamination and potentially hazardous foods as defined by
the Code
HACCP or other food safety system principles, procedures and processes as they apply to
particular operations and different food types, including:
◦ critical control points for the specific food production system and the predetermined
methods of control, especially time and temperature controls used in the receiving,
storing, preparing, processing, displaying, serving, packaging, transporting and
disposing of food
◦ main types of safety hazards and contamination
◦ conditions for development of microbiological contamination
◦ environmental conditions, including temperature controls, for storage
◦ temperature danger zone and the two-hour and four-hour rule
contents of organisational food safety program, especially procedures and monitoring
documents
equipment operating procedures, especially how to calibrate, use and clean a temperature
probe and how to identify faults
choice and application of cleaning, sanitising and pest control equipment and materials
high risk customer groups, such as:
◦ children or babies
◦ pregnant women
◦ aged persons
◦ people with immune deficiencies or allergies.
126
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Policies and procedures may
relate to:
Food hazards may be:
Critical control points are specific
steps where control of food hazards
is essential to maintain the safety
and suitability of the food, including:
cleaning and sanitation
hazards:
◦ control methods for each critical control point
◦ corrective actions
◦ systematic monitoring of hazard controls and
record keeping
equipment maintenance
food:
◦ receiving
◦ storage
◦ preparation
◦ display
◦ service
◦ disposal
personal considerations:
◦ dress
◦ hygiene
◦ protective equipment and clothing
pest control
record maintenance
training.
actual or potential
chemical
insects and vermin
microbiological:
◦ bacteria
◦ natural poisons
◦ moulds
◦ yeast
physical:
◦ broken glass
◦ metal
◦ foreign objects
process-related where food is vulnerable to
contamination:
◦ displayed food
◦ need for food to be touched by hand
◦ re-thermalisation or defrosting
◦ processes involving temperatures that promote
rapid growth of micro-organisms.
receiving
storing
preparing
processing
127
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Food safety monitoring may
involve:
Incidents may include:
Food type may include:
Safety of food served and sold to
customers under other conditions
may be achieved by:
Food prepared, served and sold
to customers under other
conditions may relate to:
Items intended for single use may
include:
displaying
serving
packaging
transporting
disposing.
bacterial swabs and counts
checking and recording that food is stored in
appropriate timeframes
chemical tests
monitoring and recording food temperatures using a
temperature measuring device accurate to plus or
minus 1 degree Celsius
monitoring and recording temperature of cold and hot
storage equipment
visual examination of food for quality review.
customer complaints
existence of pests and vermin
food not under temperature control
food poisoning
misuse of single use items
spoilt or contaminated food
stocks of out-of-date foodstuffs
unclean equipment.
dairy
dried goods
eggs
frozen goods
fruit and vegetables
meat and fish.
packaging control:
◦ using packaging materials suited to foods
◦ monitoring of packaging damage
protective barriers
temperature control
supervision of food displays
utensil control:
◦ providing separate serving utensils for each dish.
drink dispensing
pre-packaged food items
self-service food.
disposable items:
◦ cutlery
◦ crockery
face wipes and serviettes
individually packaged items:
◦ beverages
◦ condiments
128
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Cleaning, sanitising and
maintenance may involve:
Food identified for disposal must
be held and kept separate and
either:
◦ jams and spreads.
cleaning:
◦ dirt
◦ food waste
◦ grease
◦ pest waste removal
maintenance:
◦ recalibration of measurement and temperature
controls
◦ minor faults
sanitising:
◦ eating and drinking utensils
◦ food contact surfaces.
clearly identified as not safe, or suspected of not
being safe, for consumption
destroyed
disposed of so that it cannot be used for human
consumption
returned to supplier
subject to recall.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
consistently use safe food handling practices in a
range of different food handling circumstances
demonstrate knowledge of food safety program and
requirements, including critical control points and
methods of food hazard control for each critical
control point.
Assessment must ensure use of:
an operational food preparation area or commercial
kitchen with the fixtures, large and small equipment
and workplace documentation defined in the
Assessment Guidelines; this can be a:
◦ real industry workplace
◦ simulated industry environment such as a training
kitchen servicing customers
food ingredients and ready to eat food items
current plain English regulatory documents
distributed by the national, state, territory or local
government food safety authority
the Code
current commercial food safety programs, policies
and procedures used for the management of food
safety.
129
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
direct observation of the individual completing tasks
in a food handling facility
use of case studies to assess ability to react to a
range of incidents where hazards have not been
controlled
oral or written questioning to assess knowledge of
food safety legislative requirements, policies and
procedures, including hazard control measures
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITXFSA101 Use hygienic practices for food safety
any commercial cookery, commercial catering,
patisserie, Asian cookery or food and beverage unit
involving food preparation.
130
DRAFT THREE
SITXFSA202 Transport and store food
SITXFSA202
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Transport and store food
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXFSA003A Transport and store
food in a safe and hygienic manner.
Prerequisite removed. Title simplified. Minor adjustments to
expression of content to streamline and improve unit. Wording
adjusted to better reflect regulatory requirements.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to transport food from a food preparation area to another
location. It also deals with holding or storage on arrival.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to catering operations where food is transported
from the preparation area to another location and stored on arrival.
This could include restaurants, educational institutions, aged care
facilities, hospitals, defence forces, cafeterias, kiosks, cafes,
residential catering, in-flight and other transport catering, events
catering and private catering. It applies to food handlers who directly
handle food when transporting and storing food. People at many
levels use this skill in the workplace including cooks, chefs, caterers
and catering assistants.
Competency field
Unit sector
The person transporting the food may or may not be driving the
vehicle.
Food handlers involved in transporting and storing food must comply
with the requirements contained within the Australia New Zealand
Food Standards (ANZFS) Code (the Code). Business may be
required to implement a food safety program and food handlers
would need to comply with the transportation provisions
Food Safety
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Transport food safely
and hygienically.
1.1. Select suitable food transportation vehicles according to
legislative requirements.
1.2. Package, load, restrain and unload food appropriately.
1.3. Use hygienic food safety practices for food transportation
1.4. Use safe manual handling techniques when moving and
storing food.
1.5. Maintain records of food transportation as required.
2.1. Select food storage conditions for specific food types.
2.2. Maintain environmental conditions for specific food types to
ensure freshness, quality and appearance.
2.3. Ensure storage and holding methods optimise nutritional
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
2. Store food safely and
hygienically.
131
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
quality and comply with relevant stock control principles.
2.4. Use hygienic food safety practices and observe work health
and safety procedures and practices.
2.5. Keep storage areas free from contaminants and pests.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
literacy skills to:
◦ read work instructions and food labels
◦ complete records of food transportation
numeracy skills to calculate quantities during the packing and unpacking process
problem-solving skills to deal with routine food handling, storage and transportation
problems.
Required knowledge
basic aspects of national, state or territory food safety laws, standards and codes, including:
◦ actions that must be adhered to by organisations
◦ employee responsibility to participate in hygienic practices
◦ reasons for food safety programs, when they are required for transportation activities
and what they must contain
◦ role of local government regulators
◦ ramifications of failure to observe food safety law and organisational policies and
procedures
◦ meaning of contaminant, contamination and potentially hazardous foods as defined by
the Code
advantages and disadvantages of different forms of transport for particular food items,
quantities and circumstances
safe storage principles and practices for different food types, including storage options
characteristics of different food items and conditions required to maintain optimum
freshness, palatability and safety, including:
◦ dairy
◦ dried goods
◦ eggs
◦ frozen food
◦ fruit and vegetables
◦ meat and fish
for the specific industry sector and organisation:
◦ sources and effects of microbiological contamination of food in transit
◦ methods of transportation and storage to ensure the safety of food
◦ temperature controls and temperature danger zones, for storage of main food types
used in the business
◦ the contents of food safety transportation procedures included in organisational food
safety program
safe manual handling techniques, in particular loading and unloading, lifting and dealing with
heated surfaces.
RANGE STATEMENT
132
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Type of transportation used may
include:
Legislative requirements refer to
federal, state or territory, and local
regulations and guidelines and may
apply to:
Specific food types may include:
Environmental conditions may
relate to:
cars
refrigerated trucks
trolleys, carts and buggies
vans.
food safety programs
lining
sealing
temperature.
dairy
dried goods
eggs
frozen food
fruit and vegetables
meat and fish.
humidity
light
pests
temperature.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
transport and store food items according to food
safety requirements and regulations
demonstrate knowledge of specific requirements for
different food types, including:
◦ dairy
◦ dried goods
◦ eggs
◦ frozen food
◦ fruit and vegetables
◦ meat and fish.
Assessment must ensure use of:
vehicles suitable for the transportation of food
food ingredients and ready to eat food items to be
transported
industry-current equipment for the transportation and
storage of food
current plain English regulatory documents
distributed by the national, state, territory or local
government food safety authority
the Code
133
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
current commercial food safety programs, policies
and procedures used for the management of food
safety.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
direct observation of the individual transporting and
storing food items
inspection of food transported and stored by the
individual
use of case studies to assess knowledge of
requirements for different food types
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
food safety requirements
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITHCCC104 Package prepared foodstuffs
SITXFSA101 Use hygienic practices for food safety.
134
DRAFT THREE
SITXFSA401 Develop and implement a food safety program
SITXFSA401
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Develop and implement a food safety program
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXFSA002A Develop and
implement a food safety program.
Prerequisite removed. Minor adjustments to expression of content to
streamline and improve unit. Wording adjusted to better reflect
regulatory requirements.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to develop, implement and evaluate a food safety program
for the all stages in the food production process including receipt,
storage, preparation, service and disposal. It requires the ability to
determine program requirements and prepare policies and
procedures for other personnel to follow.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, hospitality and catering organisations
with permanent or temporary kitchen premises or smaller food
preparation areas.
This includes restaurants, cafes, clubs, hotels, tour operators,
attractions, function, event, exhibition and conference caterers,
educational institutions, aged care facilities, correctional centres,
hospitals, defence forces, cafeterias, kiosks, canteens, fast food
outlets, residential caterers, in-flight and other transport caterers.
A food safety program would most commonly be based on the
Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) method but
this unit can apply to other food safety systems.
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
It applies to senior personnel who work independently and who are
responsible for making strategic decisions on establishing and
monitoring risk control systems for food-related hazards. This could
include chefs, kitchen managers, catering managers, fast food store
managers and owner-operators of small business catering
operations or retail food outlets.
Food businesses must comply with requirements contained within
the Australia New Zealand Food Standards (ANZFS) Code (the
Code). The Code contains a non-mandatory standard for the
development of a food safety program.
Food Safety
Cross-Sector
135
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Evaluate
organisational
requirements for
food safety program.
1.1. Evaluate organisational characteristics that impact on food
safety.
1.2. Examine food handling operations and processes and identify
potential or existing food hazards.
1.3. Identify critical control points in food preparation system
where food hazards must be controlled.
1.4. Identify product suppliers and determine quality assurance
specifications for foodstuffs supplied.
1.5. Evaluate existing product specifications for food items
prepared and sold.
1.6. Evaluate existing policies and procedures and monitoring
practices, including record keeping, and assess need for
change.
2.1. Consult with stakeholders in program development.
2.2. Integrate regulatory requirements and standards into policies
and procedures.
2.3. Establish and document critical control points and control
methods for each point.
2.4. Develop procedures for systematic monitoring of controls
and associated record keeping.
2.5. Develop corrective action procedures for uncontrolled hazards.
2.6. Develop or modify and record product specifications covering
food items prepared and sold.
2.7. Identify training needs and develop training program.
2.8. Develop schedule for regular review of food safety program.
2.9. Document food safety program and provide to regulatory
authorities as required.
3.1. Communicate food safety programs, policies, procedures and
product specifications to colleagues and ensure display of
appropriate signage and access to information.
3.2. Organise appropriate training and mentoring.
3.3. Monitor operational activities to ensure that policies and
procedures are followed.
3.4. Manage response to incidents of uncontrolled food
hazards and oversee implementation of corrective action
procedures.
3.5. Make changes to practices that led to the food safety breach,
and document, communicate and implement changes.
3.6. Maintain food safety management documents.
4.1. Ensure food safety program is audited as required by
legislation.
4.2. Participate in food safety program audits and provide
assistance to inspectors.
4.3. Retain records of food audits according to legislative
requirements.
5.1. Conduct scheduled review of food safety program in
2. Develop food safety
program to control
hazards.
3. Implement food
safety program.
4. Participate in food
safety audit.
5. Evaluate and revise
136
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
food safety program.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
consultation with colleagues.
5.2. Validate required food safety controls.
5.3. Review policies, procedures, product specifications,
monitoring systems and record keeping methods, and revise
as required.
5.4. Prepare and document amended food safety program and
provide to regulatory authorities as required.
5.5. Communicate changes and monitor inclusion in production
processes.
5.6. Identify and respond to additional training needs based on
changes to food safety practices.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ consult on and review food safety program
◦ provide information to colleagues
critical thinking skills to evaluate and respond to a range of strategic and operational factors
that influence the food safety program
literacy skills to:
◦ interpret sometimes complex materials describing regulatory requirements relating to
food safety
◦ develop and write comprehensive food safety programs and procedures
numeracy skills to work with the concepts of measurement
planning and organising skills to coordinate and respond to multiple and interrelated
operational challenges
problem-solving skills to proactively identify and respond to systemic operational issues.
Required knowledge
options for the structure and implementation of a food safety program, including the use of
the HACCP method as the basis
consultative and communication mechanisms used by organisations to develop and
implement procedural systems
key features of federal, state or territory and local food safety compliance requirements as
they impact food safety program development, including:
◦ contents of national codes and standards that underpin regulatory requirements
◦ components of a food safety program, especially procedures and monitoring documents
◦ local government food safety regulations and audit frequencies
◦ consequences of failure to observe food safety policies and procedures
◦ meaning of contaminant, contamination and potentially hazardous foods as defined by
the Code
HACCP or other food safety system principles, procedures and processes as they apply to
particular operations and different food types, including:
◦ critical control points for the specific food production system and the predetermined
methods of control, especially time and temperature controls used in the storage,
preparation, display, service and cooking, cooling and transporting of food
◦ methods of food storage, production, display, service and cooking, cooling and
137
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
transporting, especially, appropriate temperature levels for each of these processes
◦ main types of safety hazards and contamination
◦ conditions for development of microbiological contamination
◦ environmental conditions, including temperature controls, for storage
◦ temperature danger zone and the two-hour and four-hour rule
equipment operating procedures, especially how to calibrate, use and clean a temperature
probe and how to identify faults
choice and application of cleaning, sanitising and pest control equipment and materials
high risk customer groups, such as:
◦ children or babies
◦ pregnant women
◦ aged persons
◦ people with immune deficiencies or allergies.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Organisational characteristics
may include:
Food hazards may be:
clientele:
◦ at risk client groups with a higher than average
risk of harm from food contamination, such as:
- aged persons
- children or babies
- people with immune deficiencies or allergies
- pregnant women
equipment
existing prerequisite programs
facilities
food items prepared and sold
re-thermalisation and service requirements
size and nature of organisation.
actual or potential
chemical
environmental
insects and vermin
microbiological:
◦ bacteria
◦ natural poisons
◦ moulds
◦ yeast
physical:
◦ broken glass
◦ metal
◦ foreign objects
process-related where food is vulnerable to
contamination:
138
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
◦
◦
◦
◦
Critical control points include:
Policies and procedures may
relate to:
Monitoring of controls may
involve:
displayed food
need for food to be touched by hand
re-thermalisation or defrosting
processes involving temperatures that promote
rapid growth of micro-organisms.
receiving
storing
preparing
processing
displaying
serving
packaging
transporting
disposing.
audit
cleaning and sanitation
communication
contingency management
corrective actions
equipment maintenance
evaluation
food:
◦ supply
◦ receiving
◦ storage
◦ preparation
◦ display
◦ service
◦ disposal
hazards:
◦ control methods for each critical point
◦ corrective actions
◦ systematic monitoring of hazard controls and
record keeping
personal considerations:
◦ dress
◦ hygiene
◦ protective equipment and clothing
pest control
record maintenance
training.
bacterial swabs and counts
checking and recording that food is stored in
appropriate timeframes
chemical tests
monitoring and recording food temperatures
monitoring and recording temperature of cold and hot
139
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Incidents of uncontrolled food
hazards may include:
Food safety management
documents may include:
storage equipment
visual examination of food for quality review.
customer complaints
existence of pests and vermin
food not under temperature control
food poisoning
misuse of single use items
spoilt or contaminated food
stocks of out-of-date foodstuffs
unclean equipment.
audit reports
audit tables
customer complaint forms
documented food safety program
food flow diagrams
food production records
hazard analysis table
incident reports where food hazards are found not to
be under control
policies, procedures and product specifications
records of the monitoring of hazard controls,
including:
◦ any record required by local legislation
◦ illness register
◦ list of suppliers
◦ temperature control data
◦ training logs
verification records.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
Evidence of the ability to:
develop and implement a complete food safety
program in line with regulatory requirements, that
includes:
◦ policies
◦ procedures
◦ product specifications
◦ monitoring documents
monitor, evaluate and make ongoing improvements
to food safety program over a period of time
demonstrate knowledge of food safety systems and
options for a service industry food preparation
organisation.
Assessment must ensure use of:
140
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
an operational food preparation area or commercial
kitchen with the fixtures, large and small equipment
and workplace documentation defined in the
Assessment Guidelines; this can be a:
◦ real industry workplace
◦ simulated industry environment such as a training
kitchen servicing customers
current plain English regulatory documents
distributed by the national, state, territory or local
government food safety authority
the Code
current commercial food safety programs, policies
and procedures used for the management of a food
preparation team.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
review of a completed food safety program
developed by the individual inclusive of policies,
procedures and product specifications
use of case studies to assess ability to develop
programs to meet differing workplace needs,
including responding to uncontrolled hazards
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
regulatory requirements and food safety systems,
such as HACCP and their application to different
situations
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
BSBWRT401A Write complex documents
SITHKOP403 Coordinate cooking operations
SITHKOP404 Plan catering for events or functions.
141
DRAFT THREE
Governance and Legal Compliance
SITXGLC501 Research and comply with regulatory requirements
SITXGLC501
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Research and comply with regulatory requirements
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXGLC001A Develop and update
legal knowledge required for business compliance.
Title changed to better reflect the intent and content of the unit. Reworked Elements, Performance Criteria, Required Skills and
Knowledge to more fully articulate content.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to comply with laws and licensing requirements for specific
business operations. It requires the ability to access and interpret
regulatory information, determine scope of compliance, develop,
implement and continuously review and update policies and
practices for business compliance.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to regulatory requirements for day-to-day business
operations in the tourism, travel, hospitality and event industries and
to special requirements for one-off events.
It applies to senior personnel who operate independently or with
limited guidance from others and who are responsible for making a
range of operational business and regulatory compliance decisions.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Governance and Legal Compliance
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Research
information required
for legal compliance.
1.1. Identify sources of information for compliance with laws and
licensing for business operations.
1.2. Evaluate areas of business operation and determine scope of
compliance requirements.
1.3. Access regulatory information relevant to specific business
operation.
1.4. Identify risks, penalties and consequences of non-compliance.
1.5. Assess and act on need for specialist legal advice.
2.1. Develop and clearly articulate regulatory policies and
procedures in a format readily accessible to all workers.
2.2. Nominate the roles and responsibilities of personnel for
regulatory compliance within policies and procedures.
2.3. Distribute policies, procedures and legal information to
2. Develop and
communicate
policies and
procedures for legal
compliance.
142
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Ensure compliance
with legal
requirements.
4. Maintain personal
and organisational
knowledge of
regulatory
requirements.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
personnel at appropriate times.
2.4. Organise information updates for personnel and ensure
knowledge of roles and responsibilities for legal compliance.
3.1. Communicate with regulatory authorities when planning
business operations and submit required documentation.
3.2. Maintain business and occupational licences and check
contractor compliance to avoid risk to business.
3.3. Continuously evaluate business operations for non-compliance
and implement modifications.
4.1. Identify and use a range of opportunities to maintain
knowledge of current regulatory requirements.
4.2. Use organisational communication methods to share updated
regulatory knowledge.
4.3. Continuously review and distribute plans, policies and
procedures for compliance with current laws and licensing
requirements.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ consult with regulatory authorities to determine the scope of compliance requirements
◦ provide clear and accurate information to personnel about roles and responsibilities in
regulatory compliance
critical thinking skills to evaluate areas of business operation and determine scope of
compliance
learning skills to proactively maintain current knowledge of regulatory requirements
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret unfamiliar and complex materials describing regulatory requirements
◦ research regulatory requirements specifically applicable to the business operation
◦ write comprehensive yet easily accessible regulatory policies and procedures; complete
complex documentation required by regulatory authorities
planning and organising skills to research, establish and regularly monitor all components of
a business compliance system
problem-solving skills to evaluate business operations for non-compliance and implement
changes to practices
self-management skills to take responsibility for regulatory compliance
teamwork skills to share updated regulatory knowledge with personnel.
Required knowledge
legal responsibilities and liabilities of managers and directors in varying business structures
sources of information and advice on regulatory compliance including:
◦ local, state, territory or commonwealth government departments or regulatory agencies
◦ industry associations
◦ plain English documentation that explains the operational requirements of legislation
functions and general operating procedures of regulatory authorities of particular relevance
to the tourism, hospitality and events industries
methods of receiving updated information on laws and licensing requirements
143
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
use of policies and procedures in managing regulatory compliance
a range of formats for and inclusions of policies and procedures
objectives and primary components of a broad range of local, state, territory and
commonwealth government laws to which all types of businesses must comply including
those that cover:
◦ anti-discrimination especially provisions for Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) and
harassment
◦ Australian Consumer Law (ACL) especially provisions for refunds, exchanges and
cancellations, terms and conditions of quotations and consumer contracts
◦ contracts
◦ employer superannuation contributions
◦ environmental protection especially provisions for environmental hazard identification,
use of minimal impact practices and reporting of incidents
◦ Fair Work Act 2009 especially provisions for National Employment Standards (NES)
◦ local community protection especially provisions for land management and access and
protecting the lifestyle of neighbouring residents
◦ taxation
◦ workplace relations
◦ public liability and duty of care
◦ work health and safety
◦ Workers Compensation especially provisions for injury reporting and occupational
rehabilitation
objectives and primary components of laws, codes, standards and licensing requirements
that impact on specific operators within the tourism, hospitality and event industries; chosen
to be applicable to the individual’s context these could include:
◦ Criminal Code Act 1995 - child sex offences outside Australia
◦ European Economic Directive of Foreign Travel
◦ food safety
◦ Food Standards Australia New Zealand Act 1991
◦ liquor licensing, especially as it relates to the responsible service of alcohol
◦ Queensland Tourism Services Act (2003)
◦ Residential Tenancy Act
◦ responsible conduct of gaming
◦ travel agents licensing
for each relevant law, code, standard and licensing requirement, the depth of knowledge
must cover any:
◦ key practices that are prohibited by the law
◦ auditing and inspection regimes
◦ main consequences of non-compliance
◦ need to apply for and maintain business or occupational licensing and associated
mandatory training and certification requirements
◦ requirements for record keeping and acceptable record keeping mechanisms
◦ statutory reporting requirements for businesses
◦ key business insurances required including public liability and workers compensation
◦ adherence to mandatory codes of conduct enshrined in legislation
◦ requirements to develop and implement plans, policies, codes of conduct or incorporate
certain business practices
◦ rights and responsibilities of employees and employers
144
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
◦
other specific action that must be taken for legal compliance.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Sources of information may
include:
Laws and licensing may involve:
computer data, including the Internet
discussions with experienced industry personnel
industry:
◦ accreditation operators
◦ associations and organisations
◦ developers of codes of conduct or ethics
◦ journals
◦ seminars
lawyers
networking with:
◦ colleagues
◦ suppliers
plain English documents, issued by government
regulators, that describe laws relevant to business
operations
libraries
media
personal observations and experience
reference books
local, state, territory or commonwealth government
departments or regulatory agencies
training courses
unions.
anti-discrimination
Criminal Code Act 1995 - child sex offences outside
Australia
consumer protection
contracts
EEO
environmental protection
Fair Work Act 2009
financial operations
food safety
land management
local community protection
liquor
mandatory codes of conduct, enshrined in legislation
NES
occupational licences and certification for:
145
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
◦
◦
Business operation may be for:
Specialist legal advice may
involve:
Regulatory policies and
procedures may include:
food handlers and food safety supervisors
operators of table games (dealers) within
licenced casinos
◦ tour guides operating in certain destinations
public liability and duty of care
Queensland Tourism Services Act (2003)
responsible service of alcohol
responsible conduct of gaming
taxation
travel agents licensing
work health and safety
Workers Compensation
workplace relations.
day-to-day business operations in:
◦ events
◦ hospitality
◦ tourism
◦ travel
one off:
◦ event
◦ tour
◦ contract
series of:
◦ events
◦ tours
◦ contracts.
compliance consultants
industry associations
lawyers
local, state, territory or commonwealth government
departments or regulatory agencies.
accident and incident reporting
counselling and discipline
customer service
cancellations, refunds and exchanges
EEO
food handling and hygiene
harassment
local community protection
minimal impact practices to reduce negative
environmental impacts of water, energy and site use
responsible service of alcohol
responsible conduct of gaming
transport, handling and storage of food
waste management
work health and safety:
◦ consultation
146
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Information updates may involve:
Opportunities may include:
◦ emergency evacuation
◦ hazard identification and risk assessment
◦ occupational rehabilitation.
briefings prior to:
◦ commencement of service period
◦ delivery of tours
◦ operation of event or function
internal memos
staff handbooks
staff meetings
training sessions.
discussions with experienced industry personnel
networking with:
◦ colleagues
◦ suppliers
participating in:
◦ industry accreditation schemes
◦ industry seminars
◦ membership of professional industry associations
◦ training courses
subscribing to regulatory newsletters.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
access and interpret regulatory information and
determine the scope of compliance for specific
business operations
develop a diverse range of policies and procedures
for legal compliance
integrate, into compliance planning activities,
knowledge of:
◦ sources of detailed information and advice on
regulatory compliance
◦ objectives and primary components of a broad
range of local, state, territory and commonwealth
government laws relevant to specific tourism,
hospitality or event business operations
◦ use of policies and procedures in managing
regulatory compliance.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry business operation for which a tailored set of
regulatory requirements can be researched and
compliance management implemented
computers, software programs, printers and
147
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
communication technology used to administer
regulatory requirements
current legislation
current plain English regulatory documents
distributed by government regulators
codes of practice and standards issued by regulatory
authorities
regulatory information and business management
manuals issued by industry associations or
commercial publishers
current commercial policies and procedures used to
manage regulatory issues.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
evaluation of a portfolio, prepared by the individual,
on managing regulatory compliance for a specific
business operation including:
◦ notes and reports on regulatory information
sourced
◦ written report evaluating the scope of compliance
requirements
◦ list of policies and procedures required to
manage regulatory compliance
◦ sample policies and procedures
◦ documents completed for submission to
regulatory authorities
◦ briefings and internal memos provided to
personnel on current compliance requirements
use of case studies so the individual can suggest
appropriate scope of regulatory compliance
requirements for different business operations
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of:
◦ sources of information on regulatory compliance
◦ objectives and primary components of laws
relevant to specific tourism, hospitality or events
business operations
◦ use of policies and procedures in managing
regulatory compliance
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
BSBMGT617A Develop and implement a business
plan
BSBPMG501A Manage projects
148
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
BSBRSK501A Manage risk
BSBWRT401A Write complex documents.
149
DRAFT THREE
Human Resource Management
SITXHRM301 Coach others in job skills
SITXHRM301
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Coach others in job skills
N
Replaces but is not equivalent to SITXHRM001A Coach others in
job skills.
Significant changes to Elements, Performance Criteria, and
Required Knowledge to refocus the unit. Additional Performance
Criteria and Required Knowledge covering coaching in
organisational procedures.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to provide on-the-job coaching to colleagues. It requires the
ability to explain and demonstrate specific skills, knowledge and
procedures and to monitor the progress of colleagues until they are
able to operate independently of the coach. This unit has no parity
with units in TAE10 Training and Education Training Package, but
covers the situation in workplaces where buddy systems and
informal on-the-job training are extremely common.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, hospitality and event sectors.
It applies to experienced operational personnel and to supervisors
and managers who informally train other people in new workplace
skills and procedures.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Human Resource Management
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Prepare for
on-the-job coaching.
1.1. Identify the need for coaching based on a range of factors.
1.2. Identify specific coaching needs through discussion with
colleague and organise coaching sessions.
2.1. Explain the overall purpose of coaching to colleague.
2.2. Explain and demonstrate the specific skills.
2.3. Communicate required knowledge and check colleague
understanding.
2.4. Advise organisational procedures for completing workplace
tasks.
2.5. Provide colleague with opportunity to practise the skill and ask
questions.
2.6. Provide feedback in a constructive and supportive manner.
2. Coach colleagues on
the job.
150
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Follow up coaching.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
3.1. Monitor progress of new workplace skills and provide
supportive assistance.
3.2. Report progress to the appropriate person.
3.3. Identify performance problems or difficulties with the
coaching and rectify or refer to the appropriate person for
follow up.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ develop rapport
◦ show sensitivity to the colleague
◦ use active listening and open questioning techniques to confirm understanding of job
tasks
initiative and enterprise skills to observe the colleague and provide assistance without their
request
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret workplace documentation completed by colleague
◦ numeracy skills to calculate adequate time required for coaching and the colleague to
complete required tasks
planning and organising skills to complete own work tasks within designated timelines and
simultaneously coach others in their job skills
problem-solving skills to identify and resolve deficiencies in the skills and knowledge of
colleagues
self-management skills to take responsibility for colleague coaching
teamwork skills to pass on organisational knowledge to colleague.
Required knowledge
objectives and scope of the coaching
the key principles of training:
◦ explanation
◦ demonstration
◦ review
◦ listening to trainee explanation
◦ observing and evaluating trainee demonstration
◦ providing feedback.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Factors may include:
Coaching sessions could be
direction from colleagues
own observation and workplace experience
request for coaching from colleague to be coached.
before or after work
151
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
conducted in a range of contexts,
including:
Skills to be coached are generally
those not requiring formal or
extended training sessions, but
short, commonly-used tasks, such
as:
Required knowledge refers to the
essential knowledge required to
carry out tasks or undertake skills
effectively, such as:
Performance problems or
difficulties may be due to:
in a simulated location away from the actual
workplace
on-the-job during work hours.
customer service skills
selling or promoting products and services
technical or practical skills, such as operating
equipment, making something or completing
documentation.
ingredients or components of items
knowledge of products or services
legislative, work health and safety and hygiene
requirements
principles underpinning skills, such as
communication and selling
reasons for undertaking various tasks.
breakdown in communication
inappropriate circumstances for coaching
insufficient opportunity to practise
language or cultural barriers
shyness or lack of confidence.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
provide supportive on-the-job coaching and provide
constructive feedback
clearly communicate and demonstrate the workplace
tasks required of the colleague
integrate knowledge of the key principles of training
complete coaching activities within commercial time
constraints to ensure the colleague is effective.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry environment with colleague requiring
coaching
work tasks to coach others in
a colleague with whom the individual can interact.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
direct observation of the individual coaching a
colleague in a required work skill
role plays to assess the individual’s ability to use:
◦ active listening and open questioning techniques
to confirm understanding of job tasks
◦ key training techniques
152
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Guidance information for
assessment
use of problem-solving exercises so the individual
can suggest ways of resolving performance problems
or difficulties
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
key training principles
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITXCOM201 Show social and cultural sensitivity
SITXMGT401 Monitor work operations.
153
DRAFT THREE
SITXHRM401 Roster staff
SITXHRM401
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Roster staff
N
Replaces but is not equivalent to SITXHRM003A Roster staff.
Significant changes to Performance Criteria and Required
Knowledge. Technology skills and knowledge added.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to develop, administer and communicate staff rosters. It
requires the ability to plan rosters according to industrial provisions,
operational efficiency requirements and within wage budgets.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, travel, hospitality and event sectors.
This unit applies to individuals responsible for the development of
staff rosters for situations involving potentially large numbers of staff
working across a range of different service periods and would not
apply to small office environments.
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
It applies to senior personnel who operate independently or with
limited guidance from others, including dedicated specialist staff or
operational supervisors and managers.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Human Resource Management
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Develop staff rosters.
1.1. Develop rosters according to relevant industrial agreements
and other considerations and wage budgets.
1.2. Maximise operational and customer service efficiency
while minimising wage costs.
1.3. Combine duties where appropriate to ensure effective use of
staff.
1.4. Roster teams with the most effective skills mix to meet all
operational requirements.
1.5. Take account of social and cultural considerations and
broader organisational policies that affect staff rosters.
1.6. Consult with colleagues to ensure input to rosters.
1.7. Use roster systems and equipment to administer rosters.
2.1. Present rosters in required formats to ensure clarity of
information according to organisational standards.
2.2. Communicate rosters to appropriate colleagues within
designated timeframes.
2. Present and
communicate
rosters.
154
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Maintain rostering
records.
4. Evaluate rosters.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
3.1. Administer records of shift time completed by employees or
contractors.
3.2. Maintain staff rostering records according to organisational
procedures.
4.1. Monitor the effectiveness of rosters in consultation with
colleagues.
4.2. Identify ways in which rosters and roster development
processes may be improved and take appropriate action.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to consult with colleagues, ask questions and confirm requirements,
and listen, understand and interpret verbal and non-verbal messages
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret documents outlining opening and closing times, operational hours,
and expected customer traffic
◦ write potentially complex roster documentation
numeracy skills to complete planning activities involving dates, times and staff ratios
planning and organising skills to plan rosters to meet operational needs
problem-solving skills to re-work rosters in cases of staff illness
self-management skills to take responsibility for rostering enough staff to meet operational
needs
teamwork skills to consider staff requests and personal commitments when planning rosters
technology skills to use:
◦ a computer and keyboard
◦ the system capabilities and functions of software programs.
Required knowledge
sources of information on award and other industrial provisions
the key elements of applicable awards, including:
◦ leave provisions
◦ mandated breaks between shifts
◦ maximum allowed shift hours
◦ standard, overtime and penalty pay rates
for the industry sector:
◦ role of rosters and their importance in controlling staff costs
◦ the system capabilities and functions of rostering software programs
◦ a range of formats for and inclusions of staff rosters
◦ a range of methods used to communicate rosters including electronic
for the specific organisation:
◦ social, cultural and skills mix of the team to be rostered
◦ full details of human resource policies and procedures that cover leave provisions and
socio-cultural issues
◦ operational requirements of the business activity, department or event subject to
rostering
◦ wage budget for the business activity, department or event subject to rostering.
155
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Rosters may be for:
Industrial agreements and other
considerations may relate to:
Operational and customer service
efficiency may involve:
Social and cultural
considerations may relate to:
Broader organisational policies
may relate to:
events
functions
individual department
specific project
whole organisation.
single or multiple awards
award provisions for:
◦ leave
◦ mandated breaks between shifts
◦ maximum allowed shift hours
◦ standard, overtime and penalty pay rates
overall number of hours allocated to different staff
members
use of:
◦ contractors and consideration of fees
◦ permanent or casual staff.
providing an appropriate ratio of:
◦ front of house to back of house staff
◦ staff to customer numbers
◦ supervisors to operative staff
providing sufficient number of staff to meet:
◦ customer expectations of different service styles
◦ the demands of known or estimated numbers of
customers
rostering:
◦ staff with the correct skills to fulfil all operational
duties
◦ teams with the correct skills mix.
allowance for rostered days off for:
◦ carer commitments
◦ cultural or religious festivals
◦ family commitments
mixing people:
◦ from different cultures
◦ with different language abilities
types of work to be undertaken by individuals with
disabilities or impairments.
sociocultural-friendly workplace initiatives
family-friendly workplace initiatives
leave for:
156
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
◦
◦
◦
◦
◦
◦
◦
◦
Roster systems and equipment
may include:
Communicate rosters:
Records of shift time may involve:
carers
compassionate reasons
illness or injury
jury service
long service
maternity or paternity
rehabilitation of injured workers
study
◦ vacation.
computers
electronic equipment used by staff to log
commencement and completion time of rostered
duties
rostering software programs.
on-line
by email
via a noticeboard
paper based.
authorising payment for duties completed
electronic equipment used by staff to log
commencement and completion time of rostered
duties
time sheets:
◦ electronic
◦ paper-based.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
prepare multiple rosters to meet diverse operational
requirements
roster sufficient staff to ensure the delivery of high
quality customer service within wage budget
constraints
integrate knowledge of the industrial provisions,
human resource policy and the skills mix of the team
to be rostered
complete rostering activities within commercial and
staff time constraints.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry business operation or activity subject to
rostering
computers, printers and software programs currently
used by the tourism, hospitality or event industry to
prepare rosters
157
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
awards applicable to the tourism, hospitality or event
industry
operational information about the organisation or
department subject to rostering
information about the cultural and skills mix of a team
subject to rostering.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
projects or activities that allow the individual to
develop rosters, that meet a set budget, for a
department’s weekly operation, a function or event
use of problem-solving exercises so the individual
can determine the correct skills and cultural mix for a
particular service period
exercises and activities to assess the individual’s
knowledge of award provisions
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
the role of rosters and their importance in controlling
staff costs
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITXCOM201 Show social and cultural sensitivity
SITXFIN402 Manage finances within a budget
SITXMGT401 Monitor work operations.
158
DRAFT THREE
SITXHRM402 Lead and manage people
SITXHRM402
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Lead and manage people
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXHRM005A Lead and manage
people.
Re-worked Required Skills and Knowledge to more fully articulate
content.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to lead and manage people and teams and support and
encourage their commitment to the organisation. It requires the
ability to lead by example and manage team performance through
effective leadership.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, travel, hospitality and event sectors.
It applies to those people who operate independently and are
responsible for leading and motivating people and teams. This
includes supervisors, operational and senior managers.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Human Resource Management
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Model high
standards of
performance and
behaviour.
2. Develop team
commitment and
cooperation.
1.1. Act as a positive role model through individual performance.
1.2. Show support for and commitment to organisational goals in
day-to-day work performance.
1.3. Treat people with integrity, respect and empathy.
2.1. Develop and clearly communicate plans and objectives in
consultation with the team.
2.2. Make plans and objectives consistent with organisational
goals.
2.3. Communicate expectations, roles and responsibilities of
team members to encourage people to take responsibility for
their work.
2.4. Encourage teams and individuals to develop innovative
approaches to work.
2.5. Identify, encourage, value and reward individual and team
efforts and contributions.
2.6. Model and encourage open and supportive communication
within the team.
2.7. Seek and share information from the wider enterprise
environment with the team.
159
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Manage team
performance.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
2.8. Represent team interests in the wider environment.
2.9. Seek feedback from team members and implement changes
within the bounds of organisational goals and policies.
3.1. Delegate tasks and responsibilities, identify barriers to
delegation and implement processes to overcome them.
3.2. Evaluate the skills of team members and provide opportunities
for individual development.
3.3. Monitor team performance to ensure progress towards
achievement of goals.
3.4. Provide mentoring and coaching to support team members.
3.5. Motivate individuals and teams to achieve optimum
performance.
3.6. Provide recognition and reward for team achievements.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to provide effective support and motivation to a team and overcome
communication barriers
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret a wide range of operational workplace information
◦ write clear and articulate team plans
planning and organising skills to ensure activities and initiatives important to team
development are integrated into own work planning
problem-solving skills to identify skill deficiencies and provide opportunities for individual
development
self-management skills to take responsibility for team outcomes
teamwork skills to represent team interests in the wider organisation environment.
Required knowledge
roles of and functions performed by supervisors and managers
different leadership styles
characteristics of effective leadership
principles of teamwork, including:
◦ characteristics of effective teams
◦ roles and attributes of team members
◦ organisation of teams
◦ potential team problems
◦ benefits of effective teamwork
role and theories of motivation
group dynamics
types of organisational plans and planning processes.
160
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Plans and objectives may:
Team may be:
Expectations, roles and
responsibilities may include:
Innovative approaches may
include:
Open and supportive
communication may involve:
Information may include:
be:
◦ short
◦ medium
◦ long-term
relate to:
◦ contingency management
◦ increased productivity
◦ meeting Key Performance Indicators (KPI)
◦ operational activities
◦ organisational strategies
◦ performance targets for a particular project
◦ sales targets
◦ task management.
contractors
paid employees
permanent teams
project or event-based
volunteers.
adherence to policies and procedures
cooperative and open communication
nature and scope of work
relationships with others in the workplace and
interdependent areas of activity
reporting requirements
roles of leaders and managers, including:
◦ decision making
◦ delegation of tasks
◦ information provision
◦ monitoring staff
◦ planning and organising.
alerting colleagues to the potential of new
technologies
making suggestions about better ways of doing
things
seeking information or ideas from unexpected places
trying new approaches to old problems.
being prepared to declare own need for assistance
involving others in developing solutions
planned and unplanned exchanges of information
providing constructive feedback
providing open access to documents
using technology to support effective communication,
e.g. email groups.
organisation performance, including financial
161
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Feedback may be about:
Opportunities for individual
development may include:
Recognition and reward for team
members may include:
changes in organisational policies
marketing information and targets
overall organisational objectives
plans for new equipment
rationale for management decisions
technology updates
training developments.
allocation of tasks
effectiveness of communication:
◦ from the leader
◦ within the team
◦ within the enterprise
performance of:
◦ individuals
◦ self
◦ team
◦ the enterprise
interaction between:
◦ different departments
◦ different teams
◦ other supervisors and managers
workplace practices:
◦ efficiency
◦ deficiencies.
change in job responsibilities
external training and professional development
formal promotion
internal training and professional development
opportunity for greater autonomy or responsibility.
acknowledgment to the whole team of individual
good performance
incentive initiatives
informal acknowledgment
presentation of awards
written reports to management.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Evidence of the ability to:
lead by example and build positive team culture
through effective leadership
monitor individual and team performance over a
period of time and motivate individuals and teams to
achieve optimum performance
integrate knowledge of leadership, motivation and
162
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
teamwork principles.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry business operation, project or event for
which a team is managed
a team whose overall performance is the
responsibility of the individual.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
project or event activities to assess the individual’s
ability to:
◦ model high standards of performance and
behaviour
◦ communicate expectations, roles and
responsibilities of team members
◦ delegate individual tasks
◦ coach and support team members to achieve
optimum performance
evaluation of reports prepared by the individual
detailing how team commitment was encouraged and
how team performance was managed during the
conduct of operational activities
use of, case studies and problem-solving exercises
so the individual can suggest methods to overcome
problematic performance issues for individuals and
the team
oral or written questioning to assess knowledge of
leadership, motivation and teamwork principles
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
BSBPMG501A Manage projects
SITXCOM201 Show social and cultural sensitivity
SITXHRM503 Monitor staff performance
SITXMGT401 Monitor work operations.
163
DRAFT THREE
SITXHRM501 Recruit, select and induct staff
SITXHRM501
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Recruit, select and induct staff
N
Replaces but is not equivalent to SITXHRM002A Recruit, select and
induct staff.
Re-worked Elements, Performance Criteria, Required Skills and
Knowledge to more fully articulate content. Additional Performance
Criteria requiring evaluation of applicants for customer service
attitude and experience and adherence to equal employment
opportunity principles and law. Anti-discrimination deleted - not
relevant to this unit.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to coordinate the recruitment, selection and induction of
new staff members within the framework of existing human resource
policies and procedures. It requires the ability to identify recruitment
needs, develop selection criteria, process and evaluate applications,
select people according to their attitude, aptitude and fit to the
service industries and coordinate induction programs.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, travel, hospitality and event sectors
It applies to senior personnel who operate independently or with
limited guidance from others, including dedicated specialist staff or
operational or senior managers.
The recruitment of staff is subject to the provisions of Equal
Employment Opportunity (EEO) law.
Competency field
Unit sector
No licensing or certification requirements apply to this unit at the
time of endorsement.
Human Resource Management
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Identify recruitment
needs.
2. Administer
recruitment.
1.1. Identify recruitment needs based on monitoring of service
and efficiency levels in the workplace.
1.2. Consult colleagues about staffing needs and job descriptions.
1.3. Obtain approval for recruitment according to organisational
recruitment policies.
1.4. Use job descriptions to develop clear and concise selection
criteria.
1.5. Ensure criteria incorporate customer service attitude and
experience to ensure a fit for the service industries.
2.1. Choose and organise selection processes taking into account
the skill requirements for the job.
164
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Select staff.
4. Plan and organise
induction programs.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
2.2. Create and disseminate advertisements for positions.
2.3. Process applications according to organisational policy.
2.4. Review applications against criteria and choose people to
progress to an interview.
2.5. Inform unsuccessful applicants of decisions and provide other
recruitment information in appropriate media within
reasonable timeframes.
2.6. Establish a need and make special arrangements for those
progressing.
2.7. Process and file recruitment records according to
organisational policy.
3.1. Use selection criteria as the basis for selection ensuring merit
based selection and adherence to EEO principles and law.
3.2. Participate in selection processes.
3.3. Evaluate applicants for customer service attitude and
experience to ensure a fit for the service industries.
3.4. Select people according to their attitude, aptitude and fit to the
existing organisational culture.
3.5. Communicate selection recommendations to appropriate
colleagues.
3.6. Make employment offers according to organisational
procedures.
3.7. Advise new employees about employment details according to
organisational policy.
3.8. Create and maintain accurate, clear and complete records of
the selection process.
4.1. Plan content and format of induction programs to reflect
organisational objectives and policies.
4.2. Include all appropriate information in induction programs
according to organisational policy.
4.3. Liaise with operational colleagues to ensure induction
programs are implemented in a manner that minimises
operational disruption.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to conduct interviews and adapt interview techniques to meet the
needs of a range of social and cultural groups
critical thinking skills to evaluate the skills, knowledge and experience of applicants and their
fit to the existing organisational and service industry culture
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret job applications and key organisational policies
◦ write complex and varied documentation, including advertisements, selection criteria and
required induction program content
numeracy skills to calculate advertising costs and salary levels
planning and organising skills to evaluate staffing requirements and plan for recruitment of
appropriate numbers
problem-solving skills to identify deficiencies in applications and resolve by re-advertising or
165
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
choosing different recruitment methods
self-management skills to take responsibility for recruiting and selecting a workforce to meet
operational needs
teamwork skills to consult team members about staffing needs and select new staff
members that will complement existing workers.
Required knowledge
for the specific industry sector:
◦ recruitment and selection practices
◦ formats for and inclusions of selection criteria and job advertisements
◦ effective advertising media
◦ features of an effective recruitment advertisement
◦ roles of recruitment agencies
◦ relationships of job descriptions to selection criteria and ways to develop clear and
concise selection criteria
◦ methods of linking interview questions to selection criteria
◦ key elements of applicable awards
◦ nature and role of induction programs and typical content
for the specific organisation:
◦ roles and responsibilities of different personnel in the recruitment and induction process
◦ required make-up of interview panels
◦ procedures for employment checks
◦ full content recruitment and human resource policies
the key elements of EEO employment laws and how they must be implemented in
recruitment and selection processes.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Recruitment needs may be:
Organisational recruitment
policies may relate to:
casual
contract
full-time
part-time
permanent
project-related, e.g. for an event
temporary
volunteer.
approval processes for:
◦ advertised salaries
◦ recruitment of new personnel
nature and content of:
◦ communications with applicants
◦ job advertisements
participants in interview panels
required skills profile of potential employees for
166
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Advertisements may be
disseminated:
Appropriate media:
Special arrangements may involve:
Selection processes may include:
particular jobs:
◦ apprentices
◦ certified in skills that meet licensing requirements
◦ skilled via achievement of qualifications
◦ skilled via industry experience
◦ trainees
role of different personnel within the recruitment and
induction process
timing and nature of induction programs
use of different media in the recruitment process
use of government-subsidised traineeships and
apprenticeships.
direct to the public
internally
externally
using different media:
◦ e-recruitment via the Internet using specialist job
seeking sites
◦ e-recruitment via the intranet
◦ internal ads via email distribution
◦ posting of ads on staff noticeboards
◦ published ads in local, metropolitan, national
newspapers and trade journals in print or online
publications
via recruitment agencies.
may include:
◦ email
◦ fax
◦ letter
◦ telephone
may suit a particular special need, such as providing
a document in large print.
access:
◦ parking
◦ security clearance
using:
◦ assistive technology
◦ electronic presentation media
◦ interpreters
◦ special interview techniques, such as looking
directly at a person who lip-reads
◦ teleconference
◦ videoconference
visual information and diagrams instead of written
material.
checks:
◦ police
◦ reference
167
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Records of the selection process
may include:
Information in induction
programs may include:
◦ working with children
◦ qualifications
evaluation of portfolios
exchange of written information
interviews:
◦ by human resource specialists, department
managers or selection committees
◦ face-to-face
◦ teleconference
◦ telephone
◦ videoconference
presentation to a selection committee
skills tests.
administrative documents
interview schedules
interviewer details
panel comments, score sheets and
recommendations
records of interview.
conditions of employment
contact details for various departments or colleagues
current organisational focus or initiatives
employee:
◦ benefits
◦ responsibilities
◦ rights
enterprise:
◦ culture
◦ goals
◦ objectives
◦ responsibilities
◦ vision
key organisational policies and procedures
industrial arrangements for the organisation
orientation of:
◦ departmental locations and equipment
◦ staff amenities
◦ off-site operations
◦ whole of business premises
organisational charts
payroll information:
◦ awards and applicable pay rates
◦ superannuation
◦ wage payments
policies and procedures specific to the job role
work health and safety information.
168
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
administer the total recruitment, selection and
induction process
develop selection criteria, conduct fair and equitable
interviews and make selections based on agreed
criteria
evaluate multiple applicants and select new staff
members to meet a specific organisation need
integrate knowledge of recruitment and selection
practices.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry business operation, activity or event for
which new staff members are recruited and selected
operational information about the organisation or
activity subject to recruitment
industry current:
◦ recruitment documentation
◦ job descriptions, linked selection criteria and
interview questions
◦ key human resource policies
multiple applicants with whom the individual can
interact.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
use of case studies so the individual can determine
and evaluate staffing requirements
review of documents prepared by the individual:
◦ selection criteria
◦ advertisements
◦ interview questions
◦ unsuccessful applicant letters
◦ employment offers
◦ plans outlining inclusions for induction and
orientation programs
direct observation, using role plays, of the individual
conducting a number of job interviews
exercises and activities to assess the individual’s
knowledge of award provisions and organisational
human resource policies
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of:
◦ links between job descriptions, selection criteria
and interview questions
◦ effective advertising media for different jobs
169
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
◦
Guidance information for
assessment
EEO and anti-discrimination law
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the .
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITXCOM201 Show social and cultural sensitivity
SITXHRM502 Manage volunteers
SITXMGT401 Monitor work operations.
170
DRAFT THREE
SITXHRM502 Manage volunteers
SITXHRM502
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Manage volunteers
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXHRM004A Manage volunteers.
This unit covers the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to manage a volunteer workforce. It requires the ability to
determine and evaluate volunteer staffing requirements, recruit,
select, train and maximise volunteer retention.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to individuals working in any industry who need to
manage volunteer involvement in business or community activities. It
is particularly relevant in the community, cultural, sporting and
tourism sectors where volunteers feature prominently as part of the
workforce both as part of one-off events and ongoing industry
activities.
It applies to senior personnel who operate independently or with
limited guidance from others, including dedicated specialist staff or
operational supervisors and managers.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Human Resource Management
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Research, determine
and define needs for
volunteer
involvement.
1.1. Determine and evaluate volunteer requirements based on
analysis of relevant human resource information and
consultation with relevant stakeholders.
1.2. Assess benefits, costs and risks of volunteer involvement to
the organisation.
1.3. Establish and assess the requirements and impacts of
relevant legislation and industry codes.
1.4. Define overall volunteer roles according to specific
organisational or project requirements.
2.1. Identify and incorporate consideration of volunteer social and
other motivations in work design programs.
2.2. Develop appropriate position descriptions based on review
of volunteer roles.
2.3. Establish and incorporate volunteer rewards into the
recruitment program.
2.4. Communicate and delegate responsibility for volunteer
coordination to relevant paid personnel.
2.5. Identify key target areas from which volunteers might be
2. Undertake volunteer
recruitment.
171
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Maximise volunteer
retention.
4. Ensure a positive
experience for
volunteers.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
recruited.
3.1. Develop a climate of recognition and support for volunteers
through representation in the wider environment.
3.2. Identify and incorporate individual requirements of volunteers
into work role design.
3.3. Arrange suitable induction and training for volunteers to
ensure work roles, rights and responsibilities are clearly
understood.
4.1. Liaise with volunteers regularly to monitor experience from
both organisation and volunteer perspective.
4.2. Identify and evaluate areas of concern and initiate follow-up
action.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ provide information about volunteer responsibilities and responsibility for volunteer
coordination to paid personnel
◦ discuss the volunteers experience with the organisation
critical thinking skills to research and evaluate aspects of volunteer recruitment and
management
literacy skills to:
◦ research sources of a volunteer workforce
◦ write volunteer recruitment information and position descriptions
numeracy skills to estimate numbers of volunteers
planning and organising skills to evaluate volunteer requirements and plan for recruitment of
appropriate numbers and skills
problem-solving skills to identify and resolve volunteer skill deficiencies through training,
coaching or re-assignment of duties
self-management skills to take responsibility for recruiting and managing a volunteer
workforce to meet operational needs
teamwork skills to develop a climate of recognition and support for volunteers within the paid
workforce.
Required knowledge
social, political, cultural and historical issues that affect volunteering
contribution made by volunteers in the relevant industry or community sector, and more
broadly in Australian society
motivational patterns of volunteers
benefits, costs and risks of using volunteers
human resource management practices and principles for volunteers, including:
◦ defining broad work roles and position descriptions
◦ recruitment methods
◦ training requirements
links to broader organisational or project strategies
insurance issues that impact on using a volunteer workforce
the key elements of legislation that impact on volunteer management, including Equal
172
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
Employment Opportunity (EEO), workplace relations and work health and safety .
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Human resource information may
include:
Benefits, costs and risks may
include:
Relevant legislation and industry
codes may include:
Social and other motivations may
relate to:
Position descriptions may include
information on:
Volunteer rewards may include:
event information
operational plans
organisational human resource plans.
community cultural development
community engagement
financial
impact on the paid workforce
risks of using untrained or partially trained staff.
company codes and guidelines
EEO
organisation articles of association
professional association regulations
work health and safety.
acknowledgment
break from routine
desire to do something different
enjoyment
increased self-esteem
learning new skills
loyalty
meeting new people
pathway to employment
sense of involvement
socialisation
status
support of family members and friends
travel.
accountability
commitment
reimbursement of costs
required knowledge
responsibilities
rewards
skills and attributes
uniform.
community involvement
free admittance to games, competitions or events
free or discounted merchandise
opportunities for social interaction
pathway to employment
173
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Target areas may include:
Representation in the wider
environment may include:
skill development.
family and friends
local community and community groups
past and present membership of service
organisations
unemployed people
volunteer agencies.
promoting the benefits and value of volunteers to
colleagues
providing input to organisation’s overall human
resource plan.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
determine and evaluate volunteer staffing
requirements, recruit, select, train and maximise
volunteer retention for an organisation or community
activity
integrate knowledge of human resource
management principles to recruit, select and induct
volunteers.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry business operation or activity for which
volunteers are recruited, selected and trained
operational information about the organisation or
activity subject to volunteer use
current recruitment documentation.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
projects or activities to assess the individual’s ability
to:
◦ determine and evaluate volunteer staffing
requirements
◦ recruit, select train volunteers
◦ maximise volunteer retention for an organisation
or community activity
evaluation of documents prepared by the individual:
◦ reports outlining the benefits, costs and risks of
volunteer involvement to the organisation
◦ lists or plans identifying volunteer roles
◦ position descriptions
◦ recruitment ads
◦ descriptions of volunteer rewards
174
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Guidance information for
assessment
evaluation of a report completed by the individual
giving details of the management of a volunteer
workforce for a tourism, hospitality or event industry
operation from inception to conclusion
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
human resource management principles used to
recruit, select and induct volunteers
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
BSBPMG501A Manage projects
SITXCOM201 Show social and cultural sensitivity
SITXEVT503 Manage event staging components
SITXHRM501 Recruit, select and induct staff
SITXHRM503 Monitor staff performance.
175
DRAFT THREE
SITXHRM503 Monitor staff performance
SITXHRM503
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Monitor staff performance
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXHRM006A Monitor staff
performance.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to monitor staff performance within the framework of
established performance management systems. It requires the
ability to monitor the day-to-day effectiveness of staff and to conduct
structured performance appraisals and formal counselling sessions.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, travel, hospitality and event sectors.
It applies to senior personnel who operate independently or with
limited guidance from others, including dedicated specialist staff or
operational supervisors and managers.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Human Resource Management
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Monitor staff
performance and
provide feedback.
2. Recognise and
resolve performance
problems.
1.1. Consult with and inform colleagues about expected
standards of performance using appropriate communication
mechanisms.
1.2. Monitor ongoing performance by maintaining close contact
with the workplace and colleagues.
1.3. Regularly provide confirming and corrective feedback to
colleagues.
1.4. Provide colleagues with guidance and support.
1.5. Provide recognition and reward for achievements and
outstanding performance.
1.6. Identify the need for further coaching or training and organise
according to organisational policies.
2.1. Identify and investigate performance problems.
2.2. Use feedback and coaching to address performance
problems.
2.3. Discuss and agree upon possible solutions with the
colleague.
2.4. Follow up outcomes of informal counselling through review in
the workplace.
2.5. Organise and conduct a formal counselling session when
needed according to required procedures.
176
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Implement
performance
management
systems.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
3.1. Implement formal performance management systems.
3.2. Conduct individual performance evaluations openly and fairly.
3.3. Complete and file performance management records.
3.4. Agree on courses of action with colleagues and follow up in
the workplace.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to provide effective feedback, coaching and counselling to team
members
critical thinking skills to evaluate the reasons contributing to poor staff performance
initiative and enterprise skills to proactively provide colleagues with appropriate guidance
and support to enhance their work performance
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret staff records and performance management documents
◦ write potentially complex and sensitive information about staff performance
planning and organising skills to coordinate regular performance appraisals and coordinate
and operate formal counselling sessions
problem-solving skills to identify and respond to staff performance issues
self-management skills to take responsibility for monitoring staff performance
teamwork skills to monitor the performance of individuals, their effect on the team and take
corrective action to enhance the whole of team performance.
Required knowledge
role and importance of monitoring staff performance and providing feedback and coaching
the key elements of performance standards and performance management systems
performance appraisal practices, including:
◦ reasons for performance appraisal
◦ the format for and inclusions of performance appraisal documents
◦ methods of appraising performance
for the specific organisation:
◦ procedures for performance appraisal interviews
◦ procedures for formal counselling sessions
◦ grievance procedures.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Expected standards of
performance and performance
problems may relate to:
adherence to procedures
cost minimisation
customer service standards
level of accuracy in work
personal presentation
177
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Guidance and support may
include:
Recognition and reward may
include:
Possible solutions to performance
may include:
Required procedures for a formal
counselling session may include:
Performance management
systems may include:
productivity
punctuality
response times
team interaction
waste minimisation.
advice on training and development opportunities
confirmation of organisational objectives and key
performance requirements
ensuring adequate resources are applied
opportunity to discuss work challenges
representing staff interests in other forums
support with difficult interpersonal situations.
acknowledgment of individual good performance to
the whole team
informal acknowledgment
presentation of awards
written reports to management.
additional training
adjustment of workload
agreement on short-term goals for improvement
assistance with problems outside of the workplace
reorganisation of work practices.
formal notification to staff member and management
invited participation of appropriate people
organisation of appropriate location for counselling
session.
methods of collecting performance data
methods of interpreting performance data
processes for performance appraisal interviews
type of assessment:
◦ self
◦ peer
◦ team
◦ productivity indicators.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Evidence of the ability to:
monitor the day-to-day effectiveness of staff and
provide supportive feedback and guidance for
improvement
conduct structured performance appraisals and
formal counselling sessions for diverse staff members
operating at different levels of effectiveness
integrate knowledge of procedures for formal
178
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
performance management and counselling.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or events
industry business operation for which staff
performance is monitored
commercial procedures for conducting performance
appraisals and formal counselling sessions
current performance appraisal and counselling
documents
team members with whom the individual can interact.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
project or work activities to assess the individual’s
ability to:
◦ address problematic performance management
issues
◦ report on how performance management issues
have been addressed
use of role-plays to conduct:
◦ performance appraisals
◦ formal counselling sessions
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
procedures for formal performance management and
counselling
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role, for
example:
SITXCOM201 Show social and cultural sensitivity
SITXHRM402 Lead and manage people
SITXMGT401 Monitor work operations.
179
DRAFT THREE
Inventory
SITXINV201 Receive and store stock
SITXINV201
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Receive and store stock
N
Replaces but is not equivalent to SITXINV001A Receive and store
stock.
Re-worked Elements, Performance Criteria, Required Skills and
Knowledge to more fully articulate content. Technology skills and
knowledge added.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to check and take delivery of stock and to appropriately
store, rotate and maintain the quality of stock items.
It does not include specialist stock control processes for perishable
foodstuffs which are covered by the unit SITXINV202 Maintain the
quality of perishable supplies.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to the tourism, travel, hospitality and event industry
sectors and to any type of stock.
The unit is relevant to organisations where stock control is an
integral and essential part of business operations, and where there
are control issues to be considered. The unit is not appropriate for
situations where stock management is very simple, such as
controlling stationery supplies in a small office.
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
It applies to operational personnel who work with very little
independence and under close supervision. They apply little
discretion and judgement and follow predefined organisational
procedures to report any stock-related discrepancies to a higher
level staff member for action.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Inventory
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Take delivery of
stock.
1.1. Check incoming stock against orders and delivery
documentation.
1.2. Identify, record and report discrepancies.
1.3. Inspect items for damage, quality and use-by dates and record
findings according to organisational procedures.
180
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
2. Store stock.
3. Rotate and maintain
stock.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
1.4. Record details of incoming stock according to organisational
procedures.
2.1. Promptly transport stock to and store in appropriate storage
area.
2.2. Use safe manual handling techniques to avoid injury when
moving and storing stock.
2.3. Label stock according to organisational procedures.
2.4. Report on excess stock according to organisational
procedures.
3.1. Rotate stock for maximum use and minimum wastage.
3.2. Regularly check the quality of stock and report findings.
3.3. Safely dispose of all excess or spoilt stock and waste,
especially hazardous substances, to minimise negative
environmental impacts.
3.4. Maintain cleanliness of stock handling and storage areas,
identify and report any problems.
3.5. Use stock control systems and equipment according to
organisational speed and accuracy requirements.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to make accurate verbal reports of stock discrepancies and quality
literacy skills to:
◦ read and comprehend order and delivery documentation, use-by dates, stock labels, and
organisational procedures
◦ write records of incoming stock and simple reports about stock discrepancies and quality
numeracy skills to count incoming, stored and rotated stock items
planning and organising skills to conduct stock activities in a logical and time-efficient work
flow
problem-solving skills to identify, record and report order discrepancies and quality of stock
items
technology skills to use:
◦ a computer and keyboard
◦ the system capabilities and functions of a stock control system
◦ electronic equipment used for stock control.
Required knowledge
principles of stock control, including:
◦ rotation and replenishment
◦ product life cycle and maximising the use of all stock
◦ checking for slow moving items
◦ segregation of non-food items from food items that have potential to cross-contaminate
for the specific industry sector, types of:
◦ computerised stock control systems; their functions and features
◦ electronic equipment used for stock control; their functions and features
◦ stock recording documentation
◦ stock security systems
181
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
◦ storage and their suitability for different kinds of stock
for the specific organisation:
◦ relevant stock, including product life and storage requirements for specific goods
◦ procedures for security, recording incoming stock, reporting on discrepancies,
deficiencies and excess stock
◦ order and delivery documentation
safe manual handling techniques for the receipt, transportation and storage of stock
safe and correct use of equipment, such as forklifts
correct and environmentally sound disposal methods for all types of waste and in particular
for hazardous substances.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Stock may include:
alcohol
cleaning agents and chemicals
customer travel products:
◦ luggage labels
◦ travel bags
◦ travel wallets
tickets
vouchers
event supplies
food:
◦ dairy products
◦ canned products
◦ dry goods
◦ frozen goods
◦ fruit
◦ meat
◦ oils
◦ poultry
◦ seafood
◦ vacuumed sealed items
◦ vegetables
fuel:
◦ aircraft
◦ coaches
◦ hire cars
◦ vessels
general stores
housekeeping supplies
linen
merchandise
non-alcoholic beverages:
182
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
◦
◦
◦
Stock control systems may
involve:
mixers
juice
soft drink
◦ tea coffee
uniforms.
bin cards
imprest
integrated point-of-sale systems
ledgers
stock control procedures and template documents
and reports for:
◦ ordering
◦ levels
◦ loss
◦ performance
◦ monitoring of quality
◦ receipt
◦ reorder cycles
◦ rotation
◦ security
◦ stocktakes
◦ valuation
◦ wastage
storage requirements for different kinds of stock
use of :
◦ electronic stock control equipment
◦ stock control software systems.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
interpret and complete stock documentation and
efficiently and safely receive, store and maintain
diverse stock items on multiple occasions
integrate, into daily work activities, knowledge of:
◦ stock recording procedures
◦ security procedures
◦ manual handling techniques
complete stock activities within commercial time
constraints.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry stock control environment where stock is
received, stored and recorded
computers, printers and stock control software
systems currently used by the tourism, hospitality or
183
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
event industry
electronic equipment used for stock control
a diverse and comprehensive range of tourism,
hospitality or event industry stock items that are
received and stored
current commercial stock recording procedures and
documentation for the receipt and storage of stock.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
direct observation of the individual:
◦ receiving and storing stock
◦ using correct manual handling techniques
review of documents prepared by the individual:
◦ records of incoming stock
◦ discrepancy and deficiency reports
◦ excess stock reports
use of problem-solving exercises to assess the
individual’s ability to respond to stock deficiencies,
order discrepancies and overstocked items
written and oral questioning to assess knowledge of
stock recording and security procedures
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
BSBCMM201A Communicate in the workplace
SITXINV202 Maintain the quality of perishable
supplies
SITXWHS101 Participate in safe work practices.
184
DRAFT THREE
SITXINV202 Maintain the quality of perishable supplies
SITXINV202
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Maintain the quality of perishable supplies
N
Replaces but is not equivalent to SITHCCC003B Receive and store
kitchen supplies.
Unit renamed for clarity and re-categorised to Inventory.
There was confused intent with, and duplication across, the two
units SITXINV201 Receive and store stock and SITHCCC003B
Receive and store kitchen supplies. The unit Receive and store
stock covers stock control for all types of stock. This unit now only
covers the particular skills and knowledge required to store
perishable supplies in optimum conditions to minimise wastage and
avoid food safety hazards.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to maintain the quality of perishable supplies for
commercial cookery or catering operations. It requires the ability to
store perishable supplies in optimum conditions to minimise wastage
and avoid food contamination.
It does not include general stock control processes which are
covered by the unit SITXINV201 Receive and store stock.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit must be assessed after the following prerequisite unit:
SITXFSA101
Use hygienic practices for food safety
This unit is particularly important within a food safety regime and
applies to hospitality and catering organisations including hotels,
restaurants, clubs, educational institutions, health establishments,
defence forces, cafeterias, residential caterers, in-flight and other
transport caterers, event and function caterers.
People at many levels use this skill in the workplace during the
course of their daily activities including cooks, chefs, caterers, and
kitchen attendants.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Inventory
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Store supplies in
appropriate
conditions.
1.1. Conduct temperature checks on delivered goods ensuring
they are within specified tolerances.
1.2. Record temperature results according to organisational
procedures.
1.3. Identify any deficiencies, with delivered food items, reject
185
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
2. Maintain perishable
supplies at optimum
quality.
3. Check perishable
supplies and dispose
of spoilt stock.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
supply within scope of responsibility or report findings.
1.4. Choose and prepare correct environmental conditions for
the storage of perishable supplies.
1.5. Date code all perishable supplies to maximise use.
1.6. Promptly store supplies in appropriate storage area to
minimise wastage and avoid food contamination.
2.1. Regularly check and adjust the environmental conditions of all
storage areas and equipment to maintain perishable supplies
at optimum quality.
2.2. Conduct temperature checks according to food safety
procedures and protect supplies from spoilage.
2.3. Protect supplies from damage of cross-contamination and
pests.
2.4. Rotate perishable supplies for maximum use according to
expiration dates.
3.1. Regularly check all perishable supplies for quality.
3.2. Inspect items for animal and pest damage and report incidents
of infestation.
3.3. Identify any deficiencies, report findings or dispose of any nonusable supplies within scope of responsibility.
3.4. Safely dispose of spoilt stock and waste to minimise negative
environmental impacts.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to make simple verbal reports on the disposal of perished supplies
literacy skills to:
◦ read and comprehend date code and stock rotation labels
◦ write date code and stock rotation labels and simple documents that record temperature
results
numeracy skills to:
◦ use a thermometer correctly to measure temperatures
◦ estimate times for regular temperature checks
planning and organising skills to regularly check and adjust the environmental conditions of
storage areas
problem-solving skills to:
◦ evaluate quality of stored supplies and make adjustments to their storage conditions to
ensure a quality product
◦ monitor storage temperatures and adjust according to identified discrepancies
◦ identify unsafe and perished supplies and dispose of them
teamwork skills to report incidents of spoilage to supervisors
technology skills to use thermometers and adjust temperature and humidity controls on
storage equipment.
Required knowledge
contents of stock date codes and rotation labels
meaning of:
186
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
◦
◦
wastage to a commercial catering organisation and reasons to avoid it
contaminated food as defined by the Australia New Zealand Food Standards (ANZFS)
Code
reasons for protecting food from contamination
different types of contamination:
◦ microbiological
◦ chemical
◦ physical
methods of rejecting contaminated food
correct environmental storage conditions for the main food types used in a commercial
kitchen:
◦ beverages
◦ dairy products
◦ canned products
◦ dry goods
◦ food
◦ frozen goods
◦ fruit
◦ meat
◦ oils
◦ poultry
◦ seafood
◦ vacuumed sealed items
◦ vegetables
food safety procedures and standards for storage of perishable supplies:
◦ appropriate containers
◦ labelling and coding
◦ first in first out methods
◦ storage environments
◦ temperature, humidity, light and ventilation specifications for storage
◦ cleaning and sanitising processes for food storage areas
◦ quarantining the storage of items that are likely to be the source of contamination of
food, including chemicals, clothing and personal belongings
indicators of spoilage and contamination of perishable supplies:
◦ degradation of flavour, aroma, colour and texture
◦ enzymic browning
◦ drying and hardening
◦ crystalisation
◦ infestation of animal and pest waste
◦ mould
◦ exposed packaged food through damaged packaging
◦ odour
correct and environmentally sound disposal methods for kitchen waste and hazardous
substances.
187
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Temperature checks may relate to:
Deficiencies may include:
To reject supply may involve
Environmental conditions may
involve:
Supplies include:
cold or chilled foods
frozen foods
ingredients
raw foods
reheated foods or ingredients.
contaminated food
food that is intended to be:
◦ frozen but has thawed
◦ chilled but has reached a dangerous temperature
zone
packaged food that is exposed through damaged
packaging.
rejecting supply immediately on delivery by supplier
rejecting supply of goods delivered under concession
and not formally received
quarantining contaminated food from other food until
the rejection is finalised
returning food to the supplier
disposing of contaminated food with consent of the
supplier.
correct application of humidity and temperature
controls
correct ventilation
protecting perishables from exposure to:
◦ heating or air conditioning
◦ accidental damage through people traffic
◦ environmental heat and light
sanitary cleanliness
storing perishables:
◦ in dry stores
◦ in cool rooms
◦ in freezers
◦ in refrigerators
◦ sanitised and hygienic conditions
◦ at room temperature.
beverages
dairy products
canned products
dry goods
food
frozen goods
fruit
meat
oils
188
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Quality may include:
poultry
seafood
stock on hand
vacuumed sealed items
vegetables.
currency of best by or use by dates
freshness
size
weight.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
maintain the quality of a diverse range of perishable
supplies for commercial cookery or catering
operations including these main food groups:
◦ beverages
◦ dairy products
◦ canned products
◦ dry goods
◦ frozen goods
◦ fruit
◦ meat
◦ oils
◦ poultry
◦ seafood
◦ vacuumed sealed items
◦ vegetables
integrate knowledge of:
◦ correct environmental storage conditions for the
main food types
◦ food safety procedures and standards for storage
of perishable supplies
◦ indicators of spoilage and contamination of
perishable supplies
integrate checks on perishable supplies with other
duties and within commercial time constraints.
Assessment must ensure use of:
an operational commercial kitchen with the fixtures,
large and small equipment and workplace
documentation defined in the Assessment
Guidelines; this can be a:
◦ real industry workplace
◦ simulated industry environment such as a training
kitchen servicing customers
thermometers and temperature recording charts
189
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
a diverse and comprehensive range of perishable
food supplies.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
direct observation of the individual date coding
perishable supplies and storing them in appropriate
environmental conditions
evaluation of temperature records completed by the
individual
problem solving exercise to assess the individual’s
ability to identify a range of spoilt and contaminated
food items
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
correct environmental storage conditions, food safety
procedures and standards and indicators of spoilage
and contamination
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITHCCC104 Package prepared foodstuffs
SITHCCC205 Produce cook-chill and cook freeze
foods
SITHCCC206 Rethermalise chilled and frozen foods
SITXINV201 Receive and store stock
SITXWHS101 Participate in safe work practices
TLIE1005A Carry out basic workplace calculations.
190
DRAFT THREE
SITXINV301 Purchase goods
SITXINV301
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Purchase goods
New unit.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to determine the purchasing requirements for goods,
source suppliers, discuss requirements and to assess the quality of
goods before purchasing.
It does not cover the specialist skills to systematically purchase and
control the supply of goods for an organisation. These skills are
covered by the units:
SITXINV401 Control stock
SITXINV601 Establish stock purchasing and control systems.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to the tourism, travel, hospitality and event industry
sectors and covers the purchase of any type of goods including food
and beverage supplies. Purchasing goods may involve: placing an
order for future delivery or purchasing goods face-to-face and taking
immediate delivery.
The unit can apply to operational personnel who operate with some
level of independence and under limited supervision. This includes
tour coordinators, account managers for professional conference
organisers, event coordinators and banquet coordinators. In a
kitchen environment it can apply to chefs of all levels including
commis chefs, but in larger organisations purchasing often remains
the responsibility of sous chefs and executive chefs.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Inventory
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Determine
purchasing
requirements.
1.1. Access and interpret information and discuss the end product
requirements with relevant personnel to ascertain goods to
be purchased.
1.2. Check and assess quality and suitability of stock on hand
before proceeding with new purchases.
1.3. Maximise use of suitable stock on hand to avoid wastage.
1.4. Use forecasting methods to calculate required quantity of
goods.
1.5. Ascertain price limitations for the purchase of goods using job
costings.
191
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
2. Source suppliers and
discuss requirements
3. Assess quality of
goods and make
purchase
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
1.6. Develop purchase lists and prioritise purchasing requirements
according to organisational deadlines.
2.1. Source and review potential suppliers and comply with
organisational procedures for the supply of goods
2.2. Inform supplier of requirements and specifications.
2.3. Confirm availability of supply to meet the production
requirements.
2.4. Seek price for the supply and negotiate costs within scope of
individual responsibility and organisational policy.
2.5. Refer complex supply issues to a higher level staff member for
action
3.1. Assess supplier capacity to meet price, quality and delivery
expectations.
3.2. Complete an assessment of the quality of the goods.
3.3. Select supplier and purchase goods based on price,
availability and quality and within scope of individual
responsibility and organisational policy.
3.4. Keep accurate purchase records.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ discuss product and purchase requirements with supervisors and managers
◦ provide clear directions to suppliers about product specifications and purchasing
requirements
◦ conduct basic negotiations on the cost of goods
critical thinking skills to assesses the quality of goods on offer by the supplier
initiative and enterprise skills to purchase from the most cost effective supplier
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret operational documents which describe the purchasing requirements
e.g. recipes, menus, itineraries, event running sheets, and organisational procedures
◦ write purchase orders and descriptive purchase specifications for suppliers
numeracy skills to interpret job costings and calculate supplier costs
planning and organising skills to prioritise purchasing requirements according to
organisational deadlines
problem-solving skills to identify deficiencies in:
◦ current stock on hand and purchase new stock
◦ supplier quality and choose a more appropriate supplier
teamwork skills to discuss production requirements with supervisors and managers to
determine purchase requirements
technology skills to use a calculator to assist with supply numbers and costs.
Required knowledge
for the specific industry sector and organisation:
◦ features of products sold and the expected level of quality
◦ formats for and contents of workplace documents that describe supply requirements
◦ forecasting methods for calculating required quantity of goods
192
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
◦
◦
◦
◦
◦
◦
formats for and inclusions of job costings that describe purchase price limitations
sources of product and supplier information
sources of information on negotiated cost of supply, contractual arrangements and
preferred supplier arrangements
formats for and inclusions of supplier specifications for the purchase of goods
full content of stock ordering procedures and documents
individual stock ordering responsibilities.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Information may include:
Relevant personnel may include:
Goods may include:
buffet designs
catering orders
customer specifications:
◦ numbers
◦ special requests
event orders
event running sheets
function orders
menus
operational itineraries for crew
passenger itineraries
passenger lists
recipes
reservation profiles
rooming lists
standard yields.
chef
event coordinator
executive chef
manager:
◦ event
◦ operations
◦ reservations
sous chef
supervisor.
alcohol
cleaning agents and chemicals
customer travel products:
◦ luggage labels
◦ travel bags
◦ travel wallets
◦ tickets
◦ vouchers
193
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Quality and suitability of stock on
hand may involve:
Forecasting methods may include:
event supplies
food:
◦ dairy products
◦ dry goods
◦ fresh goods
◦ frozen goods
◦ fruit
◦ meat
◦ poultry
◦ seafood
◦ vegetables
fuel:
◦ aircraft
◦ coaches
◦ hire cars
◦ vessels
general stores
housekeeping supplies
linen
merchandise
non-alcoholic beverages:
◦ juice
◦ mixers
◦ soft drink
◦ tea and coffee
uniforms.
ability to meet customer requirements:
◦ numbers
◦ special dietary requirements
◦ special requests
ability to meet requirements of:
◦ event
◦ menu
◦ recipe
◦ touring itinerary
for food:
◦ currency of best by or use by dates
◦ freshness
◦ size
◦ weight
numbers of goods on hand.
moving averages
popularity index
use of sales reports for future customer bookings
yield tests:
◦ butcher’s test
◦ standard measures
194
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Job costings may be specified in:
Suppliers may include:
Organisational procedures for the
supply of goods may involve:
Specifications may include:
Assessment may involve:
◦ standard yield test.
budgets
customer quotations
event costings
itineraries
menus
recipes
tour costings.
any supplier who meets the production requirements
of the end product
contracted suppliers
existing suppliers
food markets
new suppliers
preferred suppliers
retailers
suppliers who meet quality and price specifications
those located:
◦ interstate
◦ locally
◦ overseas
wholesalers.
completing purchase orders
gaining authority to purchase
limitations on which suppliers can be used
who is authorised to negotiate and purchase.
budget
colour
deadlines for supply
delivery or pick up requirements
detailed description
expected supply cost
fresh or frozen food
general description
grade
numbers to be purchased
product name
quality
required labelling
size
special instructions or requirements
storage procedures
upper purchase price barrier
use for product
weight.
comparing price with previous supply costs
visual assessment
195
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Quality of the goods may involve:
Purchase goods may involve:
taste test
checking on other customers’ satisfaction with the
supplier.
ability to meet:
◦ customer specifications
◦ organisational quality specifications
◦ portion requirements
currency of best by or use by dates
freshness
size
weight.
placing an order for future delivery
purchasing goods face-to-face and taking immediate
delivery.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for assessment Evidence of the ability to:
interpret and confirm purchasing requirements and
and evidence required to
purchase a diverse range of goods to meet different
demonstrate competency in this
end product requirements
unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
assesses supplier capacity to meet price, quality
and delivery expectations
integrate into purchasing activities, knowledge of
stock ordering procedures and documents
complete purchasing activities according to
organisational deadlines.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
business activity for which goods are purchased; for
example:
◦ a function
◦ a kitchen operation
◦ a tour
◦ an event
a diverse and comprehensive range of tourism,
hospitality or event industry supply items that can
be assessed for quality and suitability
operational documentation, e.g. details of supplier
contracts and job costings
current commercial stock control procedures and
documentation for the ordering of goods.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
direct observation, using role plays, of the
196
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Guidance information for
assessment
individual:
◦ discussing purchase requirements with
supervisors and managers
◦ negotiating the quality and cost of items with
suppliers
projects and activities that allow assessment of the
individual’s ability to:
◦ assess the quality of goods on offer
◦ determine purchase requirements for particular
business operation
◦ purchase goods to meet deadlines
review of documents prepared by the individual:
◦ product specifications
◦ purchase lists
use of problem-solving activities so the individual
can suggest methods for resolving costly or
substandard quality of supply
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
contractual arrangements, preferred supplier
arrangements and stock ordering procedures
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITHCCC301 Produce poultry dishes
SITHCCC302 Produce seafood dishes
SITHCCC303 Produce meat dishes
SITHCCC304 Produce and serve food for buffets
SITTTSL201 Operate an online information system
SITXFIN402 Manage finances within a budget.
197
DRAFT THREE
SITXINV401 Control stock
SITXINV401
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Control stock
N
Replaces but is not equivalent to SITXINV002A Control and order
stock.
Title simplified. Re-worked Elements, Performance Criteria,
Required Skills and Knowledge to more fully articulate content.
Technology skills and knowledge added. Prerequisites removed.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to process stock orders, maintain stock levels, minimise
stock losses, manage stocktakes and maintain all documents that
relate to the administration of any type of stock.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to the tourism, travel, hospitality and event industry
sectors.
The unit is relevant to organisations where stock control is an
integral and essential part of business operations, and where there
are complex ordering and control issues to be considered. The unit
is not appropriate for situations where stock management is very
simple, such as controlling stationery supplies in a small office.
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
It applies to stock control personnel who operate independently,
have responsibility for others and make a range of decisions on the
overall administration of stock.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Inventory
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Maintain stock levels
and records.
1.1. Use stock control systems and equipment to administer all
stock control and ordering processes.
1.2. Monitor and maintain stock levels to meet organisational
requirements.
1.3. Monitor stock security and adjust procedures as required.
1.4. Inform colleagues of their individual stock ordering
responsibilities.
1.5. Maintain records of stock levels and create reports according
to organisational procedures.
1.6. Monitor stock performance, and identify and report fast or
slow-selling items.
1.7. Monitor and adjust stock reorder cycles.
198
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
2. Process stock
orders.
3. Minimise stock
losses.
4. Follow up orders.
5. Organise and
administer
stocktakes.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
2.1. Process orders for stock according to organisational
procedures.
2.2. Maintain stock levels and record current accurate details.
2.3. Check and record incoming stock against purchase and supply
agreements.
3.1. Regularly check the storage of stock and ensure its
protection.
3.2. Identify, record and report stock losses.
3.3. Identify avoidable losses and establish reasons for them.
3.4. Recommend solutions and implement procedures to prevent
future losses.
4.1. Monitor the delivery of stock to ensure agreed deadlines are
met.
4.2. Liaise with suppliers to ensure continuity of supply.
4.3. Resolve routine supply problems or refer to appropriate person
for action.
4.4. Distribute stock within the organisation according to required
allocations.
5.1. Organise stocktakes at appropriate intervals.
5.2. Allocate stocktaking responsibilities to staff and supervise the
operation of the stocktake.
5.3. Produce accurate stocktake reports within designated
timelines.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ liaise with suppliers about deliveries and discrepancies
◦ discuss reasons for stock losses with staff
◦ provide clear directions to staff about their stocktaking responsibilities
critical thinking skills to analyse stock performance, and identify fast or slow-selling items
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret supplier purchasing agreements, purchase orders, records of
incoming stock and organisational procedures
◦ write detailed reports on stock levels, performance, losses and stocktakes
numeracy skills to calculate supplier costs and complex order costs, reconcile incoming
stock and invoices against purchase orders, calculate complex details of stock on hand and
stock losses and produce complex numerically based reports
planning and organising skills to efficiently order and maintain stock so that stock levels
meet organisational requirements
problem-solving skills to identify reasons for stock losses, recommend solutions and
implement procedures to prevent future losses
teamwork skills to direct staff on ordering responsibilities and supervise staff participation in
stocktakes
technology skills to use:
◦ a computer and keyboard
◦ the system capabilities and functions of a stock control system
199
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
◦
electronic equipment used for stock control.
Required knowledge
principles of stock control, including:
◦ rotation and replenishment
◦ product life cycle and maximising the use of all stock
◦ checking for slow moving items
◦ segregation of non-food items from food items that have potential to cross-contaminate
for the specific industry sector:
◦ different types of computer stock control systems used, their functions and features
◦ electronic equipment used for stock control; their functions and features
◦ stock security systems
◦ types of storage and their suitability for different kinds of stock
◦ methods to monitor and maintain stock levels
for the specific organisation:
◦ relevant stock, including product life and storage requirements for specific goods
◦ departmental or individual stock ordering responsibilities
◦ full content of stock control and security procedures
◦ sources of information on negotiated cost of supply, contractual arrangements and
preferred supplier arrangements
◦ full content of stock ordering procedures and documents
◦ stock reorder cycles
◦ stock level reports
◦ stock performance reports
◦ stock loss reports
◦ full content of stocktake procedures, documents and reports
reasons for stock loss and damage and methods to control these.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Stock control systems may
involve:
bin cards
imprest
integrated point-of-sale systems
ledgers
stock control procedures, template documents and
reports for:
◦ ordering
◦ levels
◦ loss
◦ performance
◦ monitoring of quality
◦ receipt
◦ reorder cycles
◦ rotation
200
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Stock may include:
Process orders may involve:
◦ security
◦ stocktakes
◦ valuation
◦ wastage
storage requirements for different kinds of stock
use of :
◦ electronic stock control equipment
◦ stock control software systems.
alcohol
cleaning agents and chemicals
customer travel products:
◦ luggage labels
◦ travel bags
◦ travel wallets
◦ tickets
◦ vouchers
event supplies
food:
◦ dairy products
◦ dry goods
◦ frozen goods
◦ fruit
◦ meat
◦ poultry
◦ seafood
◦ vegetables
fuel:
◦ aircraft
◦ coaches
◦ hire cars
◦ vessels
general stores
housekeeping supplies
linen
merchandise
non-alcoholic beverages:
◦ mixers
◦ juice
◦ soft drink
◦ tea coffee
uniforms.
any method of ordering:
◦ electronic
◦ email
◦ on-line
◦ telephone
◦ face-to-face
201
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Protection may involve:
Stock losses may involve:
placing an order for future delivery
purchasing goods face-to-face and taking immediate
delivery.
avoiding cross contamination
correct application of humidity and temperature
controls
correct ventilation
securing stock
storing stock in correct location and conditions to
avoid damage
treating pest and vermin infestations.
inappropriate storage conditions
lack of rotation leading to product deterioration
overstocking
pests or vermin
theft.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
order, control and administer continuous and efficient
supply of a diverse range of stock
monitor and maintain stock levels over a stock lifecycle period which includes a stocktake
produce and distribute multiple and diverse stock
control reports
complete stocktakes
integrate, into daily work activities, knowledge of
stock control procedures
complete stock order and reporting activities within
commercial time constraints.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry stock control environment where stock levels
are monitored and maintained
computers, printers and stock control software
systems currently used by the tourism, hospitality or
event industry
electronic equipment used for stock control
a diverse and comprehensive range of tourism,
hospitality or event industry stock items that are
monitored and maintained
current commercial stock control procedures and
documentation for the ordering, monitoring and
maintenance of stock.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
202
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Guidance information for
assessment
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
direct observation, using role plays, of the individual:
◦ resolving stock delivery issues with suppliers
◦ supervising the operation of a stocktake
projects and activities that allow assessment of the
individual’s ability to:
◦ process stock orders
◦ monitor and maintain stock levels over a stock
life-cycle period which includes a stocktake
review of reports prepared by the individual:
◦ stock level
◦ stock performance
◦ stock loss
use of problem-solving activities so the individual can
suggest methods for minimising stock losses
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
the principles of stock control, procedures for stock
management and stocktakes
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
BSBWRT401A Write complex documents
SITXMGT401 Monitor work operations
SITXWHS401 Implement and monitor Work Health
and Safety practices.
203
DRAFT THREE
SITXINV601 Establish stock purchasing and control systems
SITXINV601
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Establish stock purchasing and control systems
N
Replaces but is not equivalent to SITXINV003A Manage and
purchase stock.
Change to title for greater consistency across Training Package and
to better reflect the intent of the unit. Changes made to structure and
word content of Elements and Performance Criteria for clarity.
Technology skills and knowledge added.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to establish and implement stock control and cost effective
stock purchasing and supply systems for a business.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to the tourism, travel, hospitality and event industry
sectors.
The unit is relevant to organisations where stock management is an
integral and essential part of business operations, and where there
are complex purchasing and control issues to be considered. The
unit is not appropriate for situations where stock management is
very simple, such as controlling stationery supplies in a small office.
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
It applies to senior managers who operate with significant autonomy
and who are responsible for making a range of strategic
management decisions.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Inventory
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Determine stock
requirements.
2. Establish optimum
supply
arrangements.
1.1. Use business data, forecasting methods and standard
measures to calculate required stock levels.
1.2. Determine stock requirements for standard business periods,
peak seasons and special events.
1.3. Establish cost-effective purchase quantities based on business
information and supplier advice.
2.1. Evaluate quality of supply, based on feedback from colleagues
and customers.
2.2. Source and review potential suppliers.
2.3. Develop appropriate and accurate purchase specifications.
2.4. Assess suppliers against specifications considering all
relevant factors.
204
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Develop and
implement stock
control systems.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
2.5. Assess terms of purchase and negotiate with suppliers to
achieve optimum supply arrangements.
2.6. Adjust sources of supply and make accurate records of
agreements.
3.1. Develop stock control systems and communicate to all
relevant staff.
3.2. Develop special control systems for stock with high wastage
or loss.
3.3. Monitor workplace systems and make adjustments according
to feedback and operational experience.
3.4. Initiate training of staff to minimise stock wastage.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to negotiate complex supply arrangements and liaise with stock
suppliers
critical thinking skills to assess supplier ability to meet the needs of the organisation and
evaluate and determine optimum supply arrangements
initiative and enterprise skills to negotiate cost effective supply and maximise profitability
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret complex supplier cost sheets, specific terms of purchase and supplier
contracts
◦ research potential suppliers, sort and analyse information to make decisions on supply
arrangements
◦ write complex and accurate purchase specifications and stock control system
documents
numeracy skills to:
◦ work with budgets
◦ interpret complex stock performance, wastage and stocktake reports
◦ calculate standard methods and measures
◦ interpret supply costs and calculate cost effective quantities for purchase
planning and organising skills to plan, establish and monitor stock control systems
problem-solving skills to monitor the quality and cost of supply, identify deficiencies and
adjust purchasing arrangements
self-management skills to take responsibility for purchase and stock control decisions
teamwork skills to discuss, review and incorporate feedback from team members
technology skills to use:
◦ a computer and keyboard
◦ the system capabilities and functions of a stock control system.
Required knowledge
for the specific industry sector:
◦ forecasting methods for calculating required stock levels including formulas for yield
testing and use of standard measures
◦ methods to calculate cost-effective order quantities for different stock items
◦ different types of computer stock control systems used, their functions and features
◦ stock security systems
205
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
◦ types of storage and their suitability for different kinds of stock
◦ a range of supply sources for different types of product
◦ formats for and inclusions of purchase specifications, including appropriate terminology
for the specific organisation:
◦ relevant stock, including product life and storage requirements for specific goods
◦ standard business periods, peak seasons and special events
reasons for stock loss and damage and methods to control these
a range of formats for, inclusions and uses of:
◦ stock control procedures including those for stock with high wastage or loss
◦ various stock control reports.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Data may include:
Forecasting methods may include:
Standard measures may include:
Stock may include:
historical sales figures
stocktake figures
supplier lead time
wastage reports.
moving averages
popularity index
use of sales reports for future customer bookings
yield tests:
◦ butcher’s test
◦ standard measures
◦ standard yield test.
food portion size:
◦ count
◦ cup
◦ scoop
◦ slice
◦ measure
◦ volume
◦ weight
fuel consumption for:
◦ particular road, sea or air travel conditions
◦ types of aircraft, sea vessels and land transport
vehicles
expected customer numbers for:
◦ events
◦ peak season
◦ standard business periods
standard recipes
standard yields.
alcohol
206
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Purchase specifications may
include:
cleaning agents and chemicals
customer travel products:
◦ luggage labels
◦ travel bags
◦ travel wallets
◦ tickets
◦ vouchers
event supplies
food:
◦ dairy products
◦ canned products
◦ dry goods
◦ fresh goods
◦ frozen goods
◦ fruit
◦ meat
◦ oils
◦ poultry
◦ seafood
◦ vacuumed sealed items
◦ vegetables
fuel:
◦ aircraft
◦ coaches
◦ hire cars
◦ vessels
general stores
housekeeping supplies
linen
merchandise
non-alcoholic beverages:
◦ juice
◦ mixers
◦ soft drink
◦ tea and coffee
uniforms.
budget
colour
deadlines for supply
delivery or pick up requirements
detailed description
expected supply cost
fresh or frozen food
general description
grade
numbers to be purchased
product name
207
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Relevant factors may include:
Terms of purchase may include:
Stock control systems may
involve:
quality
required labelling
size
special instructions or requirements
storage procedures
upper purchase price barrier
use for product
weight.
ability to meet all aspects of the specification
after sales service
competitive pricing
credit terms available
delivery service, including emergency delivery
lead time
minimum and maximum order quantities
product availability
references from other customers
trading hours.
centralised or decentralised purchasing
competitive or open market buying
contract buying
cooperative buying
cost plus buying
credit terms
negotiated buying
one stop buying
sealed bid buying
volume buying and warehousing.
bin cards
imprest
integrated point-of-sale systems
ledgers
stock control procedures and template documents
and reports for:
◦ ordering
◦ levels
◦ loss
◦ performance
◦ monitoring of quality
◦ receipt
◦ reorder cycles
◦ rotation
◦ security
◦ stocktakes
◦ valuation
◦ wastage
storage requirements for different kinds of stock
208
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Special control systems may
involve:
use of:
◦ electronic stock control equipment
◦ stock control software systems.
controlling ordering quantities
maintaining correct environmental conditions for the
storage of perishable foodstuffs, including controls
for:
◦ temperature
◦ light
◦ humidity
procedures for:
◦ correct handling of perishables to avoid spoilage
of stock
◦ issue quantities
◦ issuing only to authorised persons
◦ stock transfer to other departments
◦ requisitioning
segregated storage of non-food items from food
items that have potential to cross-contaminate.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
establish and implement cost effective stock
purchasing and control systems for a diverse range
of stock items
monitor stock control systems, stock quality and costeffectiveness of supply over a period of time
integrate knowledge of various stock control reports
and data required to calculate cost-effective
purchasing.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry business operation for which stock is
purchased and stock control systems are developed
computers, printers and stock control software
systems currently used by the tourism, hospitality or
event industry
current commercial purchase specifications, stock
control procedures and reports, supplier cost and
contractual documentation used for the purchase of
stock
suppliers with whom the individual can interact and
negotiate.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
209
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Guidance information for
assessment
examples are appropriate for this unit:
projects and activities that allow assessment of the
individual’s ability to:
◦ determine stock levels for normal and peak
operating seasons
◦ use reports and supplier information to calculate
cost-effective order quantities
◦ develop a variety of tailored stock control
systems
◦ evaluate the performance of systems and make
adjustments
review of documents prepared by the individual:
◦ stock control procedures
◦ purchase specifications
◦ reports evaluating the quality and cost of supply
use of problem-solving activities so the individual can
develop systems to control stock with high wastage
or loss
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of:
◦ types of storage and their suitability for different
kinds of stock
◦ stock control systems used by the industry
◦ a range of supply sources for different types of
product
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
BSBWRT401A Write complex documents
SITXFIN501 Prepare and monitor budgets.
210
DRAFT THREE
Languages other than English
SITXLAN21__ Conduct basic oral communication in a language other than English
SITXLAN21__
Conduct basic oral communication in a language other
than English
Modification history
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXLAN1__A Conduct basic
workplace oral communication in a language other than English.
Minor adjustments to expression of content to streamline and
improve unit.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to use and understand very simple and commonly used
expressions of a predictable nature in a language other than
English. It covers activities, such as welcoming and farewelling
customers, providing face-to-face routine customer service and
other routine workplace activities.
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
There is no direct parity with any formal language proficiency ratings
or assessment frameworks, but this unit broadly relates to
International Second Language Proficiency Ratings (ISLPR) 1.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all industry contexts and to individuals working at
different levels of responsibility. This could include frontline,
supervisory or management personnel.
This unit can be used for the assessment of basic oral proficiency in
any language other than English. For reporting purposes,
recognition is limited to those languages listed below which are of
importance to the tourism industry. A specific code has been
allocated for each of these languages. Each language must be
indicated in brackets after the unit title.
For example: SITXLAN2111 Conduct basic oral communication in a
language other than English (Italian).
SITXLAN2101
(Arabic)
SITXLAN2102
(Indonesian)
SITXLAN2103
(Cantonese)
SITXLAN2104
(Dutch)
SITXLAN2105
(Finnish)
SITXLAN2106
(French)
SITXLAN2107
(German)
SITXLAN2108
(Greek)
SITXLAN2109
(Hindi)
SITXLAN2110
(Hungarian)
SITXLAN2111
(Italian)
SITXLAN2112
(Japanese)
SITXLAN2113
(Korean)
211
DRAFT THREE
SITXLAN21__
Competency field
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Unit sector
Conduct basic oral communication in a language other
than English
SITXLAN2114
(Malay)
SITXLAN2115
(Mandarin)
SITXLAN2116
(Polish)
SITXLAN2117
(Portuguese)
SITXLAN2118
(Russian)
SITXLAN2119
(Serbian)
SITXLAN2120
(Spanish)
SITXLAN2121
(Swedish)
SITXLAN2122
(Swiss German)
SITXLAN2123
(Taiwanese)
SITXLAN2124
(Thai)
SITXLAN2125
(Turkish)
SITXLAN2126
(Croatian)
SITXLAN2127
(Bosnian)
SITXLAN2128
(Australian Indigenous languages)
SITXLAN2129
(AUSLAN)
Languages other than English
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Initiate
communication.
2. Communicate in a
language other than
English to support
routine workplace
activities.
1.1. Identify language needed to conduct basic communication.
1.2. Recognise and observe social and cultural conventions of the
language speaker.
2.1. Use appropriate simple and commonly used courtesy
expressions, including those for greeting, farewelling,
apologising and thanking.
2.2. Where language barriers exist, make efforts to communicate
through use of gestures or basic vocabulary in the other
person’s language.
2.3. Understand and use routinely required key words, short
phrases and gestures.
2.4. Identify and use appropriate resources and seek assistance
from those with suitable language skills.
2.5. Use visual techniques to enhance or replace oral
communication.
212
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills in a language other than English to:
◦ support courteous and positive interactions
◦ use and understand key words, phrases, short expressions and numbers.
Required knowledge
cultural values and social norms relevant to the language being assessed, including:
◦ body language
◦ forms of address
◦ taboo topics
awareness of potential cross-cultural communication issues sufficient to avoid giving
offence.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Basic communication may include:
answering very simple queries about products and
services:
◦ in-house facilities
◦ local attractions and places of interest
◦ pick-up and drop-off point for tours
◦ shopping centres
◦ tour desk
◦ transport terminals, and taxi and other transport
services
conducting simple product and service transactions,
such as:
◦ advising check-in and check-out procedures and
times
◦ advising opening and closing times
◦ payment for a tourism service, e.g. day tour,
accommodation and ticket
◦ payment of a restaurant bill
◦ purchase of souvenir products
◦ references to timetable, signage and basic rules
◦ selection of food and beverages from a menu
listening to requests and comments
providing factual information, such as:
◦ currency
◦ location of specific facilities
◦ opening hours
◦ prices
◦ procedures, e.g. check-in and tour pick-up
213
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Courtesy expressions (formulaic
language) may include:
Resources may include:
Visual techniques may include:
◦ room and floor numbers
◦ safety rules
providing general assistance within the scope of
responsibility
providing very simple directions.
Did you have a good trip?
Do you need another towel?
Good morning
Goodbye
Have you had lunch?
How are you?
May I clean your room now?
May I help you?
Sorry, I don’t understand. Do you speak English?
This way please.
dictionaries
international signage, such as ‘No Smoking’ signs
language mats
menus written in the specific language
pamphlets written in the specific language
phrase books
signs written in the specific language
websites with translating facilities.
drawing attention to pamphlets and timetables
locating specific costs and items on menus
marking of a map
signs, gesturing and appropriate body language.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
conduct basic workplace communication in a
language other than English:
◦ listen to requests and comments
◦ provide general assistance
◦ provide very simple directions
gesture in a socially and culturally appropriate
manner.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated workplace activity for which
communication in languages other than English is
required
other people with whom the individual can interact in
the relevant language
resources that support communication in languages
214
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
other than English:
◦ dictionaries and phrase books
◦ language mats
◦ signs
◦ industry materials, such as menus, timetables
and brochures written in languages other than
English.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
oral assessment of conversational language use
direct observation of the individual communicating in
a language other than English while undertaking
typical workplace activities
review of visual aids prepared by the individual to
assist verbal communication
written or oral questioning to assess cultural
knowledge and cross-cultural communication
considerations
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITHACS303 Provide accommodation reception
services
SITHFAB202 Operate a bar
SITHFAB307 Provide table service of food and
beverage
SITXCCS201 Provide visitor information.
215
DRAFT THREE
SITXLAN22__ Conduct routine oral communication in a language other than English
SITXLAN22__
Conduct routine oral communication in a language other
than English
Modification history
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXLAN2__A Conduct routine
workplace oral communication in a language other than English.
Minor adjustments to expression of content to streamline and
improve unit.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to understand and use a language for routine
communication. It covers speaking and listening skills required to
conduct routine tasks and provide simple factual information and
instructions.
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
There is no direct parity with any formal language proficiency ratings
or assessment framework, but this unit broadly relates to
International Second Language Proficiency Ratings (ISLPR) 1+ to 2.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all industry contexts and to individuals working at
different levels of responsibility. This could include frontline,
supervisory or management personnel.
This unit can be used for the assessment of routine oral proficiency
in any language other than English. For reporting purposes,
recognition is limited to those languages listed below which are of
importance to the tourism industry. A specific code has been
allocated for each of these languages. Each language must be
indicated in brackets after the unit title.
For example: SITXLAN2206 Conduct routine oral communication in
a language other than English (French).
SITXLAN2201
(Arabic)
SITXLAN2202
(Indonesian)
SITXLAN2203
(Cantonese)
SITXLAN2204
(Dutch)
SITXLAN2205
(Finnish)
SITXLAN2206
(French)
SITXLAN2207
(German)
SITXLAN2208
(Greek)
SITXLAN2209
(Hindi)
SITXLAN2210
(Hungarian)
SITXLAN2211
(Italian)
SITXLAN2212
(Japanese)
SITXLAN2213
(Korean)
SITXLAN2214
(Malay)
SITXLAN2215
(Mandarin)
SITXLAN2216
(Polish)
216
DRAFT THREE
SITXLAN22__
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Conduct routine oral communication in a language other
than English
SITXLAN2217
(Portuguese)
SITXLAN2218
(Russian)
SITXLAN2219
(Serbian)
SITXLAN2220
(Spanish)
SITXLAN2221
(Swedish)
SITXLAN2222
(Swiss German)
SITXLAN2223
(Taiwanese)
SITXLAN2224
(Thai)
SITXLAN2225
(Turkish)
SITXLAN2226
(Croatian)
SITXLAN2227
(Bosnian)
SITXLAN2228
(Australian Indigenous languages)
SITXLAN2229
(AUSLAN)
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Languages other than English
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Conduct routine
transactions in a
language other than
English.
2. Give simple
directions and
instructions.
1.1. Identify language needed to conduct routine
communications and make introductions.
1.2. Understand and use appropriate courtesy expressions.
1.3. Understand and use key words, phrases, gestures and
sentences.
1.4. Provide simple advice on workplace events and topical and
familiar matters.
1.5. Provide simple explanations of problems and their causes, and
offer apologies as required.
1.6. Use simple terms to seek clarification from others when
required.
1.7. Support communication with reference to workplace
materials and visual information.
1.8. Identify need for and seek assistance from others with
appropriate language skills.
2.1. Provide clear, succinct and simple directions and
instructions using appropriate pace and correct sequence.
2.2. Support communication with use of appropriately sequenced
expressions and questions to emphasise or clarify directions
and instructions.
217
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ interact in a positive and courteous way
◦ participate in routine communications and provide simple directions and instructions in a
language other than English, including:
- use and understanding of key words, phrases, sentences and vocabulary specific to
communicating about number, time, place, distance, quantity and currency.
Required knowledge
cultural values and social norms relevant to the language being assessed:
◦ body language
◦ forms of address
◦ taboo topics
cross-cultural communication issues in routine communication sufficient to conduct routine
workplace transactions.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Routine communications may
include:
answering simple queries about products and
services:
◦ in-house facilities
◦ local attractions and places of interest
◦ pick-up and drop-off point for tours
◦ shopping centres
◦ tour desk
◦ transport terminals, and taxi and other transport
services
conducting product and service transactions:
◦ accepting a simple booking
◦ dealing with others on the telephone
◦ processing payment for a tourism service
◦ processing payment and purchases:
- restaurant bill
- souvenir products
◦ responding to basic requests for such things as
toiletries, towels, razor, hairdryer, blanket, pillow,
laundry list, ‘Do Not Disturb’ sign and breakfast
menu
◦ taking a message
◦ taking an order
providing factual information:
◦ availability and cost of products and services
◦ check-out times
218
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Courtesy expressions may
include:
Topical and familiar matters may
include:
Workplace materials and visual
information may include:
Simple directions and
instructions may relate to:
◦ menu or wine list explanations
◦ location of facilities
◦ opening and closing hours
◦ procedures and rules.
Did you have a good trip?
Do you need another towel?
Good Morning
Goodbye
How are you?
May I clean your room now?
May I help you?
Sorry, I don’t understand. Do you speak English?
This way please
Would you like a newspaper?
celebrations
deaths or marriages
demonstrations
elections
public holidays and festivals
sporting or cultural events
strikes or accidents
weather conditions.
hotel information signs and tags printed in the target
language to assist where necessary
international signage, such as ‘No Smoking’ signs
menus written in the specific language
pamphlets written in the specific language
pamphlets, timetables, charts, price tags and menus
signs written in the specific language
signs, maps, diagrams, forms, labels and tickets.
advising check-in and check-out procedures
how facilities and services work:
◦ room equipment
how to get to restrooms, car park, restaurant, bistro,
bar, pool or gym
how to get to tour pick-up point
how to use telephone
where facilities are located, such as attractions and
rides at a theme park, and general transport
where to go to catch a tour bus or taxi
where to go to purchase everyday goods, such as
medication and sunscreen
where to go to purchase everyday services, such as
post office and tour services.
219
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
conduct routine workplace communication in a
language other than English:
◦ understand requests and comments
◦ clarify information by asking simple factual
questions
◦ respond to requests for factual information and
simple advice
◦ provide routine information and maintain
communication in relation to routine transactions
◦ provide directions and instructions
◦ follow social and cultural conventions for the
language being used.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated workplace activity for which
communication in languages other than English is
required
other people with whom the individual can interact in
the relevant language
resources that support communication in languages
other than English:
◦ dictionaries and phrase books
◦ signs and maps
◦ language mats
◦ industry materials, such as menus, timetables
and brochures written in languages other than
English.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
oral assessment of conversational language use
direct observation of the individual communicating in
a language other than English while undertaking
typical workplace activities
review of visual aids prepared by the individual to
assist verbal communication
written or oral questioning to assess cultural
knowledge and cross-cultural communication
considerations
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
220
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
SITHACS303 Provide accommodation reception
services
SITHFAB202 Operate a bar
SITHFAB307 Provide table service of food and
beverage
SITXCCS201 Provide visitor information.
221
DRAFT THREE
SITXLAN31__ Conduct oral communication in a language other than English
SITXLAN31__
Conduct oral communication in a language other than
English
Modification history
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXLAN3__A Conduct workplace
oral communication in a language other than English.
Minor adjustments to expression of content to streamline and
improve unit.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to conduct both predictable and non-routine, varied
communications, transactions and interactions in a language other
than English.
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
There is no direct parity with any formal language proficiency ratings
or assessment framework, but this unit broadly relates to
International Second Language Proficiency Ratings (ISLPR) 3.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all industry contexts and individuals working in at
many different levels of responsibility. This could include frontline,
supervisory or management personnel.
This unit may be customised for training delivery and assessment of
proficiency in any language. For reporting purposes, recognition is
limited to those languages listed below which are of importance to
the tourism industry. A specific code has been allocated for each of
these languages. Each language must be indicated in brackets after
the unit title.
For example: SITXLAN3101 Conduct oral communication in a
language other than English (Arabic).
SITXLAN3101
(Arabic)
SITXLAN3102
(Indonesian)
SITXLAN3103
(Cantonese)
SITXLAN3104
(Dutch)
SITXLAN3105
(Finnish)
SITXLAN3106
(French)
SITXLAN3107
(German)
SITXLAN3108
(Greek)
SITXLAN3109
(Hindi)
SITXLAN3110
(Hungarian)
SITXLAN3111
(Italian)
SITXLAN3112
(Japanese)
SITXLAN3113
(Korean)
SITXLAN3114
(Malay)
SITXLAN3115
(Mandarin)
SITXLAN3116
(Polish)
SITXLAN3117
(Portuguese)
222
DRAFT THREE
SITXLAN31__
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Conduct oral communication in a language other than
English
SITXLAN3118
(Russian)
SITXLAN3119
(Serbian)
SITXLAN3120
(Spanish)
SITXLAN3121
(Swedish)
SITXLAN3122
(Swiss German)
SITXLAN3123
(Taiwanese)
SITXLAN3124
(Thai)
SITXLAN3125
(Turkish)
SITXLAN3126
(Croatian)
SITXLAN3127
(Bosnian)
SITXLAN3128
(Australian Indigenous languages)
SITXLAN3129
(AUSLAN)
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Languages other than English
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Converse with
others.
2. Provide detailed
information and
advice.
3. Respond to
unpredictable
situations and
problems.
1.1. Use techniques to extend interactions with others.
1.2. Seek and offer additional information and assistance to
support quality of communication and service.
1.3. Support communication with comments on topical familiar
matters, workplace business and events.
1.4. Use non-verbal communication to convey an acceptance of
and sensitivity towards others.
2.1. Identify need for detailed information and advice.
2.2. Convey detailed information and advice using narrative and
descriptive statements.
2.3. Repeat, paraphrase and clarify communications to avoid
misunderstanding and to explain difficult points.
2.4. Use workplace documents, materials and other references
to support explanations as required.
3.1. Provide appropriate advice in response to requests,
unpredictable situations and problems.
3.2. Identify need for and seek assistance from others to better
respond to the situation or problem.
3.3. Identify key facts of problems and facilitate solutions through
open communication with relevant people.
3.4. Provide explanations of problems and their cause, and
elaborate on detail.
3.5. Respond to conflict and complaints with sensitivity, following
appropriate social and cultural conventions.
223
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
4. Conduct negotiations
at a functional level.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
3.6. Convey appropriate apologies and expressions of regret as
required.
4.1. Facilitate negotiations at a functional level through
exchange of key information and agreement on details.
4.2. Provide appropriate explanations about products and services.
4.3. Achieve mutual understanding and agreement.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills in a Language other than English to:
◦ interact positively and courteously in non-routine and varied interactive workplace
communications
◦ establish rapport
◦ provide detailed information and advice
◦ solve problems and conflicts
◦ conduct negotiations at a functional level.
Required knowledge
social and cultural conventions relevant to the language being assessed, including:
◦ knowledge and some consistent use of forms of address
◦ recognition and consideration of customs, protocols and taboos
cross-cultural communication challenges that may occur when negotiating and solving
problems, and how these may be addressed
aspects of verbal and non-verbal communication that support effective negotiation and
interaction in the language being assessed.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Techniques may include:
Detailed information and advice
may relate to:
Workplace documents, materials
and other references may include:
Unpredictable situations and
initiating conversations about topical matters
making offers of additional assistance
questioning about needs and preferences.
external products and services
internal products and services
medical and emergency information.
general information
product-specific information:
◦ booking conditions
◦ brochures
◦ menus
◦ price lists
◦ timetables.
complaints
224
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
problems may relate to:
Negotiations at a functional level
may relate to arrangements for:
emergency situations
cross-cultural misunderstandings
operational details:
◦ delays
◦ equipment malfunction
◦ lost luggage and stolen property
◦ lost people
◦ variations
safety issues.
accommodation
conferences and functions
entertainment
shopping
tours.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
conduct workplace oral communication in a language
other than English:
◦ use narrative and descriptive statements
◦ use repetition, clarification and paraphrasing
techniques to clarify requirements, answer
questions about products and services, solve
problems and conflict and reassure others
◦ provide detailed information and specialised
assistance in area of work activity
◦ conduct product and service transactions
◦ use a range of effective non-verbal
communication skills.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated workplace activity for which
communication in languages other than English is
required
other people with whom the individual can interact in
the relevant language
resources that support communication in languages
other than English:
◦ dictionaries and phrase books
◦ language mats
◦ industry materials, such as menus, timetables
and brochures written in languages other than
English.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
225
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Guidance information for
assessment
oral assessment of conversational language use
direct observation of the individual communicating in
a language other than English while undertaking
typical workplace activities
review of workplace documents prepared by the
individual to assist verbal communication
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
language requirements, cultural conventions and
cross-cultural communication considerations
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITHFAB309 Provide advice on food
SITTTSL303 Sell tourism products and services
SITTTSL305 Process reservations
SITXCOM401 Manage conflict.
226
DRAFT THREE
SITXLAN32__ Conduct complex oral communication in a language other than English
SITXLAN32__
Conduct complex oral communication in a language other
than English
Modification history
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXLAN4__A Conduct complex oral
communication in a language other than English.
Minor adjustments to expression of content to streamline and
improve unit.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to conduct complex, creative, routine and non-routine
communication in a language other than English. This involves very
fluent listening and speaking skills at a high level of complexity to
conduct negotiations, make presentations, provide oral summaries
in the workplace and participate in social and cultural activities.
Unit descriptor
The unit does not cover interpreting and translating skills, which are
described in units of competency in the PSP04 Public Sector
Training Package.
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
There is no direct parity with any formal language proficiency ratings
or assessment framework, but this unit broadly relates to
International Second Language Proficiency Ratings (ISLPR) 4 to 4+.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all industry contexts and individuals working in at
many different levels of responsibility. This could include frontline,
supervisory or management personnel.
This unit may be customised for training delivery and assessment of
proficiency in any language. For reporting purposes, recognition is
limited to those languages listed below which are of importance to
the tourism industry. A specific code has been allocated for each of
these languages. Each language must be indicated in brackets after
the unit title.
For example: SITXLAN3212 Conduct complex oral communication
in a language other than English (Japanese).
SITXLAN3201
(Arabic)
SITXLAN3202
(Indonesian)
SITXLAN3203
(Cantonese)
SITXLAN3204
(Dutch)
SITXLAN3205
(Finnish)
SITXLAN3206
(French)
SITXLAN3207
(German)
SITXLAN3208
(Greek)
SITXLAN3209
(Hindi)
SITXLAN3210
(Hungarian)
SITXLAN3211
(Italian)
SITXLAN3212
(Japanese)
227
DRAFT THREE
SITXLAN32__
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Conduct complex oral communication in a language other
than English
SITXLAN3213
(Korean)
SITXLAN3214
(Malay)
SITXLAN3215
(Mandarin)
SITXLAN3216
(Polish)
SITXLAN3217
(Portuguese)
SITXLAN3218
(Russian)
SITXLAN3219
(Serbian)
SITXLAN3220
(Spanish)
SITXLAN3221
(Swedish)
SITXLAN3222
(Swiss German)
SITXLAN3223
(Taiwanese)
SITXLAN3224
(Thai)
SITXLAN3225
(Turkish)
SITXLAN3226
(Croatian)
SITXLAN3227
(Bosnian)
SITXLAN3228
(Australian Indigenous languages)
SITXLAN3229
(AUSLAN)
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Languages other than English
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Conduct
negotiations.
2. Deliver
presentations.
1.1. Establish rapport by using appropriate courtesy protocols,
establishing common ground and observing social, cultural
and business conventions.
1.2. Provide explanations, information and supporting details
relevant to negotiations.
1.3. Use an appropriate range of language functions for
negotiations, including introducing formal talk, using
turn-taking skills, and agreeing and disagreeing tentatively.
1.4. Use appropriate intonation, voice tone and signalling
expressions effectively.
1.5. Exchange and agree to information about the subject of the
negotiation.
2.1. Deliver presentations in a style that supports its objective and
takes account of audience characteristics, occasion and
venue.
2.2. Present information in a logical and concise manner using
appropriate sequencing and linguistic linking.
2.3. Support presentations with relevant public speaking
techniques.
228
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
3. Participate in social
and cultural
activities.
4. Provide summaries
of oral
communication.
3.1. Use language and language functions appropriate to varied
social and cultural activities.
3.2. Adapt and modify communication strategies and language
functions as required.
4.1. Recognise situations when the services of a professional
interpreter are required, and arrange for assistance.
4.2. Convey the purpose and meaning of the original utterance.
4.3. Make appropriate comments between parties to check and
clarify meaning.
4.4. Use communication strategies and language functions that
support immediate communication.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills in a language other than English to:
◦ establish and maintain rapport
◦ conduct negotiations
◦ provide oral summaries that support immediate communication
◦ make presentations and use public speaking techniques
◦ participate effectively in social, cultural and workplace activities.
Required knowledge
social, cultural and business conventions relevant to the language being assessed,
including:
◦ colloquialisms
◦ customs
◦ dialect
◦ forms of address
◦ idiom
◦ language conventions
◦ protocols and taboos
cross-cultural communication challenges that may occur when negotiating and solving
problems, and how these may be addressed
aspects of verbal and non-verbal communication that support fluent and unhindered
communication in the language being assessed
technical vocabulary required to support specific workplace activities.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Presentations may include:
guiding or interpretive activities
instructing and training
presentations at conferences
promotional activities
229
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Public speaking techniques may
include:
Social and cultural activities may
include:
providing complex information on products and
services
sales presentations.
audience participation
demonstrations and visual aids
humour
non-verbal communication.
accompanying people to dinner
conference activities
meetings
professional development activities
tours
trade fairs.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
conduct complex workplace oral communications in a
language other than English (rare linguistic errors
may occur):
◦ establish and maintain rapport during extended
interactions, including social activities
◦ make presentations to groups of people
◦ conduct business negotiations
◦ use narrative and descriptive statements
◦ use repetition, clarification and paraphrasing
techniques to clarify requirements ,solve
problems and conflict and reassure others
◦ provide detailed information and advice in area of
work activity
◦ use extended non-verbal communication skills
effectively.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated workplace activity for which
communication in languages other than English is
required
other people with whom the individual can interact in
the relevant language
resources that support communication in languages
other than English:
◦ dictionaries and phrase books
◦ industry materials, such as menus, timetables
and brochures written in languages other than
English.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
230
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Guidance information for
assessment
examples are appropriate for this unit:
oral assessment of conversational language use
direct observation of the individual communicating in
a language other than English
use of role play activities that simulate simultaneous
language use and customer service activity
written or oral questioning to assess cultural
knowledge and cross-cultural communication
considerations
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
BSBCMM401A Make a presentation
SITTGDE303 Lead tour groups
SITTGDE304 Prepare and present tour
commentaries or activities
SITXMGT501 Establish and conduct business
relationships.
231
DRAFT THREE
SITXLAN33__ Read and write information in a language other than English
SITXLAN33__
Read and write information in a language other than
English
Modification history
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXLAN5__A Read and write
workplace information in a language other than English.
Minor adjustments to expression of content to streamline and
improve unit.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to read and write workplace information in a language other
than English. It covers reading a range of documents and writing
routine documents, such as letters and brief reports.
Unit descriptor
The unit does not cover interpreting and translating skills, which are
described in units of competency in the PSP04 Public Sector
Training Package.
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
There is no direct parity with any formal language proficiency ratings
or assessment framework, but this unit broadly relates to
International Second Language Proficiency Ratings (ISLPR) 3.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all industry contexts and individuals working at
many different levels of responsibility. This could include frontline,
supervisory or management personnel.
This unit may be customised for training delivery and assessment of
proficiency in any language. For reporting purposes, recognition is
limited to those languages listed below which are of importance to
the tourism industry. A specific code has been allocated for each of
these languages. Each language must be indicated in brackets after
the unit title.
For example: SITXLAN3302 Read and write information in a
language other than English (Indonesian).
SITXLAN3301
(Arabic)
SITXLAN3302
(Indonesian)
SITXLAN3303
(Cantonese)
SITXLAN3304
(Dutch)
SITXLAN3305
(Finnish)
SITXLAN3306
(French)
SITXLAN3307
(German)
SITXLAN3308
(Greek)
SITXLAN3309
(Hindi)
SITXLAN3310
(Hungarian)
SITXLAN3311
(Italian)
SITXLAN3312
(Japanese)
SITXLAN3313
(Korean)
SITXLAN3314
(Malay)
232
DRAFT THREE
SITXLAN33__
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Read and write information in a language other than
English
SITXLAN3315
(Mandarin)
SITXLAN3316
(Polish)
SITXLAN3317
(Portuguese)
SITXLAN3318
(Russian)
SITXLAN3319
(Serbian)
SITXLAN3320
(Spanish)
SITXLAN3321
(Swedish)
SITXLAN3322
(Swiss German)
SITXLAN3323
(Taiwanese)
SITXLAN3324
(Thai)
SITXLAN3325
(Turkish)
SITXLAN3326
(Croatian)
SITXLAN3327
(Bosnian)
SITXLAN3328
(Australian Indigenous languages)
SITXLAN3329
(AUSLAN)
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Languages other than English
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Read and
understand
workplace
documents.
2. Write simple routine
workplace
documents.
1.1. Read and understand routine and non-routine workplace
documents.
1.2. Interpret accompanying visual information to support
comprehension.
1.3. Identify main ideas, key facts and requirements.
1.4. Identify and take account of document tone and purpose.
1.5. Act on information and respond to requests, seeking
assistance where required.
2.1. Prepare accurate routine workplace documents using key
words, phrases, simple sentences and visual aids as required.
2.2. Clearly and accurately convey main ideas, facts and details in
written text.
2.3. Provide clear written directions and instructions in a
correctly ordered sequence.
2.4. Support written communication with use of appropriately
sequenced expressions and questions that help define or
clarify the goal.
2.5. Write information in appropriate place on standard forms.
2.6. Adhere to workplace and cultural conventions and protocols
when preparing written documents.
2.7. Provide written responses to documents in an appropriate
233
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
form and tone.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
literacy skills in a language other than English to:
◦ read and interpret documents to:
- identify purpose, main ideas, key issues and facts, writer attitude and mood
- determine type of response and action required
◦ write routine workplace documents using appropriate language and cultural conventions.
Required knowledge
linguistic knowledge and writing conventions for the language being assessed, including:
◦ grammar, spelling and punctuation conventions
◦ features specific to the language, including vocabulary and sentence structure
technical vocabulary required to support specific workplace activities.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Routine and non-routine
workplace documents required to
be read and understood may
include:
Visual information may include:
Routine workplace documents
may include:
brochures and promotional material
conference programs
correspondence:
◦ emails
◦ faxes
◦ letters
◦ memos
menus and wine lists
reports
reservations information
schedules and itineraries.
diagrams
forms
labels
maps
signs
tickets.
brief reports
complaint responses
correspondence:
◦ emails
◦ faxes
◦ letters
responses to requests for routine information
234
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Written directions and
instructions may include:
thank you letters and invitations.
general information on work health and safety rules
how to use simple equipment.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
read and write workplace information in a language
other than English:
◦ understand and identify document purpose, main
ideas, key issues, facts, attitude and tone of
written texts (some use of a dictionary may be
made but infrequently)
◦ understand meaning with reasonable accuracy
when reading texts related to straightforward
everyday situations
◦ use linguistic knowledge and skills to
communicate meaning effectively in routine
workplace documents (some errors may occur in
writing, provided facts are not distorted and
meaning is clear):
- answering queries about products and
services
- conducting simple product and service
transactions
- providing factual information
- responding to requests for general assistance
and factual information.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated workplace activity where written
communication in languages other than English is
required
industry materials, such as routine reports, workplace
documents and informational materials written in
languages other than English.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
review of written communications prepared by the
individual
written or oral questioning to assess the individual’s
ability to read and interpret workplace documents
written in a language other than English
written or oral questioning to assess cultural
knowledge and cross-cultural communication
considerations
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
235
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Guidance information for
assessment
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITTTSL304 Prepare quotations
SITTTSL307 Process travel-related documentation.
236
DRAFT THREE
SITXLAN34__ Read and write documents in a language other than English
SITXLAN34__
Read and write documents in a language other than
English
Modification history
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXLAN6__A Read and write
workplace documents in a language other than English.
Minor adjustments to expression of content to streamline and
improve unit.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to read and write a range of workplace documents in a
language other than English at a high level of complexity and
fluency, including summarising texts, and reproducing information
from texts in one language to prepare a text in another.
Unit descriptor
The unit does not cover interpreting and translating skills, which are
described in units of competency in the PSP04 Public Sector
Training Package.
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
There is no direct parity with any formal language proficiency ratings
or assessment framework, but this unit broadly relates to
International Second Language Proficiency Ratings (ISLPR) 4 to 4+.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all industry contexts and to individuals working at
different levels of responsibility. This could include frontline,
supervisory or management personnel.
This unit may be customised for training delivery and assessment of
proficiency in any language. For reporting purposes, recognition is
limited to those languages listed below which are of importance to
the tourism industry. A specific code has been allocated for each of
these languages. Each language must be indicated in brackets after
the unit title.
For example: SITXLAN3403 Read and write documents in a
language other than English (Cantonese).
SITXLAN3401
(Arabic)
SITXLAN3402
(Indonesian)
SITXLAN3403
(Cantonese)
SITXLAN3404
(Dutch)
SITXLAN3405
(Finnish)
SITXLAN3406
(French)
SITXLAN3407
(German)
SITXLAN3408
(Greek)
SITXLAN3409
(Hindi)
SITXLAN3410
(Hungarian)
SITXLAN3411
(Italian)
SITXLAN3412
(Japanese)
SITXLAN3413
(Korean)
237
DRAFT THREE
SITXLAN34__
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Read and write documents in a language other than
English
SITXLAN3414
(Malay)
SITXLAN3415
(Mandarin)
SITXLAN3416
(Polish)
SITXLAN3417
(Portuguese)
SITXLAN3418
(Russian)
SITXLAN3419
(Serbian)
SITXLAN3420
(Spanish)
SITXLAN3421
(Swedish)
SITXLAN3422
(Swiss German)
SITXLAN3423
(Taiwanese)
SITXLAN3424
(Thai)
SITXLAN3425
(Turkish)
SITXLAN3426
(Croatian)
SITXLAN3427
(Bosnian)
SITXLAN3428
(Australian Indigenous languages)
SITXLAN3429
(AUSLAN)
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Languages other than English
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Read workplace
documents.
2. Provide informal
written translations.
3. Write workplace
documents.
1.1. Read and understand workplace documents, including
explicit and implicit information, ideas, technical information
and writer requirements.
1.2. Interpret accompanying visual and graphics material.
1.3. Understand the culturally-specific meaning contained in
documents.
2.1. Capture and convey information in written texts and
summaries, taking account of cultural differences.
2.2. Provide explanation or comments to clarify meaning as
required, especially about culturally-specific details.
2.3. Recognise documents requiring professional translation
and arrange for assistance as required.
3.1. Produce written workplace documents according to
recognised conventions, standards and formats.
3.2. Ensure content of written documents is appropriate to
audience and purpose.
3.3. Develop ideas in appropriate depth to meet the requirements
of the particular context.
3.4. Tailor language to meet requirements of the situation.
3.5. Observe social and cultural conventions when writing
238
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
workplace documents.
3.6. Write documents with minimal errors so that intended meaning
is clearly conveyed to the reader.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
literacy skills in a language other than English to:
◦ read and interpret information and workplace documents that include some complex
ideas and concepts
◦ write documents that require clear and fluent expression of information and ideas
◦ appropriately structure texts
◦ use language tailored to the requirements of the situation.
Required knowledge
linguistic knowledge and writing conventions for the language being assessed, including:
◦ grammar, spelling and punctuation conventions
◦ social, workplace and cultural conventions
◦ ways to convey nuances of meaning
technical vocabulary for specific workplace activities
standard formats and protocols for a range of workplace documents relevant to the
workplace.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Workplace documents to be read
and informally interpreted may
include:
Documents requiring
professional translation may
include:
Written workplace documents
may include:
brochures and promotional material
conference programs
correspondence
manuals
menus and wine lists
reports
reservations information
schedules and itineraries.
complex contractual documents
complex proposals, submissions and tenders.
correspondence
menus and wine lists
promotional material
quotations
reservations information
schedules and itineraries
simple manuals
239
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
simple reports.
240
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
read and write workplace documents required to fulfil
a given job role in a language other than English:
◦ read and write a range of workplace documents
◦ write documents with clear and fluent expression
of information and ideas, correct structure and
appropriate style and tone for the audience and
workplace situation (rare linguistic errors may
occur).
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated workplace activity where written
communication in languages other than English is
required
industry documents, such as reports and promotional
materials written in languages other than English.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
review of written communications prepared by the
individual
written and oral questioning to assess the individual’s
ability to interpret workplace documents
written or oral questioning to assess cultural
knowledge and cross-cultural communication
considerations
written or oral questioning to assess linguistic
knowledge, generic structure and other specific
language features, such as vocabulary and sentence
structure
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
BSBWRT401A Write complex documents
SITTTSL304 Prepare quotations
SITTTSL307 Process travel-related documentation.
241
DRAFT THREE
Management and Leadership
SITXMGT401 Monitor work operations
SITXMGT401
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Monitor work operations
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXMGT001A Monitor work
operations.
Minor adjustments to expression of content to streamline and
improve unit. Added sustainability and innovation plus extra focus on
supervising others.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to oversee and monitor the quality of day-to-day work. It
requires the ability to communicate effectively with team members,
plan and organise operational functions and solve problems.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all industry sectors, and to individuals operating
at a team leading, supervisory or frontline management level.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Management and Leadership
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Monitor and improve
workplace
operations.
2. Plan and organise
workflow.
1.1. Monitor efficiency and service levels through close contact
with day-to-day operations.
1.2. Ensure that workplace operations support overall organisation
goals and quality assurance initiatives.
1.3. Identify quality problems and issues and make appropriate
adjustments to procedures and systems, with relevant
approvals.
1.4. Proactively consult with colleagues about ways to improve
efficiency and service levels, including potential for new
technologies and other innovations.
1.5. Provide feedback to colleagues and management to inform
future planning.
1.6. Identify and take opportunities to evaluate current and
emerging industry trends and practices for relevance to own
work situation.
1.7. Assess and respond to opportunities to improve sustainability
of day-to-day operations.
2.1. Assess current workloads, and schedule work to maximise
efficiency and customer service quality within budget
242
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Monitor and support
team members.
4. Solve problems and
make decisions.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
constraints.
2.2. Delegate work according to principles of delegation.
2.3. Assess workflow and progress against agreed objectives and
timelines.
2.4. Assist colleagues in prioritisation of workload through
supportive feedback and coaching.
2.5. Provide timely input to appropriate management regarding
staffing needs.
3.1. Monitor team and individual performance against agreed goals
and objectives.
3.2. Pro-actively share information, knowledge and experiences
with team members.
3.3. Challenge and test ideas within the team in a positive and
collaborative way.
3.4. Provide feedback, coaching and support to team members.
3.5. Complete and submit workplace records as required.
4.1. Identify and analyse workplace problems from an operational
and customer service perspective.
4.2. Initiate short-term action to resolve immediate problem where
appropriate.
4.3. Analyse problems for long-term impact, and assess and action
potential solutions in consultation with relevant colleagues.
4.4. Where a team member raises a problem, encourage
individual participation in solving it.
4.5. Take follow-up action to monitor effectiveness of solutions.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication and leadership skills to:
◦ delegate work within a team
◦ provide positive coaching and mentoring support to a team
critical thinking skills to evaluate internal and external business information
initiative and enterprise skills to proactively seek opportunities for workplace improvement
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret varied and wide ranging information of an operational nature
◦ complete workplace records relevant to team operations
numeracy skills to develop schedules and timelines for team activities
planning and organising skills to coordinate multiple and potentially competing operational
priorities
problem-solving skills to anticipate and respond to a wide range of unpredictable operational
problems and situations at a frontline management level.
Required knowledge
work organisation and work planning methods appropriate to the industry sector
leadership and management roles in the relevant industry sector
operational functions in the relevant industry sector
concepts of quality assurance and how it may be managed and implemented in the
243
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
workplace
sustainability considerations for frontline operational management, including:
◦ relationship between operational efficiency and financial sustainability
◦ ways of minimising waste in the relevant work context
◦ social responsibilities of the operation
time management principles and their application to leaders and managers for planning own
work and the work of others
principles of effective delegation
problem-solving and decision making processes and techniques and their application to
typical workplace issues
industrial or legislative issues that affect short-term work organisation appropriate to the
industry sector, including:
◦ relationship of relevant industrial awards to hours and conditions of work
◦ ensuring systems and procedures meet work health and safety requirements.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Procedures and systems may
relate to:
Sustainability may be:
Principles of delegation may relate
to:
Workplace records may include:
Workplace problems may include:
administration
health and safety
service standards
technology
work practices.
economic:
◦ business profitability
environmental:
◦ conservation of resources
◦ handling of waste
social:
◦ cultural diversity
◦ ethical practices.
clear communication of what is required
gaining commitment
no undue interference
regular reporting
selecting the right person.
regular performance reports
staff records.
delays and time difficulties
difficult customer service situations
equipment breakdown or technical failure
failure to deliver promised service to customers
inadequate financial resources
inadequate staffing
244
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
poor rostering
poor staff performance
procedural inadequacies or failures
unrealistic or impractical product development or
marketing resulting in operational difficulties.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
plan and organise workflow for a team operation
monitor and respond to a range of team based
operational and service issues over a period of time
demonstrate knowledge of work structures plus
frontline management roles and responsibilities in the
relevant industry sector
demonstrate knowledge of quality assurance,
workflow planning and delegation techniques in a
frontline management context.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated business operation or activity for
which the individual can monitor work activities
a team of people for which the individual can plan
and organise workflow.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
evaluation of a team-based project or work activity
conducted by the individual, including reporting on
that activity
use of case studies and problem-solving exercises to
assess ability to develop approaches to different
workplace situations and problems
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
management principles, management roles and
responsibilities and legal issues affecting operational
management
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITXHRM402 Lead and manage people
SITXHRM503 Monitor staff performance.
245
DRAFT THREE
SITXMGT501 Establish and conduct business relationships
SITXMGT501
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Establish and conduct business relationships
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXMGT006A Establish and conduct
business relationships.
Minor adjustments to expression of content to streamline and
improve unit.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to establish and manage positive business relationships. It
requires the ability to use high-level communication and relationship
building skills to conduct formal negotiations and make commercially
significant business-to-business agreements.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all industry sectors, and to individuals who take
responsibility for making decisions about purchasing or marketing
activities. They also oversee the maintenance of contracts or
agreements. This could include senior operational personnel, sales
and marketing personnel, managers or owner-operators of small
businesses. Agreements may relate to corporate accounts, service
contracts, agency agreements, venue contracts, rate negotiations,
preferred product agreements, supply agreements and marketing
agreements.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Management and Leadership
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Build business
relationships.
2. Conduct
negotiations.
1.1. Establish relationships within appropriate cultural context.
1.2. Build trust and respect in business relationships through use of
effective communication skills and techniques.
1.3. Proactively identify and take up opportunities to maintain
regular contact with customers and suppliers.
2.1. Conduct negotiations in a professional manner in the relevant
cultural context.
2.2. Conduct negotiations in the context of current organisation
goals.
2.3. Maximise benefits for all parties through use of established
negotiation techniques and in the context of establishing
long-term relationships.
2.4. Incorporate feedback and input from colleagues into
negotiation where appropriate.
2.5. Communicate results of negotiations to appropriate colleagues
246
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Make formal
business
agreements.
4. Foster and maintain
business
relationships.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
and stakeholders within appropriate timeframes.
3.1. Confirm agreements in writing according to organisational
requirements, using formal contracts where appropriate.
3.2. Obtain approvals for all aspects of formal agreements
according to organisational procedures.
3.3. Evaluate and act on the need for specialist advice as required.
4.1. Proactively seek, review and act upon information needed to
maintain sound business relationships.
4.2. Honour agreements within scope of individual responsibility,
complying with agreed terms.
4.3. Take account of agreed performance indicators.
4.4. Make adjustments to agreements in consultation with
customer or supplier and share information with appropriate
colleagues.
4.5. Nurture relationships through regular contact and use of
effective interpersonal and communication styles.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ conduct negotiations that may be of significant commercial value
◦ establish and nurture ongoing professional relationships
critical thinking skills to evaluate potentially complex internal and external issues that affect
professional relationships and business negotiations
initiative and enterprise skills to pro-actively seek opportunities for building business
relationships
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret potentially complex agreements, conditions and contracts
◦ develop or participate in the development of formal commercial agreements
numeracy skills to evaluate commercial data and cost structures
planning and organising skills to plan activities and initiatives that support professional
relationships
problem-solving skills to anticipate and respond to challenges in the negotiation process.
Required knowledge
commercial context for business relationships in the relevant industry sector, including:
◦ industry structure and interrelationships
◦ sources of supply
◦ distribution and marketing networks
◦ professional networks
principles of negotiation, stages in the negotiating process and different techniques that can
be applied
nature of agreements and contracts in the relevant industry sector and their key inclusions
key components of contract law at an overview level, including:
◦ terms and obligations of contract
◦ methods of contractual agreement
◦ exclusion clauses
247
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
◦ dispute resolution clause
◦ termination of contracts
other legal requirements that impact negotiations and agreements in the relevant industry
sector, including consumer protection.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Opportunities to maintain regular
contact with customers and
suppliers may include:
Parties may be:
Negotiation techniques may
include:
association membership
cooperative promotions
industry functions
informal social occasions
program of regular telephone contact
social media.
cooperative partners
customers
suppliers.
active listening and questioning
appropriate cultural behaviour
appropriate language
bargaining
clarification of needs of all parties
confirming agreements
developing options
identification of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs),
goals and limits
identifying points of agreement and points of
difference
non-verbal communication techniques
preparatory research of facts, statistics, KPIs and
product usage rates.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Evidence of the ability to:
establish and maintain business relationships over a
period of time that allows for the demonstration of
interpersonal and relationship building skills
conduct formal negotiations and make and manage
agreements and contracts in a specific business
context
demonstrate knowledge of industry structure and
interrelationships, industry networks, and distribution
248
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
and marketing networks
demonstrate knowledge of the role and features of
contracts in a given business operation or sector.
Assessment must ensure use of:
other people with whom business relationships can
be established
real or simulated sales or operational details for
which contracts may be negotiated and agreed
materials that support the negotiation process, such
as preparatory facts, statistics, KPIs and market
information.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess the practical skills and knowledge required to
establish and conduct business relationships. The
following examples are appropriate for this unit:
direct observation of the individual participating in
negotiations
evaluation of negotiation activities undertaken by the
individual, including:
◦ planning and preparation
◦ outcomes and reporting
◦ agreements reached
use of case studies to assess application of different
techniques to different negotiating scenarios
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
industry structure and interrelationships, negotiating
principles and techniques and legal compliance
issues
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITTPPD401 Package tourism products
SITTPPD601 Develop tourism products
SITXINV601 Establish stock purchasing and control
systems
SITXMPR403 Plan and implement sales activities
SITXMPR404 Coordinate marketing activities.
249
DRAFT THREE
SITXMGT502 Manage projects
SITXMGT502
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Manage projects
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXMGT003A Manage projects.
Re-worked Elements, Performance Criteria, Required Skills and
Knowledge to more fully articulate content.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to develop project plans, implement project activities,
monitor progress to ensure objectives are achieved and to evaluate
all aspects of projects.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, travel, hospitality and event sectors
and the project could relate to events planning and execution,
product development, research or initiatives such as the introduction
of new workplace systems or technologies.
It applies to senior personnel who operate independently or with
limited guidance from others and who are responsible for making a
range of operational business and project management decisions.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Management and Leadership
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Define project scope.
1.1. Identify project objectives, budget, scope of activities and
deliverables.
1.2. Clarify relationship of project to others and to organisational
overall objectives.
1.3. Identify stakeholders and requirements for consultation and
involvement in project activities.
1.4. Confirm administrative structure for project management,
individual responsibility and reporting hierarchy.
1.5. Determine required resources for the project.
2.1. Consult with stakeholders to facilitate input and to achieve
approval for project plan.
2.2. Identify risk, regulatory and sustainability issues and
incorporate into plan.
2.3. Integrate quality, financial, human and physical resource
specifications for project activities.
2.4. Develop and integrate project evaluation methods.
2.5. Plan internal and external communications, public relations
and marketing approaches.
2. Develop project plan.
250
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Administer and
monitor project.
4. Evaluate project.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
2.6. Document an integrated project management plan which
identifies priorities, key project milestones, timelines, and
responsibilities of project personnel and stakeholders.
2.7. Communicate plan and roles and responsibilities to all
involved.
3.1. Implement project activities according to plan and in
conjunction with stakeholders and project team members,
providing support and assistance as required.
3.2. Implement financial and quality control systems according to
project plan.
3.3. Monitor progress to ensure objectives, deliverables, timelines,
cost and quality of project are achieved.
3.4. Identify deviations from plan, assess and take action to realign
project activities to meet objectives.
3.5. Determine and act on the need for project variations including
additional project resources.
3.6. Provide progress and final reports according to project
requirements.
3.7. Complete project within agreed timelines.
4.1. Assess project effectiveness at specified stages, using agreed
evaluation methods.
4.2. Evaluate completed project for administrative efficiency,
quality and achievement of objectives.
4.3. Report outcomes to stakeholders and use information to
enhance future project planning and management activities.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication and negotiation skills to elicit diverse stakeholder input and agreement on
complex project planning and management issues
critical thinking skills to evaluate and respond to complex, interrelated and potentially
conflicting factors within project management activities
literacy skills to write complex project plans and evaluation criteria
numeracy skills to interpret project budgets for diverse components and develop resource
specifications within budgetary parameters
planning and organising skills to manage interrelated aspects of a complex project and
project timelines
problem-solving skills to identify deviations from project plans and make adjustments to
ensure objectives are delivered
teamwork skills to:
◦ consult with stakeholders and incorporate their views into project planning and
management issues
◦ lead and motivate a project team
technology skills to use computers, word processing and software packages for project
management.
Required knowledge
251
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
project management processes and the project life-cycle:
◦ planning and the requirements of project plans:
- objectives
- deliverables, scheduling and milestones
- allocation of roles and responsibilities
◦ documentation and role of technology
◦ monitoring and control systems
◦ evaluation criteria, both quantitative and qualitative and methods for measuring the
success of project objectives
for the particular industry sector and organisation:
◦ role of various project management personnel and stakeholders in the management of
projects
◦ reporting hierarchy
◦ risk, regulatory and sustainability issues for project management including those related
to:
- financial management
- human resource management
- physical resource management.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Project objectives may relate to:
Stakeholders may include:
Administrative structure for
project management may involve:
community or industry development
economic or social benefits
education or training
profit
research.
community agencies
customer or client
funding bodies
government departments or statutory authorities
host organisation
industry associations
internal personnel
management
management committee
media
regulatory authorities
sponsors.
advisory and reference groups
consultants
consultative groups
contractors and suppliers
internal or external project manager
management
252
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Project management plan may
include:
Support and assistance may
include:
management committee
secretariat.
budget
consultation strategies
internal and external communication processes and
channels
key milestones
marketing
objectives and outcomes
personnel
quality assurance
reporting requirements
risk management and contingency plans
safety initiatives
selection or tendering process
sponsors
stages
sustainability considerations
timeframes.
additional resources
formal training opportunities
informal coaching and feedback
moderation and joint planning sessions
regular meetings and briefings
representing team interests in wider forums.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
develop and implement plans for multiple and diverse
projects involving:
◦ dedicated project budgets
◦ multiple administrative components
◦ a project management team
◦ a wide range of stakeholders
lead a project team and liaise with stakeholders
during the planning and implementation phases
integrate knowledge of:
◦ administrative processes for project planning and
implementation
◦ risk, regulatory and sustainability issues for
project management
complete projects within nominated timeframes.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
253
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
industry business operation or activity for which
projects are managed
projects to be managed by the individual
information and communications technology currently
used to manage projects
physical and financial resources to support the
project
a project team for whom the individual is a leader
project stakeholders with whom the individual can
interact.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
evaluation of integrated project management plans
produced by the individual
evaluation of performance measurement documents
produced by the individual including qualitative and
quantitative evaluation criteria
evaluation of progress and final project reports
produced by the individual in which they evaluate the
project for administrative efficiency, quality and
achievement of objectives
use of problem solving exercises that allow the
individual to respond to the need for plan
adjustments
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of:
◦ administrative processes for project planning and
implementation
◦ risk, regulatory and sustainability issues for
project management
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role:
BSBADM502B Manage meetings
BSBWRT401A Write complex documents
SITXFIN501 Prepare and monitor budgets.
254
DRAFT THREE
Marketing and Public Relations
SITXMPR401 Coordinate production of brochures and marketing materials
SITXMPR401
Coordinate production of brochures and marketing
materials
Modification history
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXMPR001A Coordinate production
of brochures and marketing materials.
Minor adjustments to expression of content to streamline and
improve unit. Added trade practices to Required knowledge. Added
sustainability. More emphasis on physical and virtual.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to coordinate the development process for brochures and
other marketing materials from a content and production
perspective.
This unit contains employability skills.
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
This unit applies to all industry sectors and all types of marketing
materials, both physical and virtual. People working independently
with limited supervision undertake this role. Depending on the
business context, this could include sales and marketing personnel,
managers, and owner-operators of small businesses.
This unit reflects the general skills needed by those involved in sales
and marketing activities and does not include the skills required by
professional graphic designers or copywriters.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Marketing and Public Relations
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Plan production of
brochures and
marketing materials.
1.1. Plan production of brochures and marketing materials
according to marketing objectives.
1.2. Evaluate factors that impact nature of materials and the
development process, including sustainability considerations.
1.3. Create production plans, including timelines, responsibilities,
budget and contingency measures.
2.1. Produce or obtain accurate and complete information for
inclusion.
2.2. Present information in a clear format.
2.3. Present information in a culturally appropriate way.
3.1. Provide accurate and complete specifications to quoting
2. Produce information
for inclusion.
3. Obtain quotations for
255
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
artwork and printing
as appropriate.
4. Develop final copy
for brochures and
marketing materials.
5. Coordinate
production of
brochures and
marketing materials.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
organisations within appropriate timeframe.
3.2. Obtain quotations with details of potential variations to cost
and conditions that may apply.
4.1. Develop copy using basic creative writing techniques or obtain
from relevant source.
4.2. Integrate accurate, practical and operational details.
4.3. Present accurate information about costs and conditions.
4.4. Check copy for accuracy prior to submission for production.
5.1. Liaise with production personnel and monitor schedule.
5.2. Check and correct production work as required.
5.3. Approve artwork according to organisational guidelines.
5.4. Obtain and deliver materials on schedule or action
contingency measures.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to collaborate with others on technical, organisational and creative
issues
critical thinking skills to evaluate factors that impact on production of marketing materials
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret quotations and product conditions
◦ proofread draft materials
◦ create copy or check quality of outsourced copy
◦ research information for inclusion from varied and potentially unfamiliar sources
planning and organising skills to plan and coordinate all aspects of the production process
problem-solving skills to respond to challenges that arise in the production of marketing
materials
numeracy skills to:
◦ calculate costs and quantities of materials to be produced
◦ work with numerical concepts of size, shape and layout
◦ work with detailed product costings
technology skills to:
◦ liaise with others about technical production issues
◦ work with current industry marketing technologies.
Required knowledge
objectives of materials and the market for which material is required
physical and virtual media marketing opportunities and factors that impact production of
materials in those contexts
current digital print production technologies, processes and terminology
printing and industry conventions in relation to placement of information, page numbering
and copyright information
quality indicators in marketing material production, including:
◦ readability
◦ photographic quality
◦ effective use of colour
◦ spacing requirements
256
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
creative writing techniques used for the content of brochures and other marketing materials
procedures and requirements for preparation and proofing of material
copyright laws and restrictions that apply to the inclusion of certain content in brochures and
other marketing materials
procedures for copyright clearance of restricted materials
trade practices requirements around the need for accuracy of information in marketing
materials.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Brochures and marketing
materials may include:
Factors for consideration during
planning may relate to:
Information for inclusion may be:
advertising materials
conference programs and registration forms
destination guides
direct mail pieces
display materials
event prospectus
invitations
product brochures
product support manuals
promotional flyers and leaflets.
accessibility, such as the need to provide materials in
alternative formats
availability of information
design issues:
◦ style
◦ size
legal requirements
marketing considerations:
◦ distribution considerations
◦ market for review of competitive materials
◦ objectives
resource constraints:
◦ budget
◦ in-house capability
technology:
◦ digital media opportunities
objectives of the material
sustainability considerations
time parameters.
advertisements
logos
maps
photos
257
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Accurate and complete
specifications include:
special offers or incentives
sponsor messages
supplier information
tariff details.
conditions of contract
delivery platform
interactivity requirements
layout and style of text
number of colours
number of photographs
production and delivery deadlines
size
total number required
type of paper (for print-based materials).
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
coordinate all aspects of the development process
and produce materials within specified deadlines
produce materials that meet stated objectives,
provide current and accurate information, and are
free of errors
demonstrate knowledge of current production
processes, terminology and copyright restrictions.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated product or service for which
brochures and marketing materials can be developed
current information and communications technology
for the development of content
suppliers, such as graphic designers, print production
organisations and copywriters with whom the
individual can interact.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess the practical skills and knowledge required to
coordinate the production of brochures and marketing
materials. The following examples are appropriate for
this unit:
evaluation of brochures or other physical or virtual
marketing materials produced by the individual
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
coordination and production processes, copyright
laws and clearance procedures
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
258
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Guidance information for
assessment
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITXMGT501 Establish and conduct business
relationships
SITXMPR404 Coordinate marketing activities.
259
DRAFT THREE
SITXMPR402 Create a promotional display or stand
SITXMPR402
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Create a promotional display or stand
N
Replaces but is not equivalent to SITXMPR002A Create a
promotional display or stand.
Minor adjustments to expression of content to streamline and
improve unit. Added elements and principles of design.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to create a display or stand for the promotion of a product
or service. It requires the ability to identify the objectives of the
promotion, determine who the audience will be, select all display
components and assemble the display or stand.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all industry sectors. People working with some
level of independence create displays at promotional events or
within their own workplaces. This includes sales and marketing
personnel, managers, and owner-operators of small businesses.
Displays may be used to promote any product, service, or event; a
group of products being cooperatively marketed; or even a whole
city, region or tourism precinct.
This unit does not cover the skills of a specialist display designer or
visual merchandiser.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Marketing and Public Relations
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Make preparations
for display or stand.
2. Create the display.
1.1. Identify display or stand objectives in consultation with
appropriate colleagues.
1.2. Obtain operational information to assist in display or stand
preparation to allow time for adequate planning.
1.3. Plan display or stand to meet target audience needs.
1.4. Select and organise adequate display supplies and
transportation arrangements according to display plan.
1.5. Identify the need for and seek assistance from display
specialists where appropriate.
2.1. Create or dress the display or stand, making creative use of
available materials and supplies.
2.2. Consider the elements and principles of design in creating
the display.
2.3. Use display techniques that maximise visual appeal of
260
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
display and reflect the nature of product or service being sold.
2.4. Use display equipment correctly and safely.
2.5. Check display or stand to ensure safety of colleagues and
customers.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
critical thinking skills to evaluate options for creative display
literacy skills to:
◦ interpret information about the needs of the target audience and operational aspects of
the display or stand
numeracy skills to work with concepts about size, space and layout
planning and organising skills to coordinate practical and creative aspects of display
creation
visual literacy skills to work with the elements and principles of design.
Required knowledge
industry contexts in which displays are used, including:
◦ trade and consumer shows
◦ shopping centre promotions
◦ information centre displays
◦ window displays
◦ promotional functions
materials and equipment used for display in different locations and settings, such as stages,
exhibition booths, permanent displays and window displays
elements and principles of design as they apply to the creation of displays
visual merchandising techniques using commonly available materials, including techniques
for maximising the effectiveness of collateral in displays, including brochures and posters
work health and safety practices for transporting, carrying and assembling the display or
stand
safety issues associated with the construction and operation of promotional displays and
stands in different venues.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Information to assist in display or
stand preparation may include:
budget allocation
floor plans
nature of display area, including booth and stage
need for utilities, such as electricity and water
need for waste management
work health and safety requirements
security
set-up times and duration
261
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Display supplies may include:
Elements and principles of design
may include:
Display techniques may include
the use of:
type of surface on which display is to be created.
adhesives and velcro
audiovisual systems, including videos and sound
systems
balloons and other decorations
collateral materials, such as brochures, posters,
banners and organisational colours and logo
computers
floral arrangements and potted plants
furniture
mobiles
pins
scissors
string.
alignment
balance
coherence
colour
composition
contrast
direction
dominance
emphasis
form
line
movement
pattern
proportion
proximity
repetition
rhythm
shape
simplicity/complexity
space (positive and negative)
subordination
texture
unity.
cultural artefacts
fabric
flags
freestanding display options
local produce
printed materials
product samples
signs
3-D materials.
262
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
create a display or dress a promotional stand to meet
specific objectives using accepted display techniques
and working within typical workplace time constraints
apply the elements and principles of design
create display or stand in a well organised and safe
manner.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a display space or promotional stand
display and promotional materials used in the
relevant industry sector.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess the practical skills and knowledge required to
create a promotional display or stand. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
evaluation of the creativity and visual appeal of a
display created by the individual
use of case studies to assess application of different
display techniques to typical industry promotional
situations
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
different visual merchandising techniques, safety
considerations
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITXCOM302 Make presentations
SITXMPR404 Coordinate marketing activities.
263
DRAFT THREE
SITXMPR403 Plan and implement sales activities
SITXMPR403
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Plan and implement sales activities
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXMPR003A Plan and implement
sales activities.
Minor adjustments to expression of content to streamline and
improve unit. Added innovation, legal, ethical and sustainability to
Performance Criteria. Added more on new technologies and media.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to plan and implement sales activities. It requires the ability
to identify and analyse market and customer needs, proactively
target current and new customers, plan the operation of sales calls,
make calls and prepare sales reports.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all industry sectors, and to individuals taking
responsibility for coordinating sales activities within the parameters
of an established sales strategy. People working independently with
limited supervision undertake this role. This could include sales and
marketing personnel or managers and owner-operators of small
businesses.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Marketing and Public Relations
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Plan sales activities.
1.1. Plan sales activities for existing and potential customers
according to marketing plan or other organisation systems.
1.2. Identify, analyse and incorporate organisation, customer and
market information into sales planning process.
1.3. Source prospects and create profiles.
1.4. Proactively seek and evaluate innovative sales opportunities
and take advantage of new technologies and media.
1.5. Estimate potential revenue, based on analysis of information
and in consultation with appropriate colleagues.
1.6. Plan activities and practical sales call patterns that
maximise opportunities to meet individual and team targets.
1.7. Consider legal, ethical and sustainability issues.
2.1. Make sales call appointments in advance where appropriate.
2.2. Develop sales call strategies and tactics based on market
knowledge, current sales focus and consultation with
colleagues.
2.3. Gather information and support materials to support sales
2. Prepare for sales
calls.
264
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Make sales calls.
4. Review and report
on sales activities.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
calls.
3.1. Make sales calls according to agreed call patterns.
3.2. Build relationships with customers through use of effective
interpersonal communication styles.
3.3. Develop customer trust and confidence through demonstration
of personal and professional integrity.
3.4. Proactively identify and resolve customer issues and
problems.
3.5. Use selling techniques to maximise opportunities to meet and
exceed sales targets.
3.6. Provide current, accurate and relevant information on product
features and benefits according to current marketing focus.
3.7. Encourage feedback from customers and proactively seek
market intelligence.
4.1. Review activities according to agreed evaluation methods and
incorporate results into future sales planning.
4.2. Prepare sales reports according to organisational policy and
required timeframes.
4.3. Present current and clear market intelligence to those
responsible for sales and marketing planning.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ use effective selling techniques
◦ establish and conduct positive business relationships
critical thinking skills to evaluate market and customer information for sales opportunities
initiative and enterprise skills to proactively identify and respond to new opportunities
literacy skills to:
◦ interpret customer and market trend information
◦ develop sales reports
numeracy skills to:
◦ calculate potential sales revenues
◦ create and interpret sales statistics
planning and organising skills to plan for and manage sales call patterns
problem-solving skills to proactively identify and respond to operational and more systemic
customer problems
self-management skills to take responsibility for sales outcomes
technology skills to use current sales management systems.
Required knowledge
principles of selling, sales communication and relationship building
industry structures and interrelationships, industry networks and information sources
industry and market knowledge appropriate to the sector and organisation, including:
◦ distribution and marketing networks, especially those that support the product or service
being promoted
◦ commission structures
265
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
◦ current customer and market trends
◦ links between sales and other areas of organisational operations
structure and content of marketing plans and the role of sales in the overall marketing mix
legal issues that impact on sales personnel, including consumer protection provisions
ethical considerations for sales personnel, including:
◦ truth and honesty in sales
◦ targeting of particular groups in the community
sustainability considerations for sales activities, including:
◦ reducing waste of printed materials
◦ sustainability as a sales tool.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Information to be incorporated into
the sales planning process may
include:
Practical sales call patterns may
be affected by:
Legal, ethical and sustainability
issues may relate to:
Sales call strategies and tactics
may include or be based on:
Information and support materials
may include:
competitive activity
financial statistics
market trends
sales and marketing reports.
call intensity required
current organisational priorities
geographic considerations and restraints
need for administration and reporting time
specific sales and revenue targets
technology capabilities.
consumer law and trade practices
work health and safety obligations
resource conservation
targeting of particular groups
ways of presenting information.
current sales figures for nominated periods
focus on specific products or offers
individual customer history
response to competitive activity.
brochures
display material
electronic updates
giveaways
incentive material
Internet and web pages
other handouts
tariff sheets.
266
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
plan and implement a range of sales activities for an
operation, product or service including the
preparation of sales reports
use effective communication skills during sales calls
demonstrate knowledge of the industry, including
structure and interrelationships, industry networks,
information sources and distribution and marketing
networks.
Assessment must ensure use of:
real or simulated products or services for which the
individual can conduct sales activities
current information and communications technology
used by industry to manage sales activities
marketing plans and operational sales documents,
such as sales reports and sales support materials
other people with whom the individual can interact.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
evaluation of sales activities undertaken by the
individual including sales planning and associated
implementation
sales reporting, incorporating analysis of
performance
use of case studies to assess knowledge of how
sales activities can be used in specific industry
contexts
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge,
such as, structure of the industry, industry
interrelationships, distribution networks and legal
compliance issues
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
In the workplace, people always combine the skills
described in different units to do their jobs. For effective
assessment of this unit, the assessor should use
integrated activities that also provide evidence of skills in
other units, for example:
SITXMGT501 Establish and conduct business
relationships
SITXMPR404 Coordinate marketing activities.
267
DRAFT THREE
SITXMPR404 Coordinate marketing activities
SITXMPR404
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Coordinate marketing activities
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXMPR004A Coordinate marketing
activities.
Minor adjustments to expression of content to streamline and
improve unit. Added innovation, legal, ethical and sustainability.
Added more on new technologies and media.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to plan and coordinate a range of marketing and
promotional activities at an operational level. The unit incorporates
knowledge of marketing principles.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all industry sectors, and to individuals who take
responsibility for coordinating marketing activities within the
parameters of an established marketing strategy. People working
independently with limited supervision undertake this role. This could
include marketing coordinators or managers and owner-operators of
small businesses.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Marketing and Public Relations
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Plan and organise
marketing activities.
2. Undertake a general
public relations role.
3. Review and report
1.1. Plan marketing activities according to marketing plan or
other organisational systems.
1.2. Identify, analyse and incorporate relevant market information
and legal, ethical and sustainability issues into short-term
planning.
1.3. Confirm target markets and marketing medium.
1.4. Evaluate potential and suitability of marketing opportunities
that arise.
1.5. Proactively seek and evaluate innovative marketing
opportunities, including use of new technologies and media.
1.6. Develop and implement action plans to address operational
details.
2.1. Establish and conduct positive relationships with industry and
media colleagues.
2.2. Use networks to support marketing activities.
2.3. Develop public relations resources as required, including
media releases and industry or media support materials.
3.1. Review activities according to agreed evaluation methods and
268
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
on marketing
activities.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
incorporate results into future planning.
3.2. Prepare reports according to organisational policy and
required timeframes.
3.3. Present current and clear market intelligence to inform sales
and marketing planning.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to establish and conduct positive business relationships
critical thinking skills to evaluate the potential of different marketing activities
initiative and enterprise skills to proactively identify and respond to new opportunities
literacy skills to:
◦ interpret market trend information and marketing plans
◦ develop detailed action plans for marketing activities
◦ prepare media releases and marketing reports
numeracy skills to work within marketing budgets
planning and organising skills to coordinate diverse and unpredictable operational details
problem-solving skills to proactively identify and respond to potentially complex
implementation challenges
self-management skills to take responsibility for the quality and outcomes of marketing
activities
technology skills to work with current web based marketing technologies.
Required knowledge
content and structure of marketing plans
key marketing principles, including the marketing management process and the four Ps product, place, price and promotion
industry structure and interrelationships, industry networks and information sources
industry and market knowledge appropriate to the sector and organisation, including:
◦ distribution and marketing networks, especially those that support the product or service
being promoted, including e-business options and major promotional events
◦ commission structures
◦ current customer and market trends and preferences
features, benefits and practical application of marketing activities commonly used in the
service industries, including:
◦ advertising
◦ familiarisations
◦ in-house promotions
◦ public relations
◦ social media
◦ trade and consumer shows
◦ signage and display
legal issues that impact on the marketing of products and services, including consumer
protection provisions
ethical considerations for marketing activities, including:
◦ appropriate use of images and text
269
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
◦ protection of children
◦ targeting of particular groups in the community
sustainability considerations for marketing activities, including:
◦ reducing waste of printed materials
◦ sustainability as a marketing tool.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Marketing activities may include:
Information to be incorporated into
the planning process may include:
Legal, ethical and sustainability
issues may relate to:
Potential and suitability of
promotional activities may relate to:
Operational details may include:
advertising
display and signage
events
familiarisations:
◦ media
◦ trade
industry and public relations activities
market research
product development within scope of individual
responsibility
web-based and social media activities.
competitive activity
financial statistics
marketing reports
marketplace trends
sales reports.
consumer law and trade practices
work health and safety obligations
resource conservation
targeting of particular groups
ways of presenting information.
consistency with overall marketing direction
exposure to be achieved
matching of attendees to target markets
resource considerations:
◦ financial
◦ human
timing of the activity or event.
administrative and procedural requirements
availability of promotional materials
available technology
contracting of other services, such as display
equipment requirements
need for external assistance
potential for cooperative approaches
270
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
public relations implications
staffing requirements and briefings
strategies to ensure maximum benefits
travel arrangements.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
plan and coordinate multiple and different marketing
activities for an operation, product or service
integrate knowledge of the relevant industry,
including structure and interrelationships, industry
networks, information sources, and distribution and
marketing networks
integrate knowledge of the types of marketing
activities used in the relevant industry sector and
major industry promotional events
demonstrate knowledge of marketing principles and
their application to practical workplace activities.
Assessment must ensure use of:
real or simulated products or services for which the
individual can conduct marketing activities
current information and communications technology
used by industry for marketing activities
marketing plans and operational marketing
documents, such as action plans and marketing
reports.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
evaluation of marketing activities planned and
conducted by the individual, including reports on
lessons to be learned for future activities
evaluation of critiques prepared by the individual
about industry marketing activities
use of case studies to assess the application of
marketing knowledge to different industry situations
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
marketing principles, structure of the industry,
industry interrelationships, distribution networks and
legal compliance issues
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
271
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITXMPR403 Plan and implement sales activities.
272
DRAFT THREE
SITXMPR405 Participate in cooperative online marketing initiatives for the tourism
industry
SITXMPR405
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Participate in cooperative online marketing initiatives
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXMPR006A Participate in
cooperative online marketing initiatives for the tourism industry.
Minor adjustments to expression of content to streamline and
improve unit.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to evaluate online cooperative tourism marketing initiatives,
provide appropriate website content and update this content using
remote authoring skills. It requires a general knowledge of online
marketing initiatives in the tourism industry and the basic technical
skills that allow business operators to participate effectively in these
initiatives.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all industry sectors. People working
independently with limited guidance from others undertake this role.
This could include sales and marketing personnel, managers, and
owner-operators of small businesses.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Marketing and Public Relations
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Evaluate online
cooperative
marketing initiatives.
1.1. Source and evaluate information about current online
cooperative marketing initiatives and sites for potential
value to the business.
1.2. Select initiatives that respond to the business context.
1.3. Evaluate additional skills, equipment or other resources
required to participate.
2.1. Review content requirements set down by administrator of
cooperative initiative.
2.2. Develop content suited to an online environment and
administrator requirements.
2.3. Identify, organise and prepare appropriate images for
inclusion.
2.4. Upload content according to guidelines and protocols.
3.1. Develop protocols for regular and timely updating of content
in cooperative sites.
3.2. Update content using remote authoring techniques according
to requirements of cooperative site.
2. Provide online
content in
appropriate format
and style.
3. Use remote
authoring to update
content.
273
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
3.3. Evaluate content and outcomes of participation and identify
and address issues arising.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
critical thinking skills to evaluate the potential and outcomes of online marketing initiatives
literacy skills to:
◦ research information from varied and unfamiliar sources about online marketing
initiatives
◦ read and interpret technical requirements of the initiative
◦ write online promotional content for the product or service
numeracy skills to work with numerical features of digital technologies
planning and organising skills to coordinate the different requirements for participation in a
cooperative initiative
problem-solving skills to identify and respond to technical issues with online content
technology skills to:
◦ upload content and use remote authoring processes and techniques
◦ manipulate digital images.
Required knowledge
online cooperative marketing opportunities available to the tourism industry in Australia
current national, state and regional frameworks for online cooperative marketing initiatives
for particular industry sectors
guidelines and requirements for format and style of typical online copy
techniques for capturing, manipulating and uploading digital images to cooperative sites,
including saving and storing images.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Cooperative marketing initiatives
may be established and run by:
Sites may relate to:
Business context may include:
tourism organisations:
◦ local
◦ regional
◦ state or territory
◦ national
private organisations.
bookings and reservations
destination-based sites
information only
product-based sites, e.g. bed and breakfasts
referral services.
available technology
budget
274
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Content requirements for
cooperative sites may include:
Protocols may include:
intended audience and market
marketing goals and strategies
time resources
training requirements
types of product and service offered.
conformity with style guides
links to other sites and emails
number and size of digital images or multimedia
number of words
order of information
pricing by room or package
proximity to data and geocoding.
allocation of responsibility for updating of content
monitoring pricing and the timing of the release of
special offers
monitoring system-generated emails
timetable for updating words and images.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
evaluate potential of cooperative online marketing
initiatives for a range of products and services
use technical skills to create, upload and update
content, including words and images
demonstrate knowledge of current developments and
initiatives in online cooperative marketing in the
Australian tourism industry.
Assessment must ensure use of:
real or simulated products and services for which
content can be developed
current information and communications technology.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
evaluation of online content developed by the
individual
evaluation of reports prepared by the individual to
compare different online cooperative marketing
initiatives
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of
potential online cooperative marketing initiatives for
tourism operators within Australia
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
275
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Guidance information for
assessment
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role.
276
DRAFT THREE
SITXMPR501 Obtain and manage sponsorship
SITXMPR501
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Obtain and manage sponsorship
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXFIN006A Obtain and manage
sponsorship. Re-categorised to Marketing and Public Relations.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to obtain and manage sponsorship for a business activity,
product, service or event. It requires the ability to determine
sponsorship requirements, source and negotiate with potential
sponsors and manage sponsorship arrangements.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to any tourism, travel, hospitality or event sector
where sponsorship is sought to support business or community
activities. Sponsorship may relate to a one-off activity, such as an
event, or to ongoing operations, such as sponsorship of a particular
service.
It applies to senior coordinators and mangers who operate
independently, have responsibility for others and are responsible for
making a range of financial and operational decisions. They may
work under the overall guidance of event organising committees.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Marketing and Public Relations
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Determine
sponsorship
requirements and
opportunities.
2. Source sponsorship.
1.1. Identify sponsorship requirements in consultation with
colleagues.
1.2. Develop targets for sponsorship based on financial parameters
of the activity.
1.3. Identify items, activities or projects to be sponsored to meet
the needs of the organisation.
1.4. Identify potential sponsors based on potential sponsor
appeal, the nature of the activity and previous approaches.
2.1. Develop sponsorship materials in a clear, concise and
professional format to include a full breakdown of costs and
benefits.
2.2. Distribute and present sponsorship materials according to
agreed targets.
2.3. Undertake follow-up promotion and negotiation with potential
sponsors.
2.4. Discuss and negotiate additional opportunities with the
277
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Service sponsors.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
sponsor.
2.5. Make written sponsor contracts or agreements to include full
details of commitments made by both parties.
3.1. Brief colleagues on details of sponsorship arrangements.
3.2. Organise activities according to sponsorship agreement
ensuring all agreements are honoured.
3.3. Monitor and evaluate activities and make required
adjustments.
3.4. Provide and request feedback from the sponsor.
3.5. Identify and action opportunities to enhance value of
involvement for sponsors and benefits for the organisation.
3.6. Maintain and distribute accurate and current sponsorship
documentation throughout the process.
3.7. Liaise and follow up with sponsor to initiate future cooperative
approaches.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to liaise and negotiate with sponsors and mange their participation
critical thinking skills to evaluate a potential sponsor’s best fit with the business activities or
projects
initiative and enterprise skills to identify and action opportunities to obtain sponsorship
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret details of the business activities or projects to be sponsored and
complex sponsorship contracts or agreements
◦ research potential sponsors that are aligned with the business activities or projects
◦ write sponsorship materials and agreements expressing complex business ideas and
proposals
numeracy skills to evaluate budgets and interrogate or use a range of financial data to
inform sponsorship activities
planning and organising skills to organise sponsorship activities according to agreements
problem-solving skills to monitor activities, identify sponsorship servicing deficiencies and
make required adjustments
self-management skills to take responsibility for sourcing and managing sponsorship
arrangements
teamwork skills to brief colleagues on details of sponsorship arrangements
technology skills to design effective sponsorship proposals.
Required knowledge
for the particular industry sector and business type:
◦ a range of business activities or events which would appeal to sponsors
◦ potential sponsorship opportunities and sources of finance
protocols for sponsor contact
packages that can be offered to sponsors
a range of formats for and inclusions of sponsorship proposals
features of sponsorship contracts and agreements:
◦ legal requirements to supply services as contracted and ramifications of failure to comply
278
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
◦
sponsor reporting expectations and requirements.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Colleagues may include:
Items, activities or projects may
include:
Potential sponsors may include:
Sponsorship materials may
include:
Sponsorship documentation may
include:
customers
event organisers
funding bodies
management
management committees.
entertainment
individual awards within an awards program
meals
one-off promotional activities or projects
ongoing organisational activities, such as an annual
publication
overall event or activity sponsorship
permanent or temporary exhibitions
physical items, such as satchels
social events
speaker sessions
sporting components
travel.
community organisations
educational institutions
existing sponsors
government agencies
individuals
industry organisations or professional associations
investors
private companies.
electronic presentations
printed promotional material.
activity reports or schedules
attendance figures
contracts
feedback documentation
financial records.
279
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Guidance information for
assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
determine sponsorship requirements and obtain and
manage sponsorship for a business activity, product,
service or event
monitor and manage sponsorship arrangements over
a period of time
develop clear, concise and professional sponsorship
proposals
integrate knowledge of practices and protocols for
accessing sponsorship opportunities
effectively communicate and negotiate with
sponsors.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry business operation, product, service or
event that a sponsor can be involved in
computers, printers and software packages currently
used by the tourism, hospitality and event industries
to design effective sponsorship proposals
current commercial sponsorship contracts
sponsors to allow the individual to communicate,
negotiate and manage sponsorship arrangements.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
project activities that allow assessment of the
individual’s ability to initiate and manage sponsorship
evaluation of sponsorship packages and proposals
produced by the individual
oral or written questioning to assess knowledge of
sponsorship practices and protocols for accessing
sponsorship opportunities
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
BSBCMM401A Make a presentation
BSBPMG510A Manage projects
SITXEVT503 Manage event staging components
SITXMGT501 Establish and conduct business
relationships
SITXMPR404 Coordinate marketing activities.
280
DRAFT THREE
SITXMPR502 Develop and implement marketing strategies
SITXMPR502
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Competency field
Unit sector
Develop and implement marketing strategies
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXMPR005A Develop and manage
marketing strategies.
Title changed to better reflect the intent and content of the unit.
Minor adjustments to expression of content to streamline and
improve unit. Added innovation and sustainability.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to analyse internal and external business environments and
to develop and evaluate marketing strategies and plans for products
and services.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all industry sectors, and to individuals in senior
marketing or management roles. This may include those whose
primary role is marketing related, or those for whom marketing is a
part of a broader job responsibility. Units and qualifications for
marketing specialists are found in the BSB07 Business Services
Training Package.
Marketing strategies could be developed for a new or existing
product or service, a small or medium-sized business organisation, a
destination or a specific project, such as an event.
No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements
apply to this unit at the time of endorsement.
Marketing and Public Relations
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Collect and analyse
information on the
internal business
environment.
2. Collect and analyse
information on the
external business
environment.
1.1. Confirm core activities, customer base, business values and
current business direction.
1.2. Identify and analyse information on current and past
marketing and its effectiveness.
1.3. Review business performance information to identify
strengths, weaknesses and critical success factors.
1.4. Identify and record current capabilities and resources,
including the need for specialist assistance.
1.5. Record and report information according to organisational
requirements.
2.1. Identify and analyse information on expected market growth or
decline with associated risk factors.
2.2. Record and analyse projected changes in the labour force,
population and economic activity.
281
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Develop marketing
strategies.
4. Prepare marketing
plan.
5. Implement and
monitor marketing
activities.
6. Conduct ongoing
evaluation.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
2.3. Gather and analyse comparative market information.
2.4. Identify and analyse industry and customer trends and
developments, including emerging technologies and
innovations.
2.5. Identify and analyse legal, ethical and sustainability issues
and potential business impacts.
2.6. Record and report information according to organisational
requirements.
3.1. Identify and analyse opportunities based on internal and
external market analysis.
3.2. Explore new and innovative marketing approaches.
3.3. Develop marketing strategies that are consistent with direction
and values of the organisation.
3.4. Integrate legal, ethical and sustainability considerations.
3.5. Develop strategies in consultation with key stakeholders.
4.1. Formulate marketing plan that clearly communicates priorities,
responsibilities, timelines and budgets.
4.2. Provide timely opportunities for colleagues to contribute to
marketing plan.
4.3. Submit marketing plan for approval according to organisational
policy.
5.1. Implement and monitor activities detailed in plan according to
schedule and contingencies.
5.2. Produce marketing reports according to organisational policy.
5.3. Share information on marketing activities with operational staff
to maintain awareness of current organisational focus.
6.1. Evaluate marketing activities using agreed methods and
benchmarks.
6.2. Make adjustments according to evaluation.
6.3. Communicate and implement agreed changes.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to lead consultation with stakeholders and colleagues
critical thinking skills to analyse complex information about internal and external business
environments from varied sources
initiative and enterprise skills to proactively identify creative marketing opportunities
literacy skills to:
◦ research complex and potentially unfamiliar business and marketing information
◦ write complex plans and reports
numeracy skills to develop marketing resource strategies and scenarios
planning and organising skills to coordinate complex planning and implementation
processes
problem-solving skills to evaluate marketing activities and challenges, and develop strategic
responses
technology skills to evaluate the potential of current and emerging marketing technologies.
282
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
Required knowledge
data collection tools and research methodologies of particular relevance to marketing
marketing planning techniques and formats, including key features of a marketing plan
internal and external issues that impact on market planning in a given industry context
industry marketing and distribution networks in the relevant context
new and innovative marketing strategies in the relevant industry context, including current
and emerging marketing technologies and the opportunities they present
legal issues that impact on marketing activities, including:
◦ Australian Consumer Law and consumer protection
◦ copyright
◦ privacy
◦ specific issues arising from use of new technologies
ethical considerations for marketing, including:
◦ appropriate use of images and text
◦ codes of practice
◦ protection of children
◦ targeting of particular groups in the community
sustainability considerations, opportunities and constraints for marketing in the relevant
context, including those related to:
◦ cultural and social sustainability
◦ economic sustainability of marketing initiatives
◦ resource conservation and waste minimisation.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Sources of information may
include:
Capabilities and resources may
include:
Comparative market information
may include:
business advisory services
financial institutions
government agencies
industry associations
industry publications
Internet
official statistics
peers.
communication capabilities
e-business capacity
equipment capacity
financial resources
hours of operation
human resources
location and position
staff skill levels.
benchmarking
best practice information
283
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Trends and developments may be:
Legal, ethical and sustainability
issues may relate to:
competitor information.
demographic
ecological and environmental
economic
government activities
industrial
social and cultural
technological, including social media developments.
codes of practice
cultural expectations and influences
requirements of legislation and regulations
sustainability:
◦ environmental
◦ financial
◦ social.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
research and critically analyse internal and external
business environments
develop a marketing strategy and plan for a product
or service that identifies current and relevant
marketing issues and includes a detailed, realistic
implementation program
integrate knowledge of marketing strategies,
techniques and distribution networks for the product
or service, including opportunities presented by new
technologies
demonstrate knowledge of implementation and
monitoring issues specific to the product or service.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated product or service for which
market planning can be undertaken
current information and communications technology
to support the research and planning process
a group of stakeholders who contribute to the
planning process
customers to whom products and services are
marketed.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
evaluation of the marketing aspects of a project
conducted by the individual
evaluation of marketing plans prepared by the
284
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Guidance information for
assessment
individual
use of case studies to assess application of
marketing planning principles to different industry
situations and contexts
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITTPPD503 Research and analyse tourism data.
285
DRAFT THREE
Work Health and Safety
SITXWHS101 Participate in safe work practices
SITXWHS101
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Participate in safe work practices
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXOHS001B Follow health, safety
and security procedures.
Title changed to better reflect the intent and content of the unit . Reworked Required Skills and Knowledge to more fully articulate
content.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to incorporate safe work practices into all workplace
activities. It requires the ability to follow predetermined health, safety
and security procedures and to participate in organisational work
health and safety management practices.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, travel, hospitality and event sectors
and to any small, medium or large organisation.
All personnel at all levels use this skill in the workplace during the
course of their daily activities.
The unit incorporates the requirement for all employees, under state
and territory Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) or Work Health
and Safety (WHS) legislation, to participate in the management of
their own health and safety, that of their colleagues and anyone else
in the workplace. They must cooperate with their employer and
follow practices to ensure safety at work.
Competency field
Unit sector
No occupational licensing or certification requirements apply to this
unit at the time of endorsement.
Work Health and Safety
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Work safely.
2. Follow procedures
1.1. Follow organisational health and safety procedures.
1.2. Incorporate safe work practices into all workplace activities.
1.3. Follow safety directions of supervisors, managers and
workplace safety warning signs.
1.4. Use personal protective equipment and clothing.
1.5. Promptly report unsafe work practices, issues and breaches
of health, safety and security procedures.
1.6. Identify and remove hazards from immediate workplace area
and report all workplace hazards as they arise.
2.1. Recognise emergency and potential emergency situations.
286
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
for emergency
situations.
3. Participate in
organisational work
health and safety
practices.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
2.2. Follow organisational security and emergency procedures.
2.3. Seek assistance from colleagues or authorities.
2.4. Complete emergency incident reports accurately, following
organisational procedures.
3.1. Participate in work health and safety management
practices developed by the organisation to ensure a safe
workplace.
3.2. Actively participate in the work health and safety consultation
processes.
3.3. Report work health and safety issues and concerns as they
arise.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ participate in consultation processes
◦ report and explain hazards
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret workplace safety signs, procedures and emergency evacuation plans
◦ complete basic template reports about hazards and emergency incidents
problem-solving skills to:
◦ identify and report hazards
◦ identify security and emergency issues.
Required knowledge
basic aspects of the relevant state or territory OHS or WHS legislation. This would include:
◦ actions that must be adhered to by businesses
◦ employer responsibilities
◦ employee responsibilities to participate in work health and safety practices
◦ employee responsibility to ensure safety of self, other workers and other people in the
workplace
◦ ramifications of failure to observe OHS or WHS legislation and organisational policies
and procedures
for the specific industry sector and organisation:
◦ workplace hazards and associated health, safety and security risks
◦ contents of health, safety and security procedures
◦ format and use of template reports for hazards and emergency incidents
◦ safe work practices for individual job roles.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Health and safety procedures may
cover:
consultation
emergencies
287
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Safe work practices may include:
Issues and breaches of health,
safety and security procedures
may involve:
Workplace may include:
handling chemicals and hazardous substances
hazard identification and reporting
incident and accident reporting
safe work practices.
clearing hazards from immediate work area
following the direction of:
◦ safety signage
◦ supervisors
◦ managers
handling chemicals, poisons and dangerous
materials safely
operating beverage dispensing systems, taking
account of the dangers associated with inert gases
taking short breaks away from stressful situations
involving difficult colleagues and customers
taking designated breaks and rotating tasks
using:
◦ equipment designed to assist with or replace
manual handling
◦ ergonomically sound furniture and workstations
◦ personal protective equipment and clothing
◦ safe manual handling techniques for shifting
heavy items
◦ safe posture and movements, including sitting,
standing and bending
◦ working with knives and hot equipment to avoid
injury.
being asked to participate in unsafe work practices
failing to replace unsafe damaged property or fittings
ignoring the direction of:
◦ safety signage
◦ supervisors
◦ managers
lack of:
◦ required safety signage
◦ training in health and safety procedures
◦ training in safe work practices
seeing others using unsafe work practices
using broken or malfunctioning equipment.
any tourism, travel, hospitality or event environment,
such as:
◦ heritage venues
◦ holiday parks and resorts
◦ hotels, motels
◦ clubs
◦ event, meeting and exhibition venues
◦ restaurants
288
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
◦
◦
◦
Emergency situations may
include:
Security and emergency
procedures may cover:
Participation in work health and
safety management practices may
involve:
retail outlets
retail travel agencies
office environment for tour operators, event
organisers, tour wholesalers
any location where a tour is delivered, for example:
◦ onboard a coach or cruise vessel
◦ a tourist precinct where walking tours are
operated
◦ in a national park.
accidents
bomb threats
natural events, e.g.earthquakes, floods, electrical
storms
chemical leak or spill
fires
illness
irrational customers
power failure
suspicious behaviour of staff or other people in the
workplace
robberies or armed hold-ups.
evacuation of staff and customers
security management of:
◦ cash
◦ documents
◦ equipment
◦ keys
◦ people.
participating in:
◦ consultation
◦ hazard identification
◦ work health and safety induction training
◦ safe work practice training
suggesting inclusions for work health and safety
policies and procedures.
289
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Consultation processes may
involve:
a diary, whiteboard or suggestion box used by staff
to report issues of concern
discussions with and reports to formal work health
and safety representatives and committee members
formal meetings with agendas, minutes and action
plans
informal meetings with notes
work health and safety discussions with supervisors
and managers during the course of each business
day
regular staff meetings that involve work health and
safety discussions
special staff meetings or workshops to specifically
address work health and safety issues
surveys or questionnaires that invite staff feedback
on work health and safety issues.
290
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
integrate the use of predetermined health, safety and
security procedures and safe work practices with
day-to-day work functions
participate in consultation activities
integrate, into daily work activities, knowledge of the
basic aspects of OHS or WHS legislation and the
ramifications of disregarding this.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry environment where safe working practices
must be maintained
current plain English regulatory documents
distributed by the local work health and safety
government regulator
codes of practice and standards issued by
government regulators or industry groups
work health and safety information and business
management manuals issued by industry
associations or commercial publishers
current commercial policies, procedures and
template documents used for the management of
work health and safety practices.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
direct observation of the individual:
◦ explaining workplace safety or emergency
procedures to a colleague or customer
◦ using safe work practices during an integrated
assessment of operative functions, such as
cleaning and tidying bars, guiding tours, setting
up events, selling products in an office
use of simulated activities to assess participation in:
◦ emergency evacuations
◦ consultation meetings
◦ hazard identification
use of problem-solving exercises to assess the
individual’s ability to respond to hazards
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of:
◦ OHS or WHS law and the employee
responsibilities for workplace safety and security
◦ personal protective equipment and clothing
appropriate for particular jobs and situations
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
291
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Guidance information for
assessment
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITHACS103 Prepare rooms for guests
SITHASC201 Cook simple Asian dishes
SITHCCC201 Cook simple dishes
SITHCCC202 Prepare and present food
SITTGDE401 Coordinate and operate tours
SITTTOP301 Load touring equipment
SITTTOP402 Set up and operate a camp site
SITTTSL305 Process reservations
SITTVAF303 Tow and site recreational vehicles
SITXINV201 Receive and store stock
SITXWHS301 Identify hazards, assess and control
safety risks.
292
DRAFT THREE
SITXWHS301 Identify hazards, assess and control safety risks
SITXWHS301
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Identify hazards, assess and control safety risks
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXOHS003B Identify hazards, and
assess and control safety risks.
Minor name change.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to identify hazards, assess the associated workplace safety
risks, take measures to eliminate or minimise those risks and
document all processes.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, travel, hospitality and event sectors
and to any small, medium or large organisation.
All people working at all levels can participate in risk assessments
which are commonly conducted as a team effort. Frontline
operational personnel, who operate with some level of
independence and under limited supervision, would assist other
colleagues during the process. Individuals may conduct the
assessments independently of others.
This unit incorporates the requirement, under state and territory
Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) or Work Health and Safety
(WHS) legislation, for businesses to conduct risk assessments
involving their workers to manage the safety of those workers and
anyone else in the workplace.
Competency field
Unit sector
No occupational licensing or certification requirements apply to this
unit at the time of endorsement.
Work Health and Safety
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Identify hazards.
2. Assess the safety
risk associated with
a hazard.
1.1. Access and use hazard identification and risk assessment
tools and template documents.
1.2. Use appropriate methods to identify actual or foreseeable
hazards that have the potential to harm the health and safety
of workers or anyone else in the workplace.
1.3. Work alone or with other personnel to identify hazards.
1.4. Keep records of identified hazards according to organisational
procedures.
2.1. Access and use risk assessment tools and template
documents.
2.2. Work alone or with other personnel to assess the risk.
2.3. Use a systematic method to assess the risk.
293
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Eliminate or control
the risk.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
2.4. Collect sufficient evidence of the type and level of risk posed
by the identified hazard.
2.5. Document the outcome of the risk assessment suggesting
actions to eliminate or control risks.
2.6. Keep records of risk assessments according to organisational
procedures.
3.1. Discuss, with others, ways of eliminating or controlling the
risk.
3.2. Take measures to eliminate or control risks.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ discuss hazards and associated risks with other workers
◦ participate in risk assessments and assertively suggest control methods
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret hazard identification and risk assessment template documents and
organisational policies and procedures
◦ complete hazard identification and risk assessment reports using template documents
numeracy skills to score the risks and calculate an overall risk level for the identified hazard
problem-solving skills to identify and logically evaluate hazards, associated risks and
suggest control measures
teamwork skills to:
◦ actively and cooperatively participate in group risk assessments
◦ suggest effective controls while incorporating the views of other people in the workplace.
Required knowledge
basic aspects of the relevant state or territory OHS or WHS legislation, specifically
requirements for:
◦ when, where and how hazards must be identified
◦ when, where and how risk assessments must be conducted
◦ consultation in the hazard identification and risk assessment process
◦ work health and safety committees or work health and safety representatives as
mechanisms for consultation
◦ record keeping
for the specific industry sector and organisation:
◦ range of group risk assessment mechanisms commonly used
◦ format and use of appropriate hazard identification and risk assessment templates
◦ range of methods for identifying hazards in the workplace
◦ common methods applied to the assessment of safety risks, including the four-staged
process model recommended and published by state and territory work health and
safety authorities
◦ common methods applied to controlling risks, including the five-stepped hierarchical
process model recommended and published by state and territory work health and
safety authorities
◦ hazard identification and risk assessment procedures.
294
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Hazard identification and risk
assessment tools and template
documents may include:
Appropriate methods include:
Anyone else in the workplace may
include:
The workplace may include:
self-designed tools
tools and templates developed:
◦ by external consultancy services
◦ by industry associations for use by member
businesses
◦ for public use and found within business
management publications, including those
developed by work health and safety government
regulators
tools developed for the organisation as part of a work
health and safety management system.
conduct of site safety audits
completion of safety checklists
inspections of the workplace
observation of daily activities
investigation of accidents and incidents
review of injury or illness registers
environmental monitoring of the workplace
investigation of staff complaints or reports of safety
concerns
review of staff feedback via consultative processes,
such as meetings, surveys or suggestion box
submissions.
contractors
customers
visiting supplier representatives.
any tourism, hospitality or event environment, such
as:
◦ heritage venues
◦ holiday parks and resorts
◦ hotels, motels
◦ clubs
◦ event, meeting and exhibition venues
◦ restaurants
◦ retail outlets
◦ retail travel agencies
◦ office environment for tour operators, event
organisers, tour wholesalers
any location where a tour is delivered, for example:
◦ onboard a coach or cruise vessel
◦ a tourist precinct where walking tours are
operated
295
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Other personnel may include:
Hazards may be associated with:
Systematic method involves:
◦ in a national park.
contractors
managers
work health and safety committee members
work health and safety representatives
peers and colleagues
staff under supervision
supervisors
tourism suppliers.
physical environment, for example:
◦ crowds
◦ customer ability to fully engage in all activities,
e.g. health issues
◦ electrical items
◦ exposure to weather and natural disasters
◦ flooring
◦ hot and cold work environments
◦ lighting
◦ noise levels
◦ pests
◦ touring activities to be undertaken
◦ wild animals and local wildlife
◦ working space of workers
plant, for example:
◦ appliances
◦ beverage dispensing systems using inert gases
◦ equipment
◦ machinery
◦ tools
working practices, for example:
◦ length of time spent at certain task and allocation
of breaks
◦ rostering and shift allocation
◦ opening and closing procedures
◦ standard operating procedures for work-related
tasks
security issues, for example:
◦ customer behaviour
◦ storage of cash, documents and keys
◦ theft and robbery.
identifying the injury or illness or consequences that
could result from the hazard
determining the exposure to the hazard
estimating the probability that an incident or injury will
occur
determining an overall risk level for the identified
hazard.
296
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Ways of eliminating or controlling
the risk involves:
Measures may involve:
substituting a system of work or equipment with
something safer
isolating the hazard
introducing engineering controls
adopting administrative controls
using personal protective equipment
implementing combined control methods to minimise
risk.
implementing control measures when responsible
making suggestions for ways of eliminating or
controlling risks
referring to a higher level staff member for decision
on implementing controls.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
participate in multiple risk assessments to identify
workplace hazards, assess the associated safety
risks and take measures to eliminate or control those
risks
use appropriate methods and documents for hazard
identification, risk assessment and control
demonstrate knowledge of the basic aspects of OHS
or WHS legislation for identifying hazards, assessing
and controlling risks.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or events
industry environment where hazards must be
identified and risk assessed
current plain English regulatory documents
distributed by the local work health and safety
government regulator
work health and safety information and business
management manuals issued by industry
associations or commercial publishers
current commercial policies and procedures, and
hazard identification and risk assessment template
documents.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
direct observation, using role plays, of the individual
discussing hazard identification, risk assessment and
control with colleagues
evaluation of hazard identification and risk
297
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Guidance information for
assessment
assessment documents completed by the individual
use of simulated activities to assess participation in:
◦ hazard identification
◦ risk assessments
use of, case studies and problem-solving exercises
so the individual can suggest methods of eliminating
or controlling the risks associated with various
hazards
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of:
◦ legal requirements for hazard identification and
risk assessment
◦ contents of hazard identification and risk
assessment procedures
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
SITHACS103 Prepare rooms for guests
SITHASC201 Cook simple Asian dishes
SITHCCC201 Cook simple dishes
SITHCCC202 Prepare and present food
SITTGDE401 Coordinate and operate tours
SITTPPD404 Develop in-house recreational activities
SITTTOP301 Load touring equipment
SITTTOP402 Set up and operate a camp site
SITTTSL305 Process reservations
SITTVAF303 Tow and site recreational vehicles
SITXINV201 Receive and store stock
SITXWHS101 Participate in safe work practices.
298
DRAFT THREE
SITXWHS401 Implement and monitor Work Health and Safety practices
SITXWHS401
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Implement and monitor work health and safety practices
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXOHS004B Implement and
monitor workplace health, safety and security practices.
Title simplified and changed to reflect legislative change from
Occupational Health and Safety to Work Health and Safety. Reworked Required Skills and Knowledge to more fully articulate
content.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to implement those predetermined work health and safety
practices designed, at management level, to ensure a safe
workplace. It requires the ability to monitor safe work practices,
coordinate consultative arrangements, risk assessments, work
health and safety training and the maintenance of records.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, travel, hospitality and event sectors
and to any small, medium or large organisation.
It applies to those people who operate independently or with limited
guidance from others. This includes supervisors and departmental
managers.
This unit incorporates the requirement, under state and territory
OHS or WHS legislation, for businesses to take a systematic
approach for managing the safety of their workers and anyone else
in the workplace.
Competency field
Unit sector
No occupational licensing or certification requirements apply to this
unit at the time of endorsement.
Work Health and Safety
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Provide information
on health, safety and
security.
1.1. Explain relevant work health and safety information to
personnel.
1.2. Make all current work health and safety information readily
accessible to staff.
2.1. Monitor adherence to organisational work health and safety
procedures.
2.2. Monitor ongoing compliance with safe work practices.
2.3. Take prompt action to address non-compliance with
procedures and safe work practice.
2.4. Monitor the day-to-day effectiveness of work health and safety
practices in maintaining the health, safety and security of
2. Monitor safe work
practices.
299
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
3. Coordinate
consultative
arrangements for the
management of
health, safety and
security issues.
4. Implement and
monitor procedures
for identifying
hazards, assessing
and controlling risks.
5. Implement and
monitor health,
safety and security
training.
6. Maintain work health
and safety records
and reports.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
personnel.
3.1. Coordinate the operation of all consultative processes.
3.2. Provide the opportunity for staff members to contribute their
views on current and future work health and safety
management practices.
3.3. Resolve or refer issues raised through work health and safety
consultation to the appropriate person.
3.4. Provide timely staff and own feedback on work health and
safety management practices to the designated person.
4.1. Coordinate scheduled hazard identification activities ensuring
hazards are identified at times designated by legislation.
4.2. Identify any hazards on an ongoing basis through own day-today workplace operations.
4.3. React to reports of hazards by other workers, coordinate and
participate in risk assessments.
4.4. Implement any risk control methods or refer to appropriate
person if control is outside scope of responsibility.
4.5. Monitor the effectiveness of control measures, promptly
identify any inadequacies and resolve or report them to the
appropriate person.
5.1. Identify work health and safety training needs based on
regular staff monitoring.
5.2. Make arrangements for fulfilling training needs.
5.3. Monitor effectiveness of training and make required
adjustments.
6.1. Complete work health and safety records and reports
accurately and legibly and store according to organisation and
legal requirements.
6.2. Use data and reports to provide reliable and timely input to the
management of workplace health, safety and security.
6.3. Minimise use of printed materials and maximise electronic
transmission and filing of all documents to reduce waste.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ explain issues of work health and safety responsibility to personnel
◦ discipline non-compliant personnel
◦ conduct sometimes complex work health and safety consultation activities
◦ explain all work health and safety procedures and information on safe work practices
critical thinking skills to:
◦ allow for a rational and logical evaluation of the effectiveness of work health and safety
management practices
◦ incorporate the views of other people consulted in the workplace
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret unfamiliar and complex materials describing regulatory requirements
for work health and safety management and organisational policies and procedures
300
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
◦
write high level reports about the effectiveness of work health and safety management
practices, including recommendations for change and complete accurate records for
regulatory compliance
planning and organising skills to coordinate consultative arrangements, work health and
safety training and regular hazard identification and risk assessment activities
problem-solving skills to analyse work health and safety system deficiencies and
recommend change
teamwork skills to monitor staff members’ daily compliance with work health and safety
management practices and counsel on non-compliance.
Required knowledge
the primary components of relevant state or territory OHS or WHS legislation. This would
include:
◦ actions that must be taken for legal compliance
◦ employer responsibilities to provide a safe workplace
◦ requirement to consult and acceptable consultation mechanisms
◦ requirements for the use of work health and safety representatives and committees, and
their roles and responsibilities
◦ requirements for hazard identification, risk assessment, risk control and acceptable
mechanisms
◦ requirements for record keeping and acceptable record keeping mechanisms
◦ requirement to provide information and training
◦ employee responsibilities to ensure safety of self, other workers and other people in the
workplace
◦ employee responsibility to participate in work health and safety practices
◦ ramifications of failure to observe OHS or WHS legislation and organisational policies
and procedures
for the specific organisation:
◦ the full content of work health and safety policies, procedures, consultation, hazard
identification, risk assessment and reporting documents
◦ methods used for work health and safety consultation, hazard identification and risk
assessment
◦ options for the provision of training.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Work health and safety
information may include:
consultative arrangements for work health and safety
employee roles and responsibilities in work health
and safety management practices
legal obligations and ramifications of failure to
comply
location of first aid kit and emergency evacuation
plan
work health and safety training information and
301
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Work health and safety
procedures may cover:
Safe work practice may include:
updates
policies:
◦ overall approach of organisation to work health
and safety
◦ participation of personnel in work health and
safety management practices
◦ responsibilities of employees to ensure safety
procedures
specific risk control measures relevant to the
workplace
specific regulations and codes of practice
use of:
◦ hazard identification reporting documents
◦ risk assessment template documents.
consultation
emergencies
evacuation of staff and customers
handling chemicals and hazardous substances
hazard identification and reporting
incident and accident reporting
risk assessments and reporting
safe work practices
security management of:
◦ cash
◦ documents
◦ equipment
◦ keys
◦ people.
clearing hazards from immediate work area
following the direction of:
◦ safety signage
◦ supervisors
◦ managers
handling chemicals, poisons and dangerous
materials safely
operating beverage dispensing systems, taking
account of the dangers associated with inert gases
taking short breaks away from stressful situations
involving difficult colleagues and customers
taking designated breaks and rotating tasks
using:
◦ equipment designed to assist with or replace
manual handling
◦ ergonomically sound furniture and workstations
◦ personal protective equipment and clothing
◦ safe manual handling techniques for shifting
heavy items
◦ safe posture and movements, including sitting,
302
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Consultative processes may
involve:
Times designated by legislation
may include:
Hazards may be associated with:
standing and bending
working with knives and hot equipment to avoid
injury.
a diary, whiteboard or suggestion box used by staff
to report issues of concern
fact sheets to fully inform personnel about work
health and safety rights and responsibilities
formal work health and safety representatives and
committees
formal meetings with agendas, minutes and action
plans
informal meetings with notes
work health and safety discussions with employees
during the course of each business day
recording issues in a management diary
regular staff meetings that involve work health and
safety discussions
seeking staff suggestions for content of work health
and safety policies and procedures
special staff meetings or workshops to specifically
address work health and safety issues
staff handbook which includes work health and safety
information
surveys or questionnaires that invite staff feedback
on work health and safety issues.
when changes to the workplace are implemented,
including:
◦ before the premises are used for the first time
◦ before and during the installation or alteration of
any plant
◦ before changes to work practices are introduced
◦ when any new information relating to health and
safety risk becomes available.
physical environment, for example:
◦ crowds
◦ customer ability to fully engage in all activities,
e.g. health issues
◦ electrical items
◦ exposure to weather and natural disasters
◦ flooring
◦ hot and cold work environments
◦ lighting
◦ noise levels
◦ pests
◦ touring activities to be undertaken
◦ wild animals and local wildlife
◦ working space of workers
plant, for example:
303
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Work health and safety training
needs may include:
Work health and safety records
and reports may include
documentation of:
◦ appliances
◦ beverage dispensing systems using inert gases
◦ equipment
◦ machinery
◦ tools
working practices, for example:
◦ length of time spent at certain task and allocation
of breaks
◦ rostering and shift allocation
◦ opening and closing procedures
◦ standard operating procedures for work-related
tasks
security issues, for example:
◦ customer behaviour
◦ storage of cash, documents and keys
◦ theft and robbery.
coaching or mentoring in safe work practices
formal training programs in safe work practices
hazard identification, risk assessment and control
work health and safety policy and procedure
induction
work health and safety representative or committee
provision of information, fact sheets and signage to
ensure safe work practices.
consultation
hazard identification
incident and accident notifications to work health and
safety regulatory authorities
incident or accident, near miss reports and related
statistics
monitoring reports and recommendations for change,
including effectiveness of:
◦ agendas for and minutes of meetings
◦ committee members
◦ consultation decisions and follow-up actions
◦ consultation processes
◦ diaries of meetings
◦ work health and safety information provided to
personnel
◦ risk controls
◦ safe work practices
risk assessments
risk control actions
training action plans
training undertaken.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
304
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
Evidence of the ability to:
implement and monitor predetermined work health
and safety work practices, coordinate consultative
arrangements, risk assessments, work health and
safety training and the maintenance of records
monitor the effectiveness of the work health and
safety system over a period of time
integrate knowledge of management practices that
must be implemented for compliance with state or
territory OHS or WHS legislation
integrate knowledge of policies and procedures when
monitoring work health and safety practices.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry business operation for which work health
and safety management practices are implemented
and monitored
computers, software programs, printers and
communication technology used to administer the
implementation and monitoring of a work health and
safety system
the relevant state or territory OHS or WHS legislation
current plain English regulatory documents
distributed by the local work health and safety
government regulator
codes of practice and standards issued by
government regulators or industry groups
work health and safety information and business
management manuals issued by industry
associations or commercial publishers
current commercial work health and safety policies
and procedures
an operational team for which the individual
coordinates work health and safety management
practices.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
direct observation, using role plays, of the individual
providing work health and safety information and
conducting work health and safety consultation
sessions
evaluation of documents prepared by the individual:
◦ action plans to coordinate consultative
processes, hazard identification and risk
assessment activities
◦ a range of work health and safety records and
305
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Guidance information for
assessment
reports
◦ reports detailing the effectiveness of work health
and safety management practices and
recommendations for change
use of case studies and problem-solving exercises
so the individual can suggest methods for controlling
staff non-compliance with procedures and safe work
practices
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of:
◦ legislative requirements
◦ contents of policies and procedures
◦ methods used for WHS consultation, hazard
identification and risk assessment
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
BSBADM502B Manage meetings
BSBMGT515A Manage operational plan
BSBPMG501A Manage projects
SITTPPD404 Develop in-house recreational activities
SITXMGT401 Monitor work operations
SITXWHS601 Establish and maintain a Work Health
and Safety system.
306
DRAFT THREE
SITXWHS601 Establish and maintain a Work Health and Safety system
SITXWHS601
Modification history
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Prerequisite units
Application of the
unit
Licensing/
Regulatory
Information
Establish and maintain a work health and safety system
E
Replaces and is equivalent to SITXOHS005A Establish and maintain
an OHS system.
Title changed to reflect legislative change from Occupational Health
and Safety to Work Health and Safety. Re-worked Required Skills
and Knowledge to more fully articulate content.
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge
required to develop, implement and sustain effective, professional
and contemporary work health and safety management practices. It
requires the ability to establish and review systems, policies and
procedures designed to ensure a safe workplace.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit applies to all tourism, travel, hospitality and event sectors
and to any small, medium or large organisation.
It applies to those senior managers who operate with significant
autonomy and are responsible for making a range of strategic
management decisions.
This unit incorporates the requirement, under state and territory
Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) or Work Health and Safety
(WHS) legislation, for businesses to take a systematic approach for
managing the safety of their workers and anyone else in the
workplace.
Competency field
Unit sector
No occupational licensing or certification requirements apply to this
unit at the time of endorsement.
Work Health and Safety
Cross-Sector
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Elements describe the
essential outcomes of a unit of
competency.
Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement. Assessment of
performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1. Establish and
maintain a
framework for health,
safety and security.
1.1. Access and interpret key legislative documents to ensure that
work health and safety systems comply with regulatory
requirements, standards and codes.
1.2. Design a work health and safety management system to
suit the characteristics and needs of the organisation, in
consultation with appropriate personnel.
1.3. Identify and provide adequate financial, human and specialist
external resources to address work health and safety
management practices.
1.4. Develop and clearly articulate work health and safety
policies and procedures in a format readily accessible to all
personnel.
307
DRAFT THREE
ELEMENT
2. Establish and
maintain consultative
arrangements for the
management of
health, safety and
security.
3. Establish and
maintain practices
for identifying
hazards, and
assessing and
controlling risks.
4. Evaluate
organisational
health, safety and
security system.
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
1.5. Define and allocate health, safety and security responsibilities
within relevant job descriptions.
1.6. Consult with key personnel, and develop and implement a plan
for all work health and safety training requirements.
1.7. Establish and monitor a system for keeping work health and
safety records.
1.8. Establish and maintain systems to ensure communication of
work health and safety information to personnel.
2.1. Establish and maintain appropriate consultative processes
to suit the characteristics and needs of the organisation.
2.2. Plan for and ensure that consultation is conducted at times
designated by legislation.
2.3. Resolve issues raised through consultation.
2.4. Provide employees with accessible information on the
outcomes of consultation.
3.1. Develop or access hazard identification and risk
assessment template documents that incorporate
assessment criteria for assessing risks.
3.2. Plan for and ensure systematic hazard identification at
times designated by legislation.
3.3. Develop procedures for the ongoing identification of types of
hazards designated by legislation.
3.4. Develop procedures for the assessment and control of risks
associated with identified hazards.
3.5. Nominate the roles and responsibilities of personnel for hazard
identification, risk assessment and risk control within
procedures.
3.6. Take a lead role in controlling risks, including implementing
interim or emergency solutions.
3.7. Manage the response to any incident or accident and follow
legislative requirements for notifying and cooperating with
work health and safety government regulators.
4.1. Assess and maintain ongoing compliance with OHS or WHS
legislation and regulatory requirements, standards and codes.
4.2. Consult with a range of personnel to elicit feedback on work
health and safety policies, procedures and practices.
4.3. Assess the effectiveness of work health and safety
management practices, develop, implement, document and
communicate improvements and changes to the work health
and safety system.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
communication skills to:
◦ consult with a range of personnel to elicit feedback on work health and safety policies,
procedures and practices
◦ discuss training needs with key supervisory and management personnel
◦ interview personnel about incidents or accidents, near misses
308
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
critical thinking skills to:
◦ allow for a rational and logical evaluation of the characteristics and needs of the
organisation in order to design a tailored work health and safety system
◦ evaluate and review the system
literacy skills to:
◦ read and interpret unfamiliar and complex materials describing regulatory requirements
for work health and safety management systems and internal reports providing
operational feedback about the effectiveness of practices
◦ develop comprehensive yet easily accessible work health and safety policies,
procedures and template documents
◦ write high level reports about the effectiveness of work health and safety management
practices and rationale for change
planning and organising skills to plan for, establish and regularly monitor all components of
a work health and safety management system
problem-solving skills to:
◦ take a lead role in controlling risks, including implementing interim or emergency
solutions
◦ manage the response to any incident or accident
self-management skills to take responsibility for work health and safety management
teamwork skills to consult with key personnel and incorporate their views to develop an
effective work health and safety system.
Required knowledge
the structure, characteristics and needs of the organisation
objectives, components and comprehensive details of relevant state or territory OHS or
WHS legislation. This would include:
◦ actions that must be taken for legal compliance
◦ employer responsibilities to provide a safe workplace
◦ requirement to consult, designated times for consultation and acceptable consultation
mechanisms
◦ requirements for the use of work health and safety representatives and committees, and
their roles and responsibilities
◦ designated times for hazard identification and categories of hazards that must be
identified
◦ acceptable mechanisms for hazard identification, risk assessment and risk control
◦ requirements for record keeping and acceptable record keeping mechanisms
◦ requirement to provide information and training
◦ employee responsibilities to ensure safety of self, other workers and other people in the
workplace
◦ employee responsibility to participate in work health and safety practices
objectives, components and comprehensive details of work health and safety codes of
practice and standards developed by industry or regulatory bodies
ramifications of failure to observe OHS or WHS laws and codes of practice
methods of receiving updated information on OHS or WHS laws and codes of practice
components of work health and safety management systems
a range of methods used by the specific industry sector and organisation to:
◦ conduct consultation when developing policies and procedures
◦ communicate work health and safety policies, procedures and safe working practices
309
DRAFT THREE
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
◦ conduct ongoing work health and safety consultation
◦ evaluate the effectiveness of work health and safety management practices
a range of formats for and inclusions of:
◦ policies and procedures
◦ work health and safety templates for hazard identification and risk assessment
◦ incident, accidents or near miss reports
◦ reports that document the evaluation of systems and required changes
◦ work health and safety record keeping systems.
RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.
Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation,
needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.
Work health and safety
management system includes
practices to ensure:
Work health and safety policies
and procedures may cover:
adequate facilities for the welfare of employees
appropriate management of incidents or accidents
and notification to work health and safety
government regulators
availability of information, instructions, training and
supervision that ensure employees’ health and safety
safe:
◦ machinery, equipment and materials
◦ premises, including the provision of entrances
and exits that are safe
◦ systems of work
◦ working environment.
consultation
emergencies
evacuation of staff and customers
handling chemicals and hazardous substances
hazard identification and reporting
incident and accident management and notification to
work health and safety regulatory authorities
incident and accident reporting by staff
ongoing monitoring of risk control
overall organisational approach to work health and
safety
participation of personnel in work health and safety
management practices
responsibilities of employees to ensure safety
risk assessments and reporting
safe work practices
security management of:
◦ cash
◦ documents
◦ equipment
◦ keys
310
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
Work health and safety training
requirements may include:
Work health and safety records
may include documentation of:
Work health and safety
information may include:
Consultative processes may
involve:
◦ people.
coaching or mentoring in safe work practices
formal training programs in safe work practices
hazard identification, risk assessment and control
work health and safety policy and procedure
induction
work health and safety representative or committee
provision of information, fact sheets and signage to
ensure safe work practices.
consultation:
◦ diaries of meetings
◦ agendas for and minutes of meetings
◦ committee members
◦ consultation decisions and follow-up actions
hazard identification
incident or accident notifications to work health and
safety regulatory authorities
incident, accident and near miss reports and related
statistics
policies and procedures
risk assessments
risk control actions
training plans
training undertaken.
consultative arrangements for work health and safety
emergency evacuation plan
employee roles and responsibilities in work health
and safety management practices
legal obligations and ramifications of failure to
comply
work health and safety training information and
updates
organisation-specific policies and procedures
specific risk control measures for the workplace
specific regulations and codes of practice
use of:
◦ hazard identification reporting documents
◦ risk assessment template documents.
a diary, whiteboard or suggestion box used by staff
to report issues of concern
fact sheets to fully inform personnel about work
health and safety rights and responsibilities
formal WHS representatives and committees
formal meetings with agendas, minutes and action
plans
informal meetings with notes
involving personnel in:
311
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
◦
Times designated by legislation
for consultation will vary but may
include when the organisation:
Hazard identification and risk
assessment template documents
may include:
Assessment criteria may include
those:
Systematic hazard identification
conducting hazard identification and risk
assessment
◦ making decisions on how to eliminate or control
risks
work health and safety discussions with employees
during the course of each business day
recording issues in a management diary
regular staff meetings that involve work health and
safety discussions
seeking staff suggestions for content of work health
and safety policies and procedures
special staff meetings or workshops to specifically
address work health and safety issues
staff handbook which includes work health and safety
information
surveys or questionnaires that invite staff feedback
on work health and safety issues.
conducts hazard identification and risk assessment
or reviews hazard identification and risk assessment
practices
introduces or alters facilities for the welfare of
personnel
introduces or alters procedures for monitoring
workplace risks
is proposing to make changes to the premises,
equipment, materials and systems of work that might
affect the health and safety of personnel
makes decisions about actions to eliminate or control
risks
makes initial and ongoing decisions on how best to
consult with personnel.
self-designed tools developed for the organisation as
part of a work health and safety management system
tools and templates developed:
◦ by external consultancy services
◦ by industry associations for use of member
businesses
◦ for public use by, and found within, business
management publications, including those
developed by work health and safety government
regulators.
developed by external consultancy services
outlined in Australian standards
self-determined for the organisation as part of a work
health and safety management system
suggested by industry associations for use by
member businesses.
when changes to the workplace are implemented,
312
DRAFT THREE
RANGE STATEMENT
at times designated by legislation
may occur:
Types of hazards designated by
legislation may include:
Assess effectiveness of WHS
management practices may involve:
including:
◦ before the premises are used for the first time
◦ before and during the installation or alteration of
any plant
◦ before changes to work practices are introduced
◦ when new information relating to health and
safety risk becomes available.
physical environment, for example:
◦ electrical items
◦ equipment
◦ flooring
◦ hot and cold environments
◦ lighting
◦ noise levels
◦ working space of any workers
plant, for example:
◦ appliances
◦ equipment
◦ machinery
◦ tools
working practices, for example:
◦ length of time spent at certain tasks and
allocation of breaks
◦ opening and closing procedures
◦ rostering of staff and shift allocation
◦ security procedures
◦ standard operating procedures for work-related
tasks.
monitoring the ongoing effectiveness of risk control
methods
reviewing:
◦ incidents or accidents, near misses
◦ work health and safety reports
◦ work health and safety statistics.
EVIDENCE GUIDE
The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.
Overview of assessment
Critical aspects for
assessment and evidence
required to demonstrate
competency in this unit
Evidence of the ability to:
establish and implement a complete work health and
safety system covering diverse work health and
safety system components
evaluate and make ongoing improvements to work
health and safety practices over a period of time
develop comprehensive work health and safety
system documents
integrate knowledge of management practices that
313
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Context of and specific
resources for assessment
Method of assessment
must be established and maintained for compliance
with state or territory OHS or WHS law.
Assessment must ensure use of:
a real or simulated tourism, hospitality or event
industry business operation for which a tailored work
health and safety management system can be
established and monitored
computers, software programs, printers and
communication technology used to administer the
development of a work health and safety system
the relevant state or territory OHS or WHS legislation
current plain English regulatory documents
distributed by the local work health and safety
government regulator
codes of practice and standards issued by regulatory
authorities or industry groups
work health and safety information and business
management manuals issued by industry
associations or commercial publishers
current commercial policies and procedures, and
hazard identification and risk assessment template
documents
a team for which the individual establishes work
health and safety management practices.
A range of assessment methods should be used to
assess practical skills and knowledge. The following
examples are appropriate for this unit:
evaluation of a portfolio, prepared by the individual,
which incorporates an entire written work health and
safety system for an organisation, including:
◦ policies and procedures
◦ hazard identification and risk assessment
template documents
◦ information fact sheets for workers
◦ job descriptions incorporating work health and
safety roles
◦ training plans
◦ consultation strategy
evaluation of reports, prepared by the individual:
◦ how work health and safety policies, systems and
procedures were tailored to suit the
characteristics and needs of an organisation
◦ evaluation of the effectiveness of work health and
safety management practices
use of case studies and problem-solving exercises
so the individual can suggest appropriate WHS
systems, policies and procedures for different
workplace sizes and types
314
DRAFT THREE
EVIDENCE GUIDE
Guidance information for
assessment
written or oral questioning to assess knowledge of:
◦ relevant OHS or WHS law
◦ methods for conducting ongoing work health and
safety consultation
◦ methods for evaluating the effectiveness of work
health and safety management practices
review of portfolios of evidence and third-party
workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
individual.
The assessor should design integrated assessment
activities to holistically assess this unit with other units
relevant to the industry sector, workplace and job role,
for example:
BSBADM502B Manage meetings
BSBPMG501A Manage projects
BSBWRT401A Write complex documents
SITXGLC501 Research business compliance
requirements.
315
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