PLENTY AT TWENTY - english language schools association

 WEDNESDAY 18TH MARCH 2015 ELSA­FRANCE ANNUAL TEACHER DEVELOPMENT DAY PLENTY AT TWENTY ECOLE INTERNATIONALE BILINGUE ­ THE VICTOR HUGO SCHOOL 23, RUE DE CRONSTADT 75015 PARIS FRANCE IN PARTNERSHIP WITH INTERNATIONAL GRADUATE PROGRAMS FOR EDUCATORS, BUFFALO STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK RECOGNIZED BY THE EUROPEAN COUNCIL OF INTERNATIONAL SCHOOLS ELSA­FRANCE• 86 RUE DE LA TOUR 75116 PARIS WWW.ELSA­FRANCE.ORG•[email protected]­FRANCE.ORG ASSOCIATION RÉGIE PAR LA LOI DE 1901• SIRET: 43126229400025 N° FORMATION PROFESSIONNELLE: 11 75 450001 75 ELSA BOARD PRESIDENT: DONNA PHILIP, INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF LYON VICE PRESIDENT: NANCY WILLARD MAGAUD, EDUCATIONAL CONSULTANT TREASURER: ANNE­CLAIRE MALHERBE, MALHERBE INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL SECRETARY: NAYR IBRAHIM, BRITISH COUNCIL ELSA ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT: DANIELA BRUNEAU TDD Program Committee 2015 PROGRAM CHAIR: ANTONY MCDERMOTT, ECOLE JEANNINE MANUEL PARIS NANCY WILLARD MAGAUD, EDUCATIONAL CONSULTANT CAROLYN COMFORT, LENNEN BILINGUAL SCHOOL FAY HUTCHINSON, AMERICAN SCHOOL OF PARIS EDWARD BOUCHER, EIB VICTOR HUGO KELLY HERRITY Special Thanks The ELSA Board and the TDD Committee extend their warmest thanks to France Ponsart, head of Ecole Internationale Bilingue Victor Hugo School, for hosting the ELSA TDD. Support to the ELSA Teacher Development Day was provided by the Fondation Jeannine Manuel making it possible to invite speakers from the United States to present workshops specially designed for the conference. ELSA ANNUAL TEACHER DEVELOPMENT DAY PLENTY AT TWENTY Abstracts and Bios (subject to changes) ENGLISH STREAM 9:15­10:45 Yo Canterbury! (HS) This presentation will include a dynamic performance of poems from ​
Telling Tales ​
(Canongate 2014), my contemporary remix of ​
The Canterbury Tales and Chaucer’s original text. I will share insights into the creative process of rewriting a classical text inspired by a variety of art forms. After a Q&A, we will examine how this challenging and brilliant dramatic poem can be remixed in st​
the 21​
century classroom via creative writing and performance. 11:15­12:30 Poetic Taster (General) Food is a universal language that crosses cultural barriers. It gives us a comfort zone from which we can write about commonplace and complex issues. This tried and tasted workshop will explore a gustatory memory, enabling you to write a poem rich in sensory detail. It will give you simple tools to re­use with class groups of any age and ability. No poetry writing experience necessary! Patience Agbabi​
is an internationally respected poet, performer and Creative Writing Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She was born in London in 1965 to Nigerian parents. After spending her teenage years in North Wales, she studied English Language and Literature at Pembroke College, Oxford, and did her MA in Creative Writing, the Arts and Education at Sussex University. Since 1995 she has taught creative writing in secondary schools, libraries, youth clubs, prisons and several universities in the UK and abroad, holding lectureships at Greenwich, Sussex and Kent from 2002 to 2005. She has performed worldwide on British­Council­sponsored projects and is on the council of management for Arvon. Her four collections of poetry include ​
Transformatrix​
, which resulted in a nomination as one of the UK’s Next Generation Poets in 2004. Her latest collection is Telling Tales​
(Canongate, 2014), a contemporary remix of Chaucer​
’s Canterbury Tales. ​
Simon Armitage declares it ‘The liveliest versions of Chaucer you’re likely to read’. 13:30­14:45​
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The Changing Faces of Edgar Allan Poe: Literary Theory, Culture and The Fall of the House of Usher (General) This talk takes a historical look at different literary­critical approaches to Poe's work and the way that they have shaped our impressions of the writer and American literature more generally. I will discuss how feminist, biographical, structuralist, post­structuralist, and a variety of other "schools" of criticism have used Poe's work to make claims about the relationship of literature to politics. My case study will be ​
The Fall of the House of Usher ​
(1839). My aim is to expose how our critical approach to texts fundamentally shapes their meaning and the problem of considering literature through the lens of authorial intent. 15:15­16:30​
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"Beautiful, Radiant Things": Anarchism and Aestheticism in Late Nineteenth Century America (HS + school leavers) This talk concerns the response of American writers to leftwing terrorism in the late nineteenth century (specifically the Haymarket bombing in Chicago in 1886) and the way that literature was forced to adapt to new realities. I show how in response to anarchism and its threat to traditional ways of life, American writers began to engage in a more serious way with the legacies of French and British Aestheticism and Decadence (Baudelaire, Wilde, Pater). An element of my argument is that radical class politics fundamentally challenge the idea of national literary canons and problematise ideas of cultural borders. (Most suitable for school leavers.) Dr. Michael Collins ​
is a Lecturer in American Literature at The University of Kent, where he also serves as Deputy Director for The Centre for American Studies. Dr. Collins has published widely on topics related to nineteenth­ and early­twentieth­century American literature and culture and held a Leverhulme Early Career Fellowship at The University of Nottingham before joining Kent. His first monograph ​
A Multitude of Gaudy Appearances​
is forthcoming with The University of Michigan and considers the relationship between the antebellum short story and concepts of ritual and performance. He also works on the history of Anarchism and the relationship between anthropology and literature in the late nineteenth century. ENGLISH DRAMA STREAM Active approaches to teaching Shakespeare ​
for primary and secondary These exploratory training sessions will provide teachers with a range of new approaches and stimulating activities designed to support their in­class teaching. Focusing on a range of texts, the workshop will provide a practical demonstration of Globe Education’s practises appropriate at primary and secondary level. Reflection and next steps for teaching Shakespeare ​
for primary and secondary These exploratory training sessions will provide teachers with a range of new approaches and stimulating activities designed to support their in­class teaching. Focusing on a range of texts, the workshop will provide a practical demonstration of Globe Education’s practises appropriate at primary and secondary level. Fiona Drummond recently performed in Curious Directive’s play ​
The Kindness of Strangers ​
on tour. Other credits include; ​
Boxer Beetle​
at Rich Mix, ​
Happy Birthday Wanda June​
at the Old Red Lion, Theatre By The Lake summer season; ​
Noises Off, Hay Fever​
and ​
Keep Smiling Through​
and London Assurance​
at the National Theatre. Her work on devised and new writing include ​
Theatre Uncut​
at The Young Vic, ​
Unseen​
at the V&A Museum, ​
Syzygy​
at The Bush/Theatre 503, ​
And the act going home tonight is… ​
at Drywrite/Trafalgar Studios 2, as well as a number of readings and R&D sessions at the National Theatre studios. While training she played Viola in ​
Twelfth Night​
at Shakespeare’s Globe. Fiona has been a Globe Education Practitioner since 2007. She has lead workshops for all age groups from nursery to post graduate. Her work has included work with international students and teachers, students with Special Educational Needs, and the Globe Youth Theatre. She recently became a Learning Consultant for Globe Education. THINKING/ENGLISH STREAM 9:15 ­ 10:45 Making It Stick: Strategies for Effective Teaching and Learning (grades 6­12) One of the challenges every teacher faces is how to ensure not just that students learn, but that what they learn stays with them over time. Learning lost soon after it occurs is essentially worthless. Unfortunately, too much learning falls into this category. What teaching strategies and approaches to learning best result in enduring learning? How can we increase the possibility that what students learn from and with us actually “sticks?” This workshop will explore common misconceptions about teaching and learning (e.g. that underlining, highlighting and re­reading are effective ways to learn) along with alternative best practices that recent research has shown results in successful, effective, long­lasting learning. Participants can expect to come away with a number of research­based, effective teaching practices that lead to long­lasting learning. Robert DiYanni ​
is presenting two more sessions in the afternoon. Please see below for his biography. 11:15­12:30 Teaching Poetry to Teenagers (MS/HS) Teaching poetry seems to be a problematic area. There is evidence, certainly in England, of: • anxiety from both teachers and pupils when poetry is to be read; • a narrowing of pedagogical approaches as pupils get older; • a feature­logging tendency in writing about poetry. This presentation offers some recommendations for active approaches to poetry in the classroom. Examples of work appropriate to the age range 11 to 18 will be included. The presentation is based on work done with trainee and experienced teachers in England an overseas. See Warner, L. (2011) ‘Teaching poetry to teenagers’ in Lockwood, M. (ed.) Bringing Poetry Alive, London: Sage, 99­112. Lionel Warner​
was an English teacher in high schools for thirty years before moving to The University of Reading, where he works on three programmes that lead to Qualified Teacher Status. He has published work on teaching literature and the mentorship of trainees. He is a senior assessor in various roles with Cambridge Assessment. 13:30 ­ 14:45 Teaching Critical Thinking Through Literature: Inferences and Implications (grades 6­12) Literature offers fertile ground for helping students develop their capacity for critical thinking. Under the guidance of their teachers, students can learn to think critically about literature by means of thinking with and through literary works. In this workshop we will focus on making inferences based on careful observation of details in some short works of poetry and fiction. We will consider the implications of inferences based upon observations, and we will explore ways to extend and apply interpretive strategies centered on inference making by connecting literary understanding to life experience. 15:15 ­ 16:30 Ethical Thinking: Challenges and Dilemmas (grades 6­12) Introducing students to ethical thinking enhances their critical thinking skills. Through ethical challenge scenarios, students can be invited to consider differing values and perspectives, and to consider how their own values influence the ethical decisions they make. Through such scenarios, students also learn to identify and evaluate assumptions and to consider the implications and consequences of their decisions and actions. In this workshop we will explore a number of ethical scenarios that invite and require participants to examine each of these facets of decision­making. Participants will explore strategies for using these and other ethical scenarios to help their students develop their critical thinking capacities. Robert DiYanni​
is a professor of humanities and an instructional consultant at the Center for the Advancement of Teaching at New York University. In these capacities he teaches courses in literature, critical thinking, and interdisciplinary humanities, and he works with faculty throughout the university to improve their pedagogical practice. He has conducted workshops worldwide on teaching and learning, on critical and creative thinking, and on the teaching of literature and writing. He has also written and edited numerous books on these subjects. Recently published is his college text, ​
The Pearson Guide to Critical and Creative Thinking​
. Forthcoming in July 2015 is a book for teachers from Wiley­Blackwell: ​
Critical and Creative Thinking: A Brief Guide for Teachers. PRE­PRIMARY AND PRIMARY STREAM 9:15 – 10:45 Working in Dialogue with the Principles and Values of the Pre­Schools of Reggio Emilia: Environments, Materials and the 100 Languages of Children (ages 3­7) In this workshop, Debi will explore her perspective of the underlying theory and principles of the Infant Toddler Centres and Pre­Schools of Reggio Emilia. She will show examples of how the environment is considered as the ‘third teacher’, explore the concept of ‘intelligent materials’ and examine the ways in which these materials relate to Loris Malaguzzi’s idea of the ‘100 Languages of Children.’ Participants will be taken on a visual journey exploring the complex underlying the principles,values and practice of how what has come to be known as “The Reggio Approach”. Participants will gain a deeper understanding to enable them to reflect upon their own learning environments and materials used. 11:15 – 12:30 Developing Projects of Enquiry with Inspiration from the Pre­Schools of Reggio Emilia: Examples from Practice from UK Nursery Schools (ages 3­7) In this workshop, Debi will explore how a community of researching nursery schools in the UK have worked with the Reggio Emilia concept of ‘progettazione’. Debi will share a framework for thinking about projects of enquiry and illustrate it with documentaries and examples from practice that reveals methods for developing critical thinking and the expression of ideas through creative materials. Participants will gain knowledge of project working and ideas on using materials in the classroom to provoke and inspire thinking. Debi Keyte­Hartland ​
won the EECERA/Routledge Practitioner Research Award 2013 in Tallinn, Estonia for her paper entitled “Developing Children’s Critical Thinking Through Question and Dialogue: From The Recall of Knowledge to the Co­Construction of Knowledge”. Debi Keyte­Hartland is a passionate advocate for early childhood education illuminating what is possible if we value children as citizens of today. She is an international freelance consultant based in the UK working directly with teachers and senior leadership teams exploring approaches of education that create fertile conditions for deep thinking of both children and educators. Her specialist experience and interest is in the use of the visual arts as a tool for creative and critical thinking and in how these expressive visual languages can embrace values of active listening and co­construction of knowledge. She is also Co­Director of Sightlines Initiative, the UK reference point of Reggio Children. WEB ­​
debikeytehartland.me​
EMAIL – ​
[email protected]​
TWITTER ­ @debikeytehart 13:30 – 14:45 Science Enquiry in the Early Years (Ages 4­7) Young children are natural scientists and we need to foster their sense of curiosity by providing them with interesting and exciting science lessons that engage and stimulate discussion. This workshop aims to provide ideas and activities that can be used in school to develop the science enquiry skills at this early age. It will be a ‘hands on’ practical session with plenty of ideas to use back in school. Kate Blacklock’s​
teaching experiences have seen her work in the United Kingdom and abroad with roles that include Science Co­ordinator and Deputy Head. She worked as a Teacher Adviser for primary Science with Learning Excellence in Lancashire where she became a senior team leader. She has also held the role of Primary Development Leader with the North West Science Learning Centre, developing and delivering course programmes for National network of Science Learning Centres. She has extensive experience in the delivery of support services for science including courses, conferences and tailored in­school support across the country. Kate has presented at local, regional and national level providing creative ideas for use in a wide variety of educational settings. She is also an active member of the Association for Science Education. Kate has written several primary science curriculum materials for Key Stage 1 and 2 and is co­creator of the ‘Discovery Dog’, ‘Problem Pup’ and Science Enquiry Games materials for Early Years and Key Stage 1. 15:15 – 16:30 Introduction to Positive Discipline (Pre­Primary and Primary) How to engage and encourage students to help them develop a feeling of personal capability so they are active participants in their learning and socialization? The Positive Discipline approach of Jane Nelsen and Lynn Lott is a pragmatic approach which combines firmness and kindness. How do we motivate children to develop a sense of cooperation, responsibility, autonomy, effort and feeling of capability? How can we fully take advantage of an educational approach based on confidence and mutual respect? How can we develop in students the feeling of belonging and significance that gives them the motivation to invest themselves in their class and learning? In this introduction to Positive Discipline, Béatrice Sabaté, clinical psychologist and lead trainer of Positive Discipline, will present in an interactive manner, this Adlerian approach which is neither permissive nor punitive. She will explain the tools of encouragement that underlie the wish to succeed. The session will be given two times, one specifically directed to Middle and High school students; the other to Pre­primary and Primary students. Béatrice Sabaté ​
is a clinical psychologist as well as a Lead Trainer in “Positive Discipline”. She has had over 15 years of experience in the educational community in the United States where she put in place the Positive Discipline approach in schools such as the French American School of New York and the Lycée International Franco Americain de San Francisco. Having been greatly influenced by the Adlerian principles and Jane Nelsen in the U.S. she returned to France four years ago and is now developing the program here, adapting it to the French culture. She is the President of the Association Discipline Positive France and co­founder of Acteurs de lien where she leads parent groups, and trains teachers and other trainers in this approach. Beatrice has translated some of Jane Nelsen’s books into French, most recently “Discipline Positive pour les adolescents”, showing how to bring up children with firmness combined with kindness. [email protected] /​
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www.acteursdelien.com MOSTLY PRIMARY STREAM 9:15 – 10:45 Developing conceptual understanding in fractions – (Ages 5­9) Why do children find fractions difficult to understand and why do teachers find fractions difficult to teach? In this session we will explore practical, exciting resources, images and ideas that make understanding and manipulating fractions much easier ­ and more fun ­ for your children and develop their mathematical thinking in a fractions context. 11:15 – 12:30 Fun with Geometry (Ages 7­11) Geometry is about much more than descriptions of shapes. In this session we will be playing with ideas in circle geometry, cutting and folding to discover areas of shapes and exploring angles in practical, creative ways which will engage children’s interest as well as extending their understanding. Chris Crispus Jones ​
is an independent maths consultant based in Milton Keynes, England. She has many years of experience in developing mathematical thinking in schools and is renowned for her lively, thought provoking and creative work. She has written materials and led training at a national level and was Maths Lead for the Primary and Secondary teams for Central Bedfordshire. She now works in schools, assessing their needs and planning and delivering support to leaders, staff and parents. She also delivers Initial Teacher Training and MA level training for the Mathematics Specialist Teacher programme. Winner of the Best Overall Primary Maths resource in the 2009 TES/ATM competition, her ideas and resources are used by thousands of teachers. One school using her planning files across the school remarked, “we're really enjoying using your maths plans, seems much more fun for the children and stretches them more than we expect...every day!”​
[email protected] 13:30 ­ 14:45 ​
​
‘The soul never thinks without a picture’​
(Aristotle) Developing thinking through art based activities Often we're not aware of our thinking ­ it happens automatically ­ but if we take time to ponder what's going on then we can become more efficient and more creative with our minds. This session will provide practical examples of how to develop thinking skills through art based activities. Alison Pattinson ​
is the Primary Principal at the International School of Lyon, where she has been leading the IB Primary Years Programme for the past 7 years. She has been a classroom teacher in various age groups and is art teacher throughout the primary school. Prior to this Alison spent 14 years working in Primary Schools in the North West of England. In that time she taught the full primary age range from 3 – 11, held 3 Deputy Head Teacher posts, was a National Strategy Lead Teacher and Advisor, and was a Mentor for PGCE SCITT students. 15:15 – 16:30 ​
Creative Science Enquiry (Ages 7­11) Science is a highly creative subject and leading the children in developing a sense of excitement and curiosity can be a very rewarding (if noisy) experience. This workshop aims to provide a more creative look at the types of activities you can use to stimulate learning and foster a sense of wonder in older children in the Primary Years. You will leave with plenty of ideas to use back in you classroom as you try out some of the activities for yourself. Kate Blacklock’s​
teaching experiences have seen her work in the United Kingdom and abroad with roles that include Science Co­ordinator and Deputy Head. She worked as a Teacher Adviser for primary Science with Learning Excellence in Lancashire where she became a senior team leader. She has also held the role of Primary Development Leader with the North West Science Learning Centre, developing and delivering course programmes for National network of Science Learning Centres. She has extensive experience in the delivery of support services for science including courses, conferences and tailored in­school support across the country. Kate has presented at local, regional and national level providing creative ideas for use in a wide variety of educational settings. She is also an active member of the Association for Science Education. Kate has written several primary science curriculum materials for Key Stage 1 and 2 and is co­creator of the ‘Discovery Dog’, ‘Problem Pup’ and Science Enquiry Games materials for Early Years and Key Stage 1. LANGUAGE MATTERS STREAM 9:15­10:45 Fine Tune Your Writing Workshop (KG­Grade 6) If you’ve been experimenting with Writing Workshop and are wondering how you can fine­tune your practice then join Mollie for this practical, informative session. We will explore new ways to engage young writers by varying lesson formats between the standard mini­lesson and an inquiry­based model. We will analyze conferring strategies that ensure students walk away with a writing strategy that is easy to implement and replicate. And finally, we will review systematic ways to guide students to reflect on their published pieces in order to set goals for upcoming units. You will leave feeling eager to return to the classroom to implement these new tactics and watch the level of your students’ writing improve dramatically! 11:15­12:30 Close Reading in an Upper Grade Reading Workshop (grades 3­8) Do you ever wonder if your students are really reading? Sure, they’re no longer struggling to decode the words and they have a basic understanding of the text but are they reading in a way that sparks deep reflection, debate and a desire to read more? Too often, the answer is no. This session will provide you with strategies for helping your students look for subtle messages, social issues, and playfulness of words and conventions in order to find meaning that will help them see more clearly their lives and the lives of those around them. Making meaning in such a significant way will engage and sustain a reader throughout his lifetime­ and isn’t that the goal of reading instruction, after all? Mollie Cura ​
is an experienced literacy consultant with over a decade of work in public, private and international schools and educational organizations. While studying at Columbia University, Mollie worked closely with Lucy Calkins at the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project. She currently works with schools and organizations in New York, Washington D.C., Boston, London, Dublin and Paris to train teachers and help implement the workshop model. Mollie employs research­based, innovative ways to dramatically enhance students' abilities to read and write. More information on Mollie's work can be found at​
​
www.CuraLiteracyConsulting.com​
. 13:30­ 14:45 Voice Matters Vocal Fitness, Vocal Health, and Vocal Communication As a teacher, your voice is the principal reason why your students feel curious, inspired and encouraged. It is also a reason why they may become distracted, disengaged and bored ! Content is worthless if the student’s ear is switched off. In this 75­ minute session, I will teach you seven practical, easy to apply, and fun exercises to turbo charge your speaking voice and keep it flexible, strong and engaging. This is an enjoyable, interactive and practical session, vital for your vocal health. Join us to once and for all take control of your most valuable communication asset – your voice. Please wear flat shoes (or be prepared to take off high heels!). www.voicematters.com 15:15 ­ 16.30 Voice Matters: same session as above Poll Moussoulides is a master voice coach and personal performance specialist who has created and delivered learning modules for individuals and groups all over the world. Over the last twenty years, his skills have been employed to help thousands improve and optimise their vocal and physical habits, and feel more confident about how others perceive them. Born in Dublin, he left Ireland to train at the University of Kent at Canterbury and Eastern Michigan University, before returning to Ireland to coach as well as teach at various schools and institutes. In 2007, he established the Irish Voice Association, and is also a founding member of the Irish Film & Television Academy (IFTA). His clients have included several Oscar­winning actors, television presenters, CEOs of global corporations, legal teams, champion athletes, sales teams, call centres, national sports team coaches, teachers; and disadvantaged community groups. He has a special interest in the vocal health of teachers and in helping them to inspire their students to think, move and speak with confidence. CURRENT TRENDS I 9:15­10:45 Qualified Teacher Status AO OK? (General) This presentation is about Qualified Teacher Status (QTS): what it means, and how to acquire it. We will consider: ∙ the history and currency of QTS, and why it is not the same as PGCE ∙ the standards by which it is judged routes to QTS, with a focus on Assessment Only, a route which is available to teachers within and outside the UK ∙ some case studies. Lionel Warner​
was an English teacher in high schools for thirty years before moving to The University of Reading, where he works on three programmes that lead to Qualified Teacher Status. He has published work on teaching literature and the mentorship of trainees. He is a senior assessor in various roles with Cambridge Assessment. Bianca Pellet ​
came to France in 2008, initially working as a teaching assistant in a bilingual nursery school before taking up a post as an English teacher at EIB Paris ­ The Victor Hugo School. After working as an unqualified teacher for five years, she gained Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) via the Assessment Only (AO) route in summer 2014, thanks to the joint forces of Educators Abroad and the University of Reading. As teacher of English and humanities at EIB Paris, she also sits on several committees to help formulate school policy, is the head of Grade 10, and has run several extra­curricular activities and trips for the students that she teaches. Additionally, she has experience marking IGCSEs, O Levels and Checkpoint examinations for Cambridge International Examinations (CIE) and Edexcel. 11:15­12:30 Creativity and Critical Thinking (MS and HS) The word creativity is sometimes associated with a lack of seriousness, rigor, and “real” learning. However, research shows that creativity is not only inherently linked to critical thinking, but it is also quickly becoming one of the most sought­after qualities employers look for when hiring for positions in fields such as business, technology and science. This workshop aims at addressing several issues concerning the importance of creativity in the classroom. Considering the shifts in education paradigms brought about by the rapid changes in technological advancements within the last two decades is essential to this topic. Teachers are faced now with a new generation of learners for whom traditional instruction is not always relevant or effective. Indeed, the challenge lies in incorporating creativity in literary instruction, analysis and evaluation, and the ways in which this can be done to foster critical thinking skills. Therese Zanone ​
was born and raised in Colorado (USA) where she also obtained her bachelor’s degree in English Literature. During a school exchange to France, she met her husband and decided to return to Grenoble after completing her studies. She started working as an English teacher for adults in 2004. In 2006, she returned to the university where she obtained her master’s degree in American Literature. The same year, she started working as a middle school and high school English teacher at the American School of Grenoble. Two years later, she was selected for a position in the English section at the CSI (Cité Scolaire Internationale) in Grenoble. This same year she began her doctorate, focusing on the work of American author Steven Millhauser. Between 2006 and 2013, she worked full time at the CSI teaching almost every level imaginable while working on her thesis, which she completed in June of 2013. Today she is a very full­time teacher and responsible for a variety of classes both at the CSI and at the American School. 13:30­14:45 ­ Schools of Character (General) In this session, I will talk about the most recent work we have been doing with The Character Lab (​
www.characterlab.org​
) in researching and implementing strategies that develop character strengths or non­cognitive capacities in our children such as self­control, grit and optimism, and how to think of this work in light of the mission of our schools. 15:15­16:30 Schools of Character (General) (repeat session) Dominic Randolph became the sixth Head of Riverdale Country School in July 2007. Riverdale is a Pre­K­Grade 12 independent school in New York City of 1100 students. Previously, he served as Assistant Head Master at The Lawrenceville School and has worked in a variety of teaching and administrative roles in schools in Europe and the Middle East. His work has focused on curriculum development, understanding the implications of cognitive and technological advancements for learning, character development and positive psychology, interdisciplinary studies and design thinking. He is interested in how we can successfully create innovative and dynamic environments for students while preserving positive academic traditions. His work with KIPP and the University of Pennsylvania on character strength development was featured in the NYT article “​
What if the Secret to Success is Failure​
” by Paul Tough and in his recent book​
. This has led to the founding of the Character Lab in NYC­a non­profit sponsoring “translational research” on character strengths in schools. Riverdale has also sponsored and helped develop with IDEO a toolkit for educators on design thinking​
. He serves on the boards of The Lawrenceville School and the Guild of Independent Schools of New York City. CURRENT TRENDS II 9:15­10:45 ​
Practical Differentiation: Moving beyond all, most and some (MS and HS) Every classroom is a mixed ability classroom, inhabited by students who have a multitude of different learning needs. One of the most challenging aspects of teaching is ensuring that we are providing the right level of stretch and support for all. Differentiation is perhaps the most important thing we can do to ensure we reach each student, but what is effective differentiation? Learning for all? Success for all? Coping with difference? In this session we will explore what effective differentiation looks like, how differentiation can help us reach all learners, and how we can manage it without creating an unrealistic workload. As well as addressing these issues there will be a range of practical solutions to take away and use in your classroom. Emma Gregory is the Learning Communities Co­coordinator at The International School of Lyon, where she also teaches English Literature. She previously worked in London as a classroom teacher and English lead for middle school. She has been involved in the providing teacher training for the last three years through workshops, mentoring and cross school collaboration. She is passionate about teaching and learning, both in and beyond the classroom. 11:15­12:30 Free Technology for Teachers (MS and HS) There is so much free technology available on the web, but are you struggling to keep up with it? I will cover just over 50 of the best web tools out there and how you can use them in the classroom. In the session we will start by looking at the importance of sharing and suitable organisational tools available to teachers. We will then move on to look at cool free video / audio tools, as well as other presentation and interactive tools. I promise the tools I am going to present are not only really cool, but easy for you and the students to use and I hope you will be integrating several of the tools presented the following month at school. A website link will also be provided with the all the resources shown in the session, as well as video tutorials. Charlotte Lemaitre ​
has been teaching humanities as well as IB and A Level Geography at the British School of Brussels for 6 years. Previously she taught in the UK system as well as at Cité Scolaire Internationale de Lyon. She has always been passionate about IT and is constantly looking for effective ways to introduce it into her teaching. She has helped her department develop a detailed VLE and she has also written several ibooks for her IB classes. She is also on the school’s IT committee, as well as being responisble for helping to trial IPads in the Secondary school. More recently she has been given the responsibility of turning her school into a Fairtrade school. This transformation has been very successful with the school achieving two UK awards, as well as winning the best Fairtrade school in her region in Belgium. 13:30­14:45 Developing Resilient, Confident, and Independent Learners (MS and HS) Most of us acknowledge that didactic, lecture­style teaching fosters a culture of passivity in pupils, where pupils have come to expect to have learning “fed” to them – to be told the answers, rather than be taught the skills to discover the answers themselves, or even consider the possibility of alternative answers. What we need now is to feel confident that we can improve progress and performance – yes, in tests too – by using Talk­Less Teaching™ techniques which allow learning to go far deeper than it does when pupils are mostly passive recipients of their learning. This session provides a bank of exciting, engaging, practical ways to allow learners to access and understand complex topics and skills in a way which prevents them from being “passengers” in your lessons. Isabella Wallace ​
is co­author of the best­selling teaching guides, Pimp Your Lesson!: Prepare, Innovate, Motivate and Perfect”, and “Talk­Less Teaching: Practice, Participation and Progress”. She is an award­winning teacher and Advanced Skills Teacher, consultant and contributor for the Oxford Dictionary of Education and she presents nationally and internationally on outstanding learning and teaching. She has worked at Senior Curriculum and School Governance levels, and having experienced both sides of the lesson observation process, she knows exactly what’s needed to make a lesson outstanding. 15:15­16:30 Fairtrade Schools (MS and HS) In this session I will explain how we introduced this idea at the British school of Brussels and how we got the students / teachers on board with the idea. I will share activities, leaflets and events that we carried out in our school and the local community. Finally I will highlight awards you can aim to achieve, as well as the benefits it can provide for your school, such as excellent student leadership. The British School of Brussels in 2014 achieved the UK Fairtrade Foundation FairActive award, as well as winning the best Fairtrade school in our region in Belgium 2014. Charlotte Lemaitre ​
has been teaching humanities as well as IB and A Level Geography at the British School of Brussels for 6 years. Previously she taught in the UK system as well as at Cité Scolaire Internationale de Lyon. She has always been passionate about IT and is constantly looking for effective ways to introduce it into her teaching. She has helped her department develop a detailed VLE and she has also written several ibooks for her IB classes. She is also on the school’s IT committee, as well as being responisble for helping to trial IPads in the Secondary school. More recently she has been given the responsibility of turning her school into a Fairtrade school. This transformation has been very successful with the school achieving two UK awards, as well as winning the best Fairtrade school in her region in Belgium. WELL­BEING 9:15­10:45 Counseling Techniques Is counseling a simple conversation between a student and his counselor? The goal of this workshop is to explain that counseling is anything but a simple discussion and to clearly identify the role of a counselor within a school. Anthony will explain the basic conditions to establish in counseling that lead to a strong and productive rapport between the counselor and student. Anthony will also define and explain some key fundamental counseling techniques that can be utilized with middle and high school level students in identifying the problem and setting goals, always keeping in mind that change is at the focal point. Participants will also learn about ethical guidelines to follow such as confidentiality and when to break that privilege with a student. Anthony is conducting this workshop in hopes of leaving you with some techniques and strategies that you will be able to apply in your next counseling session.
Originally from New York, ​
Anthony Suzzi­Valli ​
has been practicing school counseling since 2004. He has his Master’s Degree in school counseling from Queens College and he has his permanent counseling certification from the New York State Department of Education. He worked as a guidance counselor at the Herricks Middle School in New York from 2004­2007. In 2008, Anthony began working in Paris in the Anglophone Section at L’Institut de la Tour as an American History and EAL teacher. At the L’Institut de la Tour he founded the middle school counseling program. He is currently working as the middle school counselor at the American School of Paris. 11:15­12:30 13:30 – 14:45 ​
Introduction to Positive Discipline (MS and HS) The Positive Discipline approach of Jane Nelsen and Lynn Lott is a pragmatic approach which combines firmness and kindness. How do we motivate children to develop a sense of cooperation, responsibility, autonomy, effort and feeling of capability? How can we fully take advantage of an educational approach based on confidence and mutual respect? How can we develop in students the feeling of belonging and significance which gives them the motivation to invest themselves in their class and learning? In this introduction to Positive Discipline, Béatrice Sabaté, clinical psychologist and lead trainer of Positive Discipline, will present in an interactive manner, this Adlerian approach which is neither permissive nor punitive. She will explain the tools of encouragement which underlie the wish to succeed. The session will be given two times, one specifically directed to Middle and High school students; the other to Pre­primary and Primary students. Béatrice Sabaté​
is a clinical psychologist as well as a Lead Trainer in “Positive Discipline”. She has had over 15 years of experience in the educational community in the United States where she put in place the Positive Discipline approach in schools such as the French American School of New York and the Lycée International Franco Americain de San Francisco. Having been greatly influenced by the Adlerian principles and Jane Nelsen in the U.S. she returned to France four years ago and is now developing the program here, adapting it to the French culture. She is the President of the Association Discipline Positive France and co­founder of Acteurs de lien where she leads parent groups, and trains teachers and other trainers in this approach. Beatrice has translated some of Jane Nelsen’s books into French, most recently ” Discipline Positive pour les adolescents”, showing how to bring up children with firmness combined with kindness. [email protected] /​
www.acteursdelien.com 15:15­16:30 Starting the School Day Right using the “Morning Meeting” The start of the school day is very important. The “​
Morning Meeting​
” has a calming influence whether or not you have an Advisory Program. It is a structure students learn to rely on first thing, and it allows students to share any difficult situations that may have come up at school or at home. I​
t is ​
a time for students to talk within the group about themselves, their relationships, the values that are important to them, their leadership role in the school, and issues within the group as well as talk about current events, plan for upcoming trips, and play group­building games. Teachers create stronger relationships with their students and observe an increase in students' readiness for the day, stronger peer relationships, a decrease in tardiness to class and an increase in student leadership skills. This is an interactive session where teachers will go home with a template and lots of ideas and easily accessible resources to immediately get their own Advisory/Morning Meeting structure in place. Fay Hutchinson teaches Middle School Science at the American School of Paris. HISTORY STREAM 9:15­10:45 ​
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HISTORY, INTER­DISCIPLINARITY, GLOBAL DIALOGUE, and UNESCO’s Memory of the World programme I Delegates can attend one or both sessions. For 20 years, UNESCO’s Memory of the World register, a sister project of the World heritage programme has been inscribing archives of an unequalled richness and universal value which offer teachers and students enormous potential for the future of their education. These sessions will introduce the UNESCO Memory of the World programme, provide an idea of the many riches which this register contains, then outline UNESCO and its partner’s project of ensuring this material is brought into contact with the living memories of school children and school teachers around the world, with an aim to providing the most stimulating, pedagogically and technologically up to date lessons, activities and curricula, fit for an ever evolving globalising world consciousness. Session I​
will introduce Memory of the World including a discussion about the programme, the virtues, the envisioned problems, as well as the administration of taking addresses of potential partners. Delegates will then be shown some examples of how it can use used in school curricula including IGCSE and IB from PYP to IBDP. Delegates will be presented with a series of sources and information and asked to examine specific items from the register with a view to creating a range of activities and lessons which will then be shared and reflected upon. The interdisciplinary approach will be focused primarily on the subject of history. 11:15­12:30 HISTORY, INTER­DISCIPLINARITY, GLOBAL DIALOGUE, and UNESCO’s Memory of the World programme II Session II​
is a more practical extension of session I at which delegates use their own experience, ideas and pedagocial creativity to interact with previously unseen sources and come up with lesson plans, activities and ideas for units of inquiry. Participants are not required to have attended session I. DR. MARTIN PORTER was born and educated in Liverpool, he obtained a First Class Honours degree in Medieval and Modern History at UCL. He began his MA/Doctorate in 1990 as a Frank Knox Fellow at Harvard then went to EHESS in Paris as a Leverhulme Fellow, before completing his doctorat at Oxford University. A former College Lecturer at Oxford University, and Honorary Research Fellow of the Wellcome Institute, he left England to take up a Jean Monnet Fellowship followed by a Visiting Fellowship at the EUI in Florence, before becoming a Senior Researcher at Centre for Advanced Studies in the Humanities in the University of Copenhagen. In 2004 he left academia and joined International School of Lyon as a part­time History/TOK teacher. He is also a part­time lecturer at IEP (Sciences­Po) in Lyon. Besides having worked on a variety of films and television and musical projects, the last few years have seen him working on numerous theatre projects with a variety of professional theatre companies. A former acting Principle Examiner for the IBO, he is currently a member of UNESCO’s IAC Committee on Education and Research, for the Memory of the World Project. 13:30­14:45 A Picture Is Worth A Thousand Words (HS) Artists have always been key recorders of historical events. Not only the factual event but the deeper feeling inspired by historical events. In order to understand history one needs to recreate the era. The study of paintings does this. Visuals also help a student retain an historical event. As they retain the memory of a picture and it's events they better understand historical events on a larger scale. This session discusses ways to use art visuals as a starting point for the discussion of historical events. Students learn to look and understand why artists chose subject matter and how the study of art links to all realms of study: science,economy, politics, religion. How a painting can show multiple sides to an historical event involving many aspects of society. During the session Elizabeth will work from specific examples of historical paintings. Elizabeth Lefevre is an Upper School Art teacher at the American School of Paris where she teaches ​
studio art , decorative art, ceramics, sculpture, and art history​
. ​
She also manages the art gallery at ASP organizing and hanging art expositions by international artists.​
Elizabeth holds a ​
BA from the American University of Paris, Hobart William College and Hamilton College and has studied Beaux Arts in Tournai, Belgium , the Slade and Hamstead Art School in London and the New York Art Student League and Silvermine in the US. 15:15­16:30 Getting through all that content without over­using teacher­talk (HS) How do we make sure that progress is clearly visible to teacher and pupils in one lesson? It’s difficult to assess the impact of our teaching and the progress of our learners if we allow lessons to be dominated by the sound of our own voice. This session focuses on how to monitor and celebrate visible progress, as well as how to cover large amounts of content without resorting to “administering it aurally”! ● Ascertaining a clear starting point from which progress can be measured ●​
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Clever questioning techniques ●​
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Activities designed to cover large amounts of content in a fun and exciting way ●​
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Strategies that make progress highly visible to all ●​
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Planning lessons in a way that maximises rapid progress ●​
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Techniques for checking and building on understanding quickly and efficiently ●​
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Ensuring that your pupils work harder than you do! Isabella Wallace ​
is co­author of the best­selling teaching guides, Pimp Your Lesson!: Prepare, Innovate, Motivate and Perfect”, and “Talk­Less Teaching: Practice, Participation and Progress”. She is an award­winning teacher and Advanced Skills Teacher, consultant and contributor for the Oxford Dictionary of Education and she presents nationally and internationally on outstanding learning and teaching. She has worked at Senior Curriculum and School Governance levels, and having experienced both sides of the lesson observation process, she knows exactly what’s needed to make a lesson outstanding. INTER­SCHOOL INITIATIVES 9:15­10:45 Librarians’ Round Table Jennifer Elliot 11:15­12:30 ELSA Challenge Quiz and ELSA Spelling Bee Edward Boucher 13:30­14:45 ELSA Poetry by Heart 2015 Poetry by Heart​
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http://www.poetrybyheart.org.uk/​
is a poetry competition that has been running nationally in the UK for several years. In 2015, ELSA is bringing Poetry by Heart to France! Students are challenged to memorize and recite several poems. The competition is designed for students to "​
​
foster deep personal connections with the poems chosen and bring poetry alive for their friends, families and communities". ​
Come to this session to discover how you and your students can get involved in this fun and enriching event in the future. Jennifer Elliot Le Clainche ​
is the Head Librarian in the secondary school at Ecole Jeannine Manuel in Paris. She is organising the ELSA Poetry by Heart competition for 2015. Ecole Jeannine Manuel library website: ​
http://libguides.ecolejeanninemanuel.org twitter:​
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https://twitter.com/ecolejmlibrary [email protected]