Student Bulletin - LaGuardiaHS.org

#BlackHistoryMonth
LaGuardia Arts
Weekly Bulletin
Dr. Mars, Principal
February 9 - 13, 2015
Respect For All
Each student and staff member brings to the New
York City public school community the richness of our
City’s cultural diversity and the desire for respect.
February 2, 2015
Dear Parent,
We are writing to inform you that February 9 through February 13, 2015 is Respect For All Week in all New York City
public schools. Bullying, including cyberbullying, intimidation, and bias-based harassment have no place in our schools or
communities, and we all need to work together to address this issue. For this important initiative, the Department of
Education is working in collaboration with the New York City Council, United Federation of Teachers (UFT), Council of
School Supervisors and Administrators (CSA), and other community partners to raise awareness about diversity and to
promote respect for one another.
It is the DOE’s policy to maintain a safe and supportive learning environment that is free from bullying and bias-based
harassment, intimidation, and/or bullying on the basis of race, color, creed, ethnicity, national origin,
citizenship/immigration status, religion, gender, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, weight or
disability. The Citywide Standards of Intervention and Discipline Measures and Chancellor’s Regulations A-830, A-831
and A-832 address these issues.
Respect For All Week is designed to continue the focus on the importance of promoting respect for diversity and creating
inclusive school climates so that all students and other members of the school community feel safe and respected. To date,
several thousand teachers, parent coordinators, and other staff have received Respect For All training. Brochures have
been distributed to all students, and schools have designated one or more Respect For All Liaisons who are identified on
posters displayed in the school.
All of us grapple with issues of respect every day. Teaching children to respect others is a shared responsibility. During
this week, we ask each of you to reinforce the Respect For All message that students will be hearing in school. If
you have questions regarding Respect For All Week, feel free to contact your school’s principal or Respect For All
Liaison, or email [email protected]
Thank you for your continued support of your child’s education. Please know that the DOE, City Council, UFT and CSA
are united in our commitment to promoting respect for diversity and fostering inclusive learning environments for all
students, and that we will do all we can to help make Respect For All Week a success.
Sincerely,
Carmen Fariña, Chancellor
Department of Education
Melissa Mark-Viverito, Speaker
New York City Council
Michael Mulgrew, President
United Federation of Teachers
Ernest Logan, President
Council of School Supervisors and Administrators
LaGuardia Arts and the NYC DOE is committed
to maintaining a safe and supportive learning
environment that is free from harassment,
intimidation and/or bullying and from discrimination
based on actual or perceived race, color, citizen-ship/
immigration status, religion, creed, national origin,
disability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, gender
expression, sexual orientation, or weight.
If a student (or their parent) feels the student is a
victim of harassment, intimidation, bullying and/or
discrimination, please contact the school immediately.
Our Respect For All liaison is Mr. Brummel, but a
report can also be made to Mr. Sommers, Assistant
Principal, or any staff member.
The DOE has some excellent materials for families.
Please
visit:
http://schools.nyc.gov/RulesPolicies/
RespectforAll/StudentResources/Helpful+Resources/default.htm
February
Daniel Dromm, Chair
New York City Council Education Committee
Class of 2016
Programming Assembly
Monday, February 9; 3:10 PM - 4:10 PM
While Monday is a Conference Day where
teachers will receive Professional Development
in the afternoon, Juniors are expected to
attend the Programming Assembly from
3:10 PM - 4:10 PM in the Concert Hall.
It takes approximately 6-7 months to ensure
that our school is properly programmed for
Fall 2015. The Programming Assembly will
discuss graduation requirements, choosing
courses with an eye to your college application,
and procedures to have students accurately
register for their courses in Daedalus.
Imp
The Programming Assembly for
ant the Classes of 2017 & 2018 will
be on Monday, February 23;
3:10 PM - 4:10 PM; Concert Hall
7
Sat
Rising Stars: The Pursuit of Happiness;
7:30 PM; Concert Hall; Tickets $20
8
Sun
Rising Stars: The Pursuit of Happiness;
5:00 PM; Concert Hall; Tickets $20
Conference Schedule
9
M
Class of 2016 Programming Assembly;
3:10 PM - 4:10 PM (Required)
Athletic Physicals for Spring Sports;
appointments required.
Respect For All Week Begins
10
T
Lock Down Drill; Period 5
PM School Begins
Advanced Placement Fair;
Lunch Periods; 7th Floor Dining Hall
Safe Dates Group; Lunch Periods;
Room 323C
11
W
TEDx­ 4:30 PM; Little Flower Theater;
$10/students; $20/adults
La! Lecture Series: Lukas Valin;
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM; Library
ort
Academic Forum; 6:30 PM
12
Th
Attendance Meeting; Period 5
Safety Meeting; Period 6
Gospel Blackout;
Preview Assemblies Periods 3 and 4
Senior Dues Deadline without penalty
TOC
Schedule
Teacher Preference Sheets Due
13
F
Last Day to Submit Teacher Surveys
Gospel Choir Concert; 7:30 PM;
Concert Hall
Newsworthy
1
9
M
Conference
Building Community
2
10
T
Regular
Administrative
3
11
W
Regular
16
M
Midwinter Recess Begins
Instructional
5
12
Th
Regular
College & Careers
6
13
F
Regular
20
F
Daedalus Opens for 2015 - 2016
Programming
23
M
www.LaGuardiaHS.org
School Resumes; Conference Schedule
Classes of 2017 & 2018 Programming
Assembly; 3:10 PM - 4:10 PM
Building Community
Box Office
TEDx
Wednesday, February 11 at 4:30 PM
TEDX is an independent, fully sanctioned Ted Talks.
Our topic is taking what you are passionate about and
using it to transform your community
Tickets: $10/Student; $20/Adult
Tickets available through our website or
the School Store.
G os pe l C hoir C once rt
Tickets available through our website or the school
store. Tickets are no longer available online 3 days
before the performance; then, tickets can only
be purchased in advance from the School Store.
Children under the age of 5 are not permitted.
B l ac k His tory C a ba re t
Friday, February 27 at 7:30 PM
Tickets: $15/Advance; $20/Box Office
Tickets available through our website or the school
store. Tickets are no longer available online 3 days
before the performance; then, tickets can only
be purchased in advance from the School Store.
Children under the age of 5 are not permitted.
S we e n e y Todd; T he De mon
Ba r b e r of Fle e t Stre e t
La! Lecture Series Continues on February 11
Urban Air Quality and Pollution Scientist Dr. Lukas
Valin from Columbia University’s Earth Institute will
be our next guest at the La! Lecture Series. The
event will take place on February 11, 5:00 PM - 7:00
PM, in the Library. All are welcome.
March 27 - 29, 2015
Tickets available through our website beginning
February 9 at 12:01 AM.
Safe Dates Group Meets on Wednesdays
Dating someone can be incredibly right or go horribly
wrong. Join others in Room 323C every Wednesday
during lunch periods and discuss experiences and
concerns. Also, students learn tips for dating and
keeping themselves safe. The group is run by Ms.
Carela, our SAPIS, who students can also speak to
regarding healthy living, drug & alcohol use, body
image issues, and other individual concerns.
The Pursuit of
Happiness-CAM
Rising Stars 2015
Respect For All Liaison: Mr. Brummell, located in the Deans Office
Friday, February 13 at 7:30 PM
Tickets: $15/Advance; $20/Box Office
Peer Leaders
Peer Leaders are students who give evidence of
interpersonal and intellectual skills, as well as have
the ability to communicate effectively to large and
small groups of people, can motivate others, and
exhibit appropriate dedication to academic and drug
free life. For additional information, please contact
Ms. Carela, SAPIS, in Room 323C. To download
the application, please visit: http://laguardiahs.
org/?p=5414
Start Saving for Project Cicero Book Drive
Project Cicero collects new and gently used books
so that underserved schools can have classroom
libraries. The book drive is March 2 - March 5. Bring
books to the Guidance Suite. For more information,
visit www.projectcicero.org.
2
Administrative
Athletic Physicals
The Team Doctor will be here on
February 9 to provide no-cost
medicals for students wishing to
participate in Spring Sports. You
should go to the Boys PE office
to set your appointment now.
Prepare for Lock Down
Teachers are asked to ensure
all classroom phones and door
locks are working. Staff are
to report any problems to Mr.
Sommers. Also, please remind
students of their responsibilities
during such a drill.
When Building Permits are
Needed
A reminder to staff that you
must file a building permit
request if you are going to be
in the building after 4:15 PM
with students for any activity,
including
rehearsals
and
tutoring. A permit in on file for
club to meet until 6:30 PM.
Teachers who are working after
school should a) let Mr. Shin,
After School Administrator in
Charge, know where you will be
working, and b) exit the building
no later than 7:30 PM.
When school is not in session,
such as on weekends and
holidays, permits need to be
filed. Please allow two weeks
turnaround from submission to
approval.
Such requests are
handled in room 237. For more
information, see Ms. Fogel.
Fundraising for Clubs and
Teams
Clubs and teams wishing to raise
funds, either through selling
items or soliciting donations,
must follow certain guidelines.
To
discuss
the
paperwork
and the process necessary to
receive approval, please see Mr.
Sommers, in Room 229.
Senior Dues
Payment of Senior Dues is
mandatory. The full amount
of $240 must be paid by
Friday, February 13, 2015.
Any Senior Dues paid after
this date is subject to a late
fee. Dues include Graduation,
Caps and Gowns, Yearbook,
Senior Luncheon, Miscellaneous
Expenses
Associated
with
the Class of 2015, and the
production of Senior and Studio
Awards. Financial Assistance is
available. See the November
24, 2014, Weekly Bulletin for
the complete Senior News.
Staying on the path to Graduation
In addition to being currently enrolled in credit bearing classes,
students who are still
missing one or more required
course(s) will not graduate on time without attending
Summer School and/or PM School.
PM School Begins this Week
Students have already been programmed for PM for classes not
previously passed, and the courses already appear on student
schedules. PM School begins Tuesday, February 10, from 4:15
PM - 6:15 PM. Students who should plan on Summer School already have
a Period 13 code stating, “Off Track (subject).” For more
information, please speak to the student’s Guidance Counselor.
Is your housing uncertain?
Do you live at a temporary
address?
If your family — or a family you
know — is living in ANY of the
following situations...
Housing that is not Fixed,
Regular, AND Adequate;
• A shelter, emergency or
transitional housing;
• Sharing housing due to loss of
housing or economic hardship;
• In a motel, hotel, trailer park,
or camping grounds due to
lack of other housing;
•
•
The Role of Students and Staff in a Soft
Lock-down
Our next lock-down drill will take place
on February 10, Period 5. Below are the
procedures to be followed:
•
•
•
•
...your children have important
educational rights under the
McKinney-Vento Act, a federal law.
For information about your
educational rights, resources, and
assistance, please see Dr. StricklinWitherspoon.
In a car, park, public space,
Emergency
Readiness
What is a Soft LockDown?
•
abandoned building, or bus or
train station;
• Awaiting foster care
placement; or
• In any of the above housing
arrangements and are eligible
for the Migrant Education
Program
A soft lockdown is when there is a
potential threat or hazard inside the
building, but there is no identified
imminent danger to those assigned
to do a building sweep.
A soft lockdown will begin with the
PA announcement: “This is a drill.
Attention, this is a soft lockdown
drill.
Take proper action. This
announcement will be repeated.
Upon hearing the announcement, all
BRT members (except for Assembly
Point Coordinators) will report to the
Command Post, as well as the Nurse,
the Custodian and an SSA.
The floor wardens on each floor will
contact the Command Post at x3208
for further directions.
All students out in hallways and
bathrooms should immediately go to
the nearest cafeteria, classroom, or
3
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
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office.
All other staff members in rooms,
offices or cafeterias will quickly
retrieve anyone out in the hallways
or in restrooms near their rooms or
offices and bring these individuals
inside.
Lock the doors and do not allow
anyone in or out for any reason.
Make sure everyone in the room
remains silent and quickly move to
the middle of the room, out of sight
and away from the door. The door
pane should not be covered.
Turn the lights out.
Do not open the door for any reason,
if you hear the end of period signal
or even if you hear fire gongs or
someone banging on the door saying
they are first responders.
After conferring with the Command
Center, School Safety and all Floor
Wardens will begin a sweep of the
building.
When the sweep teams indicate that
the threat no longer exists, they
will notify the Command Center and
bring any student out in the hallways
to the Dean’s Office.
At that point an announcement will
be made. Do not open your door for
any reason until you hear the PA
announcement “The soft lock-down
has now been lifted”
Administrative
Bring Your Own Device Policy — DRAFT
In anticipation of the NYCOE approving a policy allowing for students to bring cell phones to school,
LaGuardia Arts decided to update our current Bring Your Own Device Policy (BYOD), currently found on
page 39 in the Student Handbook, to allow for cell phones.
Once the DOE approves their policy, the LaGuardia Arts policy will be decided by our School Leadership
Team. Various stakeholder groups — the PA Executive Board, the Student Government Organization, a
panel of teachers, teacher teams and administrators — have already provided input into the development
of our policy below. While the policy is still in draft form, all stakeholders have the opportunity to review
the policy and address concerns to their respective representatives.
Bring Your Own Device Policy
(BYOD) DRAFT – 1/30/2015
Any student who wishes to use
a personally owned electronic
device within LaGuardia Arts
must abide by the policy
listed below. For the purposes
of BYOD, “Device” means a
privately owned wireless and/
or portable electronic piece of
equipment that includes but is
not limited to laptops, netbooks,
tablets/slates, smart-watches,
MP3 players, and cell phones.
• The student takes full
responsibility for his or her
device and keeps it with
him or her at all times. The
school is not responsible for
the security of the device.
• The student is responsible
for the proper care of
their personal device,
including any costs of
repair, replacement or any
modifications needed to use
the device at school.
• Personal devices are to be
charged prior to bringing it to
school and must be capable
of running off its own battery
while at school.
• All devices must be turned
off, and not in use in
hallways, escalator bays,
and stairwells during passing
periods. Devices should
never be used in bathrooms
and locker rooms.
• The student must comply
with staff members’ requests
to shut down, close, or have
the device out-of-sight.
• The student may not use the
devices to record, transmit
or post photos or video of
a person or persons neither
on campus nor at LaGuardia
Arts. Nor can any image,
audio or video recording
at school be transmitted
or posted at any time
without the express written
permission of a teacher.
Teachers give tacit consent to
recording only for a student’s
individual use as detailed in a
student’s IEP.
• The student should only
use their device to access
relevant files. Headphone
usage is subject to teacher
permission and supervision.
• All ringers, ringtones or noise
generating aspects of the
device must be turned off at
all times in the building.
• Cell phones and other
recording devices
are prohibited during
examinations, in restrooms,
locker rooms, and during
internal emergency
preparedness drills and
exercises.
• The school reserves the
right to inspect a student’s
personal device if there is
reason to believe that the
student has violated NYC
Department of Education
Policies or LaGuardia Arts
policies, administrative
procedures, school rules
or has engaged in other
misconduct while using their
personal device.
• Violations of any policies,
administrative procedures
or school rules involving a
student’s personally owned
device may result in the loss
of use of the device in school
and/or disciplinary action.
Disciplinary action will be
progressive in nature.
• warning
• confiscation of item and
return at end of school day
• confiscation of item and
return following parent
conference
• confiscation of item and
return following student
entering into behavioral
contract
• revocation of privilege to
bring item to school
• The student agrees to
abide by the DOE’s Internet
Acceptable Use and Safety
Policy (IAUSP).
• The use of any electronic
device is a privilege and may
be revoked for cause.
• This policy is intended to be
consistent with the DOE’s
Discipline Code.
LaGuardia Arts believes in
creating a safe environment for
all, artistically, intellectually, and
psychologically, and any act that
infringes on a student’s right to
a safe learning environment,
such as bullying, harassment,
or inappropriate use of an
electronic device will be
subject to discipline within the
boundaries of the DOE discipline
code.
(rev. 2/2015)
At LaGuardia Arts, we feel that our BYOD policy adequately addresses the needs and concerns of all
stakeholders. We developed our policy on the concept of respect — we respect others’ decisions whether
or not to be recorded; we respect others’ right to attend class without distractions; and we respect our
school when we behave appropriately by following rules and instructions. In return, respect is returned
by helping students achieve the social, academic, and life skills necessary to be college and career ready.
4
Administrative
Students
AP Students: Share Your Experiences at Fair
We encourage current AP students to
come to our AP Fair in the seventh-floor cafeteria
on Wednesday, February 11. You will have the
opportunity to speak to prospective Advanced
Placement students about the rigor and reward
associated with an AP class at LaGuardia Arts High
School. Thank you!
LaGuardia’s
AP Fair
When: Wednesday, February 11
Where: Seventh-floor Cafeteria
Teachers
Updates to Advance
MOTP - By now, each teacher must have a
minimum of 2 observations signed and returned.
MOSL - Teachers are encouraged to log on to
Stars Classroom to verify rosters for Spring
Semester
All interested ninth, tenth, and eleventh grade
students are invited to LaGuardia’s AP Fair on
Wednesday, February 11, in the seventh-floor
cafeteria. Students will have the chance to learn
about the opportunities and challenges presented by
our school’s AP courses, speak with current AP students and teachers, review course offerings, and ask
questions.
Arts Teachers - Please review goal setting to
ensure accuracy.
LaGuardia Selected to Participate in NAEP Assessment
We are pleased to notify you that LaGuardia
High School has been selected to represent schools
across the nation by participating in the National
Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). First
administered in 1969, NAEP is the largest nationally
representative and continuing assessment of
what students know and can do in various subject
areas. It is administered by the National Center for
Education Statistics, within the U.S. Department of
Education. NAEP is different from state assessments
because it provides a common measure of student
achievement across the country. The results
of NAEP are released as The Nation's Report
Card, which provides information about student
achievement to educators, parents, policymakers,
and the public.
selected to take a mathematics, reading, or
science pilot assessment on a tablet. In addition
to answering questions in one of these subjects,
students will be asked questions about themselves
and their educational experiences, such as
the amount of reading they do and the types
of classes they take. These questions provide
contextual information for the assessment, as well
as information that may be related to students’
learning. If you would like to view sample subject
area and contextual questions, please visit
http://nationsreportcard.gov/parents.asp.
Teachers will be notified prior to the exam of the
names of students participating in the exam. If you
have any questions, please email Ms. van Keulen at
[email protected]
In our school, the NAEP assessment will be
given on February 26, 2015. Fifty seniors were
Vacation Assignments
Many in the La! community are unavailable to
complete class assignments over a vacation period.
Teachers wishing to assign work over a vacation
should make the assignment “non-location specific”
so that a student can complete the assignment
anywhere in the world. For example, a student
traveling to Mexico cannot be expected to visit a
specific MoMa exhibit. In addition, assignments
should be given no later than 3 days prior to the
beginning of the break and can be due no sooner
than 3 days after the students return.
Setting Up Your Gradebook
Juniors and the March SATs
Mid-Winter Recess is perfect for Juniors to study
for the March SAT exams. Please remember that
the earlier you register for the exam, the closer to
home your testing location will be. It is suggested
for Juniors to take the March SAT Exam if they are
taking the AP Exams in May and the SAT Subject
Test(s) in June.
1) Click on Settings->Course Categories.
2) Click on “Use Weighted Categories.”
3) Enter departmental grade categories.
4) Enter departmental category weights.
5) You may check “Drop Lowest Grade.”
6) Click on “Save To...” and select your classes.
7) Please note that we are only setting up
one marking period in Skedula during the
second semester. Thank you.
5
Instructional
Part 7 in a series of 9
Universal Design of Learning
We are continuing to explore
ways to address different
learners and to reduce barriers
to learning by talking about
the UDL practice of Providing
Options for Recruiting Interest
(part of Principle 3: Provide
Multiple Means of Engagement).
Students differ dramatically in
levels of motivation and kinds of
educational settings that engage
them intellectually. There is no
one means of engagement that
is optimal for all students and
for all subjects. Some students
like learning alone and like being
taught through independent
study and introspection. Some
other students like learning in
groups and they understand
better when they interact with
other students. Such students
like best to be taught through
group activities, seminars, and
discussions.
How will this look in the
classroom?
Students should be provided with
as much choice as possible in
how the learning objectives can
be reached and in the tools and
supports available to all students.
Offering such choices can develop
self-determination, pride in
accomplishment, and increase the
degree to which the students feel
connected to their learning.
Some strategies are:
• The context and content used
for practicing and assessing
skills should be varied within
a marking period
• Students should be provided
a variety of tools to gather
information and create an end
product that allows them to
Conferences: There are many types of conferences including
reading, writing, goal-setting, evaluation, and coaching. The
major purposes are to collaborate, assess, and guide.
Cooperative Learning Activities: Cooperative learning involves
students working together in groups (often following a
teacher presented lesson), with group goals and individual
accountability. Critical to the process are two factors:
showcase their learning
• Use a variety of types of
rewards (using a token
or point system, whereby
children earn points that
accumulate toward a bigger
prize such as gift certificates,
tickets to sport events or
school’s shows, recognitions
(on a bulletin board, in the
school newsletter, during
the announcements) and
privileges ( going first,
choosing a class activity,
teaching a class, designing a
bulletin board )
• Involve students when
possible in setting their
own personal academic and
behavioral goals (next week’s
UDL focus)
• Using different types of
assessments
Self-Evaluations: A key concept in alternative assessment
is having the student learn to recognize his/her own progress
by taking the time to reflect. Those who are able to review
their own performance, explain the reasons for choosing the
processes they used, and identify the next step, develop
insight and self-involvement.
(Information from http://www.rmcdenver.com/useguide/
assessme/definiti.htm?)
1. how to help another student without giving the answer;
and
2. how to work together toward a common goal.
Products in a math classroom: Assessment that enhances
mathematics learning as an integral part of instruction
encourages and supports student learning. Opportunities for
informal assessment occur naturally in every lesson. They
include listening to students, observing them, and making
sense of what they say and do. In planning lessons and
making instructional decisions, teachers identify opportunities
for a variety of assessments. Questions like the following
become a regular part of the teacher’s planning: “What
questions will I ask?” “What will I observe?” “What activities
are likely to provide me with information about students’
learning?” Evidence of mathematics learning can be found
in activities that range from draft work, through work that
reflects students’ use of feedback and helpful criticism, to a
polished end product. Continuous assessment of students’
work not only facilitates their learning of mathematics but
also enhances their confidence in what they understand and
can communicate. Products of classroom activity that are
indicators of mathematics learning are:
Demonstrations: A demonstration transforms ideas into
something concrete and observable through visual, audio,
art, drama, movement, and/or music. This could also include
opportunities to demonstrate and explain procedures and
strategies such as a science experiment or a solution to a nonroutine math problem.
Products: Student products represent completed student
work in a variety of forms; writing, videotapes, audiotapes,
computer demonstrations, dramatic performances,
bulletin boards, debates, etc. Students can demonstrate
understanding, application, originality, organizational skills,
growth in social and academic skills and attitudes, and success
in meeting other criteria.
Response Groups: Response groups are opportunities for
small numbers of children to discuss books or events in depth
with one another. Often these groups are organized and run
by children themselves because they all have read the same
book or experienced the same event and want to discuss it.
Teachers participating in a response group will gain insight into
their students’ thinking skills, group behaviors, and affective
characteristics.
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•
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Discussion: A discussion provides a safe, open forum where
students are encouraged to speak, listen, and respond to
opinions, feelings, and ideas regarding the designated topic.
oral comments
written papers
journal entries
drawings
computer-generated model
(Information from: https://www.sedl.org/scimath/compass/
v02n02/standard.html)
Goal Setting: Setting goals with students provides the basis
for monitoring student performance through collaboration and
self-reflection.
6
The College Prep Scholarship
We believe that the right information can change the way outstanding low-income juniors see their futures. For qualified students,
the purpose of the College Prep Scholarship is three-fold: to make them realize a top-tier education is possible; to prepare them for
the college admissions process; and to equip them with practical knowledge on how to gain admission to the nation’s leading colleges
and universities.
The College Prep Scholarship provides students with the potential to receive multiple awards, including full scholarships to summer
programs at leading colleges, individualized college admissions counseling, invitations to our College Admissions Conferences, allexpense-paid visits to college campuses, and more. The College Prep Scholarship application is now open and is due in March 25.
OVERVIEW
QuestBridge offers two programs
for high school students:
•
•
The College Prep
Scholarship for juniors
who are preparing for the
college application process
The National College Match
for seniors applying to
college
There are no fees involved in
applying to any of our programs.
The College Prep Scholarship
Through QuestBridge’s College
Prep Scholarship, more than
1,500 high-achieving low-income
juniors will be selected as College
Prep Scholars to receive awards
designed to help them become
successful applicants to top
colleges.
High school juniors who complete
our free, online application
(available in February each year)
are eligible for a range of awards.
All of the awards are designed to
prepare students to make the most
of their chances in the college
admissions process. The awards
include:
•
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Full scholarships to
summer programs at
leading universities such as
Brandeis, Emory, Harvard,
Notre Dame, Stanford, Penn,
and Yale
Invitations to attend the
annual QuestBridge College
Admissions Conferences,
where students can meet
college admissions officers
and attend workshops on
applying to leading colleges
as low-income students
Individualized college
counseling provided by
QuestBridge staff and
current Quest Scholars
All-expense-paid visits to
partner college campuses
Telementoring with Amherst
College students about the
college admissions process
The QuestBridge College
Prep Scholarship gives
outstanding low-income
high school juniors an
early advantage in college
admissions.
College Prep Scholars
are uniquely prepared
to gain admission and
full scholarships to toptier colleges through
QuestBridge. The majority
of College Prep Scholars
are selected as Finalists for
the QuestBridge National
College Match program.
Watch the Video
ELIGIBILITY
Students must be juniors who are planning to apply to
college during the fall of their senior year.
Citizenship requirements: U.S. citizens, Permanent
Residents, and international students attending high
school in the United States are eligible to apply for
the College Prep Scholarship.
With a proven track record
of helping outstanding
low-income students attain
their college dreams, the
QuestBridge College Prep
Scholarship will provide you
with everything you need to
know about getting into a
leading college—for free.
SELECTION CRITERIA
• QuestBridge takes all of the
following factors into account
when evaluating an application
for the College Prep Scholarship:
• Academic Achievement
• Financial Qualifications
• Personal Circumstances
• Academic Achievement
We seek students who have
demonstrated a very high level of
academic achievement. The academic
characteristics below are based on
profiles of past College Prep Scholars
from previous years, and are not strict
requirements or cut-offs:
Grades and rigor of high school
curriculum: Primarily As in the most
challenging courses at your high
school (usually including Honors, AP,
and/or IB level courses, if available.)
Class rank: Top 5-10% of your
graduating class.
Standardized test scores: SAT (CR+M)
scores above 1259; ACT composite
score above 27. We also recommend
submitting any PSAT, PLAN, AP, IB, or
SAT Subject Test scores.
We also look for evidence of strong
writing ability, intellectual spark, and
determination through essays and the
teacher recommendation.
Financial Qualifications
College Prep Scholars typically come
from households earning less than
$60,000 annually for a family of four,
and often less than $50,000. This is
not a strict cut-off and we encourage
students who feel they have faced
significant financial hardship to review
these financial details carefully to see
if they may qualify.
Start here...
7
(click)
Remember to record your College Acceptance Decisions in Naviance.
Click the pencil to the right of the Results column, next to “Unknown”.
College & Careers
Financial Aid
— FAFSA
The FAFSA and other college
financial aid forms should be
completed now, even if your
parents’/guardians’ taxes are not
complete. (You enter the correct
amounts later.) For assistance,
please
see
Counselor.
your
Guidance
Click Here for the answer to
these and more FAFSA questions.
The NYS Higher Education Service
Corporation is a valuable resource
to help you with the Financial Aid
process.
Chat online at
StartHereGetThere.org
Call toll free at 1-800-808-1790,
Mondays through Thursdays from
9:00 AM to 5:00 PM.
Email us anytime at [email protected]
hesc.ny.gov
Website http://www.hesc.ny.gov
College Midyear Reports Indicators of College
The Guidance Department is preparing documents
Enrollment
and will automatically send your Midyear Report
and Midyear Transcript to all schools on your
Naviance list. NYC transcripts are finalized a little
later than other places in the country, so you may
receive ‘missing transcript emails,’ but please do
not worry; this is to be expected. Knowing this, we
make sending your reports a priority, so if there is
an error on your transcript (received February 3,)
please see your Guidance Councilor immediately, so
the incorrect transcript is not sent out.
Based on research and the best practices of its 350plus members, the National College Access Network
(NCAN) developed a recommended set of Common
Measures to help college access and success programs
guide and assess their work. LaGuardia Arts and
the DOE track indicators to use of data to guide
improvements to student services and demonstrate
the effectiveness of the college access-success field.
This data is also used to enhance equitable outcomes
for subgroups of students.
Juniors
The Essential Indicators are and core demographic
groups are:
The students and families that are more secure
and
more
comfortable
with
the c o l l e g e
application process are those who not only
are independently motivated but also Im
por
those who take advantage of multiple
tan
t
opportunities to acquire information.
Academics
• Percent of students on track to/completing
common core/rigorous college prep curriculum
as defined by their state
Testing
• Percent of students taking SAT
• Percent of students taking ACT
While all students go at their own rate, the Guidance
Department takes a deliberate, methodical approach,
providing information in a variety of venues so that
families can synthesize the information and make
informed decisions. The College Application Process
has now officially begun for the Class of 2016. Here
are a few of the events that are important for current
Juniors to attend.
Admissions
• Percent of students completing college
admissions applications, by school type
Financial Assistance
• Percent of students who complete and submit a
FAFSA form
• Percent of students awarded financial aid
Class of 2016 Programming Meeting
Monday, February 9; 3:10 PM - 4:10 PM; Concert Hall
Advanced Placement (AP) Fair
Wednesday, February 11; Lunch Periods;
7th Floor Dining Hall
Core Demographics
• First Generation College Going
• Free/Reduced Lunch Status
• Race
• ESL Status
• Gender
Planning for College 2: Understanding the
Process
Tuesday, February 24; 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM;
Concert Hall
Guest Speaker: Jacqueline DeLaFuente
Hobart and William Smith Colleges
Associate Director of Admissions
For more information about measures to create
better college access and success, please visit
http://www.collegeaccess.org/Common_Measures
Planning for College 3: Making the First Step
Thursday, March 5; 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM;
Concert Hall
The Weekly Bulletin is a
collection of original material
and collected/adapted
information intended to keep
the LaGuardia Community
informed.
College & Conservatory Fair
Monday, April 20; 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Planning for College 4: An Admissions Director’s
Perspective
Tuesday, April 28; 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM; Concert Hall
Dr. Mars, Principal
Mr. Moore, Teacher
Mr. Sommers, AP
Dr. Stricklin-Witherspoon, AP
Ms. van Keulen, AP
8
Financial Aid
Undocumented students face unique challenges in their quest to obtain postsecondary education. This tip
sheet is designed to help this population with some of the pressing questions they have while contemplating
whether or not they can enroll in school.
Question
Answer
1. I just finished high school and want
to go to college. Will the fact that I
am an undocumented student
prevent me from continuing my
education?
Generally speaking, your status will not prevent you from being
admitted to college or a vocational program, or from enrolling in
classes. Your status as an undocumented student limits the type
of financial aid you receive and could impact your tuition charges
(See Questions 2, 3, 4, 7 and 8 below). Alabama and South
Carolina prohibit undocumented students from enrolling in any
public postsecondary institution.
2. I am an undocumented student, but
I have lived in the U.S. since I was
three years old. Am I eligible for
financial aid to help pay for college?
As an undocumented student, you are not eligible for federal
financial aid such as Federal Pell Grants, Federal Work-Study,
and Federal Direct Student Loans (Direct Loans). However, you
may be eligible for financial aid from other sources, including your
college and private organizations. The following states allow
undocumented students to receive state aid (if otherwise eligible):
California, Minnesota, New Mexico, Texas, and Washington.
3. I was born in the U.S. but my
parents are undocumented. How
does my parents’ status affect my
eligibility for federal financial aid?
Yes. 18 states have enacted legislation that allows undocumented
students who meet certain qualifications to be charged lower instate tuition at some or all public postsecondary institutions in the
state. The states which have enacted such legislation are:
California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Kansas,
Maryland, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, New
York, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah, and
Washington. In addition, the University of Hawaii and the
University of Michigan allow undocumented students to pay instate tuition through Board of Regents decisions and Virginia
grants in-state tuition to students eligible for DACA.
5. If I live in a state which allows
undocumented students to pay instate tuition, do I have to do
anything to be eligible to receive this
benefit?
Common criteria for undocumented students to receive in-state
tuition in certain states include: attending a state high school for
two to four years, earning a high school diploma or General
Education Diploma (GED) in the state, enrolling in a public
postsecondary institution in the state, and filing an affidavit stating
intent to legalize status and become a permanent resident. Check
with the college you plan to attend about the criteria in your state.
© 2013 NASFAA
1
“Do you now have or will
you have children who will
receive more than half of
their support from you
between July 1, 2015 and
June 30, 2016?”
Question #53
Section 2
“At any time since you
turned age 13, were both
of your parents deceased,
were you in foster care or
were you a dependent or
ward of the court?”
© 2014 NASFAA
Financial aid counselors are not required by federal regulations to
report undocumented students who seek counseling or other
services from the financial aid office.
11. If I have been approved for Deferred
Action, am I able to complete the
FAFSA?
As a noncitizen you are unable to complete the FAFSA unless
you have a Social Security Number (SSN). Deferred Action allows
students to remain in the country; however it does not make such
students eligible for federal student aid, even if students have a
SSN.
Question #53
Section 2
“At any time since you
turned age 13, were both
of your parents deceased,
were you in foster care or
were you a dependent or
ward of the court?”
Question #54
Section 2
“As determined by a court
in your state of legal
residence, are you or were
you an emancipated
minor?”
Question #55
Section 2
“As determined by a court
in your state of legal
residence, are you or were
you in legal guardianship?”
A: A student is considered independent if he or she is a ward of the
court, or was a ward of the court, at any time when the individual was age
13 or older. If your ward of the court status changed before you reached
age 13, you may be considered dependent on your parent. You should
talk about your situation with the financial aid administrator at your
college who will help you determine your correct dependency status.
Unique Situations FAFSA Tips
Unique Situations FAFSA Tips
Question #56
Section 2
Q: I became homeless during my senior year in high school. Am I
considered an independent student?
Question #58
Section 2
“At any time on or after
July 1, 2014, did your high
school or school district
homeless liaison
determine that you were
an unaccompanied youth
who was homeless or
were self-supporting and
at risk of being homeless?”
A: You are considered an independent student if you received a
determination any time on or after July 1, 2014, that you were an
unaccompanied youth who was homeless. The financial aid administrator
at your college may require you to provide a copy of the determination or
other documentation.
“At any time on or after
July 1, 2014, did the
director of a runaway or
homeless youth basic
center or transitional living
program determine that
you were an
unaccompanied youth who
was homeless or were
self-supporting and at risk
of being homeless?”
If you are not sure you have a determination, but you believe you are an
unaccompanied youth who is homeless or are an unaccompanied youth
providing your own living expenses who is at risk of being homeless,
contact your high school’s homeless liaison for assistance. Contact your
college’s financial aid office for assistance if your high school’s homeless
liaison did not make a determination.
“Youth” means that you are 21 years of age or less or are still enrolled in
high school as of the day you sign the FAFSA.
“At any time on or after
July 1, 2014, did the
director of an emergency
shelter or transitional
housing program funded
by the U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban
Development determine
that you were an
unaccompanied youth who
was homeless or were
self-supporting and at risk
of being homeless?”
A: Answer “Yes” to Question #57 if you received a determination any time
on or after July 1, 2014, that you were an unaccompanied youth who was
homeless. The financial aid administrator at your college may require you
to provide a copy of the determination or other documentation.
Q: I am no longer under the court because my foster parents took legal
guardianship of me a few years ago. However, my foster parents do not
support me with their own financial resources. They still get a foster care
check each month for me. How do I answer question #53?
A: If you were in foster care at any time when you were 13 or older, answer
“Yes” to Question #53. If you are in a legal guardianship, answer “Yes” to
Question #55.
Note: Neither legal guardians nor foster parents are considered parents
when completing the FAFSA. This means you do not list their income and
household size information on your FAFSA.
Q: I turned 18 and graduated, so my court case was closed. My college
is saying I am no longer an independent student because I am no
longer a ward of the court. Am I considered dependent or independent?
A: You are considered independent if you were a ward of the court, at any
time, when you were age 13 or older. This means you should check “Yes”
to Question #53, if you were a ward of the court when you were age 13 or
older.
Q: I was emancipated at age 15, but lived with my aunt and uncle
during my last semester of high school. How should I complete the
FAFSA?
A: If you have a copy of a court order stating you are an emancipated
minor, answer “Yes” to Question #54 and complete the FAFSA as an
independent student. The court must be located in your state of legal
residence. If the court order is no longer in effect and you have not reached
the age of majority for your state of legal residence, answer “No” to
Question #54. Complete the FAFSA as a dependent student if you answer
“No” to the remaining questions on the paper FAFSA and none of the other
boxes in Section Two of the FOTW Worksheet apply to you.
Q: My grandparents are my court-appointed, legal guardians. They
have provided support for me all my life. How do I complete the
FAFSA?
A: If you have a copy of a court order stating you are in a legal
guardianship, answer “Yes” to Question #55 and complete the FAFSA as
an independent student. The court must be located in your state of legal
residence . If the court order is no longer in effect and you have not
reached the age of majority for your state of legal residence, answer “No”
to Question #55. Complete the FAFSA as a dependent student if you
answer “No” to the remaining questions on the paper FAFSA and none of
the other boxes in Section Two of the FOTW Worksheet apply to you.
2
© 2014 NASFAA
Q: My mom died a few years ago and I have no contact with my dad. I am
in a transitional living program. How do I complete the FAFSA? Am I an
independent student?
A: Answer “Yes” to Question #58 if you received a determination any time
on or after July 1, 2014, that you were an unaccompanied youth who was
homeless or at risk of being homeless. The financial aid administrator at
your college may require you to provide a copy of the determination or
other documentation.
If you are not sure you have a determination but you believe you are an
unaccompanied youth who is homeless or are an unaccompanied youth
providing your own living expenses who is at risk of being homeless,
contact the director of the youth center or transitional housing program for
assistance. Contact your college’s financial aid office for assistance if the
director of the youth center or transitional housing program did not make a
determination.
“Homeless” means lacking fixed, regular, and adequate housing, including
living in shelters, motels, cars, and temporarily with other people because
you have nowhere else to go.
Question #95
“How many people are in
your household?”
If you are not sure you have a determination, but you believe you are an
unaccompanied youth who is homeless or are an unaccompanied youth
providing your own living expenses who is at risk of being homeless,
contact the director of the emergency shelter for assistance. Contact your
college’s financial aid office for assistance if the shelter director did not
make a determination.
Question #105
Signatures
Q: I live with my foster parents and their children. Are they my “family
members?”
A: No. If you are considered independent (for example, because you are in
foster care), and you have no dependent children of your own, you are a
family of one (yourself).
Q: I have filled out this form as an independent student because I am a
ward of the court. Do I need my father’s or mother’s signature? I do not live
with them, but I see them sometimes.
A: No. Because of your status as a ward of the court, you are considered
an independent student and a parental signature is not required.
“Youth” means that you are 21 years of age or less or are still enrolled in
high school as of the day you sign the FAFSA.
Source: National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA)
1/15
“Unaccompanied” means you are not living in the physical custody of a
parent or guardian.
“Homeless” means lacking fixed, regular, and adequate housing, including
living in shelters, motels, cars, and temporarily with other people because
you have nowhere else to go.
© 2013 NASFAA
“Unaccompanied” means you are not living in the physical custody of a
parent or guardian.
“Homeless” means lacking fixed, regular, and adequate housing, including
living in shelters, motels, cars, and temporarily with other people because
you have nowhere else to go.
Q: I lived in an emergency shelter last year. How do I complete the
FAFSA?
2
“Youth” means that you are 21 years of age or less or are still enrolled in
high school as of the day you sign the FAFSA.
“Unaccompanied” means you are not living in the physical custody of a
parent or guardian.
Question #57
Section 2
♦ Get Ready for College:
www.getreadyforcollege.org/gPg.cfm?pageID=1586
10. If I discuss my undocumented status
with a counselor in the financial aid
office at my school, is he or she
required to report me to U.S.
Citizenship and Immigration
Services (USCIS)?
“At any time since you
turned age 13, were both
of your parents deceased,
were you in foster care or
were you a dependent or
ward of the court?”
Q: I am a ward of the court who graduated from high school and then
went to live with my mother for two months. Did I lose my independent
status?
1
♦ Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund:
www.maldef.org
Scholarships can be used to pay most educational expenses,
including but not limited to: tuition and fees, room and board,
books and supplies, the cost of a computer, and personal
expenses including transportation. You should check with the
organization that awarded you a scholarship about any
restrictions on its use.
Question #53
Section 2
A: TANF benefits count as support that you provide to your child.
You should answer “Yes” to this question, as long as you provide more
than half of the child’s support.
A: The term “ward” is used to mean “dependent” of the court. You are a
ward of the court (regardless of whether this status is determined by the
county or state) if the court has assumed custody of you. You should
have court ordered documents that designate you a ward of the court.
♦ Fast Web: www.fastweb.com
9. Can I use my scholarship money to
pay expenses other than tuition?
Undocumented Students Tips
Q: I have a child who will be living with me and I will receive assistance
from the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program. Do I
answer “Yes” to Question #51? Are TANF or welfare benefits considered
to be like earned income?
“At any time since you
turned age 13, were both
of your parents deceased,
were you in foster care or
were you a dependent or
ward of the court?”
Here are some websites you can use to research scholarships:
♦ SADCO Scholarship Program:
http://sadco.org/sadco-scholarship-program
Q: I am a single mom with one child and will get free day care for my
child (from a grandmother, aunt, or free day care center) while I go to
college. Does the value of this free childcare have to be reported on the
FAFSA?
Q: I am a dependent child of the court of my county. Is this the same as a
“ward” of the court?
8. As an undocumented student, I
know I am not eligible for financial
aid from the federal government.
Where can I look to find private
scholarships?
♦ La Plaza Scholarship and Financial Aid Guide:
(English PDF) (Spanish PDF)
Undocumented Students Tips
Question #53
Section 2
The aid available to undocumented students from colleges and
other postsecondary schools varies widely among institutions. Aid
could include institutional scholarships, grants, loans, and work
programs. Institutional scholarships often come with a merit
component. To find out what is available at the college you plan to
attend, contact the financial aid office.
♦ Mexican Scholarship Fund: http://mexicanscholarshipfund.org/
A: No, this service is not income and the information is not collected on
the FAFSA. However, note that you need to let the financial aid
administrator at your college know that you are receiving free dependent
care; an allowance for dependent care may not be added to your cost of
attendance.
Question #51
Section 2
7. As an undocumented student, what
type of financial aid is available from
the college I plan to attend?
♦ Genesco Migrant Center: www.migrant.net
Questions on the 2015–16 FAFSA that may cause difficulty for students in unique situations, such as
wards of the court or foster youth, are listed below. Question numbers refer to the paper FAFSA. Sections
refer to the FAFSA on the Web (FOTW) Worksheet. Please note that some questions on the paper FAFSA
do not appear on the FOTW Worksheet. Answering yes to any question in Step Three on the FAFSA
and/or checking the corresponding box in Section Two on the FOTW Worksheet means that you will be
treated as an independent student and will not need to provide parental information on the FAFSA.
Free childcare
Yes. Three states—Arizona, Georgia and Indiana —have enacted
legislation which prohibits undocumented students from receiving
in-state tuition at public postsecondary institutions in those states.
♦ Scholarships for Hispanics: www.scholarshipsforhispanics.org
Students in Unique Situations: Tips for
Completing
the Free Application for Federal Student Aid
(FAFSA)
Question #44
Section 4
Answer
6. I know that a few states allow
undocumented students to be
charged lower in-state tuition. Are
there any states which have laws
prohibiting undocumented students
from receiving in-state tuition?
♦ Latino College Dollars: www.latinocollegedollars.org
As a U.S. citizen, you are eligible to receive federal financial aid,
regardless of your parents’ status. However, their status will
prevent them from borrowing a parent PLUS to help pay your
college expenses. For more information about how this affects
your eligibility for federal student aid, contact the financial aid
office at your school.
4. I am an undocumented student but I
have lived in Kansas since my
family came to the U.S. when I was
six. I will graduate from high school
soon. If I attend a public college in
Kansas, am I eligible for in-state
tuition?
Question
Special Situations
Tip Sheet for
Undocumented Students
9
College & Careers
High Schools: Audition
Competition to Participate in
The 24 Hour Musicals
Event: Ongoing until February 16,
2015
An exciting opportunity for
young actors: upload your
video audition, in which you
introduce yourself with a prop
and a costume, and sing a
little bit to show your voice.
A Grand Prize winner will be
invited to participate in The 24
Hour Musicals 2015, rehearsing
and performing alongside top
Broadway and Hollywood actors.
Second prize includes backstage
access, and third prize receives
two tickets. Finalists will be
judged according to vocal quality,
originality, creativity and humor.
Even if you don’t win a prize, it’s
a great experience to audition.
Open to students 16 and up, with
written permission from parents/
guardians. For further information
and to register, please click
here.
High Schools: Princeton
University Summer
Journalism Program (PUSJP)
2015
Registration Deadline:
February 20, 2015
Event: July 31- August 10, 2015
PUSJP is an all-expenses-paid
program for high school student
journalists from low-income
backgrounds that will take place
for 10 days on the campus of
Princeton University. Classes
at the program are taught by
professional reporters and
editors. Students meet with
numerous Princeton professors
as well as Princeton’s president
and dean of admissions. To be
eligible for the program, students
must currently be juniors in high
school, live in continental U.S.,
have at least a 3.5 GPA, and
the combined income of their
parent(s)/guardian(s) must not
exceed $45,000. The first round
of the application should be filled
out online here by February 20,
2015. Click here for additional
information about the program.
BAM Education Scripps
Scholarship Fund
BAM Education is offering up to
$90,000 in scholarship money
Samuel H. Scripps Scholarships.
The deadline is approaching for
the 2015 Samuel H. Scripps BAM
Scholarship Fund. Students who
have previously participated in
BAM Education programs who are
entering or are in post-secondary
education are invited to apply.
Two- and four-year scholarships
are offered to students pursuing
higher education in the fields
of performance, presentation,
or arts administration. Now
in its eighth year, the Scripps
Scholarship is offering up to
$90,000 in scholarship money.
http://www.bam.org/education/scripps-scholars?utm_
source=Promo&utm_medium=Email&utm_
content=2015_02_04_Scripps_Scholarship_
Promo&utm_campaign=Education&sourceNumb
er=38806
The Hadassah, Young Judaea
Scholarship Fund
If you have already applied to
or are considering a Year Course
or Teen Summer Program with
Young Judaea, please note that
our main needs-based scholarship
opportunity deadline is fast
approaching.
The Hadassah, Young Judaea
Scholarship Fund has helped
hundreds of young people to
visit Israel for summer and Year
programs with generous lifechanging donations.
Act fast to set the ball rolling
for your scholarship! Deadline
10
for applications is the 17th. To
qualify for this scholarship, a
member of your family must
have be an annual member of
Hadassah. This costs $36 and
you can sign up here. In order
to be eligible for this needs based
scholarship you need to have paid
the deposit for the program of
your choice. http://www.psas.
org/CJUD.aspx
American Museum of Natural
History
Just a few blocks away, the
American Museum of Natural
History has a wide variety of
programs and opportunities for
high school students. Everything
from internships, after school
programs, and educational
opportunities are offered. http://
www.amnh.org/learn-teach/grades-9-12
Student in Foster Care
Several $500-$1,000 awards.
They have to write 2 essays and
get a letter of rec by March 6. If
you know any students who are
in foster care, please share this
opportunity with them!
http://www.representmag.org/pdf/awards_for_youth_
in_foster_care/17th_annual_represent_awards_for_
youth_in_foster_care_app.pdf
College & Careers
National Student Clearinghouse
La! recommends that families do not return the Student Clearning House form (below), allowing
the DOE and LaGuardia to determine whether students actually enroll in college.
Dear High School Students and Families:
Your school, with support from the New
York City Department of Education (DOE),
is working to provide students with a rich,
engaging, and rigorous education that
prepares them for college or a career
when they graduate. That preparation
begins early in required coursework and
involvement in your school community.
We continue to strengthen supports for
students and families, as well as principals,
teachers, counselors, and college advisors
so that the work in classrooms every day
produces meaningful growth in student
learning and prepares students to make
successful transitions after graduation.
As we work toward the goals of college
and career success, we understand the
need to help students, families, and
schools understand the progress they are
making. Toward that end, we are working
to address a critical need: Helping schools
understand information about their high
school graduates’ college success so
teachers and principals can better align the
high school program with expectations for
college readiness.
To accomplish these goals, the DOE is
working together with the National Student
Clearinghouse (NSC), which provides
information on high school graduates’
college performance. In order for the DOE
to collect data on college enrollment from
the NSC, the DOE will be sharing names
and dates of birth of students. For the DOE
to do this, federal law regarding student
privacy requires us to provide you with
notice and an opportunity for you to instruct
the DOE not to release this information.
We are therefore providing the attached “opt
out” forms for families who do not want to
share student information. Only students
and families that wish to exercise that
right to opt out need to complete the
form. If you completed an opt out last
year concerning these designations, your
2014-2015 Directory Information Notice And Opt Out
Form For The National Student Clearinghouse
A Federal law called the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
(“FERPA”) prohibits the New York City Department of Education
(“NYC DOE”) from releasing personally identifiable information
contained in a student’s educational record without the consent
of the parent (if the student is under the age of 18) or of the
student(if the student is over the age of 18). However,an
exception in FERPA to this prohibition allows the NYC DOE to
designate certain types of personal information about you and/
or your children as “directory information” and to release it
unless you have specifically instructed the NYC DOE not to do
so in accordance with the procedures set forth below. “Directory
information” is defined in FERPA as information that is generally
not considered harmful or an invasion of privacy if released. It
includes the names of students, their grade level, their dates of
birth and their home addresses, as well as other categories of
information that are not the subject of this notice.
Effective Monday, February 2, 2015, the NYC DOE designates
certain categories of information as “directory information” for
the limited purposes described below.
If you wish to stop the NYC DOE from releasing directory
information as described in this notice about you or your children,
you must complete the opt out form below no later than Friday,
February 27, 2015, and submit it to the Records Room, Room
206F, or if you are submitting on behalf of more than one child,
to the principal of each child’s school. If you do not wish to opt
out, there is no need for you to fill out the opt-out form or
to take further action. You must submit one opt-out form for
each student. Under FERPA, students age 18 or above have the
opt-out remains effective and there is no
need to resubmit this form. If you did
not previously complete the opt out form
and wish to do so now, please read the
attached opt out form, and if you do not
want information released about you (if
you are an adult) or about your child or
children (if they are under age 18), please
complete it as indicated.
While the DOE believes that using this
information to support student transitions
is worthwhile, we understand that in doing
so we must respect individual student
privacy. If you have any questions about
the attached forms, or the efforts of you
or your child’s school to prepare you or
your child for college and careers, you
may contact the school for additional
information.
Thank you,
New York City Department of Education
right to prohibit release of directory information, and completion
of the opt out form by a parent or guardian will be ineffective.
Copies of this notice and opt out form are available at your or
your child’s school, or may be accessed at http://schools.nyc.
gov/RulesPolicies/default.htm. Any request you make to prohibit
release of directory information with respect to the designation
below will remain in effect for a particular opt out unless you
specifically revoke it. Therefore, if you completed an opt out last
year concerning this designation, your opt-out remains effective
and there is no need to resubmit this form. If you later wish to
revoke an opt out, you must do so in writing to the principal of
your or your child’s school, or if you are revoking an opt out on
behalf of more than one child, to the principal of each child’s
school .
The National Student Clearinghouse (the “NSC”) is a non-profit
organization that will provide college enrollment and graduation
information to the NYC DOE. This information will help schools
understand and improve students’ college readiness and success,
and will be used by NYC DOE for research purposes. The NYC DOE
designates names and dates of birth of students entering 9th
grade, together with NYC DOE students for the years 1998-2014,
as directory information for the limited purpose of disclosing
this information to the NSC. The NSC, in turn, will give the NYC
DOE information on NYC DOE students who enrolled in a higher
educational institution. This information includes where the
student entered college, the state where the college is
located, dates enrolled, graduation date (if applicable)
and degree earned (if applicable).
Please complete and sign on the next page if you wish to opt out
of release of information to the NSC If you do not wish to opt out,
there is no need for you to take further action .
LaGuardia Arts
 I am the student listed below, and am age 18 or over. I do NOT want my name, grade level and date of birth released to the
National Student Clearinghouse.
 I am the parent or guardian of the student listed below, who is under age 18. I do NOT want my child’s name, grade level and
date of birth released to the National Student Clearinghouse.
Parent/guardian signature if student is under age 18 Student signature if student is age 18 or above
Please complete in full if you have made either of the above opt outs:

Student Name:OSIS #:Grade:

Date of Birth (MM/DD/YYYY):
Parent/Guardian Name:

Home Address:

Telephone Number:Email Address:

For 2014-2015 students: if you wish to opt out, please return this form to Room 206F
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