news Child Falls Injury p6

June 2014 Issue No 65
news
www.safekids.org.nz
Starship Trauma Update:
Child Falls Injury
p6
While childhood fall related injuries are often
viewed as ‘part’ of growing up, some falls can
cause serious injury with great social and
financial costs to children, their families and
the government. In some cases falls are fatal.
WHERE
THEY
FALL
0-4 years
Home playgrounds,
chairs, slipping,
tripping or
stumbling
on same level
ground.
10-14 years
School or public playgrounds,
slipping, tripping or stumbling
on same level ground or
surface, scooters and
skateboards, or colliding
with another person.
5-9 years
School or public playgrounds,
slipping, tripping or stumbling
on same level ground or
surface, out of trees.
IN NEW ZEALAND:
I FELL
Every day 11 children
are hospitalised.
ACC claims costs from child falls
That’s 3,901 a year.
2 children die
every year.
It’s also the #1 cause of
hospitalisation for unintentional
injuries.
Q&A: Is it legal to turn off air
bags if a child ever needed
to sit in the front seat?
Page 6
amount to $45 million
per year on average
(Source: ACC)
Infographic:
Child Falls Injury
Page 7
Boys (60%)
Tamariki
Māori
Urban &
deprived areas
Playground equipment is
the leading cause of fall
related hospitalisation (37%).
Except for the ACC claims costs, New Zealand figures are from the Safekids Aotearoa factsheet “Childhood unintentional fall related injuries”
March 2012. www.safekids.org.nz/index.php/page/Falls.
WORLDWIDE:
Every day
130 children die
from fall related injuries around the world
(WHO, UNICEF, World Report on Child Injury Prevention, 2008).
SOME GOOD PRACTICE INTERVENTIONS ARE:
ENGINEERING
ENFORCEMENT OF RULES
EDUCATION
The use of stair gates, sand,
wood chip or any impact
absorbing safety surfacing for
playgrounds, and installing
safety mechanisms in
windows.
Enforcement of playground soft
surfacing materials to a safe
depth, regular maintenance of
playground equipment, and
enforcement of the helmet rule
when children ride bikes.
Promote engineering and
enforcement interventions,
use of safety helmets,
and active supervision by
caregivers.
Medical Factsheet:
Diagnosing and treating
button battery child injury
Page 8
CREATED MAY 2014
0800 POISON
Under Threat
Page 4
RISK FACTORS FOR
HOSPITALISATIONS:
Photo credit: RIDE-ON – Nelson/ Tasman
PLUS: Burns Safety Ads, Seven Sharp, Rural Women 20Km Bus Trials Update,
New Resources and Community Events around the Country!
Sponsored By
5th Floor, Cornwall Complex
40 Claude Road, Epsom, Auckland 1023
PO Box 26488, Epsom, Auckland 1344
New Zealand
P +64 9 630 9955
F +64 9 630 9961
[email protected]
www.safekids.org.nz
Safekids Aotearoa’s mission is to reduce the incidence and severity of unintentional injuries to children in New Zealand ages 0-14 years.
MESSAGE FROM THE DIRECTOR
The Hardest Job in the World – Parenting!
Have you ever wondered what the hardest
job in the world is? At Safekids Aotearoa
we think there’s only one job that fits this
description – parenting!
As a parent or caregiver, we are
responsible for ensuring that children
enjoy a life free from the adverse effects
of injury. It can involve providing a safe
sleeping environment, a home designed
or safety devices installed to prevent fall
injuries, or a space to play away from
driveways.
“As parents and caregivers we
are legally accountable for the
decisions we make that affect the
health, safety and wellbeing of
our children.”
Sincerely,
It’s also a 24/7 job that is selfless and
often self-sacrificing. However what makes
Welcome Helena!
Helena has previously worked in local government
and the tertiary education sectors. She is a registered
librarian (RLIANZA) and currently undertaking the New
Zealand Diploma in Public Relations and Communication
Management through the Open Polytechnic of New Zealand. In
her spare time she enjoys movies, cooking, reading, yoga and
competitive ballroom dancing.
Helena can be contacted [email protected]
Book celebrates Starship, Safekids
Starship: Inside Our National Children's
Hospital celebrates the history and wonderful
work of Starship. Edited by Starship's Clinical
Director of Haematology & Oncology Dr Lochie
Teague, the book offers remarkable insight on
a world-class hospital.
The book includes contributions from frontline and behind-the-scenes
staff who are passionately dedicated to Starship's care of sick and
injured children. Safekids Aotearoa has its own chapter describing the
history, goals and achievements of the organisation since the early
1990s. Support Starship and Safekids by buying the book. Order one
now by emailing [email protected]
COVER: Thank you to Mt Roskill
Early Childhood Centre teachers
and students for helping us
with the photography of the
Preventing Falls to Under Fives
Project Plan (see page 7).
2
safekids news June 2014 Issue No 65
Children have the universal right to be
protected from preventable injuries, and
as parents and caregivers we are legally
accountable for those decisions that
affect the health, safety and wellbeing of
children.
That is why at Safekids Aotearoa, with the
support of our sponsors, partners and
community coalitions, we strive to make
evidence-based child injury prevention
information available so we can all make
the right decisions for our children.
It can be transporting children in child
restraints until they are 148cm tall,
teaching kids how to swim, or making
sure they wear helmets when cycling and
scootering.
Helena Westwick joined Safekids in April as the
new Information Specialist. Her background is in
corporate librarianship, web content management,
communications and marketing. She has an MA from
The University of Auckland and a Masters of Library
and Information Studies from Victoria University of
Wellington.
parenting the most difficult job in the
world is not the physical things we have to
provide, but the decisions we have to make
to keep them safe.
Ann Weaver
Director, Safekids Aotearoa
Safekids News is the quarterly publication of Safekids
Aotearoa
For enquiries, contact the editor at [email protected]
Safekids News aims to promote discussion within the injury
prevention community. Articles from other organisations do not
necessarily reflect the views of Safekids Aotearoa.
About Safekids Aotearoa
Safekids Aotearoa is the injury prevention service of Starship
Children’s Health and a member of Safe Kids Worldwide. Our
mission is to reduce the incidence and severity of unintentional
injuries to children in Aotearoa aged 0 – 14 years.
Safekids Aotearoa Team
Ann Weaver, Director
Anthony Rola, Marketing and Communications
Blackie Tohiariki, Kaitohutohu/ Māori Advisor
Chantal Woodfine, Partnerships Manager
Gervaise Ledger, Team Support
Heather Robertson, Policy Analyst
Helena Westwick, Information Specialist
Joanna Milne, PA to the Director
Moses 'Alatini, Policy Analyst
Simone Randle, Injury Prevention Advisor
Victoria Jarvis, Programme Coordinator
A Service Of
Make a difference
Safekids Aotearoa encourages the involvement of government,
community, industry, decision makers and families in child safety.
If you would like to know more about us, wish to advocate on
behalf of children in your community, or partner in a programme
with us, contact us at:
Safekids Aotearoa
PO Box 26488, Epsom, Auckland 1344, New Zealand.
Telephone: +64-9 630 9955
Fax: +64-9-630 9961
www.safekids.org.nz
CHILD INJURY PREVENTION NEWS
2014 Workshops: Christchurch, Wellington
and Palmerston North
The 2014 Safekids Aotearoa child injury prevention
workshop series got off to a great start with sessions in
Christchurch, Wellington and Palmerston North.
Christchurch
In Wellington and Palmerston North, Safekids Aotearoa Māori Advisor
Blackie Tohiariki talked about the symbolism of the koru and how it
relates to the learning attendees gained at the workshops.
“In its embryonic form, the delicate young leaves of the koru are
wrapped and cradled, reminding us our responsibilities as guardians
to the children who rely on us. The outward curve of the koru also
symbolises the passage of learning and development we
must all take. Using the knowledge we gain at the
workshops, we hope to guard the safety and wellbeing of children in Aotearoa,” Blackie said.
Palmerston North
BOOK NOW:
• Moerewa, Northland:
11 June
• Auckland: 19 June
• Hastings: 25 June
A certificate of attendance will be
given to those who complete
a workshop. To register,
contact: [email protected]
govt.nz
Wellington
Workshop attendees came from a wide range
of organisations. “Participants received
new information, brushed up on existing
knowledge, shared experiences, challenges
and success, and worked together on ideas
going forward. Feedback from participants
indicates that the sessions were interactive,
informative, and, I dare say, a fun day!” said
Safekids Aotearoa Injury Prevention Advisor
Simone Randle.
“Ka pai and thank you to all the wonderful people
who came along to listen, ask questions and share their
views and ideas,” Simone added.
Below are just some of the comments we received
after the three workshops:
Very well
Great workshop. I
always learn something
new. When I left I had
plenty to think about
and a plan of action.
facilitated.
With excellent
Really enjoyed it!
Good networking
opportunity. Well-
presented and well
organised.
presentations and
information.
An informative
and interesting
workshop, especially
the button battery
part.
Really enjoyed the
interactive sessions,
great to monitor
progress on these
issues.
Radio Campaign: Who’s Your Hot Water Lifeguard?
A trip to the beach may not be as appealing during the winter season, however
according to Safekids Aotearoa and Burn Support Charitable Trust, ‘Lifeguards’
are still needed, especially at home.
The radio campaign ‘Who’s Your Hot Water Lifeguard’ is playing in radio stations
Flava, NuiFM and Radio 531pi throughout winter. It features the voices of New
Zealand Breakers forward Dillon Boucher and Pacific radio host Nicole Rex who
encourage listeners to be the life guards and learn about
important hot water burns prevention messages.
According to Safekids Aotearoa every day a child is burned
severely enough to be admitted into hospital. Of 1 to 2 year olds
admitted to hospital due to severe burns, over half are caused
by spilt hot drinks (tea and coffee) and other liquids.
To listen to the radio ads, visit: http://youtu.be/W88ScblAp2g
safekids news June 2014 Issue No 65
3
CHILD INJURY PREVENTION NEWS
0800 POISON Under Threat
Supporters of the National Poison Centre
are worried that combining the 0800
POISON emergency helpline with smoking,
gambling, alcohol, drugs and depression
counselling telephone services could add
precious seconds before callers receive
potentially life-saving specialist advice they
immediately need.
keep a standalone 0800 POISON helpline
which Dr Clark said adheres to World Health
Organisation guidelines. If you would like to
sign the petition, visit:
labour.org.nz/0800poison
The Ministry of Health announced this year
the development of an integrated national
telehealth service, creating a '111-style'
triage service to merge the dedicated
helplines of Problem Gambling, Quitline,
Alcohol Drug Helpline and 0800 POISON.
Dr David Clark, the Labour Party’s Associate
Health Spokesperson, said every second
counts for a poisoned child.
“It is important for parents and caregivers
to receive immediate first aid information
or emergency advice to reduce the adverse
effects of a poisoning injury, or the risk of
death to the child,” Dr Clark said.
In response, a petition has been created to
The Battery Controlled Featured at Seven Sharp
Mike Hoskings and Toni Street gave
The Battery Controlled campaign a
boost by featuring the button battery
injury demonstration kit developed
by Safekids Aotearoa, in partnership
with Energizer.
Seven Sharp also featured a mum whose
daughter was hospitalised after swallowing
a button battery, and Safekids Aotearoa
Director Ann Weaver who showed how easy it
is for small children to find button batteries at
home.
It also featured Starship Hospital's Dr Michael
Shepherd who explained to parents the
importance of taking immediate action if they
suspect that a child has swallowed a button
battery, or has inserted one in the nose or
ears.
“In as little as 2 hours a button battery stuck
in the throat, nose or ears can cause serious
injury that can lead to the death of the child.
Take the child to a hospital emergency
department immediately where the battery
can be removed,” Mike said.
To watch the Seven Sharp feature, or to order
The Battery Controlled demo kit, posters and
flyers (Registration required), visit:
www.tvnz.co.nz/seven-sharp/playingpoison-video-5883575
www.thebatterycontrolled.co.nz/partners
4
safekids news June 2014 Issue No 65
CHILD INJURY PREVENTION NEWS
US: Hollywood Turns Up to Support ‘Safe Kids Day’
On Saturday, April 5 more than 450 families and kids attended the firstever Safe Kids Day in Los Angeles, California. Drew Barrymore, Malin
Akerman, Ciara, Kendra Wilkinson, Neal McDonough, Vanna White and
Tom Arnold were just some of the stars that attended the Hollywood
venue to support Safe Kids Day.
Like in New Zealand, preventable injuries are the #1 killer of children in
the U.S.
“Safe Kids Day is a day to celebrate the potential of every child by helping
prevent injuries and save lives. Our goal was to raise awareness and
funds to support our programs in the U.S. and in other countries where
Safe Kids is present,” said Kate Carr, President and CEO of Safe Kids
Worldwide.
For more information about Safe Kids Day, visit:
http://www.safekids.org/skd/
Illuminated 20K Bus Sign Trials a Success
A year-long trial in Ashburton has shown that illuminated
20k signs on buses can have a big impact on driver
behaviour.
According to Rural Women NZ, during the ‘Either Way It's 20k’ trial in
Ashburton there was a marked drop in speeds when the 20k signs
were in operation, with many motorists slowing to between 25 and
35 km/h.
The bright LED signs lit up automatically when the bus door opened,
and flashing amber lights operated for 20 seconds before the bus
stopped and after it had pulled away, giving approaching drivers
plenty of warning of a hazard ahead.
Rural Women NZ hopes the 20k signs will be approved for use as
part of next year’s amendment to the Traffic Devices Control rule. For
further information, visit:
www.ruralwomen.org.nz
safekids news June 2014 Issue No 65
5
ADVOCACY MATTERS
Q&A
Booster Seats,
Front Seats and Airbags
By Moses ‘Alatini, Safekids Aotearoa Policy Analyst
Question: Is it legal to turnoff air bags if a child ever
needed to sit in the front seat? –Parent, Dunedin.
Answer: According to the NZ Transport Agency (NZTA), it is legal
to switch airbags off if a child ever needed to sit in the front
passenger seat. Many vehicles (mainly European ones) have
switches that allow the driver to temporarily disable passenger
airbags, and they can also be retrofitted in New Zealand (Low
Volume Certification is needed for that). Furthermore, quite a few
newer vehicles can detect when a child restraint is installed in
the front seat and disable the airbags automatically. Consult your
car’s user manual for details.
Question: Can my 5 year old sit in the front seat with a
booster seat? Is there a law for this if I can or cannot? –
From Rochelle of Huntly
Answer: According to NZTA, it is legal to put a child in the front
passenger seat, in the following circumstances:
• They are correctly restrained, including child restraints for
children under 7 years old.
• When the back seats are unavailable, such as when the
vehicle has no back seats (utility vans), for cars that only have
2 passenger seats, or when all back seats are occupied by
younger restrained children.
NZTA and Safekids Aotearoa
recommends that children sit
in the back seat of a vehicle
where they will be safer in
the event of a crash. NZTA
and Safekids Aotearoa
also said to never place a
child in a rear-facing child
restraint into the front seat
of a car that has a passenger
airbag, unless that airbag has
been switched off. If the airbag
is activated the child could be
seriously injured or killed.
Safekids Aotearoa and NZTA agree that all child restraints,
including forward facing restraints, are best installed in the rear
passenger seat. Evidence from research also shows that children
under the height of 148cm should be restrained in a correctly
installed child restraint that is suitable for their size and age.
For more information about the child passenger safety laws, and
keeping children safe on the road, visit:
www.nzta.govt.nz/resources/factsheets/07/docs/07-
child-restraints.pdf
www.mysafekids.org.nz/passengersafety
Cycling and Scootering
Policy Guidelines for
Early Childhood Centres
An early childhood version of Safekids Aotearoa’s Safe2Scoot
school policy guideline is now available.
ADHB Health Promotion Facilitator Paula Nepia authored the
policy document which answers the question: Why does your
Early Childhood Centre need a cycle and scooter policy?
“Cycles and scooters are popular toys or modes of transport for
children aged 0-4, so we would like to see centres have a policy
on the use of safety helmets and provide a safe environment
where children scoot, cycle or skate safely,” Paula said.
On average 49 children age five years old and under are
hospitalised for injuries relating to cycle and scooter injuries
every year. Children’s brains are particularly vulnerable to injury,
and cycle helmets provide effective protection and reduce the
risk of injuries.
The policy document can be downloaded at:
www.safekids.org.nz/index.php/page/skateboard-scooter
6
safekids news June 2014 Issue No 65
THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL: Falls Injury Resources
Infographic: FALLS INJURY
This new infographic is based on Safekids Aotearoa’s factsheet
Childhood Unintentional Fall Related Injuries (March 2012) with
additional information from ACC on claims costs from child falls, and
worldwide child fall death figures from the WHO and UNICEF’s World
Report on Child Injury Prevention (2008).
While childhood fall related injuries are often
viewed as ‘part’ of growing up, some falls can
cause serious injury with great social and
financial costs to children, their families and
the government. In some cases falls are fatal.
To download this infographic or to order printed copies, visit:
www.safekids.org.nz/index.php/page/Falls
WHERE
THEY
FALL
www.safekids.org.nz
BABIES DON’T NEED
BABY WALKERS
Babies Don’t Need Baby Walkers
Babies learn to walk at different ages. Some babies
pick this up faster than others. The best place for babies
to learn how to crawl and walk is on the floor. Time on
their tummies, rolling, crawling and stretching on the
floor is what babies need for their development.
Baby walkers are not baby minders. They can be
dangerous. They allow babies to reach places they
couldn’t reach if they were playing on the floor. Babies
using baby walkers can move quickly – much more
quickly than you can imagine - and supervising them
doesn’t mean you can stop an injury. It’s better not to
have a baby walker at all.
0-4 years
Babies Don’t Need
Baby Walkers
Home playgrounds,
chairs, slipping,
tripping or
stumbling
on same level
ground.
10-14 years
Baby walkers are not baby minders. They can be
dangerous. They allow babies to reach places
they couldn’t reach if they were playing on the
floor.
School or public playgrounds,
slipping, tripping or stumbling
on same level ground or
surface, scooters and
skateboards, or colliding
with another person.
Babies using baby walkers have:
5-9 years
School or public playgrounds,
slipping, tripping or stumbling
on same level ground or
surface, out of trees.
• Fallen against fires, down stairs and off decks
• Been burned by hot water from pots and
kettles they shouldn’t have been able to reach
• Poisoned themselves with medications and household
cleaners parents thought were stored out of reach
The best place for babies to learn how to crawl and walk is on the
floor. Time on their tummies, rolling, crawling and stretching on
the floor is what babies need for their development.
This Safekids Aotearoa A5 flyer educates parents about the
dangers of baby walkers. To order, download our order form
www.safekids.org.nz
IN NEW ZEALAND:
I FELL
Every day 11 children
are hospitalised.
ACC claims costs from child falls
That’s 3,901 a year.
2 children die
every year.
It’s also the #1 cause of
hospitalisation for unintentional
injuries.
RISK FACTORS FOR
HOSPITALISATIONS:
Tamariki
Māori
Boys (60%)
Preventing Falls for
Under 5s Project Plan
Safekids Aotearoa’s Preventing Falls to Under Fives project plan
is now available to Safekids community coalitions and partners.
The resource is modeled from a project developed, delivered and
evaluated by Kidsafe Taranaki Trust.
The project plan guides community groups on how
to deliver a falls prevention workshop to parents
and caregivers of children under five.
Urban &
deprived areas
amount to $45 million
per year on average
(Source: ACC)
Playground equipment is
the leading cause of fall
related hospitalisation (37%).
Except for the ACC claims costs, New Zealand figures are from the Safekids Aotearoa factsheet “Childhood unintentional fall related injuries”
March 2012. www.safekids.org.nz/index.php/page/Falls.
WORLDWIDE:
Every day
130 children die
from fall related injuries around the world
(WHO, UNICEF, World Report on Child Injury Prevention, 2008).
SOME GOOD PRACTICE INTERVENTIONS ARE:
ENGINEERING
ENFORCEMENT OF RULES
EDUCATION
The use of stair gates, sand,
wood chip or any impact
absorbing safety surfacing for
playgrounds, and installing
safety mechanisms in
windows.
Enforcement of playground soft
surfacing materials to a safe
depth, regular maintenance of
playground equipment, and
enforcement of the helmet rule
when children ride bikes.
Promote engineering and
enforcement interventions,
use of safety helmets,
and active supervision by
caregivers.
Falls are the biggest cause of unintentional injury
hospitalization, accounting for 40 percent of injury
hospitalisation to children under five years.
We would like to thank Kidsafe Taranaki for allowing us to use
their project plan to develop a national resource that will support
communities. To download or order this resource, visit:
www.safekids.org.nz/index.php/page/Falls
www.safekids.org.nz
CREATED MAY 2014
Between 2006 and 2012, more than 1,000
preschool aged children were admitted to hospital
each year due to a fall, an average of 3 a day.
Photo credit: RIDE-ON – Nelson/ Tasman
Sponsored By
5th Floor, Cornwall Complex
40 Claude Road, Epsom, Auckland 1023
PO Box 26488, Epsom, Auckland 1344
New Zealand
P +64 9 630 9955
F +64 9 630 9961
[email protected]
www.safekids.org.nz
Safekids Aotearoa’s mission is to reduce the incidence and severity of unintentional injuries to children in New Zealand ages 0-14 years.
safekids news June 2014 Issue No 65
7
THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL: TheBatteryControlled.co.nz
Medical Factsheet: Diagnosing and Treating
Button Battery Child Injury
Safekids Aotearoa has developed a medical
factsheet that contains valuable information
for GPs, paramedics, nurses and medical
first responders on diagnosing and treating
children suspected of swallowing or
inserting a button battery in the nose or
ears.
The Battery Controlled Medical Factsheet
was made in partnership with Starship
Children’s Health Emergency Department
Clinical Director Dr Mike Shepherd and the
National Poison Centre.
“Each year 20 children are taken to the
Starship Emergency Department because of
button battery-related injuries, or have been
suspected of swallowing one. The National
Poison Centre also receives on average 90
button battery-related calls per year,” Mike
said.
When a child swallows a button battery,
or inserts it into the nose or ears, it can
get stuck. Saliva or secretions triggers an
electrical current causing severe burns and
tissue damage within 2 hours. The injury is
so severe it can cause the death of a child.
The medical factsheet contains button
battery injury facts, information on medical
complications, how to make an x-ray
diagnosis and treatment guidelines.
“It’s absolutely vital that a child suspected
of swallowing or inserting a button battery
be taken straight to a hospital emergency
department. It’s also important for medical
practitioners to have the knowledge to
diagnose and treat button battery related
injuries,” Mike added.
You must register at The Battery Controlled
website to download this new factsheet
http://www.thebatterycontrolled.co.nz/
partners
In Partnership With
Tauranga: School Learns How to be Safe
around Button Batteries
At Tauranga’s Brookfield School, year 4 and 5
students conducted a science experiment to
learn what happens if a button battery gets
stuck in the throat, nose or ears, thanks to a
lesson plan created by Safekids Aotearoa in
partnership with Energizer.
“The lesson fitted nicely, as we had just been
learning about the digestive system and the
oesophagus. The students wrote about the
damage that can be caused by button batteries
to our bodies, and how to prevent it” said room
8 teacher Ngaire Gow.
“We also found the new Energizer packaging
tricky to open, which we thought was good as
it prevents small children from getting into the
packaging,” she added.
The Battery Controlled lesson plan is curriculum
linked to health & safety, science and
technology, and is suitable curriculum levels
2-4. The lesson plan contains a materials list,
instructions, video clip links and a discussion
guide.
To download and the lesson plan or order
resources, you must register at The Battery
Controlled website:
http://www.thebatterycontrolled.co.nz/
partners
8
safekids news June 2014 Issue No 65
STARSHIP TRAUMA UPDATE
Fall-Related Injury Admissions for children
aged 0-4 years, Jan 2009 to Dec 2013
Data supplied from Starship Trauma Services, analysis by Heather Robertson, Safekids Aotearoa Policy Analyst
During the five year time period from
January 2009 to December 2013 a total
of 2,680 children aged 0-14 years were
admitted to Starship Children’s Hospital
with unintentional fall-related injuries. This
equates to a yearly average of 536 children,
or approximately 10 children admitted per
week. An additional four children were
admitted and subsequently died as a result
of their fall-related injuries, (not included in
subsequent analysis provided).
Males accounted for 59 percent (1,573)
of admissions for fall-related injuries, in
comparison to 41 percent (1,106) for females.
Overall children aged between 0-4 years
accounted for 27 percent of admissions, 5-9
years for 47 percent, and 10-14 years for 26
percent of fall-related admissions.
Injury severity was assessed using the
Injury Severity Score (ISS), which assigns
numerical values to indicate the overall
severity of injuries (highlighting the
potential threat to life). Scores over 16
are deemed to be severe in nature and
constitute a major trauma admission.
However it should be noted that injury ISS
scores below this number can still have
long term consequences for the child and
their family. Between 2009-2013 a total of
128 (4.8%) fall-related injury admissions to
Starship Children’s Hospital were rated 16 or
above, using ISS ratings¹. See Figure 1.
Mechanisms of injury
Fall-related injuries reported in the narrative
description of the injury mechanism for
children aged the 0-4 years is listed on Table
1 below.
Body region injured and type of injury
When categorized by body region, injuries to
the extremities (upper or lower limb) occurred
in 454 of the fall-related injury events, head
(136), external (skin or soft tissue) (126), neck
(24) and the chest and abdomen (4 and 6
respectively). Eighteen children were injured
in more than one body area following a fall.
Fall-relatedinjuries included fractures (546),
lacerations (127), and concussions (14). Other
injuries included head injuries, dislocations,
and hematomas for example.
Safety messages for children
aged 0-4 years
• Actively supervise children i.e. on
playground equipment
• Use window latches to prevent falls from
windows
• Use non slip mats in baths and showers
• Change babies on the floor
• Take care when carrying babies and
toddlers
• Use stair guards at the top and bottom of
steps and stairs
• Use bed rails to prevent falls out of beds,
bunks are for children aged nine and over
• Check equipment regularly and always use
as intended (i.e. do not put bouncers or
rockers on tables)
• Be aware of children's developmental
level i.e. – can they climb up on furniture?
For more information, email
[email protected]
Figure 1. Frequency of Falls Admissions (2009-2013), 0-14 Years
Figure 2. 0-4 Place of Injury
Overview of fall-related injuries for
children aged 0-4 years
For children aged 0-4 years a total of 731
fall-related hospital admissions occurred
between 2009 to 2013. In total 7.4% of
these admissions were allocated an ISS
score of sixteen or above, accounting for
42% of all ISS scores over sixteen for fallrelated injury admissions for children aged
0-14 years². The majority (67%) of these
injuries occurred in the home environment.
Gender distribution revealed male children
accounted for 55 percent of fall-related
hospital admissions, in comparison to 45
percent for female children. By ethnic group,
European children accounted for the highest
number of fall-related admissions (49%),
followed by Māori (20%), Pacific (16%),
Other (7%), Indian (4%), and Chinese (3%).
Place of injury
The majority of fall-related injuries in
children aged 0-4 years occurred in the
home environment (60%), followed by public
buildings (16%), recreation (12%), other
(11%), and street (1%). See Figure 2.
Table 1. Mechanisms of Injury
Total 0-1 yr
Total 2-4 yrs
Total
Other (onto or out of objects, structures and surfaces)
Playground equipment
Trampoline
Table, chairs, bench, shelves, vanity, drawers, stool,
bookcase, and desk
Bed, Bassinet, Cot, Bunk Bed
Slipped, tripped or running at the time of the injury
Being Carried by an adult or child who subsequently fell
and/or dropped the child
Deck/balcony, floor, ledge, retaining wall, other floor, and
balustrade
Couch or Sofa
Object or Action Associated with the Injury Mechanism
35
6
≤5
22
122
130
64
27
157
136
68
49
24
6
34
21
39
7
45
45
41
9
25
34
9
22
31
Window
11
17
28
24
Steps, stairs, escalator
11
13
Bike, skateboard, scooter, tricycle
≤5
16
21
Bath or shower
≤5
16
18
Tree
0
13
13
Bouncer chair
7
0
7
Changing table
7
0
7
Shopping trolley
≤5
≤5
7
1. Six admissions for children aged 0-14 years were missing ISS values.
2. Five admissions for children aged 0-4 years were missing ISS values
safekids news June 2014 Issue No 65
9
THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL: Community events
Tiaho Primary Celebrates Road Safety Day
Road Safety Day was held in Wairoa last
month, with RoadSafe Hawke’s Bay, Eastern
District Police, St Johns, Plunket and Tiaho
Primary School staff and 130 students
participating.
An education circuit was designed for
students with seven safety stations: safe
walking, safe cycling and scootering, safe
travelling/ child restraints, first aid, bus
safety, a ‘crashed car’ scene station and a
colouring competition station.
“Safekids Aotearoa’s Safety Sam height
charts were used to measure students at the
child restraint station. They also received a
certificate with their height measurement
and information packs to take home,” said
Road Safety Coordinator Kae Schlierike.
Aside from learning about why it is
important to sit in child restraints until they
are 148cm tall, students were taught bike
safety skills, how to wear safety helmets
correctly and first aid lessons.
“It was a great activity for Wairoa. The day
was enjoyed by students and teachers alike.
We hope to do the safety circuit in other
schools,” Kae said.
To order Safekids Aotearoa’s ‘148cm’ child
restraint resources, download our order
form
www.safekids.org.nz
Wairoa: Driveway Poster for Kids, by Kids
We would like to thank the junior class at
Te Kura o Waikaremoana and Kahungunu
Executive Injury Prevention Coordinator Cheryl
Te Amo in Wairoa for sending this driveway
safety poster written in Te Reo Māori.
For the translation, see below:
Kare to mama I te kite I a koe, by Te
Awatea
(Your mother won’t see you)
Kia tupato kei tukia koe e te motuka, by
Wharetapu
(Be careful you will get run over by a car)
Kaua e hikoi ki te taha o te motuka, by
Whakamoe
(Dont walk on the side of the car)
Kaua e takaro ki muri I te motuka, by
Ripeka
(Don't play behind the car)
Kia tupato mo te motuka, by Kohi
(Be careful of the car)
Kia tupato kei whara koe, by
Hinetetoiongarangi
(Be careful you will have an accident)
Kaua e noho ki muri I te motuka, by
Whirimako
(Don't sit behind the car)
Wiri: Safer to Wait Till You’re 148cm
Auckland Transport and Plunket visited
Nestle’s factory in Wiri to promote child
restraints. As a visual aid they borrowed
Safekids Aotearoa’s height block to promote
booster seats to school age children.
Child restraints, safety information and the
148cm height block were on display for the
whole week at Nestle’s staff cafeteria.
According to NZ Transport Agency’s Child
Restraint Factsheet, as the driver, you must
make sure that any child under 7 years of
age is properly restrained by an approved
child restraint that is appropriate for the age
and size of the child.
The factsheet also states that it is generally
accepted that children under the height of
10
safekids news June 2014 Issue No 65
148cm should be seated in an appropriate
child restraint. The specific type of child
restraint you need to use depends on the
age and size of the child.
“The display was a great way to engage staff
around the issue of child restraints, as it is
an important issue for South Auckland. The
display went up on World Safety Day (28th
April) and we had a great response with
staff taking home many of the information
sheets provided by Plunket and Auckland
Transport” said Michael Kane, Factory
Manager.
Safekids Aotearoa has a series of safety
resources, including 148cm height charts
and flyers, to help promote child passenger
safety messages. To order resources,
download the order form from our website
www.safekids.org.nz/index.php/page/
Campaign_Tools
THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL: Community events
Howick: Road Safety Week Promotes Booster Seats
Our Lady Star of the Sea School celebrated Road Safety Week in May,
and at the top of their agenda is promoting the new child restraint
law and international best practise in keeping kids safe in cars.
It’s a law in NZ for children to use child restraints until they are
7 years old. It’s also internationally recognised that school aged
children are safer in booster seats until they are 148cm tall.
“To raise awareness, we had the Safekids height block display that
says ‘Your kids might seem old enough, but are they tall enough to
be out of booster seats?’. We also gave out 148cm height charts to
students to take home” said Peta Lindstrom, Star of the Sea School
Associate Principal.
“The Student Travelwise group also organized other Travelwise
activities during the week, including a scooter safety course during
lunchtimes, and creating road safety slogans for our Walking School
Bus reflector jackets.
“Another highlight was Funky Feet Friday, when all students were
encouraged to create a pair of Funky Feet Shoes and join the
school's two walking school buses. It was a great road safety week
for everyone,” Peta added.
Hawera: Driveway Kits
Bring the ‘Shock’ Factor
Roadsafe Taranaki supported Plunket and Hawera Play Centre at their
annual Kid’s Day at King Edward Park in Hawera, taking with them the
Safekids Aotearoa Driveway Run Over Safety Kit to educate parents
and whanau on the risks posed by vehicles in driveways to children.
“We asked the children to stand or sit along the mat which
was behind the vehicle, and their older siblings, parents and
grandparents to sit in the driver’s seat. They looked for their children
by using the mirrors or looking back, and were astonished by what
they couldn’t see,” said Marion Webby, Road Safety Coordinator at
Roadsafe Taranaki
“One mum asked each of her six children to pick a number on the
driveway mat, and was shocked by how far she couldn’t see from the
driver’s seat. The Safekids Driveway Safety Kit is fantastic and should
be used at community events as much as possible,” she added.
There are Driveway Safety Kits available to community groups across
the country. For locations and contact details, visit
www.safekids.org.nz/index.php/page/driveway-run-over-kitlocations
Okahu Bay: Emergency
Services Day Promotes
Driveway Safety
PORSE In Home Childcare held their ‘Emergency
Services Day’ down at Okahu Bay and had the Fire
Service, NZ Police and their police dogs, the ambulance
and Eagle helicopter service in attendance. Safekids
Aotearoa’s Driveway Safety Kit was also on display.
“We invited educators, families and members of the public to
attend. The driveway kit was set up behind one of our cars and
we encouraged the adults to sit in the driver’s seat to see if they
could see the children standing behind the car. Everyone who
participated was surprised at what they could not see,” said
Caroline McKeown of Porse.
“It’s also great to hear that some of the people who had seen the
kit 2 years ago say that the activity definitely made them more
aware of moving their vehicles in driveways, car parks and the
like. Thank you so much for letting us use this, we will be keen to
access it again in the future,” Caroline added.
If you would like to borrow a Driveway Safety Kit to use at your
next community event, visit:
www.safekids.org.nz/index.php/page/driveway-run-over-kitlocations
safekids news June 2014 Issue No 65
11
INFO CENTRE UPDATE: KidsInfo Bulletin & SafetyLit
Stay Up-To-Date with Injury Prevention Info and Research
How do you stay up to date with injury prevention
information and research?
Filtering the many information channels we have
access to can be time consuming and labour
intensive. Safekids Aotearoa Information and
Resource Centre offers two free services that
might help you:
KidsInfo Bulletin
Our Information
Specialist is on the
constant lookout
for new information
and research on
topics related to
unintentional injury
in children between the
ages of 0 to 14. We collate
and share this information
in our bimonthly KidsInfo
Bulletin. The bulletin’s contents are mainly New Zealand
published articles and reports, but some overseas content is
included too. The KidsInfo Bulletin is on the Safekids website
under “Information and Resource Centre” and we email it to
subscribers every two months.
SafetyLit
Another service we offer is
filtering SafetyLit for child injury
prevention related content.
SafetyLit is a free service from the
World Health Organisation (WHO)
and contains references to new
academic research and information about safety – all aspects
and all age groups. We scan and filter the contents for items on
topics relevant to Safekids’ work.
If you would like to subscribe to these services, please contact
Helena Westwick, Information Specialist at
[email protected]
Do you have question relating to child injury prevention?
Are you a researcher, injury prevention
worker, health professional, educator,
transport planner or just interested
in child injury prevention?
Maybe you are looking for facts
and figures, starting some
research, planning child safety
interventions or running training
sessions?
The Safekids Aotearoa Information and
Resource Centre is a professional library
service with a collection of national and international material
collected since 1993.
We aim to promote and assist child injury-prevention work
throughout New Zealand by providing:
• Information about any area of unintentional child injury and its
prevention.
• Resource material about planning interventions,
education, training sessions and campaigns.
• Child injury issues, trends and emerging issues.
Safekids Information and Resource Centre is here to help answer
your queries and undertake literature searches for you. Contact
Helena Westwick, Information Specialist at
[email protected]
WE’D LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU!
If you have ideas, comments or suggestions that you would
like to share regarding this edition of Safekids News, you can
contact the editor at:
Safekids Aotearoa
5th Floor, Cornwall Complex
40 Claude Road, Epsom Auckland 1023
PO Box 26488, Epsom, Auckland 1344
New Zealand
P+64 9 630 6655
F+64 9 630 9961
[email protected]
www.safekids.org.nz
Safekids Aotearoa’s mission is to reduce the incidence and severity
of unintentional injuries to children in new Zealand ages 0-14 years.
12
safekids news June 2014 Issue No 65