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CALEDONIAN Black Cyan Magenta Yellow
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2015
CALEDONIANRECORD.COM
ESTABLISHED 1837
SPORTS
75 CENTS
NORTH COUNTRY
Celtics Knock
Off Knicks
COMMUNITY
Fatal Crash Still
Under Investigation
PAGE B1
Families Celebrate
Milestones
PAGE A6
PAGE B5
ST. JOHNSBURY
LYNDON
SCHOOL GETS TOP
GRADE ON AUDIT
SOLAR FARM DEVELOPER EYES COMMUNITY
By taylor reed
Staff Writer
ST. JOHNSBURY – The town school just posted glowing
audit results for the 2013-2014 fiscal year.
“It’s really a reflection of how hard the staff here works
to make sure the books are in good shape,” said auditor
Nathan Hawley of Montpelier-based Pace & Hawley.
He appeared before the St. Johnsbury School Board of
Directors last week to outline results. The school basically
nailed it, minus shortcomings in documentation for the
free/reduced lunch program.
“In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above
present fairly, in all material respects, the respective financial
position of the governmental activities, each major fund and
See audit, Page A6
SUPERIOR COURT
JURY FINDS MAN
GUILTY OF ASSAULT
FOR KILLER PUNCH
Large Energy Consumers
Contacted; Trustees
Briefed About Significant
Possible Impact To LED
By James Jardine
Staff Writer
A number of large, 500-kilowatt solar farms
may be coming to Lyndon. The possibility was
discussed Monday night, when Lyndonville Electric Department Manager Ken Mason briefed Village Trustees.
Mason told the Village Trustees he met with
Sam Carlson, a representative of Green Lantern
Development, a company based in Waterbury, Vt.
In a preliminary conversation last month, Carlson told Mason he had met with representatives
from Lyndon Institute and Lyndon State College,
and hoped to meet at some point with the owners
of Q Burke Resort, about the possibility of installing solar farms in the area. All three are large
scale power users and customers of Lyndonville
Electric.
One of the principals of Green Lantern Devel-
PHOTO BY JAMES JARDINE
Ken Mason, Lyndonville Electric Manager, discusses possible solar farms proposed for
Lyndonville with Village Trustees Monday night. Back row, Trustees Heather Bollman,
Ron Aiken, Jr., Raymond Durocher, Randy Amadon and Timothy Gaskin.
opment is Luke Shullenberger, who several years
In a Caledonian-Record article dated June 5,
ago was involved in a proposed district heating 2010, it was reported that Shullenberger wanted
system in Lyndonville. That plan, to produce to create Green Mountain Biomass Energy Park
steam heat for large scale users in Lyndon at a cen- and initially planned to site it at the former Contral plant, never left the concept stage.
See solar, Page A6
VERMONT
SENATE BILL WOULD EXPAND DNA DATABASE
Faces Maximum 7 1/2 To 15
Years In Prison
who chairs the committee, said the move comes
partially in response to a Vermont Supreme Court
decision last year striking down a 2009 law that
expanded
the database to include not just those
MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — Top officials with
convicted
of felonies, but people charged with
the state attorney general’s office and Department
those
crimes
as well.
of Public Safety called Tuesday for exBy dave Gram
Associated Press
By roBert BleCHl
Staff Writer
LANCASTER, N.H. — Steven
Dupont, the Lancaster man
charged in a New Year’s Eve
punching death, was found not
guilty of manslaughter and negligent homicide Tuesday, but was
found guilty of first-degree assault
with a deadly weapon.
“It was a tough case and I am
Steven Dupont
pleased with the verdict,” Coos
County Attorney John McCormick said Tuesday afternoon,
See Punch, Page A6
panding the state’s DNA database beyond those convicted of felonies to those
convicted of many misdemeanors as
well.
John Treadwell, chief of the criminal
division in the attorney general’s office,
and Deputy Public Safety Commissioner Francis “Paco” Aumand testified
before the Senate Judiciary Committee.
They endorsed the plan to take DNA samples
from anyone convicted of a misdemeanor that
carries a jail sentence. The database already includes those convicted of more serious felonies.
Sen. Richard Sears, the Bennington Democrat
base by adding new types of convictions to those
that had been included.
“We think the DNA database is an extremely
useful tool” for law enforcement, Treadwell said,
because it provides “virtually unique” identifying
genetic matter and enables police both to tie perpetrators to biological substances left at
crime scenes, as well as to exclude possible suspects whose DNA profiles don’t
match material gathered by investigators.
Vermont’s DNA database has been
used in several high-profile cases since
first being developed nearly 20 years
ago. Howard Godfrey was convicted in
the 1991 murder of Patricia Scoville in Stowe 17
years after the crime, based on DNA evidence.
He died in prison in 2013. John Grega served 18
years in prison in the killing of his wife Christine
before being released after newly analyzed DNA
See dna, Page A6
“The public policy rationale for collecting and storing
somebody’s DNA because they’ve mislabeled maple syrup,
bought nine bottles of whiskey in N.H. to save a few bucks,
or ventured onto a neighbor’s meadow is not clear.”
–Allen Gilbert, ACLU
The court ruled it was a violation of the state
Constitution to “impose warrantless, suspicionless DNA collection and analysis” on people who
had not been convicted of a crime. Backers of the
change discussed Tuesday said the court clearly
left open the possibility of expanding the data-
BARTON
LONE REMAINING FIRE
OFFICER NEEDS ADVICE LOCAL LEADERS IRKED BY PLANS TO CLOSE 911 CENTER
DERBY
Selectmen, Firefighters Demand Meeting, Answers From Keith Flynn
By Jennifer Hersey Cleveland
Staff Writer
TODAY: Scattered
snow showers
INSIDE
VOL. 177, NO. 152
© T HE C ALEDONIAN -R ECORD
Classifieds. . . . . . . . . . B6
Entertainment. . . . . . . B5
For the Record . . . . . . A2
Opinion. . . . . . . . . . . . A4
Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . B1
Television . . . . . . . . . . A7
HIGH: 30
LOW: 15
Details on Page A2
NATIONAL DEBT CLOCK
$
18,091,368,405,110
Population: 319,934,743
Your share: $56,547.06
“The budget should be balanced; the
treasury should be refilled; public
debt should be reduced; and the arrogance of public officials should be
controlled.” –Cicero, 106-43 B.C.
DERBY – The Derby Select Board and area firefighters
hope to raise enough complaints to stop plans to close the
911 dispatch center in Derby.
Along with petitions and letters, they want to organize a
regional meeting of local emergency officials, from firefighters, EMS workers, border security officials and other agencies, with Vermont’s public safety commissioner to get their
message across.
Their goal is to explain why the closure to save money is
Islamic State Video Purportedly
Shows Jordanian Pilot Being
Burned Alive In A Cage
–––––
For First-time White House
Hopefuls, Vaccine Debate Is Lesson
In Glare Of National Spotlight
–––––
Republicans Challenge Obama
On Keystone, Immigration And
Health Care On Same Day
Page B8
Black Cyan Magenta Yellow
REGION
See Barton, Page A6
PHOTO BY ROBIN SMITH
Orleans County Sheriff Kirk
Martin, at the Derby Select
Board meeting Monday.
NATION
BARTON VILLAGE — Matt Lucier is in an awkward
position.
He was elected first assistant chief of the Barton Volunteer
Fire Department at the village’s annual meeting in 2014, but
since then, every official higher up the chain of command
has since left the department.
“Congratulations for sticking around,” Barton Trustee
Dave Snedeker said.
Now Lucier’s not sure what he’s authorized to do since
By roBin smitH
Staff Writer
a bad idea.
“All the fire chiefs are screaming and hollering,” Derby
Line fire chief Craig Ellam said.
They are determined, but they heard words of pessimism
from Orleans County Sheriff Kirk Martin.
Martin, speaking on Monday evening to the Derby Select
Board, said that he attended a meeting two weeks ago of Orleans County lawmakers with Public Safety Commissioner
Keith Flynn and other officials.
Martin supports keeping the 911 public safety answering
point (PSAP) in the Derby state police barracks open. But
Vt. Considering Crossbows
For Fall Archery Hunt
–––––
10 Vermont Counties Declared
Disaster Areas After Storms
–––––
Car Found In Snowbank, Woman
Charged With Drunken Driving
Page A5
See 911, Page A6
Thaddeus
Stevens
School
Where students develop a voice for
personal expression, civic participation,
and global involvement.
OPEN HOUSE:
6:00pm • Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015
Slide show starts promptly at 6:00
RSVP: 802.626.0370
Refreshments provided.
Vail Barn
100 King Drive, Lyndon Center
www.thaddeusstevensschool.org
Grades PreK-8
Online? Check us out:
www.caledonianrecord.com
CALEDONIAN Black Cyan Magenta Yellow
A2
THE REcORD • WEDNESDAY, FEBRuARY 4, 2015
FOR THE RECORD
OBITUARIES
NEWS BRIEFS
Sen. Patrick Leahy to seek 8th term
COLCHESTER, Vt. (AP) — U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy, currently the
longest-serving senator in Washington, is going to seek an eighth term in
the 2016 election.
Leahy, a Democrat, was first elected to the Senate in 1974. He’s been
re-elected six times.
Leahy’s campaign staff says he’s actively raising money for the 2016
election.
Leahy’s campaign manager, Carolyn Dwyer, says Leahy, who will turn
75 next month, is eager to run.
Dwyer tells Vermont Public Radio the campaign is actively fundraising
now because it wants to have enough money in case Leahy is targeted
for defeat by some national conservative organizations. Dwyer says a formal announcement of Leahy’s plans will be made at some point in the
future.
Vt. wants to replace faded license plates
MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — The Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles wants motorists to replace faded license plates.
The state says plates that have faded to the point they are hard to read
must be replaced.
The department says a problem with the manufacturing process of
plates produced between 2003 and 2005 may cause fading. State law allows those plates to be replaced at no cost to the owner.
Owners of vehicles with faded plates should fill out a form available
on the department’s website.
Owners will receive a new plate number unless they have a vanity or
a plate with four digits or less. If an owner of a vehicle that has other
plates wishes to keep their current registration number they must pay $10
per plate.
Local Forecast
Today: Mostly cloudy. Snow showers likely. Accumulation around an
inch. Highs in the low to mid 20s.
South to southwest winds around 10
mph.
Tonight: Mostly cloudy with periods
of light snow. A brief squall possible.
Accumulation 1 to 2 inches. Lows in
the single digits above. Southwest
winds 5 to 10 mph, becoming north.
Tomorrow: Mostly cloudy, with scattered morning snow showers, then
clearing. Colder, with temperatures
steady or falling from the low to mid
teens. North winds 10 to 15 mph.
Extended Forecast:
Thursday Night: Becoming mainly
clear and very cold. Lows 10 to 20
below.
Friday: Becoming partly sunny.
Highs in the lower teens.
Friday Night: Mostly cloudy with a
sight chance of snow showers. Lows
in the single digits above.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy. Chance of
snow showers. Highs around 20.
Saturday Night: Decreasing
clouds. Low around 5 below.
Sunday: Partly sunny and cold.
Highs in the single digits above.
Daily Weather Highlights
Our high temperatures will try to approach their average values today and
again on Saturday, but apart from those
exceptions, well below-average will remain the rule through the weekend. A
warm front related to a weather system
now over the Great Lakes will bring
snow showers today, with overall accumulation in the valleys of around an inch.
An additional 1 to 2 inches will follow
tonight in the valleys, thanks to the system’s cold front. During both of these periods, snowfall amounts will likely be a
bit higher in the mountains and hills.
Southerly winds will help to bump highs
into the 20s today, but the mercury will
get knocked back into the single digits
by tomorrow, by which time any remaining snow showers should taper off during
the morning. Clearing tomorrow night will
bring another round of teens or even 20s
below zero. Cold high pressure will
briefly ridge in on Friday, before yet another arctic front moves through from the
northwest on Saturday, says Chris
Bouchard of the Fairbanks Museum
weather station.
CONDITIONS AT
4 P.M. YESTERDAY
Clear
TEMPERATURE
Temp. at 4 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
Maximum past 24 hours . . . . . . . . .12
Minimum past 24 hours . . . . . . . . .-17
Yesterday’s average . . . . . . . . . . . .-3
Normal average . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Maximum this month . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Minimum this month . . . . . . . . . . .-17
Maximum this date (1991) . . . . . . .55
Minimum this date (1908) . . . . . . .-32
HUMIDITY
53%
DEWPOINT
-2
WINDS
2 mph, 2 max . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .SE
BAROMETER
30.03 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Falling
PRECIPITATION
New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.05 in.
Total for Month . . . . . . . . . . . .0.42 in.
Normal Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..23 in.
SNOWFALL
Past 24 Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.0 in.
Monthly Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.2 in.
Season Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66.7 in.
Season Norm To Date . . . . . . .51.9 in.
Snowpack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14.6 in.
ALMANAC
Sunrise today . . . . . . . . . . . .7:03 a.m.
Sunset today . . . . . . . . . . . .5:01 p.m.
Length of day . . . . . . . .9 hrs. 58 min.
DEGREE DAYS
Average temp. difference below 65°
Yesterday* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67
To date since July 1 . . . . . . . . . .4694
To date last year . . . . . . . . . . . . .4838
* calculated for the day before yesterday
EDNA SHATNEY
Mrs. Edna Shatney, formerly of
the East Peacham Road in
Peacham, passed away Tuesday
morning, Feb. 3, 2015 at the age of
91. For the past 12 years, she had
made her home with her daughter,
Mary Berard, on Old County Road
in Peacham.
She is survived by six children:
Florence Gordon, Mary Berard,
Roy Shatney, Norris Shatney,
Ernest Shatney, and Edward Shatney; nine grandchildren; many
great and great-great-grandchildren; brother William Hutchinson, and a sister Ernestine Shatney.
The family will observe their services privately. Burial will be in
Peacham Cemetery in the spring.
Memorial contributions could be directed to the Peacham Volunteer
Fire Department, PO Box 112, Peacham VT 05862.
Sayles Funeral Home is assisting the family with cremation arrangements.
LLOYD P. “TOBY” MUNGER
1930-2015
Lloyd P. “Toby” Munger, 84, of Lyndon, died suddenly
Monday afternoon Feb. 2, 2015 at his home.
He was born Aug. 21, 1930 in St. Johnsbury, Vt. the son
of Loring and Margaret (Stevenson) Munger. He grew up in South
Peacham and later became a dorm student at Lyndon Institute, graduating with the class of 1948. He later attended two years of college. He
enlisted in the US Air Force in 1951 where he served 24 years and retired
in 1975 as a Chief Master Sergeant. While in the Air Force he met and
married Laura Baldwin on March 17, 1954.
Following retirement Toby went back to work and worked at Maple
Grove Farms of Vermont in St. Johnsbury for 10 years, Lyndonville Office Equipment for several years and EHV Weidmann of St. Johnsbury
for eight years, retiring once again at the age of 70.
Toby was a devoted husband, father, grandfather, great grandfather
and friend. He is remembered as an all-around good guy with a tremendous since of humor. He was a well-liked and respected bowler at Gold
Crown Lanes in St. Johnsbury. Other favorite pastimes included ice fishing, pitching horse shoes and deer hunting on Mac’s Mountain in
Peacham.
Survivors include his wife, Laura Munger of Lyndonville; their four
sons, Greg Munger and his wife Honey of Midland, Texas, Kevin
Munger and his wife Marie-Anne of St. Johnsbury, Brian Munger and
his wife Louise of St. Johnsbury and Scott Munger and his wife Ellen
of Montpelier; 13 grandchildren; seven great grandchildren; his brother
in-law, David Baldwin of West Virginia; and many many friends including his close friend, Bob Briggs of Lyndonville.
He was predeceased by his parents; his son, Alan Munger; and his
sister, Lorraine Stone.
A time of remembrance will be held at a later date and will be announced by his family.
Donations made in his memory may be directed to H.O.P.E. (Helping
Other People Every day), P.O. Box 403, Lyndon Center, VT 05851.
Guibord Funeral Home of Lyndonville is assisting the family with
arrangements.
COURT LOG
Editor’s note: All information is
from Caledonia Superior Court
documents.
Dennis LaCourse Jr., 42,
Wheelock, pleaded guilty to felony
unlawful trespass at the Ashley
Suliveres residence at 40 Main
Street, Apt. 12 in St. Johnsbury at
1:30 p.m on Jan. 16 and was sentenced to serve 59-60 days to be
served eight hours a day.
A jury found Duke W. Skerry,
50, innocent on Jan. 27 of felony
1st degree aggravated domestic assault. Skerry had been accused of
pushing his sister Michelle Skerry
to the ground on May 17 in St.
Johnsbury.
Card of Thanks
The family of Stephen Gray would
like to express their appreciation
for the outpouring of support, flowers, cards and food at his passing.
Special thanks to our bosses for allowing us to spend quality time
with him during his last days; Rev.
Judi Horgan for the beautiful service and the East Burke Congregational Church for providing the
music – his 2 favorite hymns; the
White Market for the meat platter;
Hillary’s girlfriends for providing
the wonderful food at the Breslin
Center; Carol Brouha for food; Tom
Barrett of Guilbord Funeral Home
for handling the arrangements;
Carolyn & Steve Elliott, Bryan
Smith for helping with so many
chores and keeping him company;
the nurses at Caledonia Home
Health and Hospice especially
Stephanie for taking such good
care of him.
It’s wonderful to see so many people loved him as much as we did.
God Bless You All,
Donna McFarland
Kaela Gray
Hillary Gray
Jason & Nicole Gray,
Lily & Ainsley
James Murray
Patrick & Deja Murray & Aeris
Pearson’s
Brian T. Martin
Lic. Funeral Director
FUNERAL HOME
70 Church Street – Lyndonville, VT
802-626-5600
On-call Service Available 24/7
Funerals • Preplanning • Cremations
The Riverside
School’s
Lights,
Camera,
14th Annual
AUCTION
Saturday, February 7
6:00 PM Silent Auction
7:30 PM Live Auction & Prizes
hors d’oeuvres • Libations • prizes
$10 Single • $15 Couple
THE BARN AT RIVERSIDE
30 Lily Pond Road • Lyndonville • 802.626.8552
Online? Check us out:
www.caledonianrecord.com
Shawn J. Goss, 38, Danville,
pleaded guilty to baiting deer in
Danville on Nov. 19, 2014 and was
ordered to pay $607 in fines and
court surcharges.
Michael Burrington Jr., 37,
Sheffield, pleaded guilty to taking
deer out of season in Sutton on
Nov 27, 2014 and was ordered to
pay $607 in fines and court surcharges.
An arrest warrant was issued on
Jan. 30 for Andrea Harvey, 34,
address unknown, on a charge of
violating conditions of release.
Bail was set at $250.
Traci J. McDowell, 48, Newport, pleaded not guilty by waiver
to drunken driving on Route 5A in
West Burke at 1:32 a.m. on Oct.
24, 2014 and was released on conditions.
Jacob Leete, 22, South Ryegate, pleaded not guilty by waiver
to drunken driving on Route 302 in
Ryegate at 11:15 p.m. on Jan. 13
and was released on conditions.
Samantha A. Pal, 18, Lyndonville, pleaded guilty to drunken
driving on Pudding Hill Road in
Lyndon at 9:31 p.m. on Dec. 21,
2014 and was ordered to pay a
$400 fine.
Periodicals postage paid at St. Johnsbury, VT,
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St., St. Johnsbury, VT 05819, Tel. 802-748-8121.
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Postmaster send address changes to:
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methods without specific authorization of The Caledonian-Record.
The Caledonian-Record assumes no financial responsibility for
typographical errors in advertising but will reprint that part of any
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will please notify the management immediately of any error which
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Black Cyan Magenta Yellow
DOUGLAS M. SPAULDING
1948-2015
The world has lost a
light. Douglas M. Spaulding, 66 of Lyndonville, Vt.
passed away on Friday, Jan. 30, 2015
at home with his family by his side.
Born in Montpelier, Vt. on Feb. 1, 1948
he was the son of Lucille (Colby)
Spaulding and the late John Cleveland
Spaulding.
Doug graduated from Montpelier
High School in 1966 and, in 1968, enlisted in the United States Navy where
he spent four years traveling the world.
In 1973 he settled in the Burlington, Vt.
area and in October of that year he married his long-time crush and confidant,
Christine E. Redmond also of Montpelier, Vt. They moved to Lyndonville
in 1981 and have spent the past 33 years raising their four children and
enjoying the company of their family and many wonderful friends.
Doug began his career with Nate’s Mens Clothiers in Burlington in the
1970s and then moved on to a sales position at Poulos Insurance in 1981.
In 1984 he joined Northern Gas Transport as their Transport Manager and
in 1987, with fellow employees from Northern Gas, he co-founded Private
Coach Tours. In 1999 Doug began working closely with his brother-inlaw Donny Wells and his wife Karen as the US Director of Business Management for Sound Footings, LLC. In 2003, with encouragement from his
long time friend Kevin Tibbits, Doug returned to the Insurance Industry
as an account executive with Kinney Pike Insurance. He retired in 2013.
Looking back over Doug’s time on earth one would see a life filled with
love, laughter and so many, many memorable experiences. Some of those
would include the 16 years that he and his wife owned and operated the
“Belly Up” food booth at the Orleans County Fair and his (somewhat controversial) professionaly produced poster: Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom,
A Hunters Paradise. There was the pickled egg business and the
Willoughby Lake Crawfish business venture, both of which were very
well received. He thoroughly enjoyed catch and release fishing and especially enjoyed a lazy afternoon spent with Chris and Captain Dave Webster
drifting slowly over the waters of Moore Dam. Doug also took great pleasure spending time in the garden and always enjoyed a good pickup game
of horseshoes or a late night game of poker with his family. He especially
loved the times spent traveling with his wife and friends to places like Colorado, New Orleans, Atlanta and Las Vegas.
A lifelong dream of Doug’s came true when, in 2009, after many years
of thinking about it, he purchased the “cadillac” of dirty dog hot dog carts,
established NEK Sausage & Dogs, and set up weekend shop in West
Danville, Vt. just yards from the shores of Joe’s Pond. It was there that
Doug spent his time enjoying the company of and sharing laughter with
anyone and everyone who chose to stop by.
Doug was also a certified pyrotechnician and professional fireworks
shooter who took great pleasure in putting on countless firework displays
throughout Vermont but especially enjoyed the shows that, with the help
of his family and friends, were fired off from their hillside home in Lyndonville for the viewing pleasure and enjoyment of all within miles of the
display site. He always said there was a special rush, like no other rush,
when a shell came ripping, pounding and screaming out of its mortar and,
better yet, when a hundred would fire all at once.
Doug was a lover of all God’s creatures, big and small, and believed
and taught that all life was sacred and a gift and not something to be taken
by anybody. He especially loved his kitten Maggie and expects now to
meet up with his big dog Scotch and march on over the hill together barking, in unison, at the moon.
Besides his mother Lucille and his mother-in-law Maria Redmond, both
of Montpelier, Vt., he is survived by his wife, Christine of 41 years, his
son John Benjamin, and his wife Sarah and their children, and Doug’s
much loved grandchildren, Lucille and Reina of Milton, Vt.; his daughter
Stephanie Dwyer and husband Michael and their children and Doug’s
much loved grandchildren, Cameron and Jillian of Sutton, Vt.; and sons
Samuel of Bolton, Vt. and Alexander of Lyndonville, Vt. Also by his sister
Sherry Carver and husband Dennis of East Montpelier, Vt. and their children Karen, Kathy and Danny; his brother David and wife Leslie of Montpelier, Vt. and their children Matthew and Bradley; and sister Barbara and
her husband Anthony Ellis of Punta Gorda, Fla. He also leaves his brotherin-law Mark Redmond and wife Dorothy of Montpelier, Vt. and their children Mark and David, and a sister-in-law Jennifer Gile and her husband
David of Barnet, Vt. In addition to his family Doug also leaves old friends
and bookends Diane and the late Scott Mackay, David and Patty Webster,
Dave Pingree, Bruce Hill and Chrissie Cano, Danny and Sharon Martin,
Stephen and Jan Lea Bertrand and Don and Karen Wells. He was predeceased by his father John, his father-in-law Mickey Redmond, and by his
young nephew Brian Redmond.
At Doug’s request there will be no calling hours and a gathering of family and friends will be held at the Trinity United Methodist Church, 137
Main St., Montpelier, Vt. on Saturday, Feb. 7 at 1 p.m. Arrangements are
under the care of Guare and Sons Funeral Home of Montpelier.
Should one desire to give a gift in Doug’s memory contributions may
be made to either the Lyndon Dog Pound (Scotch’s home away from
home), P.O. Box 167, Lyndonville, VT 05851, c/o Cindy Cady, or the
Kingdom Animal Shelter, P.O. Box 462, St. Johnsbury, VT 05819.
Prior to his passing Doug took the time to write about his life in his own
words. The family invites you to view this story and to share online condolences by visiting www.guareandsons.com.
The Numbers
LUCKY FOR LIFE (Monday)
7-11-18-19-28 Lucky Ball: 16
DAILY PICKS (Tuesday)
Day Draw — Pick 3: 2-2-6; Pick 4: 0-6-1-1
Evening Draw — Pick 3: 8-4-0; Pick 4: 0-0-4-1
CALEDONIAN Black Cyan Magenta Yellow
THE REcORD • WEDNESDAY, FEBRuARY 4, 2015
A3
LOCAL
LYNDONVILLE TRUSTEES INVEST WATER SURPLUS
By James Jardine
Staff Writer
During Monday night’s meeting
of the Lyndonville Trustees, Municipal Administrator Justin Smith
shared good news. The Village
water budget is carrying a $180,000
surplus in the water department
budget over from 2014.
The $180,000 surplus results
from the Village Water Department
not completing a water project on
Speedwell Drive. In addition, an
analysis of payroll costs by Smith
shows less was spent on payroll
than was budgeted.
Smith told the Trustees that because Lyndonville has completed
extensive upgrades of its water line
infrastructure, the frequency of
breaks in water lines and other failures has been reduced. As a result
of fewer repairs needed, fewer
hours of labor are spent on repairs,
lowering payroll costs below the
amount budgeted.
The total water budget for the
coming year is $607,000 compared
to last year’s budget of $653,000.
Smith told the trustees he was
going to recommend that a “significant chunk of the surplus be put
away for savings, another chunk
should be allocated for debt reduction and a third chunk of the surplus
should be set aside for engineering
costs.”
Smith said money needs to be
saved for a reconstruction of water
lines along Route 122. Lyndonville’s water system runs out
Route 122 past the J.A. McDonald
office and continues all the way out
to the old Lyndon backup reservoir
on the Young Farm. Smith said
some of the lines on the Lyndonville end are newer, but most of
the lines along Route 122 date back
to 1895. Smith added it will take
“huge, huge money” to update all
the Route 122 water infrastructure.
Trustee Tim Gaskin said the sur-
plus was “a golden opportunity to
do some work on Route 122. He
added, “We’re never going to have
this much money again.”
Water users also will see the base
rate for water bills drop. The past
year’s water fee was $66 a quarter;
this year it will be $57 a quarter.
Overall, the past year saw an
overall drop in water usage. Smith
explained, “Last year we used four
million gallons of water than the
previous year.” Smith said some of
the drop in consumption was efforts
by users to fix leaks and otherwise
curb water usage. Last year’s per
gallon rate of $1.61 per 1,000 gallons has increased to $1.79 per
1,000 gallons used, Smith explained.
Trustees voted to invest
$100,000 of the surplus in savings
and allocate $60,000 of the surplus
to debt reduction. The remaining
$20,000 of the surplus will be set
aside for engineering costs on the
Route 122 project.
LAWMAKERS EYE NEW DEBATE ON CHILDHOOD IMMUNIZATIONS
By dave Gram
Associated Press
MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) —
Three years after a bruising debate
brought some changes to Vermont’s
laws on childhood immunizations,
some lawmakers are considering revisiting the issue amid a measles
outbreak that has sickened more
than 100 people across the U.S. and
in Mexico.
A Senate passed-bill in 2012 was
significantly scaled back in the
House after critics called it an assault
on parents’ right to choose whether
to have their children vaccinated.
And even lawmakers backing further tightening of Vermont’s rules
say they’re aware that if the state
sought to do so, a coalition of vaccine skeptics and parents-rights advocates would be ready to descend
on the Statehouse again.
A state known for organic foods,
alternative medicine and skepticism
about big pharmaceutical companies
ranks third in the country for parents
who take a “non-medical” — usually meaning philosophical or religious — exemption from having
their children get the full list of recommended vaccines, behind Oregon
and Idaho, according to the state
Health Department.
Rep. William Lippert, D-Hinesburg, said that when one lawmaker
approached him about narrowing
parent choice, he cautioned her
about the heated debate that erupted
three years ago.
The lawmaker who approached
Lippert, Rep. Barbara Rachelson, D-
Burlington, first joined the Legislature the year following the 2012 debate.
“Are there lessons to be learned
from how that went last time?”
Rachelson asked in an interview.
With the stepped-up public education by the state Health Department,
coupled with a measles outbreak that
has spread to 14 states, Vermonters
might be more ready now to embrace pro-vaccine arguments, she
said.
Infectious disease also has been
front-and-center in Vermont in recent days, with the announcement
Friday that seven children and an
adult from the Charlotte Central
School had tested positive for tuberculosis and will be given antibiotics
for nine months to ensure they do
not get sick with the disease that usually attacks the lungs.
Christine Finley, immunization
program manager with the state
Health Department, said there is a
vaccine for tuberculosis that is used
in some other countries. But she said
it is not often used in the United
States because it does not offer longlasting protection, and because tuberculosis is so rare in the U.S.
Rep. Leigh Dakin, a Chester Democrat and retired school nurse, said
he had submitted a bill drafting request to the Legislature’s legal staff
to “tighten up the regs” around parents exempting their children from
immunizations. She declined to provide further details until the bill becomes public.
Vermont has seen just one
measles case in the past 10 years, in
NOTICE
TO THE VOTERS OF
PROFILE SCHOOL DISTRICT
The Board of Education of the Profile School District
will present to the public the preliminary budget for
the 2015-2016 school year at the Profile School on
Thursday, February 19, 2015 at 7:00 PM.
NOTICE OF TOWN OF SUTTON FOCUS
GROUP MEETINGS TO REVIEW PROPOSED
UPDATES TO SUTTON ZONING AND
SUBDIVISION REGULATIONS
The Sutton Planning Commission will host four focus group meetings to present
and solicit public comment on proposed Regulation changes. The four meetings
will be held in the multi-purpose room of the Sutton School at 6:30 pm on the
following dates:
February 17th: Large Landowners/Farmers
February 24th: Board of Civil Authority/long-time residents
March 10th: Business Owners/Loggers
March 17th: Commuters/Families/Young Families
In the event you can’t make it to the meeting of the group you affiliate with
come when you can – all are welcome at any meeting.
LITTLETON PLANNING BOARD
COMMUNITY HOUSE HEALD ROOM
120 MAIN STREET, LITTLETON, NH 03561
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2015 • 6:00 PM
Review & approve minutes from January 20, 2015
Cathy Devine, Owner / Gardner Kellogg, Agent – PB15-01 – Request for a 4lot subdivision at 200 Kimball Street, tax map 100-9, in the R-1 & R-2 zones.
Other Business
Any person with a disability who wishes to attend this meeting and needs to
be provided a reasonable accommodation in order to participate, please call
the - Planning & Zoning Office (603) 444-3996, extension 27, at least 3 days
in advance so arrangements can be made.
MORE THAN ONE SELECTMAN MAY BE PRESENT AT THIS HEARING
2011, Finley said.
Dakin said that should not let residents rest easy. “We are a global society,” she said. “Folks come to visit
from all over the world.”
After the 2012 debate, Vermont
passed a scaled-down law that maintained its philosophical exemptions
for parents who decide against vaccinations, but stepped up reporting
requirements by parents and schools
and public education efforts by the
state Health Department.
Jennifer Stella, president of the
group Vermont Coalition for Vaccine
Choice, said she was not eager to go
another round over childhood immunizations. She called it “probably
premature” for anyone to convince
lawmakers to back “state encroachment on parents’ rights after the discussion we had just a few years
ago.”
FORKLIFT SPEARS VEHICLE IN LYNDONVILLE CRASH
E
A forklift speared a car in Lyndonville Tuesday morning. Jessica M. Locks, 28, of Lyndon
Center, was traveling west on Gilman Road in Lyndonville in her 2010 Chevy Cobalt at about
8:30 a.m. when she crested a hill and saw a forklift carrying a large object traveling toward
her on the right shoulder of the roadway. At that time there was also reported to be an
east-bound vehicle, limiting Locks from pulling to her left. As Locks attempted to stop, her
vehicle slid on the icy roadway. Locks’ Cobalt collided with the forklift. The forks pierced
the front of her vehicle. The operator of the forklift, Shawn Newhook, 34, of Sheffield, saw
the approaching vehicle. When Newhook saw the vehicle lose traction and start to slide,
he jumped from the forklift to a point of safety. Locks’ Cobalt was towed from the scene
due to the damage. The forklift, owned by Precision Composites of 630 Gilman Road, did
not appear to be damaged. The forklift was not registered or insured to be on the roadway.
Neither operator reported any injuries.
STATE POLICE INVESTIGATE LYNDON BEATING
By James Jardine
Staff Writer
A Lyndon man was hospitalized
as the result of injuries suffered
when he was assaulted in Lyndonville Sunday night.
According to a State Police release Almond Fletcher Jr., 65, reported he was assaulted at 11:18
p.m. on Sunday night. Fletcher
said the assault occurred while he
was in a motor vehicle parked behind Nick’s Gas and Go service
NOTICE
TO THE VOTERS OF LAFAYETTE
REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT
The Board of Education of the Lafayette Regional School
District will present to the public the 2015-2016 preliminary
budget at the Lafayette Regional School on Thursday,
February 12, 2015 at 7:00 PM.
NOTICE
TO THE VOTERS OF THE LISBON
REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT
The Board of Education of the Lisbon Regional School
District will present to the public the 2015-2016 preliminary budget at the Lisbon Regional School on Wednesday,
February 18, 2015 at 7:00 PM.
BETHLEHEM SCHOOL DISTRICT
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
FEBRUARY 16, 2015 – 6:30 PM
You are hereby notified to meet at the Bethlehem Elementary School in
said District on Monday, February 16, 2015 at 6:30 PM for the purpose of
a Public Hearing relative to the proposed Wood Pellet Heating System
which will appear on the warrant for the March Annual Meeting. This
hearing is a requirement of the USDA grant that the district has applied
for seeking partial funding for this project.
PUBLIC SERVICE BOARD
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
RE GREEN MOUNTAIN POWER’S
PROPOSED 2014 IRP
You are hereby notified that a Hearing Officer of the Public Service Board,
Kevin Fink, Policy Analyst, will conduct a PUBLIC HEARING on Monday,
February 9, 2015, commencing at 7:00 P.M., for the purpose of allowing
the public an opportunity to obtain information and/or comment on Green
Mountain Power Corporation’s proposed 2014 Integrated Resource Plan (IRP
or least cost integrated plan) (Docket No. 8397).
Under 30 V.S.A. Section 218c(a)(1), a “least cost integrated plan” for a regulated electric or gas utility is a plan for meeting the public’s need for energy
services, after safety concerns are addressed, at the lowest present value life
cycle cost, including environmental and economic costs, through a strategy combining investments and expenditures on energy supply, transmission and distribution capacity, transmission and distribution efficiency, and comprehensive
energy efficiency programs.
Hearing location: The hearing will be conducted utilizing the Vermont Interactive Technologies network at the following sites: Bennington, Brattleboro,
Lyndonville, Middlebury, Montpelier, Randolph Center, Rutland, Springfield,
St. Albans, White River Junction, and Williston. For directions: www.vitlink.org
(or contact the Public Service Board at 802-828-2358)
All hearing sites are handicapped accessible. Please contact the Public Service
Board at 802-828-2358 if you require accommodation.
Black Cyan Magenta Yellow
station on Main Street in Lyndonville. According to Fletcher, he
was assaulted by three men. State
police report he described one of
the males as being shorter with
dark hair and a beard, possibly in
his 20s.
State Police report that Fletcher
suffered injuries requiring him to
stay at Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital for treatment. According to a spokesperson for
Northeastern Vermont Regional
Hospital in St. Johnsbury, as of
Tuesday afternoon, Fletcher was
still a patient, but his condition is
stable and he is “doing well.”
Investigation is on-going and
State Police are asking anyone
with information to contact
Trooper Jason Haley at 802-7483111 or Northeast Kingdom
Crime Stoppers at 802-748-2222.
TOWN OF LYNDON
DEVELOPMENT REVIEW BOARD
The Lyndon Development Review Board will hold a public hearing on Thursday, February
19, 2015, at 7:00 PM in the Conference Room of the Municipal Building, 119 Park Avenue,
Lyndonville, VT. The following permit application(s) will be heard:
2015-001: ABFB Corporation (doing business as The White Market) is seeking to convert
the space formerly occupied by LEARN located at 154 Main Street into four one-bedroom
apartments. The application requires Conditional Use approval as a multi-family dwelling
in the Main Street zoning district under section 3.8.2.1 of the by-laws, and site plan
approval under section 9.1 of the by-laws.
Written and/or oral comments will be heard at this time. Any other proper business will
be transacted.
NOTICE
TO THE VOTERS OF
LANDAFF SCHOOL DISTRICT
SCHOOL DISTRICT BUDGET HEARING
The Board of Education of the Landaff School District will present to the public the preliminary budget for the 2015-2016 school year at the Landaff Town
Hall on Monday, February 9, 2015 at 7:00 PM.
NOTICE
TO THE VOTERS OF
BETHLEHEM SCHOOL DISTRICT
The Board of Education of the Bethlehem School District will
present to the public the 2015-2016 preliminary budget at the
Bethlehem Elementary School on Monday, February 16, 2015 at
7:00 P.M.
PUBLIC NOTICE
VERMONT AGENCY OF NATURAL RESOURCES
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION
SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
The public is hereby notified that the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources has issued
a draft certification for the Albany Transfer Station located at 1030 Main Street,
Albany, Vermont. The application for certification was received on December 2, 2104
and processed in accordance with 10 V.S.A. §§6601 et seq. and the Vermont Solid
Waste Management Rules, effective March 15, 2012 (“Rules”). The application proposes the continued operation of the transfer station with an expansion to accept municipal solid waste, food residuals and leaf and yard wastes.
Copies of the application and draft certification are available for public inspection during normal business hours at the Solid Waste Management Program office, located at
1 National Life Drive, Montpelier, Vermont and at the Albany Town Offices.
The Solid Waste Management Program intends to issue final certification at the conclusion of the public comment period. There will be no public informational meeting
convened, unless the Program receives a written request for a public meeting and
extension of the comment period, that has been signed by at least twenty-five (25)
Albany residents or by the Albany Selectboard. These requests must be received by the
Program prior to the end of the comment period.
The public comments for this draft certification will be accepted until 4:00pm on
February 26, 2015. The Agency’s response to written public comments and the final
Solid Waste Management Facility Certification, incorporating any related changes,
if/when issued, will be available at the Agency’s office and the Albany Town Office.
Questions or written comments concerning the draft certification should be addressed
to:
Kasey Kathan
Vermont Solid Waste Management Program
1 National Life Drive – Davis 1
Montpelier, Vermont 05620-3704
(802) 522-0561
[email protected]
CALEDONIAN Black Cyan Magenta Yellow
A4
THE REcORD • WEDNESDAY, FEBRuARY 4, 2015
Todd M. Smith, Publisher
OPINION
Dana Gray, Executive Editor
Editorial Comment …
Too Hot For
Winter Sports
Northern Vermont and New Hampshire readers may find amusing the latest pronouncement on climate from Gina McCarthy, the
administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency. In a blog
item posted on the EPA site and the White House site (Jan. 28), Ms.
McCarthy writes:
“2014 was the hottest year on record, and each of the last three
decades has been hotter than the last. In mountain towns that depend on winter tourism, the realities of climate change really hit
home. Shorter, warmer winters mean a shorter season to enjoy the
winter sports we love—and a financial hit for local economies that
depend on winter sports.”
It’s true that the earth has experienced warming since 1977. The
so called “hottest year on record” turns out to be only within the
margin of error accompanying several other recent years, and even
NOAA says that there is only a 38% chance that last year was the
“hottest on record.”
But moving on, we find it thoughtful of Ms. McCarthy to show
such concern for saving New England winters. Right about now
we bet we could get a majority vote for a winter with temperatures
periodically above zero, moderate snowfall only once a week, and
the need to burn 50 percent less heating oil than we are now.
McCarthy might find it hard to believe, hot as it is these days,
that the only winter sports we’ve been able to enjoy of late are
shoveling, shivering and sliding off the roads.
In My Opinion…
SEDUCED BY GLOBAL
COMMITMENT
tom PelHam
Like a Tunbridge Fair carnival barker or a TV pitchman for
the latest kitchen gadget, Governor Shumlin’s two-for-one
sales pitch for a new $90 million payroll tax during his Budget
Address was a wonder.
Give him a .7 percent payroll tax, the Governor urged, and
he’ll take that $90 million and run it through Medicaid’s Global
Commitment black box and turn it into $190 million. Further,
the Governor exhorted, he’d use a portion of that $190 million
to pay down a portion of Vermont’s Medicaid “cost shift” to
help reduce private insurances rates. With the rest of the $190
million, he’d “invest….in strengthening the overall health care
system”, whatever that means.
But, before we get too excited about the Governor’s wizardry
over state finances, let’s keep in mind that every year he’s been
Governor there have been major “budget gaps”, which are now
recognized as structural in nature and caused by the Governor’s
and Legislature’s profligate spending since 2010.
Also keep in mind that according to the Green Mountain
Care Board the annual “cost shift” has grown from $138 million in 2010 to $153 million in 2014. Governor Shumlin was,
well, Governor, during these “cost shift” expansion years and
is now asking employers for a new pay roll tax to fix the problem.
Further, let’s take a closer look at the history of “global commitment” and its seductive effect on state spending.
Global Commitment is an agreement between the state’s
Agency of Human Services (AHS) and the federal Centers for
Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) on how to spend Medicaid dollars. These dollars are comprised of a federal share
and a state share which are adjusted each year. Since 2011, the
state’s share has increased from 41.9 percent to 46.1 percent
while the federal share has dropped in inverse amounts, from
58.7 percent to 53.9 percent.
Further, JFO budget documents show that Global Commitment budgets have grown from $1.052 billion in 2011 to
$1.288 billion in 2015 and the Governor’s proposed spending
level is $1.367 billion for fiscal 2016. If the Governor’s recommendation is approved, the annual growth rate in Global
Commitment spending will be an extraordinary 6 percent. Also,
in Vermont’s most recent multi-year application for Global
Commitment funds, the projected growth rate request to CMS
were 7.1 percent for 2017 and 6.65 percent for 2018, requiring
additional tens of millions in state fund increases each year.
For Vermont’s taxpayers, the growth rate is even larger. The
combined effect of spending growth in Global Commitment
programs compounded by the increase in the State’s share results in an almost 8% annual increase in state funds to support
Global Commitment. By any measure, such growth is unsustainable.
The AHS budget is the largest in the state and programs
funded with Global Commitment comprise the largest portion
of AHS spending. Since 2010 through 2015, the portion of all
state dollars invested in AHS programs has risen from 39.7 percent to 43.9 percent. This is good news for AHS but bad news
for other agencies and departments also funded with state dollars. Once necessary increases are made to pension funds, the
education fund and other fixed areas, there is little left for our
judicial system, natural resources, higher education and other
critical areas of state responsibility.
Rather than add rocket fuel to Global Commitment spending
growth via a new $90 million payroll tax, there is an alternative. When Governors Snelling and Dean found the state budget
in disarray, they committed themselves to a multi-year strategy
to put state government on a sustainable spending foundation
with the result that Vermont enjoyed an extended period of
budget stability from 1996 through 2009. They achieved this
result by constraining spending growth to underlying growth
in the state’s economy and instituted reforms in state government to achieve cost savings.
Such an approach has not been the way of the Governor or
legislature since 2010. Unfortunately, for fiscal 2016 the Governor has missed this opportunity once more. However, the
door to sustainable spending is ready to be opened by Speaker
Shap Smith and Senate Pro Temp Campbell and Appropriation
Chairs Representative Mitzi Johnson and Senator Jane Kitchell.
But first, the seduction of ever increasing global commitment spending fueled by more taxes must be rejected.
This commentary is by Tom Pelham, formerly finance commissioner in the Dean administration, tax commissioner in the
Douglas administration, a state representative elected as an
independent and who served on the Appropriations Committee,
and now a co-founder of Campaign for Vermont.
Letters to the Editor…
School boards,
the NEA &
suggestions
To the Editor:
School Boards, the NEA, & solutions After the third letter regarding ill-spent taxpayer money
for the Sutton principal, I write,
not only to clarify, but to offer
some suggestions.
All three of those letters rightly
expressed frustration and outrage.
Apparently, the principal of the
Sutton school was fired for mistreatment of staff. She is to be paid
the remaining salary for this year,
plus next year’s salary. This settlement agreement was made by the
school board of Sutton, probably
with input from the Superintendent, who has always supported
this principal.
The NEA only supports teachers and support staff. It does not
support administrators and had
nothing to do with the benefits
package for the Sutton principal.
And when you look at the benefits
package awarded this outgoing
principal, it is apparent that administrators do not need a union to
support them. They have a contract and a school board who will
give them whatever they ask.
Here are a few solutions. Most
importantly, rewrite principal contracts so that there are clear reper-
cussions for the type of unprofessional behavior seen in Sutton.
Make contracts only for one year,
as they are for teachers. Write the
contracts in a way that protects
taxpayer money and prevents
these types of buy-outs.
Secondly, elect intelligent, quality school board members who
take seriously the hiring of a talented principal and the spending
of taxpayer money. Here’s another
example of school board mistake.
A few years back the taxpayers of
Burke paid the salaries of two
principals for half a year. This
happened because the school
board waited too long before letting go the principal. They did not
adhere to the deadlines of his contract. Burke taxpayers may not
have known about this; we just
paid, surely not as much as poor
Sutton has to pay, but still, a costly
school board mistake.
Lastly, the school board members we elect must willingly listen
not only to taxpayers, but to all educational staff. The teachers in
Sutton certainly had concerns
about this principal before the incident which led to her downfall.
In my experience, it takes a concerted effort for educators to even
be heard by the board when they
have concerns about administrators. To my knowledge, there is no
formal process which allows
teachers to give feedback on principals to their boards. School
boards don’t really know what is
going on in their school unless
they listen to everyone. If there are
problems regarding the relationships between staff and principal,
the board needs to get that feedback and be open to receiving it.
Relationships matter. We all
want employers who listen to us
and give feedback that helps us
improve in our jobs. Yelling,
threats, and bullying have no place
in schools or any workplace. Employees deserve to be treated us as
valued staff and professionals, as
opposed to being micromanaged.
And of course, everyone wants an
employer who can gracefully accept feedback, as opposed to lashing out in retribution. Sadly, the
principal of Sutton was lacking.
School board members, please
listen. It’s time to make changes.
Respectfully,
Nancy Pepin-Vogt
West Burke, Vt.
We need more
world peace
To the Editor:
I have been reading what others
have written about this national
and world situations in the political terms and would like to offer
my six bits to the discussion.
I have a growing concern, along
with many others, over the world
and domestic scene, as well.
Where is that World Peace that not
so long ago was the topic of the
day.
We’ve always had strife in this
crazy world, but not like what is
here today. We have unrest, wars,
takeovers, etc. on the outside and
more drug addiction, domestic violence, mass shootings, etc. right
here in our own backyard.
The politicians in the world and
yes, right here in the U.S.A. spend
more time fighting each other than
in trying to pass laws and regulations that could help all of us, here
and abroad - us normal people!
What I think we need in this
“modern” world today is much
more faith and trust in God. We
have the words, “We Trust in
God” on our monies and similar
references to God in some of our
songs and on some of our memorials, although some of those are
being at question of being removed in the courts! Jesus and His
Abba Father God has not turned
away from us, but the politicians
in the world and in the U.S.A.
have turned their backs on them in
too many cases!
We elect them to do things for
us, but it seems they think they
should do thing to us with their
nonsensical undertakings. We
need action to build up the U.S.A.
and the world, not to fragment it
for Satan to take control.
Jacob Kokaly
Newport, Vt.
Ann Coulter
How much is
that psychology
degree worth?
The Republican leadership in
Congress still hasn’t held hearings
on why college is so expensive, although I proposed the idea two
weeks ago. Of course, it’s been a
month since the GOP took control
of Congress, and they also haven’t
voided Obama’s unconstitutional
executive amnesty, passed e-Verify, a fence bill or the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Act.
Democrats are on offense all the
time, even when they’ve just had
their legs cut off. They announce
absurd agenda items and then indignantly demand to know why
Republicans are refusing to deal
with the free unicorn-rides proposal. Obama is a lame-duck president and, three months ago, his
party was slaughtered in midterm
elections. And yet, I gather that his
State of the Union address consisted of a litany of insanely expensive, utterly pointless ideas.
And Republicans fall for it
every time. They consider it a
major victory to come back with a
free-market approach to surrender.
In response to Obama’s “free”
community college idea, Republicans should say: We’re not giving
you anything, and, in fact, we’re
demanding answers from the entire “higher ed” establishment.
You’ll be surprised how liberating
and fun it is to go on offense, Re-
publicans.
The GOP needs to
hold tobacco companystyle hearings, hauling in
the presidents of various
universities and asking
them to justify their multimillion-dollar salaries.
We want professors explaining,
under penalty of perjury, exactly
how much they make per hour for
their rigorous schedules of two
classes a week, summers off, and
full-year “sabbaticals” every few
terms.
Also, we’d like to know how
driving the getaway car for a copkiller constitutes a qualification to
teach college.
College professors relentlessly
hound the rest of society for its
crimes — racism, sexism, “white
privilege” — look what you’re
doing to the environment! Why are
we paying them, again? There’s no
visible reason most of these people
should be teaching at all. How
about they explain their value to
the taxpayers who subsidize their
cushy lives?
Other than engineers, economists and quarterbacks, no one acquires any marketable knowledge
at college. The sole purpose of a
degree is to function as a substitute
IQ test. If employers were allowed
to give applicants 15-minute intelligence tests, they’d have the exact
same information as knowing
what college a person attended.
But they can’t do that, so families have to spend a quarter of a
Black Cyan Magenta Yellow
million dollars to give
their kids the parchment
equivalent of an IQ score.
High school kids who get
into good schools should
present employers with
their college acceptance
letters and skip the goingto-college part.
Republicans need to force colleges to issue reports, just like
drug companies, attesting to the
average cost, and the average
salary, for every degree. It will
cost you $160,000 to receive a degree in Spanish literature and will
take you 88 years to pay that back.
Trust Ann — liberals will go
wild. That’s how you’ll know
you’ve struck gold.
They will scream bloody murder, accuse Republicans of “McCarthyism,” say it’s too
burdensome to collect this information and how can you put a dollar value on a college education?
They better be able to put a dollar value on a college degree!
That’s how it’s being sold. Obama
doesn’t say it’s important to go to
college to learn to think analytically, read critically or be exposed
to different ideas — none of which
occurs at most colleges, anyway.
No, that’s not the pitch. The
pitch is: You’re going to fail in this
economy without a college degree!
If colleges really believe their
product is worth anything, why
don’t they guarantee their own student loans? Why should taxpayers
be on the hook for everyone’s tuition?
According to the colleges, their
graduates are going to earn all
sorts of money! At least that’s
what they say when they’re conning teenagers into taking out
colossal student loans.
“It’s burdensome” is not an excuse accepted by the government
in any other context. It doesn’t
work for businesses being forced
to come up with reams of information for the IRS, the EPA or
OSHA. And the taxpayer isn’t on
the hook for the deceptive promises of any other industry — except hucksters for home mortgages
and student loans.
I would like to hear college
presidents explain that what they
do is totally different from any
other company.
Democrats need to be exposed
as hustlers for the most fraudulent,
overpriced scam in the country.
There’s no other industry that has
politicians flacking for it, much
less conniving to prevent consumers from getting truthful information about the merchandise.
Going after Big Education is all
upside for the GOP. College professors and administrators already
vote 98 percent for the Democrats.
In fact, it’s a triple-play for Republicans: They would punish a liberal
constituency, strike a blow against
the principal vehicle of liberal indoctrination in America, and the
middle class will love it.
© 2015 ANN cOuLTER
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NEW ENGLAND
Vt. considering crossbows for fall archery hunt
Car parts manager admits fraud
MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Board
is considering expanding the use of crossbows for deer hunters in this
fall’s archery season.
Last month, the board gave preliminary approval to a proposal that
would allow all archery deer hunters to use crossbows.
Under current regulations, people who are unable to use a traditional
bow can use a crossbow if they get a note from their doctor.
State Wildlife Director Mark Scott says the number of people who
have permission to use crossbows is increasing.
The Legislature must approve the change and it must also be approved
two more times by the board, which is planning statewide hearings on
the proposal next month.
Rick Sanborn of R&L Archery of Barre says expanding the use of
crossbows would be a big change.
SOUTH BURLINGTON, Vt. (AP) — A former parts manager at a
South Burlington car dealership has been charged with selling thousands
of dollars of parts bought with the company’s credit card and pocketing
the proceeds.
The U.S. attorney’s office said Tuesday that 44-year-old David Cote
of Essex Junction has pleaded not guilty to access device fraud.
He’s accused of buying parts and accessories on e-Bay using the Freedom Nissan credit card and selling them in private sales, without reimbursing the car dealership.
Cote served as parts manager of Freedom Nissan from 2009 until he
was fired in 2012. He faces up to 10 years in prison and a maximum
$250,000 fine.
10 Vermont counties declared
disaster areas after storms
MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — Ten of Vermont’s 14 counties have been
declared federal disaster areas, which will help defray the costs of repairing public and utility infrastructure that was damaged or destroyed
in the storms that hit the state last month.
The declaration means the affected areas will be eligible for federal
reimbursement for up to 75 percent of the costs of storm response and
recovery.
More than 130,000 electric customers lost power in the Dec. 9-12
storms in which heavy, wet snow fell across the state. The 10 covered
counties suffered nearly $4-million in damages.
Communities and municipal and cooperative utilities can be reimbursed for expenses such as equipment rentals, fuel, the cost of contractor assistance, employee overtime tied directly to storm response and
restoration, and other eligible expenses.
Suspect sought in supermarket robbery
PORTSMOUTH, N.H. (AP) — Police in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, are investigating an armed robbery at a supermarket.
They said a man entered a Market Basket on Monday night and approached the customer service desk, where he showed a handgun and
demanded money. He then left and was last seen walking toward Peverly
Hill Road.
No one was hurt.
Police described the man as white and about 5-foot-7 with a stocky
build. He was wearing a dark hooded sweatshirt, gray pants or jeans, a
baseball hat with a purple visor,
and a black mask or bandanna covering his face below the eyes.
Former Gov. John Lynch to be honored
MANCHESTER, N.H. (AP) — A ceremony is honoring former New
Hampshire Gov. John Lynch.
Lynch is scheduled to receive the Robert Frost Contemporary American Award on Tuesday night. Boston Red Sox President and CEO Larry
Lucchino is the keynote speaker at the event.
The event at the Manchester Radisson Hotel was originally scheduled
for Jan. 27, but was rescheduled due to last week’s snowstorm.
Plymouth State University created the award in 1970 in memory of
the nation’s late poet laureate, who taught at an earlier incarnation of
the school. The award recognizes New Englanders whose service exemplifies Frost’s values of individuality, hard work, humanitarianism
and devotion to the country he described as “north of Boston.”
Lynch was governor from January 2005 until January 2013. He was
elected to a historic fourth term in 2010.
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Concord courthouse reopens
after fire causes damage
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — A courthouse in New Hampshire’s capital
is open again following a weekend fire in a conference room.
The Merrimack County Superior Court in Concord is fully staffed and
all hearings will be held. Court spokeswoman Carole Alfano says there
is no counter service because of water damage in the lobby, but filings
are still being accepted.
A fire alarm went off shortly after 10 a.m. Sunday, when the building
was closed and secure. Fire officials said fire damage was contained to
the first-floor room that contained vending machines. There was smoke
and water damage to other parts of the building.
No files or court records were damaged.
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Patricia Riggle of Greenland was
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of aggravated driving while intoxicated and child endangerment following the accident in Portsmouth
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Police said they found the 47year-old Riggle and her teenage
child “deeply stuck in a snowbank.” The car was towed.
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THE CALEDONIAN-RECORD
A6
FATAL CRASH STILL UNDER INVESTIGATION
LANCASTER, N.H. — Police
are still investigating the factors
that led to a fatal accident Tuesday
afternoon along Route 3 in Lancaster.
Police reported one person dead
in the crash that occurred about 1
p.m.
It was undetermined Wednesday
where specifically the crash occurred along Route 3 and if there
were other vehicles involved.
A call placed Wednesday to
N.H. State Police Troop F was not
returned and Lancaster police on
Wednesday did not release the
Audit
The school’s business manager is
Kathy Ducharme.
Despite the positive review,
Hawley highlighted weaknesses
within the free/reduced lunch program.
First, 20 percent of free/reduced
lunch applications tested by the
audit were either missing, incomplete or incorrectly classified based
on reported income.
Second, free/reduced lunch
claims submitted to the Vermont
Agency of Education “were not
supported by sufficient data to support the meals claimed,” which
could result in disallowed claims, it
states. The problem had a $7,500
impact last fiscal year, it states.
The audit also lays blame, stating,
“The staff person responsible for
maintaining claims documentation
had significant other management
responsibilities and insufficient time
and attention was devoted to this
compliance requirement.” The audit
recommendation: “Someone other
than the food services manager
should review the claim documentation and ensure that records reconcile to the claims submitted and that
supporting documentation is retained.”
The school responded by shifting
documentation duties to the business office. Ducharme, the business
manager, started addressing the
problem this summer.
“It’s a big job,” she said. “August
through September we lived and
breathed it.”
Ducharme said 68 percent of the
school’s 675 students are enrolled in
the free/reduced lunch program.
Solar
pecially from large use customers,
the utility and its other power users
could end up picking up all of the
fixed costs incurred by the net metering customer.
Mason says three large solar arrays, that generated more power
than the customers used, could
hand Lyndonville Electric a net loss
of around $275,000 to $300,000
dollars in revenues, an amount
equal to the revenue loss sustained
by LED when the Kennametal plant
in Lyndonville shut down.
According to Ken Mason, there
could be a scenario in which the
customers of Lyndonville Electric
could end up paying the fixed costs
incurred by Lyndonville Electric
while users on the solar energy net
metering program escape without
paying anything toward the cost of
operation of Lyndonville Electric if
the money they receive for generating the solar electricity is greater
than their total electric consumption
bills.
Lyndonville Electric buys wholesale power under numerous agreements with a wide variety of power
producers, including, for example,
from Hydro-Quebec right now for
7.5 cents. LED sells it for about 14
cents. Under the latest net metering
rules, though, LED would be required to purchase the net metered
solar energy at 19 cents per kwh.
LED would thus pay more to buy
power from the net metered solar
farm that it charges to sell that
power to a customer.
So far, LED’s net metering customers never received more credits
for power generated than the customer paid for power purchased
from LED because they were small
producers. Because the amount of
energy credited under net metering
was less than the energy sold to the
customer, the loss suffered by Lyndonville Electric was manageable.
Now, however, with net metering
projects allowed to total 15 percent
of LED’s peak load, the three 500
kw solar farms could end up getting
more credit for net metering than
the customers pay for electricity.
Shullenberger said Tuesday that,
so far, his firm is “just exploring the
concept” and could develop
“maybe one or up to three” solar
projects but added the firm was “really in the early stages.”
Shullenberger said the idea that
net metering could shift a utility’s
fixed costs to the other customers
was real, saying, “I agree it is a concern.” He said a solar farm would
pay property taxes on the installation. He added his firm would not
seek to avoid paying a host utilities’
fixed costs.
Ken Mason told trustees that if a
customer chooses to build a net metering site, “It’s not something
where we have any choice.” Referring to the net metering program,
Mason added, “utilities are obligated to take this whether we like it
or not.”
Barton
“I live about 300 feet from the
village line,” Lucier said, adding
that his home is on the village’s
water system. It takes him only two
minutes to get to the fire station, but
the fire department’s bylaws also indicate he has to live in the village to
be chief.
Lucie Gaboriault, the elected village clerk, does not live in the village either. Snedeker said he’d run
the question by the village’s attorney and get back to Lucier.
In the meantime, the trustees
asked how budget preparations
were going sans two major officers.
Lucier, who said Dave Claeys and
Rick Sicard have been showing him
the ropes, said the budget was levelfunded this year.
Snedeker suggested seeking out
assistance from and partnering with
the local agency program coordinator for the community emergency
response team.
Lucier won’t have to look too
hard, because Snedeker will set him
up with emergency management
specialist Bruce Melendy, who just
happens to work with him at Northeastern Vermont Development Association (NVDA).
According to NVDA’s web site,
the organization works with all 55
member towns to complete local
emergency operations plans, guides
that are useful in the early stages of
a disaster. They are updated annually with the assistance of the town
clerk, select board, emergency medical folks, and the fire chief.
Lucier is also seeking “hardworking, honest” recruits for the department. No experience is necessary,
but applicants should live nearby
and be eager to learn. The department will pay a per diem rate for
firefighters to take classes and holds
its own trainings every Wednesday
night and one Sunday per month.
Those interested can show up on
a Wednesday night between 6:30
and 8:30 p.m. or call Lucier at 6738330.
911
Selectman Perry Hunt said the
area will lose good-paying jobs.
Joe Profera, a local firefighter
and chairman of the Derby zoning
board and planning commission,
said that the meeting is needed so
local people understand the need
for a Derby dispatch center.
Selectman Grant Spates said that
it’s clear that Rutland and Derby
areas did not vote for Shumlin and
that’s why those two PSAPs are
targeted.
“Now we are getting close to the
real deal,” he said.
There is room for more dispatchers in Williston, Martin said. There
is no money in the capital budget
to expand the Derby PSAP to cover
all of northern Vermont, he said.
Martin said that as sheriff, he is
being told that nothing will change
as far as the service that his agency
will receive from the state dispatching centers.
Ellam said that Derby dispatches
more agencies, from fire departments to Homeland Security, than
any other region in Vermont.
The list, according to dispatchers, includes six state police barracks, 15 municipal police
departments, six sheriff’s depart-
ments, 39 fire departments, 19
EMS departments, fish and wildlife
for six counties, constables, Vermont Agency of Transportation,
Department of Motor Vehicles,
state liquor control inspectors and
the U.S. Forest Service.
Derby handled the overflow
when the other PSAPs were overwhelmed during Irene, he said.
Selectman Beula-Jean Shattuck
said Derby should call for a district
wide meeting to discuss this.
Select Board Chairman Brian
Smith said that at the very least
they should have Flynn here to explain why the closure would not affect public safety.
Last week, Flynn said he would
not propose a change like this if he
thought it would have any affect on
public safety.
Ellam said the fire chiefs fought
to put the PSAP in Derby and in
exchange were promised it would
not move. Unfortunately, some
said, the legislators and the governor who were in on the deal are no
longer in office.
“I would want to see an absolute
guarantee they can handle this,”
Ellam said of the Williston PSAP.
continued from Page A1
the aggregate remaining fund information of the St. Johnsbury School
District, VT, as of June 30, 2014,
and the respective changes in financial position for the year then ended
in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the
United States of America,” according to the audit.
Hawley translated.
“That’s the best opinion you can
get,” he said. “It’s basically saying
everything is okay with your financial statements. Your financial statements are in good order. It means
short period of time as crews reyour expenditures are recorded in
moved the plow truck blocking it.
appropriate accounts. Your expendi“The initial call didn’t sound tures are in order. You’ve got a good
very good to us, but fortunately record of your federal money.”
everyone there was okay,” said
Samson.
The crash was just one of several minor mishaps along that
stretch of Route 3 Tuesday morning that included a two-car collision at the entrance to Easter Seals,
to the north and not too far from continued from Page A1
the high school entrance, that in- cord Woodworking site off Church
volved one car over the embank- Street. Later, the site under considment, with minor damage.
eration for the proposed energy
Temperatures Tuesday morning park was switched to the former
were 10 below zero, and in some Northeast Tool off of Pudding Hill
Road.
areas colder.
Lyndon trustees and Lyndonville
“With the temperatures being
that cold, salt doesn’t work,” said Electric Manager Ken Mason discussed the proposed energy park
Samson.
and Shullenberger’s role in its development. In the 2010 article, Village Trustee David Mann told the
other Trustees, “I don’t think I’ll be
having a whole lot of contact with
Shullenberger going forward.”
Now Green Lantern DevelopCunningham was injured in the ment hopes to interest the three area
organizations in Vermont’s net mecrash as well.
While he has not been arraigned tering program and ultimately engion new charges as a result of the neer and develop the 500 kw solar
second alleged count of drunken farms. Lyndonville Electric would
driving, Cunningham has been be required to purchase the power
generated by the solar farms at a
cited into court.
To support that charge, Trooper price higher than its typical wholeSteven Fauteux wrote in his affi- sale costs under the Vermont’s net
davit that he stopped a vehicle on metering regulations.
The solar arrays would allow the
Interstate 91 in Barton on Jan. 24
just after midnight for several owners to generate clean renewable
energy and take advantage of state
motor vehicle violations.
Fauteux wrote that the vehicle financial incentives at the same
switched lanes without using a time. The outcome for the owner of
blinker and then, once in the left the solar array would be sharply
lane, nearly stopped for no appar- lowered energy costs.
On the negative side, if enough
ent reason. The driver went back
into the right lane without using a producers come on line in Lynblinker and while traveling at a donville Electric’s service area, esspeed lower than the statutory minimum of 40 miles per hour.
When he pulled over, Cunningham’s driver side wheels were still
in the travel lane, Fauteux wrote.
Cunningham showed signs of
intoxication, but refused a breath
test. He said he was driving slowly continued from Page A1
because of icy roads, but Fauteux he’s acting as chief, but has not been
noted that the roads were bare that elected to the position.
early morning.
The Barton Trustees told him
Cunningham’s record includes Monday evening that they can’t just
two convictions – in 2008 and appoint him chief, but he could po2009 – for possessing alcohol as a tentially serve as acting or interim
minor.
chief.
Chief Stephen Bosley and second
assistant chief Nate Edmonds have
left the village, he said.
Lucier asked if he had the authority to appoint John Nolan and Dave
Gilbert said.
“The public policy rationale for Billado as assistant chiefs to assist
collecting and storing somebody’s in taking charge of fire scenes.
DNA because they’ve mislabeled Lucier explained that the charge ofmaple syrup, bought nine bottles ficer on a fire scene is decided by
of whiskey in New Hampshire to chain of command, but right now,
save a few bucks, or ventured onto he’s flying solo and would like some
a neighbor’s meadow is not clear,” help.
Lucier said he’d like to run for
Gilbert said.
the chief position at annual meeting
on March 10, but he’s not sure if
he’s allowed to do so.
name of the victim. Police representatives from Lancaster said the
investigation continues.
It was snowing at the time, but
it wasn’t known if that contributed
to the crash.
The Associated Press contributed to this report.
POLICE SEEK CAR THAT CAUSED PLOW TRUCK SCHOOL BUS CRASH
WHITEFIELD, N.H. — Police
are searching for the driver of a vehicle involved in an early morning
accident Tuesday involving a state
plow truck and school bus.
No injuries were reported and
no students were on the bus, said
Whitefield Police Chief Ed Samson.
The crash occurred about 6:45
a.m. just north of White Mountains
Regional High School along Route
3.
The short bus owned by W.W.
Berry’s Transportation was traveling south and a N.H. Department
of Transportation plow truck north.
Police aren’t yet sure of the particulars, but it appears a third vehicle was also traveling south and
the plow truck swerved to avoid it,
said Samson.
The plow truck went into the
guardrail then spun on the roadway, causing the southbound bus
to hit it, resulting in significant
damage to the bus, said Samson.
While the other vehicle involved hasn’t yet been identified,
Samson said witnesses were able
to describe it and police feel confident the driver will be identified.
Because the crash involves a
school bus, special motor vehicles
division staff working out of N.H.
State Police Troop G will take the
lead in investigating.
The names of the school bus
driver and plow truck driver were
taken by NHSP, calls to which
were not returned on Tuesday.
The roadway was closed for a
DRUNK DRIVER WHO INJURED PASSENGER DENIES NEW DUI
By Jen Hersey Cleveland
Staff Writer
NEWPORT CITY — A driver
who severely injured a passenger in
a drunken driving crash in 2012 denied violating probation by again
driving drunk.
Deputy
State’s
Attorney
Michelle Donnelly asked Judge M.
Kathleen Manley to hold defendant
James Cunningham, 26, of West
Charleston, without bail.
Cunningham was convicted of
drunken driving with serious injury
resulting in September 2013 and
was sentenced to serve 30 days on
a work crew out of an underlying
one- to three-year sentence. One
probation condition forbids him
from consuming alcohol.
Donnelly’s request was made in
light of the fact that the Department
of Corrections needs to be able to
supervise Cunningham and ensure
the safety of the public, she said.
Public Defender Zach Weight
found the request to be heavyhanded and asked Manley to use
discretion in fashioning conditions
of release so Cunningham may
continue his employment and care
for his 4-year-old daughter.
“To hold without bail would be
a bit extreme in this situation, your
DNA
continued from Page A1
evidence resulted in dismissal of
the charge.
Support for expanding the DNA
database was not unanimous.
Some on the committee asked
skeptical questions. And Allen
Punch
continued from Page A1
after a four-day jury trial.
First-degree assault with a
deadly weapon constitutes a Class
A felony punishable by a maximum
sentence of 7½ to 15 years in state
prison.
“It still doesn’t fix anything because we still have a deceased individual,” said McCormick. “It’s not
the ideal resolution, but it’s good to
see the jury saw it our way on that
one.”
About 4 p.m. Dec. 31, 2013,
Dupont, 48, punched John Kenney,
57, also of Lancaster, outside the
door to Dupont’s Elm Street apartment.
Kenney suffered blunt-impact in-
honor,” Weight said.
Manley agreed, but said if Cunningham were to return to court
with additional charges or violations of conditions, he would very
likely be going to jail without the
possibility of bail.
“I am not allowing the defendant
to operate a motor vehicle at all,”
Manley said.
If police or probation officers request a breath test and Cunningham blows numbers, he will be
lodged. He can be arrested without
a warrant for violating conditions.
Cunningham is subject to a 24hour curfew, but he can leave the
house to go to work and other necessary engagements.
Probation Officer Shelia Martin
told Manley that Cunningham had
done so well on probation that the
Department of Corrections had requested an early discharge from
probation in October 2014, but that
request had been denied.
In the underlying case, Cunningham crashed into a rock ledge off
Interstate 91 in Derby on July 13,
2012, according to Trooper Rajesh
Hailey’s affidavit. Cunningham’s
passenger Tracey Dennis suffered
three broken ribs, a punctured lung,
a lacerated liver, and a broken nose.
She was in the intensive care unit
for five days, Hailey wrote.
Gilbert, director of the state affiliate of the American Civil Liberties
Union, said that group opposes the
bill.
Mislabeling maple syrup, bringing in more than eight quarts of
whiskey from out of state and trespassing on a neighbor’s property
are all misdemeanor offenses that
carry potential jail sentences,
juries to his head after falling to the
floor.
Dupont, who has a string of convictions for assault, argued self-defense at trial.
According to one witness,
Dupont, before the punch, had consumed most of a bottle of vodka.
He was first indicted for the
death in March, on the alternate theories of manslaughter, negligent
homicide and first-degree assault.
The first-degree assault count on
which he was ultimately convicted
was brought before a grand jury in
October and the resulting indictment corrects the previous assault
count.
The October indictment charged
Dupont with knowingly causing
bodily injury to Kenney by using
his fist as a deadly weapon
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At trial, prosecutors sought to introduce evidence of Dupont’s previous convictions for assault,
arguing they prove Dupont knows
that his fist is capable of producing
serious bodily injury and constitutes a deadly weapon in the manner used.
Had Dupont been convicted of
manslaughter, he could have faced
a prison sentence of up to 30 years.
Dupont’s criminal history includes convictions for drunken
driving as well as multiple convictions for assault, including a 2011
assault in which he fractured the
nose, cheekbone and jaw of a North
Country man.
He was found guilty on all three
counts and sentenced to a total of 12
months in Coos County jail and
was required to complete counseling.
In 2011 at Lancaster District
Court, Dupont was found guilty of
assault by banging the head of
woman against a counter in Groveton. He was fined $500 and sentenced to serve 60 days in jail, with
30 days suspended. He was also required to undergo an alcohol evaluation.
Following Tuesday’s jury verdict, the judge ordered a pre-sentencing investigation. A sentencing
date has not yet been set.
WEDNESDAy, FEBRuARy 4, 2015
continued from Page A1
he said that Flynn indicated that
Gov. Peter Shumlin has set his
sights on closing both the Derby
and Rutland PSAPs to save $1.7
million.
And Martin noted that Flynn
knows the consequences of the closure.
Flynn grew up and lived in the
Derby area and was the long-time
state’s attorney for Orleans County
before becoming Shumlin’s public
safety commissioner.
The closure would eliminate 15
to 20 positions. Some of the dispatchers in the Derby PSAP would
be asked to work at the Williston
PSAP, which would then cover all
of northern Vermont.
The Rutland PSAP would be
merged into the Rockingham
PSAP.
Martin said he didn’t agree with
the closure but he pointed out that
Derby dispatchers are already dispatching for St. Johnsbury and
Bradford areas, and cover the Vernon area where the former Yankee
nuclear power plant is located.
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CALEDONIAN Black Cyan Magenta Yellow
A7
By Dave Green
Tundra
Zits
Fred Basset
Find The Jumble Game
in Classifieds,
page B6.
6 3
2
9 6 3
Sudoku And ScrabbleGram Solutions
From Tuesday, February 3
Hagar The Horrible
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2015 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
Garfield
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Peanuts
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THE REcORD • WEDNESDAY, FEBRuARY 4, 2015
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The RecoRd • WednesdAy, FebRuARy 4, 2015
LITTLETON
AGRICULTURE
MARTY’S
FEED STORE
(AT MARTY’S FIRST STOP)
• Poulin Grain
• Blue Seal Feeds
• Pet Food & Supplies
• Equine
• Wild Birdseed & Feeders
Straw • Fertilizers
• Grass & Garden Seeds
• Fence & Fencers
MOTORSPORTS
Right off I-91, Exit 17 Rte 302
Wells River, VT
802-429-2500
absolutepowersportsvt.com
Hours: M-F 8-5 Sat. 8-2
M O T O R C Y C L E S
Compact Tractors
We Service All Makes & Models
515 Union Street TAX
Littleton, NH
FREE
603-444-5003
NH
www.littletonmotorsports.com
Compact Tractors
Route 2 • Danville, VT
802-684-2574
CHECK US
OUT ON
Power Equipment
OPEN EVERY DAY
AUTOMOBILES
SALES • SERVICE • PARTS
Route 2, Montpelier, VT
Top Shop
Award Winner
Approved
Auto Repair
• AAA Independent
Shop of the Year
Four Times
• Truck Shop
Servicing All
Types of Trucks
SERVICE YOU CAN TRUST
Open Weekdays • 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM
1193 Portland Street
St. Johnsbury, VT
802-748-3636
www.wesward.com
OIL & FILTER
CHANGE
19
Up to 5 quarts and FREE 27 pt. inspection.
Most cars & light trucks. Synthetic oil extra.
We Service All
Makes & Models
Mon-Tue-Thu- Fri 7-5pm • Wed 7-7pm
802-223-0001
www.capitolcityauto.com
19
$
95
Up to 5 quarts and FREE 27 pt. inspection.
Most cars & light trucks. Synthetic oil extra.
We Honor All Service
Contracts No Matter Where
You Bought Your Car
BOUGHT •• SOLD •• TRADED
BOUGHT
TRADED
Skidders, Backhoes,
Dozers, Loaders,
Excavators,
Skid-steers, Forklifts,
Feller Bunchers, Chippers,
Screeners, Forwarders & Farm
Tractors & Implements New & Used
Parts & Tires, Trucks & Trailers
802-223-0001
www.capcitykia.com
New Foundations
Under Existing
Homes
626-5888
WALK-INS WELCOME
•
•
•
•
•
Complete Auto Service
Alignments
Tires
Inspections
Brakes & Exhaust
724 BROAD STREET
LYNDONVILLE, VT
HOURS:
Mon.-Fri. 7:30-5:30; Sat. 8-12
www.nashequipment.com
email: [email protected]
331 Route 26, Colebrook, NH 03576
(603) 237-8857
Check out our website at:
www.jonparkstractor.com
NO SALES TAX IN NH
BURKE VIEW
GARAGE,
INC.
Established 1981
Route 114 • Lyndonville, VT
Foreign & Domestic Repairs
• Oil Change
• Vermont State Inspection
• Brakes • Exhaust • Tires
MINOR & MAJOR REPAIRS
802-626-3282
Monday-Friday • 8-5
“Where Quality Isn’t
Expensive, It’s Priceless.”
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Retaining Walls
Patios • Fire Pits
Stairs & Steps
& much more
Free Estimates
aci Certified
802-695-1341
www.haroldsconcreteconst.com
802-748-2752 • CELL: 802-274-8984
FIREARMS
C
HUCK ’S
COMMUNITY FITNESS
Over 700
Firearms
Guns Bought
& Sold
Monday . Wednesday . Friday
8:30-9:30 AM
New & Used
4 King’s Square, Whitefield, NH
603-837-2345
www.villagegun.com
GUTTERS
733 Broad Street
Lyndonville, VT
“Make it Painless”
VISIT US
TODAY
Lunch Crunch:
Monday | 12:10-12:55 PM
JOIN
ANYTIME!
802
751.9465
603-444-1188
Service 603-991-8415
Sales
49 Main Street
Littleton, New Hampshire
Next Door to Chutters
LOWER HEATING COSTS –
603-444-5425
In business for over 57 years.
R
O
O
FI
N
! Automobile &
Heavy Duty
Truck Parts
Improve energy efficiency and make
your home more comfortable and saleable.
Call Michael Trudeau for cost details.
Michael Trudeau/Kitchenland
BPI Certified Building Analyst
802-748-8322 Cell 802-748-5494
• ENERGY AUDITS • INSULATING
• AIR SEALING • REMODELING
! Battery &
Alternator
Testing
! Specialty Paints
Available
Visit www.napaonline.com
603-444-2982 603-837-2402
225 Union St.
Littleton, NH
LEAFPROOF
GUTTER COVERS
Custom Made
Many Colors to Choose
Free Estimates • Fully Insured
We Fix Damaged Fascia
Owner Installer
All Work Guaranteed
ST. JOHNSBURY, VT
WWW.SNJRAINGUTTERS.COM
802-751-6191
KMJ Precision
Fuels, Inc.
• Glass Cutting
• Key Cutting
• Shade Cutting
• Lamp Repair
• Window/Screen Repair
• Carpet Cleaning Rental
• Pipe Threading/Cutting
• Drain Auger Rentals
• Propane Exchange
Special Orders – Layaways
Fishing/Hunting Licenses
Shop truevalue.com
FREE Shipping to Our Store!
Heating Experts!
Precision Lubricants
T&B Fraser
Contracting
General
Contracting,
Roofing and
Carpentry
NEW CONSTRUCTION
& RENOVATIONS
Free Estimates
Fully Insured
Bob 274-1828 • Travis 473-8006
30+ yrs. experience
LYNDONVILLE, VT.
ELECTRONICS
G
ELECTRICAL SERVICES
PAINTING
Free Estimates
Fully Insured
JEFF GALLAGHER
802-274-4636
FLOORING
• Quality Sanding • Refinishing
• Sales and Installation of Hardwood
& Softwood Flooring
• Over 40 Years Experience
• Fully Insured
WOOD FLOOR
SERVICE
WEST DANVILLE, VT.
802-563-2512 • 800-286-8895
Generator Installs
Dan Peal – Owner
VT License #EM-05585
Fully Insured
2543 Island Pond Road
East Haven, VT 05837
802-274-9623
FLORAL
Artistic
Gardens
Premium Fresh Flowers & Upscale Design
Artistry For All Your Special Occasions
802-748-5646
Specializing in Weddings and
Expression of Sympathy
St. Johnsbury, VT
www.artisticgardensvt.com
Delivery Available
HEALTH
ASK ABOUT NEW
EDGE
PROGRAM
Get a phone when you want it!
Come in or call for details.
LANCASTER STORE
218 Main Street
Lancaster, NH 03584
603-788-2200
FRAMING
We have the
frames you’re
looking for.
• Conservation Framing
• Dry Mounting
• Stretching of
Embroidery
and Canvas
• Signature
Mats
• Do It Yourself
Framing Supplies
The Framing Format
And Gallery
485 Lafayette Street, St. Johnsbury, VT
802-748-3964
Email: [email protected]
HEARING
LANCASTER
HARDWARE
198 Eastern Ave.
St. Johnsbury, VT 05819
Lubricating Oil • Greases
Winter Chemicals
152 Pond View Road • Bethlehem, NH
Phone/Fax: 603-444-7032
Phone: 603-444-2910
Hours: Monday, Tuesday
& Wednesday, 9-4
MEDICAL
UNIFORMS
328 Main Street
Newport, VT 05855
& Accessories
Hours: By Appointment
Sandi
Rebecca
Diane
Isabelle
Twin City Plaza
1284 US Rt. 302, Barre, VT 05641
802-476-4905 • 1-800-677-4905
Peter L’Esperance • Sean L’Esperance
NATIONAL
BOARD FOR
CERTIFICATION
IN HEARING
INSTRUMENT SCIENCES
Hours: M-S 8-5 • Sun. 9-1
603-788-4445
HOME DECOR
“Your One Stop
Home Decor Outlet”
Over 35 Years Experience
Sandra Day – BC – HIS
200 Main Street • Lancaster, N.H.
JEWELRY
Route 302 (West of Lisbon)
Landaff, NH 03585
Wood or Gas Stoves & Fireplaces
Pellet Stoves
802-748-4852
1-800-838-4327
America’s Largest Hearing
Instrument Manufacturer
To learn more, visit:
www.starkey.com
S
AMERICA’ING
LL
BEST SE BS!
SCRU
603-838-2400
www.curtnrod.com
• Home Heating Oil
• Kerosene
• On-Road &
Off-Road Fuel
Route 3N
Whitefield, NH
D.P. ELECTRIC, LLC
Paint
Colormatching
Over 1400 Window
Treatments!
Many styles, colors & sizes in stock.
All displayed throughout our
five showrooms.
THURSDAY THRU MONDAY • 10-5
CLOSED TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY
KENNELS
Wright’s Mountain
Boarding Kennels
in Danville, VT
(Off Joe’s Brook Road)
BOUTIQUE
Buying
Gold, Silver
Diamonds
Estate Jewelry
Eastern Avenue
St. Johnsbury, Vt.
• Doggie Daycare
• Overnight Boarding
OWNERS:
Leonard & Lane8e Wright
620 Wild Leek Lane
St. Johnsbury, VT
802-748-1125
802-274-1418
802-748-2933
PUPPIES AVAILABLE
LOG HOME MAINT.
MARTIAL ARTS
(Next to Star Theatre)
BUCK’S
GRIME
LANDSCAPING
[email protected]
• TRUCKING & EXCAVATING
• BUSHHOGGING
• GARDENS ROTOTILLED
TREE & BRUSH REMOVAL
• HYDRO SEEDING
• PARKING LOT &
DRIVEWAY SWEEPING
• DRIVEWAY GRADING
• DRIVEWAY SEAL COAT
& CRACK FILLING
FREE ESTIMATES • FULLY INSURED
533 LAWRENCE ROAD
WATERFORD, VT
802-626-8418
802-748-1915
AFFORDABLY!
ROUGH-SAWN TIMBERS
FRAMING LUMBER
ATTICAT INSULATION
ABC METAL ROOFING
PLYWOOD
PRESSURE-TREATED LUMBER
LANDSCAPING
See you in the Spring
for all your Landscaping
& Gardening needs.
ANNUALS
HANGING BASKETS
TREES • SHRUBS
PERENNIALS • VEGETABLES
Mon.-Fri. 8-5 • Sat. 8-Noon
Dave & Diane Ainsworth
POULSEN
LUMBER
HARDWARE
Fireplaces & Stoves
Wood • Pellet • Gas
Sales • Service
& Installation
Chimney
Cleaning & Lining
376 Broad Street
Lyndonville, Vermont
802-626-4276 • 802-626-9251
(Vt.) 1-800-639-1591
CONTRACTORS
656 MONROE RD. • LITTLETON, NH 03561
C-S Auto & Truck
Parts, Inc.
&
HEATING
DEMERS HEARTH
& FIREPLACE
141 Main Street
Littleton, NH 03561
603-444-4888 • Closed Tues. & Wed.
3 Full Floors of Antiques
Brakes • Exhaust • Tires
Oil Change • Struts & Shocks
Collision Repair • Used Parts
4-Wheel Alignment
Auto Detailing • 24-Hour Towing
Vt. State Inspection Station
BLDG PRODUCTS
Circuit Training
Class Schedule:
802-748-8076
EASTERN AVENUE, ST. JOHNSBURY, VT.
Full Service Glass Shop
Locally Owned & Operated
FITNESS
THE VILLAGE
GUN STORE
We Service Everything We Sell
painlessglass.com
802-626-9990
New & Old Water / Sewer Systems
Power Lines / Drainage
Retaining Walls / Driveway Repair
Gravel / Sand / Topsoil
Stay Matt / In Town Sewer Lines
Foundations Under Old Homes
New Constuction Site Prep / Roads
Driveways / Ponds / Site Work
Foundations / Bulldozing
Demolition / Stumping
Equipment Hauling
FREE ESTIMATES • FULLY INSURED
No Job Too Big or Too Small
BUY • SELL • TRADE
• Auto & Residential
Glass Replacement
• Commercial Glazing
& Insulated Units
Sales and Service
Good Used Late Model
Cars and Trucks For Sale
www.efficiencyvermont.com or
Call 888-921-5990
EXCAVATION & TRUCKING
www.bobsconcreteconst.com
Painless
Glass
Mountain View Auto, Inc.
Incentives available from Efficiency Vermont
•COMMERCIAL •RESIDENTIAL
Price stays the same
from beginning of job
to the end of job.
GLASS SHOP
603-788-4577
107 SUMMER STREET • LANCASTER, NH
ELECTRICAL
Foundations • Floors
~
Mobile Home Slabs
~
Foundations
Under Existing Houses
EMBROIDERY
“Service Before And After The Sale”
NASH
EQUIPMENT
CONTRACTORS
Cell: 802-535-5860
Fax: 802-626-9350
Saranac Street
Antiques
“PRIMEX & FIRESTONE”
Trygg Chaine Select Skidder Chains
Norse Winches
Mon-Tue-Thu- Fri 7-5pm • Wed 7-7pm
QUALITY FLOORS, SLABS
& FOUNDATIONS
Route 2 • Montpelier, VT
95
OIL & FILTER
CHANGE
BUILDING
AUTOMOTIVE
$
ANTIQUES
DownEaster Trailers
AUTOMOTIVE
Family Owned & Operated
One Source for All Your
Automotive Needs
AG EQUIPMENT
CALEB TEMPLE
Lawn Installation • Bark Mulch
Bushhogging • Hardscaping
Retaining Walls • Sweeping
Fencing • Excavating
Light Trucking • Lot Clearing
Plowning/Sanding
Driveway Maintenance & Repair
JEFF CLEVELAND
802-626-0933
CELL 802-535-7069
765 Mitchell Drive, Lyndonville, VT
LANDSCAPE
& LAWNCARE
4 SEASON CARE
• Spring/Fall Cleanup • Mowing
• Garden Design & Installation
• Brush Clearing & Removal
• Bushhogging • Light Trucking
• Snowplowing & Sanding
Fully Insured ~ Free Estimates
CALL 802-748-8892
CELL 802-751-9491
JAMES & NANCY BUXTON
Black Cyan Magenta Yellow
Protect your investment
We specialize in:
Log home Maintenance
Cedar Log Furniture
Log Rails
JOSSELYN’S
SAWMILL INC.
306 North Road
Jefferson, NH 03583
1-800-586-4507
www.josselyns.com
USA KARATE
Sensei Chuck Simpson
• Build Self Confidence
• Learn Practical Self Defense,
Respect, Discipline & Self Control
Program Ages 4-Adult
Family Programs Available
JOIN ANYTIME
2 INTRO CLASSES
WITH UNIFORM $24.99
Circuit Training
Classes Available
School: 802-748-8411
Cell: 802-751-9465
www.sullivansusakarate.com
`