[email protected] Out of the Box www.wit.edu/enews October 2010

[email protected]
www.wit.edu/enews
October 2010
IN THIS ISSUE:
Out of the Box
Art Installation in the Casella Gallery
Out of the Box
Art Installation in the Casella Gallery
Industrial Design Student
Wins Scholarship
Dave Fustino, BIND ’11
Confessions of Columbus’
Shipbuilders
President’s Distinguished Speaker
Series Kicks Off
Faculty Profile:
Lisa MacLean, Assistant
Professor, Computer Science
Fostering Family
Scene Around
News and Newcomers
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The fictional living room by artist Randy Regier.
The infamous Bonnie and Clyde met their demise in a blaze of machine
gun hellfire when federal agents fired incessantly at their 1934 Ford. The
criminals became folk heroes; their car, a legend. On display in the Casella
Gallery, an artistic representation of a Bonnie and Clyde toy car—complete
with bullet holes and blood—speaks to society’s tendency to glorify criminals.
The toy is one of many strewn across a fictional living room floor created by
Randy Regier as part of his week-long installation on campus titled Out of the
Box. The exhibit uses original toys created by Regier, meant to look vintage,
which serve as a critique of the American consumer culture.
“His work is unusual in that it got the students thinking about visual culture
and art in a different way,” says Humanities, Social Sciences, and Management
Professor Ron Bernier. A former mechanic, Regier began his art career in the
late 90s. His work has since been featured in many private art collections as
well as multiple museums across the country. “He’s not a toymaker, but the
things that he makes resemble toys. Similar to the toys our grandparents
played with that had very specific underlying messages about gender and
nationality, Regier’s toys remind the viewer that what’s on the box is not
necessarily what’s inside.”
For instance, Regier’s Electric Man Waiting for a Train Set deceives the
consumer by printing the “Man Waiting for a” portion of the name in impossibly
small print, an aspect that an excited child would easily miss. The child may
think the toy is an electric train set when, in fact, it is just a man sitting on
a bench next to empty, trainless tracks; a commentary on neglecting to read
the fine print.
“Everything about Regier’s installations is fabricated by him,” says Bernier.
“He just has this wild imagination, and I thought it would be really great for
Wentworth students to see how far imagination can take you.”
Dave Fustino, BIND ’11
Dave Fustino can make a tea kettle sexy and
turn a sprinkler into an engrossing, interactive
children’s toy.
Designs of both a user-friendly, streamlined
kettle and an interactive children’s toy, Freddie
the Fire Hydrant, were included in the 20-project
portfolio which won him a $2,500 scholarship
from the Industrial Designer Society of America
(IDSA) to be used toward his senior year tuition.
Campus News
Industrial Design Student Wins Scholarship
“Having my designs recognized makes me feel
confident about the direction of my career,” says
Fustino.
Fustino’s winning portfolio included schoolassigned work like a beautiful-but-functional fruit
holder that displays apples creatively, an aviation- Dave Fustino, BIND ’11, displays designs for
inspired door handle meant for a captain’s cabin
Freddie the Fire Hydrant on a Cintiq tablet.
of an airliner, and designs he worked on during
his first co-op at Proteus Design, the company
responsible for the Keurig one-cup coffee maker. Fustino raves about the co-op program at Wentworth,
noting that not only did he gain insight and experience, but he was also able to use projects he
designed during his co-ops for his winning portfolio. “Having the opportunity to apply the skill-set
that Wentworth has taught me prior to graduation has allowed me to create strong relationships with
employers,” he says.
Fustino is currently completing his second co-op at Philips Color Kinetics, the world leader in LED
lighting systems. He works within the Industrial Design Group at their Burlington, Mass., office, their
global R&D headquarters for solid-state lighting. Fustino is presently working on a special project for
a local school and is helping to standardize product color specifications.
It’s the kind of experience Fustino sees as an investment. “Through the co-op program, I have learned
a great deal of valuable skills and information only on-the-job training can provide.”
A tea kettle designed by Fustino in one of his courses.
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President’s Distinguished Speaker Series Kicks Off
Title goes here
Pioneers of mankind’s achievements often stand in the forefront of history. But behind the scenes,
brilliant people like Dr. Richard J. Gran make those achievements possible.
BOSTON, Mass. – Amanda Rodgerson, who for the past three seasons has been the
Head
Women’s
Basketball
Coach atSpeaker
Southern
Mainesponsored
Community
hasfor
been
As part
of the
President’s
Distinguished
Series,
by College,
the Center
Teaching and
named
to the
same
position
at Wentworth
Institute
of Technology.
of AthletLearning,
Gran,
CEO
of The
Mathematical
Analysis
Company,
a group Director
of affiliates
that develop
mathematical
models
and simulations
of complex
engineering
systems,
of
ics Lee Conrad
made
the announcement.
Rodgerson
replaces
Carriepresented
Crawford,Confessions
who
Columbus’
Shipbuilders:
The
Unsung
Heroes
of Great to
Events
in the
‘Ascent
of her
Man,’
his discourse
stepped
down in May
after
guiding
the Leopards
a 46-53
mark
during
four
on the
intricacies
behind
major historical projects.
seasons
as head
coach.
Not unlike
the
minds
behind
famous
significantly
contributed
“We are
very
excited
aboutColumbus’
Amanda joining
ourships,
staff,” Gran
said Conrad.
“She has
achievedto the
engineering and development of a major historical vehicle: NASA’s first lunar module. In 1962, he
a lot in a short period of time as a head coach and has a solid knowledge of The Comwas one of four men who pioneered the use of computer programming technology to develop the
monwealth
Coast
Conference.
This,the
combined
with her
energy and enthusiasm, made
fully digital
autopilot
system
that made
moon landing
possible.
her the perfect candidate for the job. I am confident that our women’s basketball
continue
to develop
an upper
echelon
team
at bothofthe
conference
and
After team
sevenwill
years,
$35 million,
nineinto
analog
computers,
and
thousands
tests,
the lunar
module’s
regional
level.”
digital autopilot system became the primary guidance program for NASA and was used in the first
seven Apollo missions.
A native of Bangor, Maine, and former standout in both basketball and soccer at
In anHampden
effort to simplify
the
explanation
to a lecture
hall
fiftyand
students,
faculty,
and staff, Gran
Academy,
Rodgerson,
arrived
at SMCC
in of
2004
inherited
a struggling
compared
the that
programming
autopilot
the
most
archaic
of computers
to would
a drag race,
program
featured just
sevensystem
playersusing
during
her
rookie
season.
That squad
focused
only the
on assigning
commands,
which controlled
when
to accelerate,
when
to brake, and
capture
Maine Small
College Conference
title with
a 10-13
record and
lay the
wherefoundation
to finish. for a 2005-06 season that saw the Seawolves win a second consecutive
MSCC crown, as well as winning the Yankee Small College Conference championship.
Gran does not attribute the opportunity to work on the project to outstanding academic aptitude,
With abeing
20-7inmark,
SMCC
competed
in thetime.
United
States he
Collegiate
Athletic
Associabut rather
the right
place
at the right
Although
was on the
original
Lunar Module
tion
Tournament
and
featured
two
USCAA
All-Americans.
Rodgerson
was
voted
both
team, Gran was primarily chosen to work on the digital system because he was the only
man in the
the
YSCC
and
MSCC
Coach
of
the
year.
This
past
season
the
Seawolves
posted
a
program who was not married and therefore able to relocate to work on the project. But it wasn’t
14-10 mark,
were
the YSCC
runner-up,
and qualified
for the USCAA
Tournament.
just serendipity
that
allowed
him the
opportunity,
it was preparation.
Gran
says, “WhatShe
comes to
leaves SMCC
a 44-30
the prepared
mind with
can be
great record.
if you’re willing to take the risk.”
Campus News
Confessions of Columbus’ Shipbuilders
Dr. Richard J. Gran speaks with a student after his lecture
in Beatty Hall.
3
Fostering Family
Lisa MacLean met her son for the first time late one day in May of 2005. A six-year foster care
veteran at that point, MacLean was stopping by the foster care office to drop off the clothes of a
teenager that had been staying with her when a frantic placement coordinator stopped her.
“Oh Lisa,” he said. “We have a thirteen-week old baby coming in. Everyone I’m calling is saying
no and it’s already five o’clock. Will you take him?” MacLean agreed to take the child, a boy
named Alex, and waited around the office until he arrived. She fell in love as soon as she saw
him. MacLean brought him to her home and he has never left.
Her interest in service and working with kids is present in her life in many ways—including her
role at Wentworth. Since she began teaching here ten years ago, she has always made an effort
to incorporate community efforts into her student projects. Most recently, MacLean worked with
her senior capstone class on the construction of three different computer networks—constructed
from donated parts—which will be deployed to Haiti.
Faculty Profile
Lisa MacLean, Assistant Professor of
Computer Science
Her goal was to challenge the students with an interesting project. Through collaboration with
Pierre Arthur Elysee, assistant professor of computer science and a native Haitian, the project has
been able to identify sites for the three networks with plans to implement them later this year.
The project, called the Haiti Internet Initiative, will be an ongoing venture aimed at bringing
technology to schools in Haiti. Once the networks are implemented and the classrooms are Internetenabled, the hope is to do onsite training on using the Web. In addition to providing Internet
access, the networks will also provide jobs by creating new roles for network administrators.
MacLean feels lucky. She is able to spend her days talking about computers and working with
Wentworth’s passionate and gifted students and then gets to come home to Alex. When he came
up for adoption two years ago, MacLean acted immediately, successfully applying to become his
legal guardian.
There have been a few necessary adjustments. Her life before being a mother used to involve
exciting travel on vacations around the world to places like Russia, India, and Kenya. But these
days, she says she doesn’t need the exotic locations. She is most happy being anywhere Alex
likes to be.
Lisa MacLean and her son, Alex.
4
Scene Around
Wentworth supporters came out to participate in the annual 5K Mission Hill Road Race.
Wentworth women’s rugby players held an on campus bake sale to raise money
for new uniforms.
5
Scene Around
An exhibit in the Casella gallery displayed Meeting Minutes, a collection of prints
produced from a collection of doodles drawn by the local architect and designer,
Larry Asaro, AET ’69.
Bestselling author Dennis Lehane, Shutter Island and Mystic River, came to
campus and addressed faculty, staff, and students in Watson Auditorium.
Following his moving talk, Lehane took the time to speak with attendees and
sign copies of his books.
6
Subtitle goes here
November 8–19: New Work: Monochrome and Multicolor
BOSTON, Mass. – Amanda Rodgerson, who for the past three seasons has been the
Gum
Prints
ofBasketball
Donald
Filan,
Casella
Reception
Head
Women’s
Coach
at Southern
Maine Gallery.
Community College,
has beenon
named to the same position at Wentworth Institute of Technology. Director of AthletTuesday,
November
9, 5:00 p.m.
ics Lee Conrad
made the announcement.
Rodgerson replaces Carrie Crawford, who
stepped down in May after guiding the Leopards to a 46-53 mark during her four
seasons as head coach.
November
Veteran’s
Day
Luncheon,
Faculty
Dining
“We are very12:
excited
about Amanda
joining
our staff,” said Conrad.
“SheStaff
has achieved
a lot in a short period of time as a head coach and has a solid knowledge of The ComRoom,
12:00
monwealth
Coastp.m.
Conference. This, combined with her energy and enthusiasm, made
her the perfect candidate for the job. I am confident that our women’s basketball
team will continue to develop into an upper echelon team at both the conference and
regional level.”
November 15: International Education Week, Faculty Staff
A native of Bangor, Maine, and former standout in both basketball and soccer at
Dining
Room,
5:00
- 7:00
p.m.
Hampden
Academy,
Rodgerson,
arrived
at SMCC in 2004 and inherited a struggling
program that featured just seven players during her rookie season. That squad would
capture the Maine Small College Conference title with a 10-13 record and lay the
foundation for a 2005-06 season that saw the Seawolves win a second consecutive
MSCC crown, as well as winning the Yankee Small College Conference championship.
With a 20-7 mark, SMCC competed in the United States Collegiate Athletic Association Tournament and featured two USCAA All-Americans. Rodgerson was voted both
the YSCC and MSCC Coach of the year. This past season the Seawolves posted a
14-10 mark, were the YSCC runner-up, and qualified for the USCAA Tournament. She
leaves SMCC with a 44-30 record.
November 19: Annual Thanksgiving Luncheon, Watson
Auditorium, 11:30 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
News and Newcomers
Title goes
here
Calendar
of Events
New Employees
Kelleyrobin Mulvihill, Director of Alumni Relations, Office of
Institutional Advancement
Annie Duong, Operations Coordinator, Office of the Registrar
7