Call for Quality Schools Louisiana Department of Education 1201 North Third Street

Vision Learning Academy
TYPE 2
TYPE 4
TYPE 5
Call for Quality Schools
2012 Louisiana Charter School Application Guide
Louisiana Department of Education
1201 North Third Street
Baton Rouge, LA 70802
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Vision Learning Academy
Table of Contents
The Call for Quality Schools ........................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.
A Focus on Quality ......................................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.
Autonomy and Accountability ....................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.
Overview of Application Process ................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.
Executive Summary....................................................................................................................................... 3
Section I. Culture ......................................................................................................................................... 15
Section II. Leadership .................................................................................................................................. 37
Section III: School Operations ..................................................................................................................... 76
Section IV: Education Program ................................................................................................................. 194
Section V: Teaching ................................................................................................................................... 208
Section VI: Governance ............................................................................................................................. 208
Section VII: Budget and Financial Management ....................................................................................... 239
Section VIII: Pre-Opening .......................................................................................................................... 243
Section IX: Third Party Education Service Provider Relationship................... Error! Bookmark not defined.
Section X: For Applicants applying with a Corporate Partner........................ Error! Bookmark not defined.
Section XI: For Type 2 Charter Applicants ................................................................................................. 253
Section XII: For Type 4 Applicants .................................................................. Error! Bookmark not defined.
Section XIII: For Type 5 Charter Applicants.................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.
Section XIV: For Virtual Charter Applicants ................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.
Section XV: Financial model for nonprofits operating more than one school in Louisiana Error! Bookmark
not defined.
Appendix HH: Applicant Checklist............................................................................................................. 254
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Executive Summary
This section in its entirety will be provided to the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education and will
be posted online, along with the rest of the application for the public to review, immediately after the
deadline for submission.
Essential Information Form
Name of Proposed School Vision Learning Academy
Name of Nonprofit (as it appears on the Learning Solutions,Inc
Secretary of State’s website)
School Type (Select One)
Type 2
Type 4
Type 5
Grade Configuration in First Year 9-12
Grade Configuration at Scale 9-12
Model or Focus (e.g., Arts, College Prep, etc) College Preparatory with a visual and performing arts
focus for innovation (ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL)
Proposed Parish for School Monroe ,Louisiana (Ouachita Parish)
Primary Contact Person: LaToya Jackson
Phone: 318.381.6781
Email: [email protected]
Proposed School Leader (if known): N/A
Enrollment Projections: Delete unnecessary rows and/or add additional columns if you will not reach full
enrollment by year five. Project your student headcount (not your funded FTEs).
GRADE
Pre-K
K
1
2
3
4
5
2013-14
2014-15
2015-16
2016-17
2017-18
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Vision Learning Academy
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
30
30
60
60
Proposed Demographics
35
35
60
60
FRL %
50
50
50
50
SPED %
100
55
55
55
55
60
60
60
60
ELL %
80
1. Is the applicant an existing nonprofit operator in Louisiana?
Yes
No
If yes, list all other existing schools in Louisiana under the same nonprofit.
n/a
2. Does the school expect to contract with a third party education service provider (ESP) or other
organization for a substantial portion of school management/operation?
Yes
No
3. Is the primary learning environment for students enrolled in the school virtual?
Yes
No
4. Please see the Call for Quality Schools for a comprehensive list of direct-run schools available
for chartering in this application cycle. The list of charter schools available for takeover will be
available in December after BESE votes on the renewal and extension of existing schools.
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Part A: If you are applying for a specific RSD direct-run school, please write the name of that school into
the following box.
n/a
Part B: If you are not applying for a specific RSD direct-run school, please check as many of the following
boxes as apply:
I am interested in taking over operations of any eligible direct-run school in New Orleans
I am interested in taking over operation of any eligible charter school in New Orleans.
I am interested in taking over operation of any eligible direct-run school in Baton Rouge.
I am interested in taking over operation of any eligible charter school in Baton Rouge.
I am interested in taking over operation of any eligible direct-run school in Louisiana.
I am interested in taking over operation of any eligible charter school in Louisiana.
Executive Summary Narrative (5 page limit): Address the following questions briefly in a narrative
format. Please use the outline numbering and headers provided below, but do not repeat the questions.
I.
Culture
What is the mission of the school? Identify the proposed location (region and neighborhood) for the
school. What outreach have you conducted to engage prospective parents, teachers and pupils within
this region?
II.
Leadership
What critical qualifications, credentials and attributes have you identified for your school leader? Have
you already identified a candidate leader? If so, please provide a short bio for that leader.
III.
Education Plan
Provide a brief overview of the education program of the proposed school, including major instructional
methods, key program components and assessment strategies. Briefly identify the research base that
suggests that the school model will be successful in ensuring academic proficiency for the targeted
student population.
IV.
Teaching
Explain how you will support teacher effectiveness through evaluations and professional development.
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I.
Culture
Since 2005, Learning Solutions, Inc. has worked tirelessly throughout the Monroe/West
Monroe area to combat the drop-out rate, increase test course through quarterly stage plays
at the local municipality venue, literacy through performing arts centers to boost innovation,
reading and ACT scores, visual and performing arts numeracy and literacy festivals
throughout the community along with a plethora of other events, strategy and innovations
throughout the Monroe area and Ouachita Parish at large. All strategy have, to this point
proven highly effective, sought after and needed on a larger more concentrated
conglomerate in this area. For these reasons, we apply for Vision Learning Academy
Alternative Charter. At present, Vision Learning Academy will serve students who are
particularly at risk of – or who have already dropped out of the traditional school
environment. Currently, Monroe, Louisiana’s dropout rate hovers at nearly 11% per year,
which is proportionately higher than the state of Louisiana’s average of 6.9%, the fifth
highest state dropout rate in the nation. While research points to various factors
contributing to the continued loss of students from the system, one fact remains clear: many
students are not thriving in traditional “school” settings. We are prepared to offer immediate
alternative solutions.
VLA will not lower expectations for students based on societal conditions, challenging
personal circumstances, or behavioral or academic records: all students deserve a
rigorous, robust yet- high quality education that prepares them for college. Instead, VLA
has designed a program to improve how over-aged and under-credited students are
served, making specific accommodations to better address students’ unique
circumstances and needs, social/emotional profiles, along with personal circumstances
and goals.
Additionally, VLA seeks to equip all students with the college track high school diploma.
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II.
Leadership
Although the official School Leader for Vision Learning Academy has not yet been
selected, The School Leader will be the instructional leader of the school, and he/she will
facilitate the stabilization of student culture. To support the school leader, the Executive
Director will support, coach and guide the School Leader in best practices for the
accelerated high school setting.
The selection of VLA’s School Leader will be a rigorous process.
School Leader Recruitment
In order to sustain the momentum and intensity of the school’s framework, the school
will concentrate recruiting efforts locally; however, recruiting on the national level will
seek leaders with the greatest success rates and strongest commitments to education.
School Leader Selection
We believe that a School Leader’s primary functions revolve around the academic
achievement
of the school’s students. Therefore, we will work to recruit, hire and retain the strongest
instructional leaders for our school. For individuals interested in school leadership
positions at
VLA’s hiring process will resemble the following:
Step 1: Receipt of Cover Letter and Resume
Step 2: Resume Screening
Step 3: Interview
Step 4: Classroom/School Observation
Step 6: Reference Checks
Step 7: Second Interview (as needed)
Step 8: Notification
With the support of the Board of Directors, the Chief Executive Officer is
committed to seeking out the best. In future years, while not directly involved in the
hiring process, existing School Leaders will assist in offering insight into applicants and
their “fit” within the collection.
School Leader Evaluation
The School Leader will be responsible for supporting and evaluating all teachers, and will
establish school-wide academic performance goals and personal leadership and
professional goals with the Chief Academic Officer before each school year. Throughout
the school year, the School Leaders will meet with the Chief Academic Officer for
informal performance reviews after every 9-week interim assessment to assess actual
versus targeted test score performance for the entire school. In the Spring of each year,
the Chief Academic Officer will conduct a formal review of the School Leaders,
evaluating their accomplishments of the pre -determined goals and identifying
professional development opportunities in areas that both the School Leaders and Chief
Executive Officer identify as weaknesses in the School Leaders’ skill set and
instructional leadership.
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III.
Education Plan.
In order to understand our educational plan, it is important to describe what will be
referred to as student-driven learning through supports and innovations. Upon enrolling
in VLA , every student, along with his/her parent will be visited in the home by a
Therapist and a staff member. Once the student commits to the school‘s high
expectations, he or she will be given the Nationally-Approved Locator pre-test(practice
ACT exam), the Star Reading and Star Math Exams along with Garner’s Multiple
Intelligence Inventory Assessment which will identify his or her grade level equivalent in
each content area as well as his/her learning style. After an interview with the student,
the educational team, along with the clinicians will determine the completion/graduation
track and progression model needed to meet the student’s need, whether it be the
vocational, college-readiness, or career and business track .
This may mean a combination of courses and supplementary computer-based accelerated
credits, Common-Core State Standards Curricula modifications, vocational training
and/or co-ed learning or possible career-based study programs. The students will then be
assigned to advisors who will assist them in the beginning processes of his/her
Alternative Education Plan. (AEP). This particular advisor will stay with them through
their entire experience at VLA. Together, the student, the Therapist and the advisor will
develop the student‘s individual Alternative Education Plan which will identify the
student‘s annual academic, behavioral, social/emotional goals aligned with his or her
long-term, post-secondary plan and graduation/completion date .
The school‘s college-prep approach, including an extended school year, rigorous,
standards-aligned curriculum, and culture of high expectations, were selected based on
their proven results from their implementation at New Orleans Excuses‘ schools
achieving dramatic performance results, including KIPP, Science Academy, and
Uncommon Schools.
VLA will employ these proven, college-prep strategies influenced by the AHSI‘s
Network Distinguishers, essential design principles that are employed by alternative
schools and that provide a framework of success and support a range of alternative
strategies.
VLA’s model is heavily influenced by the "No Excuses" school model, one that has
proven to be extremely effective in raising student achievement levels in at-risk student
populations, and which can be characterized by schools that employ “principals and
teachers who demand excellence and reject the notion that economically disadvantaged
kids can’t learn.” While many of the practices utilized by the highest performing No
Excuses schools nationwide will need to be adapted to better engage and accommodate
students who have not been successful in a traditional college preparatory environment,
the principle belief still applies – that all students can be college bound through hard
work and high expectations.
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To develop its’ Visual-Performing and Graphical Arts Technological High School
design, VLA conducted extensive research on both high performing models, as well as of
alternative schools and the components that make them effective. Both sets of research
have heavily influenced the modification of our strategies. There is clear evidence that
the “No Excuses” model – one that embodies the idea that all students will be successful,
go on to college, and have post-secondary opportunities – can raise the level of academic
achievement particularly within at-risk student populations.
Vision Learning Academy has developed a framework that provides for the
success and support a range of alternative strategies rather than a prescribed method.
Distinguishers include: Authentic Learning, Teaching, and Performance Assessment;
Personalized School Culture; Shared Leadership and Responsibility; Supportive
Partnerships through Technology and the Arts; and a Future Focus.
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IV.
Teaching.
Teachers at Vision Learning Academy will be held to high levels of accountability and
innovation through the State’s model. VLA’s teachers will train its teachers in the
curriculum alignment process and on all expected instructional methods. In addition to
in-depth training on data-driven lesson planning, teachers will be trained on how to create
lessons with clear and measurable learning standards that meet students at various skill
levels, implementing supplemental curricular material, backwards planning, spiraling and
cumulative review, and engaging students through lessons with real world connections.
VLA’s teachers will also be trained on how to prepare lessons aligned with scope and
sequence assessments and in the development of high-quality, multi-modal classroom
assessments to track student progress in the interim.
External Professional Development
While most of our professional development will occur internally, exchanging knowledge
and best practices among staff members, staff will also have the opportunity to grow
professionally by learning from other high performing schools and curriculum specialists. Every
faculty member will be required to observe at another high performing high and/or alternative
school at least once per year. The staff will also be encouraged to pursue individual, ongoing
professional development opportunities, and each teacher will have access to a modest
stipend for these training opportunities. This money may be put towards purchasing materials,
taking classes, or attending seminars and conferences that enhance their ability to effectively
teach their subject.
We will predominately rely on its own staff to develop teachers, given the organization‘s
extensive experience in teaching and leadership development. During the school year, the
School Leader is responsible for developing, implementing and evaluating the efficacy of the
school‘s professional development opportunities. The School Leader will develop a
comprehensive strategic plan for professional development activities, gather formal survey data
and informal feedback from staff on the effectiveness of existing development, and identify gaps
or weak areas of professional development.
As described, professional development for staff will begin three weeks before
students arrive with in-house mandatory staff training and curriculum planning for teachers.
During the first year of operation, orientation will encompass significant acculturation and
curriculum development requiring three weeks; in the second and subsequent years this will
likely be shortened to no more than two weeks. Summer training topics will include socialization
into the mission and values at VLA, school-wide expectations with regards to academic,
discipline and behavioral expectations, lesson planning, assessments, standards alignment,
multimedia instruction, and effective use of data and Alternative Education Plan.
Teachers are provided a minimum of 450 minutes (7.5 hours) per week of planning and
professional development time. This schedule emphasizes the importance of planning, staff
collaboration, and professional development for teachers to improve their instructional practice
on an ongoing basis. VLA’s teachers will thrive in a professional culture that supports and
encourages collaboration, constant learning, and collegiality.
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V.
Governance
Complete the following table to list all proposed Board members for the school.
Name
Current Professional
Title and
Organization
Board Role
Focus/Expertise
Linda Trimble
Director of Funding and
Chief of Staff/Director
Operations and Management
Specialty Grants,
Ouachita Parish School
Board Central Office
Theresa Groce
Divine Destiny, Owner
Media/Marketing
Relations
School Culture –Quality Assurance
Chanda Ford
Assistant Director,
Public Works
Department
Secretary/Treasurer
Minutes/Organization/Governance
Scott Miller
Miller Funeral Homes,
Director
Business and Financial
Affairs
Corporate Endeavors, ESOPs,
Investments
Kevin O. Scott
Professor,
Legal
Legal Correspondence
University of Arkansas
United States Armed
Services
Terrance Jenkins
Primearica Financial
Services, Independent
owner
Voting Member
College and Career Perspectus
Millicent Bridges
Salu International,
Independent owner
Voting Member
College and Career Perspectus
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Briefly outline the role of the Board in regards to school governance and academic oversight.
GOVERNANCE
The governing Board of VLA represents the diverse professional experiences and practical
expertise necessary to support the start-up and long-term viability of a charter school
management
organization. Such experiences and expertise include education, finance, law, non-profit and
community leadership, human resources and previous governance experience.
VLA will be governed by an odd number of Board members consisting of between an adhoc
committee of 3 member and a governing Board of Directors of about 7 and 9 persons. The
adhoc committee’s sole responsibility is to oversee the governing Board.
The Board will assume final responsibility for the organization’s academic success, viability, and
faithfulness to the terms of the charter. Therefore, the Board will develop and approve the annual
budget and all organizational
policies. It will also set goals and review strategy to continually guide the organization towards
the
fulfillment of its mission.
Although Learning Solution’s Board of Directors delegates the management of the organization
to the Chief
Executive Officer, the Board is ultimately responsible for ensuring that the organization meets its
academic, fiscal and operational objectives. The primary qualifications for serving on the Board
include:
1. An unwavering commitment to seeing VLA’s students superbly prepared for high school,
college, and success in life;
2. A commitment to improving access to quality education for all children regardless of race or
economic status;
3. An understanding of the Board’s obligation to act as an effective and vigilant steward of
public
funds;
4. The ability to be a good judge of information regarding the Chief Executive Officer’s
educational and fiscal management of the organization.
5. A willingness to focus on the academic achievement of children in the schools, and not to
divert the Board’s attention to matters that are peripheral to this mission;
6. An ability to fairly and accurately assess the needs of the community, and to represent the
organization to the community and others;
7. Financial, legal, business, fundraising, management, governance, real estate development,
and/or educational experience;
8. A willingness to accept and support decisions made in accordance with the bylaws;
9. An ability and willingness to give time and energy to the organization; and,
10. A willingness and ability to provide access to resources, both financial and other, in order to
support and strengthen the organization.
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The role of the full governing Board will be to:
Safeguard the organization’s mission and competitive
advantage – On an annual basis, Board members will assess the organization’s mission, strategic
plan, and annual goals as well as the external environment to assure that the organization is
fulfilling its charter and meeting the needs of the community.
Govern by helping to fulfill the Board’s collective responsibilities, detailed in the Board’s job
description and expectations. Secure sufficient resources to fulfill the organization’s mission –
Board members are expected to work in partnership with the organization’s administration to
raise funds to support the organization’s mission.
Advocate for the organization's vision and mission and be a champion in building the diverse
constituencies necessary to support the successful launch and sustainability of the organization.
Ensure strategic and effective resource allocation – As the fiduciary agents of the organization,
Board members will review and approve the organization’s budget and funding plan and will
hold the CEO accountable for its effective and efficient management.
Serve as a liaison with the public, interpreting the organization’s vision to the community and
informing the organization of needs of the community. Hire, support, and assess the performance
of VLA’s Chief Executive Officer – The Board will work as the governing partner to the
organization’s management team and will ensure that the Chief Executive Officer has the
training, support, and encouragement necessary to fulfill the charter. In
addition, the Board will assess annually the performance of the Chief Executive Officer and will
hold him/her accountable to the job description and performance criteria upon which they
mutually agree. Consult by lending specific expertise for the benefit of the organization with
professionalism, integrity, and enthusiasm. Serve as ambassadors for the organization – As the
organization’s primary link to the community, the public, the media, and funders, Board
members are expected to garner support from the community through their passionate
commitment to and articulation of the organization’s mission. Capitalize on personal networks to
secure financial and other resources to support the organization. Set policies and procedures – As
the organization’s governing body, the Board is expected to establish policies and procedures to
support the mission. Attend regular Board meetings and participate in a meaningful and
productive manner by coming to meetings prepared and by focusing on strategic and critical
questions and issues.
Monitor and ensure legal and regulatory compliance – The Board should review organizational
policies and programs to ensure compliance with the law and with state regulations.
Be accessible for personal contact in between Board meetings and for committee serving on a
committee or taskforce as need be. Assess its own performance – As a component of holding the
organization accountable to achieving its mission and efficiently allocating its resources, the
Board is expected to evaluate its performance against its job description and performance
criteria. Collaborate with fellow Board members to fulfill the
obligations of the Board and to ensure that diverse perspectives are heard and incorporated into
the governance structure. Focus on creating group, not individual success; support Board
decisions; participate critically in the appraisal of the Board’s performance. The founding Board
of Directors understands the unique challenges of creating a strong Board from scratch. To this
end, the full founding Board plans to take advantage of the extensive governance training that
will be provided by Sally Baird and the Charter Management Company. In total, the Board,
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Chief Executive Officer and School Leaders completed approximately 75 hours of governance
training prior to the opening of Vision Learning Academy.
VI.
Finance
Complete the following table with numbers from the budget supplied in this application.
Number of Students
Per Pupil Revenue
Grant Funds
Private Funds
Other Sources
Total Revenue
Employee Salaries
(including benefits)
Building Expenses
Services/Supplies
Other Expenditures
Total Expenses
NET INCOME
2013-14
180
1,530,000.00
100,000.00
50,000.00
100,000.00
1,780,000.00
2014-15
190
1,615,000.00
100,000.00
50,000.00
100,000.00
1,865,000.00
2015-16
200
1,700,000.00
100,000.00
50,000.00
100,000.00
1,950,000.00
2016-17
220
1,870,000.00
100,000.00
50,000.00
100,000.00
2,120,000.00
2017-18
240
2,040,000.00
100,000.00
50,000.00
100,000.00
2,290,000.00
1,200,000.00 1,255,000.00 1,255,700.00 1,400,000.00 1,490,000.00
120,000.00
114,000.00
105,000.00
1,539,000.00
241,000.00
120,000.00
114,000.00
115,000.00
1,604,000.00
261,000.00
120,000.00
114,000.00
125,000.00
1,614,700.00
335,300.00
120,000.00
118,000.00
127,000.00
1,765,000.00
355,000.00
120,000.00
120,000.00
130,000.00
1,860,000.00
430,000.00
For any grants or private funds identified above, indicate whether the funding has already been secured
and any plans to secure future funding in the space below.
The private fund is from a local philanthropist who wishes to remain anonymous of which funds
have been promised for five years but not secured with a written document.
The grant funds are funds from a competitive grant source that are currently being pursued
through the Kellogg foundation.
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Section I. Culture
A. Mission Statement
Provide the mission of the proposed school. The mission statement should be a concise statement that
does the following:

Identifies the school’s target student population and community to be served.

Articulates clear guiding purposes and priorities that are meaningful, measurable and
attainable.

Provides the entire school community as well as external stakeholders a clear picture of
what the school aims to achieve.
The mission statement provides the foundation for the entire school application and operational plan.
Accordingly, the rest of the school application should fully align with and support the stated mission.
B. Targeted Student Population
1. Identify the geographic region you are proposing to serve.
2. Identify the grade levels and ages you propose to serve in the school’s first year and when it is at
scale.
3. Provide the expected demographics for the students you plan to serve including the percentage
of Free and Reduced Lunch, Special Education, and English Language Learners (ELLs).
4. Explain how the decision to serve this targeted population, including the grade levels you have
chosen, would meet the district and community needs as described in the Call for New Quality
Schools regional needs analysis. If your target school does not meet the needs identified in the
needs analysis, please describe the needs of the community you seek to operate in and how
your proposed school meets those needs.
C. School Culture
1. Describe the planned culture for the school and how this culture will promote a positive
academic environment, and reinforce student intellectual and social development. Explain the
systems, structures, practices, and traditions the school leader and leadership team will create
to foster this culture for students, teachers, administrators, and parents starting from the first
day of school.
2. Explain how the school culture will include and serve students with special needs, including
students receiving special education services, English Language Learners, and any students atrisk of academic failure.
D. Parent and Community Involvement
1. Parent and community involvement in application phase:
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a. Describe the role of parents and community members involved in developing the proposed
school. Describe the outreach you have conducted to engage prospective parents, teachers
and pupils in the region you are proposing to serve.
b. Provide evidence of support for the proposed school among prospective parents, teachers,
and pupils, or any combination thereof. Support may be gauged and demonstrated through
community meetings, parent/teacher/student letters of support, surveys of prospective
stakeholders, and/or evidence of letters of intent to enroll among other means.
c. Identify any organizations, agencies, or consultants that are partners in planning and
establishing the school, along with a brief description of their current and planned role and
any resources they have contributed or plan to contribute to the school’s development.
d. What community resources will be available to students and parents? Describe any
partnerships the school will have with community organizations, businesses, or other
educational institutions. Specify the nature, purposes, terms, and scope of services of any
such partnerships.
e. Describe evidence of support from any identified community partners (e.g., letters of
intent/commitment, memoranda of understanding, and/or contracts, and should specify the
resources to be committed or contributed from the partner, as applicable). If the school is
relying on a community partner to provide a service that is integral to the operating of the
school or educational model we strongly encourage you to provide a copy of the contract or
MOU.
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(Any supporting materials that need to be attached should be included as Appendix A –
Evidence of Support from Parents, Teachers, Pupils, and Community Partners. There is no
page limit but documentation is restricted to outside documentation.
APPENDIX A:LETTERS OF SUPPORT
Cognitive Development Center and Vision Learning Academy
MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (MOU)
2013-2014 School Year
This is an agreement between Vision Learning Academy and Cognitive Development Center
a corporation whose mission is to improve the quality of life of individuals and families by
helping
them make positive changes and healthy and effective choices by providing professional
counseling, treatment, community support and educational advocacy in a physically and
psychologically safe environment that builds self-esteem. We are committed to the principal that
all persons who need mental health treatment should receive individualized quality counseling
services. The Therapeutic/Counseling Program provides one on one support by trained Clinical
Counselors to specific, referred students who exhibit significant mental, behavioral and/or
emotional challenges. Participation by a family in the Counseling Program is at the parent
discretion and is not sponsored by Vision Learning Academy. Participation in the Clinical
Counseling Program is not a replacement for services to be provided pursuant to an IEP plan
including but not limited to mental, emotional and/or behavior plans.
PURPOSE
The purpose of this agreement is to create guidelines and procedures for Cognitive Development
Center to provide services to students enrolled in Vision Learning Academy during school and/or
after school hours on school premises. Furthermore this MOU is established to promote and
sustain positive and proactive partnership which honors mutual respect and accountability for all
parties involved in each student’s Clinical Counseling treatment plan program.
PARTICIPANTS
Participants of the Cognitive Development Center counseling program may be students enrolled
in Vision Learning Academy who are identified and referred by school officials or the parent as
needing additional support for mental, behavioral, and/or emotional challenges according to
Program regulations. Each student participating in the
Therapeutic Program will be under the Clinical Supervision of a state Licensed Professional
Counselor or Licensed Clinical Social Worker.
RESPONSIBILITES OF COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT CENTER
• The Clinical Counselors will contact the Principal/Designee of the school upon referral of a
student for counseling services and before initiating services at any school site for discussion
regarding the delivery of services.
• Cognitive Development Center will provide written parent/guardian consent to provide
counseling services within the school setting.
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• Cognitive Development Center will assign only clinical counselors who have fulfilled/ preservice training
Requirements and background investigations as dictated by Department of Health and Hospitals
regulations and any additional requirements imposed upon individuals who work with children.
• The Director of Cognitive Development Center will initiate and facilitate an initial meeting
with appropriate
staff and parents to begin implementation of clinical therapeutic strategies in the school and
home environment based on an initial screening with rudimentary counseling goals in place. Any
treatment plan must compliment
any contract for non-special education students developed by Vision Learning Academy.
• Clinical Counselors will check in daily with the school office. If they are not able to be present
at their scheduled time in the school or they have to adjust their schedules due to personal
appointments, they will notify their Cognitive Development Center supervisor, parent/guardian
and the school/program secretary or individual teachers to report their absence and/or change on
schedule.
Clinical Counselors are responsible for their client only and are not to function as teacher’s aides
or assistants.
• Clinical Counselors will follow the Cognitive Development Center chain of command at all
times.
• Clinical Counselors and clients must adhere to the classroom teacher’s instructions, schedules,
rules and activities while in the classroom setting unless otherwise noted in the client’s
Treatment Plan/IEP and agreed upon by all parties involved.
• If there is a dispute or need for mediation between the Clinical Counselors and school staff, the
counselor will contact their Supervisor for resolution or mediation. The Clinical Counselors
Supervisor will then contact the Principal/Designee discusses a plan of action.
• Clinical Counselors will not transport students to or from school/program sites without
parent/guardian prior written consent.
• Clinical Counselors will adhere to all student confidentiality and privacy mandates as
established by HIPPA.
• Clinical Counselors and appropriate Cognitive Development Center staff members will attend
and be part of appropriate student staffing and/or IEP meetings for assigned students.
• If Cognitive Development Center and the Vision Learning Academy have not had the
opportunity to mutually decide on the termination or discharge of a student from the Counseling
Program, the Clinical Counselors Coordinator will contact the school to inform them of
discharge especially when the client has been pulled from the program by the parent/guardian.
Cognitive Development Center will inform Vision Learning Academy of pending discharge of
clients who are being discharged due to the completion of treatment goals.
• Cognitive Development Center staff are not employees of Vision Learning Academy and are
not in any way to be construed as such.
RESPONSIBILITES OF VISION LEARNING ACADEMY
• Vision Learning Academy/Principal/Designee will meet with Cognitive Development Center
staff upon initiation of services to review the student’s Initial Screening, options for Counseling
and to decide how the program will work for individual students in the school setting.
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• If the student is receiving Special Education services, Vision Learning Academy will cooperate
with Cognitive Development Center to discuss possible integration into the student’s IEP. .
Appendix A – Letters of Support )
• Vision Learning Academy will provide Cognitive Development Center with a copy of a
participating Special Education student’s current IEP only with parent/guardian consent and
involve Cognitive Development Center staff in all meetings and IEPs involving that student upon
parental request.
• There must be written parent/guardian consent to initiate services.
•Staff will adhere to all student/family confidentiality and privacy mandates of Vision Learning
Academy and HIPPA.
• Vision Learning Academy classroom teachers and/or educational staff must provide specific
lessons, assignments and appropriate materials when Clinical Counselor assist a client with
focusing on academic assignments. In order for Clinical Counselors to help with noninstructional
educational support, it must be written in the student’s Clinical Counselor’s Treatment Plan.
• In the event of a dispute with any Clinical Counselor, Vision Learning Academy staff will
follow the established chain of command and communicate with their supervisor. That
supervisor/Principal will communicate immediately with the Director for resolution. Vision
Learning Academy staff are not to interview or discusses disputed issues with providers
themselves or without the provider’s supervisor present.
• Clinical Counselors are responsible for their client only and are not to function as teacher’s
aides/assistants. They cannot supervise students who are not enrolled in Cognitive Development
Center.
• Clinical Counselors will be assigned a school/program contact to discuss any immediate
matters of concern or importance regarding the student assigned to them.
• Vision Learning Academy will provide the Clinical Counselors all calendars and schedules of
current school/program activities.
• Vision Learning Academy will familiarize each Clinical Counselors with the specific
school/program site procedures, rules or regulations and introduce members of Cognitive
Development Center to important staff members at the school.
• Vision Learning Academy has the right to refuse or cancel Clinical Counselors participation for
any student with parent input and consent and/or team discussion.
RESPONSIBILITES OF COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT CENTER AND VISION
LEARNING ACADEMY
• Both parties will be committed to a positive partnership that fosters effective and consistent
interventions for resolution of student’s mental, emotional and/or behavioral challenges and
emotional development in a safe, nurturing environment.
• Clinical Counselors services will be provided in the environment most beneficial/appropriate to
the student.
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APPENDIX A –LETTERS OF SUPPORT
• Cognitive Development Center and Vision Learning Academy will meet at least once annually
to discuss each student’s Treatment Plan and will include all appropriate staff members as well
as parent/guardian. Other staff meetings may be scheduled when needed and/or appropriate and
pertinent staff from both agencies involved in the student’s program will attend.
• This MOU will be reviewed and/or renewed annually with the participation of both parties.
• Both parties will cooperate in providing in-service and training to Clinical Counselors and
Vision Learning Academy staff as agreed upon/necessary.
ATTESTATION
This Agreement is governed by the laws of the State of Louisiana and any disputes regarding
the terms of the Agreement are subject Louisiana law. Either party may terminated this
Agreement upon 30 days written notice to the other party. Cognitive Development Center and
Vision Learning Academy have read and agree to this Memorandum of Understanding and are in
full agreement of the articles and statements.
Adrian Fisher, LPC
Executive Director / President Cognitive Development Center
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APPENDIX A: LETTERS OF SUPPORT
To Whom It May Concern:
It will be my pleasure to serve as a point of contact with Learning Solutions, Inc
and Vision Learning Academy. I am very excited about this endeavor and I know
you will be an excellent leader. Career Technical College will be available as a
resource and guide to VLA's students for post-secondary guidance. If you need
anything between now and opening day, just give me a call or email me. I look
forward to working with you in helping to shape the minds and lives of the
deserving students of Vision Learning Academy .
Alexa Chance
High School Coordinator
Career Technical College
318-323-2889
[email protected]
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2. Describe how you will engage parents in the school’s culture and operations. How will the
school build family-school partnerships to strengthen support for learning and encourage
parental involvement?
E. Parent Satisfaction
1. What mechanisms will you utilize to assess parent satisfaction?
2. What adjustments will you make if the positive response rate does not meet your own internal
goals? Will you use the results in leadership evaluations?
F. Discipline Policy
1. What will be the guiding philosophy behind the creation of the school discipline policy and how
will it reflect the school culture you described above?
2. Describe your strategy for positive behavioral reinforcements. What rituals or protocols will be
in place as part of this strategy?
3. How will the discipline policy be practiced in the classroom to ensure students are on task and
focused on learning?
4. Who will be responsible for implementing the school’s discipline policy?
5. How will you ensure that disciplinary procedures are applied equitably across all student
populations, including special needs students, within the school?
6. Indicate how the school staff will be educated about, and trained to implement, the policy.
7. Include a proposed discipline policy that, at a minimum, contains the following;
a. The substantive acts for which a child may be disciplined
b. The consequences (or range of consequences) resulting from committing each such act
(including suspension or expulsion)
c. The due process procedures that the school will follow in applying its discipline policy
d. The individuals responsible for carrying out the discipline policy
e. Include school's plan for students who have been suspended, expelled or will be out of
school for more than ten days. Schools are required to provide a plan for alternative
education settings for these students.
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Appendix B – Discipline Policy EXTENDED )
DISCIPLINE POLICY
Removal from Class
Students who exhaust the in-class hierarchy of consequences and continue to interrupt the
learning environment will be sent out of class for an administrative conference. These
conferences will be tracked in JPAMS. Students must complete a written reflection to return to
class. Students who are involved in conflict with other students may also be sent to the
administrator for conflict resolution.
Skills Class
In skills class, students work on a particular behavioral skill and complete their classwork
in isolation. The purpose of skills class is to work on social skills and prepare students for return
to class as soon as possible. After an administrative conference, the following students are
recommended for skills class:
Students who have been sent out for multiple conferences during one academic day
Students who are continually sent out of class for the same reason
Students who refuse to comply with authority figures
Students who fight.
Suspensions
“Short term suspensions” shall refer to the removal of a student from school for
disciplinary reasons for a period of five or fewer days. “Long term suspensions” shall refer to the
removal of a student from school for disciplinary reasons for a period of more than five days.
“Expulsions” shall refer to the permanent removal of a student from school for disciplinary
reasons.
Short Term Suspensions
A student who has committed any of the infractions listed below shall be subject
minimally to a short-term suspension, unless the School Leader determines that an exception
should be made based on the individual circumstances of the incident and the student’s
disciplinary record. Depending upon the severity of the infraction the student may be subject to a
long-term suspension, expulsion, or referral to the appropriate law enforcement agencies.
Disciplinary Infractions
Vandalize school property causing minor damage;
Attempt to assault any student or staff member;
Endanger the physical safety of another by the use of force of threats of force that reasonably
places the victim in fear of imminent bodily injury;
Engage in conduct which disrupts school or classroom activity or endanger or threaten to
endanger the health, safety, welfare, or morals of others;
Engage in insubordination;
Fail to complete assignments, carry out directions, or comply with disciplinary sanctions;
Cheat on quizzes, exams, or commit plagiary;
Use of forged notes or excuses;
Steal, or attempt to steal, or possess property known by the student to be stolen;
Commit extortion;
Engage in gambling;
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Appendix B – Discipline Policy EXTENDED )
Abuse school property or equipment;
Use obscene or abusive language or gestures;
Engage in acts of verbal or physical sexual harassment;
Make a false bomb threat or pull a false emergency alarm;
Possess tobacco or alcohol;
Possess pagers, beepers, or portable/cellular telephones not being used for instructional purposes;
Wear inappropriate, insufficient, or disruptive clothing or attire, or violate Schools ' overall
climate in any way
Student Dress Code;
Commit any other act which school officials reasonably conclude disrupts the learning
environment
of the school;
Repeatedly commit minor behavioral infractions which, in aggregate, may be considered an
infraction subject to formal disciplinary action;
Procedures for Short-Term Suspension
The School Leader may impose a short-term suspension after conferring with the relevant
staff members. Before imposing a short-term suspension, the School Leader shall verbally
inform the student of the suspension, the reason for it, and whether it will be served in school or
out of school. The student shall be given an opportunity to deny or explain charges.
Procedures and Due Process
The School Leader also shall immediately notify the parent(s) or guardian(s) in writing
that the student has been suspended from school. Written notice shall be provided by personal
delivery, express mail delivery, or equivalent means reasonably calculated to assure receipt of
such notice within 24 hours of suspension at the last known address. Where possible, notification
also shall be provided by telephone if the school has been provided with a contact telephone
number for the parent(s) or guardian(s). Such notice shall provide a description of the incident or
incidents, which resulted in the suspension and shall offer the opportunity for an immediate
informal conference with the School Leader. The notification and informal conference shall be
in the dominant language used by the parent(s) or guardian(s). While parents will have the
freedom to disagree with any short-term suspension imposed by the School Leader, parents will
not have the right or ability to overturn any short-term suspension decision rendered by the
School Leader.
Long Term Suspensions
A student who is determined to have committed any of the infractions listed below shall
be subject minimally to a long-term suspension and perhaps expulsion unless the School Leader
determines that an exception should be made based on the circumstance of the incident and the
student’s disciplinary record. Such a student may also be subject to any of the disciplinary
measures outlined elsewhere in this document
including a referral to the appropriate law enforcement authorities.
Disciplinary Infractions
Commit, or attempt to commit arson on school property.
Possess, use, attempt to use, or transfer of any firearm, knife, razor blade, explosive, mace, tear
gas, or other dangerous object of no reasonable use to the student in school;
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Appendix B – Discipline Policy EXTENDED )
Possess, sell, distribute or use any alcoholic beverage, controlled substance, imitation controlled
substance, or marijuana on school property or at school sponsored events;
Assault any other student or staff member;
Intentionally causes physical injury to another person, except when student’s actions are
reasonably necessary to protect him or herself from injury;
Vandalize school property causing major damage;
Commit any act, which school officials reasonably conclude warrants a long-term suspension.
In addition, a student who commits any of the acts previously described as causes for short-term
suspension may, instead or in addition, be subject to a long-term suspension at the School
Leader’s discretion only if the student has committed the act at least three times in the academic
year.
Procedures and Due Process
The school may impose a long-term suspension though such a suspension may be imposed only
after the student has been found guilty at a formal long-term suspension hearing. Upon
determining that the student’s actions may warrant a possible long-term suspension, the School
Leader shall verbally inform the student that he or she is being considered for a long-term
suspension (or expulsion) and state the reasons for such actions. The School Leader will then
immediately notify the student’s parent(s) or guardian(s) in writing. Written notice shall be
provided by personal delivery, express mail delivery, or equivalent means reasonably
calculated to assure receipt of such notice within 24 hours of suspension at the last known
address. Where possible, notification also shall be provided by telephone if the school has been
provided with a contact telephone number for the parent(s) or guardian(s). Such notice shall
provide a description of the incident or incidents, which resulted in a long-term suspension (or
expulsion) and shall offer the opportunity for an immediate informal conference with the School
Leader. The notification and informal conference shall be in the dominant language used by the
parent(s) or guardian(s). The School Leader will then call and preside over a formal, long-term
suspension hearing.
At the formal hearing, the student shall have the right to be represented by counsel,
question witnesses, and present evidence. The School Leader and all members of the staff that
were involved in witnessing the alleged discipline violation are required to participate in the
hearing. A decision by the School Leader will stand as the final decision regarding the student’s
long-term suspension status.
Alternate Instruction
Students who are suspended will be provided with alternative instruction. All suspensions and
alternative instruction will be effectuated substantively and procedurally in accordance with all
applicable law. For students who have been expelled, the school will provide alternative
instruction to the extent required by law. Prior to the school’s first day of school, the School
Leader and the staff will develop a plan for alternate instruction that accommodates various
scenarios depending on the reasons why alternate instruction is required in the first place.
Arrangements will be made between the school and each individual family for the
delivery of services, pick-up/delivery of work, and the making up of any missed assignments and
classroom instructional support. All IDEA mandates will be followed for student with
disabilities.
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Appendix B – Discipline Policy EXTENDED )
Expulsion
Additionally, the School Leader may decide that the infraction does not warrant a long-term
suspension, but instead warrants an escalation in punishment – expulsion. Should the School
Leader recommend that an expulsion is required, he or she will follow the same procedures for a
long-term suspension (see above) with the exception that all expulsions will be subject to a
majority vote, by a selected colony of peers and community leaders.
Zero Tolerance Expulsion Policy for Weapons, Drugs and Alcohol
We have a “zero-tolerance, one-strike” policy for all weapons, drugs, and alcohol brought on
school grounds. Any student found guilty of bringing any weapons, drugs or alcohol to school,
will be recommended for swift expulsion to the CEO of VLA. If the School Leader is able to
provide convincing evidence that the student brought alcohol, drugs or a weapon to the school,
the CEO shall immediately recommend that the student be expelled from the school. (The
Federal Gun-Free schools Act of 1994, which applies to public schools, states that a student who
is determined to have brought a weapon to school must be suspended for at least one calendar
year.)
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Appendix B – Discipline Policy EXTENDED )
DISCIPLINE MANAGEMENT POLICY FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
Students with disabilities have the same rights and responsibilities as other students, and
may be disciplined for the same behavioral offenses. However, consideration will be given to
students with disabilities.
Our Schools will comply with all federal laws regarding student discipline for children
with disabilities and will stay apprised of any developments in the IDEA legislation. If a student
with disabilities has an Individual Education Plan (IEP) that includes disciplinary guidelines
within a behavior management plan, that student will be disciplined according to these
guidelines. Students whose IEP does not include specific disciplinary guidelines may be
disciplined in accordance with the standard school policies listed for regular
education students along with the accommodations listed below. Finally, in accordance with
CFR 300.527, students known to be eligible for evaluation, or undergoing evaluation at the time
a problem arises, will be afforded due process protections.
Discipline Policy & Procedures for Students with Disabilities
I. Overview of Procedural Safeguards
A. General. Disciplinary actions give students with disabilities extra legal protections when the
discipline constitutes a change in placement. If a student violates the Student Code of Conduct,
before consequences or punishment are imposed, the principal/designee must consider whether
the student:
Has an IDEA or Section 504 disability; or
Is a student who is “thought to have a disability.”
While all students may be disciplined, the placement of students with disabilities cannot be
“changed” when the offense is directly related to his/her disability or when the IEP or Section
504 plan is not implemented, except in the case of emergency circumstances (drugs, weapons,
significant bodily injury).
B. Determining Change in Placement.
A change in placement is a legal term that applies to the situations described below. A student’s
school suspension that occurred in a LA local education agency (LEA)during the same school
year of transfer into another LA LEA “counts” and is added to any additional
suspensions in the new school.
1. More than 10 Consecutive Days of Suspension, i.e., Expulsion
Any suspension that is for more than 10 consecutive days is considered to be a change in
placement.
2. More than 10 Total Days of Suspension in One School Year. Option 1
A series of suspensions with days that total more than 10 total school days in a school year is a
change in placement.1 The special education chairperson, with assistance and documentation
from the Administration/Disciplinarian, monitors the number of days each student has been
suspended. Students with disabilities who have not reached this 10-day threshold may be
suspended under the procedures that apply to all students.
2. More than 10 Total Days of Suspension in One School Year. Option 2
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Appendix B – Discipline Policy EXTENDED )
A series of suspensions with days that total more than 10 total school days in a school year may
be a change in placement. 2 The special education chairperson, with assistance and
documentation from the Administration/Disciplinarian, monitors the number of days each
student has been suspended. Students with disabilities who have not reached this 10-day
threshold may be suspended under the procedures that apply to all students.
Factors for Determining Pattern of Suspensions
Substantially Similar Behavior. Is the student’s behavior substantially similar to the behavior
for which the student has previously been suspended? (Factors may include same type of
behavior, same victim, same class, same day of the week or same time of day, etc.) If the answer
is yes, continue with thefollowing analysis:
Other Pattern Considerations. Consider such factors as:
Length of each suspension, e.g., 1 day, 4 days, etc.
Total cumulative days of suspensions, e.g., 11 days, 20 days, etc.
Proximity of (time between) suspensions, e.g., 1 week apart, 2 months apart, etc.
1 In-school suspension and suspension from the bus may constitute a suspension to the extent
they impact implementation of a student’s IEP. See additional information on the next page.
2 In-school suspension and suspension from the bus may constitute a suspension to the extent
they impact implementation of a student’s IEP. See additional information on the next page.
A pattern is more likely to exist when the facts in each factor are more extreme, e.g.,
longer suspension lengths, more cumulative days of suspension and fewer days between each
suspension. Also, consider whether the suspensions are: from the same class on a regular basis;
on the same day of the week; at the same time of day; for the same activity; involving same staff
or other students.
Consistent Decision-Making.
Determining whether a pattern exists is very subjective. Thus, school staff should consult with a
Department of Education Representative (Office of Federal Programs Support) when
considering this issue to ensure that factors are considered consistently across schools.
2. Additional Considerations. The following considerations apply to in-school suspension; a
suspension or removal for a portion of the school day; and for suspensions from transportation.
a. In-school Suspension. An in-school suspension will not be considered as a suspension for
the above purposes as long as a student is given the opportunity to continue to: appropriately
participate in the general curriculum; receive IEP specified services; and participate with
nondisabled children to the extent (s)he would have in the current placement. Any in-school
suspension that does not meet this standard must be considered as a suspension for purposes
of these procedures.
b. Suspension/Removal for Portion of School Day. Students sent home from school in the
morning because of misconduct is considered to have a full-day suspension. Students sent
home in the afternoon is considered to have a half-day suspension. These conditions apply
unless the student’s BIP specifically calls for the student to receive a shortened school day
when certain behaviors are exhibited.3
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Appendix B – Discipline Policy EXTENDED )
c. Bus Suspension. The following standards apply based on whether transportation is a related
service on the IEP:
1) Bus Transportation Is IEP Service. When transportation is an IEP service, a
student’s removal from the bus is considered to be a suspension unless transportation
is provided in some other way. In this case, transportation has been determined to be
necessary for the student to access educational services.
2) Bus Transportation Is Not IEP Service. When transportation is not an IEP service,
the student’s removal from the bus is NOT considered to be a suspension. In this case
the student/parent have the same obligations for the student to get to and from school
as any nondisabled peers suspended from the bus. However, school officials should
consider whether the bus behavior is similar to classroom behavior that IS addressed in
an IEP and whether the bus behavior should be addressed in the IEP or through a BIP.
Monitoring Suspensions –
Principals must have procedures in place to monitor and cumulatively total
all suspensions for students with disabilities.
3 Note: The Student Information System allows only the entry of suspension for a full day; half
days are not permitted. Thus, there may be a difference between a student’s actual total number
of suspension days and the total recorded on the System. The student’s “actual” full time
equivalent days of suspension, however, are relevant to the application of these standards.
Schools are strongly encouraged to enter suspension data in “real time.”
C. Determining Manifestation Determination & Services.
1. Manifestation Determination. Within 10 days of any decision resulting in a change of
placement the LEA representative, parent, and relevant members of the child’s IEP Team (as
determined by the parent and the LEA representative) must meet and determine whether the
student’s behavior is a manifestation of his/her disability using the Manifestation Determination
form. The procedures below are used to make this determination.
Making the Decision
1) Review Relevant Information. The team participants review all relevant information in the
student’s file, including the IEP. If the IEP was not implemented, the team documents why it
was not implemented and whether the failure to implement the IEP impacted the student's
behavior.
2) Observe Behavior. The team also reviews documentation of staff observations regarding the
student's behavior. This should include an analysis of the student’s behavior across settings
and times throughout the school day.
3) Information from Parents. The team reviews any relevant information provided by the
parents.
4) Ask Two Questions to Determine Manifestation. The team must consider the two questions
below to determine if a student’s behavior was manifested by his/her disability.
a) Relationship of Behavior to Misconduct. Was the conduct caused by or directly and
substantially related to the student’s disability?
Consider whether the behavior in question has been consistent and/or has an attenuated
association with the disability:
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Consistent Behavior. Behavior that has been consistent across settings and across
time may meet this standard.
Attenuated Association. Behavior that is not an attenuated association, such as
low self-esteem, to the disability would not have a direct and substantial
relationship to the student’s disability.
b) IEP Implementation. Was the conduct a direct result of the school’s failure to follow the
student’s IEP? If so, the principal must ensure that immediate steps are taken so that the
identified deficiencies are remedied.
d. Behavior Is Manifestation of Disability. If the relevant members of the IEP team answers
yes to either question, then the student’s behavior is a manifestation of his/her disability. In this
case:
1) Return to Placement. Unless the IEP team agrees to a change of placement as part of the
modification of the BIP, the school must return the student to the placement from which (s)he
was removed. Note: this provision does not apply to students involved with weapons, drugs
or serious bodily injury. (See Section II.)
e. Behavior is NOT Manifestation of Disability
1) Same Consequences. If the IEP team members agree that the student’s conduct was not a
manifestation of his/her disability, then the student may be subject to the same consequences
as all students.4
2) Required Services. A student with a disability who is removed from his/her current
placement must receive the following services beginning on the 11th day of cumulative
suspensions during the school year. The IEP team:
a) Identifies Services. Identifies and documents educational services the students will
receive to enable the student to continue to participate in the general education curriculum,
although in another setting (e.g., an interim alternative educational setting (IAES), etc.)
and to progress toward meeting the goals set out in the student’s IEP; and
c) Considers Need for More Restrictive Services. May convene and modify the student’s
IEP. School personnel may consider any unique circumstances on a case-by-case basis
when determining whether a change in placement, consistent with the requirements of this
section, is appropriate for a student with a disability who violates a code of student
conduct.
II. Weapons, Drugs or Serious Bodily Injury: Emergency Procedures
In circumstances related to a student’s use of weapons, drugs or imposition of serious bodily
injury, school officials may remove a student for 45 school days by following the procedures
below.
A. Criteria for Emergency Removal.
1. Weapons. A student carries a weapon to or possesses a weapon at school, on school premises,
or to or at a school function under the school’s jurisdiction.
A weapon is a device, instrument, material or substance animate or inanimate that is used
for or is readily capable of causing death or serious bodily injury (excluding pocket knife
with a blade of less than 2 ½ inches in length); firearms, including a starter gun; the
frame or receiver of such a weapon; a muffler or silencer; any destructive device
including any explosive incendiary or poison gas bombs, grenades, rockets, missiles and
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Appendix B – Discipline Policy EXTENDED )
mines; does not include antique firearms.
2. Drugs. A student knowingly possesses or uses illegal drugs, or sells or solicits the sale of a
controlled substance, while at school, on school premises, or at a school function under the
school’s jurisdiction; A controlled substance is a drug or other substance in the Federal Code that
does not include a substance legally used and possessed under the supervision of a licensed
health-care professional.
Possession of alcohol and tobacco does not fall under “controlled substance.” Therefore,
the principal cannot move a student to an IAES for possession of these items under this
section. Instead, the removal is subject to the procedural safeguards applicable to other
types of misconduct.
4 If a parent disagrees with the team’s decision that the behavior was not a manifestation of the
student’s disability or with the interim alternative educational services or location, the parent
may request an expedited due process hearing to challenge this finding. If the Hearing Officer
agrees with the parent, the student will remain in the school where the offense was committed
unless the parent and the school agree otherwise.
3. Serious Bodily Injury. A student inflicted serious bodily injury upon another person while at
school, on school premises, or at a school function under the jurisdiction of the State or an LEA.
5Serious bodily injury involves substantial risk of death; extreme physical pain; protracted
and obvious disfigurement; or protracted loss or impairment of the function of a bodily
member, organ, or mental faculty.
B. Removal
1. General. The school may immediately remove the student for up to 45 school days to an
IAES. Because drugs, weapons and serious bodily injury are so dangerous to a safe school
climate, a school may remove a student under these circumstances for 45 school days regardless
of whether the team believes that the behavior is a manifestation of the student’s disability.
The 45 school days do not include those days the school is not in session, e.g., Spring Break. The
IEP team may specify a removal for fewer days than the maximum 45 days.
C. Action during Removal. During the 45 school day period, the school must convene a
meeting to determine whether the student’s behavior is a manifestation of his/her disability. (See
b. Reevaluation. The student may be referred for a reevaluation.
c. More Intensive Services. The IEP team may meet to consider more intensive special
education services upon the expiration of the 45 day IAES or sooner.
2. Behavior is NOT Manifestation of Disability
a. Disciplinary Hearing. If all team members determine that the conduct was not a
manifestation of the student’s disability, then the 45 school day emergency placement may
proceed to a disciplinary proceeding afforded to all students.
III. Appeals
A. Reasons for Requesting an Expedited Due process Hearing
1. Parent Disagreement. Parents who disagree with the appropriateness of the alternative
placement or remedial disciplinary setting or services may request an expedited due process
hearing.
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2. School Considers Student to be Dangerous. If a school has documented reasons to believe
that keeping the student in his/her current school is substantially likely to result in injury to
the student or to others, the school should request an emergency hearing for the purpose of
transferring the student to an IAES for up to 45 school days. Note: this standard is not as high as
serious bodily injury; it does not allow for an immediate 45 school day removal.
To comply with the law, a 45 school day emergency removal for serious bodily injury must be
extremely serious, i.e., requiring medical treatment.
B. Authority of Hearing Officer
1. A hearing officer may:
a. Return the student to the placement from which the student was removed if the hearing officer
determines that the removal did not comply with these procedures or that the student’s behavior
was a manifestation of the student’s disability; or
b. Order a change of placement to an IAES for not more than 45 school days if maintaining the
current placement of the student is substantially likely to result in injury to the student or to
others.
2. The school may repeat its request for an expedited hearing if it believes that returning the
student to the original placement is substantially likely to result in injury to the student or to
others.
C. Expedited Due Process Hearing Procedures.
1. An expedited hearing must occur within 20 school days of the date the request is filed. The
hearing officer must make a determination within 10 school days after the hearing.
2. Unless the parents and school personnel agree in writing to waive the resolution meeting or
agree to mediate the dispute:
a. A resolution meeting must occur within seven days of receiving notice of the hearing request;
b. The hearing may proceed unless the matter has been resolved to the satisfaction of both parties
within 15 days of receipt of the hearing request.
3. Evidence not disclosed to the other party three business days before the hearing is excluded,
unless the parties agree otherwise.
Expedited due process hearing decisions are appealable to state or federal court.
1. Weapons, Drugs or Serious Bodily Injury. The student remains in the IAES pending the
decision of the hearing officer or until the expiration of the 45-day or code violation time period
(if less than 45 school days), whichever occurs first, unless the parent and school personnel agree
otherwise.
2. Behavior Not Manifested by the Student’s Disability. The student remains in the IAES
pending the decision of the hearing officer or until the expiration of the 45-day or code violation
time period (if less than 45 school days), whichever occurs first, unless the parent and school
personnel agree otherwise.
3. Behavior Is Manifested by Student’s Disability but Belief Behavior is Substantially
Likely to Cause Injury. The student remains in the placement (s)he was in at the time of the
behavior in question unless the parent and school personnel agree otherwise.
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Appendix B – Discipline Policy EXTENDED )
IV. Students Without IEPs or Section 504 Plans “Deemed to Have a Disability”
In some cases, a student without a disability will be deemed to have a disability. The criteria for
making this determination and the applicable procedures relevant to such a finding are discussed
below.
A. Knowledge of suspected disability (Thought to be a student with a disability)
There are certain circumstances that would indicate a school had knowledge that a student might
(or is thought to) have a disability prior to the violation of the disciplinary violation. The
following three situations give rise to such legal evidence:
1. Evaluation Requested. The parent requested an evaluation.
2. Written Concern. The parent expressed concern in writing to the student’s teacher or school
administration about the student’s need for special education and related services
3. Specific Concerns by Staff about Pattern of Behavior. The student’s teacher or other school
staff told school supervisory personnel of specific concerns about the student’s pattern of
behavior. If any of the three factors above are present, then school officials consider disciplinary
action as if the student has a disability.
B. NOT Deemed To Have Knowledge. This provision does not apply if:
1. Parent did not consent to an initial evaluation of the student
2. Parent refused special education and related services for the student or
3. The student was evaluated and was determined not to have disability.
If any of these three circumstances exist, the student may be subjected to the same
disciplinary measures applied to those without disabilities engaging in similar behaviors.
The US Department of Education’s comments to the IDEA states: a public agency will not be
considered to have a basis of knowledge merely because a child receives services under the
coordinated, early intervening services of the IDEA law UNLESS a parent or teacher of a child
receiving early intervening services expresses a concern, in writing, to appropriate agency
personnel that the child may need special education and related services.
C. School Personnel Have No Knowledge and Parent Subsequently Requests an Evaluation
If the parent requests an evaluation for a suspected disability after the student is sent to an IAES,
the school must conduct an expedited evaluation at parental request. However, the student
remains in placement, including an IAES, during the evaluation. If the student is found to have a
disability, an IEP must be developed. The IEP team must then conduct a manifestation
determination. If the behavior is manifested by the student’s disability, the team reconsiders the
student’s placement in light of the new information
V. Referral to and Action by Law Enforcement and Judicial Authorities
A. Reporting Crimes. Nothing in this part prohibits school personnel from reporting a crime
committed by a student with a disability to appropriate authorities or prevents State law
enforcement and judicial authorities from exercising their responsibilities with regard to the
application of Federal and State law to crimes committed by a student with a disability.
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Appendix B – Discipline Policy EXTENDED )
B. Transmittal of Records. School personnel reporting a crime committed by a student with a
disability must ensure that copies of the special education and disciplinary records of the student
are transmitted for consideration by the appropriate authorities to whom the agency reports the
crime. Records must be transmitted only to the extent that the transmission is permitted by the
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act.
VI. Application of Section 504 and ADA
Generally, students with disabilities eligible for services only under Section 504/ADA (i.e., need
related and supplementary aids and services only) are entitled to the procedural safeguards
specified in this section. An exception to this general rule applies to students with behavior that
is not a manifestation of his/her disabilities. In this case, these students are entitled to those
services normally available to nondisabled students who are suspended or removed pursuant to
the school’s Code of Student Conduct.
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Appendix B – Discipline Policy EXTENDED )
Determining Pattern of Suspensions Worksheet
Student Name ________________________________________ Disability___________
School ___________________________________ Grade _________ Date ___________
Determining if Pattern of Suspensions Exists For Students Suspended for More than 10
Cumulative School Days in School Year and NO Special Circumstances Apply (i.e.,
weapons, drugs or severe bodily injury)
Description of behavior related to disciplinary action:
Description of prior behavior:
Was behavior in question substantially similar to the student’s behavior in previous
incidents?
___Yes ___No If “yes,” continue to determine if there’s a pattern. If “no” the behavior is not
part of a pattern.
For all suspensions, attach dates of suspensions and number of days for each suspension &
determine:
1. What is the cumulative number of days for all suspensions combined? ______ days
2. How many days of suspension were ordered for each separate incident?
3. What period of time separated each period of suspension? (days, weeks, months)
CONCLUSION: __ Pattern of Suspensions Exists __ NO Pattern of Suspensions Exists
Basis for Decision:
Individual Completing Review: _________________________ Title: ___________________
Consultation with: ___________________________________ Title: ___________________
Positive Behavior Support
In order to assure classroom management using positive behavioral supports and effective
disciplinary tools, VLA will identify data-driven academic, career and technical,
discipline/behavioral performance results in the School Improvement Plan (SIP). VLA will
establish and use a school-based leadership team to meet on a regularly scheduled basis to
review data and guide the positive behavior process. This leadership team shall, to the extent
possible, include representatives of the school administration, both regular and special education
teachers, parents, guidance counselors, and school bus operators. The leadership team will use a
decision-making process utilizing a data-management system that allows graphical
representation of discipline issues. Said data system will permit regular and efficient monitoring
and evaluation of the effectiveness of the implementation of a school-wide system of discipline.
School data collection shall include, but not be limited to, average referrals per day per month,
referrals by problem behavior, referrals by location, referrals by time, referrals by student,
referrals by staff, individual student report by month and by year, and referrals by grade level.
Environmental changes may be made as indicated by data. For instance, increased monitoring,
schedule changes, or changes in recess structure may help to alleviate congestion or overcrowding at certain times during the day.
The team will uniformly use the two BESE-approved forms, i.e., “School Behavior
Report Form” and “School Bus Behavior Report Form,” to report incidents of alleged discipline
violations. The referral system will be utilized consistently and appropriately.
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Appendix B – Discipline Policy EXTENDED )
Each teacher at VLA shall develop lesson plans and teach expectations across the
school setting by providing direct instruction on expected behaviors at the beginning of the
school year and reinforced throughout the year for all students. Our school shall design
programs for students with special needs so that the students are challenged and engaged in
school curriculum, and are appropriately placed so they remain in school rather than being
suspended/expelled or becoming drop-outs.
G. Student Engagement
1. What is your goal for student attendance? How will you promote and reward high rates of
student attendance? If you do not meet your goal, what steps will you take to improve your
attendance rate? Who will be responsible for collecting and monitoring attendance data? How
will you handle students who are habitually absent?
2. How will you measure student satisfaction within the school? Who will be responsible for
implementing your plan to measure student satisfaction? What adjustments will you make if the
results do not meet your internal goals? Will you use the results in leadership evaluations?
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Section I. School Culture
A MISSION
Vision Learning Academy, an academically ROBUST Alternative High School program, will
provide a college preparatory, career -readiness educational model, through an enthusiastic
visual, performing, and technologically –based curriculum with high expectations for all
students, exceptional teaching and leadership, and a rigorous academic and intensive therapy
program that is research-based and data-driven.
B. POPULATION
Vision Learning Academy’s academic philosophy is founded on one core belief: all children
can learn, have vision and experience success. This belief underlies every aspect of VLA’s
design. By implementing a strong culture that is anchored by high expectations for academics
and behavior, VLA creates an environment that motivates and compels all children to
achieve.
The population of students currently not thriving in Monroe. Louisiana’s traditional high schools
are disengaged or discouraged for a wide variety of reasons. VLA is specifically targeting
students whose needs can be met through a rigorous, college preparatory curriculum with high
expectations for academics and behavior, but who require a non-traditional approach to
delivering that curriculum. Aspects of VLA that students may be lacking in their experience in
traditional environments include flexible scheduling to acknowledge life circumstances that
prohibit attendance in school, intensive and focused remediation of basic skills – even those
typically taught in the primary years, computer-based accelerated credits for students who are
old and nearing graduation, a high level of engagement through strong and caring relationships
with adults, and a year-round schedule that enables students to fast-track‘ their academic
experience and earn up to 12 Carnegie units per year.
Again, VLA will not lower expectations for students based on societal conditions,
challenging personal circumstances, or behavioral or academic records. Instead, VLA will
implement programs to improve how over-aged and under-credited students are served,
making specific accommodations to better address students‘ unique credit needs,
social/emotional profiles, personal circumstances and goals. Some examples of serving atrisk students include:
For students affected by poverty, which will be nearly the entire student population, VLA’s
staff members will facilitate students‘ access to social and human services through its
community partnerships and social service partners. Additionally, embodying one of our
values, the school will instill in students a sense of perseverance, and an understanding that
hard work is a matter of quality of life, and a method for lifting them out of poverty.
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Students with severe behavioral and emotional issues will be diagnosed for appropriate
services by the school‘s social worker, and where VLA is unable to provide direct services,
will contract with a third party social service or health provider.
Students with a history of truancy will be supported by the school‘s exceptionally high
expectations, coupled with its strict enforcement of an attendance policy. Advisors will be
responsible for contacting parents, and in some cases, the student directly, to inquire about his
or her status as soon as the student is identified as absent.
Pregnant students or students with children will be able to access a multitude of services
through VLA. The school will make referrals to health partners and any available public
health sponsored programs. Family planning and HIV prevention will be a component of Life
C. CULTURE
VLA’s structural approach is designed to re-enroll and re-engage particularly vulnerable and
at-risk students and those who have already dropped out of the system. The school will enroll
high school or over-aged students (14-21) who are under-credited, and who require remediation
of basic skills and accelerated credits to earn a college-track diploma.
Values
Vision Learning Academy will establish the following culture throughout its facility:
•Convinced – We are convinced that as we successfully meet the needs of all of our
students, we must re-imagine and reestablish schools as safe and exciting places of
learning.
•Committed- We are committed to set and pursue ambitious goals. We use objective
data to drive all of our decisions. We find solutions rather than make excuses. We
urgently overcome obstacles to achieve our goals.
•Connected- – We are always learning through reflection. This is how we remain
connected with our vision, students, parents, stakeholders and community. We reflect
on both successes and challenges to maximize our strengths and learn from our
mistakes. We are proactive to offer and solicit feedback, develop ourselves
professionally, and adjust course as necessary.
•Collaborate – We share responsibility for key decisions and remain accountable for
the results. Together, our resources become greater and we increase our impact.
•Celebrate – We approach life and work with enthusiasm and joy for the impact we
can make on our community. To sustain our efforts, we restore our liveliness daily by
celebrating small and big wins
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D. PARENTAL ENVOLVEMENT
Parental and Community Involvement
VLA is committed to parental involvement and family strengthening. As set forth in
R. S. 17:406.1, effective approaches to involving families more fully as partners in the process of
their children’s learning require the participation and coordination of numerous state and local,
public and private agencies shall be encouraged. VLA shall seek to make
connections through a variety of local and culturally sensitive methods to facilitate
parents/family members/access to local/regional family strengthening programs available in the
community. We will seek training to facilitate mutual understanding of research-based practices
promoting positive relationships between parents, LEA personnel and community service
providers. We will identify the mental health needs of its students and match those needs with
available local resources including public, nonpublic and/or volunteer organizations. Pending
inclusion of mental health services in the Medicaid Health Services Program (School-Based), the
availability of mental health services along with Multi-Systemic Therapy will be expanded in our
school.
PARENTS'/GUARDIANS' COMMITMENT STATEMENT
We fully commit to VLA in the following ways:
: We will make sure our child arrives at VLA every day by 7:45 A.M. (Monday – Friday) or
boards a bus at the scheduled time.
: We will make arrangements so our child can remain at VLA until 2:30 P.M. (Monday –
Thursday) and 3:00 P.M. on Friday.
: We will always help our child in the best way we know how and we will do whatever it takes
for him/her to learn.
This also means that we will check our child's homework every night, let him/her call the teacher
if there is a problem with the homework, and try to read with him/her every night.
: We will always make ourselves available to our children and the school, and address any
concerns they might have. This also means that if our child is going to miss school, we will
notify the teacher as soon as possible, and we will carefully read any and all papers that the
school sends home to us.
: We will allow our child to go on VLA’s field trips.
: We will make sure our child follows VLA’s dress code.
: We understand that our child must follow VLA’s rules so as to protect the safety, interests, and
rights of all individuals in the classroom. We, not the school, are responsible for the behavior and
actions of our child.
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F. DISCIPLINE
We will implement an awards-and-consequences discipline system that has proven
effective in maintaining strong culture. We strongly believe that removing a student from the
regular educational program (out-of-school suspension) for punishment purposes is detrimental
to the student’s learning. Students cannot learn if they are not in school. Therefore, all behavioral
management systems are less focused on negative consequences and more focused on the
student’s motivation to improve.
Parents may be contacted if a student receives an insurmountable amount of infraction within a
week. Eagles Wings are awarded (added ) for the following traits and values:
1. Attendance and promptness/Creativity
2. Effort on class work done at home/Articulation
3. Organization and neatness/Leadership
4. Paying attention, remaining on-task
5. Participation and asking questions
6. Following directions
7. Behavior outside of class
8. Effort on schoolwork and intellectual curiosity
9. Respect for students/teachers
10. Teamwork
The Eagle’s wings will be counted and reviewed throughout the year to determine who
earns invitations to field lessons, end of the year trips, and special events. Parents will be made
aware of the significance and consequences of repeated bonus bucks of 35 and lower. Students
who repeatedly score low on their bonus bucks may lose certain privileges.
G.STUDENT ATTENDANCE
It is the duty of all staff at VLA to cooperate fully with the visiting teachers, or supervisors of
child welfare and attendance. We will then make available to visiting teachers, or supervisors
of child welfare and attendance, FINS officers, and Truancy Assessment and Service Centers
such information as will assist them in promoting the regular attendance and school
adjustment of these children. Visiting teachers, or supervisors of child welfare and attendance
(pursuant to R. S. 17:235), and FINS officers, shall cooperate fully with the state departments
of social services, labor, and health and hospitals, and with other state and local agencies,
including interchange of confidential and privileged information; cooperate fully with
juvenile and family court authorities, training and correctional schools, law enforcement
officers; and make such referrals and conduct such investigations as seem necessary for the
enforcement of school attendance laws, including interchange of confidential and privileged
information.
Each homeroom teacher of students in grades PK-12 shall, on the first day of school each
school year, provide information to and answer any questions from students relative to the
statement of compliance as provided by Vision’s Leadership Team. Each parent/guardian of
each student in grades PK-12 shall sign the Family Accountability Agreement form to
commit to do all of the following: ensure that his child attends school daily; ensure that his
child arrives at school on time each day; ensure that his child completes allrequired
homework assignments; and attend all required parent and teacher or parent and principal
conferences. Please see example of the form on the following page this will also serve as the
governance and flow of communication throughout the school.
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Section II. Leadership
A. Leadership Team Personnel
1. Provide the profile of your school’s ideal leader, including skills, qualifications, and
characteristics. Is it a requirement that your school leader has school leadership experience?
2. Provide a detailed description of the recruiting, hiring, and selection process, and timeline for
identifying the school leader. Who makes the hiring decision for the school leader position?
3. If the Principal/Head of School candidate has been identified:
a. Explain why this individual is well qualified to lead the proposed school in achieving its
mission and goals. Summarize the proposed leader’s academic and organizational trackrecord. Provide specific evidence that demonstrates the leader’s capacity to design,
launch, and manage a high performing school. If the school leader has never run a
school, describe any principal leadership training programs that the proposed leader has
completed or is currently attending.
b. Provide specific data that demonstrates strong evidence of the school leader’s ability to
effectively serve the proposed target population.
c. What other personnel will make up the leadership team? What are the essential duties
and responsibilities for each person on the leadership team?
4. Who will coach and evaluate the other members of the leadership team (i.e., not the Principal)?
5. How will the other members of the leadership team be evaluated?
What are the qualifications and credentials necessary for the other members of the leadership
team?
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II. Leadership
1. Leadership
The School Leader will be the instructional leader of the school, and he/she will facilitate the
stabilization of student culture. To support the school leader, the Executive Director will
support, coach and guide the School Leader in best practices for the accelerated high school
setting.
2-5.-6..School Leader Recruitment
In order to sustain the momentum and intensity of the school’s framework, the school will
concentrate recruiting efforts locally; however, recruiting on the national level will seek leaders
with the greatest success rates and strongest commitments to education.
School Leader Selection
We believe that a School Leader’s primary functions revolve around the academic achievement
of the school’s students. Therefore, we will work to recruit, hire and retain the strongest
instructional leaders for our school. For individuals interested in school leadership positions at
VLA’s hiring process will resemble the following:
Step 1: Receipt of Cover Letter and Resume
Step 2: Resume Screening
Step 3: Interview
Step 4: Classroom/School Observation
Step 6: Reference Checks
Step 7: Second Interview (as needed)
Step 8: Notification
With the support of the Board of Directors, the Chief Executive Officer is committed to
seeking out the best. In future years, while not directly involved in the hiring process, existing
School Leaders will assist in offering insight into applicants and their “fit” within the collection.
School Leader Evaluation
The School Leader will be responsible for supporting and evaluating all teachers, and will
establish school-wide academic performance goals and personal leadership and professional
goals with the Chief Academic Officer before each school year. Throughout the school year,
the School Leaders will meet with the Chief Academic Officer for informal performance
reviews after every 9-week interim assessment to assess actual versus targeted test score
performance for the entire school. In the Spring of each year, the Chief Academic Officer will
conduct a formal review of the School Leaders, evaluating their accomplishments of the pre determined goals and identifying professional development opportunities in areas that both the
School Leaders and Chief Executive Officer identify as weaknesses in the School Leaders’ skill
set and instructional leadership.
3.N/A
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4. Chief Executive Officer and the Board of Learning Solutions, Inc . Adhoc of 3 Parental
Governing Board will all be apart of the School Leader’s aforementioned accountability
processes.
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Appendix C – Job Descriptions for all Leadership Team Positions
A complete job description and responsibilities for all staff members
Classroom Teacher
Primary Role and Purpose:
Collaboratively work on a team to create a solid foundation for the school’s academic
program. Provide students with appropriate educational activities and experiences that will
enable them to fulfill VLA’s mission.
Experience and Qualifications:
Bachelor’s degree required
At least 2 or more years teaching experience, preferably in an underserved area
Skills and Qualities:
Possess a strong working knowledge of curriculum and instruction.
Maintain exceptional CREATIVITY, organizational, communication, and interpersonal skills.
Embody the values of the school and be willing and able to support the school’s culture.
Demonstrate success and achievement in teaching rigorous and engaging lessons.
Sustain effective classroom management skills.
Participate actively on a small team of committed educators.
Commit to working with underserved students.
Is self-critical, reflective, and dedicated to personal and professional growth.
Possess strong written and verbal communication skills.
Shows initiative: willing to go above and beyond job requirements.
Responsibilities and Duties:
Help create and refine school standards and curriculum.
Design, write, and use lesson plans that align with school’s mission and accommodate for all
learners.
Establish communication rapport with parents, students, School Leaders and teachers.
Create and maintain a professional relationship with colleagues, students, parents, and
community members.
Perform other responsibilities as needed for the success of the school (e.g., all teachers will be
available by cell phone).
All primary roles and major responsibilities are listed. Additional duties and skills may be
required for each job.
Coordinate, create and execute robust hands on technologically enhanced lessons quarterly using
paperless instructions.
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Appendix C – Job Descriptions for all Leadership Team Positions
Dean of Students
Primary Role and Purpose:
Support VLA students and families through effective and constant communication,
dissemination of information, and fair enforcement of school policies and procedures. Will deal
with student needs, building and maintaining parent relationships, and developing the character
of our students.
Experience and Qualifications:
Bachelor’s degree required; Master’s level degree preferred
At least 3 – 5 years of urban teaching and educational leadership experience is preferred
Skills and Qualities:
Possess a strong commitment to the mission and vision of VLA.
Has experience in education, strategic planning, and communication techniques.
Has experience with youth programs, successfully working with urban youth with measurable
success.
Is a motivational and energetic leader who is committed to excellence.
Maintain an unwavering in pursuit of excellence even in the face of opposition and challenge.
Able to work collaboratively with a diversity of people.
Equipped with exceptional public speaking and writing abilities.
Knowledge of curriculum for third through eighth grade students.
Sustains energy and entrepreneurial spirit for a start-up charter school.
Operates with professional demeanor, strong work ethic, detail-driven work style and
excellent organizational skills.
Responsibilities and Duties:
Embody and believe in VLA’s mission and values.
Provide all relevant data, reports and information to the administrative team.
Organize, help administer and serve as a liaison to the Parent Involvement Committee.
Sustain and monitor a safe, orderly, disciplined culture of high academic and behavioral
standards.
Communicate with all families on a regular and consistent basis.
Assist in the development of structures and systems to assist in building consistency within
the school, and serve as the lead point of contact for culture building, student counseling, and
discipline management.
Lead community meetings, school culture meetings, and other committees.
Provide specific professional development to the rest of the faculty when appropriate.
Coordinate disciplinary systems , merits, demerits, in-school suspensions,
etc.
Evaluate behavior through detailed data analysis of student and teacher performance on a
wide variety of metrics and present the data to school constituencies in an easily accessible
format.
Provide the necessary support to faculty so that they can help administer the school’s policies.
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Appendix C – Job Descriptions for all Leadership Team Positions
School Nurse
Primary Role and Purpose:
Supports the education process by working to assure the health of students. Provides
preventative health services to facilitate students’ optimal physical, mental, emotional and
social growth and development.
Experience and Qualifications:
Qualified to practice as a Registered Nurse in the state of Louisiana and holds an unrestricted
license
At least two years of experience in public health nursing, community health nursing, school
health nursing or pediatric nursing
Certified in CPR
Prior experience in urban communities preferred
Skills and Qualities:
Maintain a commitment to the school’s student population and its health needs.
Demonstrate the ability to provide intervention in a time of crisis.
Able to work collaboratively with a diverse team of teachers.
Has exceptional organizational, communication, and interpersonal skills.
Responsibilities and Duties:
Provide health assessments.
Obtain students’ health history.
Screen and evaluate findings of deficit in vision, hearing, scoliosis, growth, etc.
Develop and implement a student health plan.
Provide ongoing health counseling with students, parents, school personnel or health
agencies.
Utilize existing health resources to provide appropriate care of students.
Maintain, evaluate and interpret cumulative health data to accommodate individual needs of
students.
Plan and implement school health management protocols.
Develop procedures and provide for emergency nursing management for injuries/illnesses.
Serve as a resource person to the school staff members in health instruction.
Coordinate school and community health activities and serve as a liaison health professional
between the home, school and community.
Where applicable, participate in the IEP plan development.
All primary roles and major responsibilities are listed. Additional duties and skills may be
required for each job.
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Appendix C – Job Descriptions for all Leadership Team Positions
Operations & Data Manager
Primary Role and Purpose:
Responsible for all matters related to fiscal and administrative procedures, including all aspects
of accounting, financial reporting, state and federal reporting, and risk management.
Experience and Qualifications:
Bachelor’s degree required
At least 3 – 5 years of experience in operations, accounting and/or finance preferred
Skills and Qualities:
Maintain a commitment to VLA’s mission and organizational success.
Is a results-driven business leader with experience in, and commitment to, operational and
financial excellence and the use of data to drive operational and financial decisions.
Has experience in managing accounting systems in an educational setting preferred.
Sustain advanced technological proficiency in financial management software and Microsoft
Excel.
Desire to grow as a leader.
Embody an entrepreneurial spirit.
Preserve personal and professional integrity.
Responsibilities and Duties:
Report directly to Director of Finance and Operations, and provide assistance on day-to-day
operations management in the school building.
Maintain financial document record keeping.
Manage accounts payable, accounts receivable, fixed assets, and accounting data entry for the
School.
Responsible for State and Federal reporting.
Manage SIS
Train staff to run reports in SIS
State compliance reporting
Maintain student cumulative files.
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Appendix C – Job Descriptions for all Leadership Team Positions
Director of Finance and Operations
Primary Role and Purpose:
The school-based Director of Finance and Operations is an essential component of VLA. This
position is designed to support non-instructional duties to allow principals and teachers to focus
exclusively on student achievement. The Director of Finance and Operations has responsibility
over several aspects of the day-to-day administration of non-instructional student support. The
Director of Finance and Operations reports directly to the Controller and Managing Director of
Operations and to the principals within the school.
Experience and Qualifications:
Bachelor’s degree required
At least 2 – 4 years of experience in operations, accounting and/or finance preferred
Successful classroom experience in an urban environment highly preferred
Experience with Quickbooks preferred
Skills and Qualities:
Maintain a commitment to VLA’s mission and organizational success
Results-driven business leader with experience in, and commitment to, operational and
financial excellence and the use of data to drive operational and financial decisions
Experienced in managing accounting systems in an educational setting
Impeccably organized and task oriented
Maintains careful attention to details to ensure positive outcomes
Proficient in MS Excel, MS Word, and MS PowerPoint
Relentlessly Driven - can act on instructions while also acting effectively without
Possess ability to work in a fast-paced, high-performing, and unpredictable environment
Display maturity, humility, strong work ethic, and a sense of humor
Desire to grow as a leader.
Embody an entrepreneurial spirit.
Preserve personal and professional integrity.
Financial Responsibilities and Duties:
Maintain financial document record keeping.
Manage accounts payable, accounts receivable, fixed assets, and accounting data entry for the
school.
Responsible for preparation of monthly bank account reconciliations and journal entries as
well as cash management and cash forecasting.
Responsible for State reporting.
Analyze comparative monthly financial reports both to prior year and budget.
Serve as the staff support and liaison for organizational audits as performed by annual
external auditors and IRS examiners.
Monitor financial activities in accordance with corporate policies and bylaws.
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Appendix C – Job Descriptions for all Leadership Team Positions
Submit claims for federal funding and reimbursements
Work with grants manager to identify areas of need within the school building
Manage procurement process for all materials within the school
Oversee and explain benefits enrollment
Complete bi-monthly payroll
Troubleshoot issues as they arise
Student Services Responsibilities and Duties:
Coordinate daily student transportation service
Coordinate daily food service
Schedule and conduct required emergency drills
Report chronic service issues to the Chief Operating Officer
Troubleshoot issues as they arise
General School Responsibilities and Duties:
Assist the Chief Operating Officer in preparing the campus annually for start-up/new school
year launch
Assist with planning and implementation of special school events and field lessons
Manage staff records such as attendance, payroll, and health insurance enrollment
Assist the Chief Operating Officer with facilities management
Manage relationships with all school based vendors
Troubleshoot issues as they arise
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Appendix C – Job Descriptions for all Leadership Team Positions
School Leader
Primary Role and Purpose:
Oversee the overall administration and management of a VLA. Oversee instructional
program, manage operations, and develop and evaluate personnel. Demonstrate leadership to
ensure high standards of instructional service. Ensure compliance with all state and federal
policies, success of instructional programs, and operations of all school activities.
Experience and Qualifications:
Bachelor’s degree required; Master’s level degree preferred
At least 5 year of experience in education
Skills and Qualities:
Able to observe and evaluate instruction and provide feedback.
Competent in disciplining adolescent children.
Able to work on and lead a team.
Capable of setting and meeting high expectations.
Comprehensive understanding of curriculum and instruction.
Capable of evaluating instructional program and teaching effectiveness.
Capable of managing budget and personnel.
Capable of interpreting policy, procedures, and data.
Exceptional organizational, communication, public relations, and interpersonal skills.
Responsibilities and Duties:
Instruction:
Establish instructional standards and daily instructional program.
Observe, develop, and evaluate staff regularly.
Monitor student progress and instructional data.
Train staff in innovative instructional strategies.
Establish instructional goals and support staff in meeting those goals.
Establish teaching standards and support staff in meeting those standards.
Operations:
Manage student recruitment and enrollment.
Ensure compliance with all state and federal policies.
Create and maintain a safe and orderly environment.
Create and oversee a plan to actualize the school’s goals and mission.
Establish a strong school culture based on the mission and values of ReNEW.
Personnel:
Recruit and lead selection process of all personnel.
Supervise, train, and develop staff.
Oversee all hiring and firing processes and documentation.
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Appendix C – Job Descriptions for all Leadership Team Positions
Promote teamwork and collaboration among staff members.
All primary roles and major responsibilities are listed. Additional duties and skills may be
required for each job.
Social Worker
Primary Role and Purpose:
Assist students with academic learning by providing strategic services that identify and address
the social-emotional-environmental issues that interfere with the educational process. Work
with parents/guardians, teachers, partnering agencies School Leaders and community-based
resources. Implement strategies that promote students’ positive school adjustment.
Experience and Qualifications:
Masters degree in counseling, social work or related field such as Psychology.
Valid Louisiana credential authorizing services as a school social worker (K-12)
Knowledge of special education programs, with experience working with individuals with
exceptional needs
Prior experience in urban communities preferred
Skills and Qualities:
Possess an understanding of the IEP process.
Maintain leadership skills in working with individuals and groups (i.e. initiating individual or
group discussion, listening, clarifying and facilitating interactions and sharing of ideas).
Has social work case reporting and writing skills.
Able to counsel students, parents, staff and community individually and in groups.
Sustain skills in conducting effective meetings and conferences (including the resolution of
disagreements).
Knowledge of community resources.
Has skill in communicating concepts and information accurately orally or in writing,
including formal statistical reports.
Able to demonstrate effective liaison relationships with parents, schools, and agencies.
Able to coordinate activities from many sources for the benefit of an individual student, and
to make arrangements for groups of students.
Able to aid in program development.
Responsibilities and Duties:
Provide social work counseling to students and parents.
Provide psycho-social assessment and diagnosis of behavioral disabilities with
recommendations and/or environmental manipulations at the school, home and/or in the
community with periodic re-evaluations.
Participate in case conferences involving cooperation with other pupil personnel workers,
school personnel and community agencies.
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Appendix C – Job Descriptions for all Leadership Team Positions
Make referral to public or private agencies with appropriate follow-up.
Serve as a liaison between school, family and community resources.
Serve as a source of information regarding community resources.
Maintain appropriate school records and provides written reports and communications.
Participate as a resource person in in-service training and planning.
Act as a consultant to resolve problems concerning issuance of credits.
Participate, as requested, in planning, implementation and follow-up phases of proficiency
testing.
Participate in the Individual Education Plan (IEP) process as required.
Special Education Teacher
Primary Role and Purpose:
Focus primarily on meeting the needs of special education students through the use of
integrated comprehensive services. Utilize differentiated teaching strategies. Work closely with
the Director of Special Education, classroom teachers and families to determine and implement
strategies for individual student’s learning capabilities.
Experience and Qualifications:
Bachelor’s degree required
At least 2 or more years teaching experience, preferably in an underserved area
Skills and Qualities:
Commit to VLA’s mission and vision.
Possess a commitment to standards-based curriculum and the use of data and assessments to
drive instructional decisions.
Able to work collaboratively with a diverse team of teachers.
Possess a strong working knowledge of curriculum and instruction.
Maintain exceptional organizational, communication, and interpersonal skills.
Demonstrate success and achievement in teaching rigorous, engaging, and fun lessons.
Sustain effective classroom management skills.
Is self-critical, reflective, and dedicated to personal and professional growth.
Has strong written and verbal communication skills.
Show initiative: willing to go above and beyond job requirements.
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Appendix C – Job Descriptions for all Leadership Team Positions
Responsibilities and Duties:
Work closely with the Director of Special Education and classroom teachers to develop the
strategies and processes to assist students with exceptionalities in achieving at high levels.
Achieve significant and consistent improvement in academic performance of students with
exceptionalities.
Comply with all relevant local, state and federal regulations governing students with
exceptionalities.
Provide all relevant data, reports and information to the administrative team.
Develop flexible groups for students within individual classes with the assistance of teachers.
Confer with parents, administrators, testing specialists, social workers, and professionals to
develop IEPs designed to promote students’ academic, physical, and social development.
Employ special educational strategies and techniques during instruction to improve the
development of sensory- and perceptual-motor skills, language, cognition, and memory.
Meet with parents and guardians to discuss their children’s progress, and to determine their
priorities for their children and their resource needs.
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Appendix C – Job Descriptions for all Leadership Team Positions
Behavior Interventionist
Primary Role and Purpose:
This individual is responsible for the implementation of the behavior intervention classroom
during the school day and will work with students who require behavior modification as
recommended by the School Leader. The Behavior Interventionist will individualize academic
and behavior supports for students who need remediation and specific skill building.
Experience and Qualifications:
Bachelor’s degree required
At least 3 or more years teaching experience, preferably in an underserved area
Skills and Qualities:
Possess a strong working knowledge of curriculum and instruction.
Maintain exceptional organizational, communication, and interpersonal skills.
Embody the values of the school and be willing and able to support the school’s culture.
Demonstrate success and achievement in teaching rigorous and engaging lessons.
Sustain effective classroom management skills.
Participate actively on a team of committed educators.
Commit to working with underserved students.
Is self-critical, reflective, and dedicated to personal and professional growth.
Possess strong written and verbal communication skills.
Shows initiative: willing to go above and beyond job requirements.
Responsibilities and Duties:
Works with 15 to 20 students to develop behavior modification plans and work on proper
classroom behavior skills.
Implements Reading and Math intervention programs to assist students with getting to proper
academic levels.
Helps create and refine behavior intervention curriculum.
Establishes communication rapport with parents, students, School Leaders and teachers.
Sustains and monitors a safe, orderly, disciplined culture of high academic and behavioral
standards.
Provides specific professional development to the rest of the faculty when appropriate.
Works closely with the social worker on case management and reporting.
Participates in case conferences involving cooperation with other school personnel.
Participates as a resource person in in-service training and planning.
Participates in the Individual Education Plan (IEP) process as required.
Achieves significant and consistent improvement in academic performance of students with
behavioral needs.
Performs other responsibilities as needed for the success of the school (e.g., all teachers will
be available by cell phone).
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(Appendix D – Resumes for all Identified Leadership Team Members-EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR )
LaToya Jackson
4108 Harvey Street Monroe, LA 71203
Cell (318-381-6781)
E-Mail: [email protected]
SUMMARY:
• Present –day Professional and Educational Consultant, with nearly a decade of
progressive experience in K-12 education • Distinguished record of leadership in academic,
stakeholder engagement, community involvement and planning as well as a host of others •
Significant success in procuring and sustaining private supplemental funding sources to
support organizational plans including a 8g public school grant committees • Demonstrated
ability in planning, budgeting, and management of partnership initiatives with local and
state government to promote student achievement and community collaboration in various
community programs • Proven record of success through innovative leadership approaches
to garner internal and external support of organization endeavors • Proven history of
teambuilding and maximizing human resources to work toward organization goals •
Exceptional representational and communication skills
EDUCATION
Northeast LA. University
La. Tech University
Northeast LA. University / University LA. Monroe
English Education,
McNeese State University
Ed. Specialist
’
Curriculum and Instruction (pursuant)
SITE- CO-ORDINATOR PROJECT PATSY –SUMMER ENRICHMENT PROGRAM
Monroe, LA
Summer ‘2007
Program Stats—Budget $800.000dollars; Employees 10; Students 75 ; 32 high school, 20
middle School, 43 elementary school students
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(Appendix D – Resumes for all Identified Leadership Team Members-EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR
Demonstrated the ability to work responsively and effectively with diverse groups, such as the
community, parents, board members, faculty, staff, students, private enterprise, media and
foundation; provided an in-depth knowledge of school finance and the establishment of
budgetary priorities, with strategies for sound financial practices, curriculum development and
policies; Provided leadership in the vertical and horizontal alignment of program curriculum,
which was developed with State of LA “Life Skills” Frameworks, and local essential skills
including a partnership with city and state politicians; Established strong ties with local
principals for sharing of information and providing students a seamless transition into the
upcoming school year.
FOUNDER/LEARNING SOLUTIONS, INC, Monroe, LA
2005-Present
Demonstrate the ability to initiate, organize, plan and develop a non-profit organization.
Establish community awareness of organization through various events with over 2500 patrons
per event. Consult with various schools and organizations to establish a retention portfolio for
community and parent awareness. Developed an early learning for children ages 2-4(reading)
curriculum. Train teachers of childcare facilities in various subjects related to specialized fields.
Established child-centered advocacy initiation throughout various programs. Develop reading
strategies initiative and supplemental strategies for the empowerment of “At-risk” youth.
Initiated and continued
“STUDIO 101” a cultural and performing arts literacy school;,
television program and after school academy for “at-risk and estranged” youth.
CONSULTANT/OWNER-GATEWAY CONSULTING GROUP, Monroe, LA
2005 – Present
Demonstrate the ability to work responsively and effectively with diverse groups, such as
aspiring business owners, early childhood development centers, community agents, students,
various church groups and alumni associations, state and federal legislators, private enterprise,
media and foundation; further demonstrates an in-depth knowledge of school improvement and
planning, Developed strategic plan to support various client’s vision and to guide day to day
operations for the first 3 months of business; Provided leadership to early learning
teacher/facilitators in the areas of curriculum implementation, school-development and childatmosphere awareness.
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(Appendix D – Resumes for all Identified Leadership Team Members-EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR
Additional Accomplishments

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Partnered with local technical college to develop and present a community-wide
economic development training workshop
Founded city-wide festival with and public relations department to assist in reaching out
to the community and improve external communication between city government and
youth awareness
Promote national concerts and other events throughout the community to educate and
rally community with over 2,000 participants in attendance per event
Developed and implemented in at least 1 local center an early learning supplemental
curriculum program guide aligned with the Louisiana State Standards to promote usage
of State produced materials and to provide clarity of state guidelines for childcare
workers as well as to boost moral and overall atmosphere of early learning centers.
Developed a solid relationship with local media ensuring local coverage of events within
the
Developed a relationship with local ministerial alliance presidents to involve local
ministers in the education process
OUACHITA PARISH SCHOOL SYSTEM – Monroe, Louisiana
318-388-2711-Frank Hoffman
Schools:
Richardson Alternative Center
2001-2002
Richwood Jr. High/High School
2002-2006
Ouachita Parish Alternative Center 2007-2008
Position: English Teacher
Summary:

Raised academic achievement – help to lead school out of school improvement status
with English Scores/techniques (low performing)

Established and implemented accelerated tutoring program for high-performing testtakers to supercede test-taking norm by scoring advanced in all areas
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
Incorporating extended day and extended year programs for students
(Appendix D – Resumes for all Identified Leadership Team Members-EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR

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

Initiating peer coaching for instructors throughout grade levels
Developed strong community involvement
Developed extracurricular “STEP-TEAM” to boost morale within student community
Initiated schools first AP course in English by obtaining certification
Served as Character Counts, Drug–Free Schools, American Cancer Society Coordinator
Gave numerous speeches in community
Increased parental involvement throughout school and academic departments
MOREHOUSE PARISH SCHOOL SYSTEM
Schools:
Carver Elementary Schools
2000-2001
Debra Davis-principal
Position: Reading Teacher
Summary





Developed an after-school reading program
Functioned as academic leader for grades 3 - 6
Organized staff development
Worked with behavior specialist to incorporate a school-wide discipline plan
Produced 100% passing scores in High-Stakes LEAP testing –grade 4(English scores)
AWARDS, HONORS AND RECOGNITION

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
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


Teacher of the Year- Excellence/ Apple Award
2001-2002
Excellence in Leadership Award
2004-consecutive years
Teacher of The Year Nominee
2002-2006
Award Academic Excellence and Achievement 2003
Who’s Who Among American High School Teachers
2003-2004
Outstanding Young Women of America
2003
Whos Who Among Business Professionals
2008-2009
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

Whos Who Among America’s Oustanding Teachers 2011
Coca-Cola Exceptional Educator Award
2012
(Appendix D – Resumes for all Identified Leadership Team Members-EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR
HIGHER EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE
Adjunct
Professorships
Career Technical College – Monroe, LA
2006-present (as needed)
APPOINTMENTS
Louisiana Reading Association-BOARD MEMBER
MEMBERSHIPS AFFILIATIONS (current and past)
Louisiana Reading Association
National Reading Association
National Teachers of English
PROFESSIONAL References:
Mr. Gerry Mansfield
327.1444
(or) 318.323.5991
Principal
Ouachita Parish Alternative
(at Richwood)
318.
PERSONAL References:
Atty. Katrina Jackson
State Representative
Larry D. Hood
571-3283
Mentor
Shane Warren
318.387.1500
Pastor
Mt. Caanan Baptist Church
225-719-2718
225-
The Assembly-West Monroe
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APPENDIX D: RESUMES OF LEADRSHIP TEAM-attorney
Attorney Lakeisha Gray-School Attorney
2315 Trenton Street Apt. 22
West Monroe, La 71291
(318) 332-5793
[email protected]
OBJECTIVE:
To obtain a legal position that will enable me to use my strong research skills, legal educational
background and ability to achieve the company’s goals while working well with people.
SUMMARY OF QUALIFICATIONS:





Excellent oral and written communication skills,
Advise clients concerning advisability of prosecuting or defending lawsuits, or legal
rights and obligations.
Interpret laws, rulings and regulations for individuals and businesses.
Perform administrative and management functions related to the practice of law.
Gather evidence to formulate defense or to initiate legal actions, by such means as
interviewing clients and witnesses to ascertain the facts of a case.
APPENDIX D: RESUMES OF LEADERSHIP TEAM (SCHOOL ATTORNEY)
EDUCATION
Southern University Law Center, Baton Rouge LA
JD Candidate – May 2011
Admitted to the Louisiana Bar-October 20, 2011


3.5 GPA- Rank 6/123
Southern University Merit Scholarship
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 SULC Moot Court Team- Class of 2010-2011
 Managing Editor of The Journal of Race, Gender, & Poverty
 Vice-President of Business & Entrepreneur Leadership Association
 Summer 2009 Study Abroad Program at London City University, London, England
Northwestern State University, Natchitoches LA
Bachelor of Liberal Arts, Social Sciences –December 2007-Magna Cum Laude (3.8 GPA)





Vice President of Future Black Law Students Association
One of the Founding Members of Thurgood Marshall Chapter of Future Black Law Students
Committee Chair of Nominating Committee of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.
Blue Key Service organization
Phi Kappa Phi
EXPERIENCE
Department of Justice, Litigation Division, Baton Rouge, LA
April 2011
January 2011-
Law Clerk-Road Hazard Division
 Abstract Depositions and attend depositions
 Prepared petitions, memorandums, and quantum values
 Legal research, case analysis, and trial preparation
Legal Services of North Louisiana, Inc., Natchitoches, LA
Summer 2010
Law Clerk
 Performed Initial Client Interview
 Prepared for Family Law, Property, and Social Security/Disability Cases
 Researched and Prepared legal memoranda on unemployment, elder, and civil law cases
Southern University Law Center, Baton Rouge, LA
August 2009 –
May 2010
Research Assistant for Professor Nadia Nedzel
Performed studies and research as related to research projects such as judicial reforms and
rule of law in Latin American countries
 Assisted in composing a Louisiana Sales and Lease book
Union Parish 3rd Judicial District Court, Farmerville, LA
Summer 2009

Law Clerk for Judge Jay McCallum

Conducted legal research using Westlaw and Lexis Nexis
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
APPENDIX D: RESUMES OF LEADRSHIP TEAM-attorney


Provided assistance to Judge during case proceedings and hearings
Study Constitution, statutes, decisions, regulations, and ordinances of quasi-judicial bodies to
determine ramifications for cases.
Smith & Nwokorie Attorneys at Law, Farmerville, LA
Summer 2009
Summer 2004/
Law Clerk



Performed case intake and legal research using Westlaw
Assisted attorneys with case preparation
Evaluate findings and develop strategies and arguments in preparation for presentation of
cases
COMMUNITY SERVICE/ AWARDS





Baton Rouge Bar Association Pro-Bono Project
Volunteer of the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Program
Certificate in Mediation- Completed 40 hours in Mediation Training
Featured in Baton Rouge Magazine “Around the Bar” October Issue
Westlaw Certified
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APPENDIX D: RESUMES OF LEADERSHIP TEAM (FINANCIAL COMPLIANCECONTRACTED PERSONNEL)
Julius L. Horne Jr.
707 South 6th Street, Monroe, La. 71202
Voicemail: 318-503-1264 Email: [email protected]
Professional Experience:
JPMORGAN CHASE
Present
Aug 2011 –
Senior Process Analyst
Monroe, La.







Interprets data and analysis and makes policy changes and/or other business decisions
Gathers data and prepares data for business analysis, reporting, trend analysis or
forecasting decisions
Develops decisions based on analysis gathered
Ensures accuracy of data and assists with problem resolution
Prepares complex financial budgeting, billing and business planning analysis/reports
Develops complex reports for clients, internal or external
Makes changes to established policies as required
Advantage Human Resourcing
June 2011
Mar 2010 –
Senior Accountant
Monroe, La.







Reported directly to the Chief Financial Officer prepared financial statements and
supporting schedules according to monthly close schedule
Supervised the departmental accounting function and coordinated the completion of
periodic financial statements and record keeping.
Full accounting responsibility for all holding companies and finance companies in
general ledger system, including general ledger maintenance, recording transactions,
accruals and adjustments in general ledger, and running queries/researching past
transactions
Advised on accounting problems and assists subordinate employees with work.
Prepared and maintained key accounting/finance documentation
Examined and reviewed various financial schedules received from subsidiaries
Prepared related supporting schedules and cash reconciliations
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APPENDIX D: RESUMES OF LEADERSHIP TEAM (FINANCIAL COMPLIANCECONTRACTED PERSONNEL)


Reviewed all month end reconciliations and journal entries prepared by the accounting
team
Performed various account reconciliations and work to resolve any discrepancies
APPENDIX D: RESUMES OF LEADERSHIP TEAM (FINANCIAL COMPLIANCE
CONTRACTED PERSONNEL)
Accent Marketing
Assistant Program Manager
2010
Nov 2008 – Mar
Monroe, La.


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
Manage team of up to 35 agents.
Inbound customer service.
Ensure team maintains call performance goals (i.e. calls per hour, etc.).
Ensure team maintains call quality goals (i.e. greeting, presentation, closing, etc.).
Ensure team adhered to ACCENT’s policies and procedures.
Maintain a positive attitude and support ACCENT’s Commitment to Excellence.
Perform other duties as assigned.
Primerica Financial Services
Oct 2008
Oct 2007 –
Personal Financial Advisor
Dallas, Ga.



Licensed Mortgage Broker (Debt Consolidations, Refinance, First Time home buyer).
Licensed Life Insurance agent (Term, Income protection Specialist).
Specialize in Debt restructure and retirement funding for families.
United States Army Reserves (Mobilized)
June 2007
First Sergeant, Foxtrot and Charlie Battery 1st BN 79th FA
Fort Sill, OK
Battery 1st Sergeant
June 2005 –
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APPENDIX D: RESUMES OF LEADERSHIP TEAM (FINANCIAL COMPLIANCECONTRACTED PERSONNEL)
MCI
March 2000 – May 2005
Global Telecommunication Company offers Internet connectivity plus business and personal
long-distance phone services.
Financial Analyst/Special Projects







Audit the Independent Local Exchange Carrier bills for long distance access and local and dispute
inappropriate charges which increased MCI Revenue.
Work with the Independent Local Exchange Carrier to resolve disputes which would increase
receivables.
Analyze and enroll in term and special plans where there is an opportunity to reduce unit costs by
analyzing monthly bills.
Work with Access Management and Optimization to bring network saving through optimization
opportunities.
Exploit regulatory changes, like Pricing Flexibility, to reduce unit access costs.
Perform other financial analysis as required, such as Reciprocal Compensation arrangements, to
support sound business decisions.
Special Projects: Various during tenure with MCI
City of Monroe Dept. of Taxation and Revenue
August 1999
February 1999 –
Sales and Use Tax Auditor


Analyze sales and use tax records for businesses in the city for proper filing and charges
Headed audit team going out to Audit businesses for sales and Use taxes
Allen Green and Company CPAs
1999
June 1997 – February
Staff Auditor




Assisted with audits of School Boards, Housing Agencies, and Small Towns.
Perform month-end close activities/reconciliation accounting for clientele.
Assist in analyzing activities and records associated with audits.
Assist in generating monthly financial statements.
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APPENDIX D: RESUMES OF LEADERSHIP TEAM (FINANCIAL COMPLIANCE CONTRACTED
PERSONNEL)
Education:
Northeast Louisiana University Monroe, LA
Bachelor of Business Administration: Accounting May 1997
Computer Skills:
Microsoft Office Word; Microsoft Office Excel; Microsoft Office PowerPoint; Microsoft Office Access;
Lacerte Tax Software; Peoplesoft; eEmpact; Dynamics; Oracle; TAMS Accounts Payable System; BNA
Sales and Use Tax Software System;
Other Activities
H & R Block Marietta, GA
Tax Advisor November 2000 – May 2005
• Responsible for Preparing Individual Federal and State returns
• Trained in off-season on areas such as Retired Taxpayers, Employee Compensation, Everyone’s return,
Amended
Returns, Employee Business Expense, Depreciation, Investment Income, Sole
Proprietorships, International Tax returns Parts I and II.
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APPENDIX D: RESUMES OF LEADERSHIP TEAM (DIRECTOR OF
FINANCIAL OPERATIONS )
Kelvin C. Horne (DFO)[email protected]
318.280.3813
Management- Hands on manager with highly developed negotiations
skills. Solid
background in planning and executing sales
and marketing plans
Team Building- Decisive team leader with extensive experience
recruiting and hiring associates, and developing talent and creating
effective work environments.
Communication- Persuasive communicator with well-developed
presentation and negotiation skills. Able to develop productive
relationship with colleagues, customers and staff at all levels.
Bachelor of Business Administration in Management
University of Louisiana at Monroe
Graduation Date: May 2000
Immanuel Healing Center (owner) August 2009-present 1.318.280.3813
*own and operate a Licensed and accredited State of Louisiana Mental Rehabilitation Clinic
*total autonomy over all of IHC’s provisional employees clients and services
*total autonomy over hiring, firing and retention of clinic
*total autonomy of day to day management and operations of client intake and services
Universal Rehabilitation Services-(Chief Financial Officer) Aug ‘2004-Dec ‘2009 1.318.342.9979
*total autonomy over all of URC’s provisional employees clients and services
*total autonomy over hiring, firing and retention of clinic
*total autonomy of day to day management and operations of client intake and services
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APPENDIX D: RESUMES OF LEADERSHIP TEAM (DIRECTOR OF FINANCIAL OPERATIONS )
State Farm- Underwriter August-2000-May-2004
*underwriter for homeowner policy for 22 agents servicing Northern Louisiana
SYDRAN SERVICES, Inc., “A Franchise of Burger King” Jan 2001 – Present
(318) 343-2062
Restaurant Operator










Total control of store operations
Maintain budgeted expense account
Recruitment of team members
Investigate and report monthly variances on food cost
Created business projections for store
Created a client based operation
Created strong employee morale with team members
Maintained, Quality, Service and Cleanliness of store
Raised gross profit by 3% in first quarter
Raised sales by 14% in first quarter
Service Merchandise Nov 1997- Jan 2001 (318) 388-4800
Lead Sales Consultant



Lead Camera Specialist
Jeweler
Professional Electronics Lead Sales Associate
Sony Digital/Hi-8 Camcorder Specialist
 Trained new employees
 Training in Operations Management
 Receiving Associate
Applications: Word, Excel, PowerPoint
Operating Systems: Windows 95, 97,98
Other: Netscape, Internet Explorer
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APPENDIX D: RESUMES OF LEADERSHIP TEAM (DIRECTOR OF
FINANCIAL OPERATIONS )
Participated in Sickle Cell Anemia Awareness 2001
Muscular Dystrophy Telethon
Participated in 1999 Memory Walk (Alzheimer’s Association)
Member of the Elder Watson Diggs Foundation
Pi Sigma Epsilon- Inducted Spring 2000 Zeta Chapter
Participated in a Compensation and Benefits Survey for the Northeast La.
region
Adopt –A- School - assist elementary students with their moral and
educational
References furnished upon request
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APPENDIX D: RESUME’S OF LEADERSHIP TEAM
Natalie Williams
137 Sarah Drive
Choudrant, LA
71227
Cell Phone: 318-348-8564
E-mail: [email protected]
Objective
To work in a challenging and stimulating environment as an assistant principal. To contribute
towards the value, achievement, and advancement of a learning institution by applying my
professional skills.
Work Experience
June 2010—Present, Sixth Grade Instructor,
Good Hope Middle School/Ouachita Parish School System
*Assist in the coordination and implementation of community involvement
June 2011—July 2011, Science Camp Administrator
Louisiana Tech University/IDEA Place
September 2009— January 2011, Adjunct Professor,
Louisiana Tech University/College of Education
July 2004—June 2010, Second Grade Instructor,
A.E. Phillips/Louisiana Tech Laboratory School
*Assist in leadership training and professional development implementation
*Coordinated and implemented community involvement and services for students
*Team teacher and mentor for prospective teachers
January 2004—July 2004, Fourth Grade Instructor
Shady Grove Elementary/Ouachita Parish School System
Education
August 2010– Current
Doctorate Education Administration and Supervision
Louisiana Tech University
November 2004—March 2007
M.S. Education Administration and Supervision cognate in Curriculum and Instruction
Louisiana Tech University
August 1999—December 2003
B.A. Early Childhood Elementary Education K-8
University of Louisiana at Monroe
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APPENDIX D: RESUMES OF LEADERSHIP TEAM (DIRECTOR OF FINANCIAL
OPERATIONS )
Awards
A.E. Phillips Elementary Teacher of the Year, 2009
Who’s Who Amongst Educators, 2007
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APPENDIX D: RESUME’S OF LEADERSHIP TEAM
Natalie Williams
Professional Strengths
 Professional
 Team
development facilitator
teaching experience
 SMART
Board trained
 Observed
and analyzed written and oral assessments
 Implemented modifications and accommodations for differentiated learning abilities
 Incorporated
differentiated learning according to academic needs
 Orchestrated
Fire Safety and Awareness in our school and community
 Involved
 Provide
in cross grade level meetings
First Aid/CPR in Emergency Crisis
 Assisted
colleagues in analyzing and organizing documents for SACS
 Aligned Singapore Math with the Louisiana Comprehensive Curriculum
Professional Licenses and Certificates
2012, Presenter,
“Who’s Arguing About Writing” Louisiana
Association (LMSA)
Middle School
2012, Staff Development Training “Differentiated Assessment and Grading”
2012, Common Core Standards Training
2010, 30+ additional education hours
2010, Supervision of Student Teaching Certification
2008 – 2010, I am quoted in several of Positive Promotions Learning/Reading Incentives
Magazines for promoting creative reading book reports in early elementary child hood
education.
March 2010, Speaker, Louisiana Association for Teachers in Mathematics
May 2010, Staff Development Training “Fluency 101”
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APPENDIX D: RESUME’S OF LEADERSHIP TEAM
May 2010, Staff Development Training “Differentiated Instruction”
February 2010, Staff Development Training “Singapore Mathematics”
September 2007, Speaker, Differentiated Instruction (Head Start Learning Center)
September 2006, Second Step: A Violence Prevention Curriculum
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APPENDIX D: RESUMES OF LEADERSHIP TEAM (SCHOOL REGISTERED NURSE)
LaShonda Ambers
107 Ashford Drive Apt 1411 ● West Monroe, LA 71291
Cell: 318-348-9216 ● Home: 318-396-6885 ● [email protected]
Professional Summary
I am a Registered Nurse with 10 years experience in clinical settings. I am a patient-focused nurse with experience
in oncology, psychiatric and medical-surgical nursing. Excellent communication skills. Reliable with a strong ability
to establish rapport with patients, family and staff.
Core Qualifications
●
Oncology experience
●
Strong clinical judgment
●
Women’s Surgery experience
●
Proficiency with computerized charting
●
Medical-Surgical experience
●
Enthusiastic caregiver
●
Solid clinical skills coupled with patient-focused
people skills
Experience
Registered Nurse (Staff) Psychiatric Unit
November 2011 to Present
LSUHSC-EA Conway Medical Center – Monroe, La
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APPENDIX D: RESUMES OF LEADERSHIP TEAM (SCHOOL REGISTERED NURSE
Responsible for assessment of patients on admit, primary care of patients while on unit, formulating and
implementing care plans for patients. Work with other disciplines during weekly Treatment Team to develop the
best treatment plan for patients.
Registered Nurse (Staff) Medical-Surgical Floor
June 2002 to March 2011
Glenwood Regional Medical Center – West Monroe, La
Responsible for primary care and medication management of patients. Assess patients and document patient
histories. Provide treatment within scope of practice as defined by state law. I have experience working with
various medical conditions such as Parkinson’s, Diabetes, Alzheimer’s, Dementia and Cancer.
Education
University of Louisiana at Monroe, 2002
Monroe, La
Nursing
Bachelor of Science
Certifications
Registered Nurse – State of Louisiana
BLS – Basic Life Support
Community Involvement
Friendship Baptist Church, member
Member-Alpha Kappa Alpha Soroity
Volunteer for the annual back to school rally and health fair.
Work with the youth department for various productions during the holidays.
Keywords
Licensed Registered Nurse, BLS certification, Medical-surgical nursing, Clinical experience, Time management,
Bachelors degree, Patient advocate, Computer charting
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Section III: School Operations
Appendix F – School Organization Chart
Organizational Chart
Mission: To provide students within low-performing schools an
academically ROBUST, rigorous, college preparatory education through a paperless-hands-on
visual and performing arts technological mediums.
│
Adhoc Committee of 3
│
Learning Solutions, Inc Board of Directors
│
Chief Executive Officer
│
Chief Academic - Director of – -Director of
School Leader/Principal -Director of Literacy/Numeracy
Officers,
Finances
Special Services
│
Special EdSchool Counselor- Behavior Int
Programs.Coordinator-Nurse
Coordinator
Admin-AssistantsTechnicians-
Teachers-
│
Computer/Data Analysis- Security
Dean of Students-
Co-Teachers- Janitors- Food
│
150 students
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Appendix G – Staff Roster
Tentative Staff Roster
Chief Executive Officer
LaToya Jackson
Yes
School Leader
Supervisor of Academics
Natalie Williams
(k-12) yes
Special Education
Coordinator
Kimberly Kirton
Yes
Director of Mathematical
Studies
Alford Cherry, Jr.
Yes
N/A
Behavior Interventionist/
School Counselor
Administrative Assistant
School Nurse
N/A
N/A
LaShonda Ambers
State Boards
Licensed Registered
Nurse
Director of Financial
Operations
Kelvin Horne
Qualified
accordance w/
bulletin 126
Financial Compliance
(contracted)
Julius Horne
Qualified
Accordance/
bulletin 126
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1. The procedure regarding the implementation of LA-R.S. 15:587.1 and SBESE Policy
for Charter Schools Relative to Criminal Offenses
No person who has been convicted of or has pleaded nolo contendere to a crime listed
in LAR S. 15:587.1(C) shall be hired by VLA for a position of supervisory or disciplinary
authority over school children unless approved in writing by a district judge of the parish
and the district attorney. For the purposes of this paragraph, any person employed to
provide cafeteria, transportation, or janitorial or maintenance services by any person or
entity that contracts with a school or school system to provide such services shall be
considered to be hired by the charter school.
No person employed or otherwise associated with VLA, including any contact person
listed on the charter school application or any member of the management board, who
has been convicted of or has pleaded nolo contendere to a crime related to
misappropriation of funds or theft shall be engaged in direct processing of charter
school funds.
VLA shall adhere to all policies/procedures adopted by SBESE concerning criminal
history review for public school employees, as well as other persons associated with the
charter school who are engaged in direct processing of charter school funds.
A criminal history review through the Louisiana Department of Public Safety and
Corrections, Office of State Police, Bureau of Criminal Identification, will be
administered as part of the hiring process for all VLA employees. The criminal history
review shall include a fingerprint check and simultaneous FBI check. All costs
associated with the criminal history review shall be the responsibility of VLA, although
the school may assign the responsibility to those persons undergoing the criminal
history review.
Prior to hiring any employee, VLA will request in writing that the Louisiana Bureau of
Criminal Identification and Information supply information to ascertain whether an
applicant for employment as a teacher, substitute teacher, bus driver, substitute bus
driver, janitor, or any other school employee who might reasonably be expected to be
placed in a position of supervisory or disciplinary authority over school children, has
been convicted of, or pled nolo contendere to, any one or more of the crimes
enumerated in R.S. 15:5871.1. The request will be on a form prepared by the bureau
and signed by a responsible officer or official of VLA.
It will include a statement signed by the person about whom the request is made which
gives his or her permission for such information to be released and must include the
person's fingerprints in a form acceptable to the bureau.
A person who has submitted his or her fingerprints to the bureau may be temporarily
hired pending the report from the bureau as to any convictions of, or pleas of nolo
contendere to, by the person to a crime listed in R.S. 15:5871.
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No person who has been convicted of or has pled nolo contendere to a crime listed in
R.S. 15:5871.1 shall be hired by ReNEW as a teacher, substitute teacher, bus driver,
substitute bus driver, janitor, or as any school employee who might reasonably be
expected to be placed in a position of supervisory or disciplinary authority over school
children unless approved in writing by a district judge of the parish and the parish district
attorney.
The statement of approval shall be kept on file at all times by the school and shall be
produced upon request to any law enforcement officer.
Not later than 30 days after its being placed on file by the school, the School Leader
shall submit a copy of the statement of approval to the State Superintendent of
Education.
VLA shall dismiss any permanent teacher or any other school employee having
supervisory or disciplinary authority over school children, if such teacher or other
employee is convicted of, or pled nolo contendere to, any crime listed in R.S.
15:L587.1(c) except R.S.
14:74.
VLA may reemploy a teacher or other school employee who has been convicted of, or
pled nolo contendere to, a crime listed in R.S. 15:L587.1(c), except R.S. 14:74, only
upon written approval of the district judge of the parish and the district attorney or upon
written documentation from the court in which the conviction occurred stating that the
conviction has been reversed, set aside, or vacated.
Any such statement of approval of the judge and the district attorney and any such
written documentation from the court shall be kept on file at all times by the school and
shall be produced upon request to any law enforcement officer.
Not later than 30 days after its being placed on file by the school, the School Leader
shall submit a copy of any such statement of approval or written documentation from the
court to the state superintendent of education. Any employment benefits, including
retirement, offered Medical and Life Insurance VLA provide all full-time employees with
medical insurance and a life insurance policy. Employees will share the cost of these
benefits at a rate that is aligned with policies maintained by other local public schools.
These benefits are effective the first day of the month following the employee’s date of
hire at a VLA. The eligibility requirements for the specific coverage, eligibility periods
and benefits payable under the plans offered by VLA are described in insurance
brochures, which may be obtained from the Director of Human Capital. Coverage may
change from time to time.
Dental Insurance
VLA provide dental insurance for its full-time employees and their spouses and
dependents. Coverage under this plan is effective on the first day of the month following
the date of hire at VLA . A full description of the benefits provided under VLA’s dental
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plan are outlined in the dental insurance provider’s brochure, which may be obtained
from the Director of Human Capital.
Vision Services Plan
VLA provide coverage for vision for its full-time employees and their spouses and
dependents. This coverage becomes effective on the first day of the month following the
date of hire at VLA. Details about this plan may be obtained from the Director of Human
Capital.
Short Term & Long Term Disability Insurance
VLA offer a long-term disability insurance coverage that is available to all full-time
employees. A full description of the benefits provided under VLA’s disability insurance is
outlined in the insurance provider’s brochure, which may be obtained from the Director
of Human Capital.
Compensation
VLA provide worker’s compensation insurance for all employees as required by
law. Employees should contact the Director of Finance and Operations if any
information is needed regarding what claims may be covered and the manner in which
claims may be made.
All employees should promptly report to the Director of Finance and Operations any
injuries suffered as a result of employment activity at or on behalf of VLA. Failure to
report an injury promptly may result in loss of benefits.
Neither VLA nor its insurer will be liable for the payment of worker’s compensation
benefits for any injury that arises out of an employee’s voluntary participation in any offduty recreational, social, or athletic activity that is not part of, required by, or an
expected part of the employee’s work-related duties.
Salary ranges for all employees
Vision Learning Academy’s Salary Scale
Employees Base Salary
School Leader $ 75,000
Classroom teacher $ 50,000
Co-teacher Intern $ 24,000
Special Ed Teacher $ 47,000
Behavior Interventionist $ 47,000
Social Worker $ 47,000
Nurse (part-time) $ 13,500
Director of Finance/Operations $ 55,000
Administrative Assistant $ 24,000
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The level of compensation for teachers at VLA will be based on Louisiana’s State Above
Average pay scales, which compensates according to level of education and years in
the classroom. Above is denoted the base salary (starting salary in Year 1) for each
position at VLA. Each position will experience a $500 to $1,000 increase for each year
of experience or service in that position.
Plans for collective bargaining
Any collective bargaining agreement entered into by the local school district or local
teachers union shall not apply to VLA.
Equal Opportunity Employment
VLA is an equal opportunity employer and makes employment decisions on the basis of
Merit. VLA seeks to have the best available person in every job. VLA’s policy prohibits
discrimination based on race, color, creed, sex, marital status, age, national origin,
physical or mental disability, medical condition, ancestry, religion, sexual orientation, or
any other consideration made unlawful by federal, state or local law or ordinance or
regulation.
VLA is committed to complying with all applicable laws providing equal employment
opportunities to individuals regardless of race, color, creed, sex, marital status, age,
national origin, physical handicap, disability, medical condition, ancestry, religion or
sexual orientation.This commitment applies to all persons involved in the operations of
VLA and prohibits unlawful discrimination by any employee of VLA.
Immigration Reform and Control Act
The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA) prohibits VLA from employing
any person not legally authorized to work in the United States. In accordance with the
requirement of IRCA, all persons commencing or resuming work after November 6,
1986, must submit to VLA documentation evidencing their right to work in the United
States. Anyone submitting false documentation shall be immediately terminated. In
fulfilling its obligations under IRCA, VLA reaffirms its commitment to comply with both
state and federal nondiscrimination laws. VLA does not discriminate on the basis of
citizenship. Any questions concerning IRCA and the required documentation should be
directed to the Director of HumanCapital.
Reasonable Accommodation of Disability
To comply with applicable laws ensuring equal employment opportunities to qualified
individuals with a disability, VLA will make reasonable accommodations for the known
physical or mental limitations of an otherwise qualified individual with a disability who is
an applicant or an employee unless undue hardship to VLA would result.
Any applicant or employee who requires an accommodation in order to perform the
essential functions of the job should contact the Director of Human Capital and request
such an accommodation.
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Adjustments to Employee Status
The School Leader may at any time, but for specified reasons, adjust the salary,
benefits (excluding any benefits required by law to be provided), leave accruals, titles,
privileges, or other personnel policies for any employee either upwards or downwards,
within parameters established by the Board of Trustees. Adjustments to employee
status may be based upon, but in no way are restricted to, promotions, demotions,
changes in job duties, disciplinary actions, and performance adjustments.
Phasing-Out and Elimination Of Positions
From time-to-time, it may be necessary to phase-out or eliminate certain positions
previously established within the school. An orderly process will be established by the
school to guide such phase-out or elimination of positions if necessary.
Unauthorized Absence
An employee who is absent for a period of at least three days without notifying the
School Leader will be considered to have resigned without giving the required two-week
notice with such resignation effective on the initial date of absence. The determination
of unauthorized absence will be made by the School Leader.
If an employee is absent unauthorized as described above, that employee will forfeit
compensation for any unused accrued vacation leave unless the School Leader makes
an exception. Such an employee will remain eligible for any salary due.
Resignation
An employee who wishes to resign is required to give to the School Leader, in writing, a
minimum of a two-week notice prior to the desired resignation date, unless the School
Leader makes an exception.
If an employee fails to give a minimum of a two-week notice prior to the desired
resignation date, that employee shall forfeit compensation for any unused accrued
vacation leave he or she may have, unless the School Leader makes an exception.
Such an employee remains eligible for any salary due.
Termination
All employees serve at the will of the School Leader, and the authority to terminate an
employee is vested with the School Leader or his or her designee, and may include, but
is in no way limited to, a decision based upon a violation of any of the policies,
procedures, regulations,or restrictions set forth in the school’s employee manual.
Terminated regular full-time employees eligible to accrue vacation leave may be
provided compensation for accrued vacation leave.
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Separation From Employment
Upon termination of employment from VLA, the employee must return all supplies, keys,
and other VLA property.
The Director of Human Capital will provide the employee with information regarding any
conversion or continuation rights to VLAs benefits. The Director of Human Capital will
also provide documentation and explain the employee’s and his or her dependents’
rights to continue group medical benefits under the federal statue commonly referred to
as COBRA.
An employee whose employment is terminated will be entitled to payment in lieu of
unused and accrued paid time off earned to the date of termination.
The provisions of the collective bargaining agreement entered into, at any time, by the
local school district in whose jurisdiction VLA is located shall not apply to the school.
Non-Discrimination and Non-Harassment
VLA is committed to providing a professional work environment free from all
forms of unlawful discrimination and harassment, including but not limited to sexual
harassment, whether on VLA’s premises or in a VLA-related setting.
VLA prohibits harassment based on race, color, sex, pregnancy, religion, national
origin, citizenship, age, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, physical or
mental disability, marital status, veteran status, creed, arrest and/or conviction records
(except as provided by law), genetic predisposition or carrier status, or any other
classification protected by applicable federal, state, or local law.
While it is not easy to define precisely what harassment is, it may include, but is not
limited to, epithets or slurs, threats, derogatory comments, unwelcome jokes, gestures
or pranks; placing written or graphic material of derogatory nature on walls, bulletin
boards, or elsewhere on VLA’s premises, or circulating such material in the workplace,
unwanted blocking of movement, or engaging in conduct that has the purpose or effect
of creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment, or unreasonably
interfering with an individual’s work performance.
Sexual Harassment
Sexual harassment may include many forms of offensive behavior and gender-based
harassment of a person of the same or different sex as the harasser, whether
committed by another staff member, a superior, or other third parties. Examples of
prohibited conduct include but are not limited to the following:
unwanted sexual advances; verbal conduct such as epithets, derogatory jokes or
comments, slurs, invitations or comments; displaying of sexually suggestive objects,
such as posters, photography, cartoons, or drawings; explicitly or implicitly offering
preferential treatment with regard to an individual’s employment status in exchange for
sexual favors or sexual activity; deliberate, repeated or unsolicited leering, sexual
gesturing or teasing; graphic verbal commentaries about an individual’s body, sexually
degrading words used to describe an individual, or suggestive or obscene letters, notes,
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emails or invitations; physical conduct such as assault, unwanted touching, blocking or
impeding movements; and unsolicited verbal or physical conduct that has the purpose
or effect of unreasonably interfering with work performance or creating an intimidating,
hostile, or offensive work environment.
Anyone in violation of VLA’s policy regarding harassment (including sexual
harassment) or unlawful discrimination will be subject to disciplinary action up to and
including termination of employment.
Notification/Investigation Procedures
If staff member experiences any unlawful harassment (including sexual harassment), or
discrimination, he or she must report such incident(s) to the SL/MD immediately. If, for
any reason, a staff member is uncomfortable discussing the matter with the SL/MD
and/or if the complaint involves the SL, he or she may contact the President of the
Board of Directors.
All allegations of harassment or discrimination will be promptly and thoroughly
investigated.
To the extent possible, a staff member’s confidentiality and the confidentiality of any
witnesses and the alleged harasser will be protected against unnecessary disclosure.
Any staff member who becomes aware of possible sexual or other unlawful harassment
or discrimination or retaliatory conduct is permitted to advise the SL or the Chief of Staff
resident of the Board of Directors so the conduct can be investigated in a timely and
confidential manner.
It is a violation of VLA policy to retaliate against a staff member or applicant for
making a good-faith complaint of harassment. Retaliation against anyone participating
in good faith in the investigation of a complaint is also a violation of this policy. If a staff
member believes that he or she has been retaliated against for making or assisting in
the investigation of a complaint, he or she should contact the SL immediately. Similarly,
anyone falsely accusing someone of unlawful harassment in bad faith is subject to
discipline.
Transportation
1. As an applicant for a Type 2 charter VLA reserves the right not to offer transportation
except for field trips and extreme emergencies. All policies and procedures regarding
transportation is noted in the Appendix H regarding transportation safety and security.
2. VLA will ensure that our facility is centrally located and is completely accessible to individual
students because we are centrally located within a 5 mile radius of our targeted population.
Because we are servicing an “at risk” population whose families may or may not have vehicles
our program will offer complimentary “bus vouchers” for the City of Monroe’s complimentary
services. The vouchers will only be given out in the case of extreme verifiable circumstances.
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3. VLA will participate in the National School Lunch Program beginning in year 2 of operations. We have
budgeted for food and labor cost for the first year with a minimum proforma and reimbursement
schedules. VLA’s secured facilities is equipped with a full State of Louisiana approved cafeteria and
dining area.
Scenario 1 Year 1
Daily Customer Base
Daily Transactions
Check Average
Daily Sales
Op Days
Annual Sales
100%
Scenario 1 Year 2
Daily Customer Base
Daily Transactions
Check Average
Daily Sales
Op Days
Annual Sales
180
360
$1.69
$608
180
$109,512
190
380
$1.72
$655
180
$117,908
Cost of Sales
Labor
$74,714
$28,800
68%
26%
Cost of Sales
Labor
$81,231
$30,240
Direct Expenses
$10,435
10%
Direct Expenses
$10,435
Depreciation
$0
0%
Depreciation
$0
Client Commission
$0
0%
Client Commission
$0
Total Costs
$113,949
104%
Total Costs
$121,906
Profit
($4,437)
-4%
Profit
($3,998)
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Average Transaction per
Hour
180
Average Transaction per
Hour
190
Average Transaction 7am8am
180
Average Transaction 7am8am
190
Average Transaction 11am12:30pm
120
Average Transaction 11am12:30pm
123
Estimated Capital Investment
$0
Upfront License Fee
$0
Estimated Smallwares &
Miscellaneous (Invoice)
$4,000
Estimated Product Opening
Order (Food Cost)
$2,782
Labor ([email protected]$10/hr x
40h)
Labor ([email protected]$10/hr x
40h)
Directs:
Directs:
Trays/Cutlery
($.11ppx200x180)
$3,955.00
Trays/Cutlery
($.11ppx200x180)
$3,955.00
Bowl($.03x400x180days)
$2,160.00
Bowl($.03x400x180days)
$2,160.00
6"Plate($.03x400x180days)
$2,160.00
6"Plate($.03x400x180days)
$2,160.00
Spoon($.03x400x180days)
$2,160.00
Spoon($.03x400x180days)
$2,160.00
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$10,435.00
$10,435.00
Scenario 1 Year 3
Daily Customer Base
Daily Transactions
Check Average
Daily Sales
Op Days
Annual Sales
100%
Scenario 1 Year 4
Daily Customer Base
Daily Transactions
Check Average
Daily Sales
Op Days
Annual Sales
200
400
$1.76
$703
180
$126,596
220
440
$1.79
$789
180
$142,041
Cost of Sales
Labor
$85,506
$31,752
68%
25%
Cost of Sales
Labor
$94,057
$33,340
Direct Expenses
$10,435
8%
Direct Expenses
$10,435
Depreciation
$0
0%
Depreciation
$0
Client Commission
$0
0%
Client Commission
$0
Total Costs
$127,693
101%
Total Costs
$137,832
Profit
($1,098)
-1%
Profit
$4,209
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Average Transaction per
Hour
200
Average Transaction per
Hour
200
Average Transaction 7am8am
200
Average Transaction 7am8am
200
133
Average Transaction 11am12:30pm
133
Average Transaction 11am12:30pm
Scenario 1 Year 5
Daily Customer Base
Daily Transactions
Check Average
Daily Sales
Op Days
Annual Sales
240
480
$1.83
$878
180
$158,052
100%
Cost of Sales
Labor
$102,608
$35,007
65%
22%
Direct Expenses
$11,565
7%
Depreciation
$0
0%
Client Commission
$0
0%
Total Costs
$149,179
94%
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Profit
$8,873
WEEK 1
MEAL
WED
3oz
BBQ Roast Beef
1 Whl Grain Bun
1 Cob Corn
FRUIT
1ea
Whole Apple
BEVERAGE
2%
Plain/1%Choc
WEEK 2
WED
MEAL
FRUIT
6%
THU
$0.85 3oz
Salisbury Steak
$0.51 3oz
$0.33 1/2c
$0.24 3/4c
Brown
Rice/Gravy
California Blend
$0.10 1/2c
$0.32 1/2c
$0.22 1ea
Whole Orange
$0.18 1/2c
2%
Plain/1%Choc
$0.25
$1.89
$0.25
$1.36
THU
1c
Cheeseburger
Pie
$0.80 4oz
1/2c
Peas
$0.21
1/2c
Sliced Carrots
$0.07
1ea
Whole Apple
$0.22 1/2c
Hot Dog, 4x1
$0.69 3oz
Whole Grain Hot
1 Dog Bun
$0.23 1/2c
1 Cob Corn
1.5oz Chili
Fruit Salad
#4953998
BEVERAGE
2%
Plain/1%Choc
WEEK 3
WED
MEAL
Chicken
Parmesan
Hamburger
$0.52 3.2oz #1298605
Rotini Marinara
$0.17
$0.25
$1.55
2%
Plain/1%Choc
$0.24 1/2c
$0.11
$0.30
$0.25
$ - $1.82
THU
Whl Grain Bun
1 #827314
2$0.51 4oz
$0.33 3ozw
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Italian Green
Beans
$0.24 1/2c
Lettuce/Tomato
$0.10 1/2c
Whole Wht
Garlic Bread
$0.23 1/2c
Baked Tater Tots
$0.20 1ea
Fruit Salad
#4953998
$0.30 1c
FRUIT
BEVERAGE
2%
Plain/1%Choc
BREAKFAST
WEEK 1
MEAL
4oz
WED
Frosted Flakes
FRUIT
1ea
Whole Banana
1ea
2%
Plain/1%Choc
WEEK 2
MEAL
4oz
WED
Rice Krispies
FRUIT
1ea
Whole Banana
BEVERAGE
1ea
2%
Plain/1%Choc
BEVERAGE
FRI
Oven Fried
Pollock
2%
Plain/1%Choc
$0.25
$1.41
$0.22 1ea
$ - 1ea
$ - 1ea
THU
Biscuit
Jelly
Boiled Egg
$0.22 1ea
$0.06 1pk
$0.19
$0.18 1ea
Whole Orange
$0.18 1ea
2%
Plain/1%Choc
$0.25
$0.65
$0.25
$ - $0.90
$0.18 1ea
$ - 1ea
$ - 1ea
THU
Biscuit
Jelly
Boiled Egg
$0.22
$0.06 1pk
$0.19
$0.18 1ea
Whole Orange
$0.18 1ea
$0.25
$0.61
2%
Plain/1%Choc
MON
$0.58 1/2c
$0.25
$ - $1.69
Red Beans
$0.25
$ - $0.90
TUE
$0.40 4oz
Baked Chicken
Thigh
$0.57
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Roasted Potatoes
Green Beans
$0.16 2oz
$0.17 1/2c
Smoked Sausage
Brown Rice
$0.35 1/2c
$0.07 3/4c
Macaroni and
Cheese
Broccoli
Wheat Dinner
Roll
Fruit Salad
$0.11 1/2c
$0.30 1ea
Collard Greens
Whole Orange
$0.16
$0.18
Wheat Dinner
Roll
Fruit Salad
$0.25
$1.57
2% Plain/1%Choc
$0.25
$1.41
2% Plain/1%Choc
FRI
$0.23
$0.33
$0.11
$0.25
$1.49
MON
TUE
$0.94
Turkey and Gravy
$0.74 1c
Pork and Veg Lo
Mein
$0.20 1c
Turkey
Tetrazzini(whl
wht)
Mashed Potatoes
$0.21 3oz
Diced Pork
$0.39 1/2c
Peas and Onions
$0.24
Vegetable Medley
$0.17 1/2c
Broccoli
$0.22 1/2c
Carrots
$0.07
$-
$0.18 1c
Pineapple/Banana
Blend
$0.22
Whole Banana
2% Plain/1%Choc $0.25
$ - $1.55
FRI
3/4c
pinepple,1/4c
banana
2% Plain/1%Choc $0.25
$ - $1.28
MON
TUE
Oven Fried
Pollock #2805789
$0.58 4oz
Jerk Baked
Chicken Thigh
$0.57 4oz
Sloppy Joe (3oz
meat)
$0.47
Bkd Potato
Wedge#6732499
$0.21 1/2c
Yellow Brown
Rice
$0.10
Whl Grain Bun
#827314
$0.33
Peas and Carrots
$0.25 1/2c
Roasted
Vegetables
$0.19 3ozw
Bkd Potato
Wedge#6732499
$0.21
Wheat Dinner
Roll#7815507
$0.11
Peas and Carrots
$0.25
$-
$0.25
$1.51
$-
1/2c
Pineapple/Banana
Blend
$0.22 1ea
Whole Apple
3/4c
pinepple,1/4c
banana
2% Plain/1%Choc $0.25
$ - $1.62
2% Plain/1%Choc $0.25
$ - $1.33
$0.25
$1.50
$7.
$7.
$0.22
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$7.
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22.
FRI
PB Cracker
Whole Apple,
138ct
$$0.14
$-
$0.22 1ea
MON
Blueberry Muffin
Whole Orange
$0.38 1ea
$ - 1ea
$ - 1ea
TUE
Biscuit
Jelly
Boiled Egg
$0.22
$0.06
$0.19
$0.18 1ea
Whole Orange
$0.18
2% Plain/1%Choc $0.25
$ - $0.61
2% Plain/1%Choc $0.25
$ - $0.81
FRI
MON
Blueberry Muffin
PB Cracker
Red Del Whole
Apple, 138ct
$0.14
$-
$0.22 1ea
2% Plain/1%Choc $0.25
$ - $0.61
Gold Del Whole
Apple
2%
Plain/1%Choc
$-
$0.25
$0.90
$0.38 1ea
$ - 1ea
$ - 1ea
TUE
Biscuit
Jelly
Boiled Egg
$0.22
$0.06
$0.19
$0.22 1ea
Whole Orange
$0.18
2% Plain/1%Choc $0.25
$ - $0.85
2%
Plain/1%Choc
$-
$0.25
$0.90
4. VLA will have a State of Louisiana Licensed and Registered Nurse on Staff on a scheduled PRN basis to
oversee and administer medications along with serving as advisor and director to all other health related
issues. VLA has also partnered with Cognitive development Center which is a licensed and accredited
State Approved Mental Clinic who will be housed on campus and in the classrooms during school hours
as a vital and integral part of our teacher/therapist model. The extension of services that will be
provided will be under a therapeutic program called MST (multi-systemic therapy)
Multi Systemic Therapy is a system that works with the highest-risk students. They are
adolescents, male and female, who have extensive histories of high-risk behavior . The
coordinator of programs who will be housed on the facility, along with the clinicians who are on
call 24 hours a day, seven days a week will bring solidarity to our cutting-edge, innovative
approach to alternative education.
Since the inception of the MST program in January 2009, Cognitive Development
Center’s has served over 585 clients throughout the State of Louisiana. We currently provide
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services with all schools within Monroe City School District. From the total number of youth we
have served, upon discharge, ninety-five percent of them have transitioned back to their home
schools and are living back in their homes. Ninety-three percent are working or in school.
Ninety-four percent have no new arrests. The average length of time a youth receives treatment
is 123 days. Currently the MST therapist/clinicians work with 4 to 6 families at any given time.
The average length of stay is 150 days. The length of stay of MST is our main ingredient to our
systematic approach. Because MST is a crisis-type behavioral health program it is , in our
opinion, tailor-made for alternative education because it lends itself to the opportunity for
semester cycles of transition for all students.
Theoretical Rationale/Conceptual Framework
Consistent with social-ecological models of behavior and findings from causal modeling studies
of delinquency and drug use, MST posits that youth antisocial behavior is multi-determined and
linked with characteristics of the individual youth and his or her family, peer group, school, and
community contexts. As such, MST interventions aim to attenuate risk factors by building youth
and family strengths (protective factors) on a highly individualized and comprehensive basis.
The provision of home-based services circumvents barriers to service access that often
characterize families of serious juvenile offenders. An emphasis on parental empowerment to
modify the natural social network of their children facilitates the maintenance and generalization
of treatment gains.
Brief Description of Intervention
MST is a pragmatic and goal-oriented treatment that specifically targets those factors in each
youthʼs social network that are contributing to his or her antisocial behavior.
Thus, MST interventions typically aim to improve caregiver discipline practices, enhance family
affective relations, decrease youth association with deviant peers, increase youth association with
prosocial peers, and ultimately improve the youth school or vocational performance, engage
youth in prosocial recreational outlets, and develop an indigenous support network of extended
family, neighbors, and friends to help caregivers achieve and maintain such changes. Specific
treatment techniques used to facilitate these gains are integrated from those therapies that have
the most empirical support, including cognitive behavioral, behavioral, and the pragmatic family
therapies.
MST services are delivered in the natural environment (e.g., home, school, community).
The treatment plan is designed in collaboration with family members and is, therefore, family
driven rather than therapist driven. The ultimate goal of MST is to empower families to build an
environment, through the mobilization of indigenous child, family, and community resources,
that promotes health. The typical duration of home-based MST services is approximately 4
months, with multiple therapist-family contacts occurring each week.
Although MST is a family-based treatment model that has similarities with other family
therapy approaches, several substantive differences are evident. First, MST places considerable
attention on factors in the adolescent and familyʼs social networks that are linked with antisocial
behavior.
For example, MST priorities include removing offenders from deviant peer groups,
enhancing school or vocational performance, and developing an indigenous support network for
the family to maintain therapeutic gains. Second, MST programs have an extremely strong
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commitment to removing barriers to service access (see e.g., the home-based model of service
delivery). Third, MST services are more intensive than traditional family therapies (e.g., several
hours of treatment per week vs. 50 minutes). Fourth, and most important, MST has welldocumented long-term outcomes with adolescents presenting serious antisocial behavior and
their families. The strongest and most consistent support for the effectiveness of MST comes
from controlled studies that focused on violent and chronic juvenile offenders.
Evidence of Program Effectiveness
The first controlled study of MST with juvenile offenders was published in 1986, and since then,
numerous randomized clinical trials with violent and chronic juvenile offenders have been
conducted. In these trials, MST has demonstrated: reduced long-term rates of criminal offending
in serious juvenile offenders, decreased recidivism and re-arrests, reduced rates of out-of-home
placements for serious juvenile offenders.
5.N/A
B. Safety and Security
VLA fully intend to implement the safety and security policies and procedures that meet and
exceed all of the State of Louisiana’s guidelines. We believe that providing a safe and secure
environment for students, staff, and community members is essential to student achievement
and the fulfillment of our mission. In addition to that, all safety and security will be provided
in accordance with applicable laws and regulations. The safety and security plan for VLA
will consist of security cameras throughout the building and a school resource officer on site
during and after school hours. The full scope of our safety and security plan and procedures
can be found in the operations manual in appendix H.
All of VLA‘s visitors will be required to present identification and sign-in as they enter the
school building. While all doors will be able to be opened from the inside to meet fire law and
regulation, only one entrance will be accessible from the outside which will be monitored at all
times. The visitor‘s log will be kept for at least 3 years.
C. Insurance Coverages
This is a prepared timeline for buying the insurance package before start of the school year.
See below for each coverage:
Coverage
School Board Legal/Educators Legal
Liability
$2 million
Employment Practices Liability
$1million
Workers Compensation
$1 million
General Liability, Excess, Crime, Sexual
Timeline
As soon as board is formed and making
school based decisions (contracts)
Before first employee is hired
When first employee is hired or board is
formed.
When lease agreement is signed or property
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Abuse, Auto Liability, Student Accident
$3 Million
is purchased (landlord requires General
Liability coverage).
Property/Flood
$1 Million
As soon as we acquire contents/school
equipment
**All coverages above will be in place before the school year begins (July 1, 2013),
sooner if parents/teachers will be on campus before school year.
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
Vision Learning Academy
School Operations Policy Manual
Policy and Procedures
Program Model Description
Standard Operating Procedures
Drafted ‘2012
School Year 2013-2014
Table of Contents:
Overview
Academy School Program Model
Chapter 1
2013-14 SCHOOL LEADER/MODEL VISION FOR SAFE SCHOOL MANAGEMENT
Chapter 2
Professional and Safe Environment/Needs Assessment
Chapter 3
Student Transportation
Chapter 4
Staff Development—
Chapter 5
Intake Process
Chapter 6
Student In-service
Chapter 7
Behavior Management/Intervention Model
Chapter 8
Therapy, Counseling and Support Models
Chapter 9
College Track /Graduation
Chapter 10
Data Management
NOTES:
1.
 Use of symbol in document identifies items requiring scheduling on master calendar.
2.
 Use of symbol in document requires access to other documents defining program services.
3.
Completed Management and Operations Plan will have a master copy organized in an individual 3-ring binder with
section I providing an up to date copy of the Plan and attached sub-divided sections to include all support Standard
Operating Procedures, Policies and reference documents.
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THIS PLAN SHALL BE CONSIDERED AN AUDITABLE RECORD, COPIES TO BE MAINTAINED IN THE OFFICE OF THE Board of
Directors and the School Leader.
Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
Attachments:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Facility Space Utilization Plan
Current Staffing Configuration (Organizational Chart)
All Written Standard Operating Procedures referenced in Management and Operational Plan related to
School Safety & Security
District policies, procedures and listings relevant to school management
OVERVIEW OF SCHOOL PROGRAM MODEL:
This plan defines methodology for ensuring a safe and secure environment for all Vision Learning
Academy staff and students and for delivering a consistent behavior modification and intervention
program with high stakes results. Through alignment with the goals and objectives set forth in the Sitebased Improvement Plan (SBIP), and specifically those related to safety, security, student services, the
education model and discipline, students will be provided a unique learning program to meet their
individual learning and behavioral needs.
Vision Learning Academy will be managed by a leadership team responsible for providing school
services. The team is committed to following procedures defined from best practice related to Effective
School Management and those defined in our individual school SBIP to ensure the safety, security and
quality of the alternative school learning environment. Driven by the School Leader’s goals and
objectives for safety, security, and discipline, as well as the School Model detailed in this plan,
professional and safe school operations will be achieved.
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
CHAPTER 1: 2013-14 SCHOOL LEADER/MODEL VISION
FOR SAFE SCHOOL MANAGEMENT
The goal of the leadership team is to manage a school environment consistent with a Robust- Rigorous
environment that define an effective and consistent management system for all learning units.
Employing these key model elements, it is the goal of VLA to create an academy-type school experience
having a positive impact on both staff and student commitment. The school management approach
requires full team commitment to elements of the model and consistent monitoring of compliance with
the system. All learning units will comply with these standards and focus on a positive and consistent
single school climate for all youth.
SITE-BASED IMPROVEMENT PLAN GOALS:
Vision Learning Academy is committed to operating safe and secure environment for all staff and students through
commitment to:
1.
A defined program of training and staff development in the areas of crisis recognition and crisis
prevention intervention, with the following goals:
Identify local training opportunities and schedule training classes that emphasize early
intervention and nonphysical methods of preventing or managing disruptive behavior.
Develop an in house repository of articles and videos dealing with conflict resolution,
Verbal de-escalation skills, Bully-Victim Violence, Silent Crisis: Sexual Minority Youth,
Peer - Mediation Training, Crisis planning, Helping the angry kid and Violence in School.
Action Plan:
Incorporate videos and role play in staff development plan as an addendum to
Instructor led Trainings. Staff will complete a minimum of 4 hours of training a
Month.
Implement a training program to teach staff how to maintain an environment free from
any form of harassment.
Develop greater recognition of discrimination and harassment in the world at large
through media studies in the classroom.
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
2.
Operating a discipline system that will offer positive incentives and consistency in the delivery of
consequences for behavior such that Students feel rewarded and staff feels empowered by
committing to the tenets of VLA’s model. Intervention will include providing a full array of
services in support of our student’s non-academic needs. In carrying out this commitment, the
following goals have been articulated:
Implement a structured school environment with strict behavioral expectations that are
clear to our students and staff to insure discipline is administered in a fair and consistent
manner.
Action Plan:
Develop a reference table that lists the appropriate intervention/responses that can be
used alone or in combination in response to a single offense. Table will be broken down
into Level 1 and Level 2 Rules and Interventions.
Implement processes that will foster a school culture and climate that is easily recognized by the
warm and caring relationships that associates have with teachers and other associates.
Action Plan:
Expand the roles of teachers/staff to act not only as teachers, but also as advisors, and
mentors. Dean of Academics will be assigned specific students per semester. Teachers
will act as mentors to their homeroom class.
Implement a process to measure how welcomed, valued, and satisfied our Parents are in
and with the school. Parents will be issued this survey at /during our grand opening
and open house.
Implement a process for assessing our parents’ opinions about how well we
communicate with them. To be measured on a monthly basis by (JPAMS).
3.
Implementing policy and procedures per this plan that will support a system to engage Parents
in all aspects of the VLA experience (academics, behavior, and therapy, power hour and rewards)
creating a close, professional relationship with Parents’ to ensure a complete awareness and
involvement in child’s education.
Identify and implement a Parents’ outreach strategy that details the VLA experience in the
following areas: academic, behavior, therapy, power hour and rewards.
Action Plan:
Schedule a Parental open house beginning of first month of school year (Aug. 16, 2013).
Attending Parents will have an opportunity to interact with their child/children’s’ teachers’ staff
and leadership team via a modified schedule. Implement a monthly community newsletter that
will feature program goals, initiatives, rewards, updates and student accomplishments first issue
to be published beginning of third month of school year.
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Appendix H – Personnel Policies or Employee Manual
VLA’s 2013 Operational and Management Model
VLA’s CONTRACT GOALS AND OBJECTIVES:
CEO Goals and Objectives
for Safety and Security
(SBIP)
Commitment:
The school will meet
and/or exceed the goals
and objective set forth in
the SBIP
School Model
Management Plan for VLA
Professional and Safe
Schools
Commitment:
Commitment:
The Operations and
Management plan is a
living document that will
be used to establish
The
Behavior model will be
followed in a fair and
consistent manner
Intake
Commitment:
Intake process will be
informative,
professional and
reflective of the climate
Student
and In-service/
culture of training
the
school.
‘The VLA Experience”
Therapist/Behaviorist
Commitment:
Students will have ALL
the resources necessary
to be successful.
Commitment:
Staff and Students will
be trained and
equipped
with the tools
Behavior Intervention
and
and support
to make a
Therapy
difference.
Commitment: Create a
Behavior Intervention
policy that is clear, with
firm discipline and
attendance policies that
are consistently enforced.
Reporting and
Communication
Commitment:
All communication
will always be open
and honest.
College Track and
Afterhours Clinic
100
Commitment:
All students
Will have a completed
portfolio and will be able
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
As Per review of the VLA Contract with the local School District, the following goals, objectives and contractual
requirements are defined to ensure an effective and safe school environment (review contract list all required
conditions related to direct student services required measurement of attainment if applicable).
Contract Defined Goal,
Objective or Requirement per
Agreement
EXAMPLE:
instruction
285 minutes of daily
Expectation of Performance or Compliance
Contract
Reference
and page #
Owner
(SL,CEO,
Teachers, and
other (define)
CEO,SL
285 minutes per master schedule
Bulletin 741
EXAMPLE:
employment
TB Testing prior to
All employees to be tested
SL,AA
ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION/VLA’s SCHOOL LEADERSHIP TEAM
The following leadership staff that will have direct responsibility for daily management of the service
contract will manage the school. The team will work with the individual teaching units within the
school to ensure direct service staff is supported in the delivery of appropriate robust and rigorous
academic content to all students in attendance. The team will ensure that the VLA model compliance
and management of a school environment that follows the College Preparatory model.
Name
Job Title
Licensed/Certified
?
LaToya Jackson
yes
Supervisor of Academics
Natalie Williams
(k-12) yes
Special Education Coordinator
Kimberly Kirton
yes
Chief Executive
Officer
School Leader
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Appendix H – School
Operations and Employee
Manual
Director of Mathematical Studies
Alford Cherry, Jr.
yes
N/A
Behavior Interventionist/
School Counselor
Administrative Assistant
School Nurse
N/A
N/A
LaShonda Ambers
State Boards
Licensed Registered
Nurse
 VLA’s SCHOOL QUALITY CONTROL ELEMENTS/
ASSESSMENT OF QUALITY AND COMPLIANCE:
VLA will commit to ongoing internal and external monitoring of school commitment to defined standards of quality
assurance. The leadership team will be held directly accountable for program compliance with said elements and
all will be evaluated based on the following
College Preparatory Model for Alternative School Elements:
Element Number:
Element Description:
Current SelfRating (0-100):
Goal:
E1
Delivering an arts and a College Preparatory student
intake program in which expectations and defining
characteristics of the program are outlined
80
E2
Delivery of a quality student introduction program
(period of time defined in this plan) termed-“The VLA
Experience-Student In-service and Training
80
E3
Daily management and staff commitment to
80
A professional, safe and secure school environment
simulating student and staff attendance at work
rather than school
E4
Effective daily delivery of service to students; and
80
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Parents using the mentor model
E5
Formally scheduled staff and team meetings driven
by agenda and written plan
80
E6
Multi-modality instruction using and defined
instructional model for delivery, rigor, robust College
Track
80
E7
Effective use of Computer Assisted Instruction / and
Credit Recovery Services
80
E8
Alignment of School Management with correlates of
Effective School Research:
80
1. Parents are engaged in their child’s education
2. Quality orientation to program
3. Quality Academic Engagements.
4. Focus remedial services and Credit Recovery
5. Public Communication of School Performance
Services
E9
Assignment of students to unique learning units
based on academic and behavioral needs
80
E10
Employment of a token economy system that works
in conjunction with a defined intervention and multisystemic therapy model
80
E11
Individual associate Success AEP (Alternative
Education Plan) management
80
E12
Parent/Guardian involvement in program
80
E13
Effective definition and coordination of afterhours
clinics with School District Transportation
80
E14
Quality School District Customer communication
80
E15
Meeting or exceeding all contract specific
requirements and performance standards
80
E16
Availability and quality coordination of support and
therapeutic intervention through community
partnerships
80
E17
Commitment evidence of an accurate and timely
data management
80
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E18
Management Team focus on staff development to
meet contract VLA’s defined expectations
80
E19
Effective financial operations procedures to ensure
quality school management (staffing and access to
resources) is supported
80
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
CHAPTER 2
PROFESSIONAL AND SAFE ENVIRONMENT (E3)
Chapters 1-6 are cumulatively defined as the program’s Intervention Plan. These chapters define the means in
which a student enters and transitions from the program, receives behavioral intervention, therapy, counseling
and support. The Dean of Students, School Leader, Special Education Coordinator and Behavior Interventions
define the vision for the Intervention Plan and works with his/her team to achieve the standards defined as
successful outcomes.
Aligning with the alternative education model, each program will maintain a robust, creative, innovative and
rigorous environment, to include key elements as define through procedures and quality school review
expectations. Our program will also align with alternative education and BESE procedures to ensure a safe and
secure school environment.
NEEDS ASSESSMENT:
The chart below identifies safety and security practices that will be implemented at the school or identify
the need and timeline for implementation. Written policies, procedures and descriptions will be
introduced as an attachment.
VLA’s IMPLEMENTATION and EXPLANATIONS
2013-14 STRATEGY TO IMPLEMENT/
IMPROVE
ns for behaPOSTING
– Our site will clearly define students’ behavior during “The VLA Experience
and Intake Training” Also, written policies pertaining to book bags, vehicle
use, and dress code will be communicated and enforced.
Improve – Ensure commitment of all staff in
implementing the MST/Teaching-Therapy model by
regular monitoring of staff and referral data in
students’ AEP
Code of Conduct
sted throughout the site.
STING
Student’s VLA Agreement Code is posted in every classroom-EVERYWHEREALL THE TIME.
Hold staff and students to strict adherence to
standards
essional Code of Conduct
ed and posted.
STING
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VLA’s IMPLEMENTATION and EXPLANATIONS
2013-14 STRATEGY TO IMPLEMENT/
IMPROVE
ve adopted and manage
icy regarding book bags.
STING
Students Documentation that Student’s have received handbook.
Policy will be followed
s adopted and
policy defining students
onal vehicles. REQUIRED
N/A
Monroe City Schools’ District Policy already in affect
will be covered during in-service
s adopted a formal
sional dress code.
STING
VLA will adopt the modify MCSD dress code conducive the VLA environment.
More stringent enforcement
formal visitor policies to
ffice check in and on-site
Our site clearly defines Parent drop off which include sign out procedures as
per MCSD handbook.
More stringent enforcement
Our site hold to the SOP as stated in VLA’s documentation.
Implemented new process to measure staff and
student attendance. Remodeled entrance to
building as safety and accountability measure to
ensure compliance.
VLA will adhere to all of MCSD transportation and procedures.
Students’ behavior on buses that is not in
compliance with adopted policies will result incur
more severe penalties.
adopted and
policy defining Parent
up to include sign out
STING
s adopted a policy
aff on limited time
minutes) personal school
nds or family to ensure a
nd safe school
ctly monitors student
schools with Parents
nsportation policies and
e in place and monitored.
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VLA’s IMPLEMENTATION and EXPLANATIONS
2013-14 STRATEGY TO IMPLEMENT/
IMPROVE
has adopted a written
E RED PROCEDURES and
f on said procedures.
VLA will be in compliance with MCSD Crisis Intervention Plan along with local
agencies and authorities, all of VLA’s staff will be in serviced at the beginning
of each school year.
Incorporate a secure radio process with law
enforcement quality radios to work in tandem with
the non-secure radios.
considering an adoption
ages to name recognition
ending).
adopted and manages to
procedure for Staff.
All students will wear name recognition badges (pending).
Policy will be consistently enforced.
Random search strategy is under investigation and consideration for the
2013-2014 school years.
Searches are going to occur on a more frequent
basis.
adopted formal written
use of metal detecting
es Security Monitoring
school and has adopted
n policy for use
CEDURE WILL PROHIBIT
F STUDENTS and STAFF
L SITUATIONS OTHER
RDINATED WITH
OCAL LAW
T-UNLESS OTHERWISE
)
ses daily and random
eapons and contraband
nd procedures are
ing and staff is fully
Security monitoring cameras are under consideration and negotiations for
the 2013-2014 school years.
Consistent Random searches will be performed
throughout the 2013-2014 school year.
re consistent with District
rch techniques.
ses random
ontrolled substances,
cedure are defined in
ff is fully trained.
- Resource Officer-Monroe City Police Department
Dean of Students and School Officers will be fully
trained in search procedure they will perform on a
more consistent basis throughout the 2013-2014
school years.
re consistent with State
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VLA’s IMPLEMENTATION and EXPLANATIONS
2013-14 STRATEGY TO IMPLEMENT/
IMPROVE
ict policies on search
hool activities, school
strategy to assign and
nnel during critical
ction times in the most
eas (i.e. before/after
Will require strict adherence to policy.
as adopted formal gang
ategies to include staff
ntify and report safety
oncerns related to gang
Will request a visit prior to end of each quarter.
actively partnering with
cement on issues
activity.
.
s adopted and staff is
tify and report safety
oncerns related to
ssion.
MCSD facility- Site policy will be considered. Concerns and assistance will be
solicited by the Monroe Police Department.
ool has adopted
o a formal plan of action
onse and management
ncidents.
Site policy is in effect. SOP is covered
In-services will be consistently scheduled to insure
site compliance
Site policy is in effect. SOP is covered
In-services will be consistently scheduled to insure
site compliance
nsistent with
s on search techniques.
ool has adopted
o a formal plan of action
to response and
ment for all critical
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s.
nsistent with
s on search techniques.
as adopted a formal Use
e policy and plan.
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VLA’s IMPLEMENTATION and EXPLANATIONS
2013-14 STRATEGY TO IMPLEMENT/
IMPROVE
Policy of stressful and situations will be immediately dispatched to the
Resource Officer and he then will refer it to the Monroe Police Department.
VLA use of force will always be a last result. De-escalate always the right
choice.
s adopted a formal
Service Center Concept
g for coordination of
services for students and
in need.
s a formal assistance
m in place to address
e anger management.
VLA has a parent program that will be incorporated and in-services will be
held to insure compliance.
In-service trainings are schedule to in-sure staff is
aware of district- regional and State resources
Staff is aware of techniques to use to deescalate potential anger
management issues along with in-house therapist.
Continue to request feedback in meetings
as a formal plan
ip defining key Strategic
ship with local law
ment.
s a formal plan and
ship with Monroe City’s
School Resource Officer.
VLA has established relationship-building process with both agencies. Will
include them in all appreciation events we host.
VLA plans at least one appreciation events for them
this per Quarter.
as adopted formal
and procedures to
safety and security
es during last weeks of
and prior to major
VLA’s Behavior Interventionist will review all behavior parts of each student’s
AEP to insure compliance and accountability measures...
Adopt and Continue with the BI (behavior
interventions management and student
accountability system.
nd procedures are in
nd staff is trained on
ory emergency drills and
ions. REQUIRED
G
VLA will have all the necessary and mandatory drills and they will be
unannounced and unscheduled...
Adopts and Continue with State requirements and
include and incorporate inclement weather process
and natural disasters in the training.
ol has identified unique
nd security needs related
opulation service and/or
nity and has adopted and
s with site-specific
and procedures to
the unique needs.
All site specific policies are being followed and adjustments have been made
to insure the safety of student, faculty and staff.
Adopt and continue with policy.
Several members of the staff have developed working relationships in key
offices.
109
The
m
ite
i
phic, referral, and critical
data are regularly
d to identify areas of
ent to safety and
practices.
s a strong relationship
al office of Dept. of
Justice and works
atively with said agency
dinate services.
s adopted and will train
ership staff in media
s it relates to critical
s and matters related to
nd security.
ocedures and plans
to safety and security are
all new staff training.
d Security briefing are
d to all staff including the
of relevant school data.
istributes all
ation and follow Policy
nvolved in dispensing of
e attends trainings.
Vision Learning Academy
VLA’s IMPLEMENTATION and EXPLANATIONS
2013-14 STRATEGY TO IMPLEMENT/
IMPROVE
VLA will collect academic and behavioral data on a weekly basis and report it
to the State Department of Education through JPAMs.
Adopt and continue with policy.
VLA will work cohesively with DJJ, probation officers and all other outside
agencies which attribute to the child’s success.
Adopt and continue with policy.
In-service and adoption of this plan will be detailed and explained during the
professional development training at the beginning of the year.
Adopt and continue with policy.
Security and security training are presented during in-service trainings.
Adopt and continue with policy
Safety and security briefings will be during weekly team meetings.
Adopt and continue with policy
School nurse is responsible for all medication disbursements, selection and
monitoring of disbursement staff and training.
Adopt and continue with policy.
110
The
m
ite
i
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
VLA CRITICAL INCIDENT REPORT (CIR)
Standard Operating Procedures
SOP Reference Chapter 2: 2.1--Professional and Safe School Environment
VLA’s Site Location: Vision Learning Academy Monroe, Louisiana
SOP Owner:
CEO, School Leader (SL), Dean of Students (DOS), Behavior
Interventionist (BI)
Date Adopted:
School Year 2013-2014
Topic
Critical Incident Reporting
Purpose
To guide School Leader in managing a binder which chronicles detailed events and
corresponding timelines for all critical incidents that occur at the site. A CIR would
be required for injuries, bomb threats, fire and alarm use, sexual incident, major
disruptions involving Students and use of public transportation.
Primary Staff Responsible
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
School Leader
Procedure
1. Using good judgment, and the list below as a guide, identify the incident occurring at the
school, near your site, or to one of the persons associated with your site which merits
detailed documentation.
2. Reporting staff member will communicate incident to direct supervisor and/or School
Leader. The School Leader is then responsible for communicating with the Chief
Executive Officer.
3. Use the standard VLA CIR form to detail each incident separately (add forms per injury
reporting procedures and emergency management plan if necessary).
4. Similar to a police blotter or report, detail the time, place, and key parties of the
individual events, which fully describe the critical incident.
5. Review the events and update as needed or as the incident unfolds (use as many pages
as needed).
6. Have at least 2 eye-witnesses (prefer VLA Staff who has been trained) sign corroborating
your observations and documentation.
7. Attach any and all documentation, which support the detailed outlining of the events.
Sign and place all documentation in a three-hole binder labeled “CRITICAL INCIDENTS”.
School Leader will maintain and keep a copy of incidents in a separated binder
accessible/for the CEO/Board of Directors.
8. Upon completion of the investigation the CEO is then required to call the incident into
the Secretary of the Board of Directors.
9.
After completing the phone call the CEO must notify the AA (administrative assistant) to
input all information into the electronic CIR data base filing system.
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
10. VLA recognizes the following: All CIRs contains legal documents and may be used during
legal proceedings. All information is accurate, clear, and consistent with policies and
procedures, which governs’ VLA programs.
IDENTIFYING CRITICAL INCIDENTS
THE INCIDENT NEED NOT BE LIFE-THREATENING TO MERIT INCLUSION IN CIR BINDER (The
following statements are refer to as a guide, not an exhaustive list)
An incident requires documentation and inclusion in Critical Incident Report (CIR) Binder if:







The incident requires the use of the Emergency Plan to bring it to resolution
Student’s health (mental & physical), safety and security is or may be compromised
by the incident
Staff health (mental & physical), safety, and security is or may be compromised by
the incident
The integrity and or quality of any of VLA’s program s is or may be compromised as
a result of the incident
The incident has legal ramifications for the company
The incident requires intervention from an outside social service agency to bring it
to resolution
Students utilizing public transportation (city bus)
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
KEY NOTES:

Definitions: Incident- Classification of events from start to finish
Event - One of numerous occurrences worth noting involving a Student
Stakeholders – Any and all Staff, Community Partnerships, Visitors, Students, Parents, Local School
District, BESE,LDOE

Frequency/Duration: As needed/document until successful closure is achieved
Achieved Successful Closure: When incident is resolved; this may take minutes, hours, days, and/or
weeks...

Special Quality Assurance Steps:
1. School Leader must sign off on final draft of incident Reports
2. TO BE REVIEWED Bi-WEEKLY or monthly BY the CEO and some appointed
Member of the Board of Directors.
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
VLA CRITICAL INCIDENT REPORT FORM
INITIAL INFORMATION:
DATE (S)_______________________
INCIDENT TIME: (FROM-TO)_______________________
**INCIDENT:
 INJURY/ILLNESS (MUST ATTACH INJURY REPORT)
 BOMB THREAT
 WEAPON
 FIRE (ALARM)
 MAJOR DISRUPTION
 OTHER: _______________________________________________________________________
SUPERVISOR (S) NAME: _____________________________________________________________________________
LIST STAFF PRESENT: _____________________________________________________________________________
STUDENT (S) INVOLVED: _________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
OTHER STUDENT (S) PRESENT: __________________________________________________________________
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PARENT CONTACT:
YES
NO
CONTACT TIME: __________________________________
NAME: _______________________________________ TELEPHONE #: _______________________________
TRANSPORTATION OF STUDENT FROM VLA: YES NO OR N/A
 DISTRICT BUS
 PARENT/GUARDIAN
 PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION, IF SO, PUBLIC BUS FARE PROVIDED: YES AMOUNT_______  NO
REQUIRED PARENT/GUARDIAN PERMISSION: YES NO
NAME/RELATIONSHIP: __________________________________________________________________
*Detailed explanation of events surrounding the Critical Incident must be submitted with the CIR form.
Supervisor’s Signature:
All Critical Incidents requiring outside intervention MUST be communicated to the CEO
immediately!!
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
VLA CRITICAL INCIDENT REPORT FORM
DATE:
DETAILED EXPLANATION OF EVENT:
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
VLA USE OF FORCE
STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES
SOP Reference Chapter 2:
2.3--Professional and Safe School Environment
VLA’s Site Location:
Vision Learning Academy, Monroe, Louisiana
SOP Owner:
Dean of Students, Behavior Interventionist
Date Adopted:
I.
Topic
Use of Force
II.
Purpose:
School Year 2013-2014
To provide safety for students and staff the following procedures for Use of Force/Non-Violent
Crisis Intervention (CPI) will be implemented and followed by VLA faculty and staff members.
III.
PROCEDURE
1. A certified instructor in Non –Violent Crisis Intervention (CPI) techniques will train ALL VLA. At
no time should any staff other than the Facility Staff attempt to “take down” or otherwise go
“hands on” with a student.
2. Only when there is an immediate threat to an individual faculty and/or staff member or student
and as a last resort will Non Violent Crisis Intervention Techniques be used.
3. Non Violent Crisis Intervention Techniques are the only techniques in which VLA has authorized
for use.
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4. The “first responder” on the scene immediately following the safe resolution of the incident
must complete a Critical Incident Form.
5. A copy of the critical incident form must be filed in the Critical Incident Binder located in the
Dean of Students’/BI office.
6. The Behavior Interventionist /Dean of Students must notify the School Leader.
7. When appropriate the Supervisor of Academics or whomever responds first to the incident will
immediately notify the Dean of Students.
8. When appropriate the School Leader will use the Monroe City Police Department for Critical
Incident procedures.
VLA notes and states that when “Take Down” or “Hands On” techniques are used there may be legal
ramifications.
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
VLA RADIO PROCEDURES
Standard Operating Procedures
SOP Reference Chapter 2: 2.1--Professional and Safe School Environment
VLA’s Site Location: Vision Learning Academy- Monroe, Louisiana
SOP Owner:
School Leader (SL), Dean of Students (DOS), Behavior
Interventionist (BI), Supervisor of Academics (SA)
Date Adopted:
IV.
School Year 2013-2014
Topic
Radio Procedures
V.
Purpose
To guide the School Leader and the Dean of Students in facilitating the most effective
and efficient use of communication via hand held radios.
VI.
Primary Staff Responsible
Dean of Students, Behavior Interventionist
VII.
Procedure
11. Each classroom will be assigned a radio identified by number. Immediately following
morning Power hour staff must claim their respective radio from its respective charger
(located in the DOS/BI) office.
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12. Staff with an assigned radio must ensure that the radio is on and in their possession at
all times.
Note: Do not allow another staff member to take into their possession your assigned
radio.
13. All radio transmissions must be school related, brief and with relevant information.
Proper business etiquette is expected at all times. Inappropriate, abusive, or otherwise
unprofessional behavior must be reported to the Leadership squad and will be dealt
with through the progressive disciplinary procedures.
14. When a radio transmission is being made, the “caller” must first identify the staff
member by name that they are attempting to communicate i.e. Mr. Big then wait for
that staff member to acknowledge the caller with “Go Ahead for Mr. Big (name the
responder).
15. Staff members should not respond on behalf of another staff member.
16. Staff members must be careful not to “step on” another staff member’s radio
transmission. Wait until all messages are complete from the caller and responder.
17. When using the radio to communicate emergencies use the appropriate code and
always state where the emergency (code) is occurring i.e. “Code Red in the Cafeteria ”
18. Staff should refrain from using associates first and last name when communicating over
the radio. When it is necessary to have a student sent to the front office or another
location staff should use the intercom system.
19. Staff is responsible for replacing their assigned radio back on the respective charger
before leaving for the day.
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
A PROFESSIONAL/PERFORMANCE-RELATED APPEARANCE PUNCH LIST
SOP Reference Chapter 2:
2.6--Professional and Safe School Environment
VLA’s Site Location: Vision Learning Academy Monroe, Louisiana
SOP Owner:
Date Adopted:
CEO, School Leader (SL), (SA) Supervisor of Academics
School Year 2013-2014
STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES
I.
TOPIC
Job Appearance
II.
PURPOSE
The following defines the procedures for the maintenance and preparation/closure of a punch
list to ensure the appropriate overall (look and feel) appearance of VLA.
III.
PRIMARY PERSON RESPONSIBLE
School Leader
IV.
Procedure
A.
The SA under the direction of the CEO will develop a punch list detailing those items,
fixtures (clocks, etc.), appliances (microwaves, etc.), accessories, furniture, etc. that may
need to be repaired, discarded, and/or replaced. The punch list is developed by the SL and
the CEO walking the floor (room by room) with a note pad listing the above-mentioned
needs. All the information on a day-to-day basis is placed in an SL appearance binder. This
list should be prepared on an on-going basis (at the end of each semester in preparation for
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the upcoming semester). The SL is responsible for walking the floor DAILY to ensure the
professional appearance (look and feel) of the floor.
B. Once the punch list has been prepared the SL should meet with the CEO to determine the
priority items, and the cost of the repair/replacement. (VLA will adopt a Procurement
Process)
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
VLA DISPENSING MEDICATION PROCEDURE
Standard Operating Procedures
SOP Reference Chapter 2:
2.7--Professional and Safe School Environment
VLA’s Site Location: Vision Learning Academy Monroe, Louisiana
SOP Owner:
Date Adopted:
IV.
CEO, School Leader (SL), School Nurse (SN)
School Year 2013-2014
Topic
Dispensing Medication
V.
Purpose
The following defines the procedure for Dispensing Medication to Students during “onstage” (classroom) hours.
VI.
PROCEDURE:
VLA’s SN is responsible for coordinating all Student medication distribution.
VII.
VLA must have on file a Medication Authorization Form, which must be properly completed by
the attending physician.
The parent/guardian must bring the medication to VLA in the appropriate prescription.
1. An authorized VLA Staff member who will be appointed/assigned by the school
nurse will check-in the medication by doing the following:
a. Each pill must be counted by the staff and authorized (do not physically
touch the pills, lay out meds on piece of paper and count by moving to one
side with end of pencil or object other than hands) –the Parent may assist
you with this task (the Parent may physically touch medication). Parent
must initial the quantity of medication to be kept at VLA on a Medication
Distribution Form.
1. Medication Authorization Form must be compared to prescription
bottle to verify that the prescription is the same.
b. Prescription must be for the exact milligrams, and frequency as described
on the Medication Authorization Form signed by physician.
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2.
3.
c. When distributing the meds, the Student must consume pill in front of
distributing staff member.
d. If a Student refuses to take medication, parent/guardian must be notified.
e. The Medication Distribution Form must have the name of the Student,
medication name, date of distribution, time of distribution, frequency of
distribution, and staff initials.
Staff members distributing meds must be authorized by having attended a
Medication Distribution Training (when applicable or as authorized by PRN
School Nurse).
Medication must be kept in a locked cabinet at all times and keys must be
located in the school’s locked vault.
4. Once medication is no longer necessary (i.e. Student is no longer at the school), medication
must be destroyed by School Nurse or authorizing person(s).
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
VLA CONFISCATION OF ASSOCIATE VALUABLES
Standard Operating Procedures
SOP Reference Chapter 2: 12.0--Professional and Safe School Environment
VLA’s Site Location: Vision Learning Academy Monroe, Louisiana
SOP Owner:
School Leader (SL), Dean of Students (DOS), Behavior
Interventionist (BI)
Date Adopted:
School Year 2013-2014
VIII. Topic
Confiscation Procedures
IX.
Purpose
To track and process confiscated items of value (Over $50.00) that are brought on
campus by the Student and clearly document the return of those items.
X.
Primary Staff Responsible
DOS, BI, SL
XI.
Procedure
Confiscate items of valor are to be submitted to the DOS accompanied by a contraband sign off sheet
and a provided container for the item. The DOS will house the item in a safe place to be determined by
the school until a Parent/Guardian retrieves the items. These items entail music players, knives, timers,
bandanas or any other electronic devices that are prohibited by VLA.
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Jewelry will not be confiscated; however, the Student will be redirected regarding bringing prohibited
jewelry on school grounds (i.e... brass knuckles, gold teeth,). Students will be instructed to remove and
place all non-permitted jewelry, as stated on the current dress code, in their pockets and not brought or
worn to school. Any continual violations on this issue will result in re-direction and processed through
the student’s behavior interventionist model as pertaining to each student’s individualized AEP.
Inappropriate clothing such as dark hooded jackets, fleece sweaters and hats of any nature unless a specialized
business day will be confiscated and not returned to the Student. The Parent/Guardian will have to retrieve the
clothing items. The clothing mentioned above will be stored in a designated area at VLA.
All other items confiscated, such as, candy, pens, mechanical pens, lighters, tobacco products or any other item
deemed prohibited, will be disposed of. Any illegal drugs or unlawful items will be confiscated and reported to the
SRO and processed immediately and accordingly through the Monroe City Schools Department. In some cases we
will not confiscate any non-prescribed anti-contraceptive devices.
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
Chapter 3:
VLA’s Student transportation
VLA’s Site Location: Vision Learning Academy Monroe, Louisiana
SOP Owner:
CEO, School Leader (SL), Dean of Students (DOS), Behavior
Interventionist (BI)
Date Adopted:
2013-2014 School Year
The timely and safe transportation of Students to and from VLA is an imperative role of the SL and the
DOS. In the chart below, identify who has the responsibility to carry out transportation-related activities.
VLA will comply in addition to the policy below with all MCSD transportation policies.
ACTIVITY
District
Transportation
Scheduling
VLA’s School
Leader, DOS and
entire academic
team
DESCRIBE PROCESS TO ENSURE
SAFETY
DOS
Upon notification from districtParent/student notification of pick-up drop
off is given to each Student with copy of
MCSD’s Bus rider rules and procedures.
Bus Arrival/Drop- DOS,
Schedule is given to associate if available
off Procedures (staff AA(administrative during Orientation if not no later than
assignment)
assistant)
second day of class attendance.
Safety and Security SL, DOS
Procedures
Supporting On-Bus
Discipline
Policy covered during Student In-service.
Safety and Security
Unloading
(recording,
monitoring, driver
Policy covered during Student In-service.
SL
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interaction)
Public
Transportation
Monitoring and
Approval
Procedures (if
applicable)
SL, BI, DOS
Approved on a case-to-case basis and upon
approval from SL- Monroe Transit System
and DOS is notified of confirmed city bus
riders. Students are given passes to confirm
they may ride city bus.
Bus Evacuation
Drills
Monroe City
School District
1 evacuation per year
Parent Drop-off
Procedures
All Staff
Covered in Parent/Student In-Service
Student Vehicle Use CEO,SL
Policy and Daily
Monitoring
Covered in Parent/Student In-Service
Supporting SOPs and documents for Student Transportation Chapter 3:
Answer questions regarding items supporting school safety management.
ITEM
ON-SITE, SOURCE, AND
AUDITABLE
(Yes, No or
N/A—Explanation
Required)
Transportation Service SOP
Process Owners District
YES
Bus Schedule Central Location Management SOP
Process Owners District
Yes
 Bus Evacuation Drill Schedule
Process Owners District
Yes
List others: Car Rider/ Walker
Process Owner District
Yes
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
VLA TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
Standard Operating Procedures
SOP Reference Chapter 3:
3.1—Transportation Services
VLA’s Site Location: Vision Learning Academy Monroe, Louisiana
SOP Owner:
Date Adopted:
School Leader (SL), Dean of Students (DOS), School Nurse (SN)
School Year 2013-2014
Topic
Transportation
Purpose
To ensure a timely and quality transportation experience for Students.
III.
PRIMARY PERSON RESPONSIBLE
SL, DOS
Procedure
District Transportation Communication (who/what/when)
The SL along with the AA will ensure that each Student has transportation through the
school district or by way of Monroe Transit Systems. The DOS or the AA will notify the
district transportation department (after the parent/student in-services) of newly
enrolled Students.
PROCEDURE/TIMING FOR ALL DISTRICT COMMUNICATION:
The School Leader is the liaison with the school district upon receipt of the bus
information from transportation; the AA will notify the DOS and parent of the bus route
number, pick-up location, and pick-up and drop-off times.
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Transportation
A. The SL is responsible for monitoring all transportation as it relates to bus arrival, number
of Students on each bus, number of buses serving program, safety and security on and
off the bus, bus evacuation drills safety of Students at the city bus stop and ensuring
Students safely boards city bus.
Procedures on Bus Arrival to Vision Learning Academy
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
All staff will have designated posts in the morning beginning at 7:30AM to the
arrival of all buses or 7:50 AM the start of power hour.
Upon arrival DOS /BI will stand near bus and talk to the bus driver and handle
all Bus referrals on the bus. The DOS /BI will issue consequences and hand one
copy to the driver and one to the student.
Students will then exit the bus and form a line to enter the power hour area.
All students will be subject to search. A Male staff member will search the
males and female staff will search the ladies. Any items taken from a student
will be documented on search and seizure sheet handled by the BI and DOS.
Students will then exit the debriefing room through the doors and head to
their respective areas. After the bell rings, students will go to their first period
class. Attendance will be taken by their homeroom/Block 1 teacher.
Procedures on Bus Dismissal
6. All VLA staff will have designated posts in the afternoon beginning at 2:54 Pm.
7. All students will exit the buildings in a safe orderly fashion.
8. All staff will be on post until their area have been declared to be all clear, at that
time VLA staff will continue with their daily assignments.
Safety and Security On/Off Bus
1. Monitor Student behaviors on bus (as indicated through school bus driver
communication – via bus referral or meetings), and when
boarding/departing the bus (quick boarding and departure – minimal
loitering).
2. The DOS will complete an arrival and departure plan outlining staff duty
points (in hallways and outside) to ensure a professional/safe arrival and
departure.
Public Transportation
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1. The SL must ensure that each time a Student utilizes the city bus as means
of transportation (other than as primary transportation – pick-up and dropoff) that a Critical Incident Report (CIR) is completed.
2. When a Student utilizes public transportation to depart during school hours,
such as a city bus, the Teacher/DOS must get verbal approval from the
parent.
Bus Evacuation Drills
The district should coordinate 5 bus evacuation drills a year utilizing the
evacuation drill form.
VII.
STUDENT Transportation
The following defines the procedures for VLA’s Students use of public transportation in the event
of early departure due to illness and/or disciplinary reasons.
PROCEDURE
A. Guardian Permission – The Teacher, SL, and DOS must receive verbal confirmation from the
Parent/Guardian. The Student does not make the phone call! The guardian/contact person
must be listed on the emergency information card.
B. Critical Incident Report (CIR) – Once verbal permission has been given, the SL and witnessing
staff must complete a CIR. The CIR must be filled out COMPLETELY (correct time, date,
name of person giving verbal permission, number called for permission, relationship of
contact). At this time the DOS must make sure that the Student has the sufficient fare
amount for transportation, be sure to indicate amount given (if any) on the CIR. If the
Student has fare, indicate on the CIR. The DOS will also make sure that the Student knows
what bus he/she must take in order to arrive at their destination safely.
C. Departing Premises – Upon leaving the Student must sign out in the front office/AA area
utilizing the site’s official sign out sheet.
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
VLA EMERGENCY EVACUATION DRILL REPORT
VLA’s Site Location: Vision Learning Academy Monroe, Louisiana
SOP Owner:
Date Adopted:
CEO, School Leader (SL),
School Year 2013-2014
Emergency evacuation drills shall be held twice within the first
two weeks of the school year and monthly thereafter for a total
of not less than 10 drills for the school year.
WL # _________
Facility: ______________
L/C: ________
DRILL TYPE
Fire:  Severe Weather: 
Bomb Threat:  Lock Down: 
Bus Evacuation: 
Number of Students Participating: ________
Evacuation Elapsed Time:
Evacuation Route Used:
Method of Alarm Activation:
Location of Pull Station If Used:
______Min.
Primary 
______Sec.
Secondary 
_________________________
_________________________
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General Comments:
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________
Problems:
Work Order #: __________
Work Order Date: __________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________
July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

Signature: __________________________________ Date: __/__/__
Print Name: _________________________________
Phone: __________
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
Vision Learning Academy
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT RESPONSE PLAN (EMP)
(IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE DISTRICT PLAN)
The following VLA- EMP has been developed to guide and protect students and staff in crisis situations where
sound judgment and quick action are necessary. Due to the potential risks related to unanticipated events, it is
important for all staff to fully understand the significance of the Emergency Management Plan. VLA’s Emergency
Management Plan is a supplement to the School District adopted EMP. VLA’s Emergency Management Plan
details specific information. The EMP will be utilized as the primary referral source for ALL emergency situations.
Refer to DISTRICT PARTNER EMP for detailed directions when
emergency situations arise.
Emergency Management Team (required):
CEO, School Leader, Special Education Coordinator, Director of Mathematical Studies. Supervisor of Academics,
Behavior Interventionist, School Resource Officer, Dean of Students
The following outline details the necessary steps to be taken in accordance with the DISTRICT PARTNER Emergency
Management Plan. The School Leader is responsible for coordinating with the District office access to local EMP’s
(required by law to be adopted for each local School District).
PLANNING
Access the SCHOOL DISTRICT PARTNER EMP. This information should be completed in ALL
DISTRICT PARTNER EMP. Remember the EMP should be located in specific areas for quick reference.
Codes:
(The following codes will be utilized in emergency situations)

Colors refer to any emergency on property that requires IMMEDIATE support. All staff should utilize
these codes only in emergency situations.
(The following signals will be used to identify type of radio and/or intercom code emergency
Situations)
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
CODE RED Fight
LOCKDOWN
CODE WHITE - Medical
CODE GREEN – Serious Injury
CODE PURPLE –
Weapon
LOCKDOWN
CODE ORANGE –
Hostage
LOCKDOWN
CODE BLACK – Bomb
EVACUATION
CODE BROWN –
Power outage
LOCKDOWN
STAFF TRAINING SCHEDULE:


“BLUE” – refers to a hazardous weather drill where the students do not evacuate the building. All
students and staff will report to the Cafeteria during a code “blue.”
“YELLOW” - refers to a bomb / fire evacuation. All students will utilize the exit(s) of the building indicated
on the evacuation route map.
All staff training related to safe school management will be defined on
the master SAFE SCHOOLS CALENDAR. The calendar will be updated
at least monthly.
EVACUATION PLAN & PROCEDURES
1.
Site-specific maps should be posted in ALL rooms indicating primary and secondary routes.
Verification of Posting: __________________________ Date: __________
Environment Specialist
2.
3.
Adhere to evacuation procedures detailed in the Monroe City Schools EMP.
Location of Emergency Management Plans.
#1 – School Leader’s Office
#2 – Dean of Students/Behavior Interventionist Office
#3 – Administrative Assistants Office
#4 – Custodial Staff’s Main Office Area
4.
All incidents must be documented using VLA’s formal reporting procedures
(INCIDENT REPORT).
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VLA’s drill schedule in Site Safety and Security Calendar.
GUNS/WEAPONS ON CAMPUS
HOSTAGE
KIDNAPPING/CHILDNAPPING
SEXUAL BATTERY
SHOOTING/STABBING
BOMB THREAT
CHEMICAL SPILL/AIRPLANE CRASH
DEATH/SUICIDE OF STAFF MEMBER/STUDENT
FIRE/EXPLOSION
1.
2.
VLA will have a Site-specific drill schedule developed, and implemented accordingly.
All evacuation routes will be posted.
MAJOR STUDENT DISRUPTION
9.
ALL of VLA’s staff and student body will be trained by a certified instructor in takedown procedures
(CIT/CPI). At no time should any staff other than the DOS/BI to take down a student. Only when there is
an immediate threat to a faculty/staff or another student will takedown procedures be acted upon.
WEATHER
MEDIA
GENERAL MEDIA/COMMUNICATION GUIDANCE:
1. Request for Information from Persons Involved Directly with VLA:
School Leader will use appropriate discretion in releasing information to persons involved directly with VLA. Such
discretion will include an assessment of the need for said information, VLA preparation of information in a
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professional manner to be a strong representation for the organization and the time sensitivity of the request.
VLA as an open book public organization will share any information requested from partners, however such
information will be appropriately screened for professional appearance that will include accuracy of information.
Any questions about release of information should be directed to the CEO, Latoya Jackson.
2. Request for Approval for Site Visit from Persons Involved Directly with School/Program: Accommodate at
earliest possible.
3. Request for Information form Local Media: Regardless of source, the CEO will be contacted prior to
releasing information or scheduling of campus tours. If media appears at building, defer them until CEO
or CEO’s delegate/spokes person arrives.
4. Request for Information from Person’s Interested in Learning more about Program: If the party may
have business interest in visiting the school, contact CEO. If the party is a community individual with a
desire to better understand the program model, provide a tour and appropriate general program
information but not without prior approval from the CEO.
5. Any unusual Request for Information: Refer to the office of the CEO.
Vision Learning Academy has developed formal marketing materials defining the model; the SL must be
contacted for said material.
Approved By:
________________________________
_____________
CEO
Date
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School-Based Security Survey for Accountability

Identify and rank-order the MOST SIGNIFICANT STRENGHTS at the school related to operation of a safe and
secure school ensuring a quality daily experience for staff and students:
SCHOOL SAFE AND SECURITY STRENGTH #1: Professionalism of staff and the number of staff that have prior
Alternative School training.
SCHOOL SAFE AND SECURITY STRENGTH #2: Site location closed campus
SCHOOL SAFE AND SECURITY STRENGTH #3: Proximity to law enforcement, emergency medical services.

Identify and rank-order the schools MATERIAL WEAKNESSES that need school leadership focus to ensure
ongoing safety and security for staff and associates and the contributing factor(s):
SCHOOL SAFETY AND SECURITY WEAKNESS #1: Student’s Behavior.
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CONTRIBUTING FACTOR (S):
Students are high-risk associates.
SCHOOL SAFETY AND SECURITY WEAKNESS #2: Building procedures.
CONTRIBUTING FACTOR (S): Procedures have to be followed at all times. Staff cannot relax must adhere and be
on point at all times.
SCHOOL SAFETY AND SECURITY WEAKNESS #3: Students can possibly refuge within campus without being
immediately detected.
CONTRIBUTING FACTOR (S): Campus too large for complete coverage. Adjoined with another District campus.
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VLA ‘S PROCESS FOR A PROFESSIONAL AND SAFE ENVIRONMENT
Emergency Management Response Plan (EMRP) and Safety and Security Manual for ongoing sites
Answer
Yes or No
EMPR Policy and Procedures
Define
1. School has an adopted EMPR
YES
IF NO—CRITICAL ISSUE MUST BE
ADDRESSED AT PRIORTIY LEVEL WITH SL
2.  All Staff Trained on EMPR annually
YES
Covered during summer orientations
and ongoing in-service
3. VLA complies with Monroe City Schools’ approved District policy
for their facility?
YES
Our plan used the district plan as
resource.
4. EMPR hard copies are sufficiently located through site?
YES
Defined locations: SL. DOS, BI -Office –
AA Front Desk
5. New staff training includes EMPR review?
YES
Locations are covered – their first point
of contact is DOA personnel.
Key School Safety and Security Contact Information:
Point of Contact (person’s
name and title)
Role
(Must address at
minimum all of the
roles listed)
Contact Information (must
include tele/email/address)
Strength of
Relationship (110 weak to
strong)
LaToya Jackson
CEO
318-381-6781
Monroe City Police Dept
Municipal law
enforcement contact
318-329-2600
Royce Toney
Office of the Sheriff
contact
318-329-1200
Monroe City Police
Gang suppression/activity
officer
318.329.2600
Sgt. Roy Brown
School Resource Officers
318-329-2600
Thea Burrrell
Contact for medical
318-323-1143
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services
EMERGENCY RESPONSE
911
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VLA’s Supporting SOPs for Safe School Environment Checklist
Chapter 2:
ON-SITE, SOURCE, AND
AUDITABLE
ITEM
(Yes, No or
N/A—Explanation
Required)
EMRP/Safety and Security Manual
2013-2014 Student Code of Conduct Handbook
MANDATORY/MUST BE
PLACED IN BINDER
Critical Incident Reporting SOP
YES
Critical Incident Form
YES
Use of Force SOP
YES
Emergency Phones Use SOP
YES
Radio and Intercom Procedures SOP
YES
School Professional Appearance/Punch list SOP
YES
Professional Environment Review SOP
YES
Fire drill and Bus Evacuation tracking forms
YES
Building Closure SOP
YES
Distributing Medication SOP
YES
MCS District Emergency Operations Manual
YES
Classroom Procedures listing (Students expectations and Staff expectations)
YES
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Chapter 4:
Staff Development—Academy Alignment
School Leadership staff will provide effective and individualized staff development opportunities to
support each employee’s professional development, ensure contract compliance, promote internal
growth and succession planning and support the bi-monthly/weekly staff development initiative.
Development of Monitoring
System to ensure Staff
Qualifications and Readiness
Overview of Procedures
Quality Rating of
Current System
-Not operational
-Operational
-Quality
New employee orientation
Orientation and in service training monthly
calendar item
Operational
Verification of Staff Qualifications Review is conducted by AA under direction of SL
prior to hire
Operational
Ongoing development training
(Common-Core State
Standards/Best Practices...etc
related)
Operational
In-service training program implement a monthly
calendar item.
Background Screening (BESE
Describe in Detail: New hires complete application
requirement to include finger
printing and Criminal background Interview- finger printing (own cost) and drug
testing is schedule within 72 hours of hire offer.
checks)
Operational
Discipline policy in place to
address weakness in level service
delivery for all staff
Operational
Critical Incidents and personnel issues are
documented and forwarded to Learning Solutions
Board of Directors.
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VLA’s Process for Staff Development
Training of staff on emergency response plans
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Emergency drills and bus evacuations
Training on Use of Force
Training on Crisis Prevention Intervention (CPI) and CPR
Other site-specific priority training related to school safety (i.e. gang behaviors)
Bus Driver/Transportation appreciation events
New employee orientation
Staff Training on behavior intervention model
Critical Schools Dates (begin date, breaks, student holiday, etc.)
Required School Safety and Security Training
District Contract manager meetings
District meetings with Safety and Security Liaisons
Pre-scheduled or regular meeting with key school partners
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_______________________________________________________
VLA NEW STAFF TRAINING/ORIENTATION
SOP Reference Chapter 4:
_______________________________________________________
4.1—Staff Development
VLA’s Site Location: Vision Learning Academy Monroe, Louisiana
SOP Owner:
CEO, School Leader (SL),
Date Adopted:
I.
School Year 2013-2014
TOPIC
New Staff Training/Orientation
II.
PURPOSE
To provide salient information to newly hired personnel regarding organizational vision,
historical background, and current direction. This orientation should also include, but
not be limited to, specific job expectations, organizational hierarchy, adjacent
organizational support, and an explanation of benefits.
III.
PRIMARY STAFF RESPONSIBLE
CEO
School Leader
IV.
PROCEDURE
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A. The CEO will deliver to all new personnel the organizational vision, historical
background, and current direction. At this time, the organizational hierarchy of VLA
should be fully explained. The DFO will further ensure all HR policies are followed
relative to orientation of new employees.
B. All new hires will receive Sexual Harassment Training and Compliance Training by the SL.
Copies of Completion will be kept in the staff files.
Mon.
Intro. to lead staff; lead staff meeting – attend a vision
meeting
8:30-9:30 am
Office set-up/Intake Wrap-up
9:30-12:00 noon
LUNCH
12:00 noon – 1:00pm
Review of Job Descriptions & job expectations – where
are we and where are we going? What is the vision of
vision? Review with SL.
1:00-2:30pm
DOA/BI
Review of Academic-College Prep Plans and AEP
binders
2:45-3:45 pm
CEO/SL
Q/A Session
3:50-4:30pm
CEO/SL/DOA/BI
Training Modules (The VLA Experience/Rigor, Vision
World, Vision Universe and Overview of AEP tracking)
8:30-12:00noon
LUNCH
12:00-1:00pm
Classroom Observation
1:00-2:30pm
Office Time (Lesson Planning Time)
2:30-4:00pm
SL,DFO
Attend a Staff Meeting
8:30 – 9:00
DOA
Review Academy Plan
9:00-11:00am
SL, DOA
Go over in depth a Academics/Rigor
11:00-12:00noon
LUNCH
12:00-1:00pm
Go over Orientation and roles of DOS/DOA in regards to
Safety and Security-Day to Day Routines. Lessons
Provided in “The VLA Experience Student Orientation
Packet.” All staff will be able to present, The VLA
Experience to incoming students.
1:00-4::30pm
CEO
CEO/SL
Tue.
SL
Wed.
CEO/SL
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Thur.
Fri.
DFO,CEO
Q/A session-benefit packages/time off etc...
8:30 – 9:00am
DFO,FC
Training Plan Review (review of current materials and
ideas)
9:00-9:30 am
CEO,SL
Office Time/Individual Sessions w direct
supervisor(classroom/office time for all other staff
members)
9:30-12:00noon
LUNCH
12:00-1:00pm
Possible Classroom Observation and time to do lesson
planning
1:30-4:30pm
SL/CEO
Attend Meeting w/ direct supervisor and staff
8:30-9:00am
SL/BI
Compliance and Sexual Harassment and all other
environmental and high-intensity trainings
9:00-12:00noon
LUNCH
12:00-1:00pm
Materials Prepped for Monday
1:00-3:30
Debrief in anticipation of Monday full expectations
3:30-4:30pm
SL
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VLA -BI-MONTHLY STAFF DEVELOPMENT
VLA’s Site Location: Vision Learning Academy Monroe, Louisiana
SOP Owner:
CEO, School Leader (SL), Dean of Students (DOS),
Topic
Bi-Monthly/Weekly Staff Development
Purpose
In order to meet VLA’s Management priorities; all managers must have a vested interest in
each staff person’s development. Through bi-monthly /weekly/daily discussions, managers
will have the opportunity to provide feedback to each staff person regarding his/her current
performance and define action plans to improve as needed—this feedback and the
determined performance outcomes will link directly to the Individual Contributor in the
Incentive Plan. Staff will also have the opportunity to provide their direct managers
feedback regarding the level of support and leadership provided to them.
Goals:
Aligned with the Four Program Priorities, the goals of the Bi-Monthly Staff Development
Initiative process are as follows:
1. To provide feedback to staff regarding performance against defined criteria and create
action plans as required
2. To provide feedback to managers based on the level of support and leadership provided
to the team
3. To determine each staff person’s Individual Contribution toward school performance, to
be used in calculating the annual Incentives
Primary Staff Responsible
School Leader (SL), Director of Financial Operations (DFO)
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Procedure






On a bi-monthly basis each manager will meet one-on-one with each of his/her direct reporting
staff.
During this 15 minute discussion, the manager will provide feedback to the staff person regarding
his/her performance against the five defined criteria (See attached Staff Development Tracking
Form), discuss any advancement in development or certification accomplished since the last Staff
Development conversation, define any areas of improvement needed and seek feedback regarding
the effectiveness of the leadership and support provided to that staff person.
Ratings for the incentive criteria will be documented each month in cumulative form on the Staff
Development tracking Form.
The overall effectiveness of staff development at VLA will be evaluated once a semester through the
QSR process. During the QSR, the auditor will look for evidence of documented observations to
support the staff development feedback and correlation of Individual Contributor scores with overall
performance.
The staff member will also have the opportunity to provide feedback on the overall leadership,
support and communication provided to them by their direct manger. This rating will be
incorporated into that manager’s extra-ordinary contribution score.
Following delivery of individual staff development reviews, all forms are to be maintained by the
School Leader in a “Staff Development” binder to be located in the School Leader’s office. These
tracking forms should be typed and a copy provided to each staff member, in order to assist them
with tracking their own staff development needs or goals.

The bi-monthly scores will be averaged together to establish the Individual Contributor Score for the
semester.

School Leaders and staff will receive the same bi-monthly staff development process as defined
above and the CEO will receive the same process from the Board of Directors.(see attached form)
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BI-MONTHLY
STAFF NAME: __________________________________________________
STAFF DEVELOPMENT
QSR Scores
TRACKING FORM
MANAGER/SUPERVISOR’S NAME: ________________________________________________________
Overall:
SITE: ________________________________________________________________
MONTH
:_____________________
:______________
Criteria: Score each criteria on a 1-20 scale (20 optimum performance)
1. Extra-ordinary VLA team contribution
Work Ethic, Customer Service, Adaptability,
Communication, Signature Innovative Projects
/20 Comments:
/20 Comments:
2. Quality of academic delivery
Quality of Work, Job Knowledge, Performance
Standards, Self-management
/20 Comments:
/20 Comments:
3. Quality of student behavior management
Quality of Work, Job Knowledge, Performance
Standards, Self-management
/20 Comments:
/20 Comments:
4. Quality of data/record management
Quality of Work, Self-management,
Communication
/20 Comments:
/20 Comments:
5. Commitment to professional development
Personal/professional development,
Communication, Self-management
/20 Comments:
/20 Comments:
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Total Points (out of 100):
/100
/100
Management Requests/Areas of Need
Identified
To be completed by Staff Member:
Using a 1-20 score (20 optimum performance)
how would you rate the overall leadership,
support and communication you have received
from your direct supervisor?
/20 Comments:
/20 Comments:
BI-MONTHLY
NAME: __________________________________________________
Current QSR Scores
CEO/SL/Admin DEVELOPMENT
Overall:
MGR. NAME: ________________________________________________________
SITE: ________________________________________________________________
MONTH
:_____________________
TRACKING FORM
:____________
Criteria: Score each criteria on a 1-20 scale (20 optimum performance)
Extra-ordinary team contribution
/20 Comments:
/20 Comments:
Work Ethic, Customer Service, Adaptability,
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Communication, Signature Project
Quality of communication to all supervisees
/20 Comments:
/20 Comments:
/20 Comments:
/20 Comments:
/20 Comments:
/20 Comments:
/20 Comments:
/20 Comments:
Written and verbal communication, in delegation
encouragement and support
Empowerment
Delegation to management team in leadership
delegation and support
Contribution to school
environment/department
Overall effectiveness in school/department
performance and leadership skills and delegations
Commitment to professional development
Personal/professional development, Communication,
Self-management
Total Points (out of 100):
/100
/100
Areas of Needed Improvement Identified
To be completed by Staff Member:
Using a 1-20 score (20 optimum performance)
how would you rate the overall upper level
leadership and/or Board of Directors support,
encouragement and communication to
improve?
/20 Comments:
/20 Comments:
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What do you need changed or additional
support in?
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BACKGROUND CHECK AND DRUG SCREENING
Standard Operating Procedures
SOP Reference Chapter 4:
4.3—Staff Development
VLA’s Site Location: Vision Learning Academy Monroe, Louisiana
SOP Owner:
Director Finance Operations (DFO), Administrative Assistant (AA),
School Leader (SL)
Date Adopted:
XII.
School Year 2013-2014
Topic
Pre-employment background check and drug screening
XIII. Purpose
VLA is an equal opportunity employer that recognizes the need to protect the individuals we
serve and to provide the highest quality services. All applicants will be recruited,
interviewed, screened and selected to determine their qualifications, ability to do the job,
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and criminal history background regardless of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin,
disability or veteran status.
XIV. Primary Staff Responsible
DFO, SL, AA
XV.
Procedure
All new hires will follow the defined VLA policy for pre-employment background checks and
drug screening (New Hire Flow Process, Pre-Interview Process, Applicant Reference Checks
and Drug Test Process).
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CHAPTER 5:
VLA’S STUDENT INTAKE PROCESS AND PROCEDURES
VLA utilizes a defined, well-prepared and professional intake process in which Parents and Students will be
educated on the policies and procedures of the School (inclusive of academic and behavioral components) and
complete both program and LDOE required paperwork. Implementation of a successful intake process will include
the following:



Communication with districts/schools to obtain assignment of new student and accurate and timely
enrollment into the district database and onsite.
Professionally organized and management student intake process (timely notice and communication with
Parents, management of all tracking logs and paperwork)
Professionally organized, developed and delivered Parent/associate orientation
SITE-BASED PROCESS FOR STUDENT INTAKE

Below is VLA’s process for each step in Student Intake:
STEP 1: Monroe City School District Referrals/ All Students meeting Bulletin 126 req. are Welcome
PERSON (S) RESPONSIBLE:
SL
DESCRIBE IN DETAIL PROCESS:
Zone school and/or local school board conduct hearing, decision is made to refer. MCSD Referrals are sent via
email. District contacts SL’s office. Any student meeting “At-Risk” population and “alternative education criteria
may be admitted on a first come first serve basis provided that all slots are available. SL contacts CEO for
funding and operations to ensure that school has not exceeded chartering capacity.
STEP 2: Student and Parent Contact—Scheduling for Attendance at “The VLA Experience.” Orientation
Upon receipt of the referral, SL or designee contacts Parents/guardians to advise of intake process, time
of orientation, dates of orientation and dress code.
PERSON (S) RESPONSIBLE: in take Specialist/Teachers/SL/AA/DOS/BI/DOA/DMS/DFO
PROCESS: Orientation consists of a Power Point Slide Presentation and”THE VLA EXPERIENCE.” Hands-on and
interactive orientation (academic rigor and behavior intervention model). Orientation last approximately 50
minutes. Other agenda items will be added
Transition process expectations.
PROCEDURE FOR NON-ATTENDANCE: Re-schedule
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STEP 3: Student Intake and Orientation
PERSON (S) RESPONSIBLE: SL, AA, DOS
STRATEGY USED FOR SCHEDULING: Parents are contacted to apprise of orientation logistics.
PROCESS: Same as above
STEP 4: Scheduling for Parent/Student Orientation
PERSON (S) RESPONSIBLE: SL, AA, DOS, Teachers
PROCESS: First Week of school, the students assigned to an orientation team and classrooms for orientation.
STEP 5: Attendance and Orientation Completion
PERSON(S) RESPONSIBLE: Teachers
PROCESS: Pre Testing - During Orientation, Star Reading, Star Math, Tabe, Math Essentials, ACT practice test,
EOC practice Test in all subject areas
PROCEDURE FOR NON-ATTENDANCE: Re- starts every Monday with DOS and AA. Students cannot miss a day or
the student is recycled to the next class start.
PROCEDURE FOR NON-COMPLETION
Recycled one time—fail second time – restart process after second
attempt is failed student may not be admitted to VLA and slot will be filled
STEP 6: Schedule Assignments and Data is Tracked for Class Schedule
PERSON(S) RESPONSIBLE: SL, DOA
PROCESS: Test scores are analyzed
PROCEDURE FOR ACADEMIC READINESS ASSESSMENT: College Prep Track - Assigned
PROCEDURE FOR BEHAVIORAL ASSESSMENT: Cognitive Development Center-Behavior Interventionist
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PROCEDURE FOR ACCESSING STUDENT PRIOR HISTORY ACADEMIC: Previous school District
Records/JPAMS/TETRADATA
PROCEDURE FOR ACCESSING STUDENT PRIOR HISTORY BEHAVIORAL: TETRA- DATA
VLA Supporting SOPs and documents checklist for Student Intake Process--Chapter 5:
ITEM
ON-SITE, SOURCE, AND
AUDITABLE
(Yes, No)
Student Orientation SOP
Yes
New Student Enrollment Packet
Yes
—All sections required for input of data during Orientations assessment
Yes
Student College Preparatory TRAC Assignment SOP
Yes
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES
VLA STUDENT INTAKE & ORIENTATION
VLA’s Site Location: Vision Learning Academy Monroe, Louisiana
SOP Owner:
CEO, School Leader (SL), Dean of Students (DOS), Behavior
Interventionist (BI), Teachers, (AA) Administrative Assistant
Date Adopted:
School Year 2013-2014
Topic
Student Orientation
Purpose
To ensure a quality Orientation/Intake experience for Students and Parents.
PROCEDURE
A.
(DOS,AA) & Assigned Teacher Teams are responsible to do on site Orientation.
Orientation presentation and Intake packet is updated as needed.
B. Orientations are scheduled weekly at a set time and date typically during the first week
of school. DOS, AA and Teacher Teams will provide all prospective Students and Parents
with a thorough Orientation explanation of the VLA Experience and expectations.
C. During orientation, Parents and Teachers will be introduced to “The VLA Experience.”
requirements and expectations therein. Other topics covered in Orientation includes:
a. Student Code of Conduct
(Dress Code)
b. AEP(Alternative Education Plans)
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c. Teacher and Therapist Model
d. Attendance Expectations
e. Graduation and transitions into the world
D. In delivering the Intake/Orientation the DOS and the Teacher Teams will accomplish
four goals:
a. Establish commitment from both Students and Parents
b. Explain in detail the requirement of the school and why Student compliance is
mandatory
c. Establish communication between Parent and Staff/School to ensure the
Parents will support and be involved in their Student’s education and be
responsible for their Student’s behavior at VLA.
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VLA-NEW STUDENT ENROLLMENT
Standard Operating Procedures
SOP Reference Chapter 5:
5.2—Associate Intake Processes
VLA’s Site Location: Vision Learning Academy Monroe, Louisiana
SOP Owner:
School Leader (SL), Dean of Students (DOS), Behavior
Interventionist (BI), Administrative Assistance (AA)
Date Adopted:
School Year 2013-2014
Topic
New Student Enrollment into VLA
Purpose
To enroll Students into the school Main Information System (JPAMS) and review past
records (TETRADATA), entry assessments, and student progress within the first five days of
enrollment.
PROCEDURE
DOS, AA and Teacher Teams enroll the students into the school by completing the enrollment page one
and two of VLA’s intake packets.
Once the enrollment pages are completed, the student will then be assessed with the STAR
Reading, STAR Math, and other relevant assessments as appropriate dependent upon grade
level and need. These assessments will notify the Teachers of the academic abilities of the
Students and will help teachers build the students AEP for continual assessment and College
track.

This intake information is also entered into the Onsite database by the staff member.
The Teachers will then schedule the Student in the appropriate flexibility groups until a copy
of the transcript is received from the prior zoned school or program.
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Upon verification and accuracy of the intake information, the DOS will file the following
information in student files:
d. Student’s enrollment form pages one and two
e. A copy of all assessment given draft copy of the courses will be place in the AEP
binders the student will be given until transcript is received

The DOS will receive the information, on the new student, from the school and proceed to enter
the information into JPAMS. This process will to be completed within the first five (5) days of the
student’s enrollment date.
DOS/AA will then complete the student’s discipline folder and enter all information,
original Request for Record, and the faxed transmittal copies of the request for record
from the student’s last school attended.
A copy of the Request for Record will also be kept in the file in the office of the DOS.
Request for record is as follows:
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
Student’s records are requested within the first five (5) day via fax
Five (5) days after the first request then second request is made via fax
Ten (10) days after the second request a third and final request is made via fax
On the fifteenth (15) day, if records have not yet been received, a call is made to
the last school or program attended to find out the exact status of the student’s
information.
If after fifteen days the information is still not received and the zoned school or
programs are not cooperative, the previous district’s contact office will be
notified.
The DOS/AA/BI is responsible for maintaining the JPAMS portion of the database which
refers to all record requests for attendance and behavior.
Upon the student’s completion of the program, it is the responsibility of all persons’
indicated above to prepare students for continued life-long learning in a college, career
college or technical program.
This exit packet will consist of the following information:
k.
l.
m.
n.
o.
p.
q.
Student’s graduation packet and withdrawal from
Transcript including any and all credits earned during the school year
Immunization records from MIS system (Original 680 Form should be included)
College Application and Admittance w/schedule
Copies of all pre and post assessments
Standardized test scores
(AEP) Alternative Education Plan
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5-year Career Track Readiness Portfolio with Financial Plan
Working in Collaboration with Monroe City Schools to Provide a Quality Alternative
School Experience for Your Child
Vision Learning Academy
What Next?
Your child has received a referral to attend Vision Learning Academy
The next step in the process is for you and your child to attend a
required orientation and complete formal enrollment. The school is
located at:
Learning Solutions, Inc.
Since 2005, Learning Solutions, Inc has
partnered with School Districts across
Northern Eastern Louisiana to offer a
School Name:
xxxx xxxxx Street
Monroe, LA71203
better alternative for primarily middle
and high school students. You can
expect to see an Energetic and Exciting
Chapter
Contact Intake: LaToya
Jackson
Change in your child as he/she leaves
6: Student In-service and Training—
VLA with a Vision. With highly qualified
318.381.6781
Using a defined the
Louisiana State Common Core State Standards that
onaapassion
series oftoacademic
stafffocuses
that has
serve. Over
assessments, definitions of the VLA experience and overall expectations, the course will prepare students
the years we have found helping young
for a successful transition to the classroom.
TAKE A DEEP BREATH—the assignment to Vision Learning Academy is a
adults requires parent/family as well as
Successful
implementation
of a professionally
organized
great- life-changing
opportunity
for you and your child
to take and managed in-service and training program
the
entireculture
community.
JOIN
US!!!
resulting
in
rigorous
and
robust
academic
and
behavioral
assessment,
school
definition
and
important
steps to succeed in school and life. The most important
first
PARENT:
Alternative
Education
Plans
Plan
will
include:
step is to attend orientation; we welcome questions and will offer you
the opportunity
to take a full
tour ofExperience—bi-weekly
our school.
1. Full Involvement
in School
o Behavioral assessments and activities
o Behavioral
history per student records
School
communication
o Previous Districts TETRADATA or JPAMS reviews
Expected
of Scheduled
__Aug.
16, 2013______
Multi-systemic
Sessions
2. o
ADate
School
CommittedOrientation:
to Counseling
Supporting
Your
Needs.
o Full battery Academic assessment defined by VLA
3. Open Door School Policy—we need you to be involved
The Vision Learning Academy Experience is will Blow Your Mind and
Change Your Life:
ASSOCIATE (Student):
THE PROCESS of GETTING STARTED:
1. Academy School Experience (structure, daily-high
District Referral (today) Orientation/IntakeVLA Enrollment student
Expectations,approx.
professional
dress) Full Enrollment
start full-time—within
2 weeks)
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Vision Learning Academy
In-Service Goals will be defined by the number of days to which we are engaged.
1. General:
settings.
Review of program expectations academic assessments soft skill preparation and goal
1. Number of Days: 5
2. Strategy for Daily Services:
__X_ Assigned Instructor
___Assigned Instructor Teams
___Rotation of Staff Assignment
3. Last date of curriculum update: _August 10, 2013 _________________
4.  Schedule for Curriculum Review: Once every school year update (Common Core State Standards
Used).
Note in Calendar
DAY
GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
ACTIVITIES
Instruction/Assessment/Training Goals
Outline by day of Lessons and Activities
for days of formal In-service enrollment
(define based on actual number of days of
assigned)
Write out the IDREAM creed (bell work). TABE
Locator test given, Into to policies and procedures.
All students will fill out information cards. , Life
Skills worksheet –Understanding Common Core
Interactive Activity
Day 1
Set individual goals for the week. To learn
the vision/mission statement/ IDREAM
creed by the end of the week. Obtain
knowledge of the program expectations of
students.
Day 2
Review goals set by students; Review the Bell work, Complete In-service Analysis of the
understanding of the full value contract. Day, Review AEP requirements- review for final
exam. TABE TEST, ACT practice test /Life Skills
worksheet-Common core Interactive activity
Day 3
Review Success Planner; obtain
information for student handbook.
Instructions on employability and college
entrance exam.
Complete VLA student handbooks –Career
Research. Resume Development and review for
final exam and fast-track scheduling and possible
credit recovery. Interview Process. IDREAM life
creed. Interactive Common Core Activities
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Vision Learning Academy
Day 3
Review Success Planner; obtain
information for student handbook.
Instructions on employability and college
entrance exam.
Complete VLA student handbooks –Career
Research. Resume Development and review for
final exam and fast-track scheduling and possible
credit recovery. Interview Process. IDREAM life
creed. Interactive Common Core Activities
Day 4
Follow up on goal setting for the week.
Each student has to have at least three
copies of the IDREAM Life creed in their
binders.
Final exam, Prepare for floor visit and discussion
on students life goals and interest for the future.
Money Management Life Skills-Review and
refresher of previous activities –Garners multiple
intelligences
Day 5
Close-out training.
Final Exam, Resume Due, Life skills worksheet.
Visit the floor. (Tour of facility) IDREAM life
creed whole group-assessment-what is common
core and college prep fast track final exam.
Description:
TYPE
NAME OF ASSESSMENT
PURPOSE
ASSESSOR
Include administrator and
evaluator if applicable
ACADEMIC
STAR Reading
STAR Math
TABE
To obtain a general
idea of the student’s
literacy and
numeracy levels.
Teachers
To equip each
student with the
knowledge of the
policies and
procedures of the
VLA Behavioral
Excellence
CDC Staff
ACT Practice Test
BEHAVIORAL
Cognitive Development
Center:
MST Model
MHR Model
Behavior Interventionist
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Vision Learning Academy
4. Procedures for non-successful completion of In-service and Training.
REASON FOR NOT
SUCCESSFULLY
COMPLETING
TRAINING
COMMUNICATION PROCESS (TO
WHOM, WHAT INFO, AND WHEN)
PROCEDURE
Student does not
Conference with Parent/CDC /SL
Contact Parent, Contract terms immediately
complete because of and BI to discuss contracts and terms revisited with new agreements from all parties.
too many behavioral of admittance.
implications
Student does not
complete the after
two attempts?
Conference with Parent, Exit
interview preparation, Start
withdrawal paperwork if noncompliance continues or general
agreement is not able to be reached.
Student is evaluated Termination from program,
as not able to
management team will help family
complete In-service? look for other alternatives for
student(s).
Contact Parents, Withdrawal paperwork
immediately started if conditions are not
continuously met.
Parent conference with SL and Behavior
Specialist team.
VLA’s Checklist for Supporting SOPs
Chapter 6:
ITEM
ON-SITE, SOURCE, AND
AUDITABLE
(Yes, No)
PDT SOP
SOP attached.
In-Service and Training Curriculum Guide
Yes
New Student Enrollment Packet
(School Leader)
Assessment Samples (books, forms and answer keys) Sample Yes
In-service packet—all sections required for input of data by
DOS
Student Development Planner (contains additional
Yes
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Vision Learning Academy
assessments, AEP and Pupil Progression Plan)
Day Review Success Planner; obtain information for student
3
handbook.
Instructions on employability and college entrance exam.
Complete VLA student handbooks –
Career Research. Resume
Development and review for final
exam and fast-track scheduling and
possible credit recovery. Interview
Process. IDREAM life creed.
Interactive Common Core Activities
Day Follow up on goal setting for the week. Each student has to Final exam, Prepare for floor visit
4
have at least three copies of the IDREAM Life creed in their and discussion on students life goals
and interest for the future. Money
binders.
Management Life Skills-Review and
refresher of previous activities –
Garners multiple intelligences
Day Close-out training.
5
REASON FOR NOT
SUCCESSFULLY
COMPLETING
TRAINING
PROCEDURE
Final Exam, Resume Due, Life skills
worksheet. Visit the floor. (Tour of
facility) IDREAM life creed whole
group-assessment-what is common
core and college prep fast track final
exam.
COMMUNICATION PROCESS (TO
WHOM, WHAT INFO, AND WHEN)
Student does not
Conference with Parent/CDC /SL
Contact Parent, Contract terms immediately
complete because of and BI to discuss contracts and terms revisited with new agreements from all parties.
too many behavioral of admittance.
implications
Student does not
complete the after
two attempts?
Conference with Parent, Exit
interview preparation, Start
withdrawal paperwork if noncompliance continues or general
agreement is not able to be reached.
Student is evaluated Termination from program,
as not able to
management team will help family
look for other alternatives for
Contact Parents, Withdrawal paperwork
immediately started if conditions are not
continuously met.
Parent conference with SL and Behavior
Specialist team.
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Vision Learning Academy
complete In-service? student(s).
VLA’s Checklist for Supporting SOPs
Chapter 6:
ITEM
ON-SITE, SOURCE, AND
AUDITABLE
(Yes, No)
PDT SOP
SOP attached.
In-Service and Training Curriculum Guide
Yes
New Student Enrollment Packet
(School Leader)
Assessment Samples (books, forms and answer keys) Sample Yes
In-service packet—all sections required for input of data by
DOS
Student Development Planner (contains additional
assessments, AEP and Pupil Progression Plan)
Yes
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Vision Learning Academy
Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT TRAINING
SOP Reference Chapter 6: 6.1—Associate Professional Development Training
VLA’s Site Location: Vision Learning Academy Monroe, Louisiana
SOP Owner:
Dean of Students (DOS), Administrative Assistant (AA),
School Leader (SL)
Date Adopted:
School Year 2013-2014
Topic
Professional Development Training
Purpose
To provide the Student’s of VLA- the in- service and training needed to build the foundation necessary for Life
Skills, Leadership skills, Academic Assessments, Professional Skills Development, Employability Skills and
Technology for the workforce, life-long learning and College Readiness and College Preparatory experiences.
PRIMARY PERSON RESPONSIBLE
Teacher teams. DOS, AA, SL
Procedure
A.) Day 1
Peer leadership/ Management Program
1) Introduction of the Peer Leadership Program to Potential Students
a) Purpose Of Peer Leadership
b) How it applies College Preparatory Goal
c) Leadership traits for an effective leader
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Academic Development:
1) Student-in-waiting will take the Test of Adult Basic Education (TABE) Locator
and respective Level Test along with an ACT practice Test (all components).
a) Familiarize Students with TABE question types, determine appropriate TABE
test to administer. Measure basic education skills for English, Reading, Math
2) Students will receive their study guide for VLA’s policies and procedures
a) Familiarize Students with VLA history, and day-to-day operation of company business
b) Intro. IDREAM LIFE Creed, Creed to Pursue
E.) Day 2
Academic Development:
1) Students will complete the Test of Adult Basic Education (TABE), Star Reading, Star
Math, ACT Prep practice test and other relevant exams.
Student Development:
Employability Development
1) Complete assignments
* Full Value Contract
* Writing Assessment
* Multiple Intelligence Inventory
F.) Day 3
Academic Development:
1) Students will complete a Academic Assessment Test to determine entry level format
proficiency in writing to provide a valid and reliable indicator of anticipated VLA
Program and academic success
Student Development:
1) Students will engage in discussion and process appropriate means of:
a. Morality/ Relationships
Employability Development
1) Students will complete various interest level survey and assessments
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G.)Day 4
Academic Development:
1)
Continuation Academic Assessment Test to determine entry-level format
proficiency in writing to provide a valid and reliable indicator of anticipated Program
and academic success.
Student Development:
2) Students will engage in discussion and process appropriate means of:
a. Beliefs and Attitudes
b. Accepting “NO”
Employability Development:
1) Students will complete the Career Research section in the In-Service Training
handbook.
H.) Day 5
Student Development:
1) Students will engage in discussion and process appropriate means of:
a. Giving and Accepting Compliment
b. Accepting and Giving Criticism
Employability Development
1) Students will turn in Final surveys and complete the Final Exams
2.) Students will receive their flexibility grouping schedule
Students will start each day with the following:
IDREAM Life Creed
Creed to Pursue
SONG
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Vision Learning Academy
Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
VLA STUDENT ASSESSMENTS, TRANSCRIPTS
Standard Operating Procedures
SOP Reference Chapter 6:
6.2 – Associate Professional Development Training
VLA’s Site Location: Vision Learning Academy Monroe, Louisiana
SOP Owner:
Dean of Academics (DOA), (DMS) Director of Mathematical Studies,
Administrative Assistant (AA), School Leader (SL), (BI)
Date Adopted:
School Year 2013-2014
Topic
Transcript Review/Behavioral Review
Purpose
The following defines the procedure used to inform incoming Students of their current course
enrollment and review past academic history (transcript information) to set the stage for
what’s to come.
PROCEDURE
E. Within five (5) days of Associate entry a schedule will be forwarded to the program LPA
by the Academic Coach. From here the LPAs have three (3) business days to have an
academic counseling session with Associate.
F. Upon Meeting with the Students a minimum of the following with be discussed.
i.
Grade Level
ii.
Current credits/credit need for graduation
iii.
Pre-Test Scores
iv.
Two (2) years past EOC and/ or GEE/ILEAP scores
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Vision Learning Academy
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
Current course enrollment
College -TRAC (Flexibility grouping)
College/Vocational and Career exploration
Alternative Education Plan (AEP)
Set goals in IN-SERVICE to include vocational/technical colleges
Students signature for the following:
-Pupil Progression Plan
-Transcript Review
-Goals and Objectives
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Vision Learning Academy
Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
VLA’S STUDENT DEVELOPMENT PLANNER (SDP)
STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES
SOP Reference Chapter 6:
6.4—Associate Professional Development Training
VLA’s Site Location: Vision Learning Academy Monroe, Louisiana
SOP Owner:
Dean of Academics (DOA), (DMS) Director of Mathematical Studies,
Administrative Assistant (AA), School Leader (SL), (BI), (DOA)
Date Adopted:
School Year 2013-2014
I.
TOPIC
SDP completion
II.
PURPOSE
To ensure proper planning and record keeping for each Student enrolled at VLA point of
entry to graduation.
III.
PROCEDURE
A. SDP Cover
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)
Write the appropriate program-indicating site of initial Student enrollment.
Write date of initial entry in space provided
Write the date of referral or expulsion in space provided.
If Student transitions from one VLA to another, please enter dates of subsequent
transitions.
Write Student’s length of stay in the section labeled # of days assigned (i.e. –
semester, year).
Check appropriate place for reason for placement.
Write date Student is scheduled to transition.
Indicate any special services received by the Student.
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Vision Learning Academy
9)
10)
11)
IV
Check if involved with DJJ (has a probation officer, previous arrest, etc.).
Complete ALL personal data.
Print names of all staff working directly with student
(SL/Teachers/BI/Therapist/CDC Staff and DOS).
B. Assessments
1) On cover, complete all Pre-VLA assessment data: GPA, Credits, Attendance, and
Referrals.
2) For returning students (n/ a during first school year 2013-14), access old SDP, to
obtain this information.
3) All assessment results completed during In-Service (first two weeks of the program)
should be recorded in the inside cover to include:
a) ACT/TABE pre-test Assessment
b) Learning Styles/Multiple Intelligence Assessment
c) Writing Assessment results
d) Academic Assessments (ex. STAR, or other district mandated test)
e) State Assessment Pre Test
4) Note—all assessments should be scored within 5 days of testing.
5) Any space requiring a signature and date should be completed.
6) Any assessment requiring a separate answer sheet should be scored and filed in the
Student file.
C. Career Exploration
1) Interview each student to complete the questions on the page
2) If applicable, allow Students to do an internet search on career information/ schools
3) Complete and score the Employability Exam
D. Course Enrollment and Grade Tracking
1) Complete all course information for each 9 week grading period
2) Fill in “Date Mailed/Sent Home” each time a Progress Report or Report Card is sent
to the Parent
3) DOS/DOA/AA/SL will assist teachers w/ filling in “Overall GPA” for each grading
period (every 3 weeks)
4) DOS/DMS/DOA/AA/SL will assist teachers w/ filling in individual course grades for
each grading period (every 3 weeks)
5) DOS/DMS/DOA/AA/SL will assist teachers w/ filling in the “Completion Date” at the
end of the period in which the course is completed (usually 18 weeks)
E. Pupil Progression Plan
1) Both the Student and the SL & DOA must sign and date the Pupil Progress Guideline
that applies to the Student
2) Note: The SL& DOA must ensure to communicate any differences between the
Guideline in the SDP and in the State Requirements for Pupil Progression Guidelines
and notate those differences on the SDP Guideline
F. Alternative Education Plan
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Vision Learning Academy
1) For all Students, the following must be completed prior to the Student’s promotion
from In-service:
a. BI/DOA and Student signatures and dates reflecting the completion of the
Academic/Behavioral Counseling session
b. Entry information and Assessment information
c. Initial After-Graduation Goals
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Vision Learning Academy
Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
Chapter 7: Behavior Management System
Intervention Model (E10)
VLA’s Behavior Management plan is designed to provide fair, consistent and open feedback to students
regarding behavior. VLA‘s systems incorporates the following key elements:
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Utilize a token economy system for student feedback
VLA’s systems will have a leveling component with consequences tied to continued
infraction
All staff will be fully trained on system and be held accountable for appropriate
professional use
The system will be correlated with the State of Louisiana’s code of conduct for alternative
schools so that consequences will be supported by Board approved action
VLA’s systems has a Parent’s involvement component
The system will be introduced to Parents and students during Intake and PDT
Systems will address a wide range of behavior that define professional conduct
THE SYSTEM WILL BE CLEARLY DEFINED IN A SINGLE PAGE PUBLIC POSTING
THROUGH-OUT THE SCHOOL
A reward system will be defined to recognize compliant behavior
The system will be reinforced through the schools ongoing interaction with the
community and Cognitive Development Center’s Multi-systemic Therapy and Mental
Health Rehabilitation Model’s.
Throughout VLA’s research we found that consistency in behavior management is the single
most important variable in developing positive school culture throughout an alternative school.
The system will recognize positive behavior, be flexible and offer students and Parents clear
feedback on behavior expectations and offer fair consequences for infractions. Staff training and
support is essential to implementing an effective system to support individual student success.
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Vision Learning Academy
Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
Behavioral Management and Intervention Methods
1. Description :
SYSTEM COMPONENTS
DESCRIPTION
Token Economy System
Daily Use:
Therapist Intervention: Because therapist will be in the
classrooms reinforcing positive behavior DURING instruction
throughout the entire day and throughout performancebased assessments in class, VLA’s expectation is that
infractions in behavior will be at a minimum. After a second
re-direction in any situation from Therapist, students are
immediately handed a multicolored slip to attend an
intervention session with Therapist /BI immediately
following the “teacher buy-in” part of the lesson. Student is
immediately guided into, according to his individual AEP,
redefining and self-correcting his behavior through. When
behavior is minor a minor consequence is determine based
on Therapist home and family findings and things listed in
students AEP. If behavior is major incident or the student
has received a second or third intervention slip in his binder,
the BI/Therapist and the DOS is called to determine the
outcome according to the student’s individual AEP. If the
incident is major and the student has exceeded the three
color-coded (yellow, orange, red) slips in his AEP record DOS
will refer the student associate to the SL for immediate
resolution and consequence determination and
documentation.
All Students receive a total of five chances per infraction (2
in-class redirections (therapist only and 3 color-coded
leveled warnings (yellow (DOS conf) orange (DOS, Parent,
Therapist, BI conference) and Red, DOS/SL conferencediscussion of suspension-and/or expulsion). At the end of
the week, students who have not received any infractions
receive-“EAGLES WINGS which can be used for bonus
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Vision Learning Academy
points-assignment pass-extra iPAD time, canteen discounts
etc rewards are individually based on student’s stimulus
section of individualized AEP….
Weekly Review: CDC Staff /BI/ DOS identifies potential
associates who are in need of intensive or targeted
interventions. One indication is Level drop – from YELLOW
ZONE-to ORANGE ZONE-to RED ZONE.
Orange zone and above is an
automatic indication of the relinquishment of absolutely
all privileges as pertaining to field trips, recreational
therapy… down time etc….
Consequence Assumptions:
Token Economy System
Daily Use:
Therapist Intervention: Because therapist will be in the
classrooms reinforcing positive behavior DURING instruction
throughout the entire day and throughout performancebased assessments in class, VLA’s expectation is that
infractions in behavior will be at a minimum. After a second
re-direction in any situation from Therapist, students are
immediately handed a multicolored slip to attend an
intervention session with Therapist /BI immediately
following the “teacher buy-in” part of the lesson. Student is
immediately guided into, according to his individual AEP,
redefining and self-correcting his behavior through. When
behavior is minor a minor consequence is determine based
on Therapist home and family findings and things listed in
students AEP. If behavior is major incident or the student
has received a second or third intervention slip in his binder,
the BI/Therapist and the DOS is called to determine the
outcome according to the student’s individual AEP. If the
incident is major and the student has exceeded the three
color-coded (yellow, orange, red) slips in his AEP record DOS
will refer the student associate to the SL for immediate
resolution and consequence determination and
documentation.
All Students receive a total of five chances per infraction (2
in-class redirections (therapist only and 3 color-coded
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leveled warnings (yellow (DOS conf) orange (DOS, Parent,
Therapist, BI conference) and Red, DOS/SL conferencediscussion of suspension-and/or expulsion). At the end of
the week, students who have not received any infractions
receive-“EAGLES WINGS which can be used for bonus
points-assignment pass-extra iPAD time, canteen discounts
etc rewards are individually based on student’s stimulus
section of individualized AEP….
Weekly Review: CDC Staff /BI/ DOS identifies potential
associates who are in need of intensive or targeted
interventions. One indication is Level drop – from YELLOW
ZONE-to ORANGE ZONE-to RED ZONE.
Orange zone and above is an
automatic indication of the relinquishment of absolutely
all privileges as pertaining to field trips, recreational
therapy… down time etc….
Consequence Assumptions:
Leveling System/Parent as
Describe Levels and Consequence:
Partners in Level Drop/Change
Level 1 (Yellow) Therapist/BI conference
Level 2 –(Orange) Therapist/BI/Parent with
possible shadowing
Level 3 –(Red) DOS/SL begins a contract or Suspension and
or Expulsion discussion
Level 4 - Parent Conference and notify letter of intent of
expulsion to find a school that is a better “fit” for the
student.
Level 5 – Expulsion recommendation to MCS District
Strategy for Parent Orientation Parent Orientation will have DOC/BI cover behavior module
to System—Intake
and its impact on student and his/her graduation or
transition back to another school,
 Period review of System for
possible change/modification
Utilizing the month of August as a base lined we are
targeting a 5% decrease in referrals monthly.
Staff Training
Bi-weekly training during flexible grouping meetings on the
behavior model as well as data collection on the number of
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Vision Learning Academy
interventions by staff.
Positive Reward Systems
EAGLES WINGS…
Is operational and students will have the ability to use their
positive accounts(EAGLES WINGS) to purchase items, use on
special extra-curricula activities, field trips and buying back levels
of behavior..etc
ONE PAGE REQUIRED
BEHAVIOR SYSTEM
POSTED?
WILL BE POSTED THROUGHOUT THE SCHOOL AND
EACH CLASSROOM
ONE PAGE STUDENT
WILL BE POSTED THROUGOUT THE SCHOOL AND
REWARD SYSTEM POSTED? EACH CLASSROOM
STUDENT BEHAVIOR AND SCHOOL VLA’s ADOPTED CONSEQUENCE RESPONSES
INFRACTION
REFERRAL?
Yes or No
Class/School
Arrival Tardy
No
Fighting
YES
PARENT CONTACT
REQUIRED
CONSEQUENCE
(Yes or No)
Automated(JPAMS)
DOS/SCHOOL
RESOURCE OFFICER
YES
BEHAVIORAL SLIP(THERAPIST
INTERVENTION-CHECK DAILY)
HOME ENVIRONMENAL STUDY)
Suspension 3 days minimum up to
Expulsion Recommendation
Inappropriate
Physical Contact
YES
Racial/Sexual Slurs
YES
YES
Suspension 3 days minimum up to
Expulsion Recommendation
YES
Suspension 3 days minimum up to
Expulsion Recommendation
Gambling
YES
YES
Suspension 3 days minimum up to
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Vision Learning Academy
Expulsion Recommendation
Bullying
YES
YES
Suspension 3 days minimum up to
Expulsion Recommendation
Leaving Class
without Permission
YES
YES
Suspension 1 days minimum up to
Verbal Threat Staff
YES
YES
Suspension 3 days minimum up to
Expulsion Recommendation
Verbal Threat
another Associate
YES
YES
Suspension 1 days minimum up to
Possession of
Contraband
YES
Insubordination
YES
Expulsion Recommendation
Expulsion Recommendation
YES
Suspension 3 days minimum up to
Expulsion Recommendation
YES
Suspension 3 days minimum up to
Expulsion Recommendation
Profane or Abusive
Language
YES
Cheating
YES
YES
Suspension 1 days minimum up to
Expulsion Recommendation
YES
Suspension 3 days minimum up to
Expulsion Recommendation
Poor Attendance
YES
YES
Performance Improvement plan specific
Attendance milestones – non-compliance
Expulsion Recommendation
Tardy
YES
YES
Suspension 1 day minimum up to
Expulsion Recommendation/See school’s
policy
Excessive Absence
YES
YES
Parent conference/phone calls
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Vision Learning Academy
Unexcused Absence YES
YES
Parent conference/phone calls
Refusal to Write
Comply to leveled
system
YES
YES
Parent conference
Excessive Dress
Code Violation:
No
YES
Home Study Environmental Intervention
done by Multisystemic model CDC
Refuses to stay in
Dress Code:
No
YES
BI/DOS Intervention
Violation of Class
Rules
YES
YES
Leveled Model comes into affect
2nd Violation of
Class Rules
YES
YES
Leveled Model comes into affect
3rd Violation of Class YES
Rules
YES
Leveled Model comes into affect
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
Life Skills Development:
Monthly Themes & Character Education
SOP Reference Chapter 7:
7.1—Behavior Management System
VLA’s Site Location: Vision Learning Academy Monroe, Louisiana
SOP Owner:
Dean of Academics (DOA), Administrative Assistant (AA),
School Leader (SL), (BI),
Date Adopted:
AUGUST
School Year 2013-2014
Health (Hygiene) Awareness Month
CHARACTER KEY – RESPECT
SEPTEMBER
CULTURAL DIVERSITY –
CHARACTER KEY – HONESTY
OCTOBER
VISION AWARENESS MONTH
CHARACTER KEY – COURAGE
NOVEMBER
LAW/GOVERNMENT (LOCAL/STATE) MONTH
CHARACTER KEY – GRATITUDE
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Vision Learning Academy
DECEMBER
ARTS/ALIVE MONTH (POETRY/THEATRE/DANCE)
CHARACTER KEY – GENEROSITY
JANUARY
ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND COMMUNITY AWARENESS MONTH
CHARACTER KEY – RESPONSIBILITY
FEBRUARY
CULTURAL DIVERSITY - BLACK HISTORY MONTH
CHARACTER KEY – CARING
MARCH
COLLEGE AND CAREER AWARENESS MONTH
CHARACTER KEY – KNOWLEDGE
APRIL
ENTREPRENEURSHIP (JOB READINESS SKILLS) MONTH
CHARACTER KEY – FAIRNESS
MAY
COMMUNITY SERVICE MONTH
CHARACTER KEY - PATRIOTISM
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
CHAPTER 8: STUDENT COUNSELING AND SUPPORT
VLA will support student rigorous progress and improvement on an academic and behavioral level by providing
site-based therapy and counseling throughout the school day and documented communication with each
student’s Parent/Guardian, and providing internal and external community providers (CDC) Cognitive
Development Center for students in need. Successful implementation of a student counseling and support system
will include:



st
Homeroom/1 block staff mentor to each student by units of 15-20 students, whereby the students and
mentor meet each week and every day during power hour to focus on character building skills,
community service and behavior management
Parent/guardian are involved in and support their students:
o Documented bi-weekly communication
o Attendance to conferences and “shadows” due to behavior infractions
o Feedback on school performance in bi-monthly- “How Are We Doing?” Surveys
Partnership with local agencies to provide counseling and recreational therapy services to youth identified
as needing additional support and professional crisis or counseling support intervention beyond the
services offered through the school day.
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
VLA’S PROCESS FOR COUNSELING AND SUPPORT
COUNSELING
SUPPORT SERVICES
VLA’s
COORDINATOR
ON CAMPUUS
RESOURCE (Yes
or No)
STATE/DISTRICT or LAW
ENFORCEMENT
REPORTING
REQUIREMENTS FOR
INTERVENTION
EXTERNAL
PARTNER?
(Agency, contact,
telephone)
Drug Use/Abuse
BI
No
Yes
Cognitive
Development Referral
Drug Screening
BI
No
No
Cognitive
Development Referral
Alcohol Use/Abuse
BI
No
No
Cognitive
Development Referral
Sexual Abuse
BI
No
Yes
Cognitive
Development Referral
Teen Pregnancy
BI
No
No
Cognitive
Development Referral
Family Crisis
Therapist/BI
No
Yes
Cognitive
Development Referral
Separation/Divorce
BI
No
No
Cognitive
Development Referral
Gang Involvement
and Prevention
BI
No
Yes
Cognitive
Development Referral
Suicide Prevention
and Crisis Response
SL
No
Yes
Call 911
Homelessness and
Basic Needs
BI
No
Yes
Cognitive
Development Referral
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Clinical Evaluation
BI
No
Call 911
Call 911
Emergency Clinical
Response
SL
No
Call 911
Call 911
Emergency Medical
Services
SL
No
No
Call 911
Business Partnering
Services
SL
Yes
-
-
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
REQUIRED COUNSELING/SUPPORT INTERVENTIONS:
COUNSELING/SUPPORT
INTERVENTIONS
DESCRIPTION
(site-based strategy to address need)
Availability of Counseling and
Support Services to the
estimated 80-90% of students
most in need
Through weekly evaluations of the behavioral model we will identify those students that
are not adhering to our program tenets. Utilize the model work with the Parents at each
level identifying outside agencies that may be of service to the students who are in trouble.
Teenage Pregnancy Prevention
Drug Awareness and Use
Prevention
VLA will offer information support as to the importance of regular doctor visits, continuing
their education, Parenting classes and social service providers through the school nurse.
VLA will offer information support to local, state and federal prevention programs. As well
as, in service programs on drug use recognition and youth support programs.
Marketing Internal to School
Availability of Student Service
Center Services
VLA will identify service providers in the area – region – state. Establish a relationship with
providers– identify avenues of referral. For example, court diversion, court order, Parent
referral for incorrigible youth, or social service.
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
CHAPTER 9: COLLEGE TRACK /GRADUATION
Upon meeting the criteria defined for a Louisiana High School or Career Track Diploma, each student will complete
a professional transition process (including an essay and interview) to prepare to enter into a post-secondary
College, University or Technical facility.




Parent notification
Completion of a formal essay consisting of 500 words on what’s next and their experiences at VLA.
Professional interview format of as many as possible post-secondary meetings
Formal scheduling of appointment with all schools for which students are seeking post-secondary
education
COORDINATOR
RESPONSIBILITIES
PROCESS
DESCRIPTION
Ongoing strategy to meet and
develop relationship with VoTechnical Schools, Colleges and
Universities
During onsite meetings students will
ask key questions and make decisions
concerning their life’s vision.
Implementation of a value added
support systems and outreach
program.
Student Preparation
500 word Exit Essay and Collaborative
Life-Centered Exit Exams: “Things You
Must Know”.
Exit Portfolio Development
requirements.
Parent Preparation
Exit Parent Meetings with
Administration Team and Lead
Teachers
Technical Colleges Graduation
Coaches
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Appendix H – School Operations and Employee Manual
CHAPTER 10: VLA’S DATA MANAGEMENT
VLA will accurately track and submit to the office of the SL and Monroe City Schools Resource Office weekly School
Safety and Security data using JPAMS. The DOS along with the AA and other personnel be responsible for
completing and submitting a weekly roll-up report of Safety and Security issues for the purpose of weekly
communication with school-based leadership and to support the tracking of historical data. Data to be reported
weekly will include (key School Safety and Security Indicators to be tracked and to become a part of quality school
grading School Performance Score):


Student Referrals for Service (Discipline Behavior Management) office of DOS
Student Referrals for service by category Student Support and Assistance Center
-drug use/abuse
-drug screening
-alcohol use/abuse
-sexual abuse
-teen pregnancy prevention
-family crisis/intervention
-suicide prevention
-anger management
-gang involvement/prevention
-clinical evaluation
-emergency medical
-emergency clinical
-homelessness/basic needs
-parenting services

Critical Incidents (documented)— Indicators
1. Physical attacks/fights
2. Insubordination
3. Threats/Intimidation
4. Possession of Alcohol
5. Possession of Drugs
6. Distribution of Controlled Substances
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7.
8.
9.
10.
11.









Possession of weapon other than firearm
Possession of firearm or explosive device
Use of weapon to harm other
Violence against staff
Other






Disciplinary Action against staff for reasons related to Academy non-compliance
School based trainings on VLA’s Model Compliance
External Partner Service Report (scheduled involvement of direct delivery of service at school location)
Local Law Enforcement Response
Emergency Service Response (Fire/Ambulance/Misc.)
District Customer Senior Administrative Visit
Key Community Stakeholder Visit
Volunteer School Service hours
% of current population Juvenile Justice Involved
Student use of reporting hotline or direct communication of key school safety and security information
Student out of school suspension
Student withdrawal (processing expulsion or District Approval Full Exclusion)
In-Service Enrollment
In-Service Successful Completion
In-Service Re-assignment

In-Service Transition/Removal
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Section IV: Education Program
Appendix I – Curriculum to be used by the school – No more than 1 page for each grade served
including all content areas)
National Common Core Standards 9-12 Core 4
Sample9-1 National Common Core State Standards Curriculm for all subjects



RL.9-10.7. Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic
mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment (e.g., Auden’s “Musée des Beaux
Arts” and Breughel’s Landscape with the Fall of Icarus).
RL.9-10.8. (Not applicable to literature)
RL.9-10.9. Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work
(e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a
play by Shakespeare).
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

RL.9-10.10. By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas,
and poems, in the grades 9–10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high
end of the range.
By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and
poems, at the high end of the grades 9–10 text complexity band independently and
proficiently.

RH.11-12.7. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats
and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a
problem.

RH.11-12.8. Evaluate an author’s premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging
them with other information.

RH.11-12.9. Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a
coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

RH.11-12.10. By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the
grades 11–CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently.
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Appendix K – School Calendar & School Day Schedule for each School Level
First Day of School: August 15, 2013
School Day Start/ End Time:
8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. for all with an option to stay until 4:00 p.m.
Hours in school day: 6 hours
Number of Instructional Minutes per day:
360 minutes (All) and 120 minutes of Extended Day
Program (Optional)
Number of Instructional School Days per year: 194
Number of Before School hours devoted to academics: 0 hours
Number of After School hours devoted to academics: 2 hours (Optional)
Number of days devoted to staff development during school year: 180 minutes per
week = 12 days
Number of days devoted to staff development prior to school opening: 15 days
SCHOOL CALENDAR:
7/17 - 8/3 Staff Development
8/15 First Day of School
9/4 Labor Day
10/5 - 10/11 Fall Break
11/16 - 11/26 Thanksgiving Break
12/21 - 1/3 Winter Break
1/22 MLK Day
2/9 - 2/14 Mardi Gras Break
4/25-5/1 Spring Break
5/28 Memorial Day
6/15 Last Day of School
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IV EDUCATION PROGRAM
Identify short and long term goals.
Thus, in order to set targets to measure school performance, Vision Learning Academy
will set goals across a range of indicators, providing a comprehensive and meaningful analysis of
student and school performance.
Vision Learning Academy has adapted a framework used by the Colorado Coalition
for Alternative Education Campuses to frame its short- and long-term school-wide goals:
Indicator Metric:
1 Year
5 Year
80%
100%
Student Achievement: % Students Meeting AEP goals
% Eligible Students Good/Excellent EOC
50%
75%
Student Growth: % Students Making Expected TABE
70%
95%
Gains
(2.0 grade gain in 12 months)
Meet AYP goals
Annually
Annually
75
120
SPS score
Transition Success: Graduation Rate*
85%
100%
College Matriculation Rate 75% 90%
(of graduating 12th students)
College Readiness % High School Students Achieving
40%
90%
ACT Score Equivalent to TOPS Eligibility
% Graduating Students Applying to College
100%
100%
Student Progress: Non Academic
% Students Completing 1 Career
Internship
Daily attendance
Operational Annual audit
Positive annual fund balance
Financial reporting to SBESE
100%
100%
80%
90%
Annual
Compliant
Annual
Compliant
* Number of students that graduated at the end of each semester divided by the number of
students eligible for graduation at the beginning of that semester.
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Educational Program
In order to understand our educational plan, it is important to describe what will be
referred to as student-driven learning through the arts and various ancillary
technological strategy, instructional methods, and course offerings. Upon enrolling in
VLA , students will first be visited in the home by a staff member, and his/her parents
when possible. This is in order to understand the school‘s college-going culture of
high expectations for getting back on track to academic success. Once the student
commits to the school‘s high expectations, he or she will be given the TABE Locator
pre-test, the Star Reading and Star Math Exams along with Garner’s Multiple
Intelligence Inventory Assessment which will identify his or her grade level
equivalent in each content area as well as his/her learning style and area of giftedness
. After an interview with the student about his or her academic needs as well as a
review of transcripts, the Transitions Coordinator along with the school Counselor,
and the clinicians and therapist from IHC will determine a student‘s graduation track
and progression needed requirements and the academic scheduling that will best meet
his or her needs. This may mean a combination of courses and supplementary
computer-based accelerated credits . The students will then be assigned to advisors
who will assist them in the beginning processes of his/her Alternative Education Plan.
(AEP). This particular advisor will stay with them through their entire experience at
VLA. Together, the student, IHC and the advisor will develop the student‘s
individual Alternative Education Plan which will identify the student‘s annual
academic, behavioral, social/emotional goals aligned with his or her long-term, postsecondary plan.
Curriculum Selection and Alignment
As stated at the beginning of this proposal, VLA will not lower expectations for
students based on societal conditions, challenging personal circumstances, or
behavioral or academic records: all students deserve a robust- rigorous, high quality
public education that prepares them for college. Instead, our program modifies how
over-aged and under-credited students are served, making specific accommodations
to better address students‘ unique remediation and credit needs, social/emotional
profiles, personal circumstances and goals. Implicit in this approach is the idea that
VLA will use a rigorous, college preparatory curriculum modeled after successful
traditional alternative educational programs, while the methods for supporting
students to achieve the standards and objectives will reflect the practices of the best
alternative high schools nationally. This approach is in sync with making Monroe
City School District into a World-Class System.
The leadership team of VLA will utilize the Common Core State Standards to ensure its
academic program is closely aligned with state learning standards, as defined by the
Common Core Standards, which are aligned with VLA‘s mission to prepare all students to
earn a high school diploma and succeed in college.
Students will be required to pass the EOC exams in all of the State required High Stakes
testing areas in order to graduate high school along with the completion of the Core 4 subject
area requirements; since it is aligned to the Common Core, it will serve as the foundation for
the curriculum. In addition to a resource base of sample activities and assessments, the
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Common Core State-Standards provides a curriculum map, scope, and sequence to serve as a
solid framework for lesson/unit planning, scope and sequence assessments, and supplemental
curriculum development.
Curriculum development at VLA begins with the end in mind and is then backwards
designed with clear and measurable goals. All instruction is conducted with a clear vision of
the skills that VLA’s students will master before graduating from high school. Consequently
our educational approach is built upon a demanding curriculum focused on college
preparatory literacy and numeracy through the world of technology and the arts. VLA has
adopted this intentional, focused, standards-based approach because it clarifies for teachers
and students the skills and content that must be taught and mastered in order for students to
succeed. Additionally, the curriculum will be mapped to the skills and knowledge that
students need to master.
While the Common Core State Standards outlines discrete, standards-based, time-bound
units for instruction, the sample activities and lesson plans will be presented in extremely
eccentric and non-standard ways. Teachers will pull from the Common Core State Standards
activities, supplemental curricula directly made available by VLA, and their own individual
research on curricular programs that are effective with similar student populations to create a
comprehensive, common core, instructional plan for each course.
Subject
Source
Curriculum Name
Reason for Choosing
Math
CCSS
Math Targeted Interve Research-based,
Graphic Arts/Techno
achievement
proven curricula with
spiraling,hands-on
instruction
Science
CCSS
Delta Education/
Sequential, hands-on,
Technology
spiraling instruction,
focus on mastery
English/
English/Language
CCSS
Phonics Blitz
Research-based
Arts
Accelerated Reader,
curricula proven
Visual and
effective with targeted
Performing Arts
population
Social Studies
CCSS
Louisiana Humanities
Visual and Performin
Arts/Techno
Research-based
curriculum proven
effective with targeted
population
The supplemental programs made available to VLA’s teachers will be chosen based on their
successful use in other high performing, college preparatory, urban schools serving an at-risk
student population. While VLA is confident these curricula will give teachers a sound
foundation for curriculum development and planning, the organization will continuously
evaluate the effectiveness of materials according to scope and sequence assessment results, as
well as students‘ progress toward their Alternative Education Plans, and will empower teacher
teams to make data-driven recommendations for changes or additions to the curriculum
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throughout the life of the school to ensure maximum learning results for students.
VLA has selected curricula for its schools with proven results and provides robust
professional development to use the curricula well. The following sections present a starting
point and roadmap for effective, standards-aligned instruction – based on proven best
practices of existing, high-performing high schools. The ultimate determination of VLA’s
success driving student achievement will rest on the shoulders of well-trained, high-capacity
teachers who will be empowered with autonomy to vary how the curriculum is delivered in a
way that effectively meets the needs of over-aged and under-credited students.
Mathematics
VLA’s high school math program will be aligned with the Common-Core State Standards,
with a strong focus on math applications. Students will progress through high school math
courses earning the required four units for graduation – including Understanding Numbers,
Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, all with a strong emphasis on applications. Higher level
math courses (Pre-Calculus, Calculus, Trigonometry) may be offered from semester to
semester, given the fluctuating skill levels of students enrolling throughout the course of the
year. Lessons will be designed to make clear connections between skills learned in the
classroom, and their real world, career applications. This is a best practice for engaging
students in an alternative high school design. The Common Core will be supplemented by an
extremely enthusiastic Visual and Performing Arts literacy design at the high school level,
which allows teachers to supplement instruction with remediation and skill building targeted
toward each student‘s Alternative Education Plan and skills deficits as identified through
ongoing scope and sequence assessments. In addition, students will be able to utilize some of
the performance-based assessments as proficiency exams to earn credits.
Science
VLA’s coursework will emphasize the application of Science knowledge through
hands-on learning opportunities using teacher-developed materials, and lessons
aligned to the Common Core State- Standards. Research has shown that ―the best
way for students to appreciate the scientific
enterprise, learn important scientific concepts, and develop the ability to think
critically is to actively construct ideas through their own inquiries, investigations, and
analyses.
Students‘ progression through the common core will include courses in Life
Sciences, Biology and Chemistry. Similar to math instruction, a strong emphasis will
be placed on applications, including labs and field study as far away as Canada and
as close in underneath the old oak tree outside. For instance, students studying
chemical reactions may have a lesson on the chemistry of food preparation and visit a
local restaurant to hear from a chef and practice concepts themselves. Teachers will
be strongly encouraged to draw connections across the curriculum and develop units
of study incorporating multiple subjects. Science assessments will often be authentic
and project-based, providing students an opportunity to demonstrate in a variety of
formats what they have learned and how they have processed information across
subjects. Finally, science instruction will develop mastery of core vocabulary and
conceptual knowledge.
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Analyses indicate that teachers who frequently use standards-based teaching
practices positively influence urban African-American students' science achievement
and attitudes.
English Language Arts (Reading and Writing)
VLA’s English Language Arts program will reflect intensive, artistic bi-lingual collegepreparatory study. Students will experience literacy from the most eccentric and will include
a requirement for four course units for graduation and eligibility in the TOPS program. To
prepare, students will develop their academic skills and abilities through a strong ELA
curriculum that ensures reading fluency and comprehension, and strong writing ability in a
variety of genres. VLA’s Literacy through the Arts component will be
divided into three categories; students will receive literacy skill building (reading and
vocabulary intervention) for 30 minutes daily, and literature and grammar (reading
application) for 20 minutes and visual , performing and graphical arts on a modified block
schedule. The skill building classes will focus on phonemic awareness, decoding, and
vocabulary development while the ELA classes will focus on literature, choral reading,
fluency, and comprehension.
Recognizing many of VLA’s students will enter the school significantly below grade level,
because of our keen awareness that a majority of low-performing students write and speak
based on what they here; we have included phonics instruction as a key part of the English
Language Arts curriculum across all grade levels.
Phonics are not normally taught in the high school grades, however, VLA expects that a
majority of its’ students will enter school with a weak literacy foundation, and may not have
had previous exposure to in-depth phonics instruction – fundamental for future academic
success.
VLA will use a structured and explicit format for teaching phonics. A major
component of the skill building classes will focus on vocabulary development – a
critical skill for students to master in order to matriculate and be successful in college.
Vocabulary is tested in all high stakes state and national standardized assessments, and will be
necessary for students to engage socially with their future college classmates and their
professional colleagues after college graduation.
VLA is committed to ensuring that all students utilize strong literacy skills to become
active and purposeful leaders in society. The literature strand of the English Language
Arts high school curriculum will focus on fluency and text comprehension. Students
will practice their fluency through guided group and individual reading of a variety of
texts and genres. VLA’s literature classes will provide students with exposure to
many different texts and genres, and teachers will develop a deliberate and rigorous
plan for introducing increasingly difficult texts to students based on each student‘s
skill level. Research indicates that the more reading materials students are exposed to,
the easier it is for them to develop strong writing and comprehension skills. The
variety of texts will develop students‘ ability to hone their reading skills through live
experiences with authors and field trips to many contexts. Literature circles with
community leaders, fondly noted as community roundtables and Socratic seminars
will lead students to deeper understanding by engaging students in conversation with
peers and the teacher about what they read, reinforcing comprehension skills, and
building students‘ abilities to reflect, analyze and critique.
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5 Kahle, J., Meece, J., & Scantlebury, K., (2010). ―Urban African-American middle school science students:
Does standards-based teaching make a difference?‖ Journal of Research in Science Teaching 37, 9. 1019-1041.
Social Studies
VLA will approach Social Studies instruction through the Common Core State Standards
Curriculum in a way that is engaging and challenging. As in all subjects, teachers will
understand which objectives will be assessed during each course, which will then be
mapped into engaging and challenging teacher-designed lessons. Social studies
classes will focus on mastery of key concepts and vocabulary, improving non-fiction
reading skills, learning important historical content, and application into written
essays and oral presentations, reinforcing VLA‘s belief in infusing literacy instruction
in every class and subject. The use of primary sources in the social studies content
will be critical to developing students analysis and evaluation skills. In addition to
the CCSS-based social studies scope and sequence, VLA leadership team will
correlate objectives to Facing History and Ourselves, which brings concepts and
historical lessons alive for students through engaging lessons, student interactions and
group work, and real-world connections. Facing History engages students of diverse
backgrounds in an examination of racism, prejudice, and anti-Semitism in order to
promote the development of a more humane and informed citizenry. By studying the
historical development and lessons of the Holocaust and other examples of genocide,
students make the essential connection between history and the choices they confront
in their own lives. VLA’s teachers will be expected to pay particular attention to
cultural bias when developing Common Core-aligned Social Studies lessons, as
multicultural education can improve interdisciplinary mastery of reading, writing and
mathematical skills.(6)
Life Skills and Planning
Life Skills and Planning will be a formal curriculum taught by the Transition’s coordinator
and or supplemental “field-related” personnel. The curriculum will be focused on important
life skills, such as health and safety, conflict resolution, financial management, basic career
skills, workplace expectations, and post-secondary preparation. Each student‘s Alternative
Education Plan, developed, will include details about his or her post-graduation plans. No
matter their chosen path, VLA will require all students to develop post-high school plans that
contribute to the future success of the student – be it through college, a professional
internship, trade school, the military, or the workforce. Regardless of his or her selected path,
students will be required to take college entrance exams (i.e., ACT) and apply to at least one
college or postsecondary educational option in order to graduate.
Through the Life Skills and Planning curriculum, VLA will facilitate student visits to
colleges, information about the college application and financial aid processes, and exposure
to the multitude of post-secondary study options, including four-year universities, junior
college, etc. Guest speakers from various fields and occupations will be invited to speak to
students regularly during our bi-weekly “town-hall meetings” particularly those who have
persevered through situations similar to the student population and achieved academic and
professional success.
Curriculum alignment with school’s schedules and calendar
As described above, VLA‘s daily schedule and calendar has been built specifically to
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accommodate the personal goals and circumstances of the target student population.
Students‘ schedules will enable them to take four 4 50-minute interval classes per day
between 8:00 a.m. and dismissal at 2:00, as well as the option to stay for any afterschool life building activities that we may have scheduled after school. VLA’s
students will have the opportunity to participate in career internships or community
service. While courses will be offered each semester, curricular software will enable
students to augment their course of study by earning accelerated credits through
proficiency exams at their own pace. Our system enables overaged students to
continually enroll, pursuing credits and skills necessary to earn a high school diploma
as soon as possible and without interruption. Accommodations have also been built
into the daily schedule to accommodate students‘ anticipated personal circumstances.
For instance, what VLA refers to as “Power Hour” will occur during the first daily
hour of the day. During this time slot, the therapist, clinicians , teachers and students
will be in rotating blocks with group and individual counseling, daily motivation, reboot session with teachers, completion corners for students who have assignments
due in a class later that day will have an opportunity to go to one of the many
rotations and receive the help that he/she needs in order to set an enthusiasticenergized tone for the rest of the day for all students.
Instructional Methodologies
Students attending VLA, regardless of the circumstances or reason, will share the common
experience of having failed to thrive in their previous learning environments. They will need
to be reengaged in a learning process that is productive for them, and will remain highly
vulnerable to dropping out again unless they receive critical academic intervention. VLA’s
success in preparing over-aged and under-credited students to earn a high school diploma and
pursue college is directly correlated to its commitment to identify instructional strategies that
are well suited to meet the diverse needs of each of its students.
The CCSS will be delivered in small classes and instructional methods will be highly
student-centered and differentiated. Like all successful alternative education schools, VLA‘s
instructional approach is empirically based upon the practice of high-performing urban
alternative schools. It allows for teacher adaptation and improvement tied to measurable
outcomes. A major component of the school‘s professional development will focus on
coaching teachers in effective selection and use of these core instructional methodologies to
meet individual student needs within a classroom setting using multiple-intelligence
strategies. Ninety percent of all lessons will be hands on and what we refer to as “paperless”.
Data-Driven Instruction
Using data to meaningfully drive instruction is the foundation upon which we build our
educational program. Unique to VLA‘s assessment program will be the use of authentic
assessments, providing students with a variety of formats to demonstrate skill. We feel that
these types of assessments show consistently more real-time data. Additionally, students will
be consistently measured on progress against their Alternative Education Plan, which will
include non-academic metrics around factors contributing to a student‘s achievement,
including attendance and truancy, behavior, and engagement. Interim benchmark assessments
will serve as the foundation for classroom instruction and lesson planning. At a macro-level,
VLA’s Program Executive or appointee, the Transition Coordinator and the Academic
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Coordinator will meet at the conclusion of each data cycle (every nine weeks) to analyze and
discuss student performance and track the school‘s progress toward its academic goals.
At a micro-level, the results will provide teachers with robust feedback on their
students‘ progress in meeting their Common Core Standards. This will assist them in
knowing, at any moment, which students have mastered topics and which students
have not, as well as in aggregate what standards were learned and what standards
need to be re- taught.
Results from all interim assessments will be stored in the school‘s TETRA-DATA System
which tracks mastery of GLEs for all students. In addition to facilitating thoughtful analysis
of interim results to inform instructional and curricular modifications, TETRA-DATA will be
used to create GLE-based report assessments that will be discussed with students, and
families when possible, every nine weeks to inform them of progress.
Teachers and advisors will track student progress each day, and during each lesson. In
accordance with our proposed use of the on-course lesson plan format, each lesson
will be expected to include a closing assessment. Again, all classrooms within VLA
will be equipped with a CPS, clicker remote student response system at each student‘s
desk. This will allow teachers to require all students to respond to oral or written
questions and get immediate feedback on their comprehension level and the
effectiveness of a current lesson. The use of this technology will encourage
participation as students will be prevented from simply not answering and waiting for
someone else to respond. Real-time adjustments to a lesson can take place when using
the remotes. The CPS clicker system will track questions according to CCSS. It will
communicate and store data within the online TETRA- DATA System.
Balanced Literacy
The Balanced Literacy model will be used across all subjects to develop students‘ literacy,
reading and writing skills. Teachers will institute various strategies to effectively implement
Balanced Literacy, including whole- and small-group instruction, guided reading and writing,
and independent practice. During group instruction, students will work in homogeneous
groups according to their reading and writing levels, strategies will be modeled and new
concepts will be introduced. During guided practice, students work largely independently,
with the teacher acting as mentors.‘ Independent practice enables students to choose books
and written topics of interest to them, deepening their love of reading and writing, as well as
their comprehension and fluency. Students will experience these reading and writing
strategies within all classes and all subjects.
Exposure to excerpts, essays, articles and books related to material being studied in
each subject engages students in different types of texts and critical thinking is required as
students discuss relevant topics rather than arbitrary concepts. Implementing Balanced
Literacy
effectively, VLA teachers will require students to think creatively, discuss multiple
viewpoints, express their ideas, and engage in higher-order thinking – all critical skills
aligned with the school‘s mission to prepare students for graduation from high school and
success in four-year colleges and universities.
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Differentiation
A defining quality of VLA’s educational program is to meet all students where they
are, but also to hold each child to the same standard of academic excellence. To
accomplish this, teachers will be required to use differentiated instructional strategies
to implement VLA‘s rigorous curriculum, including:
Readiness/Ability Evaluation:
Teachers will use a variety of diagnostic assessments to understand each student's ability
and/or readiness, including the practice EOC test, TABE Locator and full battery, and much,
much more.
Adjusting Questions:
Teachers will receive training and support on using a variety of questioning techniques to adjust
the level of critical thinking to meet student needs. The use of the new Bloom‘s Taxonomy in
creating daily lesson objectives and individual student goals will challenge students at their level
and differentiate to encourage greater critical thinking.
Curriculum Compacting:
Compacting the curriculum assesses a student‘s knowledge, skills and attitudes and provides
alternative activities for students who have already mastered curriculum content. This will be
achieved by pre-testing basic concepts or using performance assessment methods. Students
who demonstrate that they do not require instruction move on to tiered problem solving
activities, literature circles, or technology-based supplemental curricula while others receive
instruction.
Flexible Grouping:
VLA’s teachers will permit movement between level groups at any point a student is
identified as requiring more support or more challenging work. Student‘s readiness varies
depending on personal abilities and interests, and teachers will be sensitive to the concept
that a student may be below grade level in one subject, but above grade level in another
subject.
Learning Profiles/Styles and Student Interests:
When necessary, teachers will assign students to tasks by learning style, preferred
environment, learning modality, or personal interests. Teachers will teach to different
learning styles of students, encouraging them to find their own strengths in how they learn.
This will partially be supported through the integration of technology.
Learning Centers:
Learning centers will be differentiated through varying complexity of activities, taking into
account different students‘ abilities and readiness. Students will understand what is expected
of them at the learning center and manage their use of time.
Anchoring Activities:
Students will understand what activities are appropriate at any time when they have completed
assignments, and activities can be assigned for a short period at the beginning of each class as
students organize themselves and prepare for work. At the high school level, students will be
afforded a great deal of independence in selecting activities worthy of their time and appropriate
to meet their learning needs.
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Spiraling Cumulative Review
Given the pace with which material will be covered in order to catch students up on a trimester
system, VLA’s teachers will commit a significant proportion of instructional time to systematic
cumulative review. During class, teachers will regularly revisit skills learned earlier in the year.
Supplementary curriculum software will support this process by providing students with ongoing
drills and exposure to concepts learned earlier in the year or course. Providing ongoing
cumulative review will develop the fluency of students to perform skills clearly outlined in the
various curricula. With repeated practice and cumulative review, teachers will help students to
maintain learned skills and look for opportunities to apply them in new settings.
Anticipated Professional Development
The success of our educational program rests on the quality of its teachers and leaders, and adults
in the building are responsible for students achieving at high levels. VLA will maintain high
expectations for staff, who have been hired based on their uncompromising belief that students
will be successful and graduate from college, and because they embrace a spirit of continuous
improvement of their craft as lifelong learners. VLA’s teachers will be open to feedback and
accountability, opportunities to learn and grow, and tools that will allow them to do their job
more effectively. They will be well prepared to use every minute of instructional time
productively.
Our professional development program will center on two critical strands:
Cultural training to ensure mission alignment and appropriate expectations across
classrooms;
and, skills-based training on components of the education plan including lesson planning,
development of Alternative Education Plans, data-driven instruction, significantly
differentiated classrooms, and Curricula and assessments to ensure delivery of relevant and
effective lessons in each classroom, every day.
Lesson Planning
While most teachers at VLA will have significant experience in lesson planning, planning
lessons with the level of differentiation required will require extensive modeling, training and
practice. VLA will provide as much structure as possible, including a consistent lesson
planning format. The standards-based lesson plan format will require all teachers to include
measurable objectives for each lesson plan mapped to the CCSS. During the school year, all
lesson plans will be turned in on a weekly basis, and teachers will receive continual feedback
from the School Leader on their planning procedures.
Data Driven Instruction
Given the robust use of data analysis and expectation of data-informed instruction that will be
used at VLA, all new teachers will receive training during summer orientation that covers:
Our data-driven culture and its application in an alternative setting
Developing scope and sequence assessments
Developing and monitoring Alternative Education Plans
Using authentic assessments to monitor student achievement and skill acquisition
Data analysis protocols
Using data to drive instruction
Curriculum and Instructional Methods
VLA will train its teachers in the curriculum alignment process and on all expected instructional
methods. In addition to in-depth training on data-driven lesson planning, teachers will be trained
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on how to create lessons with clear and measurable learning standards that meet students at
various skill levels, implementing supplemental curricular material, backwards planning,
spiraling and cumulative review, and engaging students through lessons with real world
connections. VLA’s teachers will also be trained on how to prepare lessons aligned with scope
and sequence assessments and in the development of high-quality, multi-modal classroom
assessments to track student progress in the interim.
Curriculum and Instructional Methods
VLA’s teachers will train its teachers in the curriculum alignment process and on all expected
instructional methods. In addition to in-depth training on data-driven lesson planning, teachers
will be trained on how to create lessons with clear and measurable learning standards that meet
students at various skill levels, implementing supplemental curricular material, backwards
planning, spiraling and cumulative review, and engaging students through lessons with real
world connections. VLA’s teachers will also be trained on how to prepare lessons aligned with
scope and sequence assessments and in the development of high-quality, multi-modal classroom
assessments to track student progress in the interim.
Effectiveness
The educational program at VLA is strategically built upon the best practices of the highest
performing college preparatory alternative education school serving similarly low income,
minority, and at-risk student populations in combination with the most effective practices
identified in alternative high school programs across the country. The school‘s college-prep
approach, including an extended school year, rigorous, standards-aligned curriculum, and
culture of high expectations, were selected based on their proven results from their
implementation of No Excuses‘ schools achieving dramatic performance results.
Relevance
The most relevant curriculum for at-risk students is a curriculum that prepares them for college.
More than being simply relevant, VLA‘s college-preparatory curriculum is essential. The
curriculum will be presented in a compelling manner, and enable students to master basic skills
while attaining accelerated concepts and higher order thinking skills. Research indicates that an
aligned curriculum can increase student achievement and helps overcome the usual predictors of
socioeconomic status, gender, race, and some teacher quality variables.8
Rigor
Students who have been identified as particularly at-risk, and who have not thrived in
a traditional environment, are especially targeted with low expectations – even though
many students‘ failure to succeed was on behalf of adult performance at past schools
or personal circumstance rather than student aptitude. VLA seeks to change that
reality.
7 Association for High School Innovation, ―AHSI Network Distinguishers.‖ www.ahsi.org
8 Edvantia. ―Research Brief: Aligned Curriculum and Student Achievement.‖December 2011.
http://www.edvantia.org/services/pdf/Aligned.pdf.
VLA ‘s use of the Common Core Standards-based curriculum and rigorous assessment protocol
necessary to prepare students for college and beyond. Teachers will challenge students to think
critically by questioning strategies, providing challenging work, and pushing students to think,
read, and write at a deeper level.
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VLA, as part of its mission to provide college preparatory education to all students, will ensure
special education students receive robust support within the school community for them to excel
and meet high academic performance standards. In accordance with all applicable state and
federal laws and regulations, VLA will offer students with disabilities the least restrictive
environment possible within the guidelines of each student‘s Individualized Education Plan
(IEP).
We will ensure a Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) for all students by providing and
directing special education and related services that meet all State Board of Elementary and
Secondary Education (SBESE) standards at the school‘s expense. We will not discriminate
against students who have or may have disabilities in enrollment practices, as it is the school‘s
mission to provide a college preparatory education to underserved and at-risk students.
All students, including those identified as disabled under Louisiana State Law and
Federal IDEA
law, will achieve the school‘s mission of being prepared to enter into college. VLA has
included a thorough support system into its overall school design and model to support the
academic needs of all students, including those with exceptionalities. Overall, the special
education program at VLA will be guided by the following main principles:
Equal Access to College Preparatory Curriculum
All students at VLA will have access to a high-quality, rigorous, college preparatory
curriculum regardless of whether the student has an identified disability or not.
Integration in Student Population –
To the greatest extent possible, students with disabilities will be integrated in the
regular student population and included in every part of the school's culture and
expectations.
Strict Adherence to Procedure
VLA’s special education department will strictly adhere to the special education
policies and procedures of the school, as these policies and procedures ensure that
students and parents are given due process in decisions regarding special education
evaluations and services.
Involvement of Stakeholders
Beyond the extent required by law, VLA’s special education staff will include
parents, classroom teachers, administrators and others in decisions involving a
student's disability and/or accommodations.
Provision of Life-Long Strategies for Success
VLA will equip all students with strategies for life-long success, achievement, independence
at the highest possible level and, to the extent possible, exit students from special education
services. The goal of VLA’s special education program is to minimize the impact of each
student‘s disability and to maximize each student‘s opportunities to participate with his or
her general education peers and in general settings. VLA’s staff will act on the belief that
students with disabilities add to a school‘s diversity and are integral members of a school‘s
community. Staff will hold high expectations for its students‘ outcomes and believe that all
students with disabilities are capable of making significant academic, behavioral, social, and
emotional gains, as appropriate. Because no single standard or approach can meet the needs
of diverse learners, our staff will meet the needs of students with exceptionalities by making
individual-level decisions.
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Section V: Teaching
VLA’s staffing plan aims to provide a robust staff to stabilize the new school’s culture while
simultaneously driving rigorous instruction for the diverse needs of the student body. Beginning
in Year 3, VLA will downsize in leadership and instructional staff in order to maintain the
momentum for year three. The following explanations will touch on the five year staffing model
for leadership, instructional staff and operations staff.
Our goal in Year 1 is to provide at least a 15-to-1 ratio of students to teacher in every section;
thereafter the ratio will be 18-to-1. Thus, we estimate that VLA will have eight core sections
and one part-time PE section throughout Grades 9-12. In order to satisfy our mission of
providing accelerated, rigorous, college preparatory education to our students, we know that the
first two years are critical for providing intense interventions and remediation. In these early
years, we will over-staff our school team with co-teachers; therefore, in Years 1 and 2, hire an
additional 5 co-teachers who will work directly with a lead teacher.
Our co-teacher positions will provide a double benefit to success of VLA: first, they will
provide the necessary interventions and remediation to close the achievement gap in the first two
years. Second, these co-teachers will also be a human capital pipeline to fill lead teacher
positions in following years. In Year 3, as the instructional needs of our students normalize, we
will eliminate co-teachers from our staffing model.
One of VLA’s key determiners for staffing success is the mandatory professional development
that is required for all staff.
External Professional Development
While most of our professional development will occur internally, exchanging knowledge
and best practices among staff members, staff will also have the opportunity to grow
professionally by learning from other high performing schools and curriculum specialists. Every
faculty member will be required to observe at another high performing high and/or alternative
school at least once per year. The staff will also be encouraged to pursue individual, ongoing
professional development opportunities, and each teacher will have access to a modest
stipend for these training opportunities. This money may be put towards purchasing materials,
taking classes, or attending seminars and conferences that enhance their ability to effectively
teach their subject.
We will predominately rely on its own staff to develop teachers, given the organization‘s
extensive experience in teaching and leadership development. During the school year, the
School Leader is responsible for developing, implementing and evaluating the efficacy of the
school‘s professional development opportunities. The School Leader will develop a
comprehensive strategic plan for professional development activities, gather formal survey data
and informal feedback from staff on the effectiveness of existing development, and identify gaps
or weak areas of professional development.
As described, professional development for staff will begin three weeks before
students arrive with in-house mandatory staff training and curriculum planning for teachers.
During the first year of operation, orientation will encompass significant acculturation and
curriculum development requiring three weeks; in the second and subsequent years this will
likely be shortened to no more than two weeks. Summer training topics will include socialization
into the mission and values at VLA, school-wide expectations with regards to academic,
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discipline and behavioral expectations, lesson planning, assessments, standards alignment,
multimedia instruction, and effective use of data and Alternative Education Plan.
Teachers are provided a minimum of 450 minutes (7.5 hours) per week of planning and
professional development time. This schedule emphasizes the importance of planning, staff
collaboration, and professional development for teachers to improve their instructional practice
on an ongoing basis. VLA’s teachers will thrive in a professional culture that supports and
encourages collaboration, constant learning, and collegiality.
Tentative Schedule for Professional Development
1. July 16th to August 3rd – Teacher orientation, curriculum training and planning, culture
building, multimedia instruction, goal setting, scope and sequence assessments, meetings with
community leaders to gain insight into community dynamics.
2. Every Wednesday for 50 minutes – Team meetings will take place to discuss student
achievement and what's working within classrooms.
3. Every other Friday for 55 minutes – Entire staff or content area professional development will
take place; these groups will be rotated throughout the year.
4. One Saturday a month – Professional development for struggling teachers; topics will be
determined by the needs of teachers.
5. Once every nine weeks – School-wide discussion of scope and sequence assessment results
including related development needs/training
The Special Education Coordinator will be included in all professional development
within the school.
Additionally, the School Leader will work with the Special Education Coordinator to
identify customized professional development opportunities externally to train and have the
Special Education Coordinator will equip the entire staff with specialized knowledge and
strategies for working effectively with students with exceptionalities. In this way, the Special
Education Coordinator will not only receive personalized training and be encouraged to expand
his/her qualifications, but the he/she will also be a significant source of professional development
for the rest of the staff.
As previously stated , a clear concept of the type of school culture sought at VLA will not
be sufficient to ensure that it will manifest in practice. Included below is a framework for the
planning and execution of the key elements of the school‘s strong, cohesive culture. This
framework will be a priority focus of July professional development required for all staff and led
by VLA’s team of outside contractors and consultants from all walks of life.
Table
WHAT
DETAILS
HOW
Articulate core values
Decide how to be incorporate
organizational values as a
school.
.
Sweat the small stuff
Start with the smallest incident Engage teachers to
like being
shape these
unprepared for math class,
interactions
and articulate the
See core Values
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expected teacher response.
What should the
teacher say? How and when
should the teacher
say it? What consequences
should the student
receive? What does the
teacher do?
Map out consequences
Define consequences for
infractions
Family accountability
agreement
Systematize it
Design a teacher-friendly,
consistent schoolwide
system for tracking positive
and negative
behaviors.
Points tracking system
Design rituals to celebrate
Be just as systematic in
rewarding the positive as
the negative. Design a clear
Friday bi-weekly celebrations
success
incentive system.
Model and Train/
WHAT
Represent/Model
DETAILS
Be the values-be the leader
HOW
Summer orientation and school
culture sessions
Engage Staff
Devote time to defining vision
Summer orientation
with teachers to build buy-in.
Explain the rationale behind
using one whole-school culture
as oppose to classroom to
classroom
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Train Staff
Articulate who we are and who
Staff orientation
we are not. Walk through every
aspect of school culture
System and artifact development
Promote development of artifacts
Teacher training
Role Play
Provide staff with the
Staff orientation
opportunity to implement
routines and procedures
Start Intentionally
Start the year right. Devote time
First day of school schedule and
in the first days and weeks to
delayed after school-activities
reinforce expectations
Model Expectations for students
Debrief poor decisions from
Model/ role play multiple times
students
Do it until it’s right
Redo until expectations are met
Flexible schedule to allow for
routine drills
Follow Through
WHAT
DETAILS
HOW
Observe Staff
Be vigilant, especially in the
first weeks, in
giving staff feedback on time,
classroom management, and
the use of the individual and
whole-class tracking systems.
Observation forms
Revisit Expectations
Provide weekly time with staff
to follow up on questions or
confusion regarding school
culture. Watch for wholeschool, class, or individual
trends and follow up regularly
Daily emails, daily classroom
walk-throughs, persistent
Feedback and review protocols
Regularly
Stay Consistent
Feedback starting with individual
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Maintain Regular Contact
with Families
Model and train staff how to
communicate with the families
hallway and school-wide
presence.
Stay in contact with families –
student behavior information
is relayed more clearly
between adults rather than
through students. Design
systems to keep families
informed and that require their
involvement.
Systems, vocabulary, and
support for constant
communication with teachers,
teacher meetings
Weekly reports-phone calls-sixweeks conferences
Role Plays
staff, and families.
Additionally, VLA will have one Special Education Teacher. Assuming that 12% of the
student population (150 students) qualifies for special education services, we will need at least
one special education teacher. This number of teachers may grow or shrink according to the
number of student actually qualifying for services.
Support
To promote the development of student intervention services, VLA will have a Special
Education Coordinator and will have its own Professional School Counselor. Both positions will
work closely with the school leader and teachers to ensure that all students are getting necessary
educational or social services to promote healthy development. These positions will remain
intact through the terms of this charter.
Additionally, a school security guard will be on staff in order to protect the safety of the entire
school community and a part-time nurse will provide health-related services to students at VLA.
Operations
The finance, operations and data components of running the school will rest in the hands of the
Operations Team—Director of Finance & Operations (DFO) and Administrative Assistant (AA).
The Operations Team will work closely with the CEO to ensure smooth operations and
state/federal compliance with all fiscal policies. The Operations Team will also work closely
with the school leader to ensure operations are setup to facilitate a clean, healthy and functional
learning environment. The Operations Team will remain intact through the terms of this charter.
High School Staffing Chart
To be opened August 2013
Executive Director of High School
School Leaders
Year 1
1
1
Year 2
1
1
Year 3
1
1
Year 4 Year 5
1
1
1
1
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Teachers – Core subjects
8
PE Teacher (1/2 time)
½
Special Education Teacher
1
Co-Teachers
5
Special Education Coordinator
1
Professional School Counselor
1
Director of Finance & Operations
1
Administrative Assistant
1
Security Officer
1
Nurse
1
8
½
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
8
½
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
8
½
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
8
½
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
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Appendix N: Completed and Signed Charter School Board Member Questionnaire
Appendix P –Bylaws – submitted with eligibility documentation
Board of Directors
The governing Board of VLA represents the diverse professional experiences and practical
expertise necessary to support the start-up and long-term viability of a charter school
management organization. Such experiences and expertise include education, finance, law,
non-profit and community leadership, human resources and previous governance experience.
VLA will be governed by an odd number of Board members consisting of between an adhoc
committee of 3 member and a governing Board of Directors of about 7 and 9 persons. The
adhoc committee’s sole responsibility is to oversee the governing Board.
The Board will assume final responsibility for the organization’s academic success, viability,
and faithfulness to the terms of the charter. Therefore, the Board will develop and approve
the annual budget and all organizational
policies. It will also set goals and review strategy to continually guide the organization towards
the fulfillment of its mission.
Although Learning Solution’s Board of Directors delegates the management of the organization
to the Chief
Executive Officer, the Board is ultimately responsible for ensuring that the organization
meets its academic, fiscal and operational objectives. The primary qualifications for serving
on the Board include:
1. An unwavering commitment to seeing VLA’s students superbly prepared for high
school, college, and success in life;
2. A commitment to improving access to quality education for all children regardless of
race or economic status;
3. An understanding of the Board’s obligation to act as an effective and vigilant steward
of public funds;
4. The ability to be a good judge of information regarding the Chief Executive Officer’s
educational and fiscal management of the organization.
5. A willingness to focus on the academic achievement of children in the schools, and not
to divert the Board’s attention to matters that are peripheral to this mission;
6. An ability to fairly and accurately assess the needs of the community, and to represent
the organization to the community and others;
7. Financial, legal, business, fundraising, management, governance, real estate
development, and/or educational experience;
8. A willingness to accept and support decisions made in accordance with the bylaws;
9. An ability and willingness to give time and energy to the organization; and,
10. A willingness and ability to provide access to resources, both financial and other, in
order to support and strengthen the organization.
The role of the full governing Board will be to:
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Safeguard the organization’s mission and competitive advantage – On an annual basis,
Board members will assess the organization’s mission, strategic plan, and annual goals as
well as the external environment to assure that the organization is fulfilling its charter and
meeting the needs of the community.
Govern by helping to fulfill the Board’s collective responsibilities, detailed in the Board’s
job description and expectations. Secure sufficient resources to fulfill the organization’s
mission – Board members are expected to work in partnership with the organization’s
administration to raise funds to support the organization’s mission.
Advocate for the organization's vision and mission and be a champion in building the
diverse constituencies necessary to support the successful launch and sustainability of the
organization.Ensure strategic and effective resource allocation – As the fiduciary agents
of the organization, Board members will review and approve the organization’s budget
and funding plan and will hold the CEO accountable for its effective and efficient
management.
Serve as a liaison with the public, interpreting the organization’s vision to the community
and informing the organization of needs of the community. Hire, support, and assess the
performance of VLA’s Chief Executive Officer – The Board will work as the governing
partner to the organization’s management team and will ensure that the Chief Executive
Officer has the training, support, and encouragement necessary to fulfill the charter. In
addition, the Board will assess annually the performance of the Chief Executive Officer
and will hold him/her accountable to the job description and performance criteria upon
which they mutually agree.
Consult by lending specific expertise for the benefit of the organization with
professionalism, integrity, and enthusiasm.
Serve as ambassadors for the organization – As the organization’s primary link to the
community, the public, the media, and funders, Board members are expected to garner
support from the community through their passionate commitment to and articulation of
the organization’s mission.
Capitalize on personal networks to secure financial and other resources to support the
organization.
Set policies and procedures – As the organization’s governing body, the Board is
expected to establish policies and procedures to support the mission. Attend regular
Board meetings and participate in a meaningful and productive manner by coming to
meetings prepared and by focusing on strategic and critical questions and issues.
Monitor and ensure legal and regulatory compliance – The Board should review
organizational policies and programs to ensure compliance with the law and with state
regulations.
Be accessible for personal contact in between Board meetings and for committee serving
on a committee or taskforce as need be. Assess its own performance – As a component of
holding the organization accountable to achieving its mission and efficiently allocating its
resources, the Board is expected to evaluate its performance against its job description
and performance criteria. Collaborate with fellow Board members to fulfill the
obligations of the Board and to ensure that diverse perspectives are heard and
incorporated into the governance structure. Focus on creating group, not individual
success; support Board decisions; participate critically in the appraisal of the Board’s
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performance. The founding Board of Directors understands the unique challenges of
creating a strong Board from scratch. To this end, the full founding Board plans to take
advantage of the extensive governance training that will be provided by Sally Baird and
the Charter Management Company. In total, the Board, Chief Executive Officer and
School Leaders completed approximately 75 hours of governance training prior to the
opening of Vision Learning Academy
ORGANIZATION STRUCTURE
VLA’s mission is the primary driving and guiding force behind the operations of its schools.
Every member of the school community ultimately is accountable to the mission and
responsible for reporting on their work as it relates to the mission. The Board of Directors is
the group of individuals charged with stewarding the mission of the organization and
ensuring the organization’s long-term organizational viability. The Board is responsible for
setting organizational policies, positioning the general strategic direction of the organization,
and properly governing the organization’s ongoing operations to ensure that they are
conducted in a manner consistent with the mission and with the law.
In addition to its school oversight responsibilities, the Board is also responsible for
governing CEO. The CEO has systems and structures that are utilized at the schools in
order to allow the School Leaders to focus on
instructional leadership at the school sites.
SCHOOL SUPPORT
It is the goal of the CEO and Parental team’s along with our community partnerships to
serve as a support system for the schools in order to allow the School Leaders, teachers
and other school staff members to focus primarily on the students.Therefore, the CEO
and the Management Team provides direct support to the schools’ to help financial
management, fundraising, strategic planning, and data analysis personnel.
This team is comprised of highly qualified individuals who bring a unique set of
specialized skills necessary for achieving VLA’s mission of preparing students for
college and beyond.
Based upon their areas of expertise, each member of the team is responsible for providing
direct support services to VLA. The roles and responsibilities within the team require that
each member of the team be knowledgeable of both the academic and operational
components of the schools. Collaboration between the members of the CEO team is
imperative to VLA’s success as is the collaboration between the CEO and school staff
members.
In terms of support focused on academic planning, the CEO team is comprised of the
Chief Academic Officers (CAO), Director of Special Education, Director of Early
Childhood and Director of Literacy. This group focuses their attention on the needs of the
School Leaders and teachers to ensure academic achievement and excellence for every
student. The CAOs will work in concert with VLA’s Chief Executive Officer to support
and evaluate every School Leader as well as to drive the academic planning and
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professional development at all levels of the organization. The Director of Literacy work
closely with the CAOs to develop the supplementary Visual and Performing Arts and
Technological curriculum, work directly with teachers to aid in their classroom planning,
provide professional development to all staff and analyze student and teacher outcomes.
Finally, the Director of Special Education oversees the special education programming
and planning for the organization and will provide direct support to School Leaders and
teachers to ensure that the academic needs of each student are being met.
When looking at operational support in particular, the Financial Controller and Managing
Director of Operations at the CEO works very closely with the school-based Directors of
Finance and Operations.
These staff member work with the Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer to
create and set policies and procedures, manage financial systems, procure vendors and
provide professional development. Likewise, the Director of Data and Assessment at the
CEO works in conjunction with the Data Managers and Curriculum Captains at the
school sites. This team collaborates in order to develop and sustain an aligned assessment
and data analysis system. As described earlier, the gathering, analyzing and disseminating
of data drives much of the academic planning at VLA; therefore, it is crucial that the data
team work to create cohesive systems across the network of VLA.
Finally, VLA’s team is rounded out with individuals whose daily roles overlap with both
the academic and operational support needed at the schools. The Chief Executive Officer
(CEO) of VLA reports directly to the Board of Directors and leads the Management
team and the complete operation of the school; while also ensuring that the schools are
meeting their goals, all in pursuit of VLA’s mission to prepare students for college. The
CEO works closely with the COO to hire the most effective staff at both the CEO and
school levels as well as plan for the professional development needs of the entire staff. In
addition, the Chief of Staff works closely with the CEO, Financial
Controller and Grant Writer to ensure that all of VLA’s fund development needs are
being met through the submission of grants and the acquisition of philanthropic partners.
Finally, the Director of Information Technology works closely with the CEO to develop
and sustain all of VLA’s technology needs and computer-based learning programs
throughout the school year. The Director of Finance collaborates with School Leaders
and teachers for the academic programming and staffing needs of the regular and
extended school day and year while also ensuring that the funding essential for the
program’s success is available and accessible to create and maintain highly effective
programs.
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Section VII: Budget and Financial Management
BUDGETING AND FINANCIAL IMPACT
FIVE-YEAR BUDGET
Below is a five year proposed budget for VLA aligned with the five-year growth plan. VLA will be
working at a deficit for the first three years and is relying on the assistance of philanthropic
funding as is built to full capacity and becomes capable of being funded by the per pupil
amounts.
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Year 4
2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016
1 school
1 school
2 schools
2 school
Chief Executive Officer$ 85,000 $ 87,000
$ 88,500
$90 ,000
Director of SPED $ 60,000
$ 60,500
$ 61,000
$ 61,500
Data Coordinator $ 35,000
$ 36,000
$36,500
$ 37,000
Literacy Coordinator$50,000
$52,000
$ 53,000
$ 55,000
Grant Coordinator $ 40,000
$ 50,000
$ 50,000
$50,000
Accountant/CPA
$ 31,250
$ 85,000
$ 87,500
$ 90,000
Admini Assistant
$ 40,000
$40,500
$ 44,000
$ 45,000
Board Expenses. $ 10,000
$ 11,800
$ 13,000
$ 14,200
Achievement Net $ 25,000
$ 50,000
$ 60,000
$ 70,000
Academic and Fin $ 15,000
$ 25,000
$ 30,000
$ 35,000
Allowance for Prof $ 20,000
$ 35,000
$ 45,000
$ 50,000
Allowance for Adv $ 20,000
$ 25,000
$ 25,000
$ 25,000
Allowance for CEO
Team Travel
$ 20,000
$ 20,000
$ 25,000
$ 25,000
Allowance for
Celebrations
$ 25,000
$ 35,000
$ 45,000
$ 40,000
Office Equipment
/ ipads/cell phon
$ 50,000
$ 30,000
$ 30,000
$ 30,000
SubTotal
$ 1,153,750 $1,471,800 $1,669,500 $1,849,200
Benefits at 28%
$ 242,188
$ 310,000 $ 334,125
$ 373,750
Total Expenses $ 1,395,938
$ 1,781,800 $ 2,003,625 $ 2,222,950
7% per pupil from
schools
$ 9 87,040 $1,511,312 $1,940,470 $2,302,956
Operating Income -$408,897.32 -$270,487.85 -$63,154.94 $80,005.56
New Schools
Venture Fund
$ 200,000
$$-
Year 5
2016-2017
3 schools
$ 90,000
$ 62,000
$37,500
$ 60,000
$50,000
$ 92,500
$ 46,000
$ 14,200
$ 70,000
$ 40,000
$ 50,000
$ 25,000
$ 25,000
$ 40,000
$ 30,000
$ 1,912,700
$ 387,125
$ 2,299,825
$2,302,956
$3,130.56
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SCHOOL BUDGET
Below is a current example of a start-up budget for Vision Learning Academy. All aspects of
running a healthy school are included in this budget, which is break even. Directors of Finance
and Operations will be responsible for monitoring the school-based budgets. The School
Leaders and the Financial Controller will report to the Board monthly on actual expenses todate and projected expenses at year-end. In addition, an independent Certified Public
Accounting Firm will conduct an annual third party financial audit of the back office.
School Information
150 Number of Students
15-20 Student : Teacher Ratio
2 SPED Teachers
8 Number of Teachers
15% Percent of Special Education Students
0 students Level I SPED allowance $1366 - speech only
0 students Level II SPED allowance $8198 - MM, LD, Etc.
0 students Level III SPED allowance $15029 - Autism, Sev Prof, MR, ED, etc.
90% Percent of Free and Reduced Lunch Students
29% Percent of Benefits
$8,500 Per Pupil Allowance 194-197 Number of School Days
$1,700.00 IDEA
$750.00 Title I Funding per student
$75.00 Title II Funding per student
$55.00 RTA Monthly Token
$283.00 Bus Route
$50,000 Average Teachers' Salary
$35,000 Average Co-Teacher Teachers' Salary
Revenues
$ 1.2millionPer Pupil Amounts = number of students times per pupil allowance
$0 Special Education Per Pupil Allowance - see levels above
$0 Title I = allowance of $750 per student
$0 Title II - allowance of $75 per student
$200,000 Charter Startup Grant - 1st year allowance
$ IDEA - allowance of $1700 per student
$ 1.5million Total Revenues
Expenses
Teachers
$400,000 Regular Education Teachers - allowance $49,000
$50,000 8.5 Self Contained Teacher 50K
$47,280 Co-Teacher Expense
$20,000 Band Instructor - 2/3 Live Oak 1/3 Laurel
$170,000 SPED Teachers - 4 allowed
$115,000 3 Teacher Associates / Co-teachers
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$100,000 City Year - AmeriCorps - 10 aides
$477,982 Benefits
$48,000 TFA fees for 10 teachers + PTP fees for TeachNOLA and TFA
$200,000 Teacher Advancement Program Bonuses
$ TOTAL for Teachers
Administration
$80,000 School Leaders
$55,000 Dean of Students
$50,000 Behavior Interventionist
$50,000 School-based Director of Finance and Operations $50,000 School-based Data Coordinator $40,000 Admin Asst. / Data
$20,000 Admin Asst / Parent Coordinator ($10 per hour)
$208,840 Benefits
$,553,000 TOTAL for Administration
Support Staff
$275,000 Allowance for Extended Day program
$27,500 Nurse - 1/2 of salary (shared with another school)
$60,000 Social Worker (CIS)
$45,000 Security Guard
$15,000 Parent and Community Liason
$25,000 Allowance for Playworks
$65,000 Allowance for SPED service professionals
$32,347 Benefits
$ 427,150TOTAL for Support Staff
Supporting Supplies
$28,800 Ipads /Cellphones - 40 Based School Supplies
$30,000 Copy Machines
$35,500 Amazon.ComCredit(Library) - software and scanners for every classroom
$50,500 Kendall fire / Software (Apps) - allowance of $500 per student
$10,000 Teacher Classroom Allowance ($500 per teacher)
$10,000 Celebrations for Teachers
$20,000 Computers for each staff member - 20 @ $900
$17,500 Allowance for Elmo's for each classroom - 15 classrooms @ $700 each
$20,000 Allowance for student response systems for each clrs. - [email protected] $1000 each
$50,000 Misc. Office Supplies and furniture
$15,000 Allowance for Uniforms
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Facilities
$19,856 Maintenance
$112,000 Allowance for School Cleaning - nightly
$50,000 Allowance for upgrades and general school maintenance
$144,000 Allowance for Utilities - $12000 per month
$32,500 Allowance for Crime, General, and Sexual Insurance
$25,000 Allowance for Security Camera Upgrades
Operations
$181,500 Transportation allowance for 300 students using tokens - $55 per month
$278,755 Transportation allowance for 250 students riding buses at $300 per route (5)
$50,000 Allowance for PD / Travel for all staff - [email protected] $1000
$45,000 Allowance for Student Field Studies / Celebrations- 15k per school
$40,000 Allowance for Technology Support
$15,000 Allowance for Lunch $4.00 per student - LOST
$2,388,960 TOTAL for Expenses
$ 424,510 Subtotal
$406,943 7 % deduction for Charter Management Organization Expenses
$ 17,567 Overall School Surplus
SUSTAINABILITY
The Federal Public Charter Schools Program (PCSP) Title Vb funding of $800,000 is exhausted in
year three of a new charter school's operational budget. In year three, VLA will maintain a
balanced budget by making up for the loss in Federal start-up funds.
FUNDING DEVELOPMENT
At this time, VLA is seeking philanthropic assistance for approximately $1,500,000 to allow for
the building of a strong back office for year two and year three and to provide a surplus for any
unexpected expenses during the start-up years. As long as the present facility agreements
remain at a reasonable cost and Louisiana's per pupil amounts do not decrease, after year three
the economies of scale will allow VLA to continue running with a budget surplus on the State's
allotment of funding.
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Section VIII: Pre-Opening
(Appendix T – Timelines and Schedule for Pre-Opening – 5 page limit)
Appendix T: This chart is VLA’s start up AND Solvency plan:
Resources:
SL: School Leader
DFO: Director of Finance and Operations
CEO: Chief Executive Officer*
CAO: Chief Academic Officer*
BI: Director of Intervention Services/BI
AA: Administrative Assistant Director of Information Technology*
GW: Grant Writer*
BP = Board President*
BOD = Board of Directors*
Board Development
and Governance
Resources
Monthly Board meetings
CEO/BP
include discussion and
resolutions related to facility
in 2012
Determine additional Board CEO/ BOD
competencies required
reflecting organization’s
growth and execute
recruitment and nomination
process
Start/Due Date
April 2012/Ongoing
November 2012/ Ongoing
BP
Ongoing
Approve annual budget
and multi-year
financial plan
BOD
DECEMBER 2012
Annual Board Retreat
updating organizational
goals to reflect
CEO, BOD
FALL 2012
Ensure all new Board
members attend all
meetings, retreats and
training sessions
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OBJECTIVES
Conduct criminal
background check for any
new
Board members
BOD
WITHIN 30 DAYS
Update instructional staff
job descriptions as
necessary
CAO,SL
November 2012
Recruit and select School
Leader(s)
CEO, BP,DFO
November 2012-April 2013
Recruit and select all
instructional staff
CEO, SL, DFO
February-June 2013
Review instructional
programs to ensure
alignment with mission and
values, effectiveness
CAO,SL
March 2013/ Ongoing
Create -specific handbooks
(student, parent,
staff)
CEO, CAO, SL
April 2013
Determine school wide
instructional expectations
and practices
CAO, SL
APRIL 2013
Create staff culture binder
defining all
instructional routines and
systems to support
mission and values
CAO, SL
April 2013
Determine curriculum
review process and plan for
creating units of instruction
CAO, SL
APRIL 2013
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Finalize and purchase
curriculum selections
CAO, SL, DFO
June 2013
Update staff pre-service
including staff culture,
curriculum plans, goals,
data-driven instruction
CAO, SL
June 2013
Training for staff on using
data to create
action/re-teach plans
CAO, SL
July 2013
Determine classroom
purchasing needs
(furniture,
supplemental materials,
manipulatives, rugs,
technology etc)
DFO, CEO, SL
July 2013
Attend all special education
training workshops
sponsored by the LDOE
BI, CAO, SL
Ongoing
Attend all Charter School
workshops
CEO, DFO
Ongoing
SL,CAO
June 2013
SL, CEO, CAO
June 2013
CAO,SL
June 2013
BI,SL,CAO
July-August 2013
Create ongoing staff
professional development
plan
Create teacher observation
and feedback process
Create staff evaluation and
development process
Identify special education
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population
Contract with special
education providers SL,
DIS, DFO August 2012
CEO, DFO, BI, SL
July-August 2013
CAO, SL, CEO
January 2013
AA,SL
February 2013
Open bank accounts
CEO, DFO,BP
March 2013
Enlist with a payroll
services company
CEO, DFO
May 2013
Recruit students; hold
lottery if necessary
SL,DFO,CAO
Application Timeline
Conduct criminal
background checks on all
new
staff
Attend all and LA DOE
sponsored charter
leader meetings
AA,SL
Ongoing
CEO,SL,DFO,CAO
Ongoing
Enroll employees in
benefits
(package including but not
limited to health,
dental, vision, long term
disability, short term
disability and retirement
plan)
DFO,
May 2013/Ongoing
Update transportation plan
to include MCS students
SL, CEO
June 2013
Create student recruitment
strategy
Update job descriptions for
non-instructional staff
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Review and finalize MCSD
shared services
agreement
CEO, DFO,SL
June 2013
Comply with all LA DOE
and MCS request
DFO, CAO,CEO,SL,BI,BP
Ongoing
FINANCIAL SOLVENCY AND START UP PLAN
Governance
Resources
Hire Director of Finance
CEO, BP
and Operations (DFO)
Start/Due Date
FEB. 2013
Open bank accounts CEO,
CEO,BP,DFO
FEB-Mar 2013
CEO,BOD,BP
June 2013
Finalize year 1 and 5 year
budgets
CEO,CAO,DFO,BOD,BP
May 2013
Select accounting software
CEO,DFO
May 2013
Receive training on
accounting software
DFO, CEO
May 2013
Ensure proper fund
accounting systems are in
place
DFO, CEO
May 2013
Develop proper filing
systems
AA,DFO,SL,
May 2013
CEO, BOD,BP,SL
May 2013
CEO,DFO
May 2013
Update payroll contract to
include MCS staff
Create internal controls
process to ensure proper
segregation of duties
Establish regular review
process and checkpoints
.
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Identify tax requirements
and timelines
CEO, DFO,BOD
May 2013
Obtain line of credit
CEO,BOD,DFO
May 2013
Complete Electronic Funds
Transfer Enrollment
Form
DFO
May 2013
Provide information to MCS
for payment by
electronic transfer
DFO
May 2013
Comply with all state
DFO,CEO
financial requests
Fundraising/Grant Applications
Governance
Resources
Update fundraising plan
CEO,BOD,BP
Ongoing
Complete requirements,
timeline and application
process for federal grants
(i.e., i3, start up loans ..etc)
CEO, GW
August 2012
Complete and submit
Foundations and Start up
Grant Applications
CEO,GW
October-December 2012
Implement fundraising plan
CEO, BOD,BP,CAO,
Ongoing
Start/Due Date
August 2012
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Section XI: For Type 2 Charter Applicants
Excellsior Christian School
Agreement to Lease
Location: 2209 Hwy 165 South Monroe, Louisiana 71201
Date:
8/1/2012
Re:
MOU Intent to Lease for mer Excellsior Private School for the term of 5 years
The Board of Directors of the former private school known as Excelsior Christian School has come into
agreement with Vision Learning Academy to lease the 29,000 square foot facility which includes the
following:
6 classrooms
1 dining area
1state approved kitchen area
1 racquetball room
1multipurpose room
1 weight room
1 furnished computer lab
1 gymnasium
10 bathrooms
1 teacher workroom
3 offices
The aforementioned building is owned by Liberty Christian Center and the board has agreed to lease the
building to Vision Learning Academy . There are no potential renovations needed for school ready
operations at this time. The building is up to code and operational ready.
The Capacity approved by the fire marshal is 300.
‘
Accommodations have been made to meet a 5 year growth spurt by the leasing of four 12x12 fully
equipped portable buildings that will be included in the monthly lease amount beginning in year 2.
At a rate of 29,000.00 square feet at $4.00 per square feet. This state approved facility will be leased at a
rate of 10,000.00 per month.
Johnny Drumgole
Executive Director
Liberty Christian Center-Monroe
[email protected]
1.318.348.8633
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Appendix FF: Applicant Checklist
The applicant will use the left column of boxes to check off the sections completed. LDOE will use the
right column of boxes for its completeness check.
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Executive Summary
Section I. Culture
Section II. Leadership
Section III. School Operations
Section IV. Education Program
Section V. Teaching
Section VI. Governance
Section VII. Budget and Financial Management
Section VIII. Pre-opening
Section IX: Third Party Educational Service Provider Relationship
Section X: Applicants applying with a Corporate Partner
Section XI: Type 2 Charter Applicants
Section XII: Type 4 Charter Applicants
Section XIII: Type 5 Charter Applicants
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Section XIV: Virtual Charter Applicants
Section XV: Nonprofits operating more than one school in Louisiana
Appendix A – Evidence of Community Partners
Appendix B – Discipline Policy
Appendix C – Job Descriptions for all Leadership Positions
Appendix D – Resumes for all Identified Leadership Team Members
Appendix E – Quote letters from possible insurance providers
Appendix F – School Organization Chart
Appendix G – Staff Roster
Appendix H – Personnel Policies or Employee Manual
Appendix I – Curriculum to be used by the school
Appendix J – Course Scope and Sequence for One Grade in Each School Level
Appendix K – School Calendar & School Day Schedule
Appendix L – Teacher Evaluation Rubric/Tool
Appendix M – Resumes of all Board Members
Appendix N – Charter School Board Member Questionnaire
Appendix O – School Leadership Evaluation Rubric/Tool (in manual)
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Appendix P – Bylaws
Appendix Q – Conflict of Interest Policy
Appendix R – Optional Letters of commitment from private sources
X
Appendix S – Budget Forms 1-4 submitted as a separate excel file
Appendix T – Timelines and Schedule for Pre-Opening
Appendix U – Third Party ESP School Performance Data Chart
Appendix V – Most recent Financial Audit of third party ESP
Appendix W – Most recent annual report of third party ESP
Appendix X – Draft of Management Agreement with Third Party ESP
Appendix Y – Most recent financial audit of corporate partner
Appendix Z – Most recent annual report of corporate partner
Appendix AA – Draft Memorandum of Understanding with Corporate Partner
Appendix BB – Approved board minutes approving draft MOU with Corporate Partner
Appendix CC – Virtual Charter Testing Plan
Appendix DD – Staff/Teacher Policy Acceptable Use of Technology
Appendix EE – Electronic Communication Policy
X
Appendix FF – Applicant Checklist
I certify that I have the authority to submit this application and that all information contained herein is
complete and accurate, realizing that any misrepresentation could result in disqualification from the
application process or revocations after award. I understand that incomplete applications will not be
considered. The person named as the contact person for the application is so authorized to serve as the
primary contact for this application on behalf of the organization.
______________Theresa Groce/TG___
7/29/2012
Signature of President of Nonprofit Corpor
Or Local School Board President
Date
______________Theresa Groce___________
Printed Name of President of Nonprofit Corporation
Or Local School Board President
7/29/2012_____
Date
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