Conference Program - The Western Section of The Wildlife Society

Annual Meeting 2015
Hyatt Vineyard Creek Hotel and Spa
PLENARY SESSION THEME:
Advancing Wildlife Conservation through
Integration and Alignment in Planning
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
DAY AND ROOM DESIGNATIONS: TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY
ROOM
WEDNESDAY
MORNING
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
AFTERNOON
WEDNESDAY
EVENING
Exhibit Hall Set-Up
Alexander Valley
Ballroom III / IV
Chalk Hill
4 – 6 p.m.
Exhibit Hall Open
6 – 9 p.m.
Welcome Reception*
7 – 9 p.m.
Exhibit Hall
7 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Conference Registration
6 – 9 p.m.
Conference Registration
7 a.m. – 7 p.m.
No-Host Cocktail Reception 6
– 7 p.m.
Alexander Foyer
Alexander Valley
Ballroom I
Symposium: Impacts of Marijuana
Cultivation*
8 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Alexander Valley
Ballroom II
Dry Creek Valley
Ballroom
Sonoma Mountain
Russian River 1
Russian River 2
Green Valley
Boardroom
Keynote Address & Dialogue:
Ellie Cohen, President and CEO of
Point Blue Conservation Science
10 – 11:30 a.m.
California Fisher Working Group
8 – 10 a.m.
Concurrent Session
Mesocarnivores
1 – 5 p.m.
Concurrent Session
Birds
1 – 5 p.m.
Members Banquet, Section
Awards & Dutch Raffle*
7 – 10 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions
Wildlife Techniques
(followed by…)
Wildlife Diseases
1 – 5 p.m.
Technical Writing Workshop*
8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. (cont’d)
Resume Workshop for
Undergrads: 3 – 5 p.m.
Yellow-billed Cuckoo Working Group
1 – 5 p.m.
Breakfast Roundtable*
7:30 a.m.
Poster Set-Up: 12 – 2 p.m.
-------Poster Viewing and
Student Poster Judging
2 – 7 p.m.
Western Section TWS
Board Meeting
10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Conservation Affairs Committee
9 – 10 a.m.
Hospitality Suite
#123
Speaker Practice Room: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
-------TWS-WS Retirees Meeting (bring your own lunch)
11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Humboldt State Alumni Reception: 5 – 6 p.m.
* Events requiring separate registration and fee
How to stay in communication with TWS-WS:
Twitter: @WesternTWS
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tws.western
•
Join our new Constant Contact email list (which replaces our old members Yahoo group): http://goo.gl/efWvfr
•
And finally, visit our website for the most up to date information: www.tws-west.org
Program and Schedule
2
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
DAY AND ROOM DESIGNATIONS: THURSDAY & FRIDAY
Room
Alexander Valley
Ballroom III/IV
THURSDAY
MORNING
THURSDAY
AFTERNOON
Exhibit Hall
7 a.m. – 8 p.m.
THURSDAY
EVENING
Poster Reception
6 – 8:00 p.m.
FRIDAY
Exhibit Hall
7 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
-------Silent Auction Closes
9:55 – 10:15 a.m.
Career Fair
10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Chalk Hill
Conference Registration
7 a.m.– 8 p.m.
Conference Registration
7 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Nevada Chapter Meeting
and
Hawaii Chapter Meeting
8 – 9:30 p.m.
Alexander Foyer
Alexander Valley
Ballroom I
Concurrent Sessions
Riparian Birds
(followed by…)
Landbirds & Forest Management
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Alexander Valley
Ballroom II
Concurrent Session
Reptiles and Amphibians
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Dry Creek Valley
Concurrent Session
Mammals
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Sonoma Mountain
Western Wildlife Meeting
7:30 – 8:30 a.m.
-------Resume Workshop for Undergrads
(repeat)
10 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Russian River 1
Russian River 2
Poster Reception
6 – 8 p.m.
Concurrent Session
Grasslands and
Wildlife Conservation
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
San Joaquin Chapter Meeting
8 – 9:30 p.m.
Resume Workshop for
M.S. / Ph.D. Students
8-10 a.m.
-------Resume Critique with Barbara
Peters: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Poster Pick-up
7 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Poster Viewing and Student Paper Judging
7 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Green Valley
Boardroom
Professional Development Mtng
7:30 – 8:30 a.m.
-------How NOT To Give a Scientific
Presentation
11 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Hospitality Suite
#123
Molecular Ecology
Working Group
11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Program and Schedule
Concurrent Sessions
Climate Adaption Strategies
Plenary Session:
(followed by)
Advancing Wildlife Conservation
Effects of Drought on Wildlife
Through Integration And
North Coast, SF Bay Area and
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Alignment In Planning
Sacramento-Shasta Chapter
2 – 5 p.m.
members, meet across the
Concurrent Sessions
street at the Marriott Courtyard Collaboration in Support of Wildlife
(refer to “Schedule at a
Annual Members’
Conservation
Glance”).
Meeting, Members Forum
(followed by)
and Raffle
Linking Research to Policy and
5 – 6 p.m.
Management
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
CDFW Timber Program Meeting
12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
-------CDFW Science Institute Meeting
1:30 – 2:00 p.m.
-------Speaker Practice Room
2:00 – 5:00 p.m.
3
Job Interview Panel
10 – 11 a.m.
Southern California Chapter
Meeting
8 – 9:30 p.m.
Annual Meeting Planning
Committee Wrap-Up Meeting
1 – 2 p.m.
Central Coast Chapter
Meeting 8 – 9:30 p.m.
Planning Committee Wrap-Up
2 – 3 p.m.
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
CONFERENCE SPONSORS
Thank You Conference Sponsors!
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society
PO Box 6756, Albany, CA 94706
www.tws-west.org email: [email protected]
Program and Schedule
4
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
TABLE OF CONTENTS
DAY AND ROOM DESIGNATIONS: TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY ............................................................................... 2
DAY AND ROOM DESIGNATIONS: THURSDAY & FRIDAY ...................................................................................... 3
CONFERENCE SPONSORS ......................................................................................................................................... 4
DETAILED SCHEDULE ................................................................................................................................................ 6
HYATT HOTEL MAP ..................................................................................................................................................... 8
PROFESSIONALS: SUPPORT OUR FUTURE WILDLIFE LEADERS! ....................................................................... 9
GENERAL INFORMATION ......................................................................................................................................... 10
NEARBY FAVORITE RESTAURANTS (ALL ARE WALKING DISTANCE FROM THE HYATT) .............................. 12
EXHIBITOR LIST ......................................................................................................................................................... 13
TWS WESTERN SECTION BOARD MEMBERS ........................................................................................................ 13
2015 ANNUAL MEETING PROGRAM COMMITTEE ................................................................................................. 15
MEETING SCHEDULES.............................................................................................................................................. 16
SPECIAL EVENTS AND WORKSHOPS..................................................................................................................... 17
KEYNOTE ADDRESS AND DIALOGUE..................................................................................................................... 19
PLENARY SCHEDULE, SPEAKER BIOGRAPHIES, AND ABSTRACTS ................................................................. 21
BUSINESS MEETING AND MEMBERS FORUM AGENDA ....................................................................................... 26
CONTRIBUTED PAPER SCHEDULE ......................................................................................................................... 27
SESSION ABSTRACT ELECTRONIC ACCESS INFORMATION .............................................................................. 28
CONCURRENT SESSION TALK SCHEDULE IN GRID FORMAT............................................................................. 29
POSTER SESSION CONTRIBUTED PAPERS........................................................................................................... 44
POSTER BOARD LOCATION MAP ........................................................................................................................... 47
PUBLISH YOUR RESULTS IN WESTERN WILDLIFE! .............................................................................................. 50
WESTERN SECTION STUDENT AFFAIRS COMMITTEE (WS-SAC) ....................................................................... 50
HARASSMENT PREVENTION POLICY ..................................................................................................................... 51
TWS CERTIFICATION PROGRAM ............................................................................................................................. 52
WESTERN FIELD COURSE / FIELD TECHNIQUES IN WILDLIFE ECOLOGY ........................................................ 54
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT ............................................................................................................................ 55
WESTERN SECTION CONSERVATION AFFAIRS COMMITTEE & TWS CONSERVATION AFFAIRS
NETWORK .................................................................................................................................................................. 55
THE WILDLIFE CONFESSIONAL: CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS ................................................................................ 57
TWS WESTERN SECTION COMMITTEES NEED VOLUNTEERS TO SERVE THE SECTION!............................... 59
Program and Schedule
5
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
DETAILED SCHEDULE
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society
Annual Meeting 2015, Santa Rosa
January 26-30, 2015
* Requires separate registration and fee
Monday
8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
12 – 6 p.m.
1 – 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday
Tuesday
8 a.m. – 2 p.m.
8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
1 – 5 p.m.
4 – 6 p.m.
6 – 9 p.m.
7 – 9 p.m.
7 a.m. – 7 p.m.
7:30 a.m.
8 – 10 a.m.
9 – 10 a.m.
10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
10 – 11:30 a.m.
11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
12 – 2 p.m.
1:00 – 5:00 p.m.
1:00 – 5:00 p.m.
1:00 – 2:25 p.m.
2:45 – 5:00 p.m.
2:00 – 7:00 p.m.
2:25 – 2:45 p.m.
3:00 – 5:00 p.m.
5 – 6 p.m.
6 – 7 p.m.
7 – 10 p.m.
Program and Schedule
Symposium – Owl versus Owl: The Conundrum of Managing Barred and Spotted Owls in the Pacific
Northwest* (Alexander I)
Southern Sierra Nevada Fisher Working Group (Russian River Valley 2)
Workshop – Scientific and Technical Writing: From Field Work to Final Draft* (Sonoma Mountain)
(Day 1 of 2)
Watershed Restoration with Point Blue (Off-site. Pre-registration required. Meet in Hyatt Lobby at 8 a.m.)
Symposium – Marijuana Cultivation and Its Impacts on Wildlife, Habitats, and the Wildlife Profession*
(Alexander I)
Workshop – Scientific and Technical Writing: From Field Work to Final Draft* (Sonoma Mountain)
(Day 2 of 2)
TWS-WS Board Meeting (Green Valley Boardroom, all members welcome and encouraged to attend)
Yellow-billed Cuckoo Working Group (Russian River Valley 2)
Vendor Hall Setup
Official Conference Opening: Registration and Vendor Hall (Chalk Hill & Alexander III)
Welcome Reception, Photo Display and Nachos with No-Host Bar* (Alexander Foyer & Alexander III)
Conference Registration (Chalk Hill), Vendors & Exhibitors (Alexander III)
Breakfast Roundtable – Linking Research on Climate Change to On-the-Ground Management*
California Fisher Working Group (Dry Creek I)
Conservation Affairs Committee Meeting (Green Valley Boardroom)
Speaker Ready Room (get key at Registration) (Green Valley)
Keynote Address and Dialogue – Ellie Cohen, President and CEO of Point Blue Conservation Science, with
Field Scientists in Conversation and Dialogue with Audience (Alexander I and II)
TWS-WS Retirees’ Meeting (Green Valley Boardroom) (bring your own lunch)
Lunch Break (on your own)
Poster Set-up (Russian River)
Concurrent Session – Mesocarnivore Techniques and Ecology (Alexander I)
Concurrent Session – Ecology and Management of Birds (Alexander II)
Concurrent Session – Wildlife Techniques (Dry Creek I)
Concurrent Session – Wildlife Diseases (Dry Creek I)
Poster Viewing & Student Poster Judging (Russian River)
Refreshment Break
Résumé Workshop for Undergrads (Sonoma Mountain)
Humboldt State Alumni Reception (Hospitality Suite #123)
No-Host Cocktail Reception (Alexander Foyer)
Members Banquet, Section Awards & Dutch Raffle* (Alexander I and II)
6
January 26–30, 2015
Thursday
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
7 a.m. – 8 p.m.
7 a.m. – 4 p.m.
7:30 – 8:30 a.m.
7:30 – 8:30 a.m.
8:30 – 9:55 a.m.
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
10:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
9:55 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.
10 a.m. – 12 p.m.
11 a.m. – 12 p.m.
11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
12:30 – 2 p.m.
12:30 – 1:30 p.m.
1:30 – 2 p.m.
2 – 5 p.m.
Friday
2 – 5 p.m.
3:30 – 3:50 p.m.
5 – 6 p.m.
6 – 8 p.m.
8 – 9:30 p.m.
7 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
8 – 10:00 a.m.
8:30 – 9:55 a.m.
8:30 – 9:55 a.m.
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
10:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
10:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
9:55 – 10:15 a.m.
10 – 11 a.m.
10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
10:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
10:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
1 – 2 p.m.
2 p.m. through Sunday
Program and Schedule
Conference Registration (Chalk Hill), Vendors & Exhibitors (Alexander III)
Poster Viewing & Student Poster Judging (Russian River)
Professional Development Committee Meeting (Green Valley Boardroom)
Western Wildlife Meeting (Sonoma Mountain)
Concurrent Session - Ecology and Management of Riparian Birds (Alexander I)
Concurrent Session – Ecology and Management of Mammals (Dry Creek)
Concurrent Session – Ecology and Management of Reptiles and Amphibians (Alexander II)
Concurrent Session –Landbirds & Forest Management (Alexander I)
Refreshment Break
Résumé Workshop for Undergrads (repeat) (Sonoma Mountain)
How NOT to Give a Scientific Presentation (Green Valley Boardroom)
Molecular Ecology Working Group, Hospitality Suite #123
Lunch Break (on your own)
CDFW Timber Program Meeting, Green Valley Boardroom
CDFW Science Institute Meeting, Green Valley Boardroom
Plenary Session – Advancing Wildlife Conservation through Integration and Alignment in Planning (Alexander
I and II)
Speaker Practice Room, Green Valley Boardroom
Refreshment Break
Annual Members Meeting, Members Forum & Raffle (Alexander I)
Poster Reception (Dry Creek Ballroom/Alexander II/III/IV)
Chapter Meetings:
 So Cal: Hyatt Green Valley Boardroom
 Central Coast: Hyatt Hospitality Suite #123
 San Joaquin: Hyatt Sonoma Mountain
 Hawaii: Hyatt Alexander Foyer
 Nevada: Hyatt Alexander Foyer
 North Coast: Marriott Courtyard* - Sonoma 3
 Sac-Shasta: Marriott Courtyard* – Santa Rosa
 SF Bay Area: Marriott Courtyard* - Sonoma 1 and 2
Conference Registration (Chalk Hill Foyer), Vendors & Exhibitors (Alexander III)
Résumé Workshop for Graduate Students and PhD’s (Sonoma Mountain Room)
Concurrent Session – Climate Adaptation Strategies (Alexander I)
Concurrent Session – Collaboration in Support of Wildlife Conservation (Alexander II)
Concurrent Session – Grasslands and Wildlife Conservation (Dry Creek)
Concurrent Session – Effects of Drought on Wildlife (Alexander II)
Concurrent Session – Linking Research to Policy and Management (Alexander II)
Refreshment Break & Silent Auction Closes (Alexander III)
Job Interview Panel (Russian River Valley II)
Career Fair (Alexander Foyer)
Résumé Critique with Barbara Peters (requires appointment) (Sonoma Mountain)
Concurrent Session-- Effects of Drought on Wildlife (Alexander I)
Concurrent Session – Linking Research to Policy and Management (Alexander II)
Annual Meeting Planning Committee Wrap-Up Meeting (Green Valley)
Student Field Weekend at Clem Miller Environmental Education Center in Point Reyes*
(requires separate registration)
7
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
HYATT HOTEL MAP
The hotel offers free Wi-Fi internet access in all of our meeting rooms.
Please, no video streaming or downloads which will slow the network for everyone.
Network: Global Meeting Wireless
Program and Schedule
8
password: Wildlife
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
PROFESSIONALS: SUPPORT OUR FUTURE WILDLIFE LEADERS!
Dear Wildlife Professional:
Remember how it felt to be a student at your first conference? Or an early career professional trying to land that first wildlife biology
job? A little overwhelming and intimidating, right?
One of the aims of The Wildlife Society is to support and foster the next generation of wildlife professionals. Please help us meet that
goal by looking for opportunities to engage with students.
Here is how (it is easy!):
•
•
•
•
Students have blue badge-holders. When you see a student, especially one who might need some conference guidance,
introduce yourself and help them engage in a conversation, session or activity.
Fill out your “Ask me about…” button. We will be encouraging students to ask you about it! You can change the topic every day
with your re-usable badge.
Play our Scavenger Hunt game, included in your registration packet, which requires participants to ask questions of other
students and professionals. When you complete the game, you can enter yourself in a raffle for great prizes!
Stop by the Student Activities table and let us know if you would be interested in being a mentor at next year’s meeting.
If you have any questions or ideas about how to help TWS-WS help students get the most out of their experiences at our Annual
Conference, please visit us at the Student Activities table, located near conference registration.
Mandi McElroy (Chair), Student Activities Sub-committee, The Western Section of The Wildlife Society, 2015 Annual Meeting.
Program and Schedule
9
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
GENERAL INFORMATION
Annual Business Meeting and Members’ Forum. The Annual Business Meeting and Members Forum will be held on Thursday from
5 to 6 p.m. in Alexander I. Section members are invited to discuss activities past and future with officers and committee chairs of the
Western Section, including new officers and Executive Board members. Attendance by all members is encouraged (and will be
rewarded)! Also, refer to “Raffle” information below.
Awards Banquet. The 2015 banquet program is simply the awards presentations, followed by networking and a short “Dutch” raffle.
We heard your comments from 2014 loud and clear, and offer a simple evening of recognition for Western Wildlifers and informal
networking with colleagues. The banquet will be held Wednesday evening from 7 to 10 p.m. in Alexander I and II.
California Fisher Working Group. The California Fisher Working Group has met annually in conjunction with the TWS Western
Section meeting since 2001. The group was created to share and discuss current research and conservation matters related to fishers
in California. The 2015 meeting will be held on Wednesday from 8 to 10 a.m. in Dry Creek I.
Carbon Offset and Reducing our Ecological Footprint:
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society is proud to partner with Point Blue Conservation Science to offset the carbon and
ecological footprint of the Santa Rosa 2015 Annual Meeting. Over the past several years, the Western Section has collected donations
from meeting attendees used to fund local restoration projects that will offset the carbon footprint of the annual meeting. This year,
each meeting registration fee includes a $5 surcharge for carbon offsets and ecological karma. TWS-WS will match this surcharge,
meaning that $10 per paid registration will be donated to Point Blue to conduct climate-smart habitat restoration in the North Bay Area
and provide science education to students and community members.
Career Fair. The Career Fair will be held on Friday from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the Alexander Foyer. This is an opportunity for
students to meet prospective employers and discuss careers in the wildlife sciences. Professionals from state and federal agencies and
several consulting firms will be present.
Cell Phone – Informal Policy. The Western Section of The Wildlife Society strongly encourages all meeting participants to silence
their cellular phones and similar devices prior to entering meeting rooms! The informal policy of the Western Section is that, if your
device makes an audible noise during any session, you will be expected to purchase a beverage for every person in your seating row
at that evening’s social function. Seriously…you beep, you buy!
Concurrent Sessions. Concurrent sessions will be held on Wednesday afternoon; Thursday morning and Friday morning (refer to Day
and Room Designations for locations.)
Conservation Affairs Committee Meeting. The Conservation Affairs Committee will meet on Wednesday, 9 to 10 a.m. (Green Valley
Boardroom). Members are welcome to attend and learn how to be more involved in the Conservation Affairs Network of The Wildlife
Society at Section or Chapter level. The committee will brainstorm ways to better inform decision makers about wildlife!
Exhibits and Vendor Displays. Exhibits will be displayed Tuesday 7 to 9 p.m.; Wednesday 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Thursday 7 a.m. to 8
p.m.; and Friday 7 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in Alexander III.
Job Board. Post and view job announcements on the job board in the Foyer area near the Registration Desk. Please do not post
résumés as we cannot be responsible for the security of your personal information.
Job Interview Panel: I Got a Job Interview, Now What? – Getting Jobs in a Tough Job Environment. Join us for a panel
discussion about the skills employers desire to see in prospective new hires and what candidates can expect in the interview process.
Panelists include biologists from Federal and State agencies and from private industry. Questions will also be fielded from the
audience. The panel discussion will be held on Friday from 10 to 11 a.m. (Russian River Valley 2).
Keynote Program. The Keynote Address and Dialogue will be held on Wednesday from 10 to 11:30 a.m. in Alexander I and II.
Following the keynote, Point Blue Conservation Science field biologists will join Ellie for conversation and dialogue, discussing
audience-directed questions.
Local Services. A listing of local services (banks, pharmacies, grocery stores, hospital, etc.) is available at the Hyatt concierge desk.
Program and Schedule
10
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Messages and Announcements. Post and view messages and announcements at the message board near the Registration Desk.
Molecular Ecology Working Group. This group is a newly formed working group initiated at the recent National TWS meeting in
Pittsburgh this past October. There is an informational meeting for people interested in joining the working group and is open to all, on
Thursday at 11:30 a.m. in the Hospitality Suite #123.
Odor Sensitivity. Please be courteous to those who may be sensitive to chemical smells, and refrain from wearing perfumes,
colognes and strong-smelling hand lotions.
Videotaping and Photography Policy. Videotaping and photography of conference participants at conference events may occur.
Western Section of TWS may use photographs and videos of conference attendees for any lawful purpose, including publicity,
illustration, advertising, newsletter, and web content. During sessions that will be photographed or videotaped, "no photo" areas will be
available in each room. More information will be available at the conference registration desk. Your registration and attendance at this
conference confirms your acknowledgement and agreement with these terms for use of videos and photographs.
Plenary Session. The plenary session, titled “Advancing Wildlife Conservation through Integration and Alignment in Planning” will be
held on Thursday from 2 to 5 p.m. in Alexander I and II. There will be no concurrent sessions during the plenary session. Everyone
should plan to attend.
Poster Session. Conference posters will be available for viewing in the Russian River Valley room on Wednesday from 2 to 7 p.m. and
Thursday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Poster Reception will be Thursday from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Dry Creek ballroom. A no-host bar will be
available. Authors will be available to answer questions about their posters during the Poster Reception. Posters will be available for
pickup on Friday in the Russian River room from 7 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Professional Development Committee (PDC) Meeting. The PDC will meet on Thursday morning from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. This is an
opportunity for PDC chapter coordinators and PDC Section members to discuss objectives and schedules for 2015 events and
activities. Whether your interest is as a subject matter expert for a topic of interest or as host of a facility that would be perfect for field
workshops, this meeting is a great chance to make an action plan to serve Western Wildlifers.
Raffles!! Raffle proceeds support the Western Section’s commitment to providing students with programs and scholarships,
encouraging their involvement and attendance at this meeting as well as our professional development events.
Raffle tickets will be sold by TWS-WS board members and designated volunteers throughout the conference up to the “last call” or
when tickets are sold out. For more detailed information, please visit the Raffle/Silent Auction table in the Exhibit Hall where all raffle
and silent auction items will be available for viewing.
This year we will hold two raffles! The first raffle will be conducted at the Members’ Banquet where we will hold our first ever Dutch
Raffle (a.k.a. bucket raffle). Each item will have a bucket and purchasers will drop tickets into the bucket of each prize they would like
to win. Raffle Master of Ceremonies Joe DiDonato returns to the banquet stage on Wednesday night to draw a winning ticket from each
bucket. The second raffle will be held at our Thursday late afternoon Members’ Meeting; this raffle is a traditional raffle where all the
tickets are drawn out of one drum. Raffle tickets will be drawn at the end of the Members’ Meeting, along with a door prize.
Silent Auction. Our Silent Auction proceeds also support student programs and scholarships. Items will be available for bidding in the
Exhibit Hall throughout the conference until the first break Friday morning. Bidders need not be present to win. However, prizes will not
be mailed and must be picked up and paid for by the winner (or a proxy) before 12:30 p.m. on Friday when the conference closes. We
reserve the right to award a silent auction item to the next highest bidder if payment or pickup is not completed by closing time on
Friday at 12:30 p.m.
Recycled and Low Environmental Impact Program Materials. This program has been printed on 30% post-consumer recycled and
Forest Stewardship Council-certified paper. In addition, the programs were printed using Toshiba’s eco-Style printer which is made with
30% recycled plastics and is Energy Star Tier 2 compliant. Ascent’s participation in Close the Loop, a zero waste to landfill recycling
program, allows for 100% recycling of collected consumable supplies such as cartridges, drum units and toner bottles. Best of all, it
manufactures eLumber™ using all the waste that was once considered unusable. Thank you to Ascent Environmental for handling the
layout, and printing this program at no charge to TWS-WS. They also provided outstanding editing skils (AND that last bit is just a silly
joke, for the few who actually read these things.)
Program and Schedule
11
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Refreshment and Lunch Breaks. Light refreshments will be provided at the early morning, mid-morning and afternoon breaks. Lunch
will not be provided. For information on local restaurants and services, inquire at the Registration Desk or at the Hyatt concierge desk.
Registration Desk. Registration materials, general information, and Western Section membership applications can be picked up at the
Registration Desk.
Résumé Workshop. The Western Section is pleased to announce the return of our fantastic résumé workshop! Barbara Peters
(retired) from the Career Center at Humboldt State University will offer outstanding guidance on job searching to students and young
professionals.
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•
•
Wednesday 3 – 5 p.m. (Sonoma Mountain) Undergraduate Students
Thursday 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. (Sonoma Mountain) Undergraduate Students (Repeat Session)
Friday 8 – 10 a.m. (Sonoma Mountain) MS to PhD Level Students
Re-usable Name badge Holders. The Western Section is now using re-usable name badge holders. At the end of the conference,
please drop your name badge holder off at the Registration Desk so it can be re-used next year. Thanks!
Speaker Practice Room. The Green Valley Boardroom is available throughout most of the meeting for speakers to practice their
presentations; obtain a key from the Registration Desk.
Student Presentation Contest. Recognition is awarded to the best student presentations, both oral and posters. Award winners will
be announced on our website and in our spring newsletter after the meeting.
Welcome Reception. A welcome reception will be held on Tuesday from 7 to 9 p.m. in Alexander II-IV. A nacho bar will be served and
a no-host bar will be available. A ticket or name badge symbol indicating payment is required for this event. Wildlife photos submitted
by Western Wildlifers and Wildlings will be on display.
NEARBY FAVORITE RESTAURANTS
(all are walking distance from the Hyatt)
A’Roma Roasters Coffee, Tea &
Ice Cream
95 5th Street; Sunday–Wednesday
6 a.m. – 10 p.m;
Thursday 6 a.m. – 11 p.m.
Chevys Fresh Mex
24 4th St; Sunday–Thursday
11 a.m. – 10 p.m.
La Gare Restaurant (French)
208 Wilson Street Reservations
suggested; Daily 5 – 10 p.m.
(closes at 9 on Sunday)
LoCoco’s Cucina Rustica (Italian)
117 4th Street
Saturday–Sunday 5 – 10 p.m.
Closed Monday.
Tuesday–Friday
11:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. & 5 –10 p.m.
Jack and Tony’s Rest. &
Whiskey Bar
115 4th St.; Sunday 4 p.m. – 2 a.m. Omelette Express (a favorite!)
Monday–Saturday
112 4th Street
11:30 – 2:00 a.m.
Monday–Friday 6:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Saturday–Sunday 7 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Khoom Lanna Thai Restaurant
107 4th St.; Saturday–Sunday
Stark’s Steakhouse
12 – 3 p.m. & 5 – 9:30 p.m.
521 Adams Street
Monday–Friday
Monday–Friday 11:30 a.m. – 9 p.m.
11 a.m. – 2:30 p.m & 5 – 9:30 p.m.
Saturday–Sunday 5 – 9 p.m.
Station 1870 Wine Bar
123 4th St
Closed Tuesday
Thursday–Sunday 12 – 10 p.m.
Monday–Wednesday 4 –10 p.m.
Flying Goat Coffee (Artisanal)
10 4th St
Daily 7 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Toad In the Hole
(Classic Pub, a favorite!)
116 5th St
Monday–Thursday
12 p.m. – 12:30 a.m.
Friday 12 p.m. – 2 a.m.
Saturday 9:30 a.m. – 2 a.m.
Sunday 12 p.m. – 12 a.m.
Sushi To Dai For
119 4th St
Monday–Friday 12 – 3 p.m.
Saturday–Sunday 5 – 11 p.m.
Jackson's Bar and Oven
135 4th St
Monday–Thursday 11:30 a.m. – 10
The Pullman Kitchen
p.m.
205 5th St
Monday–Friday 11:30 a.m. – 9 p.m. Friday–Saturday 11:30 a.m. – 11
Saturday–Sunday 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. p.m.
Sunday 11:30 a.m. – 9 p.m.
& 5 – 9 p.m.
Local Favorites that are a longer walk / short drive:
El Coqui Ruerto Rican Cuisine
400 Mendocino Ave
Monday–Saturday
11 a.m. – 10 p.m.
Sunday 12 – 9 p.m.
Program and Schedule
Russian River Brewery
725 4th Street
Sunday–Thursday
11 a.m. – midnight
Friday–Saturday 11 to 1 a.m.
12
Third Street Ale Works
610 3rd St
Sunday–Thursday
11 a.m. – midnight
Friday–Saturday 11 – 1 a.m.
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
EXHIBITOR LIST
Anatum Field Solutions
14845 SW Murray Scholls
Dr., Suite 110, PMB 602
Beaverton, OR 97007
(800) 980-4649
[email protected]
com
Ascent Environmental, Inc.
455 Capitol Mall, Suite 300
Sacramento, CA 95814
(916) 444-7301
[email protected]
nmental.com
Dudek
605 3rd Street
Encinitas, CA 92024
(760) 479-4256
[email protected]
Fletcher Conservation Lands
2624 Eagle Ave
Alameda, CA 94501
(510) 326-8175
[email protected]
PG&E
2730 Gateway Oaks Drive
Sacramento, CA 95833
(916) 206-9657
[email protected]
Tomahawk Live Trap
PO Box 155
Hazelhurst, WI 54531
(715) 356-4600
[email protected]
Holohil Systems Ltd.
77 Arbutus Spur, Sidney Isl.
PO Box 2398
Sidney BC 833
[email protected]
Quad Knopf
901 E Main St
Visalia, CA 93292
(559) 733-0440
[email protected]
USDA Forest Service
1323 Club Drive
Vallejo, CA 94503
(707) 562-8954
[email protected]
Lotek Wireless
115 Pony Drive
Newmarket, ON 375
[email protected]
Sequoia Ecological Consulting
822 Hartz Way, Suite 206
Danville, CA 94526
(925) 989-7011
[email protected]
Westervelt Ecological Services
600 North Market Blvd, Suite 3
Sacramento, CA 95834
(916) 646-3644
[email protected]
North Star Science and
Technology, LLC
PO Box 438
King George, VA 22485
(410) 961-6692
[email protected]
Swaim Biological, Inc.
4435 First Street, PMB # 312
Livermore, CA 94551
[email protected]
TWS WESTERN SECTION BOARD MEMBERS
2014 Elected Officers
President
Natasha Dvorak
Swaim Biological, Inc.
Past-President
Doug Bell
East Bay Regional Park District
President-Elect
Don Yasuda
U.S. Forest Service
Section Representative
Cynthia Perrine
TWS-WS
2014 Appointed Officers
Treasurer
John McNerney
City of Davis
Secretary
Janae Scruggs
Western Wildlife
Bridget Souza
Newsletter Editor
Debra Hawk
PG&E
Program and Schedule
Chapter Representatives
Chapter Representatives
California Central Coast
Wendy Knight
Cal Poly SLO Student Chapter
Brooke Wainwright
California North Coast
Sal Chinnici
Humboldt Redwood Company
Humboldt State Student Chapter
Darwin Mayhew
Hawaii
Rachel Sprague
NOAA - National Marine Fisheries
Nevada
Mackenzie Jeffress
Nevada Dept. of Wildlife
Sacramento-Shasta
Hal Holland
Westervelt Ecological Services
San Francisco Bay Area
Matthew Bettelheim, CWB
URS Corporation, Inc.
San Joaquin Valley
Jeff Davis
Colibri Ecological Consulting
Southern California
Jeff Lincer
Researchers Implementing
Conservation Action
UC Davis Student Chapter
Cameron Clay
UCSB Student Student Chapter
Katelyn Pilcher
San Francisco State Student
Chapter
Natalie Greer
Committee Chairs
Awards and Grants
Richard Burg
CA Dept. of Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Affairs
Erin Aquino-Carhart
CA Dept. of Fish and Wildlife
Membership
Don Yasuda
U.S. Forest Service
Professional Development
Rhys Evans
Vandenberg Air Force Base
University of Nevada, Reno Student and
Jessica Martini-Lamb
Chapter
Jamie Chambers
Sonoma County Water Agency
Contractors
Student Affairs
Mandi McElroy
Accountant
URS Corporation, Inc.
Mike Chapel
and
Program Director
David Wyatt
Cynthia Perrine
Sacramento City College
Project Manager
Candace Renger
Webmaster
Eric Renger
13
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Program and Schedule
14
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
2015 ANNUAL MEETING PROGRAM COMMITTEE
Program Chair
Don Yasuda, U.S. Forest Service
President
Natasha Dvorak
Professional Development Events
Rhys Evans
Program Director
Cynthia Perrine
Meeting Planner
Candace Renger
Banquet
Cynthia Perrine, Natasha Dvorak, Don Yasuda, Richard Burg
Abstract Review
Don Yasuda
Audio Visual Captains
Keelan Dann, Ona Alminas, Cynthia Perrine
Breakfast Roundtable
Jeff Lincer, Mackenzie Jeffress, EJ Koford
Career Fair
Karen Swaim
Conference Volunteers Management
Janae Scruggs, Patrick Tweedy
Keynote & Conversation
Cynthia Perrine
Local Arrangements & Info
Brad Valentine
Onsite Registration
Janine Payne Schneir
Photo Collection Submissions
Eveline Larrucea
Poster Session
Jessica Martini Lamb, Carlos Alvarado
Printed Program Editing
Rhys Evans, Debra Hawk, John Perrine,
Don Yasuda
Point Blue Watershed Restoration Day
Jessica Martini Lamb
Raffle and Silent Auction Coordination
Sandra Hunt-von Arb, Lisa Ollivier
Sponsors & Exhibitors Chair
Sarah Hegg
Student Activities Subcommittee
Mandi McElroy (Chair), Ivan Parr, David Wyatt, Erika Walther, Rachel
Fichman, Rachel Sprague, Tammy Lim, Don Yasuda, Cynthia Perrine,
Candace Renger, Sarah Hegg,
Erin Aquino Carhart, Jeff Lincer, Wendy Knight
Student Field Weekend
Ivan Parr (Chair), Rachel Sprague, Don Yasuda, Tammy Lim, Rachel
Fichman, Claire Woolf, Mandi McElroy, Cynthia Perrine, Candace Renger,
Mehrey Vaghti
Student Presentation Competition
Karen Converse, Brian Barton, Janae Scruggs
Program and Schedule
15
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
MEETING SCHEDULES
Official Meetings
Tuesday, January 27
10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Western Section Executive Board Meeting (Green Valley Boardroom)
Wednesday, January 28
9 – 10 a.m.
Conservation Affairs Committee (Green Valley Boardroom)
11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
TWS-WS Retirees’ Meeting (Green Valley Boardroom)
Thursday, January 29
7:30 – 8:30 a.m.
Professional Development Committee (Green Valley Boardroom)
7:30 – 8:30 a.m.
Western Wildlife editorial meeting (Sonoma Mountain)
5 – 6 p.m.
Annual TWS Western Section Business Meeting and Members’ Forum (Alexander I and II)
8 – 9:30 p.m.
Chapter Meetings
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
So Cal: Hyatt Green Valley Boardroom
Central Coast: Hyatt Hospitality Suite #123
San Joaquin: Hyatt Sonoma Mountain
Hawaii: Hyatt Alexander Foyer
Nevada: Hyatt Alexander Foyer
North Coast: Marriott Courtyard* - Sonoma 3
Sac-Shasta: Marriott Courtyard* - Santa Rosa
SF Bay Area: Marriott Courtyard* - Sonoma 1 and 2
*The Marriott Courtyard is a 3-minute walk. Cross Railroad Street at the W. 3rd Street intersection.
Friday, January 30
1 – 2 p.m.
Conference Planning Committee and Wrap-Up (Green Valley Boardroom)
Other Meetings
Monday, January 26
12 – 6 p.m.
Southern Sierra Nevada Fisher Working Group (Russian River 2)
Tuesday, January 27
1 – 5 p.m.
Yellow-billed Cuckoo Working Group (Russian River 2)
Wednesday, January 28
8 – 10 a.m.
California Fisher Working Group (Dry Creek I)
5 – 6 p.m.
Humboldt State Alumni Reception (Hospitality Suite #123)
Thursday, January 29
11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Molecular Ecology Work Group (Hospitality Suite #123)
12:30 – 1:30 p.m.
CDFW Timber Program Meeting (Green Valley Board Room)
1:30 – 2 p.m.
CDFW Science Institute Meeting (Green Valley Board Room)
Program and Schedule
16
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
SPECIAL EVENTS AND WORKSHOPS
•
Breakfast Roundtable
Linking Research on Climate Change to On-the-Ground Management
Wednesday, 7:30 a.m., Russian River Valley Room. (Separate fee and advance registration required.)
The objective of the Roundtable is to provide more opportunities for conference attendees to exchange ideas and cultivate
productive professional relationships.
To encourage conversation, the (round) tables will seat 6 to 8 people and the discussion can be lively, but not too loud. Each table
will be provided with background information, an introduction to the topics, simple guidelines, and the event will end with a
summary of ideas from each table.
•
Résumé Workshops & Résumé Critiques
with Barbara Peters, Humboldt State University (retired)
Wednesday afternoon
3 to 5 p.m.
Sonoma Mountain
Undergrads
Thursday Morning
10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Sonoma Mountain
Undergrads
Friday morning
8 to 10 a.m.
Sonoma Mountain
MS/PhD
Résumé Writing for Undergrads and Graduating Seniors: Barbara Peters (retired Career Counselor) will present Résumé
Writing workshops for undergraduate students on both Wednesday afternoon and Thursday morning (same material presented
each day). Barbara will provide information and handouts about putting together an effective résumé and cover letter targeted to
positions in the wildlife and environmental fields (seasonal, internship, and professional).
Résumé Writing for Graduate Students: Barbara Peters (Career Counselor) will also present a Résumé / Curriculum Vitae
Writing workshop for graduate students (MS & PhD) on Friday morning. Barbara will provide information and handouts about
putting together an effective CV / résumé and cover letter targeted to professional positions in the wildlife and environmental fields.
In all three workshops, Barbara will also provide a list of special skills that students develop as part of their undergraduate and
graduate experiences (research techniques, field equipment & techniques, training, licenses, etc.), as well as interviewing tips and
on-line resources for job hunting in these fields.
On Friday, Barbara will be available, on a sign-up basis, from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., in Sonoma Mountain to critique CV /
résumé; she is also willing to look at emailed résumés & CVs after the annual meeting.
Barbara Peters worked at Humboldt State University (HSU) in Arcata, CA, as a Career Counselor for 30 years. At HSU, she
specialized in helping students (undergrads and graduate students) in the natural resources and sciences with career decisionmaking, gaining summer job and internship experiences, and professional job hunting upon graduation. Prior to her time at HSU,
she worked for 5 years in the Career Planning and Placement Office at Idaho State University. She obtained her B.A. degree in
Political Science (1971) and her M.A.Ed. in Student Personnel Work in Higher Education (1976) from Idaho State University. She
lives in Eureka, CA with her fisherman husband and a Springer Spaniel, Maizey – they have raised 2 litters of Springer Spaniels
over the years. Barbara has been presenting these workshops at The Western Section since 2007 and at the Western Section
Annual Meeting since 2009.
•
How NOT to Give a Scientific Presentation Workshop
with Dr. Jon Hooper, California State University, Chico
Thursday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Green Valley Boardroom
Whether you are just starting out or looking to improve, this informative (and likely humorous) mini-workshop will provide you with
information and tips for presenting your research work to your peers. Instructor Jon Hooper will provide demonstrations on how to
give an effective presentation….and how NOT to. Dr. Jon K. Hooper, Professor, CSU Chico (and Certified Wildlife Biologist,
Certified Interpretive Trainer with a Ph.D. in Wildlife Ecology and 35+ years teaching communication workshops around the
country).
Program and Schedule
17
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
•
Career Fair
Friday, 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., Alexander Foyer
This is an opportunity for students to meet prospective employers and discuss careers in the wildlife sciences. Professionals from
state and federal agencies and several consulting firms will be present. Everyone is invited to attend the Career Fair. The
Student/Professional Lunch, served at noon, is free to students and professionals who indicated on their registration form that they
would attend; a ticket or name badge symbol is required.
•
Job Interview Panel: I Got a Job Interview, Now What?
Getting Jobs in a Tough Job Environment with David Wyatt, Sacramento City College
Friday, 10 a.m. – 11 a.m., Russian River Valley
The job interview process can be an intimidating experience for the job seeker. To help make this less mysterious, a group of 4 to
6 invited speakers from agencies, private consulting, and academia will provide insights into what can be expected during a job
interview with their respective employers. Topics include how to prepare for the interview, how you should present yourself, and
the range of potential questions you may be asked. In addition, an open discussion follows the presentations. This workshop will
be led by David Wyatt who teaches in the Biology Department at Sacramento City College.
NOTES
Program and Schedule
18
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
KEYNOTE ADDRESS AND DIALOGUE
Wednesday, 10:00 to 11:30 a.m. (Alexander II)
Ellie Cohen, the President and CEO of Point Blue Conservation Science, will deliver our 2015 Keynote
Address. The Western Section designated Point Blue Conservation Science the “Conservationist of the
Year” in 2010. Under Ellie’s leadership, Point Blue has grown to a hemisphere-scale organization,
conducting bird-focused applied ecosystem studies from the Sierra to the sea. After the keynote
address, a group of Point Blue field scientists will join Ellie on-stage for conversation around questions
collected from the audience.
Ellie Cohen has served as President and CEO of Point Blue Conservation Science since 1999. Born
and raised in Baltimore, Maryland, Ms. Cohen received her undergraduate degree with honors in
Botany (focus on ecology) from Duke University. Field studies in butterfly ecology brought her to
California in 1979.
She later received her Master in Public Policy degree from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of
Government, where she was honored with the Policy Analysis Exercise Award for highly distinguished
performance and the first annual Robert F. Kennedy Public Service Award. In 2001, she was awarded a fellowship to Stanford
University’s Executive Program for Non-profit Leaders at the Graduate School of Business.
Ellie co-founded the Bay Area Ecosystem Climate Change Consortium, bringing together scientists and natural resource managers to
cooperatively conserve nature’s benefits in the face of accelerating extremes, for wildlife and our communities. Ellie is an invited
member of the National Wildlife Federation’s Climate-Smart Conservation Team and serves as Chair of the California Landscape
Conservation Cooperative. She is also a member of the Central Valley and SF Bay Joint Ventures’ Executive Committees.
Ellie is the recipient of the BayNature 2012 Local Environmental Hero Award for Conservation Advocacy. As Ellie explained, “This
award truly belongs to PRBO’s outstanding staff and Board leaders as well as many of our partners! It is a team effort!” Read her
interview with Bay Nature here.
In 2009 she was named one of the “100 Women Taking the Lead to Save Our Planet” in the United States as part of National Women’s
History Month, recognizing her contributions to catalyzing conservation solutions to the impacts of rapidly accelerating environmental
change on nature.
Ellie speaks regularly on climate change, ecosystems and adaptive solutions that benefit wildlife as well as human communities.
Ellie and her family live in San Anselmo, California.
Program and Schedule
19
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Jaime Jahncke, Ph.D., California Current Group Director, received his Ph.D. in Biological Sciences at the
University of California, Irvine. His Point Blue work aims to advance marine conservation and by
conducting research and developing tools to inform climate adaptation, marine spatial planning and
ecosystem based management approaches. Jaime leads the Applied California Current Ecosystem
Studies (ACCESS) Partnership to support marine wildlife conservation and healthy marine ecosystems by
conducting ocean research to inform resource management, and the Whale Alert – West Coast
Partnership to protect whales by using science, innovative technology, and collaborative community
efforts to decrease ship strikes to whales.
Geoff Geupel has been with Point Blue for 35 years and is Director of the Emerging Program and
Partnerships Group and a senior management team member. His recent work has evolved from
monitoring and assessment to implementation with the goal of putting better, more appropriate
conservation practices on the ground to improve conservation outcomes and reduce the negative impacts
of climate change, habitat loss, and other threats to wildlife and people.
Wendell Gilgert, Working Lands Program Director, Emerging Programs and Partnerships, is a Great
Valley native and joins Point Blue following a 34-year career with the Natural Resources Conservation
Service where he most recently served as the Western Region Wildlife Biologist and NRCS Partners in
Flight representative in Portland, OR. Wendell’s knowledge and experience with fish and wildlife issues,
habitat management and restoration and how to work with private landowners helps the organization plan,
design, implement and monitor conservation actions on their working lands. He is leading the new
Rangeland Watershed Initiative that intends to help re-water California watersheds.
Catherine Hickey, Conservation Director, Pacific Coast and Central Valley, received her M.S. in
Conservation Ecology from UC Davis. A leader in bird conservation planning from the local to international
scale for two decades, she currently serves on steering committees of the Central Valley Joint Venture,
Migratory Bird Conservation Partnership, US Shorebird Conservation Council, North American Bird
Conservation Initiative, and the Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network.
Kristen Dybala, Ph.D., UC Davis Ecology (2012) is a Postdoctoral Researcher, Pacific Coast and Central
Valley, and focuses on bringing together the best available science to inform conservation planning in the
Central Valley. She collaborates with partners at the Central Valley Joint Venture to revise sections of the
2006 implementation plan, focusing on breeding riparian landbirds and wintering shorebirds.
Melissa Pitkin, Outreach and Education Group Director, works with Point Blue’s team of scientists and
educators to share our conservation science findings and recommendations to inspire action. She firmly
believes in training the next generation of conservationists, scientists, and educators by connecting
people to science and nature. Melissa has a M.S. in Environmental Education from Southern Oregon
University and a B.S. in Wildlife and Conservation Biology from UC Davis. She first came to Point Blue as
a third grader on a field trip to observe bird banding at Point Blue’s Palomarin Field Station, and returning
in 1997 as a biologist working at the Cosumnes River Preserve. Over the past 17 years, Melissa has
grown the Education and Outreach Group to reaching over 5,000 people of all ages each year, through
programs in the field and in classrooms, including overseeing the award-winning program called STRAW
(Students and Teachers Restoring A Watershed). Western Section note: Melissa was an instructor-mentor for the Western Field
Camp, a Professional Development Event coordinated by TWS Western Section.
Program and Schedule
20
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
PLENARY SCHEDULE, SPEAKER BIOGRAPHIES, AND ABSTRACTS
Advancing Wildlife Conservation through
Integration and Alignment in Planning
Thursday, January 29, 2015, 2 - 5 p.m.
Alexander I and II
Chair: Don Yasuda, TWS Western Section President-Elect
With the pace of environmental, social, and global change, the scale of our conservation work must link the local site to the project to
the watershed and larger regional and statewide landscapes. We have a few examples of large-scale conservation planning that took a
big upfront investment but are now starting to pay off dividends for resources such as the Bay-Delta Conservation Plan and the Desert
Renewable Energy Conservation Plan. New efforts such as Integrated Regional Planning show great promise. Local and regional land
trusts are making great strides to work with farmers, ranchers, rural residents and communities to provide for sustainable agriculture
through maintaining working open lands and areas that provide for conservation, recreation, and sustainable development.
Government agencies are realizing the need to cooperate and collaborate to share and stretch limited resources. The result of
integrated and aligned landscape conservation planning is that local, state and federal government agencies and representatives,
scientists and researchers, non-governmental organizations, interest groups, and the public are all talking and working together to find
common solutions. This will benefit us all by forcing us to tackle difficult, but ever critical questions of how to best balance competing
interests while providing for ecological, social, and economic sustainability for people and resources. We hope to set the stage to
engage our thinking and inspire us to work together to meet a challenge of the California Biodiversity Council (http://biodiversity.ca.gov)
to conservation planning - we need to “Go Big or Go Home”.
2:00 – 2:05 p.m.
Don Yasuda, Welcome and Announcements; Plenary Introduction
2:05 – 2:25 p.m.
Jim Kenna, California State Director for BLM and Co-chair of the CA Biodiversity Council.
California Biodiversity Council: The Time is Right to Go Big or Go Home
2:25 – 2:45 p.m.
Denny Grossman, Senior Advisor for Environmental Science and Policy, CA Strategic Growth
Council; Implementing an Integrated Regional Planning Program in California
2:45 – 3:05 p.m.
Debra Schlafmann, LCC Coordinator, CA Landscape Conservation Cooperative; Landscape
Conservation Cooperatives: Bridging Science and Management
3:05 – 3:25 p.m.
Barnie Gyant, Deputy Regional Forester, USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region, CA
Ecological Restoration: The Balance of Planning Versus Need for Action
3:25 – 3:45 p.m.
Refreshment Break
3:45 – 4:05 p.m.
Bob Neale, Stewardship Director, Sonoma Land Trust; Connecting Landowners and Communities
in Conservation
4:05 – 4:25 p.m.
Jim Branham, Executive Director, Sierra Nevada Conservancy; Putting It Together: Tackling
Challenges, Capturing Opportunities and Enjoying Successes
4:25 – 4:45 p.m.
Speaker Panel, Questions and Discussion
4:45 – 4:55 p.m.
Closing
Do not forget the Business Meeting,
Members Forum, and Raffle
which immediately follow the Plenary,
5 to 6 p.m., in the same room.
Program and Schedule
21
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Plenary Speaker Biographical Sketches and Abstracts
Jim Kenna, California State Director for BLM and
Co-Chair of the California Biodiversity Council
California Biodiversity Council: The Time is Right to Go Big or Go Home
The California Biodiversity Council (CBC) was formed in 1991 to improve coordination and cooperation
between the various resource management and environmental protection organizations at federal, state,
and local levels. Strengthening ties between local communities and governments has been a focus of
the Council by way of promoting strong local leadership and encouraging comprehensive solutions to
regional issues. The CBC currently has 42 members.
Drawing from experiences spanning decades, as well as from current examples in California, this talk is geared for those who work on
public policy, planning and operations at all levels of government. It addresses why some issues and problems require thinking and
acting at the landscape scale. It also addresses why now is the time to change some of the patterns and tendencies that prevent
working together. With these ideas as foundation, the talk also explores what it means, and does not mean, to work effectively at large
scales, and how necessary partnerships can be created. In support of these efforts, the CBC passed a resolution in 2013 on
Strengthening Agency Alignment for Natural Resource Conservation.
BIO: Jim Kenna was appointed the California State Director for the Bureau of Land Management in 2011, with responsibilities in
overseeing the management of more than 15.2 million acres of public lands in California and 1.6 million acres in northwestern Nevada.
Jim began his federal career as a wildland firefighter with the U.S. Forest Service in Prescott, Arizona. He previously served in
numerous key agency positions with BLM in Arizona, Oregon, Washington, D.C., and the Palm Springs Field Office in California and as
a Budget Analyst with the Department of the Interior in Washington, D.C.
While working with the BLM, Jim contributed his leadership and planning to various national and statewide initiatives and conservation
efforts. He provided leadership in establishing Service First and Stewardship Contracting initiatives and in coordinating federal, state
and local land use planning processes balancing community needs, water rights and conservation of multiple species in southern
California. During his time as the BLM Palm Springs Field Manager, he worked with communities and tribes leading to the
establishment of the Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument. He also coordinated a national conservation strategy
for sagebrush habitats with Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies and the Western Governors Association. Most recently
he led an interagency, landscape-level renewable energy and conservation planning effort covering more than 22 million acres in the
California desert. Jim is currently a co-chair of the California Biodiversity Council along with California Secretary for Natural Resources,
John Laird.
Jim has a bachelor’s degree in economics from Prescott College in Arizona. When not at work, Jim enjoys spending time with his wife,
two sons and grandchildren, hiking, rafting, reading and enjoying music.
Program and Schedule
22
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Denny Grossman, Ph.D.,
Senior Advisor for Environmental Science and Policy, CA Strategic Growth
Council
Implementing an Integrated Regional Planning Program in California
On October 6, 2014, the California Strategic Growth Council resolved to, “Coordinate state agencies for
the development and implementation of an Integrated Regional Planning approach to increase the
efficiency and effectiveness of regional development and natural resource conservation.” The California
Biodiversity Council subsequently passed a resolution to align its member agencies to support the
regional conservation assessment and planning components of this Integrated Regional Planning
initiative.
This Integrated Regional Planning program is committed to envisioning and managing for a sustainable balance between conservation
and development at a regional scale. This process will require a regional assessment of conservation goals to provide the context for
prioritization of resource management strategies and implementation of important development initiatives. The integration of these
conservation and development frameworks will also focus project mitigation resources to advance regional conservation goals through
targeted stewardship, restoration and acquisition programs.
This presentation will provide an overview of the emerging Integrated Regional Planning initiative in California, and identify next steps
for program implementation.
BIO: Dr. Dennis Grossman is the Senior Advisor for Environmental Science and Policy at the Strategic Growth Council (SGC). This
position coordinates the overall development and implementation of Integrated Regional Planning (IRP) programs for the State of
California and also focuses on the application of the IRP approach to address the environmental assessment and mitigation
components for High Speed Rail. Dr. Grossman joined SGC after providing science and policy leadership in non-profit conservation
organizations for the past 25 years. Prior positions he has held include Senior Scientist at the Conservation Biology Institute, Senior
Environmental Policy Advisor for The Nature Conservancy, Vice President for Science at NatureServe, and Chief Ecologist at The
Nature Conservancy.
Dr. Grossman is a recognized authority on biodiversity and ecological assessments, conservation planning, and the evaluation of
environmental impacts. He has made significant contributions to the classification and mapping of terrestrial, freshwater and
coastal/marine ecosystems, and the advancement of ecosystem and landscape approaches for effective conservation and resource
management. In recent years, Dr. Grossman has focused on the application of scientific knowledge and decision support technology to
improve the effectiveness of sustainable development and conservation decision making processes. He has advanced the
environmental planning and assessment capabilities of multi-lateral financial institutions, development agencies and corporations
through the application of these approaches. Dr. Grossman is co-chair of the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Section of the International
Association for Impact Assessment. Dr. Grossman earned his Ph.D. in Plant Ecology from the University of Hawaii through the EastWest Center Environment and Policy Institute. He completed M.S. and B.S. degrees in Botany at the University of Wisconsin –
Madison.
Program and Schedule
23
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Debra Schlafmann, LCC Coordinator,
California Landscape Conservation Cooperative
Landscape Conservation Cooperatives: Bridging Science and Management
The conservation challenges of the 21st Century are more complex than ever before. Widespread
threats such as drought, climate change and habitat fragmentation are too large for any single
organization to meet alone and challenge our ability to conserve wildlife for the future. It will take a
combined effort involving many public and private organizations to deal with the landscape-scale issues
facing us all. Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) provide a forum for States, Tribes, Federal
agencies, non-governmental organizations, universities and other groups to work together in a new way.
LCCs are applied conservation science partnerships with two main functions. The first is to provide the science and technical expertise
needed to support conservation planning at landscape scales – beyond the reach or resources of any one organization. The second
function of LCCs is to promote collaboration among their members in defining shared conservation goals. With these goals in mind,
partners can identify where and how they will take action, within their own authorities and organizational priorities, to best contribute to
the larger conservation effort. LCCs help partners to see how their activities can “fit” with those of other partners to achieve a bigger
and more lasting impact. I will be providing some examples of how LCCs have brought a new level of scientific capability to its
conservation partners and the benefits of partner-led landscape-scale conservation plans and strategies. Through the identification of
shared priorities, coordination of activities, and leveraging of resources among our conservation partners, together we can create
landscapes capable of supporting self-sustaining fish and wildlife populations for current and future generations.
BIO: Debra L. Schlafmann has been Coordinator for the California Landscape Conservation Cooperative (CA LCC) since May 2010.
Her primary duties include administering and expanding the effectiveness of the CA LCC. Deb has 25 years of experience mostly with
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service serving in numerous technical and leadership positions that required skills in developing partnerships
and seeking common goals for natural resources. Deb holds a bachelor of science degree in forestry from Michigan Technological
University and a master of science degree in wildlife management from Humboldt State University. Deb likes birding, boating, hiking
and spending as much time possible outdoors with her 10 year old son.
Barnie Gyant, Deputy Regional Forester,
USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region (Region 5)
Ecological Restoration: The Balance of Planning Versus Need for Action
Public land management agencies have an interesting challenge: to manage public trust resources for
present and future generations. Considering just federal and state agencies, a significant portion of the
Western Section area is managed for public trust values. For the Forest Service, this means managing
roughly 20 million acres in California and 6.3 million acres in Nevada. These lands serve as headwaters
for much of the water used for domestic, industrial and agricultural uses; provide a rich suite of outdoor
recreation opportunities and other uses; and provide important habitat for a variety of wildlife species,
including many threatened and endangered species.
One of the key roles of land management agencies today can be described as finding balance. We need to balance providing habitat
for species today with managing lands and activities to provide for habitat into the future. This is not easy in a dynamic environment
where much of the landscape is in need of ecological restoration to improve resilience and sustainability. I will discuss some of the
many challenges in seeking this balance from working with regulatory agency partners to conservation-focused stakeholders and will
describe some collaboration successes. I will focus on how the Forest Service is changing both its thinking as well as its practices to
move more efficiently towards our overall goal of having resilient forests and wildlands that serve the conservation needs of society.
BIO: Barnie Gyant oversees the areas of Program Development and Budget, Ecosystems Management, Ecosystems Planning,
Information Management, and Tribal Relations for the Pacific Southwest Region. Mr. Gyant was previously the Deputy Director of
Ecosystem Management in Region 5 from September 2009 to June 2012. Barnie successfully completed a temporary promotion to
Director, Ecosystem Management for four months in 2010 and for five months in 2011. He has an extensive background including work
assignments as Forest Supervisor, Deputy Forest Supervisor, District Ranger, Deputy District Ranger, and Resources Program
Manager. Early in his career, he was a Fisheries Biologist. Barnie has extensive experience as a line officer and natural resources
manager for the past 20 years working on eight different national forests and in four different regions. Barnie earned a Bachelor’s
Degree in Environmental Biology from East Carolina University. Key strengths include a strong background in natural resources and
ecological restoration and strong communication and collaboration skills.
Program and Schedule
24
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Bob Neale, Stewardship Director, Sonoma Land Trust
Land Trusts: Building Community Support for Landscape Conservation
Our broader conservation goals cannot be achieved solely on public lands or through regulatory efforts.
Conservation efforts on private lands, with private landowners and local communities, are key to
achieving landscape level success. Private, nonprofit land trusts have close ties with landowners and
community. Thus, we play a key role by implementing large, regional planning efforts at the local level,
because of our relationships and our work with local landowners, the community, and conservation
funders. We rely on up-to-date scientific information to inform our planning, acquisitions, and
conservation land management. In addition, we play a key educational role by translating current
scientific thought into language and ideas that are easier for the lay person to understand through our
media communications and our efforts to take the community and decision makers to see conservation
projects first hand. Today, I will describe three key projects: the Jenner Headlands Project, The Sears
Point Restoration Project, and the Sonoma Valley Wildlife Corridor Project; demonstrating how land
trusts can work with the community to build support for landscape conservation, incorporating and communicating the concepts of
ecological enhancement on working lands, wildlife permeability, and climate change adaptation strategies. I will conclude with ideas
and challenges on how to relate our conservation stories to the rapidly changing demographics of California.
BIO: Bob directs the activities of the stewardship department: working with a team of dedicated professionals to care and manage the
Sonoma Land Trust’s lands and conservation easements over the past 10 years. He grew up in southern California, watching the fields
and beach front slowly disappear to condos, mansions and strip malls. Fleeing the concrete, Bob moved north and received his B.A. in
English with a concentration in creative writing from San Francisco State. After graduating, he wandered through Europe and Turkey,
with extended stops in Paris and Istanbul. Returning to San Francisco, Bob worked in the freight industry for several years until he
finally decided to bring his attention back to his first love – the land. Beginning at Peninsula Open Space Trust, and then moving to
Sustainable Conservation, he was fortunate to work with and learn from some of the most creative people in conservation which is a
trend in good fortune that continues with his tenure at the Trust.
Jim Branham, Executive Director, Sierra Nevada Conservancy
Putting It Together: Tackling Challenges, Capturing Opportunities and Enjoying Successes
Using collaborative processes to develop consensus (not necessarily unanimity) on desired outcomes
and needed actions is a critical first step in integrating planning efforts. Contentious issues are best
addressed by identifying areas of agreement, developing action plans to address those areas and use the
trust developed during the process to address more difficult issues. Agencies and interested parties need
to commit to this process in order for it to be successful and for organizational silos to be broken down.
The Sierra Nevada Conservancy has been actively involved in a variety of collaborative efforts addressing forest/habitat issues,
including the Amador-Calaveras Consensus Group and Rim Fire restoration efforts. While these efforts have shown some level of
success, converting consensus into action continues to prove challenging.
BIO: Jim Branham has spent more than 30 years working on natural resource and rural community issues in California. He was
selected as the Sierra Nevada Conservancy’s first Executive Officer by the Conservancy Board in October of 2005. As Executive
Officer, Jim is responsible for day to day management of the organization and works closely with the Governing Board in developing
policy and program priorities. The organization’s mission is to improve the environmental, economic and social well-being of the Sierra
Nevada region in an integrated manner. The Conservancy is a State agency that awards grants and provides technical and other
assistance to parties in support of activities that help to carry out the Conservancy’s mission. Since 2007, the Conservancy has
awarded nearly $50 million in Proposition 84 grants throughout the Sierra Nevada region. The Conservancy serves a region comprised
of all or part of 22 counties covering 25 million acres, approximately one-quarter of the state of California. Prior to joining the
Conservancy Jim has worked in the California State Legislature, California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, the California
Resources Agency and the California Environmental Protection Agency. He also worked in the forest products industry, assisting the
Pacific Lumber Company with implementation of its Habitat Conservation Plan.
Program and Schedule
25
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
BUSINESS MEETING AND MEMBERS FORUM AGENDA
Thursday, January 29, 5 to 6 p.m. (immediately following the Plenary)
NOTE: Reports summarizing Executive Board and contractor accomplishments and key highlights will be located in the back of the
room. Minutes will be recorded during this meeting to track issues, ideas, and action items for the Executive Board.
5:00 p.m.
Call to Order (President Dvorak)
5:01 p.m.
Approval of 2014 Business Meeting Minutes
- (Secretary Scruggs/Past-President Bell)
5:05 p.m.
Review of Financial Status (Treasurer McNerney)
5:08 p.m.
Election Results for President-Elect and Review Bylaws Updates (Bell)
5:10 p.m.
Review of 2014 Accomplishments (Outgoing President)
- Strategic Plan 2014-2019 Completion
- Updated Communications Platform
- 60th Anniversary Celebration and record conference attendance
5:15 p.m.
Review of President’s Agenda for 2015
- Strategic Plan – Increasing member services and opportunities for members to serve the
Section
- Growing and strengthening the funding base – fundraising & examining dues
- Improve operations – making it easier and more rewarding for members to serve the Section
5:25 p.m.
Installation and Charge of 2015 Executive Board (President)
5:30 p.m.
Members’ Forum (all, led by newly-installed President)
5:45 p.m.
Review of Action Items Arising from Members Forum (Secretary)
5:48 p.m.
Adjournment (President)
5:50 p.m.
Raffle
A raffle will be held during the last ten minutes
of the business meeting!
Have you purchased your tickets yet?
Tickets are sold by Executive Board members, and at the Raffle item display table
All those who attend the business meeting will be entered in a raffle for a
door prize - must be present at the 5:50 p.m. drawing to win.
Don’t forget to head over to the Poster Session
from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Dry Creek Room!
Program and Schedule
26
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
CONTRIBUTED PAPER SCHEDULE
2015 Annual Conference
Session Name
Start Time
Room
Page
Mesocarnivore Techniques and Ecology –
Chair Esther Burkett, CA Dept. of Fish and Wildlife
Weds. 1:00 p.m.
Alexander I
36
Ecology and Management of Birds –
Chair Jeff Alvarez, The Wildlife Project
Weds. 1:00 p.m.
Alexander II
37
Wildlife Techniques –
Chair Jenny Rechel, USDA Forest Service
Weds. 1:00 p.m.
Dry Creek I
38
Wildlife Diseases –
Co-Chairs Mike Ziccardi & Kristen Gilardi, U.C. Davis
Weds. 2:45 p.m.
Dry Creek I
38
Ecology and Management of Riparian Birds –
Chair Chrissy Howell, USDA Forest Service
Thurs. 8:30 a.m.
Alexander I
39
Ecology and Management of Reptiles and Amphibians –
Chair Dave Cook, Sonoma County Water Agency
Thurs. 8:30 a.m.
Alexander II
40
Ecology and Management of Mammals –
Chair Brian Cypher, CSU Stanislaus
Thurs. 8:30 a.m.
Dry Creek I
41
Landbirds & Forest Management –
Chair Chrissy Howell, USDA Forest Service
Thurs. 10:15 a.m.
Alexander I
42
Plenary Session: Advancing Wildlife Conservation through Integration and Alignment
in Planning –
Chair Don Yasuda, TWS-WS President Elect
Thurs. 2:00 p.m.
Alexander I and II
23
Climate Adaptation Strategies –
Chair Jeff Lincer, RICA
Fri. 8:30 a.m.
Alexander I
43
Collaboration in Support of Wildlife Conservation –
Chair Lucy Harrington, Westervelt Ecological Services
Fri. 8:30 a.m.
Alexander II
43
Grasslands and Wildlife Conservation –
Chair John McNerney, City of Davis
Fri. 8:30 a.m.
Dry Creek I
44
Effects of Drought on Wildlife –
Chair Jeff Lincer, RICA
Fri. 10:15 a.m.
Alexander I
Linking Research to Policy and Management –
Chair Mike Westphal, Bureau of Land Management
Fri. 10:15 a.m.
Alexander II
Wednesday January 28, 2015
Thursday January 29, 2015
Friday January 30, 2015
45
46
When entering or exiting rooms during sessions, please be careful to open and close doors quietly. Please do not congregate and
converse in the hallway in the immediate area of a door, as your conversation may disturb ongoing sessions.
Program and Schedule
27
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
SESSION ABSTRACT ELECTRONIC ACCESS INFORMATION
To conserve paper and reduce energy consumption, abstracts for concurrent and poster sessions are provided electronically.
Abstracts are available to view, download or print via the Western Section Annual Meeting website:
www.tws-west.org/santarosa2015
Smart phone users may scan the following code
to gain quick access to the online abstracts:
Constant Contact Newsletter Emails
Replace the TWS-WS Yahoo Group.
The Western Section has moved away from our Yahoo Group email
communication system in favor of more dynamic emails hosted by
Constant Contact. The new system provides better service to our
members by allowing us to send more personalized (and attractive!)
emails that are friendly to mobile devices. If you use Gmail, check the
Promotions tab. And if you are a current member and not receiving these
messages, let us know at [email protected]
To join our new group and receive our workshop and meeting
announcements and newsletters, visit: http://goo.gl/efWvfr
Program and Schedule
28
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
CONCURRENT SESSION TALK SCHEDULE IN GRID FORMAT
Room
Alexander I
Alexander II
Dry Creek Ballroom
Day and
Time
Mesocarnivore Techniques
and Ecology
Ecology and Management of Birds
Wildlife Techniques
Wednesday
1:05 p.m.
Home Is Where The Estimation Is
Powell, Roger
Taste Aversion, Trapping, and Translocation:
Photo-sensor equipped Vaginal Implant
an overview of predator management for two
Transmitters and Precise Event Timing
protected beach-nesting birds in southern
coding aid in accessing birthing times,
California
locations, and capture of mule deer neonates
Brinkman, Matt
Bush, Anthony
Wednesday
1:25 p.m.
rSPACE: Spatially-based power analysis for
conservation and ecology
Ellis, Martha
Geospatial Modeling of Common Raven
Applications of Next-Generation Sequencing
Distribution and Abundance in Snowy Plover
Techniques to Wildlife Conservation and
Habitats of Coastal Northern California
Management
Lau, Matt
Lounsberry, Zachary
Wednesday
1:45 p.m.
Using spatially explicit power analyses to
assess the power to detect trend for the
southern Sierra Nevada fisher population
Tucker, Jody
Snowy Plovers Wintering in Coastal Northern A new method of recovering stomach content
California
samples from freshwater turtles that is
Dejoannis, Alexa
effective and humane
Karres, Nicole
Wednesday
2:05 p.m.
Accelerometers and Remote Cameras
Confirm Seasonal Patterns and Reveal
Individual Differences in Activity Patterns of
Pacific Martens
Tweedy, Patrick
The Response of Breeding Western Snowy
Plovers to Habitat Restoration Evaluated by
Resource Selection Function Analysis in
Coastal Northern California
Leja, Stephanie
Using Mobile GIS for Aerial Wildlife Surveys
Alexander, Matthew
Session Break
Day and
Time
Mesocarnivore Techniques
and Ecology
Wednesday
2:45 p.m.
The Efficacy of Assisted Dispersal for
Restoration of the Humboldt Marten
Slauson, Keith
Wednesday Spatial-temporal interactions in female fishers
3:05 p.m.
(Pekania [Martes] pennanti) on the Hoopa
Valley Indian Reservation in California
Rennie, Kerry
Ecology and Management of Birds
Wildlife Diseases
Shorebird Response to Varying Salinity and Reducing entanglement hazards to marine
Water Depth in an Experimental Design in wildlife: partnering with commercial fishermen
to recover derelict gear
Salt Pond Management
Smith, Lacy
Gilardi, Kirsten
Space-Use and Behavior of Summering
Greater Sandhill Cranes in Modoc County,
California
Grebe, Abigail
The Value and Effectiveness of Oiled Wildlife
Response
Ziccardi, Michael
Wednesday
3:25 p.m.
Reestablishing fishers on a managed
landscape in California
Facka, Aaron
Reproductive investment and success
indicate senescence and individual
heterogeneity in Black Brant
Riecke, Thomas
Conservation Through Collaboration: Zoos,
Universities and You.
Wack, Ray
Wednesday
3:45 p.m.
A Management Grid System for
Implementing the Southern Sierra Nevada
Fisher Conservation Strategy
Spencer, Wayne
Survival and Growth Rates of Wood Duck
Ducklings
Sedinger, Benjamin
Natural and anthropogenic causes of puma
mortality in southern California
Sanchez, Jessica
Wednesday
A report on occupancy estimates, range
Brood Size and Nesting Phenology in
Urban amphibian conservation in the midst of
4:05 p.m. extent, and habitat use for Sierra Nevada red Western Grebe (Aechmophorus occidentalis)
a fungal pathogen
fox, coyote, and Pacific marten in the eastern and Clark’s Grebe (Aechmophorus clarkii) in
Young, Jonathan
Sierra Nevada
Northern California
Stermer, Chris
Robison, Kristofer
Wednesday
4:25 p.m.
Native versus nonnative origins of red foxes
(Vulpes vulpes) in the Great Basin
Alden, Preston
Nesting Bird Management at PG&E: A
Complex interactive effects of water mold and
Standardized Species-based Approach to a
an herbicide on chytridiomycosis in Pacific
System-wide Challenge
treefrog (Pseudacris regilla) hosts
Burkholder, Laura
Romansic, John
When entering or exiting rooms during sessions, please be careful to open and close doors quietly. Please do not congregate and
converse in the hallway in the immediate area of a door, as your conversation may disturb ongoing sessions.
Program and Schedule
29
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Room
Alexander I
Alexander II
Dry Creek Ballroom
Day and
Time
Ecology and Management of
Riparian Birds
Ecology and Management of
Reptiles and Amphibians
Ecology and Management of
Mammals
Thursday
8:35 a.m.
Alameda Creek Riparian Bird Community
Occupancy Analyses
Riensche, David
Acoustic Monitoring of Breeding Amphibians
at Yosemite National Park and Point Reyes
National Seashore
Kleeman, Patrick
Preliminary Results of the Effects of UtilityScale Solar Energy Projects on Bats
Johnston, Dave
Thursday
8:55 a.m.
Factors Affecting Detection of Yellow-billed
Cuckoos During Standardized Surveys
Stanek, John
Woodland Salamanders: Relative
Abundances, Functional Roles, and Use as
Metrics of Seral Status in California’s Forest
Ecosystems.
Welsh, Hartwell
Roosting Ecology of Lasiurine Bats in the
Northern Portion of the Central Valley,
California
Wyatt, David
Thursday
9:15 a.m.
Bank Swallow Status on the Sacramento
River – Threatened or Endangered, and
Where Do We Go From Here?
Wright, David
“Retiring” Amphibian Breeding Ponds
Inundated by the Los Vaqueros Reservoir
Expansion Project, Contra Costa County,
California
Davis, Cheryl
Importance of Oak Mistletoe in the Diet of
Ringtails (Bassariscus astutus) in a portion of
the Central Valley of California
Wyatt, David
Thursday
9:35 a.m.
A science-based framework for setting
riparian landbird population targets in
California’s Central Valley
Dybala, Kristen
History and Status of the California RedLegged Frog (Rana draytonii) in the Sierra
Nevada
Barry, Sean
Coyote Foraging Patterns in the Central
Mojave Desert: Implications for Predation on
Desert Tortoises
Cypher, Brian
Session Break
Day and
Time
Landbirds and Forest Management
Ecology and Management of
Reptiles and Amphibians
Ecology and Management of
Mammals
Thursday
10:15 a.m.
Habitat Associations and Restoration Targets Distribution of observations of California red- A range-wide occupancy estimate and habitat
for Meadow Birds in the Sierra Nevada
legged frog in the Great Central Valley
model for the endangered Point Arena
Campos, Brent
Hydrographic Basin
mountain beaver (Aplodontia rufa nigra)
Alvarez, Jeff
Zielinski, William
Thursday
10:35 a.m.
Assessing Willow Flycatcher Population Size
and Distribution to Inform Meadow
Restoration Priorities in the Sierra Nevada
and Southern Cascades
Loffland, Helen
Thursday
10:55 a.m.
Short Term Changes in Avian Community
Composition within the Sierra Nevada's
Massive Rim Fire
Fogg, Alissa
Long-term (1997-2012) Demographic Study
of the Endangered Sierra Nevada Yellowlegged Frog In Kings Canyon National Park
Matthews, Kathleen
Role of native consumers in yellow bush
lupine invasion and restoration
Barton, Daniel
Thursday
11:15 a.m.
Management Indicator Species Response to
Time Since Natural and Anthropogenic
Disturbance in Sierra Nevada National
Forests
Roberts, Lance
An Enhanced Technique for California Tiger
Salamander Burrow Excavation,
Collaboration in Action
Grant, Jill
Effects of large scale gold mining on the
migratory behavior of a large herbivore
Blum, Marcus
Thursday
11:35 a.m.
Searching for Focal Species in the Sierra
Nevada: Conundrums for the Avian
Ecologists
White, Angela
The Northern Alligator Lizard (Elgaria
coerulea): A multi-locus look at a wideranging forest lizard
Lavin, Brian
Comparative Analysis of State Deer
Management Strategies
Webb, Kent
Thursday
11:55 a.m.
Using Management Indicator Species (MIS)
monitoring of Black-backed Woodpecker to
inform post-fire forest management
Siegel, Rodney
An endangered snake thrives in a highly
urbanized environment
Swaim , Karen
Investment in Constitutive Immune Function
by North American Elk Experimentally
Maintained at Two Different Population
Densities
Downs, Cynthia
Highway One Revisited: Twenty years of White-footed vole habitat selection at multiple
road surveys for California red-legged frogs scales supports a strong association with red
in coastal Santa Cruz and San Mateo
alder
counties
Bean, William
Westphal, Michael
When entering or exiting rooms during sessions, please be careful to open and close doors quietly. Please do not congregate and
converse in the hallway in the immediate area of a door, as your conversation may disturb ongoing sessions.
Program and Schedule
30
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Room
Alexander I
Alexander II
Dry Creek Ballroom
Day and
Time
Climate Adaptation Strategies
Collaboration in Support of
Wildlife Conservation
Grasslands and Wildlife
Conservation
Friday
8:35 a.m.
Climate Adaptation Planning for the Sierra
Nevada
Howell, Chrissy
A Road Map for Collaborative Land
Conservation
Crawford, Aimee
Use of Sierra Nevada Foothill grasslands by
nesting Tricolored Blackbirds and conservation
implications
Airola, Daniel
Friday
8:55 a.m.
Raptors and Climate Change: The Need for a
Holistic Approach
Lincer, Jeffrey
Friday
9:15 a.m.
Creating High-tide Refuge Habitat for the
Endangered California Ridgway’s Rail
Demers, Scott
Changing the process of conservation to save
the critically endangered Hawaiian monk seal
Sprague, Rachel
Habitat Associations of California Ground
Squirrels and Implications for Western
Burrowing Owl Conservation in San Diego
County Grasslands
Marczak, Susanne
Friday
9:35 a.m.
Western monarch butterflies core overwintering
habitat: evidence for a range contraction and a
role for native conifers
Griffiths, Jessica
Research and Recovery -The Hidden Benefits
of Conservation Banking
Harrington, Lucy
The effect of prairie burn regimes on mating
patterns in Dickcissels
Sousa, Bridget
California's State Wildlife Action Plan Update: A Burrowing Owl Breeding and Foraging Ecology
Plan for Conserving California's Wildlife
at Natural and Artificial Burrows in San Diego
Resources While Responding to Environmental
County
Challenges
Wisinski, Colleen
Gonzales, Armand
Session Break
Day and
Time
Effects of Drought on Wildlife
Linking Research to Policy and
Management
Grasslands and Wildlife
Conservation
Friday 1
10:15 a.m.
The effect of water level management and
drought on nesting Aechmophorus grebes in
northern California
Arsenault, David
San Diego County’s Feral Pig Damage Control Legacy effects of habitat degradation by Lesser
Project
Snow Geese on nesting Savannah Sparrows
Burg, Rich
Peterson, Stephen
Friday
10:35 a.m.
Drought severity influences female Greater
sage-grouse breeding behavior, habitat use,
and success
Gibson, Daniel
Developing a Wild Pig Management Plan on
Tejon Ranch
Hiroyasu, Elizabeth
Movement Ecology of Lions Living Along the
Edge of Cattle-Dominated Areas in the western
Okavango Delta, Botswana
Whitesell, Carolyn
Friday
10:55 a.m.
Giant Garter Snake (Thamnophis gigas) –
Surviving Landscape Changes and Drought in
California’s Central Valley
Hansen, Eric
Using Demographic Monitoring to Inform Bird
Conservation
Albert, Steven
San Joaquin kit fox presence on and near
Topaz Solar Farms, San Luis Obispo County
Meade, Daniel
Friday
11:15 a.m.
Drought and Life History of California Tiger
Salamanders in Vernal Pools of the Southern
San Joaquin Valley Geographic Region
Lopez, Ryan
Greater Sage-grouse Brood Survival and
Habitat in the Great Basin: An Opportunity to
Assess Impacts of Feral Horses and Livestock
Street, Phillip
Long Term Population and Density Estimates
for San Joaquin Kit Fox on the Carrizo Plain
National Monument (2000-2014): Implications
for Conservation
Stafford, Robert
Friday
11:35 a.m.
Response of Western Pond Turtles (Actinemys
marmorata) to Drought
Purcell, Kathryn
When the heat is on: the 2014 drought and the
first blunt-nosed leopard lizard rangewide
recruitment survey
Westphal, Michael
Locomotory performance of a kangaroo rat in a
habitat dominated by a non-native grass
Boag, Camille
Friday
11:55 a.m.
Population Trends of the Salt Marsh Harvest
Mouse During a California Drought
Smith, Katherine
Evaluation of DRECP Desert Tortoise and
Bighorn Sheep Habitat Suitability and
Connectivity Model Predictions in the Soda
Mountain Area, San Bernardino County
Heim, Susanne
Native small mammal use of an invasive grass:
Heermann's Kangaroo rats and Veldt grass
(Erharta calycina) in Coastal California
Trunzo, Juliana
When entering or exiting rooms during sessions, please be careful to open and close doors quietly. Please do not congregate and
converse in the hallway in the immediate area of a door, as your conversation may disturb ongoing sessions.
Program and Schedule
31
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
NOTES
Program and Schedule
32
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Contributed Papers Session # 1
Mesocarnivore Techniques and Ecology
Wednesday, January 28, 2015; 1 to 5 p.m.
Alexander I
Chair: Esther Burkett, California Dept. of Fish and Wildlife
1:05 – 1:25 p.m.
Home Is Where The Estimation Is; Roger A Powell
1:25 – 1:45 p.m.
rSPACE: Spatially-based Power Analysis for Conservation and Ecology; Martha M. Ellis,
Jacob S. Ivan, Jody M. Tucker and Michael K. Schwartz
1:45 – 2:05 p.m.
Using Spatially Explicit Power Analyses to Assess the Power to Detect Trend for the Southern Sierra
Nevada Fisher Population; Jody M. Tucker, Martha M. Ellis and Michael K. Schwartz
2:05 – 2:25 p.m.
Accelerometers and Remote Cameras Confirm Seasonal Patterns and Reveal Individual Differences
in Activity Patterns of Pacific Martens; Patrick J. Tweedy, Katie M. Moriarty, Clinton W. Epps and
William J. Zielinski
2:25 – 2:45 p.m.
Refreshment Break
2:45 – 3:05 p.m.
The Efficacy of Assisted Dispersal for Restoration of the Humboldt Marten; Keith M. Slauson,
William J. Zielinski, Lowell V. Diller, Keith A. Hamm and Desiree A. Early
3:05 – 3:25 p.m.
Spatial-temporal Interactions in Female Fishers (Pekania [Martes] pennanti) on the Hoopa Valley
Indian Reservation in California; Kerry M. Rennie, J. Mark Higley, Caylen M. Cummins,
Sean M. Matthews, William J. Zielinski and M. Szykman Gunther
Student Paper
3:25 – 3:45 p.m.
Reestablishing Fishers on a Managed Landscape in California; Aaron N. Facka, Richard Callas,
Deana Clifford, Tom Engstrom, Laura Finley, Sean M. Matthews, Kevin P. Smith, Robert C. Swiers,
J. Scott Yaeger and Roger A. Powell
3:45 – 4:05 p.m.
A Management Grid System for Implementing the Southern Sierra Nevada Fisher Conservation
Strategy; Wayne D. Spencer, Heather Romsos, William Zielinski, Jim Baldwin, Susan Britting and
Craig Thompson
4:05 – 4:25 p.m.
A Report on Occupancy Estimates, Range Extent, and Habitat Use for Sierra Nevada Red Fox,
Coyote, and Pacific Marten in the Eastern Sierra Nevada; Chris J. Stermer, Cate Quinn, Kristi Cripe,
Brett Furnas and Benjamin N. Sacks
4:25 – 4:45 p.m.
Native Versus Nonnative Origins of Red Foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in the Great Basin; Preston B. Alden,
Zachary Lounsberry, Mark Statham and Benjamin N. Sacks
Student Paper
4:45 – 5:00 p.m.
Discussion
Program and Schedule
33
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Contributed Papers Session # 2
Ecology and Management of Birds
Wednesday, January 28, 2015; 1 to 5 p.m.
Alexander II
Chair: Jeff Alvarez, The Wildlife Project
1:05 – 1:25 p.m.
Taste Aversion, Trapping, and Translocation: an Overview of Predator Management for Two
Protected Beach-Nesting Birds in Southern California; Matt P. Brinkman, David K. Garcelon,
Mark A. Colwell and Brian R. Hudgens
Student Paper
1:25 – 1:45 p.m.
Geospatial Modeling of Common Raven Distribution and Abundance in Snowy Plover Habitats of
Coastal Northern California; Matt J. Lau and Mark A. Colwell Student Paper
1:45 – 2:05 p.m.
Snowy Plovers Wintering in Coastal Northern California; Alexa D. DeJoannis, Mark A. Colwell and
Sean E. McAllister
Student Paper
2:05 – 2:25 p.m.
Response of Breeding Western Snowy Plovers to Habitat Restoration Evaluated by Resource
Selection Function Analysis in Coastal Northern California; Stephanie D. Leja, Allison M. Patrick and
Mark A. Colwell
Student Paper
2:25 – 2:45 p.m.
Refreshment Break
2:45 – 3:05 p.m.
Shorebird Response to Varying Salinity and Water Depth in an Experimental Design in Salt Pond
Management; Lacy M. Smith, Stacy M. Moskal, John Y. Takekawa, Susan E. W. De La Cruz,
John Krause, and Renee Spenst
3:05 – 3:25 p.m.
Space-Use and Behavior of Summering Greater Sandhill Cranes in Modoc County, California; Abigail
Grebe, Dominic Bachman and Micaela Szykman Gunther
Student Paper
3:25 – 3:45 p.m.
Reproductive Investment and Success Indicate Senescence and Individual Heterogeneity in Black
Brant; Thomas V. Riecke, Alan G. Leach and Jim S. Sedinger
3:45 – 4:05 p.m.
Survival and Growth Rates of Wood Duck Ducklings; Benjamin S. Sedinger, Christopher A. Nicolai
and Kelley Stewart
Student Paper
4:05 – 4:25 p.m.
Brood Size and Nesting Phenology in Western Grebe (Aechmophorus occidentalis) and Clark’s Grebe
(Aechmophorus clarkii) in Northern California; Kristofer M. Robison, Daniel W. Anderson and
Renèe E. Robison
4:25 – 4:45 p.m.
Nesting Bird Management at PG&E: A Standardized Species-based Approach to a System-wide
Challenge; Laura L. Burkholder, J. Mark Jenkins, Andi L. Henke, Mike Best, Glen Lubcke,
E. J. Koford, Wes Rhodehamel, Terah Donovan and Scott Demers
4:45 – 5:00 p.m.
Discussion
Program and Schedule
34
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Contributed Papers Session # 3
Wildlife Techniques
Wednesday, January 28, 2015; 1 to 2:25 p.m.
Dry Creek Ballroom
Chair: Jenny Rechel, USDA Forest Service
1:05 – 1:25 p.m.
Photo-sensor Equipped Vaginal Implant Transmitters and Precise Event Timing Coding aid in
Accessing Birthing Times, Locations, and Capture of Mule Deer Neonates; Anthony P. Bush,
Kelley M. Stewart, Vernon C. Bleich and Neal Darby
Student Paper
1:25 – 1:45 p.m.
Applications of Next-Generation Sequencing Techniques to Wildlife Conservation and Management;
Zachary T. Lounsberry, Sarah K. Brown, Luis D. Hernandez, Mark J. Statham and Ben N. Sacks
1:45 – 2:05 p.m.
A New Method of Recovering Stomach Content Samples from Freshwater Turtles that is Effective and
Humane; Nicole M. Karres, Andrea L. Goodnight and Nicholas R. Geist
Student Paper
2:05 – 2:25 p.m.
Using Mobile GIS for Aerial Wildlife Surveys; Matthew P. Alexander
This session changes to Session 4, Wildlife Diseases after the break.
Contributed Papers Session # 4
Wildlife Diseases
Wednesday, January 28, 2015; 2:45 to 5 p.m.
Dry Creek Ballroom
Chairs: Mike Ziccardi & Kristen Gilardi, U.C. Davis
2:45 – 3:05 p.m.
Reducing Entanglement Hazards to Marine Wildlife: Partnering with Commercial Fishermen to
Recover Derelict Gear; Kirsten V.K. Gilardi and Jennifer Renzullo
3:05 – 3:25 p.m.
The Value and Effectiveness of Oiled Wildlife Response; Michael H. Ziccardi
3:25 – 3:45 p.m.
Conservation Through Collaboration: Zoos, Universities and You; Ray F. Wack
3:45 – 4:05 p.m.
Natural and Anthropogenic Causes of Puma Mortality in Southern California; Winston Vickers,
Jessica N. Sanchez, Scott A. Morrison, Randy Botta, Trish Smith, Brian S. Cohen, Patrick R. Huber,
Holly B. Ernest and Walter M. Boyce
Student Paper
4:05 – 4:25 p.m.
Urban Amphibian Conservation in the Midst of a Fungal Pathogen; Jonathan S. Young,
Vance T. Vredenburg and Andy Zink
Student Paper
4:25 – 4:45 p.m.
Complex Interactive Effects of Water Mold and Herbicide on Chytridiomycosis in Pacific Treefrog
(Pseudacris regilla) Hosts; John M. Romansic, James E. Johnson, R. Steven Wagner,
Rebecca H. Hill, Christopher A. Gaulke, Vance T. Vredenburg and Andrew R. Blaustein
4:45 – 5:00 p.m.
Discussion
Program and Schedule
35
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Contributed Papers Session # 5
Ecology and Management of Riparian Birds
Thursday, January 29, 2015; 8:30 to 9:55 a.m.
Alexander I
Chair: Chrissy Howell, U.S. Forest Service
8:35 – 8:55 a.m.
Alameda Creek Riparian Bird Community Occupancy Analyses; David L. Riensche, Douglas A. Bell,
Julian K. Wood, L. Jay Roberts
8:55 – 9:15 a.m.
Factors Affecting Detection of Yellow-billed Cuckoos During Standardized Surveys; John R. Stanek,
Shannon E. McNeil and Diane D. Tracy
9:15 – 9:35 a.m.
Bank Swallow Status on the Sacramento River – Threatened or Endangered, and Where Do We Go
From Here?; David H. Wright, Dawn Garca, Kelley Barker, Greg Golet, Adam Henderson,
Henry Lomeli, Ryan Martin, Joe Silveira and Danika Tsao,
9:35 – 9:55 a.m.
A Science-based Framework for Setting Riparian Landbird Population Targets in California’s Central
Valley; Kristen E. Dybala, Nathaniel E. Seavy, Michelle Gilbert and Thomas Gardali
This session changes to Session 8, Landbirds and Forest Management after the break.
Do you like our conference logo?
This year's logo was designed by Catherine Yasuda,
a graduate student at California State University,
Chico. She is currently writing her thesis on Panamint
alligator lizards, but in her spare time she enjoys
studying and portraying nature through illustration,
photography and various other crafts. Catherine
designed the logo to represent an endangered
species - the California tiger salamander (Ambystoma
californiense). She chose this species not only
because it has critical habitat in the Santa Rosa area,
but also because collaboration between many parties
is and will continue to be necessary to ensure its
survival. If you are interested in seeing more of her
work or for additional design opportunities contact
Catherine at: [email protected]
Program and Schedule
36
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Contributed Papers Session # 6
Ecology and Management of
Reptiles and Amphibians
Thursday, January 29, 2015; 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Alexander II
Chair: Dave Cook, Sonoma County Water Agency
8:35 – 8:55 a.m.
Acoustic Monitoring of Breeding Amphibians at Yosemite National Park and Point Reyes National
Seashore; Patrick M. Kleeman, Gary M. Fellers and Brian J. Halstead
8:55 – 9:15 a.m.
Woodland Salamanders: Relative Abundances, Functional Roles, and Use as Metrics of Seral Status
in California’s Forest Ecosystems; Hartwell H. Welsh and Garth R. Hodgson
9:15 – 9:35 a.m.
“Retiring” Amphibian Breeding Ponds Inundated by the Los Vaqueros Reservoir Expansion Project,
Contra Costa County, California; Cheryl L. Davis
9:35 – 9:55 a.m.
History and Status of the California Red-Legged Frog (Rana draytonii) in the Sierra Nevada;
Sean J. Barry and Gary M. Fellers
9:55 – 10:15 a.m.
Refreshment Break
10:15 – 10:35 a.m.
Distribution of Observations of California Red-legged Frog in the Great Central Valley Hydrographic
Basin; Jeff A. Alvarez, Jeffery T. Wilcox and Sarah M. Foster
10:35–10:55 a.m.
Highway One Revisited: Twenty Years of Road Surveys for California Red-legged Frogs in Coastal
Santa Cruz and San Mateo Counties; Michael F. Westphal, Richard B. Seymour, Diane Kodama and
H. Bradley Shaffer
10:55–11:15 a.m.
Longterm (1997-2012) Demographic Study of the Endangered Sierra Nevada Yellow-legged Frog in
Kings Canyon National Park; Kathleen Matthews
11:15 – 11:35 a.m.
An Enhanced Technique for California Tiger Salamander Burrow Excavation: Collaboration in Action;
Jill M. Grant, Troy D. Kelly, Ryan Jolley, Benjamin J. Hart and Elizabeth Greunstein
11:35 – 11:55 a.m.
The Northern Alligator Lizard (Elgaria coerulea): A Multi-locus Look at a Wide-ranging Forest Lizard;
Brian R. Lavin, Chris R. Feldman and Derek J. Girman
Student Paper
11:55 – 12:15 p.m.
An Endangered Snake Thrives in a Highly Urbanized Environment; Natalie M. Reeder,
Karen E. Swaim and Ryan M. Byrnes
12:15 – 12:30 p.m.
Discussion
Program and Schedule
37
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Contributed Papers Session # 7
Ecology and Management of Mammals
Thursday, January 29, 2015; 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Dry Creek Ballroom
Chair: Brian Cypher, CSU Stanislaus
8:35 – 8:55 a.m.
Preliminary Results of the Effects of Utility-Scale Solar Energy Projects on Bats; Dave S. Johnston,
Meredith K. Jantzen, Kim M. Briones, Gabe A. Reyes and Brian B. Boroski
8:55 – 9:15 a.m.
Roosting Ecology of Lasiurine Bats in the Northern Portion of the Central Valley, California;
David T. Wyatt, Elizabeth D. Pierson, William E. Rainey, Linda Angerer, Lyle Lewis and
Kathleen M. Norton
9:15 – 9:35 a.m.
Importance of Oak Mistletoe in the Diet of Ringtails (Bassariscus astutus) in a portion of the Central
Valley of California; David T. Wyatt
9:35 – 9:55 a.m.
Coyote Foraging Patterns in the Central Mojave Desert: Implications for Predation on Desert
Tortoises; Brian L. Cypher, Tory L. Westall, Christine L. Van Horn Job and Erica C. Kelly
9:55 – 10:15 a.m.
Refreshment Break
10:15 – 10:35 a.m.
A Range-wide Occupancy Estimate and Habitat Model for the Endangered Point Arena Mountain
Beaver (Aplodontia rufa nigra); William J. Zielinski, Fredrick V. Schlexer, Jeffrey R. Dunk,
Matthew J. Lau and James J. Graham
10:35 – 10:55 a.m.
White-footed Vole Habitat Selection at Multiple Scales Supports a Strong Association with Red Alder;
William T. Bean, David Tange and Scott Osborn
10:55 – 11:15 a.m.
Role of Native Consumers in Yellow Bush Lupine Invasion and Restoration; Daniel C. Barton,
Erik Liebrecht, Kyla Winthers-Barcelona, Matthew Johnson, Ryan Baumbusch and Elizabeth Elkinton
11:15 – 11:35 a.m.
Effects of Large Scale Gold Mining on the Migratory Behavior of a Large Herbivore; Marcus E. Blum,
Kelley M. Stewart, Cody Schroeder and Tony Wasley
Student Paper
11:35 – 11:55 a.m.
Comparative Analysis of State Deer Management Strategies; Kent Webb
11:55 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Investment in Constitutive Immune Function by North American Elk Experimentally Maintained at Two
Different Population Densities; Cynthia J. Downs, Kelley M. Stewart and Brian L. Dick
12:15 – 12:30 p.m.
Discussion
Shop at AmazonSmile…
Amazon will donate a percentage of the sale to TWS-WS
Donations from this program will be used to support Western Section operations and help keep
membership and event registration fees low.
Visit AmazonSmile and select the Western Section of The Wildlife Society
as your preferred charity. http://smile.amazon.com/ch/95-4470836
Program and Schedule
38
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Contributed Papers Session # 8
Landbirds and Forest Management
Thursday, January 29, 2015; 10:15 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Alexander I
Chair: Chrissy Howell, U.S. Forest Service
10:15 – 10:35 a.m.
Habitat Associations and Restoration Targets for Meadow Birds in the Sierra Nevada;
Brent R. Campos, Ryan D. Burnett, Helen L. Loffland and Rodney B. Siegel
10:35 – 10:55 a.m.
Assessing Willow Flycatcher Population Size and Distribution to Inform Meadow Restoration Priorities
in the Sierra Nevada and Southern Cascades; Helen L. Loffland, Rodney B. Siegel, Ryan D. Burnett,
Brent R. Campos, Tina Mark and Chris Stermer
10:55 – 11:15 a.m.
Short Term Changes in Avian Community Composition within the Sierra Nevada's Massive Rim Fire;
Alissa M. Fogg, Ryan D. Burnett and Zack L. Steel
11:15 – 11:35 a.m.
Management Indicator Species Response to Time Since Natural and Anthropogenic Disturbance in
Sierra Nevada National Forests; Lance J. Roberts and Ryan D. Burnett
11:35 – 11:55 a.m.
Searching for Focal Species in the Sierra Nevada: Conundrums for the Avian Ecologists;
Angela M. White and Patricia N. Manley
11:55 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Using Management Indicator Species (MIS) Monitoring of Black-backed Woodpecker to Inform
Post-fire Forest Management; Rodney B. Siegel, Robert L. Wilkerson and Morgan W. Tingley
12:15 – 12:30 p.m.
Discussion
CALIFORNIA CENTRAL COAST CHAPTER WILDLIFE SYMPOSIUM
FEBRUARY 27, 2015
The California Central Coast Chapter of the Western Section of The Wildlife Society will be hosting a symposium intended to bring
local professionals from Monterey to Santa Barbara counties together to share ideas, professional knowledge, and information on
projects, and/or on-going research.
Friday February 27, 2015 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
County of San Luis Obispo Public Library
995 Palm Street, San Luis Obispo
We will all benefit from the knowledge shared at this event, so please consider sharing your experience with your colleagues.
For additional info, contact: Wayne Vogler (Chapter President) at [email protected]
Program and Schedule
39
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Contributed Papers Session # 9
Climate Adaptation Strategies
Friday, January 30, 2015; 8:30 to 9:55 a.m.
Alexander I
Chair: Jeff Lincer, Researchers Implementing Conservation Action
8:35 – 8:55 a.m.
Climate Adaptation Planning for the Sierra Nevada; Chrissy Howell and Jessi Kershner
8:55 – 9:15 a.m.
Raptors and Climate Change: The Need for a Holistic Approach; Jeffrey L. Lincer and Zachary
Ormsby
9:15 – 9:35 a.m.
Creating High-tide Refuge Habitat for the Endangered California Ridgway’s Rail; Scott A. Demers,
Marilyn Latta, Max Busnardo, Gavin Archbald , Jen McBroom, Toby Rohmer, Jeannie Hammond,
Steve Rottenborn, Ron Duke, Joy Albertson and Joe Howard
9:35 – 9:55 a.m.
Western Monarch Butterflies Core Overwintering Habitat: Evidence for a Range Contraction and a
Role for Native Conifers; Jessica L. Griffiths and Francis X. Villablanca
This session changes to Session 12, Effects of Drought on Wildlife, after the break.
Contributed Papers Session # 10
Collaboration in Support of Wildlife Conservation
Friday, January 30, 2015; 8:30 to 9:55 a.m.
Alexander II
Chair: Lucy Harrington, Westervelt Ecological Services
8:35 – 8:55 a.m.
A Road Map for Collaborative Land Conservation; Aimee Crawford and Jon Wilcox
8:55 – 9:15 a.m.
California’s State Wildlife Action Plan Update: A Plan for Conserving California's Wildlife Resources
While Responding to Environmental Challenges; Armand G. Gonzales, Junko Hoshi and Linda
Leeman
9:15 – 9:35 a.m.
Changing the Process of Conservation to Save the Critically Endangered Hawaiian Monk Seal;
Rachel S. Sprague and Charles L. Littnan
9:35 – 9:55 a.m.
Research and Recovery -The Hidden Benefits of Conservation Banking; Lucy G. Harrington
This session changes to Session 13, Linking Research to Policy and Management, after the break.
Program and Schedule
40
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Contributed Papers Session # 11
Grasslands and Wildlife Conservation
Friday, January 30, 2015; 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Dry Creek Ballroom
Chair: John McNerney, City of Davis
8:35 – 8:55 a.m.
Use of Sierra Nevada Foothill Grasslands by Nesting Tricolored Blackbirds and Conservation
Implications ; Daniel A. Airola, Robert J. Meese and David Krolick
8:55 – 9:15 a.m.
Burrowing Owl Breeding and Foraging Ecology at Natural and Artificial Burrows in San Diego County;
Colleen L. Wisinski, Lisa A. Nordstrom, Jeffrey L. Lincer and Ronald R. Swaisgood
9:15 – 9:35 a.m.
Habitat Associations of California Ground Squirrels and Implications for Western Burrowing Owl
Conservation in San Diego County Grasslands; Susanne A. Marczak, Colleen L. Wisinski,
Lisa A. Nordstrom and Ronald R. Swaisgood
9:35 – 9:55 a.m.
The Effect of Prairie Burn Regimes on Mating Patterns in Dickcissels; Bridget F. Sousa
Student Paper
9:55 – 10:15 a.m.
Refreshment Break
10:15 – 10:35 a.m.
Legacy Effects of Habitat Degradation by Lesser Snow Geese on Nesting Savannah Sparrows;
Stephen Peterson, Robert F. Rockwell, Christopher R. Witte and David N. Ko
10:35 – 10:55 a.m.
Movement Ecology of Lions Living Along the Edge of Cattle-Dominated Areas in the western
Okavango Delta, Botswana; Carolyn A. Whitesell, Christiaan Winterbach and Ben Sacks
Student Paper
10:55 – 11:15 a.m.
San Joaquin Kit Fox Presence on and near Topaz Solar Farms, San Luis Obispo County; Daniel E.
Meade, Jason Dart, Christine Van Horn Job, Brian Cypher, Bill Vanherweg and Jacquelline Tilligkeit
11:15 – 11:35 a.m.
Long Term Population and Density Estimates for San Joaquin Kit Fox on the Carrizo Plain National
Monument (2000-2014): Implications for Conservation; Robert W. Stafford, Craig M. Fiehler,
Brian L. Cypher, Laura R. Prugh and H. Scott Butterfield
11:35 – 11:55 a.m.
Locomotory Performance of a Kangaroo Rat in a Habitat Dominated by a Non-native Grass;
Camille D. Boag and Francis Villablanca
Student Paper
11:55 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Native Small Mammal Use of an Invasive Grass: Heermann's Kangaroo Rats and Veldt Grass
(Erharta calycina) in Coastal California; Juliana P. Trunzo and Francis X. Villablanca
Student Paper
12:15 – 12:30 p.m.
Discussion
Program and Schedule
41
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Contributed Papers Session # 12
Effects of Drought on Wildlife
Friday, January 30, 2015; 10:15 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Alexander I
Chair: Jeff Lincer, Researchers Implementing Conservation Action
10:15 – 10:35 a.m.
The Effect of Water Level Management and Drought on Nesting Aechmophorus Grebes in Northern
California; David P. Arsenault, Karen Velas, Emily Mickus and Madelyn Ore
10:35 – 10:55 a.m.
Drought Severity Influences Female Greater Sage-grouse Breeding Behavior, Habitat Use, and
Success; Daniel Gibson, Erik Blomberg, Michael Atamian and Jim Sedinger
Student Paper
10:55 – 11:15 a.m.
Giant Garter Snake (Thamnophis gigas) – Surviving Landscape Changes and Drought in California’s
Central Valley; Eric Hansen and Matt Gause
11:15 – 11:35 a.m.
Drought and Life History of California Tiger Salamanders in Vernal Pools of the Southern San Joaquin
Valley Geographic Region; Ryan P. Lopez
11:35 – 11:55 a.m.
Response of Western Pond Turtles (Actinemys marmorata) to Drought; Kathryn L. Purcell
11:55 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Population Trends of the Salt Marsh Harvest Mouse During a California Drought; Katherine R. Smith,
Laurie Barthman-Thompson, Sarah Estrella and Melissa K. Riley
12:15 – 12:30 p.m.
Discussion
The Sandhill Crane Technical Advisory Committee and
the Sacramento Shasta Chapter of TWS-WS present
Sandhill Cranes in California
February 17, 2015 – Classroom Session
February 18 or 19, 2015 – One day field Session
Holiday Inn Express, Elk Grove
Workshop topics include species’ life history, population trends, threats, survey protocols, current research, and management. The
first day will be in the classroom with an add-on option for a field portion that will teach survey methodology and further identification
skills.
For more information, draft agenda and online registration: http://tws-west.org/sac-shasta/home/calendar/upcoming-events/
Program and Schedule
42
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Contributed Papers Session # 13
Linking Research to Policy and Management
Friday, January 30, 2015, 10:15 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Alexander II
Chair: Mike Westphal, Bureau of Land Management
10:15 – 10:35 a.m.
San Diego County’s Feral Pig Damage Control Project; Rich Burg, Megan Jennings and
Scott Tremor
10:35 – 10:55 a.m.
Developing a Wild Pig Management Plan on Tejon Ranch; Elizabeth H. Hiroyasu, Jocelyn Christie,
Emily DeMarco, Adam Kreger and Maxwell Ludington
10:55 – 11:15 a.m.
Using Demographic Monitoring to Inform Bird Conservation; David F. DeSante, Danielle R. Kaschube,
James F. Saracco and Steven K. Albert
11:15 – 11:35 a.m.
Greater Sage-grouse Brood Survival and Habitat in the Great Basin: An Opportunity to Assess
Impacts of Feral Horses and Livestock; Phillip A. Street and James, S, Sedinger
Student Paper
11:35 – 11:55 a.m.
When the Heat is On: The 2014 Drought and the First Blunt-nosed Leopard Lizard Rangewide
Recruitment Survey; Michael F. Westphal, Erin N. Tennant, Joseph A.E. Stewart, H. Scott Butterfield
and Barry R. Sinervo
11:55 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Evaluation of DRECP Desert Tortoise and Bighorn Sheep Habitat Suitability and Connectivity Model
Predictions in the Soda Mountain Area, San Bernardino County; Susanne Heim
12:15 – 12:30 p.m.
Discussion
NOTES
Program and Schedule
43
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
POSTER SESSION CONTRIBUTED PAPERS
Poster Reception
Thursday, January 29, 6 to 8 p.m.
Dry Creek Ballroom
Session Chairs: Jessica Martini-Lamb (Sonoma County Water Agency) and
Carlos Alvarado (Ascent Environmental)
Note: Posters will be available for informal viewing in the Russian River Room
on Wednesday from 2 to 7 p.m., and on Thursday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Statewide Coordination and Stakeholder Input to Inform 2015 CDFW Regulation Changes Affecting Scientific Collecting Permits;
Ona Alminas, Craig Martz, Russ Bellmer, Dan Kratville, Justin Garcia, Esther Burkett, Brian Owens and Mark Stopher
Links Between Demography, Climate, and Forage Availability; Brianne Boan, Kelley M. Stewart, Thomas D. Lohuis, Thomas P.
Albright, Thomas Dilts and James S. Sedinger
Student Poster
Foraging and Nesting Habitat Association of Swainson's Hawk (Buteo swainsoni) along Lower Cache Creek, Yolo County, California;
Kevin Cahill
Student Poster
Water Drawdown from Four Bighorn Sheep Water Developments; Neal Darby, Sarah Yates and Debra Hughson
Modeling Movement Corridors for the Humboldt Marten (Martes caurina humboldtensis) in Northwestern California; Matt Delheimer,
Zav Grabinski, Melissa Kimble, Keith Slauson and Bill Zielinski
Neonate Prey Preferences of Giant Gartersnakes (Thamnophis gigas) from the Sacramento Valley of California: Implications of an
Exotic Diet for a Threatened Native; Julia Ersan, Brian J. Halstead, Erica L. Wildy and Michael L. Casazza Student Poster
Bees of the American River Watershed Project: Community Structure, Niche Overlap, and Resource Competition; Micheal Finnell,
Alisa Simonoff-Smith and Patrick Foley
Student Poster
The Greater Sandhill Crane TAC: Developing a Strategy for Crane Conservation in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta;
Rachel Gardiner
Future Direction of the California Wildlife Habitat Relationships System; Melanie Gogol-Prokurat and Monica Parisi
Avian Response to Small-scale Riparian Restoration on Private Lands in Marin and Sonoma Counties; Kathleen Grady,
Thomas A. Gardali and Derek J. Girman
Student Poster
Correlates of Community Structure and Diversity of Small Mammal Communities in Great Basin Sagebrush Habitats; Sarah Hegg,
Jade Keehn, Teresa Campbell, Scott Appleby and Marjorie Matocq
Student Poster
Lifetime Reproductive Success in a Small Population of the Snowy Plover (Charadrius nivosus); Dana Herman and Mark A. Colwell
Male Sex Bias in Capture Samples of the Endangered Salt Marsh Harvest Mouse (Reithrodontomys raviventris) from a Range-wide
Population Genetics Study; Luis Hernandez, Laureen Barthman-Thompson, Sarah Estrella, Susan Fresquez, Meg Marriott,
Katie Smith, Mark Statham, Rachel Tertes and Ben Sacks
Prevalence of Internal Parasites Based on Fecal Testing of Wild Mammals in Sonoma and Marin County Rehabilitation Centers;
Janet Hohn, Daniel J. Famini and Danielle A. Mattos
Program and Schedule
44
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Understanding the Effects of Mercury Concentration Levels on Wood Ducks: Are Males or Females More Susceptible? Eman Jabali,
Kelley M. Stewart, Ben Sedinger and Chris Nicolai
Student Poster
Lek Geography Predicts Fine-scale Genomic Structure of Sage-grouse; Josh Jahner, Daniel Gibson, Chava Weitzman,
Erik Blomberg, Jim Sedinger and Thomas Parchman
Student Poster
The Unexpected Diet and Foraging Patterns of Western Pond Turtles (Emys marmorata) in Two Northern California Urban Streams;
Nicole Karres and Nicholas R. Geist
Student Poster
A Summary of the Effects of Dredging on California Least Tern Foraging; Kathleen M. Keane, Nathan Mudry, Spencer Langdon,
Bob Schallmann, Wally Ross, Nick Liberato and Santiago Lopez
The California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s BIOS Data Viewer; Sophie King
Wildlife Connectivity from the Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada Mountains; Crystal Krause, Melanie Gogol-Prokurat and
Simon Bisrat
The Historical Range of Beaver (Castor canadensis) in Coastal California: An Updated Review of the Evidence; Christopher Lanman,
Heidi Perryman, J. Eli Asarian, Brock Dolman, Richard Lanman and Michael Pollock
Patterns in the Forest: The Northern Alligator Lizard (Elgaria coerulea) as an Indicator of Biodiversity; Brian Lavin, Chris R. Feldman
and Derek J. Girman
Student Poster
The Effects of Habitat Restoration and Sea Level Rise on Breeding Western Snowy Plovers in Coastal Northern California;
Stephanie Leja, Keith N. Barnard, Rachel M. Nypaver and Eric V. Bloom
Student Poster
Acoustic Monitoring in California’s Northern Central Valley; Aithne Loeblich, Shahroukh Mistry and Colleen Hatfield
Student Poster
Conservation Incentive Program Leads to Higher Waterbird Densities in Enrolled Rice Fields in the Sacramento Valley, California;
Kelsey Navarre and Greg H. Golet
Home Ranges of Ringtails (Bassariscus astutus) in a Central Valley Oak Woodland, Sutter Co., California; D. Scott Newton,
David T. Wyatt, Christopher Vang, Rosalinda Vizina and Kathleen Norton
Hopping Fox Syndrome - Treatment Outcomes 2009-2013; Lisa Pesch
Canine Field Assistants at the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System: The Safe and Effective Use of Ecological Detection Dogs in
Challenging Field Conditions; Robyn Powers, Katherine Ayres, Murrelet Halterman; Daniel Duke and Brian B. Boroski
Avian Community Response to Drought Differs Along Elevation Gradients and Riparian and Upland Habitats, San Gabriel Mountains,
California; Jennifer Rechel
Effects of Laying Order and Egg Volume on Black Brant Apparent Pre-fledging Survival Rates; Thomas Riecke, Alan G. Leach and
Jim S. Sedinger
An Integrated Population Model for Mottled Ducks in Texas: Harvest, Habitat, and Survival; Thomas Riecke, Jena A. Moon,
David A. Haukos, Jim S. Sedinger, Warren C. Conway and Patrick Walther
Western Snowy Plover Nest Site Selection and Oyster Shell Enhancement; David Riensche, Nicole A. Beadle and Sarah C. Gidre
Habitat Associations for Three Montane Mammal Species; Aviva Rossi, Robert Klinger and Dirk Van Vuren
Native Kangaroo Rat Consumption of Non-native Veldt Grass Seed Even When Presented with Other, Highly-preferred Seed;
Summer Schlageter; Caitrin M. Doles; Juliana P. Trunzo; Francis X. Villablanca
Student Poster
Program and Schedule
45
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Strain Variation of Borrelia burgdorferi and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in Sciurids and Woodrats in Northwestern California;
Kathleen Sholty, Richard N. Brown and Janet E. Foley
Student Poster
Fecal Glucocorticoid Metabolites in Free-living California Ground Squirrels: Experimental Validation and Inter-individual Differences in
the Stress Response; Lisa L. Surber, Minnie Vo, Lauren Kong, Tali Hammond, Eileen A. Lacey, Bree Putman,
Rulon W. Clark and Jennifer E. Smith
Student Poster
Habitat Selection of the White-footed Vole in Northern California; David Tange and William T. Bean
Impacts to Mexican Free-tailed Bats from Wind Energy Development in the Western US; Joel Thompson, Wallace Erickson, Rene
Braud and Paul Rabie
Factors Influencing Mule Deer Fawn Survival and Recruitment; Danielle Walsh, Kelley M. Stewart, Bruce K. Johnson and
Michael J. Wisdom
Student Poster
Status of Sarcoptic Mange in Urban San Joaquin Kit Foxes (Vulpes macrotis mutica); Tory Westall, Brian Cypher, Deana Clifford,
Don Richardson, Janet Foley, Jaime Rudd, Leslie Woods and Diego Montecino
Nest-site Selection and Feeding Behavior of Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) and Cooper’s Hawks (Accipiter cooperii) Across
Urban Density Using Citizen Scientists; Justin White, Kelley Stewart and Scott Bassett
Current Status of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Spotted Owl Observations Database; Katherine Whitney
The Effects of the Rim Fire on Great Gray Owl Habitat in Yosemite National Park; Joanna Wu, Rodney B. Siegel, Sarah L. Stock and
Stephanie A. Eyes
NOTES
Program and Schedule
46
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
POSTER BOARD LOCATION MAP
Poster
Board
Location
Abstract Title
Presenter
18
Statewide coordination and stakeholder input to inform 2015 CDFW regulation changes
affecting Scientific Collecting Permits
40
Links between demography, climate, and forage availability
3
Foraging and Nesting Habitat Association of Swainson's Hawk (Buteo swainsoni) Along
Lower Cache Creek, Yolo County, California
42
Water drawdown from Four Bighorn Sheep Water Developments
36
Modeling movement corridors for the Humboldt marten (Martes caurina humboldtensis) in
northwestern California
21
Neonate prey preferences of giant gartersnakes (Thamnophis gigas) from the Sacramento
Valley of California
Julia Ersan
Student Poster
23
Bees of the American River Watershed Project: Community Structure, Niche Overlap, and
Resource Competition
Micheal Finnell
Student Poster
5
The Greater Sandhill Crane TAC: Developing a Strategy for Crane Conservation in the
Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta
1
Lek geography predicts fine-scale genomic structure of sage-grouse
19
Future Direction of the California Wildlife Habitat Relationships System
Program and Schedule
47
Ona Alminas
Brianne Boan
Student Poster
Kevin Cahill
Student Poster
Neal Darby
Matt Delheimer
Rachel Gardiner
Daniel Gibson
Student Poster
Melanie Gogol-Prokurat
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Poster
Board
Location
Abstract Title
Presenter
44
Wildlife connectivity from the Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada Mountains
Melanie Gogol-Prokurat
13
Avian response to small-scale riparian restoration on private lands in Marin and Sonoma
counties
Kathleen Grady
Student Poster
26
Correlates of community structure and diversity of small mammal communities in Great
Basin sagebrush habitats
Sarah Hegg
Student Poster
11
Lifetime Reproductive Success in a Small Population of the Snowy Plover (Charadrius
nivosus)
27
Male sex bias in capture samples of the endangered salt marsh harvest mouse
(Reithrodontomys raviventris) from a range-wide population genetics study
37
Prevalence of Internal Parasites Based on Fecal Testing of Wild Mammals in Sonoma and
Marin County Rehabilitation Centers
8
Understanding the Effects of Mercury Concentration Levels on Wood Ducks: Are Males or
Females More Susceptible?
Eman Jabali
Student Poster
22
The unexpected diet and foraging patterns of Western Pond Turtles (Emys marmorata) in
two Northern California urban streams
Nicole Karres
Student Poster
6
A Summary of the Effects of Dredging on California Least Tern Foraging
20
Patterns in the Forest: The Northern Alligator Lizard (Elgaria coerulea) as an indicator of
biodiversity
14
Dana Herman
Luis Hernandez
Janet Hohn
Kathleen Keane
Brian Lavin
Student Poster
The Effects of Habitat Restoration and Sea Level Rise on Breeding Western Snowy Plovers
in Coastal Northern California
Stephanie Leja
Student Poster
33
Acoustic Monitoring in California’s Northern Central Valley
Aithne Loeblich
Student Poster
30
The Historical Range of Beaver (Castor canadensis) in Coastal California: An Updated
Review of the Evidence
Kate Lundquist
7
Conservation incentive program leads to higher waterbird densities in enrolled rice fields in
the Sacramento Valley, California
Kelsey Navarre
29
Home Ranges of Ringtails (Bassariscus astutus) in a Central Valley Oak Woodland, Sutter
Co., California
D. Scott Newton
28
Hopping Fox Syndrome - Treatment Outcomes 2009-2013
41
Canine Field Assistants at the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System: The Safe and
Effective Use of Ecological Detection Dogs in Challenging Field Conditions
Robyn Powers
15
Avian community response to drought differs along elevation gradients and riparian and
upland habitats, San Gabriel Mountains, California
Jennifer Rechel
10
An integrated population model for mottled ducks in Texas: harvest, habitat, and survival
Thomas Riecke
12
Effects of laying order and egg volume on Black Brant apparent pre-fledging survival rates
Thomas Riecke
2
Western Snowy Plover Nest Site Selection and Oyster Shell Enhancement
David Riensche
35
Habitat Associations for Three Montane Mammal Species
39
Transmission of ectoparasites across kin-structured social networks of California ground
squirrels
31
Native kangaroo rat consumption of non-native veldt grass seed even when presented with Summer Schlageter
other, highly preferred, seed
Program and Schedule
48
Lisa Pesch
Aviva Rossi
Imani Russell
Student Poster
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Poster
Board
Location
Abstract Title
Presenter
43
Strain variation of Borrelia burgdorferi and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in sciurids and
woodrats in northwestern California
Kathleen Sholty
Student Poster
32
Fecal glucocorticoid metabolites in free-living California ground squirrels: Experimental
validation and inter-individual differences in the stress response
Lisa Surber
Student Poster
25
Habitat Selection of the White-footed Vole in northern California
34
Impacts to Mexican Free-tailed Bats from Wind Energy Development in the Western US
24
Factors influencing mule deer fawn survival and recruitment
38
Status of Sarcoptic Mange in Urban San Joaquin Kit Foxes (Vulpes macrotis mutica)
Tory Westall
4
Nest-site selection and feeding behavior of Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) and
Cooper’s Hawks (Accipiter cooperii) across urban density using citizen science
Justin White
16
Current Status of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Spotted Owl Observations
Database
Katherine Whitney
17
The California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s BIOS Data Viewer
Katherine Whitney
9
The effects of the Rim Fire on Great Gray Owl habitat in Yosemite National Park
David Tange
Joel Thompson
Danielle Walsh
Student Poster
Joanna Wu
NOTES
Program and Schedule
49
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
PUBLISH YOUR RESULTS IN WESTERN WILDLIFE!
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•
•
Do you have a good study that you want to publish?
Have you developed a new technique that you want to share with other members?
Do other journals just seem out of reach, too slow, or too expensive?
Western Wildlife (formerly TWS Transactions) is the Western Section’s own peer-reviewed scientific journal. It has been re-designed
and re-invigorated to provide a convenient publishing outlet for research on animal ecology, conservation and management.
Western Wildlife especially wants papers by students, agency personnel, and private consultants, who may have little prior experience
with peer-reviewed publishing.
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Articles are Open Access – available to everyone online!
No publication charges for TWS-Western Section members!
No restrictions on authors’ rights to post or distribute PDFs!
Fully peer-reviewed, by colleagues who realize the limitations to field studies on wild animals!
Quick turn-around time from submission to review to publication!
To submit your manuscript: www.WWJournal.org
WESTERN SECTION
STUDENT AFFAIRS COMMITTEE (WS-SAC)
WS-SAC is seeking member feedback to help prioritize effort and funding for key initiatives that support student members of The
Wildlife Society. Please contribute your feedback by completing a short survey via the QR code below, or follow this link:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/WSSAC
Did you know that Western Section…
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


Has an ambassador program for student outreach?
Is planning a mentor program for student members & professionals?
Offers grants to students for research and travel to scientific meetings?
Is seeking a student (undergrad or graduate) to fill a vacant co-chair on the committee?
The Western Section Student Affairs Committee supports wildlife students and early-career
professionals by engaging students and faculty in Section activities, and emphasizes career-long
benefits and opportunities of active membership in The Wildlife Society. The WS-SAC activities and
outreach efforts extend to colleges and universities within Western Section, regardless of student
chapter affiliation or accreditation status, fostering student involvement in the natural resources field.
Chair-at-large Mandi McElroy ([email protected]), and David Wyatt, Faculty Chair, manage
the Student Affairs Committee. The survey shares more about these opportunities, and invites you to
indicate your specific interests in becoming more involved in outreach and supporting efforts to help
students get a foothold in the wildlife profession.
Program and Schedule
50
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
HARASSMENT PREVENTION POLICY
The Western Section is committed to ensuring our Conferences are free of harassment. While violations may be reported to the
President or any officer, to facilitate compliance with this policy at the Conference, Section Representative Cynthia Perrine and Section
Treasurer John McNerney have agreed to be primary points of contact for questions or to report violations.
The official policy adopted by the Western Section:
Adopted April 15, 2013
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society (TWS-WS) is committed to providing an environment free of any form of harassment. Our
policy formally discourages sexual harassment and harassment because of pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions, race,
religious creed, color, gender, national origin, ancestry, physical or mental disability, medical condition, marital status, sexual
orientation, age, gender or any other basis protected by federal, state or local law or ordinance or regulation. All such harassment is
unlawful. Our harassment prevention policy applies to all persons involved in our operations and prohibits unlawful harassment by any
officer of our organization, as well as by any person doing business with or for our organization including independent contractors,
suppliers, and volunteers.
Sexual harassment includes, but is not limited to, making unwanted sexual advances and requests for sexual favors where either:
1. Submission to such conduct is made an explicit or implicit term or condition of some benefit from the organization; or
2. A hostile environment is created because of unwelcome actions, and the organization knows, or should know, about the problem
and does nothing to correct it.
Prohibited unlawful harassment because of sex, race, ancestry, physical handicap, mental condition, marital status, age, religion, sexual
orientation, or any other protected basis includes, but is not limited to, the following behavior:
•
•
•
•
•
Verbal conduct such as epithets, derogatory jokes or comments, slurs or unwanted sexual advances, invitations or comments;
Visual conduct such as derogatory and/or sexually oriented posters, photography, cartoons, drawings, e-mail and faxes or
gestures;
Physical conduct such as assault, unwanted touching, blocking normal movement or interfering with work because of sex, race or
any other protected basis;
Threats and demands to submit to sexual requests as a condition of participation or other benefit from the organization, or to avoid
some other loss, and offers of other benefits in return for sexual favors; and
Retaliation for having reported or threatened to report harassment.
If you believe that you have been unlawfully harassed by an officer or agent of TWS-WS you should promptly report the facts of the
incident or incidents and the names of the individual(s) to the President of TWS-WS or another officer of the organization. It is the
responsibility of each officer or independent contractor of TWS-WS to immediately report any violation or suspected violation of this
policy to the President.
Upon receipt of a complaint, the organization will undertake a thorough, objective and good-faith investigation of the harassment
allegations.
If the organization determines that harassment has occurred, effective remedial action will be taken in accordance with the
circumstances involved. Any officer determined by the organization to be responsible for harassment will be subject to appropriate
disciplinary action, up to and including removal from the Executive Board or termination of membership. Any independent contractor
determined by the organization to be responsible for harassment will be subject to appropriate disciplinary action, up to and including
termination of contractual agreements.
You will not be retaliated against for filing a complaint and/or assisting in a complaint or investigation process. Further, we will not
tolerate or permit retaliation by officers or independent contractors of TWS- WS against any complainant or anyone assisting in a
harassment investigation.
All members of the Executive Board and independent contractors of TWS-WS are required to complete sexual harassment prevention
training for supervisors that complies with California AB 1825 within 60 days of appointment or election to the Board. The training will
be required every two years
If you have any questions concerning this policy, please contact the TWS-WS President.
Program and Schedule
51
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
TWS CERTIFICATION PROGRAM
Certification of wildlife biologists is a service provided by The Wildlife Society for wildlife professionals and the public, who
may desire a peer evaluation statement. The Wildlife Society is committed to the sound stewardship of wildlife resources
under the guidance of well-educated, experienced, and dedicated wildlife biologists. To further this aim, The Wildlife Society
has established standards for certifying the credentials of qualified wildlife biologists.
A professional wildlife biologist is a person with the educational background and demonstrated expertise in the art and
science of applying the principles of ecology to the conservation and management of wildlife and its habitats. An applicant
for professional certification who demonstrates this expertise through education and experience, and is judged to be able to
represent the profession as an ethical practitioner, will be designated as a Certified Wildlife Biologist.
An applicant for professional certification who has limited experience but who has completed the rigorous academic
standards and is judged to be able to represent the profession as an ethical practitioner will be designated as an Associate
Wildlife Biologist (AWB). After sufficient experience is gained, the AWB may apply for the more advanced level of
certification.
Please visit the TWS (National) website (www.wildlife.org) for additional details, or contact your TWS-Western Section
Professional Development Committee.
NOTES
Program and Schedule
52
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Congratulations to
The Wildlife Society Pittsburgh Annual Conference 2014
Quiz Bowl Champs…
Humboldt State
University!
Future Meeting Dates
5th International Wildlife Management Congress
July 26-30, 2015 Sapporo, Japan
TWS Annual Conference
October 17-21, 2015 Winnipeg, Manitoba
TWS Western Section Annual Conference
January 26-29, 2016 Pomona, CA
Where should we go next?
Talk to your Chapter Representative!
Program and Schedule
53
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
WESTERN FIELD COURSE /
FIELD TECHNIQUES IN WILDLIFE ECOLOGY
August 10 – 21, 2015, Swanton Pacific Ranch, Santa Cruz County (Davenport, CA)
This is an intensive, resident field camp emphasizing wildlife identification and field techniques for vertebrates. Administered by
California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo and the Western Section of The Wildlife Society, this course includes handson learning opportunities, data collection and a team research project. Informal time provides additional mentoring opportunities with
instructors, including wildlife professionals from USFWS, CDFW, USFS, Point Blue Conservation Science, Swaim Biological
Incorporated, and others to be determined.
What participants say about the Western Field Course:
“I felt as though this makes me a more competitive candidate for my career.”
“I gained a lot of experience in different field techniques. I appreciate a good crew
more than ever”
“This class opened my eyes to the different careers in wildlife that I did not know
about before, such as private consulting.”
“The best part was unexpected animals in the traps (skunk!) and holding things!”
What instructors say about the Western Field Course:
“I enjoyed helping out at your class. It was a good break from my typical work.”
“The students were interested and helpful.”
“Wow that was fun. Let’s do it again!”
Meals, lodging, and 4-units of academic credit are included in the course fee, which is
still being finalized but should be around $1600. Register through
Cal Poly Extended Education or call (805) 756-2053 for registration details. Course is
limited to 16 participants, with students working in groups of 3 to 5
to maximize hands-on experiential learning and mentoring.
Field Camp is always interested in additional mentor-instructors! Want to help lead a
field technique? Contact Program Director,
Cynthia Perrine: [email protected]
Program and Schedule
54
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
The number of contact hours for each workshop and contributed paper session is equal to the number of actual hours spent
in a workshop or session and does not include time allotted for breaks or lunch. Generally, attendance at a meeting such as
this is not creditable for an initial application for Certified Wildlife Biologist or Associate Wildlife Biologist (but this year’s preand post-conference events are!); however, conference hours may be credited “one for one” toward CWB Recertification. For
example, if you attend four 2.5 hour technical sessions (sorry, social events do not count!) you may claim 10 hours toward a
Professional Development Certificate (in category 1) or toward Certified Wildlife Biologist renewal (also category 1). Speaking
in or chairing a session is usually credited at 1 hour = 2 hours. Additional information on the TWS Professional Development
Certificate and Certified /Associate Wildlife Biologist programs is available from the TWS-Western Section Professional
Development Committee or on the national TWS website: www.wildlife.org
WESTERN SECTION CONSERVATION AFFAIRS COMMITTEE & TWS
CONSERVATION AFFAIRS NETWORK
The Chair of Western Section’s CAC (WS-CAC) is Erin Aquino-Carhart ([email protected]) and Vice-Chair is Steve Juarez
([email protected]). WS-CAC seeks input about local and regional conservation priorities within Western Section, and needs
additional members to serve on Chapter and Section CAC’s to expand the Conservation Affairs Network throughout Western Section.
Please complete a short survey via the QR code in this section, or follow this link:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/WSCAC
The Conservation Affairs Network (TWS-CAN) engages and unifies the efforts of The Wildlife Society, its
200+ units, and nearly 10,000 members to advance wildlife conservation policy issues at the national,
regional, and local levels. Launched in 2014, TWS-CAN creates a venue for streamlined communication,
collaboration, and cooperation on policy matters important to wildlife professionals.
Wildlife professionals now have an effective method for bringing their valuable and crucial perspectives
into the policy process, to the betterment of wildlife conservation. TWS-CAN operates through
Conservation Affairs Committees (CAC) established within TWS Sections and Chapters. These
committees are charged with identifying and addressing policy priorities within their region, and communicating their activities and
needs with other CACs and TWS Staff. CACs and TWS Staff support each other in their policy activities, lending experience and
expertise to enhance efforts.
Program and Schedule
55
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
Program and Schedule
56
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
THE WILDLIFE CONFESSIONAL: CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society is excited to announce a call for submissions for consideration in The Wildlife
Confessional, an anthology of stories by wildlife professionals about their adventures, misadventures, revelations, reflections, mishaps,
and pivotal experiences in the field.
Submissions Guidelines
Who Can Submit: Anyone in the wildlife profession (wildlife biologists, game wardens, land managers, researchers, students) with a
good wildlife story to tell. If you have told – or been told – a good yarn over a campfire or a cold beer or a long car ride... yep, *those*
are the stories we are looking for. Now is the time to put your story on paper, or to nudge that old timer collecting dust in the corner
office to tell theirs…
Subject Matter: Submissions can be humorous, reflective, poignant, inspirational, but should ultimately embody professionalism and a
respect for the natural world; submissions should be non-fiction, but should *not* be technical or how-to in nature.
Submission Format: Submissions should be in a format supported by Microsoft Word, and should include complete contact
information (full name / job title / affiliation / address /phone / e-mail).
Submittal Deadline: Submissions must be received no later than May 15, 2015.
Mail Submissions & Questions to: [email protected]
Selection Criteria
It will be the responsibility of the Editors to select the final stories from the pool of submissions. Submissions will be reviewed and
selected for publication based on their originality, quality, content, accuracy, and the level of effort necessary to edit and revise the
story suitable for publication. The Editors will contact and work with authors whose work(s) are selected to tailor their submission in
accordance with the expectations of the Editors.
Contributors whose submissions are not selected will be notified by a form letter/email thanking them for their submissions.
Author Acknowledgment: Authors will be acknowledged with a story by-line and brief about-the-author paragraph, but will not be
compensated for accepted or published submissions.
thewildlifeconfessional.wordpress.com
Program and Schedule
57
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
NOTES
Program and Schedule
58
January 26–30, 2015
The Western Section of The Wildlife Society 2015 Annual Meeting
TWS WESTERN SECTION COMMITTEES NEED
VOLUNTEERS TO SERVE THE SECTION!
Sign up to serve on Western Section committees by completing a short survey via this link:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/2015WSCommitteeSignup
or scan this QR code:
Professional Affairs Committee (Chair Don Yasuda, [email protected]; Vice-Chair Rhys Evans, [email protected]) This committee
encourages the maximum number of qualified persons residing or working within the Section’s organizational area to become members of
The Wildlife Society and the Western Section, and it shall encourage Certification of eligible professionals.
Certification Subcommittee (Chair Rhys Evans, [email protected]) This subcommittee is responsible for promotion, education, and
dissemination of Certification information to wildlife professionals and the public in the Western Section area. The Subcommittee promotes
certification among employing agencies and private interests.
Membership Services Subcommittee (Chair Don Yasuda, [email protected]) This subcommittee addresses services currently provided to
Western Section members and identifies services wanted by the membership such as a member directory and outreach.
Conservation Affairs Committee (Chair Erin Aquino-Carhart, [email protected]; Vice-Chair Steve Juarez, [email protected]) This
committee may review legislative proposals, administrative regulations, environmental assessments and impacts statements, and other
subjects or issues affecting wildlife or wildlife habitat within the Western Section, and prepares comments to be submitted on behalf of the
Western Section. WS-CAC is part of The Wildlife Society's Conservation Affairs Network.
Student Affairs Committee (Chair-at-large Mandi McElroy, [email protected]) This committee supports wildlife students and early career
professionals by engaging students and faculty in Section activities, and emphasizes career-long benefits and opportunities of active
membership in The Wildlife Society.
Professional Development Committee (Chair Jessica Martini-Lamb, [email protected]) This committee coordinates development of
technical workshops and symposia for the Annual Conference, identifying workshops, training sessions, professional meetings, and course
work offered by other individuals and organizations that meet the requirements of the Section's Professional Development Program, and
provide professional development training where current providers are not meeting the needs of wildlife biologists in the Section.
Program Committee (Chair TBD, President-Elect 2015) This committee works closely with the President-Elect to plan the Annual Conference, and
decides general and concurrent session topics, and structures additional activities for the 2016 annual conference.
Awards and Grants Committee (Chair Richard Burg, [email protected]) This committee oversees the awards bestowed by Western
Section, provides outreach to advertise and administers collection of the grant applications and provides applications to the President for
consideration by Executive Board.
Newsletter and Outreach (Chair Debra Hawk, [email protected]) This committee coordinates with the Executive Board, Chapters, and with
members to solicit and prepare content to be included in the Section newsletter. This committee also manages the Section website and
electronic communications.
[NEW] Ethnic and Gender Diversity in the Wildlife Profession Ad Hoc Committee Review the ethnic and gender diversity of the Section
membership and assess diversity of students and wildlife professionals within the Section area and provide recommendations on how the
Section can improve its outreach and representativeness. (Vacant)
[NEW] Early Career Professional Ad Hoc Committee Work with the Student Affairs Committee and Professional Development Committee to
assess needs and opportunities to provide services for wildlife professionals entering their careers that better ensures their career success
and their contributions to wildlife conservation. (Vacant)
[NEW] Enhance Careers Ad Hoc Committee Review the strategic approach to professional development available to members and develop
processes such as a 5-year Professional Development Plan to guide planning for the Professional Development Committee and identify
opportunities for networking and collaborating with other organizations. (Vacant)
[NEW] Board Operations Ad Hoc Committee Review Executive Board operational models and develop new tools and procedures as needed to
ensure effective operations methods. (vacant) Seeking committee members who are former Section Board members and members who
have knowledge of executive board Rules and Regulations from service to other organizations.
[NEW] Member’s Advisory Ad Hoc Committee Given specific charges each year. The focus for 2015 is to evaluate membership dues and make a
recommendation to the Section Executive Board on if dues should be raised or not. (Vacant)
Program and Schedule
59
January 26–30, 2015
Hey there!
Western Section Committees Need YOUR Service!
THE BACK INSIDE COVER OF
THIS PROGRAM LISTS THE
COMMITTEES THAT NEED YOUR
HELP.
COME TO THE ANNUAL MEMBERS
FORUM ON THURSDAY AT 5:00 P.M.
FOR MORE INFORMATION ON HOW
TO GET INVOLVED WITH THE
WESTERN SECTION.