The Sheridan Press E-Edition Jan. 30, 2015

Big Horn Rams, Lady Rams top Riverside. For full coverage and a schedule of weekend sports action, SEE B1.
FRIDAY
January 30, 2015
129th Year, No. 214
Serving Sheridan County,
Wyoming
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owned since 1887
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PHOTOS, VIDEO AND BREAKING
NEWS UPDATES
Felker continues
success in meet
against Camels. B1
Wyoming lawmakers move to block cuts to sheep grazing
CHEYENNE (AP) — Some Wyoming lawmakers are pushing to protect domestic
sheep in the state from a possible federal
effort to remove them from public lands.
The U.S. Forest Service recently curtailed
domestic sheep grazing on the Payette
National Forest in Idaho to protect bighorn
sheep from disease. The agency is developing a larger plan to consider whether it
needs to curtail domestic sheep in Wyoming
and other western states to reduce the
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A display of whiskey is seen behind
the bar in the former Warehouse 201
building.
threat to bighorns.
Domestic sheep producers in Idaho and
elsewhere last year appealed the Forest
Service’s decision to curtail grazing on the
Payette National Forest to a federal appeals
court in San Francisco. Wool growers’ associations in Wyoming, Colorado and Idaho
have joined the fight.
Amy Hendrickson, executive director of
the Wyoming Wool Growers Association,
said Thursday the prospect of coming feder-
al cuts to grazing allotments has created
great concern among sheep operators in the
state.
“It’s hard for a lot of our producers to
make management decisions, decisions
what to do, because they just don’t know
whether they’re going to be able to graze or
not,” Hendrickson said.
SEE SHEEP, PAGE 2
Learning leadership through service
So far, 5
applications
received for
liquor license
BY HANNAH SHEELY
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Today is the final
day for advertising the availability of a $1,500 retail liquor license
currently owned by the city. To
date, five entities have applied for
the license, and City Council will
soon begin the process of reviewing applicants before choosing a
buyer.
Applications for the license are
due by the end of the day Monday.
There is a Council meeting
Monday night, but City Clerk
Scott Badley said the earliest the
applications could be considered
by the Council would be its Feb.
16 meeting since a public hearing
regarding the applications will need to be
advertised for two
weeks, as required by
state statute.
Badley said once
applications are
received, the clerk’s
office will review
Badley
them to make sure
they are complete, send them to
the Department of Revenue
Liquor Division in Cheyenne for
review, advertise the public hearings regarding the applications,
give them to Council members for
review and then place them on a
future agenda for a public hearing and for Council discussion
and action.
City Council has wrestled with
the best way to sell the retail
liquor license since midSeptember.
At that time, Lou’s, LLC, coowned by Luminous Brewhouse
owner Cooley Butler and local
business investor Robert Utter,
applied for the license to be used
in a proposed restaurant at 201
Broadway St.
SEE LICENSE, PAGE 2
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Civil Air Patrol Cadet Staff Sgt. Nathaniel Lydic, left, does sit-ups for his physical test as Cadet Senior Airman Ryan Baum help him keep count Thursday
evening at the Wyoming National Guard Armory in Sheridan.
Civil Air Patrol provides
experience, training for local youth
BY ALISA BRANTZ
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Whether your
young one plans to enter the U.S.
Air Force, wants to take to the
skies for fun or to help people or
just needs a little more leadership, he or she may find a jumpstart to their dreams in the Civil
Air Patrol.
CAP is a nonprofit organization that performs 90 percent of
the nation's inland search and
rescue operations, saving
approximately 75 lives each year,
according to its website.
In the 1930s, more than 150,000
aviators petitioned for an organization to put their planes and
flying skills to use in defense of
their country.
As a result, the Civil Air Patrol
Scan with your
smartphone for
latest weather,
news and sports
was born one week prior to the
Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.
Originally assigned to the War
Department under the jurisdiction of the Army Air Corps, the
Civil Air Patrol continued providing aid to both local and
national agencies after World
War II.
In 1946, President Harry
Truman incorporated the Civil
Air Patrol as a benevolent, nonprofit organization. In 1948,
Congress passed a law permanently establishing Civil Air
Patrol as the auxiliary of the
new U.S. Air Force.
Today the group has about
60,000 members nationwide —
including more than 250 in
Wyoming — and has three primary mission areas: aerospace
education, cadet programs and
Civil Air Patrol Cadets salute Cadet Capt. Don Coletta on Thursday at the
Wyoming National Guard Armory in Sheridan. Cadets pictured, from left, are
Brie Marcus, Bryce Lydic, Talon Heatley, back, and Nathan Lydic.
emergency services.
In Sheridan, the Cloud Peak
Squadron meets weekly on
Thursdays with cadets — the
kids — and senior members
The Sheridan Press
144 Grinnell Ave. Sheridan, WY 82801
307.672.2431
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
Today’s edition is published for:
Ivan Hauber
of Sheridan
learning, flying and working
their way up the ranks.
SEE PATROL, PAGE 2
OPINION
PEOPLE
PAGE SIX
ALMANAC
4
5
6
7
SPORTS
COMICS
CLASSIFIEDS
PUBLIC NOTICES
B1
B4
B5
B7
A2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SHEEP: Management
FRIDAY, JANUARY 30, 2015
PATROL: Cadets could finish with full pilot’s license
FROM 1
Sen. Larry Hicks, R-Baggs, is sponsoring a bill to
codify in Wyoming law a plan that state agencies have
used for the past 10 years to resolve possible conflicts
between wild and domestic sheep. Recognizing the
plan in state law will put the state on firmer legal
ground if it has to fight any federal effort to evict
domestic sheep producers, he said.
State management agencies, hunting groups and
grazing interests worked together to devise the
Wyoming plan in 2004. It ranks sheep areas in the
state according to their value, placing the greatest
restrictions on domestic sheep in the prime bighorn
areas.
“For the last 10 years, we’ve been operating under a
handshake,” Hicks said. “In Wyoming it works really
well, to the point that the agencies have adopted it.”
The Wyoming Wool Growers Association and the
Wyoming Wild Sheep Foundation, a wild sheep conservation group, intervened together against environmental groups that filed a federal lawsuit alleging that
domestic sheep grazing threatened a small bighorn
herd on the Medicine Bow National Forest. A decision
in that lawsuit is still pending.
Hicks sponsored legislation that became law two
years ago specifying that if concern over bighorns in
the Medicine Bow National Forest threatened existing
domestic sheep operators that the state would remove
the wild sheep.
Sen. Stan Cooper, R-Kemmerer, is sponsoring similar
legislation this year that would specify the state would
remove a herd of bighorns from the Darby Mountain
area of the Bridger-Teton National Forest if the federal government proposed to cut domestic sheep operations there.
FROM 1
Senior member and cadet
parent Kristen Marcus said
what really sets the program apart from other
youth organizations in
Sheridan is that this program is putting kids into a
situation where they can
help someone in an extreme
situation.
Currently, cadets are
being trained to be groundlevel certified in search and
rescue missions and hope
to be certified in June.
Parents are encouraged to
sign up either as a sponsor
— who goes with on trips
and helps out but doesn’t
get any training — or as a
senior member who
receives training in any of
18 different positions.
“I signed up just to spend
more time with my daughter and found out it was
really cool and I want to
stay in it,” Marcus said. “I
think it’s pretty rigorous.
For the three things I wanted to train for I had to complete 117 tasks and I’ve completed 37. And that’s just for
the lower level of all of
those; to be master rating it
takes much more time.”
But the hard work could
lead to big rewards.
If a cadet begins at age 12
and continues through age
18, they could leave the program with a full pilot’s
license. Normally a very
expensive process, the
training they receive is
fully covered by the CAP
annual fee.
If a cadet has an interest
in enlisting in the Air
Force, they could enter the
ranks a grade or two higher
than a non-CAP enlistee,
meaning higher pay and
higher rank at a younger
age.
Other interests that
would benefit from participation are EMTs, life flight
pilots, private or small aircraft pilots or even somebody who just wants to
learn leadership skills,
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Civil Air Patrol Cadet Airman Brie Marcus, center, guards the goal as the cadets play broomball for
a physical training exercise Thursday evening at the Wyoming National Guard Armory in Sheridan.
Pictured, from left, are Nathaniel Lydic, Talon Heatley and Bryce Lydic.
Marcus said.
Under the direction of
Capt. Jeffrey Baum, a commercial airline pilot of 30
years, cadets get to take
flight and even take the
yoke during flight.
Some members of the
community have expressed
concerns regarding the
cadets taking flight after an
accident in 2007 killed CAP
senior members from
Sheridan.
Three members were out
in a Cessna 182R aircraft
searching for a teen who
went missing while fishing,
and were killed when their
plane crashed in the
Bighorn National Forest.
The plane went down on a
Monday evening and on
Tuesday, rescuers reached
the remote crash site and
recovered the bodies of the
crew members, Lt. Col.
James Henderson of
Cowley and Senior Member
James Meyer and Capt.
Patricia Larson, both of
Sheridan.
The missing teen, Keith
Bellack of Gillette, was
found alive.
“Since then, the community has had a foul taste in
their mouths for us,”
Marcus said. “It was horrible and it should not have
ever happened. Accidents
happen and we have worked
to rectify the problem. The
problem that caused the
crash is that orders were
not followed to the letter.
We have a new wing commander who will not put up
with any person not fulfilling any order no matter
how inconsequential it may
seem. If he gives an order
and it is not followed then
you will not fly.”
But to Marcus, it is all
about the personal benefits
both her and her daughter
have received.
Marcus has seen a
marked improvement in the
attitude of her daughter,
who she said is a typical
pre-teen.
“She is 12 going on 13 and
she has that attitude, but
she’s learning a lot of
restraint with the Civil Air
Patrol because she has to
follow orders,” Marcus
said. “Everybody works as
a team so everybody knows
what is expected of them
and when they are expected
to do it.”
As a senior member,
Marcus appreciates the
opportunity to make a difference in the lives of others.
“I’ve always been in civil
service; I’ve been a Girl
Scout leader and things
throughout my life,” she
said.
“So to be a part of potentially making real changes,
potentially churning out a
cadet who could go out and
save someone’s life is excellent,” she added. “I think it
is an amazing opportunity
for the youth and the adults
to not only get involved in
the community but also do
something that has a much
bigger picture.”
LICENSE: Council won’t consider issue until mid-Feb.
expressed frustration at the long delay.
The Yates Bros. representatives said
The restaurant would have been
they were ready to open a restaurant
owned and operated by an entity
that would have employed 30 full-time
called the Yates Bros., which operates
and 20 part-time workers by
nearly 25 restaurants around the state. November 2014.
Since the city is the selling agent in
City councilors stressed that they
the transaction, Council members
wanted to make the best choice on
wanted more details on use and ownwhich applicant received the license
ership of the license before making a
since its reduced price could be condecision. The city owns the license
sidered akin to winning the lottery.
previously used by Oliver’s Bar and
They said using the license wisely for
Grill, which closed in December 2012.
economic development was paraThe license was tied up in legal promount.
ceedings and not available for sale
Applicants to date for the license
until spring 2014.
include:
In mid-September 2014, the Council
• Lou’s, LLC, doing business as
tabled the request from Lou’s. It then
Wyoming Cattle and Creek Co. at 201
worked through a process of establish- Broadway St.
ing criteria for sale of the license —
James Yates and William Yates, of
and all new retail liquor licenses —
the Yates Bros., are listed as 50 percent
through October and November.
stockholders each in the limited liabilAn eight-week advertising period for ity company. This is a change from the
the license, as required in the newly
past application from Lou’s, LLC, in
established criteria, began Dec. 5 and
the fall in which Butler and Utter
ends today. Other criteria for purchase were listed as 33 1/3 percent stockof the license included a complete
holders each and James and William
business plan, financial history and
Yates were listed as 16 2/3 percent
projections on cash flow, use of the
stockholders each.
license to promote economic develop• Powder River Pizza, Inc., doing
ment and more.
business as Powder River Pizza Co. at
At a price of $1,500, the license is
803 N. Main St.
much cheaper than the average
Stockholders include Brock
$140,000 market value of retail liquor
Boedecker, Brett Boedecker,
licenses.
Christopher Crow, Regan Haswell,
Applicants for the license have
Thomas Pilch, Mathew Ebzery,
FROM 1
William Ebzery, Katherine Ebzery and
Powder River Pizza Co., Inc. Megan
Crow is listed as an officer.
Powder River Pizza applied for the
license last fall noting it would like to
expand its business and offer some of
its brews for retail sale. The previous
application for Powder River Pizza
stated it would surrender its bar and
grill license if it received the retail
license.
• Good 2 Go Stores, LLC, doing business as Good 2 Go Store #18 at 1229
Brundage Ave. Good 2 Go includes five
stockholders based in Idaho and was
an applicant last fall for the license. It
proposed using it in a gas station, food
counter and liquor store combination
almost identical to the Good 2 Go store
in Cody.
• El Tapatio Dos, LLC, doing business as El Tapatio Dos at 1125 N. Main
St. Lance Fletcher and Alicia Fletcher
are listed as 47 percent stockholders in
the company each.
This is a new application for the
license.
• David Harbour, with a premise
address of 331 Broadway St. There is
no listing for the trade name of the
company. The location of the license is
described as downstairs in the west
end of the building, which is the location of Harbour Chiropractic.
This is a new application for the
license.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 30, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
Sheridan man enters not guilty plea
in district court for child endangerment
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — A Sheridan
man pleaded not guilty to
one charge of child endangerment Thursday in 4th
Judicial District Court.
Kyle Nelson, 26, was
charged after a Nov. 25
search warrant executed on
his home resulted in his
arrest.
Police searching the home
discovered drug paraphernalia, some with methamphetamine residue, littering
the basement in a room
with two beds. The drug
was found hidden in the
laundry room. Also hidden
in the home were several
firearms and a large
amount of ammunition.
Police discovered that
Nelson lives in the basement of his family’s home,
where children also either
lived or regularly stayed.
According to an affidavit
of probable cause, police
had been tipped off by
someone who claimed to
have been in the house and
was worried about the chil-
dren.
The Department of
Family Services interviewed the family at the
time the search warrant
was executed and determined the children in the
home had access to the
basement where the drugs
were kept and used. The
agency declared the home
unfit for children.
If convicted, Nelson faces
up to five years in prison,
up to $5,000 in fines or both.
His trial has been scheduled for June.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Now online...
www.DestinationSheridan.com
THE DOG & CAT SHELTER
Open 12 p.m. - 6 p.m. Mon, Tues, Thurs & Fri, 11:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Sat.
And visit our web site at www.dogandcatshelter.org
Ziggy is four-year-old yellow Labrador Retriever mix & he is housebroken. He
has a very loveable and playful personality too. Ziggy loves to play in the snow
by rolling over on his back, which is quite entertaining to watch. He enjoys
going for walks but needs just little bit more training in that department. Ziggy
loves treats, toys, playing & getting attention plus he gets
along with other dogs. Ziggy is a great dog that would be
perfect companion for anyone.
Coral is a black and orange Tortoiseshell. We think
she is about one year old. She is kind of a diva and
everything is on her terms, typical tortoiseshell
behavior. Although, she does love attention and oneon-one contact, Coral would do best in a quiet home.
If you are looking for a one and only companion, come
meet Coral today, she is waiting for you!
Please bring your aluminum cans either to our Can Hut just inside the
Shelter gates or to our can trailer at Scotty0s Skate Castle. Recycling
proceeds are used to care for the animals. Thanks for your support.
This ad courtesy of:
BIG HORN BEVERAGE
Remember – if your pet
is missing, call us first
674-7694
84 EAST RIDGE ROAD
Sheridan, Wyoming
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A new kind of clay
Jess Legerski experiments with a new clay during class Wednesday morning in the lower level of the Griffith
Memorial Building at Sheridan College. Students will have to use low-temperature clay while their classes
are temporarily relocated to the Griffith building because they will not have access to their high-heat kilns.
WYOMING BRIEFS |
House holds first vote on
religious freedom bill
CHEYENNE (AP) — A bill regarding the
religious rights of people has received initial approval in the state House of
Representatives.
House Bill 83 won preliminary approval
on Thursday. It faces two more votes in the
chamber before it can be sent on to the
Senate for further debate.
Supporters say the bill protects the religious rights of people who don’t want to
participate in activities they find morally
objectionable.
Opponents argue the bill would curtail
the rights of others.
The bill comes after Wyoming was forced
by a federal court to recognize gay marriage.
The bill’s main sponsor is Republican
Rep. Nathan Winters, of Thermopolis.
Winters says the measure aims to defend
religious freedom from government overreach.
But Democratic Rep. James Byrd, of
Cheyenne, says the bill would legalize discrimination.
House panel OKs resolution on
wild horse population
CHEYENNE (AP) — The state House
Agriculture Committee has endorsed a resolution calling on Congress to address the
over population of wild horses in Wyoming
and other western states.
The resolution passed the committee on a
9-0 vote Thursday and now goes to the full
House for debate.
There are some 3,000 wild horses roaming
Wyoming on federal land. But some
landowners say there are too many wild
horses that stress the available food
resources and cause damage to ranch operations.
The Bureau of Land Management manages the wild horse herds but hasn’t been
able to keep up.
The proposed resolution has the support
of Wyoming farming and ranching organizations.
Poll shows giant gap between
what public, scientists think
WASHINGTON (AP) — The American public and U.S. scientists are light-years apart on science issues. And 98 percent of surveyed scientists say it’s a problem that we don’t
know what they’re talking about.
Scientists are far less worried about genetically modified
food, pesticide use and nuclear power than is the general
public, according to matching polls of both the general
public and the country’s largest general science organization. Scientists were more certain that global warming is
caused by man, evolution is real, overpopulation is a danger and mandatory vaccination against childhood diseases
is needed.
In eight of 13 science-oriented issues, there was a 20-percentage-point or higher gap separating the opinions of the
public and members of the American Association for the
Advancement of Science, according to survey work by the
Pew Research Center. The gaps didn’t correlate to any liberal-conservative split; the scientists at times take more
traditionally conservative views and at times more liberal.
“These are big and notable gaps,” said Lee Rainie, director of Pew’s internet, science and technology research. He
said they are “pretty powerful indicators of the public and
the scientific community seeing the world differently.”
In the most dramatic split, 88 percent of the scientists
surveyed said it is safe to eat genetically modified foods,
while only 37 percent of the public say it is safe and 57 percent say it is unsafe.
Sheridan County School District #2
Kindergarten Registration
2015-2016
(ISSN 1074-682X)
Published Daily except Sunday
and six legal holidays.
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OPINION
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Super Bowl
champ?Most
know already
S
unday, the Super Bowl will be played in
Glendale, Arizona, out in the desert. It’s
brutally hot there most of the year.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 30, 2015
LETTER |
Remembering a friend;
knowing a safety need
Re: Press editorial, Jan. 24
Larry Hurst was a great friend and an
incredible mentor. He had the ability to
make something positive out of even the
most negative situations. His death
should be no different.
Last Saturday, I read with great interest The Sheridan Press editorial on new
bicycle safety efforts being undertaken
within our state. To put it frankly, the
editorial did not go far enough.
Enforcement, education, and pathways!
As a community, we need to step up and
finish the pathway from Sheridan
College all the way to the Woodland Park
Elementary School area. This must
include a safe crossing at Sheridan
College similar to the crossing recently
installed in front of Sheridan Memorial
Hospital.
The weather is getting warmer and
children and families will be getting
more active. Imagine if they could be a
little safer as well. I believe this simple
act would have saved Larry’s life. And so
whatever it takes to accomplish this
task, let’s work together to get it done for
Larry’s memory and for our own safety.
Tyson Emborg
Sheridan
“But,” says late night funny guy Dave
Letterman, “for the Patriots, it’s a dry
cheat.”
••••••
PUBLISHER’S
NOTEBOOK
|
Stephen Woody
Who’s going to win the
Super Bowl?
There’s a lot of experts
hereabouts and much
insight; some of that
insight not printable in
“family newspapers.” To
wit:
• Darren Rogers –
Patriots, 41-27.
• Paul DelRossi –
Patriots, 28-24.
• Bill Rohrbaugh –
Seahawks, 27-20.
• Mike Pruden (Sheridan Press sports
editor) – Seahawks, 27-13.
• Tony Wendtland – Seahawks, 24-17.
(“I’m only answering your question so I will
not be fined.”)
• Duane Smith – Seahawks, 36-24. (“It
depends on if Tom Brady inflates the
balls.”)
• Tom Kinnison – Seahawks, 24-13.
• Jay Stender – Patriots, 21-12.
• Dave Alden – Seattle, 34-28.
• Gary Stevenson (No. 24 in your U. of
Wyoming football program) – “I don’t
care. Don’t like the Seahawks. Don’t like the
cheaters.”
• Bart Osthoff – Seahawks, 27-24. (“I’m
watching the Patriots deflate the balls.”)
• Charles Cole – Patriots, 24-21.
• Jim Benepe – Seahawks, 24-17.
• Jerry Hill (Super Bowl V champion,
No. 45 in your Baltimore Colts program)
— Patriots, 38-28.
• Tom Belus – Seahawks, 28-27.
• Homer “Scotty” Scott (State champion, No. 42 in your Sheridan Broncs program) – Seahawks, 23-20.
• Richard “Sut” Sutphin – Patriots, 24-17.
• And in a rare, interview with Dewey
Jacobs: Patriots, 27-24.
The Notebook’s Fearless Prediction:
Patriots win the cheese dip, 31-30.
••••••
Super Bowl trivia: Only three coaches
have won a collegiate national championship and a Super Bowl – Jimmy Johnson,
Barry Switzer, Pete Carroll.
••••••
Favorite Super Bowl story.
In Barry Switzer’s second season as head
coach of the Dallas Cowboys in 1995, they
went 12-4. Pundits, NFL coaches and others
disrespected Switzer the year before because
he had taken over Jimmy Johnson’s two
Super Bowl winning teams and was seen as
a go-along-lackey type of coach for owner
Jerry Jones. Johnson and Jones had a tempestuous marriage and breakup as coach
and owner. Jones hired Switzer who had
previously won three national championships as coach of the Oklahoma Sooners.
In preparing for Super Bowl XXX against
the Steelers, Switzer checked into the team’s
Tempe, Arizona, hotel and took a two-bedroom suite with a living room in the middle.
In one bedroom was Switzer’s ex-wife; in the
other, his girlfriend.
The news of Switzer’s suite mates leaked
to media. Jones was asked by a horde of
Super Bowl reporters about the unusual living arrangement of his Cowboys coach.
“See,” Jones replied, “I told you he could
coach.”
The Cowboys won, 27-17.
THE SHERIDAN
Press
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Office Manager
Mark
Blumenshine
Production
Manager
A
Nuclear Iran is new Auschwitz
mid the ritual expressions of regret
and the pledges of "never again" on
Tuesday's 70th anniversary of the
liberation of Auschwitz, a bitter
irony was noted: Anti-Semitism has
returned to Europe. With a vengeance.
It has become routine. If the koshergrocery massacre in Paris hadn't happened in conjunction
with Charlie Hebdo,
how much worldwide
notice would it have
received? As little as
did the murder of a
rabbi and three children at a Jewish
school in Toulouse.
As little as did the
CHARLES
terror attack that
KRAUTHAMMER killed four at the
Jewish Museum in
|
Brussels.
The rise of
European anti-Semitism is in reality just
a return to the norm. For a millennium,
virulent Jew-hatred — persecution,
expulsions, massacres — was the norm
in Europe until the shame of the
Holocaust created a temporary anomaly
wherein anti-Semitism became socially
unacceptable.
The hiatus is over. Jew-hatred is back,
recapitulating the past with impressive
zeal. Italians protesting Gaza handed out
leaflets calling for a boycott of Jewish
merchants. As in the 1930s. A widely
popular French comedian has introduced a variant of the Nazi salute. In
Berlin, Gaza brought out a mob chanting, "Jew, Jew, cowardly pig, come out
and fight alone!" Berlin, mind you.
European anti-Semitism is not a
Jewish problem, however. It's a
European problem, a stain, a disease of
which Europe is congenitally unable to
rid itself.
DROP US A LINE |
The Sheridan Press welcomes letters to
the editor. The decision to print any submission is completely at the discretion of
the managing editor and publisher.
Letters must be signed and include an
address and telephone number – which
will not be published – for verification
purposes. Unsigned letters will not be
published, nor form letters, or letters that
we deem libelous, obscene or in bad taste.
Email delivery of letters into the Press
works best and have the best chance of
being published.
From the Jewish point of view,
European anti-Semitism is a sideshow.
The story of European Jewry is over. It
died at Auschwitz. Europe's place as the
center and fulcrum of the Jewish world
has been inherited by Israel, now the
largest Jewish community on earth.
The threat to the Jewish future lies not
in Europe but in the Muslim Middle
East, today the heart of global antiSemitism, a veritable factory of antiJewish literature, films, blood libels and
calls for violence, indeed for another
genocide.
The founding charter of Hamas calls
not just for the eradication of Israel but
for the killing of Jews everywhere.
Hezbollah chief Hassan Nasrallah welcomes Jewish emigration to Israel —
because it makes the killing easier: ''If
Jews all gather in Israel, it will save us
the trouble of going after them worldwide.'' And, of course, Iran openly
declares as its sacred mission the annihilation of Israel.
For America, Europe and the moderate
Arabs there are powerful reasons having
nothing to do with Israel for trying to
prevent an apocalyptic, fanatically antiWestern clerical regime in Tehran from
getting the bomb: Iranian hegemony,
nuclear proliferation (including to terror
groups) and elemental national security.
For Israel, however, the threat is of a
different order. Direct, immediate and
mortal.
The sophisticates cozily assure us not
to worry. Deterrence will work. Didn't it
work against the Soviets? Well, just 17
years into the atomic age, we came harrowingly close to deterrence failure and
all-out nuclear war. Moreover, godless
communists anticipate no reward in
heaven. Atheists calculate differently
from jihadists with their cult of death.
Name one Soviet suicide bomber.
Former Iranian President Ali Akbar
Hashemi Rafsanjani once characterized
tiny Israel as a one-bomb country. He
acknowledged Israel's deterrent capacity
but noted the asymmetry: "Application
of an atomic bomb would not leave anything in Israel but the same thing would
just produce damages in the Muslim
world." Result? Israel eradicated, Islam
vindicated. So much for deterrence.
And even if deterrence worked with
Tehran, that's not where the story ends.
Iran's very acquisition of nukes would
set off a nuclear arms race with half a
dozen Muslim countries from Turkey to
Egypt to the Gulf states — in the most
unstable part of the world. A place
where, say, a moderate pro-American
Yemen can fall to pro-Iranian rebels
overnight.
The idea that some kind of six-sided
deterrence would work in this roiling
cauldron of instability the way it did in
the frozen bipolarity of the Cold War is
simply ridiculous.
The Iranian bomb is a national security issue, an alliance issue and a regional
Middle East issue. But it is also a
uniquely Jewish issue because of Israel's
situation as the only state on earth overtly threatened with extinction, facing a
potential nuclear power overtly threatening that extinction.
On the 70th anniversary of Auschwitz,
mourning dead Jews is easy. And, forgive
me, cheap. Want to truly honor the dead?
Show solidarity with the living — Israel
and its 6 million Jews. Make "never
again" more than an empty phrase. It
took Nazi Germany seven years to kill 6
million Jews. It would take a nuclear
Iran one day.
CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER is an American Pulitzer Prize-winning
syndicated columnist, political commentator, and physician.
IN WASHINGTON |
Letters should not exceed 400 words. The
best-read letters are those that stay on a
single topic and are brief.
Letters can be edited for length, taste,
clarity. We reserve the right to limit frequent letter writers.
Write: Letters to the Editor
The Sheridan Press
P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyo. 82801
Email: [email protected]
President Barack Obama Rep. Cynthia Lummis
The White
1004
House
Longworth
1600
HOB
Pennsylvania
Washington,
Ave.
DC 20515
Washington,
DC 20500
Phone: 202-225-2311
Phone: 202-456-1111
Toll free: 888-879-3599
Fax: 202-456-1414
Fax: 202-225-3057
Sen. Mike Enzi
Sen. John Barrasso
Senate
307 Dirksen
Russell
Senate
Building 379A
Office Building
Washington,
Washington,
DC 20510
DC 20510
Phone: 202-224-3424
Toll free: 888-250-1879
Fax: 202-228-0359
Phone: 202-224-6441
Fax: 202-224-1724
The 1st Amendment: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the
freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 30, 2015
PEOPLE
www.thesheridanpress.com
NEW FACES |
Payton Rachelle Bowie was born Jan.
19, 2015, at Sheridan Memorial Hospital.
She weighed 6 pounds, 3 ounces.
She was welcomed by parents Nathan
and Kimberly Bowie of Sheridan.
Her sibling is sister Fallon.
Her grandparents are Jeff and Paula
Bowie of Sheridan and Jason and April
Carter of Big Horn.
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Free tax
help sponsored by the
AARP in coordination with
the Internal Revenue
Service will be offered at
the Senior Center this year.
The tax help and preparation will be available on
Tuesdays and Thursdays
Karlie Jean Buckingham
Annie Ray Doke
Annie Ray Doke was born Jan. 22,
2015, at Sheridan Memorial Hospital.
She weighed 7 pounds, 14 ounces.
She was welcomed by parents Wess
and Tammy Doke of Sheridan.
Her siblings are brothers Devin,
Dayne and Damon.
Her grandparents are Dan and Teresa
Doke of Ranchester and Brian and
Lorraine Underwood of Pocatello,
Idaho.
Asher Liam Yzaguirre
Asher Liam Yzaguirre was born Jan.
23, 2015, at Sheridan Memorial Hospital.
He weighed 7 pounds, 10 ounces.
He was welcomed by parents Skye
Yzaguirre and Manuel Moreira of
Sheridan.
His sibling is brother Zaiyde.
His grandparent is Angie Yzaguirre of
Sheridan.
Adelaide Clare Wentz
Adelaide Clare Wentz was born Jan.
23, 2015, at Sheridan Memorial Hospital.
She weighed 8 pounds, 8 ounces.
She was welcomed by parents Dustin
and Jessica Wentz of Sheridan.
Her siblings are brothers Michael and
Matthew.
Her grandparents are Todd and
Arlene Wentz of Sheridan, Don and
Theresa DeFeyter of Elmira, Michigan,
and Don and Deb Bryant of Midland,
Michigan.
Star Rain Briggs
Star Rain Briggs was born
Jan. 23, 2015, at Sheridan
Memorial Hospital.
She weighed 7 pounds, 8
ounces.
She was welcomed by parents Le Tia Bosley and
Gregory Briggs of
Sheridan.
Her grandparents are
Constance and John Bosley
of Sheridan and Amy and
Ken Briggs of Dayton,
Nevada.
Abel Lynn Portwine
Abel Lynn Portwine was
born Jan. 24, 2015, at
Sheridan Memorial
Hospital.
He weighed 5 pounds, 10
ounces.
He was welcomed by parents Megan Vincent and
Jerry Portwine of Sheridan.
His siblings are sisters
Allison Kolsen, Ayla Pantle
and Alexis Gay.
His grandparents are
Ernest and Robin Portwine
of Sheridan, Robert and
Karen Vincent of Riverton,
and Victoria Boffa of
Sheridan.
Allie Harper Johnson
Allie Harper Johnson was
born Jan. 26, 2015, at
Sheridan Memorial
Hospital.
She weighed 7 pounds, 7
ounces.
She was welcomed by parents Tyler and Lindsay
Johnson of Sheridan.
Her grandparents are Bud
Johnson of Sheridan; Cindy
and Don Patenaude of
Brattleboro, Vermont;
Wendy Bloxom and John
Shassetz of Sheridan; and
Loren and Deb Foster of
Wibaux, Montana.
A5
Senior Center to offer tax
help Tuesdays, Thursdays
Payton Rachelle Bowie
Karlie Jean Buckingham was born
Jan. 21, 2015, at Sheridan Memorial
Hospital.
She weighed 5 pounds.
She was welcomed by parents Michael
and Kelly Buckingham of Buffalo.
Her grandparents are Wally and Patti
Buckingham of Buffalo, Lynn Gordon
of Sheridan and Mary and Servio
Carroll of Sheridan.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
English at Sheridan College
English teacher Sara Sinclair points to the screen during English class Wednesday
morning at Sheridan College.
TRMS announces
Principal’s honor roll
FROM STAFF REPORTS
RANCHESTER — Officials at
Tongue River Middle School
recently released the names of
students who earned a spot on the
Principal’s Honor Roll.
The following students earned
at least a 3.67 GPA in the second
quarter and had no grades lower
than a C.
Eighth grade
Anastasia Beutler, Theron
Kalasinsky, AJ Lytton, Olivia
Miller, Tiffanie Rosenlund
Seventh grade
Alexis Bernard, Kalie Bocek,
Sydney Butler, Kobe Dewitt, Abby
Keller, Sadie Koltiska, Madison
Miller, Marcus Sharp, Gabe
Veilleux, Savanah Williams
Sixth grade
Izabella Carbert, Bailey Dodge,
Alex Donston, Jerome Helvey,
James McKenzie, Shaylynn
Meiller, Sydnee Pitman, Emma
Scammom, Jack Stewart
EDITOR’S NOTE: The Superintendent’s Honor Roll was
published Jan. 29. The school honor roll will be published
Jan. 31.
GO ONLINE!
www.thesheridanpress.com
One year online subscription only $69
throughout the tax season,
beginning Tuesday.
Organizers said it is necessary to bring all pertinent paperwork and forms
to appointments, which
can be made by calling the
center at 672-2240.
The Sheridan Senior
Center is located at 211
Smith St.
A6
PAGE SIX
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
FRIDAY, JANUARY 30, 2015
TODAY IN HISTORY |
10 things to
know today
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Your daily look at latebreaking news, upcoming
events and the stories
that will be talked about
today:
1. ISLAMIC STATE GROUP
SILENT AS DEADLINE
PASSES
Families of a Japanese
journalist and Jordanian
military pilot remain in
limbo, a day after the latest purported deadline
for a possible prisoner
swap comes and goes.
2. RAP MOGUL ‘SUGE’
KNIGHT QUESTIONED BY
POLICE
The Death Row Records
founder turned himself
in connection with a hitand-run incident in
Compton, California, that
left one man dead.
3. WHICH CASE IS 35
YEARS IN THE MAKING
Pedro Hernandez is
going on trial in the murder and kidnapping case
of 6-year-old Etan Patz,
who fueled missing-child
activism in 1979.
4. WHO IS TRYING TO
STAND OUT IN WHITE
HOUSE BID
Wisconsin Gov. Scott
Walker is expanding his
political operation as he
fights for early momentum in the crowded field
of GOP presidential
prospects.
5. WHAT IS UNNERVING
AN OLYMPIC CITY
More than a dozen people in Rio de Janeiro
have been struck by stray
bullets from gunbattles
in recent weeks, unnerving the city hosting the
2016 Games.
6. BALLOONISTS PASS
DISTANCE RECORD
Their next milestone is
a 1978 duration record of
137 hours, 5 minutes and
50 seconds — the “holy
grail” of ballooning
achievements.
7. U.S.-BACKED MEXICO
DAM PROJECT DEFEATED
Residents quashed the
three-year, $30 million
hydroelectric plant project, saying construction
damaged their homes
and tainted their drinking water.
8. MEET THE FIRST
SOCIAL SECURITY
RECIPIENT
Seventy-five years ago,
Vermont’s Ida May Fuller
helped launch the granddaddy of all entitlement
programs.
9. KATY PERRY GOING
‘OLD SCHOOL’ FOR
HALFTIME SHOW
AP’s Howard Fendrich
reports that the pop
star’s surprise musical
guest will be Grammy
winner Missy Elliott.
10. GETTING READY FOR
THE ‘BIG GAME’
Corporations and momand-pop shops in Phoenix
are finding ways to circumvent the NFL’s ban
on use of the words
“Super Bowl” to capitalize on football fever.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Clay art project
Art student Mike Watkins works on a wood spirit face sculpture during class Wednesday morning in the lower level of the Griffith
Memorial Building at Sheridan College. The art department was moved to the Griffith building for temporary use as the arts wing
is renovated. The students will have to use low-temperature clay since they will not have access to the high-heat kilns.
Renovations are expected to be complete by fall of 2016.
LOCAL BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SC to offer free tax help
SHERIDAN — It’s almost tax season and students
and faculty in the Sheridan College business
department will offer the free Volunteer Income
Tax Assistance program again this year.
The program, which is a branch of the Wyoming
Free Tax Service, will meet at Sheridan College’s
Griffith Memorial Building, room 10. The scheduled
times are Feb. 7, Feb. 13, Feb. 21, Feb. 27, March 7,
March 13, March 28, April 10 and April 11, from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m.
Drop-ins are welcome, however, appointments
take priority. Call 674-6446 for an appointment.
The program offers assistance with relatively
simple tax returns, including itemized deductions,
interest, dividends, small businesses (under $10,000
of expenses), unemployment, tuition and fees,
earned income credit, educational credits and much
more. Generally, the income limit is $65,000 or less,
but if the returns are simple, the amount can be
expanded.
“This is always a great opportunity for the
Sheridan College business department to help community members get a head-start on their taxes,”
SC business instructor Tracy Dearinger said.
Participants are required to bring the following:
all Social Security cards for taxpayer and all
dependents, photo ID for taxpayer and spouse, all
W-2s, 1099s, 1098-Ts, mortgage interest statements,
real estate tax statements, medical expenses
receipts, any charitable contributions receipts,
proof of insurance if you have it, and any other
document pertaining to taxes.
Clients without Social Security cards or photo IDs
will be turned away.
For more information, contact Dearinger at 6746446 ext. 3202.
Sheridan College is located at 3059 Coffeen Ave.
SATURDAY EVENTS |
• 7:30 p.m., “Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike” production, Carriage House Theater, 419 Delphi
Ave., $15 for adults, $12 for students and military
TIPPED OVER |
‘The Thorn Birds’ author Colleen
McCullough dies
Helen Eustis, award-winning
mystery writer, dead at 98
SYDNEY (AP) — Best-selling Australian author
Colleen McCullough, whose novel “The Thorn
Birds” sold 30 million copies worldwide, has died
at age 77 after a long illness.
McCullough died Thursday in a hospital on
remote Norfolk Island, HarperCollins Australia
publishing director Shona Martyn said in a statement.
McCullough had continued producing books
despite a string of health and eyesight problems
by using dictation, Martyn said.
“Ever quick-witted and direct, we looked forward to her visits from Norfolk Island and the
arrival of each new manuscript delivered in hard
copy in custom-made maroon manuscript boxes
inscribed with her name,” Martyn said.
McCullough wrote 25 novels throughout her
career. Her final book “Bittersweet” was released
in 2013.
Her first novel “Tim” was published in 1974. It
became a movie starring Mel Gibson, who played
a young, intellectually disabled handyman who
had a romance with a middle-aged woman.
Her second novel, “The Thorn Birds,” published
in 1977, became a U.S. television mini-series in
1983 starring Richard Chamberlain, Rachel Ward
and Christopher Plummer. The Outback melodrama about a priest’s struggle between church and
love won four Golden Globe awards.
NEW YORK (AP) — Helen Eustis, an Edgar
Award-winning mystery writer who later translated works by Georges Simenon and other
European authors, has died. She was 98.
Eustis’ son, Adam Fisher, said Thursday that
she died Jan. 11 at the Beth Israel Medical Center
in New York City of natural causes.
Eustis’ “The Horizontal Man” was a crime story
about a murdered English professor that won the
Edgar in 1947 for best debut novel. “Horizontal
Man” will be included this fall in a Library of
America anthology of 1940s-’50s crime fiction by
women.
She also wrote “The Fool Killer,” adapted into a
1965 movie of the same name starring Anthony
Perkins, and the children’s story “Mr. Death and
the Redheaded Woman.”
She received an O’Henry Prize for the short
story “An American Home,” published in 1947.
Her translations include Simenon’s “When I
Was Old” and Edmond Charles-Roux’s “To Forget
Palermo.”
A native of Cincinnati, she attended Smith
College as an undergraduate and based “The
Horizontal Man” in part on her time there.
Eustis was married and divorced twice.
She is survived by her son, her daughter-in-law,
Elizabeth, and by three grandchildren.
Today’s Highlights in
History:
On Jan. 30, 1945, during
World War II, more than 500
Allied captives held at the
Japanese prison camp in
Cabanatuan in the
Philippines were liberated by
U.S. Army Rangers, Alamo
Scouts and Filipino guerrilla
fighters. Adolf Hitler marked
the 12th anniversary of his
appointment as Germany’s
chancellor with his last public speech in which he called
on Germans to keep resisting
until victory.
On this date:
In 1615, Thomas Rolfe, the
only child of John Rolfe and
his wife, Rebecca (the former
Pocahontas), was born in
Jamestown in the Virginia
Colony.
In 1815, the U.S. House of
Representatives joined the
Senate in agreeing to purchase the personal book collection of former President
Thomas Jefferson to replace
volumes lost when the
British burned the U.S.
Capitol and its congressional
library during the War of
1812.
In 1882, the 32nd president
of the United States,
Franklin Delano Roosevelt,
was born in Hyde Park, New
York.
In 1933, Adolf Hitler
became chancellor of
Germany. The first episode of
the “Lone Ranger” radio program was broadcast on station WXYZ in Detroit.
In 1948, Indian political
and spiritual leader
Mohandas K. Gandhi, 78, was
shot and killed in New Delhi
by Nathuram Godse, a Hindu
extremist. (Godse and a coconspirator were later executed.) Aviation pioneer
Orville Wright, 76, died in
Dayton, Ohio.
In 1962, two members of
“The Flying Wallendas”
high-wire act were killed
when their seven-person
pyramid collapsed during a
performance at the State
Fair Coliseum in Detroit.
In 1968, the Tet Offensive
began during the Vietnam
War as Communist forces
launched surprise attacks
against South Vietnamese
provincial capitals.
In 1969, The Beatles
staged an impromptu concert atop Apple headquarters
in London; it was the group’s
last public performance.
In 1972, 13 Roman
Catholic civil rights
marchers were shot to death
by British soldiers in
Northern Ireland on what
became known as “Bloody
Sunday.”
Ten years ago: Iraqis
voted in their country’s first
free election in a half-century; President George W. Bush
called the balloting a
resounding success. The
downing of a C-130 military
transport plane north of
Baghdad killed all 10 British
servicemen on board; the
militant group Ansar alIslam claimed responsibility.
Five years ago: China suspended military exchange
visits with the United States
in protest over $6.4 billion in
planned U.S. arms sales to
Taiwan. (Those exchanges
were reinstated in Jan. 2011.)
One year ago: An appeals
court in Florence, Italy, reinstated the guilty verdict
against U.S. student Amanda
Knox and her ex-boyfriend
for the 2007 murder of her
British roommate, Meredith
Kercher. (Knox was sentenced to 28 1/2 years in
prison, raising the specter of
a long legal battle over her
extradition from the U.S.
should the conviction be
upheld.)
Thought for Today: “Only
when we are no longer afraid
do we begin to live.” —
Dorothy Thompson,
American author, journalist
and radio commentator
(born 1893, died this date in
1961).
ALMANAC
FRIDAY, JANUARY 30, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A7
Ex-museum director now
charged with misdemeanor
RIVERTON (AP) — Prosecutors have reduced charges
against former Pioneer Museum director Carol Thiesse
from a felony to a misdemeanor.
Prosecutors say they didn’t have enough evidence to
prove the felony charges because they could not determine the value of items taken from the museum.
Thiesse pleaded not guilty to the new charges.
According to the Riverton Ranger, Thiesse now faces
one count of larceny by bailee. Prosecutors say she
stole property from the museum.
The maximum penalty
for the misdemeanor is
six months in prison and
a fine of $750.
The felony charges car2146 Coffeen Ave. • 673-1100
ried a maximum penalty
2590 N. Main • 672-5900
of 10 years in prison.
Thiesse’s lawyer said
the property had no
value and that Thiesse
did not convert it to her
own use.
Fries
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Installing a free roof at People Assistance Food Bank
Atlantic Roofing Co. worker Delano Falls Down works on the roof Thursday afternoon at the People Assistance Food Bank. Robert Springsteen,
owner of Atlantic Roofing, was approached by Dan Lick of the food bank to bid for a new roof. Springsteen decided to donate his company’s time
to the food bank in recognition for the organization’s service to the community. Springsteen was able to get R & S Supply of Billings and roofing
brand GAF to donate the roofing material. The Atlantic crew began work on the new roof Thursday morning and is expected to wrap up the job by
Friday with no cost to the People Assistance Food Bank.
REPORTS |
SHERIDAN
FIRE-RESCUE
Thursday
• Activated alarm, 3000
block Coffeen Avenue, 9:44
a.m.
• Activated alarm, 3000
block Coffeen Avenue, 3:01
p.m.
• Rocky Mountain
Ambulance assist, 100 block
South Sheridan Avenue, 3:39
p.m.
• Activated alarm, 1500
Sugarland Drive, 9:14 p.m.
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
AMBULANCE
Thursday
• Medical, 300 block
Coffeen Avenue, 9:53 a.m.
• Trauma, 300 block
Bryant Street, 10:09 a.m.
• Trauma, 100 block South
Sheridan Avenue, 3:37 p.m.
• Medical, 900 block West
Brundage Lane, 5:05 p.m.
• Medical, 900 block West
Brundage Lane, 8:47 p.m.
SHERIDAN MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL
Thursday
• Admissions — Jane M.
Satterfield, Sheridan
• No dismissals reported.
SHERIDAN POLICE
DEPARTMENT
Information in the police
reports is taken from the
SPD website.
Thursday
• Suspicious circumstance, Lewis Street, 12:20
a.m.
• Welfare check,
Sugarview Drive, 12:28 a.m.
• Damaged property,
Coffeen Avenue, 9:28 a.m.
• Drug activity, Sugarland
Drive, 10:19 a.m.
• Harassment, West Works
Street, 12:19 p.m.
• Abandoned vehicle, East
Montana Street, 12:24 p.m.
• Dog violation, Broadway
Street, 12:46 p.m.
• Suspicious vehicle,
Mydland Road, 3:24 p.m.
• Civil standby, Gladstone
Street, 3:29 p.m.
• Suspicious vehicle,
Mydland Road, 3:51 p.m.
• Driving under suspension, Mydland Road, 4:11
p.m.
• Harassment, North
Custer Street, 5:32 p.m.
• Domestic, Bowman
Avenue, 5:56 p.m.
• Dog at large, Fifth
Avenue East, 8:52 p.m.
• Bar check, North Main
Street, 9:17 p.m.
• Bar check, North Main
Street, 10:05 p.m.
• Bar check, South Gould
Street, 10:07 p.m.
• Bar check, North Main
Street, 10:09 p.m.
• DUI, East First Street,
10:18 p.m.
• Parking complaint, East
Brundage Lane, 10:31 p.m.
• Bar check, Sugarland
Drive, 10:58 p.m.
• Theft (cold), Coffeen
Avenue, 11:31 p.m.
SATURDAY
ARRESTS
Names of individuals
arrested for domestic violence or sexual assault will
not be released until those
individuals have appeared
in court.
Thursday
• Lacey Groves
McDougall, 35, Story, criminal trespass, circuit court,
arrested by SPD
• Randolph Joseph
RidesHorse, 39, Lame Deer,
Montana, DWUS, criminal
trespass, circuit court,
arrested by SPD
20
A bit of
afternoon snow
39
Milder with
snow, 1-3"
Mostly cloudy
and colder
28
46
30
Almanac
20
25
Temperature
High/low .........................................................49/20
Normal high/low ............................................37/12
Record high .............................................58 in 1971
Record low ............................................. -30 in 1951
Precipitation (in inches)
Thursday......................................................... 0.00"
Month to date................................................. 0.45"
Normal month to date .................................... 0.52"
Year to date .................................................... 0.45"
Normal year to date ....................................... 0.52"
The Sun
Rise
Set
Today
Saturday
Sunday
7:30 a.m.
7:29 a.m.
7:28 a.m.
5:13 p.m.
5:14 p.m.
5:16 p.m.
Rise
Set
1:49 p.m.
2:41 p.m.
3:36 p.m.
4:03 a.m.
4:53 a.m.
5:39 a.m.
The Moon
Today
Saturday
Sunday
Full
Last
New
9a 10a 11a Noon 1p
2p
3p
4p
5p
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection. Shown is the highest
value for the day.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High;
11+ Extreme
SHERIDAN
Big Horn
14/35
Basin
15/35
20/39
Feb 3
Feb 11
Feb 18
Feb 25
For more detailed weather
information on the Internet, go to:
www.thesheridanpress.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2015
City
Billings
Casper
Cheyenne
Cody
Evanston
Gillette
Green River
Jackson
Shown are
Saturday's noon
positions of
weather systems
and precipitation.
Temperature
bands are highs
for the day.
Gillette
25/42
Wright
24/42
Kaycee
22/43
Mon.
Hi/Lo/W
49/24/c
46/36/sn
49/36/c
45/26/sn
40/31/sf
48/30/c
47/31/c
33/28/sn
City
Laramie
Newcastle
Rawlins
Riverton
Rock Springs
Scottsbluff
Sundance
Yellowstone
Sat.
Hi/Lo/W
34/19/c
39/13/sn
42/18/c
40/20/pc
44/25/s
39/21/c
36/9/sn
30/2/sn
Charter the
Sheridan Trolley!
Regional Cities
Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
33/29/sf
31/28/s
33/23/c
32/26/sf
41/30/pc
30/27/pc
42/27/pc
28/24/pc
Iver Ammentorp Sonderby, age 87, died
January 27th at Cerbat Guest Home after a
ten year battle with Alzheimer’s.
Iver is survived by his wife Judy, four
children; Mark, Mike, Tony Sonderby and
Deidre Arzy. He leaves behind five grandIver
children, Michael Sonderby, Danielle
Ammentorp
Whisenand, Amanda Sonderby, David
Sonderby
Sonderby and Samantha Arzy. He also
leaves behind three great grandchildren;
Alexis, Casen and Hayden.
A veteran of the Berlin Airlift and the Korean War, Iver
earned several meritorious awards participating in aerial
flights for the Navy. He was an Aviation Machinist, Flight
Engineer and Navigator, with highest rank of Petty Officer, 3rd
Class. He received eight decorations including the World War II
Victory Medal, Berlin Air Lift Device, and the Air Medal. His
squadron held the 2nd best record during the “Lift” for on time
arrival, safety, flight hours, least mechanicals and most cargo.
At a young age of 17 he helped his father build ships for
Kaiser Company of Vancouver to support WWII and became an
electrical specialist before he lost his father and joined the
Navy at 18.
Following his meritorious eight years of service protecting
our freedom, he completed a BS degree in electrical engineering at LA State College. He then worked on his graduate degree
at UCLA. His career started by working with a number of electronic manufacturing companies that included Honeywell,
before starting his own company. Then he worked for Standard
Applied Engineering, where he was VP of world sales and manufacturing before his retirement to Julian, California.
He grew up in Tolna, ND and loved to fish when he was not
helping out on the family farm. He loved card tricks, telling
jokes and had a talent for a technique called sleight of hand.
His greatest hobby and interest was gold prospecting. He loved
keeping up with his Navy squadrons and was a member of both
the Berlin Airlift Veterans Association and Berlin Airlift
Historical Foundation (BAHF).
A memorial has been established with the BAHF in Iver’s
name. Any donation in his honor, no matter how small would be
appreciated at http://www.spiritoffreedom.org.
A private ceremony will be held at Sutton Memorial Funeral
Home in AZ. His ashes will then be placed between his mother
and father at the Tolna Cemetery, ND on June 16th at 10:30 a.m.
Buffalo
24/41
Worland
17/32
Sat.
Hi/Lo/W
36/17/sn
42/15/pc
38/22/c
39/15/sn
42/21/pc
42/14/sn
45/21/s
28/4/pc
January 27, 2015
Clearmont
23/41
Story
20/38
Thermopolis
21/38
Weather on the Web
UV Index tomorrow
Cody
23/39
Iver Ammentorp Sonderby
Ranchester
20/39
First
Big Horn Mountain Precipitation
24 hours through noon Thursday ................... 0.00"
Hardin
22/36
Parkman
18/38
Dayton
20/40
Lovell
17/37
Sun and Moon
Sheridan County Airport through Thursday
Shown is Saturday's weather.
Temperatures are tonight's lows
and Saturday's highs.
Broadus
21/37
15
OBITUARIES |
National Weather for Saturday, January 31
TUESDAY
Mainly cloudy
with flurries
15
JAIL
Today
Daily inmate count: 73
Female inmate count: 13
Inmates at treatment
facilities (not counted in
daily inmate count): 0
Inmates housed at other
facilities (not counted in
daily inmate count): 3
Number of book-ins for
the previous day: 4
Number of releases for
the previous day: 7
Regional Weather
MONDAY
SUNDAY
Billings
27/36
Clear
• Antonio Sean Allen, 22,
Sheridan, warrant, property destruction and defacing, circuit court, arrested
by SPD
• Jordan Elliot Leduc, 32,
Banner, DWUI, circuit
court, arrested by SPD
SHERIDAN COUNTY
SHERIFF’S OFFICE
Thursday
• Suspicious circumstance, Eby Street, Banner,
10:59 a.m.
• Warrant service, West
13th Street, 11:58 a.m.
• Domestic, Big Horn
Avenue, 12:42 p.m.
• DUI (citizen report),
Interstate 90 westbound, 2
5-Day Forecast for Sheridan
TONIGHT
p.m.
• Fraud, Bowman
Avenue, 6:59 p.m.
• Suspicious act, Acme
Road, Ranchester, 8:47 p.m.
Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
32/26/s
23/17/c
35/30/s
31/24/s
41/31/s
31/17/c
21/16/c
28/20/sf
Mon.
Hi/Lo/W
41/31/sf
44/25/c
42/32/sn
45/32/sn
45/33/c
51/32/c
43/23/c
30/17/sn
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Add a touch of nostalgia to your event!
Just $110 an hour (2 hour minimum) gets you and
30 of your friends and family to your destination.
Call 672-2485 to reserve your trolley today!
A8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
FRIDAY, JANUARY 30, 2015
Brinton, Sheridan College to host
ceramic artist for lecture, workshop
FROM STAFF REPORTS
BIG HORN — The Brinton Museum in
partnership with Sheridan College will
host an internationally-known ceramic
artist for a lecture and workshop next
week.
Gail Kendall is an Emeritus Professor of
Art at the University of Nebraska –
Lincoln. She will give an evening lecture
Thursday at 7 p.m. in The Brinton
Museum’s Reception Galley.
The one-day workshop demo will be held
Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m in the fine arts
ceramics studio at Sheridan College.
Both events are free and open to the public.
Known worldwide for her colorful pottery,
Kendall is influenced by European peasant
pots from the Middle Ages. Her workshop
demo at Sheridan College will include both
the fabrication of her exquisite plates,
bowls and covered jars using soft clay slabs
and coils (no potter’s wheel) and the artful
use of slip and traditional slipware techniques to create highly decorated and colorful surfaces.
Sheridan College is located at 3059
Coffeen Ave. The Brinton Museum is located at 239 Brinton Road in Big Horn.
For additional information, contact The
Brinton Museum at 672-3173 or the Fine
Arts Department at Sheridan College at
674-6446, ext. 3008.
Senate passes bill approving
Keystone XL oil pipeline
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Republicancontrolled Senate on Thursday approved a
bipartisan bill to construct the Keystone
XL oil pipeline, defying a presidential veto
threat and setting up the first of many battles with the White House over energy and
the environment.
The 62-36 vote advanced a top priority of
the newly empowered GOP, and marked the
first time the Senate passed a bill authorizing the pipeline, despite numerous
attempts to force President Barack
Obama’s hand on the issue. Nine
Democrats joined with 53 Republicans to
back the measure.
This bill “is an important accomplishment for the country,” said Majority Leader
Mitch McConnell of Kentucky. “We are
hoping the president upon reflection will
agree to sign on to a bill that the State
Department said could create up to 42,000
jobs and the State Department said creates
little to no impact on the environment.”
Still the vote was short of the threshold
needed to override a veto, and the legislation still must be reconciled with the version the House passed.
“We hope President Obama will now drop
his threat to veto this common-sense bill
that would strengthen our energy security
and create thousands and thousands of
new, good-paying American jobs,” said
House Speaker John Boehner.
Most Democrats framed the bill as a gift
to a foreign oil company that would have
little benefit for the American people,
because much of the oil would be exported.
They tried and failed to get amendments on
the bill to construct the pipeline with U.S.
steel, ban exports of the oil and the products refined from it, and protect water
resources.
The Senate agreed to add an energy efficiency measure, and went on the record
saying climate change was not a hoax and
the oil sands should be subject to a tax that
helps pay for oil spill cleanups. Oil sands
are currently exempt.
The Biggest Game
of the Year!
IT’S NOT A BIG GAME
WITHOUT KILLY’S WINGS!
Make Killy’s Smokehouse Deli your
Party Headquarters!
Pre-Order your Killy’s Super Smoked Wings only
$6.29 a lb. Friday through Sunday.
•Available cold, ready to heat & eat in a
pan, or hot in the case as available. Pick
up your favorite sauce including; Killy’s
Orginal & Blue Cheese BBQ Sauce, Café
Glaze BBQ sauce, Teriyaki Sauce, Sweet
Chili & Peach Jalapeno Sauce.
•Killy’s smoked Baby Back Ribs $18.99 a
rack.
• The Hottest price in 13 years- Killy’s
Pulled BBQ pork. Cold, ready to heat &
eat. $7.99 lb.
• In store specials Friday-Saturday:
• Our own feshly made and frozen ground
beef patties 85% lean made from solid
muscle ground chuck 10 lb box. $45.99
• Fresh Chicken Drumlettes $3.99 lb. (reg.
$4.79 lb). Make your own wings!
• Hillschire Little Smokies 2 for $5:00, 13
to 14 oz pkg (reg. $5.79) all beef, regular
or cheddar cheese.
• Bar S Smoked or Polish Sausage
2 1/2 lb pkg. $3.69 each (reg. $8.19 ea.)
1062 Brundage Lane • 674-2104
DELI HOURS:8am-7pm Monday thru Saturday, 9am-6pm Sunday
SPORTS
FRIDAY, JANUARY 30, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B1
Big Horn hoopers start weekend with two wins over Riverside
BY MIKE PRUDEN
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Big Horn sophomore Saije Pollard throws a cross-court pass during the second half of Thursday's win over Riverside at Big Horn High School.
BIG HORN — Both the Big Horn
boys and girls basketball teams
kicked off their three-game weekend with wins over Riverside last
night, albeit in two varying styles.
In the opening game, the Lady
Rams (11-5) were off and running,
leaving the Lady Rebels (1-12) to
eat their dust as they stormed to a
66-21 win.
The Riverside girls team is one
of the youngest in the state. Just
one junior stood out in a group of
freshmen and sophomores, and it
was evident in the team’s style of
play. As shots ricocheted off the
backboard and weak passes fell
into the arms of Big Horn defenders, the Lady Rams took full
advantage.
Of Big Horn’s 28 made field
goals, 25 of them came from with-
in 5 feet of the basket. The emphasis was on passing, specifically up
the court, and it paid off.
The Lady Rams jumped to a commanding 20-5 lead in the first quarter, and 18 of those points came in
the paint or at the free-throw line.
It wasn’t until two 3-pointers late
in the fourth quarter that Big
Horn hit a shot from deep, but it
didn’t matter. By that point the
Lady Rams had stretched their
lead to 40, starting a running clock
to end the game.
An even-scoring night across the
Big Horn stat sheet was led by
Kayla Crouse’s 12 points. She also
brought down six rebounds, five
on the offensive end of the floor.
Abby Buckingham finished with
10 points, Ashton Koltiska had
nine and Mollie Caiola had eight.
Where defensive stops led to fastbreak points for the Lady Rams, it
was the same broken record on the
Marshawn
Lynch talks
about why
he doesn't
talk to
the media
PHOENIX (AP) —
Marshawn Lynch changed
the script and fired back at
his critics.
After two days of giving
only scripted answers, the
Seattle Seahawks' star running back gave his most
extensive comments of
Super Bowl week, mostly
telling reporters why he
won't talk to them.
"I don't know what story
y'all trying to get out of me.
I don't know what image
y'all trying to portray of
me," Lynch said Thursday.
"But it don't matter what
y'all think, what y'all say
about me because when I go
home at night, the same people that I look in the face —
my family that I love, that's
all that really matter to me.
So y'all can go make up
whatever y'all want to make
up because I don't say
enough for y'all to go and
put anything out on me."
When Lynch arrived at the
podium, a man with a
reporter's credential who
said he was a teacher asked
him to give his students a
"shoutout."
But Lynch wouldn't bite
and began his unscripted
statement.
"Y'all shove cameras and
microphones down my
throat," Lynch continued.
"But when I'm at home in
my environment, I don't see
y'all, but y'all mad at me.”
turntable for the boys team: a slow
start.
Big Horn (7-9) ended up controlling the game and winning 55-41,
but another rough first quarter
left head coach Ryan Alley with
plenty to harp on as they roll into
the weekend.
“We’ve had a lot of talks about
it,” Alley said of the slow start.
“One of these times we’re going to
find a team that that’s not going to
work. Moving forward with conference we can’t have these kind of
let downs where we let a team stay
with us longer than they should.”
It was the defense that struggled
in the first quarter, allowing
Riverside (6-7) ball handlers to
penetrate and get to the basket
uncontested.
SEE DEFENSE, PAGE B8
A sluggish
start for
Tiger Woods
in Phoenix
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Sheridan Bronc Oscar Patten does the backstroke during the 200 SC meter IM against Gillette Thursday afternoon at
Sheridan Junior High School.
SEE MEDIA, PAGE B8
SHS swimmers can’t keep up with Camels
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan Broncs had another
rough outing in the pool during their home dual
against Campbell County High School.
In the 12 events, Sheridan managed only 65 points
against Campbell County’s 121 team points.
However, the Broncs had some notable individual
performances.
This week’s Sheridan Press Athlete of the Week
Presley Felker continued his strong performance
from last weekend, winning the only event for the
Broncs in the 100-meter butterfly with a time of
1:06.86.
Felker also took second in the 200-meter freestyle
and was part of the second-place teams in the 200meter medley relay, the 200-meter freestyle relay and
the 400-meter freestyle relay.
Additionally, Sheridan’s Zach Ahlstrom took second out of 10 competitors in the 50-meter freestyle.
The Broncs will head to Casper today to take on
swimming powerhouse Kelly Walsh High School.
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. (AP)
— Four holes into his first
tournament of the year,
Tiger Woods already was 4over par and 10 shots out of
the lead in the Phoenix
Open.
When he reached his tee
shot on the par-4 fifth hole,
he saw the golf ball partially sunken in a divot. Woods
put his hands on his hips,
closed his eyes and shook
his head, wondering what
else could possibly go
wrong.
He couldn't chip.
He made only one putt
over 6 feet, which is misleading only because Woods
had just three birdie
attempts on the green from
inside 20 feet.
He hit one tee shot off the
wall of someone's backyard,
another in the desert that
was marked by a hazard,
and yet another that sailed
into the gallery on a hill.
This was not the same
Tiger Woods the crowd in
Phoenix saw 14 years ago.
His last time at this tournament, Woods was No. 1 in
the world by a mile and
working his way toward
Augusta National and a
chance to sweep the majors,
which he did. Now he is No.
47 in the world, coming off
another injury-laden season,
without a major in eight
years.
He is 39. And he needs
time.
"This is my second tournament in six months, so I just
need tournament rounds
like this where I can fight
through it, turn it around,
grind through it and make
adjustments on the fly,"
Woods said.
SEE WOODS, PAGE B8
Weekend sports outlook: Tongue River basketball at home Saturday
Friday
Basketball
Sheridan girls at Cheyenne
Central, 5:30 p.m.
Sheridan boys at Cheyenne
Central, 7 p.m.
Big Horn girls vs. Moorcroft,
5:30 p.m.
Big Horn boys vs. Moorcroft, 7
p.m.
Arvada-Clearmont girls at
Kaycee, 4 p.m.
Arvada-Clearmont boys at
Kaycee, 5:30 p.m.
Wrestling
Sheridan at Laramie, 5 p.m.
Swimming
Sheridan at Kelly Walsh, 4
p.m.
Sheridan College
Women’s basketball at
Western Wyoming, 5:30 p.m.
Men’s basketball at Western
Wyoming, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday
Basketball
Sheridan girls at Cheyenne
East, 11:30 a.m.
Sheridan boys at Cheyenne
East, 1 p.m.
Big Horn girls at Sundance,
2:30 p.m.
Big Horn boys at Sundance, 4
p.m.
Tongue River girls vs. Wright,
2:30 p.m.
Tongue River boys vs. Wright,
4 p.m.
Arvada-Clearmont girls at
Upton, 1 p.m.
Arvada-Clearmont boys at
Upton, 2:30 p.m.
Wrestling
Sheridan at Story Gym
(Central-East duals), 10 a.m.
Indoor Track
Sheridan, Big Horn, Tongue
River at Chadron, Nebraska.
Sheridan College
Women’s basketball at Casper,
3 p.m.
Men’s basketball at Casper, 5
p.m.
B2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Larson wants to build
his own legacy in Ganassi’s No. 42
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) —
Kyle Larson, flashing his
new Rolex watch, was
unfazed Thursday after
learning Chase Elliott was
going to replace Jeff Gordon
in the iconic No. 24.
Many NASCAR fans have
believed that Larson was the
heir apparent to the fourtime champion, a notion
Gordon fueled with constant
praise of the reigning Sprint
Cup Series rookie of the year.
Only Larson drives for
Chip Ganassi Racing, and
says he is happy right where
he is behind the wheel of the
No. 42 Chevrolet. Gordon
announced last week that
2015 will be his last in the
car, and Hendrick
Motorsports has named 19year-old Elliott has his
replacement.
“That’s cool for him,”
Larson said. “I’m happy
where I’m at. Just flip-flop
the number, I’m good.”
Larson was part of
Ganassi’s four-driver lineup
that won Sunday’s prestigious Rolex 24 at Daytona,
where the victors receive special-edition timepieces. He
also won a sprint car race
this month in Arizona, a
midget race in Oklahoma,
and he’s riding a wave of
momentum into next month’s
start of his second Cup season.
Although he grew up a
Gordon fan, he said he never
dreamed of driving Gordon’s
car.
“When I was a kid, Jeff
Gordon was invincible and I
probably thought he was
going to race the rest of his
life,” the 22-year-old Larson
said.
He cheered for Gordon as
he won his four titles and
climbed to third on the alltime victories list, and now
believes he’s got the chance
to make his own mark in
NASCAR while driving for
Ganassi.
“A lot of people have told
me that the 24 then was what
the 42 is now where they
weren’t the biggest team in
NASCAR and Jeff kind of
took that and made it into
what it is,” said Larson.
“I like that possibility to be
the guy to make Chip
Ganassi Racing a championship team year in and year
out. I look forward to hopefully spending a long time
with Chip and win a lot of
races.”
FRIDAY, JANUARY 30, 2015
No. 4 Blue Devils dismiss junior
Rasheed Sulaimon from team
DURHAM, N.C. (AP) — Duke dismissed junior guard Rasheed
Sulaimon from the team on Thursday.
Coach Mike Krzyzewski said in a
statement that Sulaimon "has been
unable to consistently live up to the
standards required to be a member of
our program.
"It is a privilege to represent Duke
University and with that privilege
comes the responsibility to conduct
oneself in a certain manner," he said.
"After Rasheed repeatedly struggled
to meet the necessary obligations, it
became apparent that it was time to
dismiss him from the program."
Krzyewski didn't not give any
details as to what standards or conduct Sulaimon failed to meet, but university spokesman Matt Plizga said
that Sulaimon, a junior from Houston,
remains in good academic standing
and is expected to finish the spring
semester.
Sulaimon was averaging 7.5 points,
2 rebounds and 1.8 assists this year,
coming off the bench in every game.
The move comes a day after the
fourth-ranked Blue Devils (17-3, 4-3
Atlantic Coast Conference) lost at No.
8 Notre Dame.
They visit unbeaten and No. 2
Virginia on Saturday night.
Sulaimon's playing time steadily
declined during his three seasons. He
started 33 of 36 games as a freshman
in 2012-13 before bouncing in and out
of the starting lineup last year.
He averaged 29.2 minutes during his
first year while playing at least 15
minutes in every game, but averaged
25.6 as a sophomore. He's playing just
19.3 minutes per game this season.
During one two-game stretch last
season, he was held out of a home
win against Michigan, then played
just five minutes against GardnerWebb.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 30, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B3
SCOREBOARD |
Ottawa
47
19
Buffalo
49
14
Metropolitan Division
GP
W
N.Y. Islanders 48
32
Pittsburgh
48
27
Washington
48
25
N.Y. Rangers 46
27
Philadelphia
50
21
Columbus
47
21
New Jersey
48
18
Carolina
47
17
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP
W
Nashville
47
31
St. Louis
47
30
Chicago
48
30
Winnipeg
50
26
Dallas
48
22
Colorado
49
20
Minnesota
48
22
Pacific Division
GP
W
Anaheim
49
32
San Jose
49
26
Vancouver
46
26
Calgary
49
26
Los Angeles 48
21
Arizona
48
17
49
13
Edmonton
NOTE: Two points for a win,
loss.
Thursday’s Games
St. Louis 5, Nashville 4, SO
Boston 5, N.Y. Islanders 2
Montreal 1, N.Y. Rangers 0
Philadelphia 5, Winnipeg 2
Arizona 3, Toronto 1
Dallas 6, Ottawa 3
Tampa Bay 5, Detroit 1
Florida 3, Columbus 2
Minnesota 1, Calgary 0
Edmonton 3, Buffalo 2
San Jose 6, Anaheim 3
NBA |
National Basketball Association
By The Associated Press
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
L
Pct
Toronto
31
15
.674
Brooklyn
18
27
.400
Boston
16
28
.364
Philadelphia
9
37
.196
New York
9
38
.191
Southeast Division
W
L
Pct
Atlanta
38
8
.826
Washington
31
16
.660
Miami
20
25
.444
Charlotte
19
27
.413
Orlando
15
34
.306
Central Division
W
L
Pct
Chicago
30
18
.625
Cleveland
27
20
.574
Milwaukee
24
22
.522
Detroit
17
30
.362
Indiana
17
31
.354
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W
L
Pct
Memphis
34
12
.739
Houston
32
14
.696
San Antonio
30
17
.638
Dallas
30
17
.638
New Orleans 24
22
.522
Northwest Division
W
L
Pct
Portland
32
14
.696
23
.500
Oklahoma City 23
Denver
19
28
.404
Utah
16
30
.348
Minnesota
8
37
.178
Pacific Division
W
L
Pct
Golden State 36
7
.837
L.A. Clippers 32
14
.696
Phoenix
27
20
.574
Sacramento
16
28
.364
L.A. Lakers
13
34
.277
___
Wednesday’s Games
Philadelphia 89, Detroit 69
Cleveland 99, Portland 94
Toronto 119, Sacramento 102
Denver 93, New Orleans 85
Houston 99, Dallas 94
Minnesota 110, Boston 98
Atlanta 113, Brooklyn 102
New York 100, Oklahoma City 92
San Antonio 95, Charlotte 86
L.A. Clippers 94, Utah 89
Phoenix 106, Washington 98
Thursday’s Games
Milwaukee 115, Orlando 100
Indiana 103, New York 82
Memphis 99, Denver 69
L.A. Lakers 123, Chicago 118,2OT
Friday’s Games
Minnesota at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Portland at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Houston at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Toronto at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Miami, 8 p.m.
Golden State at Utah, 9 p.m.
Chicago at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Toronto at Washington, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Houston at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Portland at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Denver, 9 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at San Antonio, 9 p.m.
Phoenix at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
GB
—
12½
14
22
22½
GB
—
7½
17½
19
24½
GB
—
2½
5
12½
13
GB
—
2
4½
4½
10
GB
—
9
13½
16
23½
GB
—
5½
11
20½
25
19
32
9 47
3 31
L
15
13
14
15
22
23
22
25
OT
1
8
9
4
7
3
8
5
Pts
65
62
59
58
49
45
44
39
L
10
13
16
16
19
18
20
OT
6
4
2
8
7
11
6
Pts
68
64
62
60
51
51
50
L
OT Pts
11
6 70
17
6 58
17
3 55
20
3 55
15
12 54
25
6 40
27
9 35
one point for overtime
Friday’s Games
Pittsburgh at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Buffalo at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Chicago at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Washington at Montreal, 1 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Detroit, 2 p.m.
Arizona at Ottawa, 3 p.m.
Dallas at Winnipeg, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Carolina at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Florida at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at Boston, 7 p.m.
Columbus at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Calgary, 10 p.m.
Chicago at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Arizona at Montreal, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Washington, 1 p.m.
Nashville at Pittsburgh, 2 p.m.
Minnesota at Vancouver, 3 p.m.
AUSTRALIAN OPEN |
Australian Open at a glance
MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — A look at the
Australian Open on Friday:
Weather: Sunny, high of 21 Celsius (70
Fahrenheit).
Attendance: Single session: 21,019.
Men’s Singles Semifinal Result: No. 1 Novak
Djokovic def. No. 4 Stan Wawrinka 7-6 (1), 3-6, 6-4,
4-6, 6-0.
Women’s Doubles Final Result: Bethanie MattekSands, United States, and Lucie Safarova, Czech
Republic, def. Chan Yung-jan (14), Taiwan, and
Zheng Jie, China, 6-4, 7-6 (5).
Stat of the Day: 1 — number of tournaments
played together by Mattek-Sands and Safarova
before winning their first Grand Slam doubles title
as a team.
Quote of the Day: “I don’t think I’ve ever put that
NHL |
National Hockey League
By The Associated Press
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP
W
Tampa Bay
50
31
Montreal
47
31
Detroit
49
28
49
26
Boston
Florida
46
21
Toronto
50
22
COURTESY PHOTO | BLAINE MCCARTNEY/WYOMING TRIBUNE EAGLE
L
15
13
12
16
15
24
OT
4
3
9
7
10
4
Pts
66
65
65
59
52
48
Directing traffic
University of Wyoming women’s basketball player and Sheridan native Hailey
Ligocki directs the Cowgirl offense against Utah State in the second half
Wednesday evening at Arena-Auditorium in Laramie. Wyoming defeated Utah
State, 86-51.
much time into picking out an outfit, so it’s been all
tennis:” Mattek-Sands, responding to a question
whether her often outlandish clothing detracts from
her game.
Matches Saturday: Women’s singles final: No. 1
Serena Williams vs. No. 2 Maria Sharapova; Men’s
Doubles Final: Pierre-Hugues Herbert and Nicolas
Mahut, France, vs. Simone Bolelli and Fabio
Fognini, Italy.
Forecast for Saturday: possible showers, high of
21C (70F).
TRANSACTIONS |
Thursday’s Sports Transactions
By The Associated Press
BASEBALL
MLB PLAYERS ASSOCIATION — Named Omar
Minaya senior adviser to the executive director.
American League
BOSTON RED SOX — Agreed to terms with OF/1B
Daniel Nava on a one-year contract.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Agreed to terms with
3B David Freese on a one-year contract.
SEATTLE MARINERS — Agreed to terms with C
John Baker on a minor league contract.
National League
MIAMI MARLINS — Designated RHP Arquimedes
Caminero for assignment.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Agreed to terms with
RHP Chad Billingsley on a one-year contract.
Designated LHP Cesar Jimenez for assignment.
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Released 2B Marco
Scutaro.
American Association
KANSAS CITY T-BONES — Signed INF Jake
Blackwood and RHPs Kyle Devore, Joe Van Meter
and Jared Messer.
WINNIPEG GOLDEYES — Signed 1B CJ Ziegler.
Can-Am League
SUSSEX COUNTY MINERS — Signed RHP
Michael Suk.
Frontier League
FLORENCE FREEDOM — Named A.J. Cicconi hitting coach and Chad Rhoades pitching coach.
FRONTIER GREYS — Signed OF Shane Brown.
GATEWAY GRIZZLIES — Signed 1B Ben Waldrip
to a contract extension.
JOLIET SLAMMERS — Sold the contract of 3B
Grant DeBruin to the Washington Nationals.
LAKE ERIE CRUSHERS — Sold the contract of
RHP Brad Duffy to the Baltimore Orioles.
TRAVERSE CITY BEACH BUMS — Traded RHP
Will Rankin to Southern Illinois for OF Jay Austin
and RHP Anthony Montefusco.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
HOUSTON ROCKETS — Assigned C Clint Capela
to Rio Grande Valley (NBADL).
MIAMI HEAT — Signed G Tyler Johnson to a second 10-day contract.
MILWAUKEE BUCKS — Signed F/C Kenyon Martin
for the remainder of the season.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CLEVELAND BROWNS — Named Joker Phillips
wide receivers coach.
NEW YORK JETS — Named Rex Hogan senior
director of college scouting.
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — Named Ed
Marynowitz vice president of player personnel.
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS — Named Tom Gamble
senior personnel executive.
WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Named Chad
Grimm defensive quality control coach.
Canadian Football League
EDMONTON ESKIMOS — Released OL Matt
O’Donnell.
HAMILTON TIGER-CATS — Signed WR Luke
Tasker to a three-year contract extension.
MONTREAL ALOUETTES — Named Anthony
Calvillo receivers coach.
WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS — Traded WR Cory
Watson and the 26th-overall 2015 draft pick to
Saskatchewan for WR Kristopher Bastien, the
rights to a negotiation list player and the 15th-overall 2015 draft pick.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
ARIZONA COYOTES — Recalled F Greg Carey
from Gwinnett (ECHL) to Portland (AHL).
CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS — Acquired D Gustav
Forsling from Vancouver for D Adam Clendening.
ST. LOUIS BLUES — Announced the retirement of
G Martin Brodeur, who will remain with the club as
a senior adviser.
WINNIPEG JETS — Recalled G Jussi Olkinuora
from Ontario (ECHL) to St. John’s (AHL).
American Hockey League
AHL — Announced the Anaheim Ducks will purchase the Norfolk Admirals and relocate to San
Diego; the Adirondack Flames will relocate to
Stockton, Calif.; the Oklahoma City Barons will relocate to Bakersfield, Calif.; the Manchester
SC to host
volleyball
camp
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The
Sheridan College volleyball
team will host a spring volleyball camp in February
and March for players in
grades six through 12.
The camp will help teach
and develop the individual
skills and team concepts of
the game of volleyball.
While working closely with
Sheridan College volleyball
players and staff, the camp
will allow each camper to
focus on position-specific
drills as well as bettering
their overall performance.
The camp will take place
over a four-week period,
running every Sunday
from Feb. 22 to March 15.
Grades 6-8 will go from 34:30 p.m. and grades 9-12
from 4:30-6 p.m.
The camp costs $100 per
camper. Players can register by calling Sheridan
College head coach
Jennifer Stadler at 674-6446
ext. 4002 or by email at
[email protected]
Monarchs will relocate to Ontario, Calif.; and the
Worcester Sharks will relocate to San Jose, Calif.
LEHIGH VALLEY PHANTOMS — Loaned G Martin
Ouellette to Reading (ECHL).
ROCHESTER AMERICANS — Recalled F Allan
McPherson from Elmira (ECHL).
WORCESTER SHARKS — Recalled D Kyle Bigos
from Ontario (ECHL).
ECHL
ALASKA ACES — Released D Scott Warner.
ALLEN AMERICANS — Added G Josh Trimberger
as emergency backup.
ELMIRA JACKALS — Loaned G Travis Fullerton to
Rochester (AHL). Added G Justin Sand as emergency backup.
FLORIDA EVERBLADES — Traded F John
McInnis to Orlando for D Gleason Fournier.
TULSA OILERS — Released F Steve Mele.
OLYMPIC SPORTS
USA TABLE TENNIS — Elected Peter Sudner
chairman.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
NEW YORK CITY FC — Named Tom Glick president. Announced the resignation of chief business
officer Tim Pernetti, effective March 9.
ORLANDO CITY SC — Named Fred Pollastri senior vice president and Diogo Kotscho director of
business development.
TORONTO FC — Signed M Benoit Cheyrou.
North American Soccer League
ARMADA FC — Signed M Pascal Millien and G
David Sierra.
COLLEGE
NCAA — Placed the Wichita State baseball program on one-year probation.
ALABAMA — Named Mel Tucker defensive
backs/assistant head football coach and Jody
Wright director of football player personnel.
DAYTON — Named Erica Echko men’s and
women’s assistant tennis coach.
DUKE — Dismissed G Rasheed Sulaimon from the
men’s basketball team.
Super Bowl XLIX to feature battle between Seattle, New England
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALL TIMES EST
Friday
AUTO RACING
8 p.m.
NBCSN — NASCAR, Hall of
Fame Induction Ceremony, at
Charlotte, N.C.
BOXING
9 p.m.
ESPN2 — Lightweights, Karl
Dargan (17-0-0) vs. Tony Luis (182-0), at Mashantucket, Conn.
GOLF
3 p.m.
TGC — PGA Tour, Phoenix
Open, second round, at
Scottsdale, Ariz.
8 p.m.
TGC — LPGA, Coates
Championship, third round, at
Ocala, Fla. (same-day tape)
4 a.m.
TGC — European PGA Tour,
Dubai (UAE) Desert Classic,
third round
MEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
6 p.m.
ESPNU — Harvard at
Princeton
8 p.m.
ESPNU — Monmouth at
Fairfield
10 p.m.
ESPNU — Kent St. at Buffalo
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN — Dallas at Miami
10:30 p.m.
ESPN — Chicago at Phoenix
TENNIS
3 a.m.
ESPN — Australian Open,
women's championship, at
Melbourne
Saturday
ATHLETICS
4:30 p.m.
NBCSN — Armory
Invitational, at New York
GOLF
1 p.m.
TGC — PGA Tour, Phoenix
Open, third round, at Scottsdale,
Ariz.
3 p.m.
CBS — PGA Tour, Phoenix
Open, third round, at Scottsdale,
Ariz.
TGC — LPGA, Coates
Championship, final round, at
Ocala, Fla.
4 a.m.
TGC — European PGA Tour,
Dubai (UAE) Desert Classic,
final round
MEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPN — Teams TBA
ESPN2 — Teams TBA
ESPNU — Texas Tech at West
Virginia
FOX — Providence at St.
John's
FS1 — Xavier at Seton Hall
NBCSN — Davidson at Saint
Joseph's
1 p.m.
CBS — Arkansas at Florida
ESPNEWS — South Florida at
Tulsa
2 p.m.
ESPN — Teams TBA
ESPN2 — Teams TBA
ESPNU — TCU at Iowa St.
FS1 — Villanova at DePaul
4 p.m.
ESPN — North Carolina at
Louisville
ESPN2 — Wichita State at
Northern Iowa
ESPNU — Georgia at South
Carolina
6 p.m.
ESPN2 — Texas at Baylor
ESPNU — Purdue at
Northwestern
7 p.m.
ESPN — Duke at Virginia
8 p.m.
ESPN2 — Oklahoma at
Oklahoma St.
ESPNU — UCF at SMU
10 p.m.
ESPN2 — Memphis at Gonzaga
ESPNU — Cal Poly at UC
Davis
MEN'S COLLEGE HOCKEY
6:30 p.m.
NBCSN — New Hampshire at
Notre Dame
MOTORSPORTS
10 p.m.
FS1 — AMA Supercross, at
Anaheim, Calif.
NBA BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN — L.A. Clippers at San
Antonio
NFL FOOTBALL
9 p.m.
NBC — NFL Honors Award
Show, at Glendale, Ariz.
SOCCER
7:40 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League,
Newcastle at Hull City
9:55 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League,
teams TBA
12:30 p.m.
NBC — Premier League,
Manchester City at Chelsea
TENNIS
3 a.m.
ESPN — Australian Open,
men's championship, at
Melbourne
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
Noon
FSN — UTEP at Middle Tenn.
Sunday
GOLF
1 p.m.
TGC — PGA Tour, Phoenix
Open, final round, at Scottsdale,
Ariz.
3 p.m.
CBS — PGA Tour, Phoenix
Open, final round, at Scottsdale,
Ariz.
MEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
12:30 p.m.
ESPNU — Miami at Florida St.
1 p.m.
CBS — Michigan at Michigan
St.
2:30 p.m.
ESPNU — Utah at Southern
Cal
NBA BASKETBALL
2 p.m.
ESPN — L.A. Lakers at New
York
NHL HOCKEY
1 p.m.
NBCSN — St. Louis at
Washington
NFL FOOTBALL
6 p.m.
NBC — Super Bowl XLIX, New
England vs. Seattle, at Glendale,
Ariz.
SOCCER
8:30 a.m.
FS1 — Scottish League Cup,
semifinal, Celtic vs. Rangers, at
Glasgow, Scotland (Hampden
Park)
NBCSN — Premier League,
Arsenal vs. Aston Villa, at
London
11 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League,
Swansea City at Southampton
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
2 p.m.
ESPN2 — UConn at Temple
FSN — Kansas at Baylor
4 p.m.
ESPN2 — Iowa at Maryland
B4
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BABY BLUES® by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman
COMICS
www.thesheridanpress.com
FRIDAY, JANUARY 30, 2015
DRS. OZ & ROIZEN
Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen
MARY WORTH by Karen Moy and Joe Giella
BORN LOSER® by Art and Chip Sansom
"Godzilla 2" is set for
release in 2018, but talk about
it is all over the blogosphere.
Seems in the movie, scientist
Nick Tatopoulos is determined to show his colleagues
that the much-hunted crea-
ture is gentle. But when Nick
nuzzles up to the big G, its "
roar is so odorific that it
knocks him off his feet. (No
spoiler alert needed; that's
not the whole plot.)
As a scientist, Nick
should've expected that,
because having a revved-up
stress response can cause
serious bad breath -- and that
creature is stressed! Stress
hormones help oral bacteria
produce stinky sulfuric compounds, and dry mouth,
which is also associated with
stress, makes things worse.
But bad breath isn't the
only sneaky sign of stress.
Researchers at CarnegieMellon found that stress
makes you almost twice as
likely to catch a cold. If
you're constantly battling
that nighttime-coughing-sniffling-aching feeling, try a
chill pill instead of a cold
pill.
Dropping things also can
signal you're under stress,
because stress disrupts focus.
So if you're constantly dropping stuff, pick up our advice
for busting your stress
response.
1. Mindful meditation 10-30
minutes daily: instructions at
sharecare.com.
2. Move it. Physical activity
clears stress hormones and
your mind, reduces inflammation and relaxes muscles.
We suggest a walking program, aiming for 10,000 steps
a day.
3. Avoid inflammation-producing foods; they compound
the inflammation stress causes (which leads to greater
risk for everything from
heart and kidney problems to
some cancers). Skip added
sugars and syrups, most saturated fat, all trans fats and
any grain that isn't 100 percent whole.
DEAR ABBY
Pauline Phillips and Jeanne Phillips
GARFIELD by Jim Davis
FRANK & ERNEST® by Bob Thaves
REX MORGAN, M.D. by Woody Wilson and Tony DiPreta
ZITS® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
DILBERT by S. Adams
ALLEY OOP® by Dave Graue and Jack Bender
DEAR ABBY: Last week, I
had a seizure in front of my
fourth-grade students. This
has never happened to me
before, so I had never spoken
to my students about such a
thing. I want to write them
and their families a letter
expressing my apologies,
thanking them for their kind
thoughts and giving basic
advice on how to handle a
seizure. Is this appropriate? If
so, how do I start the letter? -APPROPRIATE IN NEW
JERSEY
DEAR APPROPRIATE:
Before writing the letter,
check with the principal of
your school. Because you
now know that you are prone
to having seizures, I think it
makes sense that your students should know what one
is, and what to do in case it
happens again in the classroom. Some seizures can be
almost unnoticeable, while
others can be quite severe. If
yours are severe, a student
should immediately inform
another adult and ask for
help.
P.S. While you may want to
thank everyone for their
kindness, it should not be
necessary to apologize to anybody for something you
couldn't control.
DEAR ABBY: My daughter
has always been very independent. She had a normal
childhood with the usual
friends and events, nothing
traumatic that I know of. She
is a pretty girl with a funny
personality and is very
bright.
The issue is, she is 18 and
has been on only two dates.
She shows no interest in
forming any sort of romantic
relationship. She has never
had a boyfriend, though
many boys have expressed
interest in her. The two dates
she did go on, one in high
school and one in college, she
called "duds."
She says she's not gay, and
has commented on good-looking guys. I don't know what
to think. Do you? -- WONDERING MOM
DEAR WONDERING MOM:
You say your daughter has
always been independent. It's
possible she has enough selfassurance that she doesn't
think she needs a man in her
life right now. It may also be
that before becoming emotionally involved with anyone she would prefer to focus
on her education or career
path. Whatever her reasons,
you would be making a mistake to push her in any direction she doesn't feel ready for,
or make her uncomfortable
about being the way she is.
DEAR ABBY: Mom passed
away five years ago, and Dad
died four months ago. For the
last years of his life Dad was
hoping we'd move into their
home. It's a beautiful place in
a country setting with lots of
trees, including pecan trees.
We were undecided.
After Dad died, my husband and I were at home
making all the funeral
arrangements and we were
both emotionally exhausted.
While I tried to stay busy
inside the house, my husband decided to go outside to
clear his head. While walking around the yard, he
found a pecan in the grass!
Abby, there are no pecan
trees in this entire neighborhood. We knew the rational
answer was that a squirrel
must have dropped it, but in
our hearts we felt it was Dad
giving us the hug we needed
so badly, and his way of
telling us that everything
will work out.
We will be moving into my
parents' home in the near
future. -- AT PEACE IN
LOUISIANA
DEAR AT PEACE: There's
nothing nutty about your
experience. Sometimes we
just need a nudge from above
to guide us into doing what's
right for us. I wish you well
in your new home.
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips.
Contact Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
CLASSIFIEDS
Phone: (307) 672-2431
FRIDAY, JANUARY 30, 2015
Fax: (307) 672-7950
www.thesheridanpress.com
TO PLACE YOUR AD
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
DEADLINES
B5
RATES & POLICIES
Deadline
Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 days . . . . . . . .6 days . . . . . . . . . . . .26 days
Monday ........................................................................Friday 2:30 PM
2 lines (minimum) . . . . . . .$10.75 . . . . . . .$16.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$40.00
Tuesday.................................................................... Monday 2:30 PM
Each additional line . . . . . .$4.75 . . . . . . . . $7.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$17.50
Email : [email protected]
Wednesday ............................................................Tuesday 2:30 PM
Visit : 144 Grinnell Street, Downtown Sheridan
Thursday........................................................... Wednesday 2:30 PM
Mail : P.O. Box 2006, Sheridan, WY, 82801
Friday...................................................................... Thursday 2:30 PM
Include name, address, phone, dates to run and payment
Saturday ...................................................................... Friday 2:30 PM
We reserve the right to reject, edit or reclassify any advertisement accepted by us for publication. When placing an ad in person or on the phone, we will read all ads back to you for
your approval. If we fail to do so, please tell us at that time. If you find an error in your
classified ad, please call us before 9 a.m. to have it corrected for the next day’s paper. The
Press cannot be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Claims cannot be considered unless made within three days of the date of publication. No allowances can be
made when errors do not materially affect the value of the advertisement.
Phone: (307) 672-2431 Fax: (307) 672-7950
Run Day
Monday – Friday, 8am – 5pm
All classified ads run for free at www.thesheridanpress.com!
All classified ads running in Monday’s Press also run in the weekly PressPlus at no additional charge!
END ROLLS FOR
SALE. $5 EACH.
Perfect for crafts!
Come by The Sheridan
Press and take a look!
144 Grinnell. 672-2431
For Lease
BUSINESS, OFFICE or
RETAIL SPACE
54 South Main:
GROUND LEVEL –
2750 sq. ft. Clean ready
to move in, includes
kitchen space and large
manager’s office.
$1,850.00 plus utilities
per month.
UPPER LEVEL –
2 office suite, each
office approximately
15’x20’, quiet with large
windows. $425.00 with
utilities included.
Contact:
(307) 672-7491
BUILDINGS
FOR LEASE
Rail Road Land
& Cattle Co.
Has Shop Space,
Warehouse Space,
Retail Space,
Office Space and
much more
for lease!
673-5555
Roommate Wanted
DAYTON. ROOMMATE
wanted. 2 BR/2 Ba
townhome. $450 all
inclusive. Must like cute
animals. Smoking OK!
751-9166.
ROOMMATE WANTED
$300/mo. Furn. Room
w/ T.V. 1/2 utilities,
cable, wifi & phone.
Smoking ok.
Bill 763-7241
GO ONLINE TODAY!
www.thesheridanpress.com
Furnished Apts for Rent
1 BR. No smk/pets.
$650 + elec. Coin-Op
W/D. 307-674-5838.
1BR. NO smk/pets.
$575 + elec + dep.
Coin-Op W/D.
307-674-5838.
ROCKTRIM. $500 / mo.
Wi-Fi/Cable. 752-8783.
WKLY
FR
$210.
Monthly
fr
$630.
Americas Best Value
Inn. 672-9757.
$
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
NICE CLEAN 2 BR,
quiet neighborhood,
ldry. hkps, sm storage
unit. $625/mo + $500
dep. 1 yr. lease.
751-2445.
4 BR 2 BA.
Nice neighborhood.
Close to school.
$1650/mo. 673-5555.
Rental assistance depending
on availability and eligibility
Non-Smoking
This institution is an equal
opportunity provider and
employer.
WESTERN APARTMENTS
RENTS AS LOW AS
307-672-0854
Dep. $450
Non Smoking Property
EXECUTIVE HOMES
at The Powder Horn
for Rent,
furnished; from
$1800/mo; utils incl;
thru May only. Contact
Judy at Powder Horn
Realty, 674-9545.
SHERIDAN APARTMENTS
Taking Applications
for 1, 2 & 3 bedroom
apartments. Coin-op
laundry facility & play area.
$450 Deposit
TDD#711
1917 N. Main Street
Sheridan, WY
www.bosleymanagementinc.com
1 bedroom...$460-$560
2 bedroom...$565-$695
This institution is an
equal opportunity provider
and employer.
www.bosleymanagementinc.com
Broadway Apts.
2 bdrm, 1 bath
townhouse
Available in
Dayton, WY.
Rent based on
income.
Please call
307-751-1752 or
1-888-387-7368
Toll-Free for application
Equal Housing
Opportunity
2 BR + office. 1 Ba
Offstreet parking. All
utilities pd. No smoking.
$750/mo.
307-751-5815.
3BR/2.5 BA Condo.
$1300/mo + Util. 2 car
garage. 220 W.
Loucks. Central A/C.
1500 SF. Avail 2/1.
751-4061.
2 BR 1 ba., remodeled,
W/D hks., fncd. yrd.
quiet, No smk/pets.
Avail 2/1. 673-5429
eves.
RANCHESTER
STUDIO apt.,
$450/mo.+ heat & dep.,
util. pd. No smk. Pets?
Laundry rm. incl.
751-4060
BIG 3 BR. Porch, gar.,
laundry, creek, sun
room,
$1200,
incl.
H/W/S, No smk./pets.
Close
to
park
&
downtown. 752-4066
COZY 2BR. Off street
parking. Washer/Dryer.
Oak Hardwood floors.
$600 + Dep + Elec. No
smkg/pets. Lease/ref's.
Call for appt. 752-4735.
2 BR Clean Duplex
Apt., 750 Absaraka,
New carpet. W/D. No
smok/PETS. $800 +
elect. 674-5981.
672-8681
TDD #711
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
2BR 1BA. W/D.
$650/mo + util. & $400
dep. Avail. NOW! Call
673-4307.
2 BR, 2 story,
Ranchester on the
Tongue River, $750/mo.
+ util., pets neg.
752-3039
CLEANING TECH/
JANITOR. Asst
supervisory capacity.
Experienced, able,
capable and
independent
oriented. Evenings /
weekends, 5-6 days
week. 25-40 hrs weekly.
Bondable. Excellent
personal history. Non
smoking work
environment. Wyoming
drivers license required,
no restrictions. Good
physical condition. Able
to lift 25#. Operate floor
machines. Ability to
work flexible and
changing schedule. $12
/ Hr.
Send letter of
application with job
history and
references to:
RPM Professional
Cleaning Services, Inc.
862-B Lincoln Dr.
Sheridan, Wy. 82801
Fax. (307) 674-4776
Email:
[email protected]
Mobile Homes for Rent
HEIDI'S MOBILE
HOME CT. #52. 2 BR/1
ba. $650/mo + W/S/G +
lot rent. 1st & last req.
No smk. Pet dep.
763-0675.
CALL BAYHORSE
STORAGE 1005 4th
Ave. E. 752-9114.
TAKING
APPLICATIONS
FOR:
Journeyman
Electrician to Work
for a Good Solid
Company. Bring
resume to 1851 N.
Main St. 674-9710
JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
E L D O R A D O
STORAGE Helping you
conquer space. 3856
Coffeen. 672-7297.
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).
$150/MO. 16' x 30' rm.
12' ceiling. Overhead
door. 307-256-6170.
Rating: SILVER
Solution to 1/29/15
$150/MO. 13' x 31'
room. Dock. Overhead
door. 307-256-6170.
PRE-OWNED VEHICLES
CARS
For s!
78 year
42,495
TRUCKS AND SUV’S
‘14 CHEVY SUBURBAN LT
‘14 CHEVY TRAVERSE
‘11 CHEVY SILVERADO LTZ
‘14 CHEVY 1500 CREW
‘13 CHEVY SILVERADO
‘11 BMW X50I
‘13 TOYOTA TACOMA
‘12 TOYOTA 4 RUNNER
‘12 CHEVY 1500 CREW LT
‘14 CHEVY EQUINOX 2LT
‘12 CHEVY 1500 LT
34,495
LOOKING
TO
hire
e x p e r i e n c e d
siding/gutter
installer.
Wages
DOE.
Call
Wyoming Seamless at
655-9272.
1/30/15
2014 Chevy Suburban LT
$
Help Wanted
WE
HAVE
an
immediate opening for a
T U M B L I N G
INSTRUCTOR. If you
are interested, please
review
the
responsibilities
and
qualifications on-line at
www.sheridanrecreation
.com or give us a call at
307-674-6421.
Help Wanted
Houses, Furnished for
Rent
3 BR, 2 Ba. $1000/mo +
Mobile Hm. Space for
util. $1000 dep. No
Rent
smoking/no pets. Avail
RV
SPACE,
Big Horn.
mid-Feb. Call 674-7155.
By day, month or year.
LGE, IMMACULATE
674-7718.
4 BR/3 Ba. in Big Horn.
Carport, storage, RV
Storage Space
Parking. W/D hooks.
CIELO STORAGE
W/S/G & lawn care
752-3904
provided. $1500/mo.
No smoking/pets.
DOWNER ADDITION
307-751-7718.
STORAGE 674-1792
LGE 2 BR/1 Ba in Big
INTERSTATE
Horn. W/S/G provided.
STORAGE. Multiple
W/D Hookups.
Sizes avail.
$750/mo. 1 pet w/
No deposit req'd.
approval.
752-6111.
307-751-7718.
2BR, 1 ba, 1 car gar,
fenced backyard, A/C,
W/D, no smoking/pets.
$850/mo + util. Lease &
dep. 672-3507.
Work Wanted
HOUSE
PAINTING,
general labor, cleaning
& cleanup. New Ref's.
683-7814 (cell).
© 2015 Janric Enterprises Dist. by creators.com
Miscellaneous for Sale
2014 Chevy 1500 Crew
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
‘10 CHEVY CAMERO SS
‘12 INFINITY G25X
‘11 HONDA ODYSSEY EX-L
‘10 SUBARU IMPREZA WRX
‘14 TOYOTA COROLLA S
‘13 CHEVY MALIBU LT
‘14 TOYOTA COROLLA LE
42,495
38,495
34,495
34,495
33,995
32,995
31,995
30,995
107
29,995
28,995 ‘14 CHEVY CRUZE
26,995 ‘12 CHEVY MALIBU
‘13 NISSAN SENTRA
‘12 FORD FUSION SE
‘09 TOYOTA CAMRY
‘06 TOYOTA AVALON
‘07 SUBARU OUTBACK
CARS
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
25,995
22,995
21,495
19,995
18,995 Sheridan’s only
full service
17,995
dealership
17,495
$
38,495
2014 Chevy Traverse
TRUCKS AND SUV’S
E. ALGER • 307.674.6419
$ 17,495
$ 15,995
OPEN
$ 14,995
$ 14,495 S A T U R D A Y S
$ 12,995 U N T I L 4 P M
$ 11,995
$ 9,995
LIKE US ON FACEBOOK AT
WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/HAMMERCHEVY
www.hammerchevy.com
‘06 CHEVY 2500 DUALLY
‘14 CHEVY EQUINOX LT
‘12 FORD F-150
‘12 CHEVY TRAVERSE
‘10 CHEVY CREW
‘07 CHEVY SUBURBAN LT
‘14 CHEVY CAPTIVA
‘07 CHEVY SUBURBAN
‘05 CHEVY 1500 EX-CAB
‘06 HUMMER H3
‘01 JEEP CHEROKEE
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
24,995
23,495
22,995
20,995
19,995
18,995
17,495
14,995
14,495
13,495
$ 7,995
$
17,495
2014 Chevy Cruze
CLASSIFIEDS
B6 THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
FRIDAY, JANUARY 30, 2015
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
THE
SHERIDAN PRESS
is looking for:
Independent
Contractors to deliver
papers.
If interested please
stop by:
The Sheridan Press
144 East Grinnell
Street, Sheridan WY
82801
F/T BOOKKEEPER
Requirements include
Quickbooks
experience minimum
of 1 year, A/R, A/P,
Payroll, Quarterly
Reports,
Reconciliations of
Accounts. Please
submit your resume to
[email protected]
No phone calls
please.
ACTIVITIES
AIDE
position at Sheridan
Manor. Must be willing
to work evenings &
weekends. Looking for
a fun, outgoing person
who is great with
elderly. Must be able to
pass background check
& have clean driving
record. Please apply
online
at
www.savacareers.com
or call Breann at 307673-2116.
FT POSITION. For
more info
www.landscapingservic
esinc.com
OPENINGS Housekeeping.
Experience
preferred. Top
wages. Apply in
person at Motel 6 &
Hampton Inn.
NEED EXTRA
CASH? PRIME RATE
MOTORS will buy
your clean vehicle.
Stop by 2305 Coffeen
to get an appraisal or
call 674-6677.
NOW HIRING
housekeepers.
Apply at
Candlewood Suites
1709 Sugarland Dr.
PRIME RATE
MOTORS Installs
B&W GN Hitches, 5th
Wheel Hitches, CM
Flatbeds, Krogman
Bail Beds, We're also
buying
Vehicles of all ages!
Stop by 2305 Coffeen
Ave. or Call 674-6677.
1994 INTERNATIONAL
Federal Express Truck
6 cyl Diesel 466 engine.
252K miles (Low miles
for this motor). 6 Speed
Trans w/ OD. 254"
Wheel Base. 16' box w/
side curtains & rear
hydraulic lift. Excellent
shape & runs perfect.
H E R I T A G E $10,000. 307-763-6024
WOODWORKS,
a or 307-763-1628
custom home builder in
JEEP
Grand
Sheridan, is now hiring 2001
Limited
a Full Time experienced Cherokee
Sun
Roof,
carpenter seeking long 4.7LV8,
term employment. Must Leather Seats Trailer
be quality oriented, Tow Package, Alum
dependable, interested Wheels, Silver Metalic
in working with logs and Color 307-674-8980
reclaimed
wood.
2006 HONDA CRV.
Company paid health
AWD. Heated Leather
benefits. Call our office
Seats. Located in
at 763-4017 to apply.
Sheridan. Call
307-680-3220.
IMMEDIATE
RETIRED PERSON, 14 hrs./day, 3 days/wk.
P/T. $11-$13/hr. Buggy
Bath, Call 674-6888.
PICKLES
NON SEQUITUR
Hints from Heloise
Heloise
Dear Readers: Our BELOVED
PETS are like family. Like family, they age, but unfortunately
dogs age more rapidly. Older
dogs and cats face many of the
same medical problems humans do. Having had the privilege of many, many dogs in our
lives (plus birds, ferrets, cats
and others, too), we have
learned some hints along the
way.
Our second mini schnauzer,
Sauvignon (Savvi for short), became diabetic at about 11 years
and required insulin shots. We
all learned how to do this (even
my husband, David, who hated
needles!) without it being a big
deal. After all, it prolonged her
life (in pretty good health, too)
for a year or so. She turned
blind a year later, and we all
learned how to cope with this
also. She went to doggie Valhalla when she was 13 years
old.
Here are some helpful hints
from Heloise and family to help
you and your pet deal with
blindness:
* Your dog can't see someone
approaching, so talk before
touching or petting your pet,
who can hear you. I used a
calm voice and would say,
"Savvi, I'm in the room" or
"Savvi, want to have dinner?"
* Leave things in place until
your pooch learns where the
furniture is and how to navigate a room. Your pet knows
your scent and will follow it
through the house!
* If there is something dangerous your pet might bump
into (sharp corners on a glass
table), pad the item, if needed.
Like a person, a pet who is
going blind will take some time
to adjust. Be patient and talk
more when moving about. Your
pet can still hear and smell, so
these senses are heightened. -Hugs, Heloise
P.S.: Our longtime friend and
Savvi's vet, Dr. Tom Vice,
kindly reminded me: "She doesn't read the newspaper or
watch TV. She will adapt better
than you think." He was right!
Visit www.Heloise.com to see
photos and read Savvi's story.
SEND A GREAT HINT TO:
Heloise
P.O. Box 795000
San Antonio, TX 78279-5000
Fax: 1-210-HELOISE
Email:
Heloise(at)Heloise.com
BABY-SITTER NOTES
Dear Heloise: Before we used
a baby sitter, I listed important
information on paper and laminated it: Our phone numbers,
close family numbers, closest
hospital, etc. The sheet is
posted on the refrigerator
whenever we go out. I use a
dry-erase marker to note where
we will be. It wipes off and is
ready for our next night out. -Sammie E., via email
CAT CRATE
Dear Heloise: We have an outside cat I feed regularly. He is
domesticated enough to bring
in when the weather is much
colder. I got a large plastic tub
with a lid, cut a hole in the side
and placed old towels and blankets in the bottom. This is his
spot to sleep. -- Pat I., Ames,
Iowa
Bridge
Phillip Alder
NOT ONLY
LEADS, BUT
ALSO SIGNALS
Albert Einstein, when
asked to describe radio,
said, "You see, wire telegraph is like a very, very
long cat. You pull his
tail in New York, and
his head is meowing in
Los Angeles. And radio
operates exactly the
same way: You send signals here; they receive
them there. The only difference: There is no cat."
A bridge defender
sends a signal from his
hand and hopes it is received by his partner,
sitting over yon. But will
that information prove
useful and be acted
upon?
How should the defenders card to defeat
this three-no-trump contract after West leads the
spade king?
The auction was simple and straightforward.
North knew that everyone would admire his
lovely club suit when he
put it down in the
dummy.
East has no spade
honor, so he signals with
his three. Then, when
South ducks, hoping to
pull off the Bath
Coup, West must realize that he has to shift
at trick two, leading
the heart six if he
thinks partner has
that ace, or the diamond eight if he
hopes partner holds
that instant winner.
Given dummy's
holdings, most players would play the diamond, which works
perfectly here. East
wins with his ace and
returns a spade, establishing West's suit
while West still has
an entry in the club
ace.
Omarr’s Daily Astrological
Forecast
BIRTHDAY GAL: Actress
Kerry Washington was
born in New York City on
this date in 1977. This birthday gal has starred as
Olivia Pope on "Scandal"
since 2012, earning a 2013
Emmy nomination for her
work. She's also appeared
on episodes of "Psych,"
"Wonderfalls" and "Boston
Legal." On the big screen,
Washington's film resume
includes roles in "Peeples,"
"Django Unchained' and
"The Last King of Scotland."
The actress has been married to NFL star Nnamdi
Asomugha since 2013.
ARIES (March 21-April
19): Ivory towers hold little
appeal. Get conversations
rolling that deal with the ordinary and you may discover the extraordinary.
Your efforts to be enticing
will pay off with a congenial
partner.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Create calibrated
moves. Move the thermostat up a few degrees where
a certain romantic relationship is concerned. Something lovely might happen
if you provide warmth and
comfort.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Spend quality time with a
significant other. Sometimes all a person needs is a
hand to hold. Someone may
find you attractive and desirable and it isn't wise to
argue with a fate like that.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Water seeks its own
level. Locate the most comfortable place within the
pecking order to better deal
with family dynamics.
Gather relatives under one
roof or get in touch with
distant loved ones.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Love and affection is not a
spectator sport. Show
you're a willing participant
and creative about pleasing
a romantic partner. You
and your special someone
need a break from the usual
places.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Be guided by gut reactions.
You're sensitive to subtle
shifts in surroundings and
the thoughts of loved ones.
You may find time to find
an item of lasting value or
to express tender feelings.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Stubborn mules can be induced to budge. You might
make progress and head-
Autos-Accessories
Finally, if South wins
the first trick and attacks clubs, West should
duck one round and take
note of East's discard of
the diamond 10 on the
second round. West
shifts to that suit, and a
spade through South results in a satisfying
down two.
Jeraldine Saunders
way with a certain immovable object. You can agree
to disagree, or find a tactful
way to compromise.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Anticipation isn't just a
feeling reserved for pouring
ketchup. Your inner clock
is counting down to a time
you can hook up with a certain someone. Your intuition is right on target.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Personal relationships take on a romantic
luster. Harmony is restored
once a minor spat becomes
a thing of the past. Surmount interpersonal challenges by being
understanding and forgiving.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Recycling has come into
vogue. You know deep in
your heart that new isn't
necessarily better, but you
may still want to throw out
or replace something that's
outlived its usefulness.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Consenting adults may
consent in imaginative
ways this weekend. One obstacle that bars a romance
may be alleviated. You may
be inspired to succeed in a
new project.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): A conversation might
spark a new feeling of permanence in a relationship.
With Venus in your sign,
you're more appealing and
attractive than ever. Take
advantage of someone's
good opinion.
IF JANUARY 31 IS YOUR
BIRTHDAY: Romance and
committed relationships
might take center stage in
the year ahead. Because
you're in love with the idea
of love, you might not be
able to discriminate between wishful thinking and
the real thing during the
next three to four weeks.
The period between now
and the end of March, however, is a good time to pursue new friendships,
whether for business or
pleasure, and a fabulous
time to make long-range
plans and key decisions. By
May, you may be sure
enough of a relationship or
the desire for a career
change to make a firm commitment or launch crucial
plans.
YOUR ELECTED
OFFICIALS |
CITY
John Heath
Mayor
307-675-4223
Public Notices
FRIDAY, JANUARY 30, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
WHY PUBLIC NOTICES ARE IMPORTANT |
Kristin Kelly
Councilor
307-673-4751
Shelleen
Smith
Councilor
307-461-7082
Thayer
Shafer
Councilor
307-673-4118
Alex Lee
Councilor
307-752-8804
Jesus Rios
Councilor
307-461-9565
Kelly Gooch
Councilor
307-752-7137
COUNTY
Pete Carroll
Treasurer
307-674-2520
Eda
Thompson
Clerk
307-674-2500
Nickie Arney
Clerk of District
Court
307-674-2960
John Fenn
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
Shelley
Cundiff
Sheridan
County Circut
Court Judge
307-674-2940
William
Edelman
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
P.J. Kane
Coroner
307-673-5837
Mike
Nickel
Chairman
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Terry
Cram
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Tom
Ringley
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Steve
Maier
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Dave
Hofmeier
Sheriff
307-672-3455
Bob
Rolston
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Paul
Fall
Assessor
307-674-2535
Matt
Redle
County
Attorney
307-674-2580
STATE
Matt
Mead
Governor
307-777-7434
Mark
Jennings
Representative
House Dist. 30
307-461-0697
Mike
Madden
Representative
House Dist. 40
307-684-9356
Bruce
Burns
Senator
Senate Dist. 21
307-672-6491
Rosie
Berger
Representative
House Dist. 51
307-672-7600
John
Patton
Representative
House Dist. 29
307-672-2776
Dave
Kinskey
Senator
Senate Dist. 22
307-461-4297
307-278-6030
Public notices allow citizens to monitor their government and make sure that it is
working in their best interest. Independent newspapers assist in this cause by
carrying out their partnership with the people’s right to know through public
notices. By offering an independent and archived record of public notices,
newspapers foster a more trusting relationship between government and its
citizens.
Newspapers have the experience and expertise in publishing public notices and
have done so since the Revolutionary War. Today, they remain an established,
trustworthy and neutral source that ably transfers information between
government and the people.
Public notices are the lasting record of how the public’s resources are used and are
presented in the most efficient and effective means possible.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Wyoming Public Service Commission
(Commission) has given Montana-Dakota Utilities Co.
(MDU) authority pass on a wholesale gas cost increase
of $0.246 per dekatherm (Dth) to its Residential, Firm
General Service, and Small and Large Interruptible
customers, and an increase of $0.376 to its Seasonal
customers, through its Commodity Balancing Account,
effective on and after January 1, 2015.
The average Residential and Firm General
Service customers using approximately 15.6 Dth in
January 2015 may expect a monthly gas bill increase of
approximately $3.84 or 3.66%, before taxes. Actual
bills will vary with usage.
The proposed retail rate increases result in a
projected dollar-for-dollar increase in the Company’s
January 2015 total revenues of approximately $102,336
using projected sales volumes. The increases do not
change the Company’s authorized rate of return.
Under Commission Rule §§ 249 and 250 a
utility may apply to pass on to its customers known or
prospective wholesale commodity cost increases or
decreases on a dollar-for-dollar basis and subject to
public notice, opportunity for hearing and refund.
MDU’s application is on file at the
Commission’s offices in Cheyenne, Wyoming, and in the
Company’s Sheridan, Wyoming, business office, and
may be inspected by any interested person during
regular business hours.
Anyone who wants to file an intervention
petition, request for a public hearing, or a statement,
public comment or protest in this matter must file in
writing with the Commission on or before February 20,
2015. A proposed intervention or request for hearing
must set forth the grounds under which they are made
and the position and interest of the petitioner in this
proceeding.
If you want to intervene in this matter or
request a public hearing that you will attend, or want to
make a statement, a protest or a public comment, and
you require reasonable accommodation for a disability,
please contact the Commission at (307) 777-7427, or
write to the Commission at 2515 Warren Avenue, Suite
300, Cheyenne, Wyoming 82002, to make
arrangements. Communications impaired persons may
also contact the Commission by accessing Wyoming
Relay at 711. Please mention Docket No. 30013-300-GP14 in your communications.
Dated: January 20, 2015.
Publish: January 23, 30, 2015.
PUBLIC NOTICE
CITY OF SHERIDAN TO ACCEPT APPLICATIONS FOR
RETAIL LIQUOR LICENSE
IN accordance with Resolution 47-14; A RESOLUTION
ESTABLISHING CRITERIA FOR THE ISSUANCE OF NEW
RETAIL LIQUOR LICENSES, the City of Sheridan will be
accepting applications for one available Retail Liquor
License. Applications are available through the
Customer Service Center, first floor City Hall or at the
State of Wyoming Liquor Division website;
eliquor.wyoming.gov. All submissions shall include
original application with supporting documentation
and a PDF copy of the submission. Applications are to
be submitted to:
Scott Badley, City Clerk/Interim Treasurer
City Hall, 3rd floor
55 Grinnell Plaza
Sheridan, WY 82801
Applications will be accepted beginning December 5,
2014 until 2:00 p.m. local time on February 2, 2015. The
submission of applications will be considered per the
resolution
criteria:
That the City Council shall consider uniform
standards, criteria and conditions which will be part of
all applications considered by Council prior to the
issuance of new retail liquor licenses, which may include
but not be limited to:
(a) A business plan of the applicant’s intended
operation and use of the license, which includes but is
not limited to representations of the following:
1. Location of operation and use of the license;
2. Whether the license will be used to attract other
businesses and how;
3. Renovation of historic or dilapidated building(s),
neighborhood and/or areas being underserved;
4. Create a business anchor;
5. Hours of operation and date when sales will
commence;
6. Customer offerings;
7. Building design; and
8. Franchise or chain affiliation
(b) Twelve months of financial projections or history of
cash flow, profit and loss statements, and projected
sales tax revenues to be generated, and current balance
sheets for the applicant’s operation;
(c) The potential increase in employment opportunity
should they be issued the retail liquor license;
(d) The potential increase to the establishment’s total
aggregate payroll should it be issued the retail liquor
license
(e) Whether location of the establishment meets
current zoning requirements, is complaint with City
Code (or will be made compliant with City code) and
how the welfare of the citizens of the City of Sheridan,
particularly those residing in the vicinity of proposed
location, would be impacted.
(f) Any other documents or information that may be
beneficial to City Council in the issuance of the retail
liquor license.
(g) Demonstration of applicant’s participation in "best
practice" responsible server programs, such as: TIPS,
CARES, “serve safe” or equivalent training and
certification for their employees.
(h) Participation in the Sheridan County Liquor
Association's "Tipsy Taxi" program.
(i) Council may issue the retail license with conditions,
including but not limited to:
(A) the license may not be transferred to different
person(s) or entity without City Council’s review and
acceptance of the criteria set forth herein and approval
that the transferee will satisfy the public-benefit goals
thereof; and
(B) a reversion condition to which the licensee shall
agree that the license will revert to the city if: the
applicant’s actual operation and utilization of the
license materially differs from the representations in the
application, or if the applicant’s operation ceases to do
business, becomes insolvent or files for bankruptcy.
After applications are received, a schedule for
Applicants to be heard will provided.
/s/Scott Badley, City Clerk/ Interim Treasurer
Publish: December 5, 12, 19, 26, 2014
January 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, 2015.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B7
GLOSSARY OF TERMS |
Default: Failure to fulfill an obligation, especially the obligation to
make payments when due to a lender.
Encumbrance: A right attached to the property of another that may
lessen its value, such as a lien, mortgage, or easement.
Foreclosure: The legal process of terminating an owner’s interest in
property, usually as the result of a default under a mortgage.
Foreclosure may be accomplished by order of a court or by the
statutory process known as foreclosure by advertisement (also
known as a power of sale foreclosure).
Lien: A legal claim asserted against the property of another, usually
as security for a debt or obligation.
Mortgage: A lien granted by the owner of property to provide
security for a debt or obligation.
IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOURTH
JUDICIAL DISTRICT
STATE OF WYOMING
COUNTY OF SHERIDAN
Probate No. PR 2015-1
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE
OF DEBRA JEAN KAYSER, Deceased.
NOTICE OF HEARING ON PETITION FOR LETTERS OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE SAID ESTATE;
Notice is hereby given, that Friday, February 13, 2015, at
8:30 a.m. of said day, at the District Courtroom of said
Court, at 224 South Main Street, Sheridan, Wyoming,
has been appointed as the time and place for hearing
the Petition For Letters Of Administration filed herein by
Joseph S. Kayser, when and where any person interested
may appear and contest the same.
DATED this 9th day of January, 2015.
/s/ NICKIE ARNEY
CLERK OF DISTRICT COURT
BY:/s/ LELA F. CHAPMAN
DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT
Publish: January 23, 30, February 6, 2015.
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
RENEWAL OF LIQUOR LICENSES WITHIN THE TOWN OF
RANCHESTER
Notice is hereby given that on the 8th day January, 2015
the applicants whose names are set forth below have
filed for the renewal of liquor licenses with the Town
Clerk of the Town of Ranchester, Wyoming. All renewals
will be from March 7, 2015 through March 6, 2016 for the
following places and premises:
RETAIL LICENSES
1) PHD Corporation, d/b/aRanchester Liquor Paul A.
and Helen L. Deutsch 530 Historic U.S. Highway 14
Ranchester, WY 82839
A one story building on Lots 1, 2, and 3, Block
1 of Johnston’s 1st Addition of the Town of Ranchester.
2) Paul and Helen Deutsch d/b/a Silver Spur Bar and
Lounge 408 Historic U.S. Highway 14 Ranchester, WY
82839
A one story building on 30 ft. of Lot 1, Lot 2
and Lot 3 of Block 5 of the Town of
Ranchester.
3) Cool Enterprises, Inc. d/b/a Buckhorn Grocery Keith
and Cheryl Delynn Cooley
723 Historic U.S. Highway 14 Ranchester, WY 82839
A one story building on Lot 1 of the Buckhorn
Subdivision of the Town of Ranchester.
RESTAURANT LICENSE
1) Bernard Food Group, d/b/a Eat Street Restaurant
Christopher and Sheena Bernard 719 Historic U.S.
Highway 14 Ranchester, WY 82839
The major southern portion of the first floor
of a building on Lot 2 of the Buckhorn Subdivision of the
Town of Ranchester.
And protests, if there be any against the issuance of
such license renewals, will be heard at the hour of 6:30
p.m. on February 3, 2015 at the Ranchester Town Hall,
Town of Ranchester, Wyoming
Dated this 12th day of January,
2015.
Teri L. Laya, Clerk Treasurer
Town of Ranchester
Publish: January 16, 30, 2015.
Proposal for Conditional Use Permit
CU-15-001: Born in a Barn Private Event Venue CUP
The Public is hereby notified that on Thursday, March 5,
2015 at 5:30 p.m., at a regularly scheduled meeting of
the Sheridan County Planning and Zoning Commission,
the Commission will consider an application from Brian
and Michelle Kinnison for a conditional use permit
located in the SE1/4NW1/4, S1/2NE1/4, N1/2SE1/4,
NE1/4SW1/4, of Sec. 17, T55N, R83W. The applicants are
proposing to host events including reunions, retreats,
and weddings from June through September. The
property is located in the Agricultural Zoning District,
consists of approximately 38.34 acres, of which 5.133
acres is proposed to be used for the CUP, and has a
physical address of 415 US Hwy 14 East.
A Public Hearing on this matter will be held on the
Second Floor in the Commissioners’ Board Room of the
Sheridan County Courthouse, at 224 South Main Street,
Sheridan, WY. The public is invited to comment on this
request. Questions may be directed to the Sheridan
County Public Works Department at 675-2420. Written
comments can be sent to the Sheridan County Public
Works Department, 224 S. Main Street, Suite 428,
Sheridan, WY 82801. If you wish to submit written
comments, please submit them by February 20th, 2015.
Publish: January 30, 2015
IN THE DISTRICT COURT IN AND FOR
SHERIDAN COUNTY,
STATE OF WYOMING
In the Matter of the Estate of
Ernest E. Selig, Deceased.
Probate No. PR 2015-6
NOTICE OF PROBATE
TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN SAID ESTATE
You are hereby notified that on the 16th day
of January 2015 the estate of the above named
decedent was admitted to probate by the above named
court, and that Jessica A. Hegy, was appointed Personal
Representative thereof.
Notice is further given that all persons
indebted to said decedent or to said estate are
requested to make immediate payment to the
undersigned at Wendtland & Wendtland, LLP, Attorneys
at Law, 2161 Coffeen Ave., Suite 301, Sheridan, WY
82801.
Creditors having claims against said
decedent or the estate are required to file them with the
necessary vouchers, in the office of the clerk of the
District Court of said Court, on or before three (3)
months after the date of the first publication of this
notice, and if such claims are not so filed, unless
otherwise allowed or paid, they will be forever barred.
Dated this 27th day of January 2015.
WENDTLAND & WENDTLAND, LLP
/s/Debra J. Wendtland – 5-2700
Attorney for Personal Representative
2161 Coffeen Avenue, Ste 301
Sheridan, WY 82801
307.673.4696 /
307.673.4828 (Fax)
PUBLICATION DATES: January 30, February 6 and
February 13, 2015.
Power of Sale: A clause commonly written into a mortgage
authorizing the mortgagee to advertise and sell the property in the
event of default. The process is governed by statute, but is not
supervised by any court.
Probate: The court procedure in which a decedent’s liabilities are
settled and her assets are distributed to her heirs.
Public Notice: Notice given to the public or persons affected
regarding certain types of legal proceedings, usually by publishing
in a newspaper of general circulation. This notice is usually
required in matters that concern the public.
Disclaimer: The foregoing terms and definitions are provided merely as a guide to the
reader and are not offered as authoritative definitions of legal terms.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Wyoming
Statutes, Annotated, Sections 34-4-104 and 34-4-105
(2014), that a certain mortgage dated December 29,
2010, which was executed and delivered by Oliver R.
Simonis and Tawny D. Simonis, husband and wife, to
First Interstate Bank, a Montana Corporation, and
recorded in the County Clerk’s Office, Sheridan County,
Wyoming, on December 29, 2010, in Book 789 at Page
544 as Document No. 2010-685185, and which
mortgage was assigned to Wyoming Community
Development Authority on March 17, 2011, and recorded
in the County Clerk’s Office, Sheridan County, Wyoming
on March 22, 2011, in Book 795 at Page 313 as Document
No. 2011-687025, will be foreclosed by a sale to the
highest bidder at a public auction of the premises
described pursuant to a power of sale contained in the
mortgage.
The premises that are described in the mortgage are as
follows:
The South portion of Lot 8 and Lot 9, Block 3, West
View Addition to the City of Sheridan, Sheridan County,
Wyoming, being more particularly described as follows:
Beginning at an existing rebar with cap marking the SE
corner of original Lot 9, said point also being on the
West right-of-way of Saberton Avenue and the North
right-of-way of a sixteen foot alley; thence along the
right-of-way of said alley S89º44’08”W, 100.56 feet to
an existing rebar marking the SW corner of original Lot
8; thence along the original West line of Lot 8,
N00º09’38”W, 64.88 feet to a set rebar with cap RLS
5300; thence leaving said original line N89º39’47”E,
100.35 feet to a set rebar with cap RLS 5300, said point
being on the original East line of Lot 9, also being the
West right-of-way of Saberton Avenue; thence along
said right-of-way S00º20’53”E, 65.00 feet to the point
of beginning.
The mortgage contains a street address of 956
Saberton Avenue.
The above sale will be conducted by the Sheriff or the
Sheriff’s Deputy at the front door of the Courthouse in
Sheridan, Sheridan County, Wyoming at 10:00 a.m. on
February 27, 2015. Oliver R. Simonis and Tawny D.
Simonis have defaulted in the terms of the note and
mortgage and the undersigned claims $142,722.49
interest due on the mortgage, plus per diem interest of
$15.99 on the unpaid balance to the date of sale, plus
reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses of sale.
The property being foreclosed upon may be subject to
other liens and encumbrances that will not be
extinguished at the sale and any prospective purchaser
should research the status of title before submitting a
bid.
DATED this 27th day of January, 2015.
Wyoming
Community
Development
Authority, Mortgagee
By:/s/James R. Bell #5-1606
Murane & Bostwick, LLC
201 North Wolcott
Casper WY 82601
307-234-9345 /
Fax: 307-237-5110
Attorney for Mortgagee
Publish: January 30, February 6, 13 and 20, 2015
REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL NO. 0202-Z
Notice is hereby given that sealed proposals for
providing Office Space in the City of Sheridan for the
Wyoming Department of Family Services and the
Wyoming Department of Workforce Services will be
accepted until 2:00 p.m., March 30, 2015 by the
Department of Administration and Information,
Procurement Section, 700 West 21st Street, Cheyenne,
Wyoming 82002. Only proposals submitted on State of
Wyoming forms will be considered. Interested parties
should phone (307) 777-7253 to obtain official proposal
documents.
Publish: January 30, February 13, March 6, 2015.
Northeast Wyoming Board of
Cooperative Educational Services
410 North Miller Avenue
Gillette, WY 82716
REQUEST FOR BID
Notice is hereby given that Northeast Wyoming BOCES,
410 North Miller Avenue, Gillette, Wyoming will receive
sealed bids for the following up to the date and time
stated:
• Mid-Size AWD Sedan
• 7-9 Passenger Utility Vehicle
• High Safety Rating, good gas
mileage, Cross-over/SUV
• 4WD 3/4 Ton Truck
Specifications and Bid Forms are available at the
Administrative Office, 410 North Miller Avenue, Gillette,
Wyoming: Phone: (307) 682-0231 ext. 106
Wyoming preference will apply per Northeast Wyoming
BOCES policy.
Northeast Wyoming Board of Cooperative Educational
Services reserves the right to accept or reject any or all
bids and to waive any irregularities or informalities in
the bidding.
Please mark envelopes SEALED BIDS.
Sealed bids will be opened and tabulated at 1:00 p.m.
on Tuesday February 24, 2015 at N.E.W.B.O.C.E.S. 410 N.
Miller Ave. Gillette, Wyoming 82716.
Northeast Wyoming BOCES is an equal Opportunity
Employer.
For more information contact: Jodie Nichols 307-6820231 ext. 106 or e-mail at [email protected]
Publish: January 30, February 6,13, 2015.
SHERIDAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 1
AND THE WYOMING SCHOOL FACILITIES DEPARTMENT
NOTICE TO CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL TESTING AND
INSPECTION SERVICE COMPANIES REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
Notice is hereby given that Sheridan County
School District No. 1 and the Wyoming School Facilities
Department has issued a Request for Proposal (“RFP”)
from firms/individuals for professional services in
connection with Tongue River Elementary School (“the
Project”).
The RFP materials, the contract documents,
and other important information will be available for
download by visiting the SFD website:
http://www.wyoming.gov/loc/03302010_1/Pages/defa
ult.aspx
Steps
• Step One – Click on the “Projects” link and choose
“Upcoming Projects” from the drop-down menu.
• Step Two – Under Tongue River Elementary School,
select “Click Here to Learn More.”
• Step Three – Select the link under “Download
Procurement Documents.”
• Step Four – Choose Tongue River Elementary School
under the Technical Services tab on the left side of
the page.
• Step Five – Click “Download Project PDF” and enter
information.
All submitted request for proposals shall be
sealed and must be received at the Sheridan County
School District No. 1 Administrative Offices located at
1127 Dayton Street, Ranchester, Wyoming, at 2:00 PM
on February 12th, 2015. Request for proposals may be
delivered in person, via United States mail or parcel
service; request for proposals will not be received by
facsimile transmission, e-mail, or any other electronic or
telephonic means. Only such request for proposals that
have been received by Sheridan County School District
No. 1 Administrative Offices, at the address, time, and
date listed above will be considered. Submitted
proposals will be immediately and simultaneously
opened and read aloud in public at 2:00 PM on February
12th, 2015.
Sheridan County School District No. 1
reserves the right to reject any and all request for
proposals received that are not deemed to be in the
best interests of the school district. The school district
further reserves the right to cancel or amend the RFP
materials and Contract Documents at any time and will
notify all persons requesting proposal documents
accordingly.
SHERIDAN COUNTY SCHOOL
DISTRICT No. 1
Publish: January 16, 23, 30, 2015.
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
The County of Sheridan, Wyoming will receive sealed
bids for the Sheridan County West Burkitt Street
Parking Lot project. The project includes the placement
of approximately 600 square yards (SY) of 6” concrete
pavement, various other concrete reconstruction,
pavement striping, and 6’ vinyl fence.
Sealed bids will be received by the office of the Sheridan
County Public Works Department, 224 S. Main Street,
Suite 428, Sheridan, Wyoming until 2:00 p.m. local time
on February 19, 2015. The bids will then be opened and
read aloud in the 2nd floor Public Meeting room at the
County Courthouse.
All bids shall be submitted in accordance with and on
the forms included in the Project Manual. Bids shall be
submitted in a sealed envelope addressed to:
Board of Sheridan County
Commissioners
County of Sheridan
Second Floor of Courthouse Addition
224 South Main Street
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
Contract Documents, including proposal Bid Forms,
Construction Drawings and Project Manual, have been
placed on file and may be examined at the offices of:
Ridgepoint Consulting
312 Whitney Lane, Ste. 3
Sheridan, WY 82801
(307) 675-5434
Sheridan County Public Works Office
224 South Main Street, Ste. 428
Sheridan, WY 82801
(307) 674-2920
Contract Documents may be obtained on or after
January 21, 2015 at the office of Ridgepoint Consulting,
at the non-refundable cost of $ 100.00 per set.
A PRE-BID CONFERENCE will be held on February 12,
2015 at 2:00 p.m. local time, at the Sheridan County
Public Meeting Room, Second Floor of Courthouse
Addition, 224 South Main Street, Sheridan, Wyoming
82801. Bidders are encouraged to visit the project sites
prior to the Pre-Bid Conference.
Contractors, in submitting their respective bids,
acknowledge that such bids conform to all
requirements of Wyoming State Statute. Each bidder
must include a bid security with the bid, payable to the
County of Sheridan, Wyoming, in accordance with the
Instruction to Bidders.
No bidder may withdraw its bid after the scheduled
time of the bid opening. Bids are to remain open for 60
days after the bid opening. The County of Sheridan
reserves the right to reject any and all bids or parts
thereof, and to waive any irregularities of any bid. The
County of Sheridan also reserves the right to award the
contract to such responsible bidders as may be
determined by the County of Sheridan.
Signed: /s/Tom Ringley, Chairman
Board of Sheridan County
Commissioners
County of Sheridan
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
Publish: January 21, 30, 2015.
LEGAL NOTICE POLICY
The Sheridan Press publishes Legal
Notices under the following schedule:
If we receive the Legal Notice by:
Monday Noon –
It will be published in
Thursday’s paper.
Tuesday Noon –
It will be published in
Friday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Saturday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Monday’s paper.
Thursday Noon –
It will be published in
Tuesday’s paper.
Friday Noon –
It will be published in
Wednesday’s paper.
• Complete information, descriptions and
billing information are required with
each legal notice. A PDF is required if
there are any signatures, with a Word
Document attached.
• Failure to include this information WILL
cause delay in publication. All legal
notices must be paid in full before an
"AFFIDAVIT OF PUBLICATION" will be
issued.
• Please contact The Sheridan Press legal
advertising department at 672-2431 if
you have questions.
B8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
FRIDAY, JANUARY 30, 2015
WOODS: Salvages an opening-round 2-over 73, nine back from the leader Palmer
hit 5-iron to tap-in range for
eagle. With water down the
Woods came up with two
left side and a perilous chip
big shots on the back nine to shot awaiting for anything
salvage a 2-over 73. That left to the right — the last thing
him nine shots behind Ryan he needed — Woods smoked
Palmer, who had a 64.
a tee shot on the par-4 17th
It was the first time in his onto the green, pin-high to
career that Woods shot over right, setting up a two-putt
par in his first round of the birdie.
year.
And he made it through
There were a few bright
the par-3 16th hole without
spots.
too much of an incident.
He was toward the bottom
As he settled over his tee
of the leaderboard at 5 over shot and was about to pull
through 12 holes when he
the trigger, someone in the
FROM B1
stands screamed out,
"Knock it in the tooth!" That
was a reference to that photograph last week of Woods
at a World Cup ski race in
Italy missing his front
tooth.
On his next try, someone
else shouted, "Everybody
quiet."
Woods never lost his poise,
hit the middle of the green
and made par.
Even so, the focus shifted
quickly from the chipped
tooth to simply his chip-
ping. Woods twice chipped
with a 4-iron, opting to
bump the ball instead of loft
it. Both came up dreadfully
short. One led to bogey, the
other a double bogey when
he three-putted from 20 feet
on the fringe.
He clanked a routine chip
some 15 feet by the hole for
a bogey. He bladed one
across the green at No. 9
and chose to use his putter
to go back a slope.
Perhaps the greater indication of the state of his
game is that no one was terribly surprised by the struggle, although the chipping is
becoming a topic. Woods is
working with a new swing
consultant, trying to fashion
a swing similar to his glory
days. He says the change
means trying to get rid of
the old swing, even in his
chipping.
This could be a process.
"It's not the first time I
have gone through this. It
takes time," Woods said. "It's
just a frustrating thing
where I just need to get
through competitive
rounds. I need to get rounds
out of my belt and get a feel
for it. Eventually I start
trusting it, start shaping
shots, and then you just go
play. Don't worry about it a
whole lot."
His game was anything
but super, but the atmosphere sure was.
The attendance was estimated at 118,461, breaking
the Thursday record at the
Waste Management
Phoenix Open by just over
30,000.
Woods and the Super
Bowl in town are the reason
for that. And while so much
attention was on Woods for
the opening round, other
players benefited from the
high-charged atmosphere.
Keegan Bradley and
Masters champion Bubba
Watson each shot 65, one
shot out of the lead.
Watson hit a drive on the
17th that rolled inches by
the hole. He missed the 5foot eagle putt, but picked
up an eagle on the third
hole. There was a big crowd
for that one, for Watson
played in the group behind
Woods.
"I could feel his crowd was
really big," Watson said.
"You could feel it, the energy, even with the weather
the way it was. People still
showed up. People still had
a blast. And obviously, Tiger
created a lot of that."
Bradley could sense it, too,
even though he played on
the opposite side of the
draw. Bradley finished his
round on No. 9 and hit what
he thought was a great
approach, except that he
wasn't sure because no one
was clapping. He turned to
his caddie and asked him if
it went over the green, or
maybe even short of the
green. And then he walked
up to the green and saw it
was 10 feet away. That's
when the light came on.
"Tiger was on the second
green. No one was watching
me," Bradley said with a
laugh. "It's just amazing to
see the draw that Tiger has.
Wow, there was a lot of people."
They saw some good golf
— just not very often from
Woods.
DEFENSE: Rams up
energy in second quarter
FROM B1
Alley said the team’s focus
over the last few weeks has
been stopping quicker
guards and getting better
help-side defense. Neither
seemed to be working early
last night.
Big Horn’s defensive
struggles carried over to the
other end of the floor, as
well. It took the Rams more
than three minutes to score
their first point, a Seth Kite
free throw, and the Rebels
led 16-12 after the first quarter.
The energy shifted in the
second quarter, and a whole
knew Big Horn team
appeared to have surfaced.
The tides had turned, and
the Rams’ defense held
Riverside scoreless for the
first 4:22 of the second quarter. Big Horn took a 19-18
lead and never looked back.
Collin Powers was the
leading scorer for the Rams
with 17. Seth Kite had 15
and Colton Bates added 13.
Both Big Horn teams are
vying for top spots in the
conference, so the weekend
is just getting started. The
Rams and Lady Rams will
battle 2A Northeast opponents Moorcroft and
Sundance tonight and
tomorrow, respectively.
Tonight’s matchup with
Moorcroft will be at home.
The girls tipoff at 5:30 p.m.
with the boys immediately
following.
MEDIA: Lynch had lots to
praise, just not reporters
FROM B1
“And if you ain't mad at
me, then what y'all here for?
I ain't got nothing for y'all,
though. I told y'all that."
Lynch, who had spurned
reporters' efforts to get him
to talk at mandatory news
conferences Tuesday and
Wednesday, seemed frustrated that they were still trying.
"I'm here preparing for a
game. And y'all want to ask
me these questions, which
is understandable. I could
get down with that. But I
told y'all. I'm not about to
say nothing. ... All of my
requirements are fulfilled."
Lynch praised his teammates, his hometown of
Oakland, California, and
his Family First
Foundation. When asked
who the best player on the
Seahawks was, he said: "All
of them."
As he has all week, Lynch
stayed five minutes before
leaving.
At Media Day on Tuesday,
Lynch repeated: "I'm just
here so I don't get fined"
while talking to reporters.
On Wednesday, he replied
to all questions with: "You
know why I'm here."
Singer Katy Perry borrowed Lynch's catchphrase
during her news conference
to discuss her halftime performance.
Asked which player she
has her eye on, Perry said:
"I'm just here so I don't get
fined."
Lynch has a history of
avoiding reporters. In
November, the NFL fined
him $50,000 for violations of
the league's media policy in
addition to collecting the
$50,000 fine that was
imposed against Lynch for
violations last season. The
fine from 2013 was held in
anticipation of future cooperation from Lynch.
The Professional Football
Writers of America complained to the league about
Tuesday's session and
Lynch had been apprised of
a potential fine. A league
spokesman declined comment.
Lynch again wore a "Beast
Mode" baseball cap and told
everyone where they could
buy one. The two hats he
already wore this week have
sold out on Lynch's website,
where they're part of his
Beast Mode apparel line.
`