Children’s Hospital of Richmond creates ‘Young at heart’ campaign

The latest trends in healthcare advertising
November/December 2006
Ad talk
Vol. 22 No. 6
Children’s Hospital of Richmond creates
‘Young at heart’ campaign
FEATURES
Ad talk
■
1, 3–6
Children’s Hospital of
Richmond ‘Young at
Heart’
Market notes
Features gallery
2, 29–31
7–12
■ Atlanta
hospital initiates
multiple advertising
efforts to maximize
exposure
Index
31
Campaign entry form 32
DEPARTMENTS
Campaign spotlight 14–26
■ New
TV campaign for
CaroMont Health focuses
on life
Radio campaign
27–28
■ California
Hospital
Association launches
radio spots to tout
services
A HealthLeaders
Media publication
Rebranding campaign offers consumers more guidance on hospital’s services
Last year, the 36-bed, not-for-profit, Children’s
Hospital of Richmond (VA), faced a brand problem: Consumers knew of the hospital, but they
didn’t know what it offered. A rebranding campaign, complete with a logo redesign, a new tagline, and publications that portrayed the hospital
in a new, refreshing light gave the hospital the
brand boost that it needed—but not before completing a ton of legwork.
“People recognize our name, but they don’t
really understand what we do or the range of
specialized services we offer,” says the hospital’s
CEO Leslie Wyatt. “We really are a bit of a
well-kept secret.” The hospital needed to make its
services (e.g., the specialty feeding program that
people from all over the country travel to take
part in) better known.
On top of that, chief administrators reviewed
the hospital’s mission statement and realized that
the facility’s brand had not evolved with its mission. It was time to answer the question “who are
we?” Branding expert Shawn Whalen, senior vice
president of Massachusetts-based healthcare public relations (PR) and branding agency Schwartz
Communications says you must do this before
you can campaign for your image.
“In today’s highly competitive healthcare market, it is critical for hospitals to first understand
their strengths and differentiators before embarking on rebranding and advertising campaigns,”
says Whalen.
“In addition to self contemplation,” he continues, “the hospital needs to consider hard market facts. How can I gain market share? What
type of patient demographic is most profitable?
What departments perform best? Why are
competitors better—or worse—than you?”
The hospital knew that, to gain market share
and fill beds, a greater awareness to consumers
of the hospital’s services was necessary in the new
branding campaign. To stay competitive, people’s
perception needed to change.
The renovation
With goals in mind for the new brand,
the hospital embarked on a market-research program to learn how people in Richmond and the
Northern Virginia region perceived the hospital
and to determine what the people specifically
want. The program took three steps to identify
consumers’ impression of the hospital: focus
group conversations, a phone survey to locals,
and a survey to patients and families.
“This was a strategic process for us,” says
Stacey Biddinger, PR executive for Children’s.
continued on p. 3
A HealthLeaders Media publication
›› Market notes
Ignite Health launches Incendia Health
Studios, first purpose-driven media company
devoted to chronic disease education
Ignite Health in Irvine, CA, one of the nation’s top 20
independent healthcare advertising agencies, announced on
September 28 the formulation of Incendia Health Studios,
to develop and distribute unbranded disease-education programs targeting the millions of people who use the Internet
to seek and share information about chronic diseases. Fabio
Gratton, chief innovation officer of Ignite Health and one of
the agency’s four founding partners, has been appointed president of the new company and will continue in his role with
Ignite Health.
The goal of the new media company is to offer health
information to patients and caregivers who are affected by
chronic diseases. The company will develop projects in much
the same way that movies are made, from the creation of
compelling story concepts through the securing of financing
and selection of distribution channels.
Incendia projects will be funded by advertising, sponsorships, and grants, but will not promote specific products or
services.
Kaiser Permanente to run Spanish ads
on English channels
Oakland, CA–based national health system Kaiser Permanente continues its “Thrive” campaign with a twist—a
bilingual Spanish/English commercial now airing on English
language television nationwide. The ad, launched in late September, highlights Kaiser Permanente’s efforts to reach the
increasingly important Latino market. In addition to the bilingual version, there is a Spanish-language spot that airs on
Spanish-language television, as well as radio spots for Spanish-language radio stations.
Continuing the theme of total health and well-being in
order to live full, happy lives, the newest Thrive ads, “Gym,”
“Stay Longer,” and “Crowd Surfing” aim to reinforce Kaiser
Permanente’s role as a health advocate helping members to
improve their lives and reap the benefits and joy of healthy
living. Additionally, the new ads try to celebrate diversity.
Creative was done by the agencies Campbell-Ewald in
Los Angeles and Accent Marketing in Jefferson, IN.
Tennis legend Mary Joe Fernandez
campaigns for asthma awareness
Mary Joe Fernandez, tennis legend and well-known tennis
commentator, is urging Hispanic-Americans with asthma to
take the Asthma Control Test™ (ACT). The ACT is an asthma assessment tool, available in Spanish and English, that
can help doctors assess the patient’s level of asthma control.
Fernandez has asthma, but refuses to let it slow her
down. She wants other people with asthma to know that they
can live a full and active life with an effective asthma-management plan. Throughout her childhood and teenage years, she
suffered from what she thought was chronic bronchitis. It
wasn’t until she was 20 years old, at the height of her tennis
career, that a doctor correctly diagnosed her as having asthma. Fernandez’s experience led to her current commitment
to help increase awareness about the importance of talking
with a doctor about asthma and the ACT. The five questions
included in the ACT are based on measures of asthma control established by the National Institutes of Health Asthma
Guidelines.
Scarborough Research to better gauge
health ad effectiveness
Scarborough Research, a media research and pattern
agency in New York City, is teaming with healthcare data
information company Solucient in Evanston, IL, to help
advertisers better gauge the effectiveness of healthcare advertising. Scarborough maintains a database of consumer
buying patterns and media usage to help media buyers, ad
agencies, and networks better target and track their advertising by zeroing in on demographic groups.
Under the agreement, Scarborough is embedding
Solucient’s HouseholdView™ proprietary life-stage
segmentation system and HealthView Plus®, Solucient’s
proprietary national research on consumer attitudes and
behaviors about healthcare services, into Scarborough’s
databases on consumer shopping habits, media patterns,
demographics, and lifestyles.
This will allow healthcare marketers to examine local
consumer media utilization to create more efficient media
plans targeting specific segments, based on healthcare needs.
continued on p. 29
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Healthcare Advertising Review
November/December 2006
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Ad talk
continued from p. 1
“Since we are a nonprofit hospital,
being cost effective is important to us.
Before launching any flashy advertising,
we needed to know what people in the
community thought of us, so we talked
. . . to everyone we could—board members, opinion leaders in the community,
parents, everyone.”
Children’s Hospital also tapped
Richmond-based branding firm Siddall, Inc., to help with the initiative
and rebranding effort.
Together, the team redesigned
Children’s logo, created a new tagline
(“Young at heart”), and updated the
hospital’s three consumer publications
to portray the hospital in a new, refreshing light.
The look and feel of the new
brand clearly communicates what types
of children will thrive at the hospital
through its services, Biddinger says. The
hospital’s logo changed from black and
white to orange.
“We picked orange because it’s
childlike and a color not typically seen
in healthcare advertising,” she says. The
new tagline, “Young at heart” was
decided on because it’s short and sweet
and gives the impression that even the
most expert medical staff still feel
young at heart and can relate much better to children than can the competition.
A work in progress
Despite making great strides with
the new branding campaign, the hospital is not yet finished. It is now in the
middle of redesigning its Web site,
which is due to launch in December,
and redesigning and refocusing its three
publications so they carry the new brand
image—the quarterly Children’s Hospital
Magazine, the quarterly newsletter Early
Addition, and a one-sheet, Tidbits, which
goes out three times per year—to fit
with Children’s new image.
Additionally, Children’s tapped
Hawaiian illustrator Jing Tsong to draw
multiple pictures of children with various medical problems, to offer more
guidance to the public about the types
of medical problems Children’s treats.
The illustrations are fresh, colorful,
and unique. Some pictures show children in wheelchairs; others are smiling
continued on p. 4
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Healthcare Advertising Review
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A HealthLeaders Media publication
Ad talk
continued from p. 3
in a hospital bed. The drawings will be
placed internally on posters, banners
outside of the facility, and billboards
in the parking garage of the hospital.
So far, initial feedback has been
extremely positive, says Biddinger.
Staff have keenly taken to the campaign and are excited to launch the
Web site and print ads to further
cement the new Children’s Hospital
of Richmond brand.
Wyatt agrees that the hospital is
moving in the right direction in terms
of its brand, which is now more important than ever.
“The world around us is changing,”
she says. “It is more competitive. We’ve
always had a brand, we just haven’t used
it to our fullest potential.” H
Children’s Hospital of Richmond
34 beds, Richmond, VA
Contact: Stacey Biddinger
[email protected]
Agency: Siddall, Inc.
Agency contact: Karen Grimm
[email protected]
Objective: The primary objective of the
hospital’s rebranding effort
is to raise awareness of the
specialty pediatric services
offered at the facility, and to
increase overall community
perception of the hospital.
Target: Adults, parents, caregivers,
community thought leaders.
Media: Newsletter, print, logo,
banner ads, Web site.
Web site: www.childrenshosprichmond.
org
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©2006 HCPro, Inc.
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Ad talk
These are the colorful illustrations that the hospital
commissioned by Hawaiian artist Jing Tsong. The
drawings are seen throughout the hospital and will
also appear on future collateral (e.g., brochures,
name tags, and mouse pads).
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Ad talk
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Features gallery
Atlanta’s Emory Healthcare initiates multiple advertising
efforts to maximize exposure
The challenge: Leverage three separate audiences, maximize exposure to
the brand, and tout two specialty services with one overall image.
It may sound impossible, but it’s
not. Just ask Georgia’s largest health
system.
Emory Healthcare, which comprises 15 health centers, did just that
with an aggressive multiintegrated
advertising campaign that advertised
the women’s care and plastic surgery
centers and branded one of the system’s hospitals as a leading healthcare
provider in the region.
The campaigns, created internally
by the marketing staff, launched separately during spring 2006, but overlapped enough to blanket the Atlanta
market with images of the Emory
brand throughout the summer and
fall months.
Emory’s vice president of brand
marketing, Mark Swilley, decided on
an integrated approach so the hospital’s
image would be seen in multiple mediums promoting different specialties at
the hospital. By using this approach,
the hospital can reach multiple target
audiences at once.
“Our goal in this campaign was
to not only promote specific service
lines, like our women’s center and
plastic surgery facility, but to also generate more awareness of the Emory
brand in Atlanta by positioning our
hospital as the premiere destination
for medical attention in the region,”
Swilley says.
The women’s center campaign:
Targeting moms and female
caregivers
To captivate the female audience
in Atlanta and tout Emory’s women’s
center, the hospital created a directmail campaign targeted to women aged
25–35 who are expectant mothers,
caregivers, or future moms.
The direct-mail piece features a tiny
infant in the middle of a yawn—an
image intended to reach both expectant
continued on p. 8
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Features gallery
continued from p. 7
mothers and women who want children
in the future.
The campaign, which asked, “Do
you know a good OB/GYN? Come
meet one!” offered a free luncheon and
symposium during which women could
meet potential doctors and nurses or
other women going through the same
experiences and ask questions.
“Choosing a doctor to deliver your
baby is a daunting task,” Swilley says.
“We wanted to make the women of
Atlanta feel comfortable doing that.”
The highly attended luncheons gave
women that opportunity and were
well-received in the community.
At least that’s what Kelly Rich, a
woman from Atlanta says. “When it
was time to preregister for the birth
of my first baby, they asked me to pick
a doctor. But how was I supposed to
pick a doctor I had never met? Then I
heard about the meet-and-greet luncheon at Emory, and I went with my sister, met a ton of doctors and nurses,
and it just made the whole experience
really comfortable.”
This portion of the campaign
ended in June, and the results proved
to be successful.
Swilley says the women’s center had
a 40% increase in calls over the course
of four months following the campaign
and that the symposium and luncheons
were highly attended.
The aesthetic surgery center
campaign: “A lifestyle upgrade”
Skewing to an older female demographic—age 45-plus with a higher
income—this second campaign aim-
ed to increase awareness of Emory’s
Aesthetic Surgery
Center.
The direct-mail
campaign is sleek
and colorful and
features older
women with a
youthful glow.
The tagline reads,
“Look younger. Feel
younger. Think of it as a lifestyle
upgrade.”
The two direct-mail pieces flirt
with the audience, saying, “Get carded
more often,” and “Make the bag boys
fight over who’s going to carry your
groceries.”
The back of the pieces spotlight
the pictures and bios of four plastic
surgery residents.
The direct-mail pieces intend to
position the center as a self-improvement center, rather than a place for
run-of-the-mill plastic surgery.
Highlighting the doctors also brands
the hospital as a confident academic
facility and one that touts the education
and experience of its physicians.
This campaign ran from June
to mid-July. Swilley says the facility
experienced a 30% increase in calls
in August and September to the aesthetic center and an increase in overall admission.
The branding campaign: Emory as
‘the midtown Atlanta hospital’
Finally, Emory launched a highend
print campaign branding Emory’s
Crawford Long Hospital as the premiere hospital in midtown Atlanta.
The ads position the hospital as a
destination, even going as far as to
compare it to a hotel.
One ad shows the hospital from an
aerial view, comparing its looks to a
luxury high-rise apartment building.
The second ad shows the inside
lobby of the hospital, which looks distinctly like the lobby of a five-star hotel.
“Our top priority is to make patients feel comfortable here at Emory,”
Swilley says. “Nobody wants to be in
a hospital, but if you have to go, why
not feel at home?”
The print ads began running in
January of this year and continued
through the end of September.
The ads were placed in high-end
regional consumer magazines, such as
Alliance Magazine and Mid Town Magazine.
Swilley says he is still tracking
results, but initial feedback has been
positive.
Over the course of nine months,
Emory’s brand appeared in three separate demographics promoting different
services.
This approach not only increases
consumer awareness of the various services offered, but increases its chances for
referrals in all three markets. H
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Features gallery
Emory Healthcare
270 beds, Atlanta
Contact: Mark Swilley
[email protected]
Objective: The objective of the advertising
campaign is to promote Emory
Healthcare’s brand as the premiere
hospital in Atlanta, and to promote
two service lines: the Aesthetic
Surgery Center, and the Women’s
Center.
Media: Print, direct mail, community
relations
Web site: www.emoryhealthcare.org
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Features gallery
Direct mail pieces that were used in the
campaign are seen here.
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Features gallery
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Features gallery
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CaroMont Health, a 24-hospital system in North Carolina, recently launched a TV campaign to promote its 435-bed Gaston Memorial Hospital in Gastonia, NC. The effort follows a successful print and
outdoor advertising campaign that showcased the real-life stories of local residents. Launched this
past September, the effort carries the tagline “Some of the most advanced healthcare in Charlotte
is actually right here in Gaston County.”
The commercials were filmed at Gaston Memorial Hospital and locations across the region featuring
actual CaroMont Health patients, doctors, and staff. The campaign’s goal is to promote the advanced
technology available at the facility and the high quality of customer care delivered at CaroMont
Health. The spots vary from 30 seconds to 60 seconds and are currently running on local network
markets.
The advertising campaign was created by Charlotte-based agency Eric Mower and Associates. The
spots focus on several areas of the hospital, including the neonatal intensive care unit, the Human
Motion Institute joint replacement program, surgery, cardiac care, and oncology. The real-life
patients of the hospital give the commercials credibility and highlight medical aliments that can
happen to anyone, at anytime.
CaroMont Health
435 beds, Gastonia, NC
Agency: Eric Mower and
Associates
Agency contact: Rick Lyke
[email protected]
Objective: The goal of this campaign is to highlight the
hospital’s customer service and focus on quality.
The campaign spotlights
its cancer center and
features real-life nurses.
Media: Television
Web site: www.caromont.org
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60-second television spot
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30-second television spot
60-second television spot
“Isaac Holt”
Isaac: I had been out cutting grass, and it had been hot, and I guess I over did it.
Eva Sue Holt (wife): I came in to the bathroom, and he was just down on all fours.
Isaac: She came in and said, “What’s going on?”
Eva Sue: He was sweating and clammy, and his color was changing, and I said “I’m going to call 911.”
Heather, EMT: When we got in him into the ambulance and hooked him up to the EKG, we knew this patient was having a heart
attack. We were able to use the monitor and cell phone to transmit the images to the cardiologist in the ER.
Cardiologist: Before Mr. Holt ever arrived in the ER, we were able to see he was having a heart attack. I saw the EKG, and we
were able to activate the necessary machines so they were ready for him when he arrived.
Eva Sue: We couldn’t have been treated better had we been big celebrities or something. It was wonderful.
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60-second television spot
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30-second television spot
“Normal McGill”
Norman: If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. But sometimes it breaks, but this got to be fixed.
Doctor: Norman had prostate cancer and underwent a radiation seed implant.
Norman: And right now I’m fine.
Doctor: The cancer is literally undetectable, which means his cancer is pretty much gone.
Norman: That’s the whole story. That’s all I have to say!
30-second television spot
“Tom Effid’
Tom: There are some days you never forget in your life, like the day the doctor said, “Tom, I found a little something on your larynx that bothers me. I think its cancer.” Something like that just stops you in your tracks.
Doctor: We were able to focus right in on the larynx and find this small but cancerous growth. In today’s world, people are scared
to have cancer in the larynx, or throat.
Tom: Yeah, that’s true. But I had no reason to be scared. They caught it in time.
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60-second television spot
“April Canipe”
Doctor: April Canipe and her son, Elija, can relate, because her son was born a month early.
April: My first son was a 29 week’er, and he’s six years old today and very healthy. He weighed 5 lbs. My second one was a 23
week’er and weighed 1 lb. and 1 oz. We lost that one. And this one, he was a 29 week’er, and we had to keep him here in the
neonatal ICU for a while.
April’s son, Elija: I remember my Mom crying because the little girl passed away because she was too little, and I was afraid my
little brother was going to pass away, too.
April: We started calling him the miracle baby, just for the simple fact that they said I wouldn’t be able to have another child
since the last horrific incident.
Doctor: He’s done very well and he’s been discharged and he’s healthy enough to go home now.
Elijah: He didn’t stay in Momma’s stomach long enough but he still made it.
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30-second television spot
“Richard Rankin”
Richard’s wife: He was in a lot of pain.
Richard: I walked for about 80 minutes that day, and then I started looking for benches to sit on.
Wife: Benches were becoming a real part of our lives.
Doctor: Sometimes people’s lives are significantly affected because of hip or knee pain, and if you can remove that pain, it allows
them to return to those activities they enjoy.
Wife: It’s made the biggest difference—he can keep up with me, and that’s meant so much to both of us.
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60-second television spot
“Millie: A day in the life”
Doctor: The day of joint replacement surgery, the patient will check in to our Human Motion Institute, and into the room where
they’ll stay.
Millie: Day one—checking in!
Doctor: Following the surgery, they may be out of the bed that say, or often times the following day.
Millie: Here it is, day two!
Doctor: The first day after the surgery, all of the patients who have had joint replacement surgery will mobilize as a group.
Millie: Day three, and I’m moving!
Doctor: We’ll see the patients for a few days postop so that by postop day three, people are ready to be discharged.
Millie: Day four, and I’m outta here!
Doctor: The schedule is to be admitted on a Monday, so you’re home by Thursday. The goal is to make them independent so they
can go home and function as usual.
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60-second television spot
“General Hospital”
Doctor: I think Gaston Hospital fills a very particular niche, especially in the birth place—it’s a very special environment, an environment that allows us to get to the very basic nature of parenting for premature infants.
Mom: We were really pleased with being at Gaston Memorial and feel safe having it be so close to us.
Doctor: We offer all the cutting-edge care that not many places in the country offer.
Tom: It was a surprise to know that that technology was here in a community hospital.
Hoover: They have the improvements, the equipment and all of that, but with it, they have heart.
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60-second television spot
“Cancer Cure”
Doctor: I think that there is a cure for cancer—we have parades of people that get it, get rid of it, and live long enough to talk
about it.
Tom: They have a 95% cancer cure rate at this hospital, and there are improvements every year. I can honestly say that everyone
here at Gaston cured my cancer.
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60-second television spot
“Kristy Crisp: Kangaroo Care”
Kristy: When Lucas was born, he was 2 lbs. and 1 oz. So he was a small little guy. The nurses and doctors told us that the
Kangaroo Care was an option—you literally hold the baby up against your skin. I tried it and started to notice that all of his
numbers on the monitor would level out when I did that—his blood pressure, oxygen, breathing, everything. It was amazing
to see.
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60-second television spot
“Dr. Andrew Miller”
Dr. Miller: When I first opened up my practice in 1959, a typical visit was $3 for the office and $5 for a house call. This machine
here is a linear accelerator. I think the retail on this is about $2 million. Now we have CAT scans, MRI machines, all kinds of
equipment. But back then, I had to rely on my hands.
Doctor: Dr. Miller developed a large mass under his arm, and it was growing very fast.
Dr. Miller: My cancer was under here—they were able to get it.
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A HealthLeaders Media publication
60-second television spot
“Lisa, Hannah, and Nurse Kelly”
Hannah: I always wanted a little sister.
Lisa, Hannah’s mother: She was an unexpected pregnancy and she was born at 34 weeks.
Nurse Kelly: Being a nurse in the neonatal intensive care unit is the most rewarding job I could imagine. You take care of these
babies who are so precious. You often make such a bond with these families. You really form friendships beyond these walls.
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Healthcare Advertising Review
November/December 2006
©2006 HCPro, Inc.
A HealthLeaders Media publication
Radio campaign
The California Hospital Association (CHA), a nonprofit aimed at improving the quality of healthcare
in California, recently launched 60-second radio
spots to promote the importance of hospitals and
their emergency services. The CHA, representing
more than 500 hospitals statewide, launched the
advocacy education campaign in English and
Spanish. The ads will run through November 15.
California Hospital Association
Sacramento, CA
Contact: Jan Emerson
916/552-7516
Objective: To promote the
emergency care
services in the state
of California regardless
of a patient’s ability
to pay.
Target: Adults, male and female
Media: Radio, Web site.
Web site: www.calhospital.org
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November/December 2006
Healthcare Advertising Review
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A HealthLeaders Media publication
Radio campaign
60-second radio spot
California Hospital Association radio spot
Female announcer:
California hospital’s are on the frontlines, caring for patients
and saving lives every day.
Male announcer:
Hospital emergency rooms are a part of a chain of
emergency services that begin with 911 and include law
enforcement, fire and rescue, paramedics, and ambulances,
and usually end at the emergency room.
Male announcer # 2:
When lives are on the line, this chain is your lifeline, and
your life depends on the strength of every link in the chain.
Female announcer # 2:
While the population of California continues to grow, the
number of emergency rooms has actually declined. One of
every six hospitals that existed ten years ago is now gone.
Male announcer # 3:
This can mean longer ambulance rides and longer patient
waits.
Female announcer # 3:
Emergency rooms are as important to a community’s
emergency response network as police and fire.
Male announcer # 4:
To learn more about the ER challenge go, to
www.calhospital.org. Paid for by the California Hospital
Association.
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Healthcare Advertising Review
November/December 2006
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›› Market notes
continued from p. 2
Marketers can also use segmentation information when
planning other marketing programs, such as comarketing
initiatives.
Developed specifically for the healthcare market, the
HouseholdView segmentation system identifies 56 types
of healthcare households. Combined with HealthView
Plus research on 20,000 households annually and the Scarborough local research of 210,000 consumers specific to
each market, the Scarborough-Solucient partnership will
enable marketers to understand the attitudes, behaviors,
and decision-making patterns of healthcare consumers.
Spirit of Women network promotes
heart health among females
An ongoing campaign to raise awareness of the dangers
associated with heart disease among females is the goal of the
Day of Dance campaign, a national effort sponsored by the
Spirit of Women network, a national coalition of hospitals
and healthcare facilities in more than 60 U.S. cities.
The campaign is now in its second year and is gearing up
for a new phase in 2007.
The campaign, launched in February 2005, hoped to
reach a wider audience this year. To do that, the network
shifted its strategy to include a greater demographic and to
retain readership with more targeted editorial coverage.
First, Spirit of Women retained its celebrity spokesperson, actor Patrick Swayze, who also made personal appearances nationwide urging women to become educated about
the importance of heart health.
Additionally, the effort increased media relations and received placements in top tier national women’s publications
such as Self, Good Housekeeping, and Woman’s World.
The strategy worked: More than 31,000 women attended
the national events. The Spirit of Women outreach continues
Questions? Comments? Ideas?
Contact Associate Editor Jenna Fogle
Telephone: 781/639-1872, Ext. 3335
to grow with an additional 19 markets lined up for the Day
of Dance campaign in 2007. For more information, go to
www.dayofdance.com.
Nickelodeon partners with ‘Produce for Kids’
to campaign for healthy eating
“Produce for Kids,” launched October 1, is a national
campaign aimed at promoting healthy eating in combination
with physical exercise.
The effort takes an integrated marketing approach that
combines point-of-sale materials, print advertising, public
relations, and Internet marketing.
The effort partnered with popular children’s television
network Nickelodeon this fall, and unique collateral will
appear in children’s hospitals nationwide, as well as in the
produce sections of supermarkets such as Meijer, Publix,
Kroger, and Giant. The posters feature characters from the
network, such as “Dora the Explorer”.
McIntyre Marketing, Inc., a brand-development firm
based in Orlando, FL, created the campaign. For more
information, visit www.produceforkids.org.
Health organizations launch campaign
promoting healthy bones
Targeted at parents and caregivers nationwide, The National Dairy Council has launched an education campaign
called “The Bone Health Campaign” aimed to raise awareness of the dangers of osteoporosis and the importance of
healthy eating, including meeting the recommended dairy
intake for young children.
The campaign, launched October 1, is also sponsored by
four leading health organizations: the American Academy of
Pediatrics, American Diabetic Association, American Academy
of Family Physicians, and National Medical Association.
The effort consists of print and digital advertisements, a
public service announcement on TV, and an interactive Web
site targeted at all consumers and health professionals.
Starting this month, consumers can visit www.3aday.com
to take a bone health self-assessment quiz and learn about
reducing the risk of osteoporosis, adopting healthy eating
habits, and dairy’s nutrients.
E-mail: [email protected]
continued on p. 30
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©2006 HCPro, Inc.
November/December 2006
Healthcare Advertising Review
29
A HealthLeaders Media publication
›› Market notes
continued from p. 29
Kaiser Permanente launches third phase
of ‘Thrive’ campaign
Kaiser Permanente, headquartered in Oakland, CA, entered the third year of its “Thrive” advertising campaign this
month with three new TV spots.
The new ads hope to counteract negative perceptions of
Kaiser after the 461-medical-center healthcare system was
fined $5 million from the state Department of Managed
Health Care over its kidney transplant program in early
September.
The crisis, which came to light in early May, became
public when it was discovered that hundreds of transplant
patients faced long delays and unnecessary red tape at Kaiser’s
San Francisco kidney program.
Kaiser’s new TV effort targets primetime audiences in
California markets on all four major networks. The TV campaign plans to go national in October. In November, billboard and other outdoor advertising will be prominent in
San Francisco bus and train stations.
One TV spot features a young man crowdsurfing through
a sea of Kaiser doctors, nurses, and other hospital staff. The
tagline is “Being connected is a wonderful thing.”
Cancer center raises public awareness
through new ads
The Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, a 300-bed
facility in Detroit, launched a $1 million advertising campaign to generate greater public awareness of the facility and
refocus its brand image as a national leader in cancer research
and prevention.
The institute’s first advertising effort in three years, the
campaign is taking an integrated approach with television,
print, Web, and billboard advertising to promote the center
and increase consumer awareness.
The ads picture real-life patients doing physical activities
(e.g., rock climbing and swimming) while talking about their
experience with the disease.
The TV ads began running on Detroit’s local toptier networks in September, and the print, Web, and billboard advertising began in October and will run through
June 2007.
Red Cross launches nontraditional
public service campaign
In honor of World First Aid Day on September 11, The
Canadian Red Cross launched a two-day public service campaign in Toronto, ON, to remind people about the importance of knowing cardiopulmonary resucitation (CPR).
The outdoor, print-only campaign is an instant attentiongrabber, with life-sized prints of people placed at the bottom
of staircases around the city.
Each image of an unconscious male or female body is
printed directly on the ground, creating the illusion that he
or she has just fallen down the stairs.
Similar images were also placed on kiosks at high-traffic
intersections.
The tagline on the creative reads “Know what to do.” To
bring additional awareness to the effort, first-aid instructors
around the city passed out information about CPR classes
and other Red Cross resources.
Toronto-based ad firm Downtown Partners created the
campaign.
Retired quarterback to promote hospital
branding effort
Former National Football League and Boston College
quarterback Doug Flutie was tapped last week by MetroWest
Medical Center, a 494-bed hospital system in Framingham,
MA, to be the spokesperson for the hospital’s new branding
campaign.
Flutie signed a two-year contract with the three-hospital
health system and will be seen in upcoming TV spots and
print collateral.
The hospital is launching the advertising campaign in
tandem with a rebranding effort and change of logo. The
campaign hopes to increase consumer awareness of the center’s location, programs, and patient outcomes.
Bob Dole launches Medicare campaign
via podcasts
Former U.S. Senator Bob Dole announced in September
the launch of a podcast urging those eligible for Medicare to
seek out more information about the available drug plans
offered in their area.
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Healthcare Advertising Review
November/December 2006
©2006 HCPro, Inc.
A HealthLeaders Media publication
›› Market notes
The online campaign features real-life Medicare beneficiaries who offer first-hand accounts of their experiences with
the drug benefit.
The effort hopes to reach not only those eligible for
Medicare, but also caregivers and family members who influence the lives of those who can benefit from the plan.
The effort launched in preparation for enrollment to
Medicare’s 2007 prescription drug coverage.
The weekly podcast, “Success: The Benefits of the New
Medicare Drug Plan,” will be updated every Monday.
For more information about the campaign or upcoming
weekly podcasts, please visit www.bobdoleonmedicare.com.
Survey: Most docs favor DTC moratorium
The majority (80%) of physicians in a recent survey said
they favor a moratorium on direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising for new drugs.
The survey of 1,360 physicians was conducted by Cambridge, MA–based market data firm MedPanel. The top three
benefits of a moratorium, according to participants, are
» it gives physicians more time to become familiar with a
drug before patients are influenced by advertising
» it gives physicians the ability to maintain control of the
physician-patient relationship without interference from
advertising
» that physicians have a lack of trust in pharmaceutical
companies
Of the 20% who oppose a mandatory waiting period for
advertisements about new drugs, most said consumer drug
advertising educates patients, encourages them to seek treatment, and forces physicians to stay up to date with new treatment options.
Opponents also said an enforced moratorium would
violate pharmaceutical companies’ free speech and freedom
to operate.
Some physicians who oppose the moratorium still see a
need for DTC reform, however.
Several respondents in the minority group expressed frustration with the nature of current ads or stated that they would
favor new DTC advertising guidelines over a moratorium, according to a MedPanel press release. H
Index
Sources
California Hospital Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
CaroMont Health System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Children’s Hospital of Richmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1, 4
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Campaign entry form
Healthcare Advertising Review welcomes submissions from hospitals, healthcare systems, and other healthcare institutions across
North America. All campaign elements are welcome, including but not limited to newspaper, radio, television, outdoor, brochures,
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_______________________________
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Editorial Board
Group Publisher: Matt Cann
Senior Managing Editor: Jay Kumar
Associate Editor: Jenna Fogle
[email protected]
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