College Catalog - Dowling College

2014 - 2015
1-800-369-5464
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Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog
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Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog
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Message from the President
Dr. Albert Inserra
Dowling College President
Welcome to the 2014-2015 academic year!
Dowling College was established in 1968 as learning community focused on the student needs of the
Long Island region. Now, almost 50 years later, Dowling College still represents the best that Long Island
has to offer - a liberal arts education in a setting that inspires, and a faculty committed to excellence for
each and every student.
What is singular about Dowling College is the level of commitment of our faculty. Let’s face it, many
colleges have a great reputation, but honestly, that is not enough. You as a student want to be known,
to be understood, and most important, you want a faculty and staff to care about your wellbeing, to
care about your academic progress, to be concerned about your future.
This is Dowling College! Whether you are an athlete, an art or music student, a pre-med major, a pre-law
major, a student who aspires to a career in the aviation industry, a student who wants to enter the
business world, a student who wants to be a teacher, or you are an entrepreneur, Dowling is here for
you! We aim to be part of your journey from the moment you decide to come to Dowling College to the
moment that you take the next step, whether it be a career, or a path that leads to furthering your
education.
This catalog provides you with several options. Explore the possibilities, speak with your advisor, and
together we will formulate a plan for your future!
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog
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Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog September 2014
Published bi-annually by Dowling College
Oakdale, Long Island, NY 11769
Non-profit Permit No. 13
Oakdale, Long Island, NY 11769
The information contained in this 2014-2015 catalog is true and correct in content and policy as of the Fall 2014
semester and is effective for the academic year which begins September 2, 2014. Dowling College reserves the right,
however, to make changes as it deems necessary. Every effort has been made to make the material presented
herein timely and accurate. This does not preclude the possibility of an undetected error. If a change of policy or
practice occurs as to a matter required by law to be in the catalog or as to other significant matters, an addendum
or correction will be published and will be available in the Office of Admissions, Room 225, Fortunoff Hall.
Non-Discrimination Policy
Statement of Policy
Dowling College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, citizenship, sex, sexual
orientation, marital status, mental or physical disabilities, age, veteran/national guard or any other similarly protected
status in its program and activities. The following persons have been designated to handle inquiries regarding the
non-discrimination policies:
Anne Dimola, Executive Director of Human Resources
Affirmative Action Officer/Title VII/Title IX
Room 001, Kramer Science Center
Oakdale, NY 11769
631.244.3020
Robert V. Campbell, Assistant Vice President of Safety, Facilities & Compliance and Title IX Coordinator
121 Central Blvd.
Oakdale, NY 11769
631-244-5050
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Throughout the catalog you will find interactive links for additional information. Many of the website references are active hyperlinks
which can be clicked to obtain additional information.
Example: http://www.dowling.edu
Please click here to visit Dowling Virtual Resources, located at the end of this catalog. Here you will find direct links to important pages
on Dowling.edu such as:
Schedules
Request Information
Dowling Institute
Academic Calendar
Blackboard (Login or Guest Access)
Course Catalog Search
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog
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Table of Contents
Tuition Adjustments and Withdrawal Policy ............................... 12
Dowling College Offerings ....................................................... iv
Estimated Annual Expenses* .................................................... 12
About Dowling College ............................................................... 1
Financial Aid ............................................................................... 13
Vision Statement .................................................................... 1
Loan Programs ....................................................................... 13
Mission of the College ........................................................... 1
Grants and Scholarships ............................................................ 14
Institutional Goals .................................................................. 1
Federal Grants ...................................................................... 14
Accreditation ........................................................................... 2
State Grants and Scholarships ........................................... 14
New York State Registration................................................. 2
Dowling College Grants & Scholarships ..................................... 16
Undergraduate Study ............................................................ 3
Designated and Endowed Scholarships ................................. 17
Pre-Professional Studies ............................................................. 3
U.S. Air Force Reserve Officers’ ................................................... 3
Grants/Scholarships/Fellowships Available through Private
Sources ................................................................................... 22
Training Corps ........................................................................ 3
Employment Programs ............................................................... 22
U.S. Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps ........................... 3
Other Financial Resources ..................................................... 22
Graduate Studies ......................................................................... 4
Student Life ............................................................................... 22
Business................................................................................... 4
National Honor and Professional Societies ........................... 25
Education................................................................................. 4
Intercollegiate Athletics ............................................................. 27
Combined Undergraduate and Graduate Studies ................. 4
Campus Recreation and Intramural ....................................... 27
Five-Year Bachelor and Master of Business Administration
Program .................................................................................... 4
Counseling Services ................................................................... 27
Accelerated BS/MBA Program .............................................. 4
Year-Round Study ..................................................................... 4
Dowling Institute .......................................................................... 5
Continuing Education ............................................................... 5
Campus Facilities ........................................................................ 5
Rudolph Campus at Oakdale .................................................... 5
Brookhaven Campus ................................................................. 6
Learning Resources ..................................................................... 7
Libraries ................................................................................... 7
Instructional Technology Support Services and Academic
Information Services .............................................................. 7
The Center for Counseling, Health and Wellness ................ 27
Career Services .......................................................................... 28
Internship Program .............................................................. 28
On-Campus Student Employment .......................................... 29
Academic Support Services ........................................................ 29
Health Services .......................................................................... 30
Insurance Plans .................................................................... 30
International Student and Scholar Services ......................... 30
Regulations for Conduct on Campus ......................................... 31
Student Judicial System ............................................................ 31
Drug-Free Awareness Program .............................................. 32
Admissions .................................................................................. 8
Courtesy to Our Neighbors......................................................... 33
Honors Program ....................................................................... 10
Workplace Violence/Campus Safety............................................ 33
Entrance Criteria .................................................................. 10
Campus Safety & Security ........................................................... 33
Financial Information ............................................................... 10
Dowling College Emergency Notification System................. 34
School of Aviation Flight School ............................................ 11
Academic Information .............................................................. 36
Payment Plan Options ............................................................... 11
Academic Advisement ................................................................. 38
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page i
Grading ....................................................................................... 38
B.A. in Psychology ................................................................. 63
Academic Clemency Policy ......................................................... 39
B.A. in Romance Languages ................................................ 64
Enrollment by Undergraduates in Graduate Courses................ 41
Study at Other Colleges ............................................................ 41
Honors ........................................................................................ 41
B.A. in Social Sciences ......................................................... 66
B.A. in Sociology ................................................................... 66
B.A. in Sociology-Anthropology ............................................ 67
B.A. in Visual Arts .................................................................. 67
Academic Progress Requirements ............................................. 42
B.A. in Visual Arts – General Track ................................ 68
Graduation.................................................................................. 43
B.A. in Visual Arts – Teacher Track .............................. 68
Academic Honesty Policy ........................................................... 44
Bachelor of Science Degrees ................................................... 69
Degree Programs ..................................................................... 45
B.S. in Aerospace Systems Technology .............................. 69
Graduate Education ................................................................... 49
Bachelor of Arts Degrees .......................................................... 49
B.A. in Biology ...................................................................... 49
B.A. in Biology - General Track ..................................... 49
B.A. in Biology - Pre-Medical Health Track ................. 50
B.A. in Biology - Pre-Physician’s Assistant Track ....... 50
B.A. in Chemistry.................................................................. 50
B.A. in Chemistry - General Track ................................ 51
B.A. in Chemistry - Professional Health Track ............ 51
B.A. in Communication Arts ................................................. 53
B.A. in Early Childhood Education ....................................... 55
B.A. in Early Childhood Education Recommended
Course Sequence ............................................................. 55
B.A. in Earth Science ............................................................ 56
B.A. in Economics ................................................................. 56
B.A. in Elementary Education .............................................. 57
B.A. in English ....................................................................... 58
B.A. in English - Literature Track ................................... 59
B.A. in English - Creative Writing Track ........................ 59
B.A. in English - Secondary English Education Track ... 59
B.S. in Applied Mathematics ................................................. 70
B.S. in Aviation Management ............................................... 71
B.S. in Biology ....................................................................... 72
B.S. in Chemistry ................................................................... 73
B.S. in Computer Information Systems ............................... 75
B.S. in Computer Science and Mathematics ....................... 76
B.S. in Criminal Justice Management ................................ 76
B.S. in Environmental Sciences ............................................ 77
B.S. in Natural Sciences and Mathematics .......................... 78
B.S. in Physical Education .................................................... 78
B.S. in Professional and Liberal Studies .............................. 80
B.S. in Special Education ...................................................... 80
B.S. in Sport Management ................................................... 81
BS in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
(TESOL) .................................................................................. 82
Bachelor of Business Administration Degree .......................... 83
B.B.A. in Accounting ............................................................. 84
B.B.A. in Finance ................................................................... 85
B.B.A. in Management & Leadership ................................... 86
B.B.A. in Marketing ............................................................... 86
B.A. in Gerontology ............................................................... 59
Minors, Certificates, and Pre-Professional Programs ............. 88
B.A. in Graphic Design and Digital Arts .............................. 60
Course Descriptions .................................................................. 97
B.A. in History ....................................................................... 60
Board of Trustees .................................................................... 98
B.A. in Marine Studies .......................................................... 61
Administration .......................................................................... 99
B.A. in Mathematics .............................................................. 61
B.A. in Mathematics - Mathematics Major Track .......... 61
B.A. in Mathematics - Secondary Mathematics Education
Track ................................................................................. 62
Faculty...................................................................................... 100
Dowling College Virtual Resources ...................................... 102
Undergraduate Programs and Offerings ......................... 102
B.A. in Music .......................................................................... 62
Our Majors: .................................................................... 102
B.A. in Philosophy ................................................................. 62
Our Minors: .................................................................... 102
B.A. in Political Science ......................................................... 63
Graduate/Doctorate Programs and Offerings ................ 102
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page ii
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Doctorate: ...................................................................... 102
Graduate: ....................................................................... 102
Useful Links ......................................................................... 103
Academic Calendar ............................................................ 103
Apply Now ........................................................................... 103
Class Schedules .................................................................. 103
Course Catalog Search ...................................................... 103
Dowling Institute ................................................................ 103
Register Online ................................................................... 103
Request Information .......................................................... 103
Schedule a Campus Tour .................................................. 103
The Tutor Center ................................................................ 103
Rudolph-Oakdale Campus ................................................... 104
Brookhaven Campus ............................................................. 105
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page iii
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Dowling College Offerings
Note: In this section, click the blue text to visit the page
online on the Dowling website, OR click the brown text to
read the information in this document.
School of Arts and Sciences
• Applied Mathematics (in this doc)
• Biology (in this doc)
• Chemistry (BA) (in this doc)
• Chemistry (BS) (in this doc)
• Communication Arts (in this doc)
• Computer Science (in this doc)
• Earth Science (in this doc)
• Economics (in this doc)
• English (in this doc)
• Environmental Sciences (in this doc)
• Gerontology (in this doc)
• Gerontology (BA) (in this doc)
• Graphic Design and Digital Arts (in this doc)
• History (in this doc)
• Marine Studies (in this doc)
• Mathematics (in this doc)
• Music (in this doc)
• Natural Science and Mathematics (BS) (in this doc)
• Philosophy (in this doc)
• Political Science (in this doc)
• Professional and Liberal Studies (in this doc)
• Psychology (in this doc)
• Romance Languages (in this doc)
• Social Sciences (in this doc)
• Sociology (in this doc)
• Sociology/Anthropology (in this doc)
• Visual Arts (in this doc)
School of Aviation
• Aerospace Systems Technology (in this doc)
• Aviation Management (in this doc)
Townsend School of Business
• Accounting (in this doc)
• Computer Information Systems (in this doc)
• Criminal Justice (in this doc)
• Criminal Justice Management (in this doc)
• Finance (in this doc)
• Management and Leadership (in this doc)
• Marketing (in this doc)
School of Education
• Early Childhood Education (in this doc)
• Elementary Education (in this doc)
• Physical Education (K-12) (in this doc)
• Secondary Education (in this doc)
• Special Education (in this doc)
• Sport Management (in this doc)
• Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
(TESOL) (in this doc)
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page iv
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About Dowling College
Each of us may define success in a different way, but we are all
looking for the opportunity to succeed. Dowling College offers our
students that opportunity. Our faculty members are world renowned
experts in their respective fields who actively engage our students in
developing new ideas and concepts. Students learn how to translate the
knowledge they acquire inside the classroom into the skills necessary to
succeed in today‘s competitive job environment. A wide variety of
services dedicated to student growth and development are offered which
give every student the
opportunity to excel in a
challenging
academic
environment.
Dowling is where your
field of interest and unique
talents come together to form
a foundation that will help you
to achieve your individual
goals. Student life is vibrant and designed to enhance our students‘
academic as well as social journey. Throughout the year exciting events are
held that encourage students to celebrate diversity and broaden their
horizons. Whether it‘s in the classroom, on the field, in the workforce or 5,000
feet above the Brookhaven Campus in one of our School of Aviation
program‘s Piper or Cessna aircraft, our students are driven to succeed. There
are over 30,000 successful alumni who are proud of their Dowling heritage
and our hope is that one day soon you will join their ranks.
Description
Founded in 1955 as Adelphi-Suffolk College and named in 1968 in
honor of its benefactor, Robert W. Dowling, noted financier and patron
of the arts, Dowling College has developed into one of Long Island's
premier academic institutions. An independent, coeducational college,
Dowling offers classes at its historic Rudolph Campus on the banks of
the Connetquot River in Oakdale, and at the 105-acre Brookhaven
Campus in Shirley. Students
can work toward their
Bachelor's,
Master's,
and
Doctoral degrees in several
disciplines through Dowling's
four schools: Arts and
Sciences, Aviation, Business,
and Education. To add greater
convenience, Dowling offers flexible year-round schedules during the
day, evening and weekends.
Dowling College is committed to hiring and sustaining skilled faculty,
who are actively engaged in their fields of expertise. In fact, more than 90
percent of our full-time faculty members have earned the highest degrees
in their discipline, and many have authored important books and
frequently present their research at forums throughout the world.
Small class sizes, which average 15 and never exceed 35 students, a
caring and supportive faculty, a challenging curriculum, and an
atmosphere that combines old-world charm with modern technology,
makes Dowling an exceptional institution for those seeking personal and
professional growth.
Dowling welcomes the entire Long Island community to its cultural
events throughout the year, including lectures, theatre productions,
musical and dance performances, sport activities, and art exhibits, which
are often free and open to the public.
All courses at Dowling College are taught by qualified professionals.
The College makes no instructional use of graduate students or teaching
assistants. The average class size is 15 students, and the student–faculty
ratio is 17:1. In recognition of its responsibility to the entire Long Island
community, the College opens its facilities to the public for special
events, such as lectures, theater productions, musical performances, sport
activities, and art exhibits.
Vision Statement
The vision of Dowling College is to become a regionally, nationally
and internationally recognized educational institution that provides
excellence in education by fostering an environment of collaborative
learning and open academic inquiry.
Mission of the College
Dowling College is an independent comprehensive educational
institution in the liberal arts tradition whose mission is to provide our
students with a well-rounded education based upon innovative teaching,
informed and engaging research, and a commitment to democratic
citizenship with a community service component. We foster an open and
supportive learning environment that is based upon collaboration
between a committed and supportive expert faculty and a student body
diverse in its interests, beliefs, culture, ethnicity, and geographic origin.
We recognize learning as a lifetime endeavor, particularly as it relates to
globalization. The college upholds its educational mission through
teaching, learning and research in the arts, sciences and professions such
as education, business and aviation, and by providing members of the
community and Dowling alumni with opportunities for continuing
education.
Institutional Goals
1. To provide Dowling College students with excellence in teaching
and learning by fostering a collaborative, open and innovative
educational environment.
2. To ensure sound and diverse financial planning and
implementation to support the academic programs and educational
mission of the College consistent with strategic planning, including
development, student recruitment and retention.
3. To serve and strengthen our local, regional, national and global
communities by promoting greater diversity and by providing a rigorous
education in the arts, sciences and professions, and by teaching our
students the value of community service and engaged citizenship.
4. To promote academic excellence in the areas of scholarship,
research, and artistic expression.
5. To maintain high academic standards by recruiting and retaining
excellent and dedicated professors actively participating in research and
professional development, and by offering students more individualized
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 1
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academic attention in small class-sizes within a setting conducive to
educational success.
6. To continue to expand and update the academic curriculum and
institutional capacity in order to support students and alumni in their
varied educational, occupational and life-long learning pursuits.
7. To promote collaboration beyond the geographical boundaries of
the college to advance the goals of social responsibility, environmental
protection, and economic and social progress.
Accreditation
Dowling College is accredited by the Middle States Commission on
Higher Education (MSCHE). Additionally, the School of Aviation is
accredited by the Aviation Accreditation Board International (AABI), the
School of Business is accredited by the International Assembly for
Collegiate Business Education (IACBE) and the School of Education is
accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education
(NCATE).
New York State Registration
The degree programs described on the following pages have been
approved by and duly registered with the New York State Education
Department (NYSED), as indicated by the Higher Education General
Information Survey (HEGIS) code number that appears in parentheses
after the program title. Students are advised that enrollment in programs
other than those registered or otherwise approved may jeopardize their
eligibility for certain student aid awards.
Conduct
Dowling College is committed to providing each member of the
College community with the best possible environment for learning and
human development.
What enables a college or university to provide "higher education" is
an atmosphere in which students, faculty, administrators, staff and local
residents can interact with individuals who are diverse in ability,
ethnicity, belief, culture, geographic origin, and age.
To ensure an environment conducive to free inquiry, learning and
personal growth, Dowling has adopted several administrative regulations,
which it resolutely enforces. These policies demonstrate the College's
dedication to the principle that the rights of all members of the academic
community are protected, and that the free expression of opinions,
exploration of ideas, and discussion of issues are encouraged on campus.
The College respects the right of each member of the academic
community to be free from coercion and harassment and will not permit
conduct which: interferes with the rights and privileges of other members
of the College community; is abusive of members or guests of any
member of the College community; results in damage to, or destruction of
or unlawful removal of, college or other property from the College campus;
or the threat of any such action. In order to ensure that each member of
the College community and his or her guests are free from such actions,
persons engaged in such disruptive activities shall be subject to
disciplinary action, including suspension, expulsion, dismissal, or
ejection, and also to charges of violation of Federal, State, or Local law.
Sex Offenses Response Policy
New York State defines sexual assault in various degrees. The College
recognizes the serious physical and psychological impact of sexual
assault. It is one of the most frequently committed violent crimes in the
United States - and the most underreported.
New York Penal Law Article 130 imposes penalties ranging from fines
through imprisonment for various sex offenses ranging from sexual
misconduct, rape, sodomy, sexual abuse and aggravated sexual abuse.
If a violation of law occurs on campus it is also a violation of College
regulations, and the College may institute proceedings against the
offenders. Such action by the College is independent of and may proceed
in parallel with civil or criminal action.
The Advisory Committee on Campus Safety will provide upon request
all campus crime statistics as reported to the U.S. Department of
Education. Individuals may request a hard copy of such crime statistics
from the College, which will be mailed to the individual within ten days by
calling 631-244-3365, the Director of Security.
These statistics can be obtained from The Dowling College Right to
Know Report (http://www.dowling.edu/security/right2know.pdf) as well as
the College‘s administrative regulations and programs to educate the
college community regarding security and crime prevention. The U.S.
Department of Education web site for campus crime statistics is
http://ope.ed.gov/security/
For more information refer to the Dowling Student Handbook
available at http://www.dowling.edu/
Procedure
Although it is expected that most complaints regarding violations of
the College‘s non-discrimination policy can be handled informally, it is
also possible for members of the College community to file a formal
written complaint with the appropriate officer of the College. Complaints
by faculty, administrative, and staff employees should be filed promptly
with Ms. Anne Dimola, Executive Director of Human Resources,
Affirmative Action Officer/Title VII/Title IX, Kramer Science Center,
Oakdale, NY 11769, 631-244-3020.
Student complaints should be filed promptly with Robert V.
Campbell, Assistant Vice President of Safety, Facilities & Compliance
and Title IX Coordinator, 121 Central Blvd., Oakdale, NY 11769, 631-2445050.
Complaints will be investigated by the College‘s Affirmative Action
Officer and the Vice-President for Student Affairs or his/her designee.
Investigations of alleged violations of the College‘s non-discrimination
policy will be conducted promptly and every possible effort will be made
to preserve confidentially and to protect the rights of the students and
employees. Further, during the investigation, the parties should explore
the possibilities of equitably resolving the particular complaint. Upon
completion, the investigators shall report the findings, together with such
recommendations as they deem appropriate, to the President.
Violations of the non-discrimination policy can result in disciplinary
action and dismissal of employees of the College and can result in
disciplinary action and dismissal of students. If disciplinary action,
discharge, or dismissal is contemplated by the College, the assistance and
testimony of the aggrieved person will often be needed to preserve the
rights of the affected individuals. The College will consult with the
aggrieved person before taking action against any employee or student
to make certain that the aggrieved person is willing to assist or testify.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 2
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Undergraduate Study
Dowling College offers full- and part-time study leading to the
degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Business
Administration in day, evening and weekend class sessions. Programs of
study include accounting, aerospace systems technology, aviation
management, biology, chemistry, communication arts, computer
information systems, computer science, early childhood education, earth
science, economics, elementary education, English, environmental
sciences, finance, gerontology, graphic design and digital arts, history,
management, marine studies, marketing, mathematics, music, natural
science and mathematics, philosophy, physical education, political
science, professional and liberal studies, psychology, romance languages,
social sciences, sociology, sociology-anthropology, special education,
speech and dramatic art, sport management, teaching English to
speakers of other languages (TESOL), and visual arts. Students may elect
a major in one academic area — a discipline major — or in two or more
related areas—an interdisciplinary or divisional major. See Degree
Programs for a description of degree programs and majors (also located
at
http://www.dowling.edu/academics/school-ofeducation/undergraduate-programs/).
Teacher training with certification in adolescence, early childhood,
childhood, middle childhood, physical, and special education, and
TESOL are offered within the framework of a bachelor‘s degree.
Candidates for certification should take special note of changes in
requirements mandated by the New York State Education Department.
Consult your academic advisor for details.
The Bachelor of Science degree in Professional and Liberal Studies is
a special program of study designed for persons who hold the A.S.,
A.A.S., or A.O.S. degree or the equivalent. This program permits
individuals with technical or professional backgrounds to receive
academic credit for professional and experiential learning as well as for
collegiate study. They then work toward a Bachelor of Science degree by
completing the remaining credits in a program of study designed to
complement previous learning and to meet personal and career goals.
Pre-Professional Studies
Law
It is important that students interested in legal professions meet with
the Pre-Law advisors in the Politics department on a regular basis. The
advisors will help students design a plan of study to meet each student‘s
needs. The plan of study emphasizes a broad liberal arts education and
the acquisition of skills in critical thinking, speaking, and writing. It is
essential that students maintain a grade point average of at least 3.0 and
that they perform well on the Law School Admission Test to have a
reasonable opportunity for admission to law school. The Pre-Law advisors are
liaisons to the Law School Admission Council and have a variety of law school
catalogs, bulletins, brochures, and other materials which students may
consult as aids in making decisions related to careers in law.
Medicine, Dentistry, Veterinary Science, and
Other Health Professions
Courses leading to the study of medicine, dentistry, veterinary
science, and other health-related fields are available to students
contemplating careers in these fields. Although students‘ individual
programs may vary, the following courses form the core of a preprofessional studies curriculum: BIO 1001A, 1002A, 1003A, 1004A; CHM
1001C, 1002A, 1003A, 1004A, 3025A, 3026A, 3027A, 3028A; MTH 1014A,
1021A; PHY 1001C, 1002A, 1003A, 1004A. These courses may be taken by
any undergraduate major or as a post-baccalaureate program.
In addition to the above core of science and mathematics courses,
some health professional schools may require additional courses. Also,
because many of the courses in the pre-professional curriculum are
offered in sequence, each student should consult with the Health
Professions Advisor as soon as possible after admission to the College.
To schedule a consultation, call the Health Professions Advisor at
631-244-3491, or contact the office of the School of Arts and Sciences.
Pre-professional studies can be arranged so that the student may
graduate with either a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree.
U.S. Air Force Reserve Officers’
Training Corps
Qualified, full-time Dowling College students may participate in the
Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) commissioning
program through Air Force ROTC Detachment 560. You can participate
in AFROTC at almost any time in your college career.
AFROTC is a commissioning program designed to educate and train
college students to be officers in the US Air Force. AFROTC is a two-part
program: Aerospace Studies courses and Leadership Laboratory.
Leadership Laboratory is a cadet run activity where cadets practice
leadership and followership skills. All classes and the lab are held at
Manhattan College at the Bronx campus. Cadets take General Military
Courses (GMC) during their freshman and sophomore years. These are
introductory, one-credit courses. After completing a summer Field Training
program between their sophomore and junior years, cadets will take
Professional Officer Candidate courses (POC) which focus on leadership,
management, and national security issues. The POC courses are three
credit courses. All cadets participate each semester in the Leadership
Laboratory.
There are many reasons to join besides learning valuable leadership
skills. You can participate in the Cadet Corps, Honor Guard, Air Force Base
visits, Introductory Flight Program, and other cadet activities. There are
numerous scholarships and financial incentives you can earn by
participating in AFROTC. In addition, you‘ll prepare to serve your
country in many fascinating career fields, such as pilot, navigator,
intelligence, maintenance, or logistics to name a few.
U.S. Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps
Qualified full-time Dowling students can participate in the Army
ROTC Program. Students must complete the four-year program or an
equivalent to receive a commission as an officer. There is no service
obligation if you participate in the first phase (Basic Course). Special
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 3
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programs are available to veterans and members of the Reserve or
National Guard.
Students may compete for an Army ROTC scholarship, which
includes tuition, books, fees, and a monthly allowance of $100.
Graduate Studies
Business
The Paul and Terry Townsend School of Business offers Masters of
Business Administration degree programs as well as advanced
certificates of concentrated study. Students may pursue degrees in
Aviation Management, Corporate Finance, Health Care Management,
Management and Leadership, or Public Management. Joint programs are
offered with the School of Education in the area of an MBA with a School
District Business Leader concentration.
In an effort to instill Dowling College‘s institutional and academic
vision, courses are offered: Oakdale. Courses are offered during the day,
evening and weekends to provide students with an opportunity to attend
classes at a time that is most convenient for them.
The Accelerated Saturday Program is structured on an accelerated
basis, providing students the opportunity to complete their 36-credit-hour
M.B.A. program over the course of three semesters and runs only in the
fall and spring. The Distance Graduate Program allows students to earn
their M.B.A. in Management and Leadership completely online.
Education
The School of Education at Dowling College is accredited by the
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE),
www.ncate.org. This accreditation covers initial teacher preparation
programs and advanced educator preparation programs. The School of
Education offers Master of Science degree programs in Adolescence
Education, Adolescence and Middle Childhood, Childhood Education,
Childhood and Early Childhood Education, Childhood and Gifted
Education, Early Childhood Education, Educational Technology
Leadership, Literacy Education, Special Education, and Sport
Management. The programs focus on the development of teacher
competencies. They provide both experienced teachers and future
teachers the opportunity to develop knowledge about theoretical
foundations, curriculum development, computer literacy, educational
research, and subject methodologies. The programs meet New York State
Education Department requirements for teacher certification.
Dowling College is authorized by the New York State Education
Department to offer an Advanced Certificate Program in Gifted
Education and Literacy Education, in addition to Advanced Certificate
Programs in Educational Administration to fulfill the needs of
professionals who wish to qualify for certification as a School Building
Leader, School District Leader, and School District Business Leader. The
College also offers a joint program leading to the advanced certificate in
School District Business Leader and the Master of Business
Administration. The purpose of these programs is to ensure that there is a
sufficient cadre of professionals available to satisfy the need for qualified
leadership in public and private schools.
Dowling College is also authorized to offer Advanced Certificate in
Educational Technology Specialist. Unique to this program is the special
emphasis on applying computer technology in an integral way to all learning
environments. Each course stresses the acceptance of the computer as a
current instructional tool that can enhance all aspects of curriculum and
school services.
A natural extension of our School of Education, the Doctor of Education
Degree in Educational Administration was designed to train leaders in
educational and non-profit sectors in several emerging areas: the power
and application of information technology, the creative management of
limited resources, and the implementation of strategies for continuous
personal improvement. As such, the unique characteristics of our Ed. D.
program include: 1) implementing advanced communication and network
access to widespread information resources, workstation to
workstation;2) researching and evaluating field work in public and private
institutions; 3) utilizing authentic assessment in evaluating student progress;
and 4) providing students with opportunities to publish their scholarly work.
Graduates will find themselves prepared to lead in the demanding
educational and non-profit organizations of the 21st Century.
Combined Undergraduate and
Graduate Studies
Five-Year Bachelor and Master of Business
Administration Program
This program is for the motivated career-oriented business student
who wants to receive both their undergraduate degree and masters‘
degree in five years.
Students accelerate the completion of their undergraduate business
degree by completing nine credits during any of the available
intersessions and an optional six credit internship during the student‘s
junior year. The internship will provide practical experience to prepare the
business major for a rewarding graduate education experience.
B.B.A.s are offered in Accounting, Finance, Management and Marketing.
M.B.A.s are offered in Aviation Management, Banking & Finance,
Corporate Finance, Management and Leadership, and Public
Management.
Accelerated BS/MBA Program
This program provides the opportunity to earn a combination
B.S./M.B.A. degree in three years. Participants in this program should have
a minimum of 60 undergraduate credits. This learning experience
culminates in an M.B.A. degree.
Year-Round Study
Dowling offers courses during accelerated summer and winter
sessions. Undergraduate and graduate level courses are available during
the day and evening hours
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 4
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Dowling Institute
The mission of the Dowling Institute is to provide individuals of all
ages with lifelong learning opportunities
designed to meet their educational, social, and
recreational needs.
The Dowling Institute presents lifelong
learning programs for adults, children, and
seniors. In addition to programs at Dowling,
educational and training programs are offered to
a variety of local communities, public schools,
and businesses.
The Dowling Institute offers customized on-site degree and nondegree programs locally, nationally, and internationally. Schedules for all
classes are remarkably flexible. We conduct classes day or night, weekdays or weekends, before or after work. We always keep our educational
offerings small and intimate. All students receive the intense, personal
attention that is the hallmark of a Dowling College education.
Continuing Education
The Dowling College Continuing Education program provides the
community with quality programs designed to meet the needs of
practicing professionals and individuals interested in personal
enrichment. These courses are not for credit. Courses are offered during
the fall and spring semesters. Information may be obtained by contacting
the Dowling Institute at 631-244-3420.
and staircase and in the ceremonial rooms. The mansion was named by its
benefactor in honor of his parents, Max and Clara Fortunoff.
Fortunoff Hall houses, in addition to the ceremonial rooms, many
administrative offices, support services, and faculty offices.
Marjorie Fortunoff Mayrock Conservatory
The Marjorie Fortunoff Mayrock Conservatory at Dowling College, a
glass and cast-iron domed structure, is among the most unique and
architecturally significant buildings on Long Island. The Mayrock
Conservatory is a cultural centerpiece of Dowling College, as well as the
community at large. Students, faculty, and friends attend receptions,
lectures, and concerts in its elegant interior. It is named in honor of the late
Marjorie Fortunoff Mayrock.
Nicholas and Constance Racanelli Center for Learning
Resources
The Nicholas and Constance Racanelli Center for Learning Resources,
a modern four story complex on the banks of the Connetquot River,
houses the Library, the Academic Computer Center, and newly
renovated multimedia enhanced classrooms. The Paul and Terry
Townsend School of Business, and faculty and administrative offices are
also located in the Racanelli Center
Bookstore
The bookstore is located on the first floor in the Racanelli Center.
Required texts, supplies, recommended paperbacks, review books, and
greeting cards are all available in the bookstore. Many traditional college
novelties, such as mugs, jewelry, and T-shirts are also available.
Cafeteria
Campus Facilities
The Cafeteria is located on the first floor of the Racanelli Center. It
affords a lovely view of the Connetquot River from its spacious seating
area. Hot and cold entrees, sandwiches, and snacks are served seven
days a week, year round.
Rudolph Campus at Oakdale
The Dowling Fit Trail
The Dowling Fit Trail is a timber fitness trail which combines
scientifically designed exercises with walking or jogging to provide a
well-balanced physical fitness routine for the entire body. Individual
exercise stations with apparatus are spaced along the Rudolph Campus,
beginning at the main entrance, around Racanelli Center, in front of
Fortunoff Hall, past the Kramer Science Center, and finishing by the
main entrance. Participants proceed from one exercise station of the
fitness trail to the next, following ―The Paw,‖ and performing the exercises
illustrated at each station.
For more information about the Dowling Fit Trail, please contact the
Department of Campus Recreation at 631-244-1142.
Max and Clara Fortunoff Hall
Max and Clara Fortunoff Hall is the focal point of the Rudolph
Campus. This ornate mansion, built at the turn of the century by William
K. Vanderbilt as a summer residence and originally named Idle Hour, is
situated on the banks of the Connetquot River. Much of the gracious
atmosphere of the original 110-room building, considered to be one of the
most beautiful mansions in America, has been retained despite extensive
damage caused by a fire in 1974. Through the generosity of Alan
Fortunoff, a former trustee of the College, the ornately carved woodwork,
marble fireplaces, and statuary have been restored in the main entrance
Jerry and Debra Kramer Science Center
The Jerry and Debra Kramer Science Center, adjacent to Max and Clara
Fortunoff Hall, is an instructional facility devoted to the natural sciences
and mathematics. In addition to classrooms and faculty offices, the
science center contains biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics
laboratories, as well as Human Resources.
Student Residence Hall
The Residence Hall is a 207-bed facility intended to provide students
with a living-learning environment which complements their classroom
education. Each apartment houses four students and features two bedrooms, a living/dining room, kitchen, full bath, and private exterior
entrance. There is wall-to-wall carpeting and air-conditioning throughout
the rooms. All apartments are equipped with phone and network
connections for each student. On-campus phone service is provided for
free; students are encouraged to obtain calling cards for regional and longdistance service. Students establish a connection to the Internet by
plugging their PCs into the network jack and ―registering‖ the PC with
the College‘s systems. Cable television service also is provided. A nonoptional comprehensive meal plan is available to meet the students‘
nutritional needs.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 5
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Gerald and Rose Mary Curtin Student Center
Brookhaven Campus
This building, formerly the carriage house of the Vanderbilt mansion,
now serves as a student recreational facility. On the second floor of the
Student Center is the Lion‘s Den, a student-built and sponsored lounge.
The Lion‘s Den has become a popular gathering spot for students, faculty,
and friends. On the first floor, the gym is the center for many intramural
activities. The offices of the Athletics Coaches, Residence Life, Student
Government Association, Recreation and Intramurals, Student Fitness
Center and Facilities Services are located in the Student Center
The Brookhaven Campus,
located on 105 acres on William
Floyd Parkway in Shirley, offers a
range of courses in aviation, and
physical education.
East Building
Stan and Pat Henry Aviation Complex
East Building, located at the intersection of Idle Hour and Central
Boulevards, houses the Office of Athletics.
Opened in 1994, the Stan and Pat Henry Aviation Complex houses the
administrative offices for the Brookhaven Campus, as well as the
administrative and instructional center for the School of Aviation, and
the Flight School. The School of Aviation offers under-graduate degree
programs in aviation, and is home to the Flight School. Dowling‘s fleet of
planes includes the various aircraft built by leading manufacturers such
as Piper and Cessna, as well as various light sport aircraft. Students can
accomplish all of their certificates and ratings, starting with their private
pilot certificate and continuing through their multi-engine instructor
rating. Students walk right out of class and into an airplane on the same
premises, with direct access to the taxiways and runways of Brookhaven
Airport. All aircraft are equipped with the latest instrumentation and
avionics, including IFR-certified Garmin Global Position Systems for
accurate, real-time traffic information with moving map capability.
Dowling‘s Doppler Radar, installed in cooperation with Metro Traffic &
Weather, provides current radar information for flights. Dowling‘s state-ofthe-art Air Traffic Control Laboratory allows students to receive cuttingedge training towards a career as an Air Traffic Controller. Additionally,
wheelchair-accessible FRASCA Flight Training Devices enable students to
train indoors at any time.
Education North and South Building
Located on Idle Hour Boulevard, the Education North Building and
Education South Building, house administrative and faculty offices for
the School of Education. The Health and Wellness Center is located in
the Education North Building.
Music House
The Music House, located adjacent to the Student Parking Lot, was
formerly the ice house for the Vanderbilt estate. The facility houses faculty
offices of the Music Department, as well as classroom and rehearsal
spaces.
Performing Arts Center
The Performing Arts Center, formerly the powerhouse for the
Vanderbilt estate, provides exhibition and performance space for
dance, music and theatre. The theatre area is equipped with flexible
seating and stage, and sophisticated lighting to accommodate
innovative as well as traditional production. The building includes a
fully equipped music-dance studio and rehearsal rooms.
Visual Arts Center
The Visual Arts Center is the site of the College‘s ceramics studio. It
also contains the Anthony Giordano Gallery where exhibitions of art
created by students, faculty, and contemporary artists are held throughout
the year.
Security Building
The Security Building, located on Central Boulevard, was formerly the
engineer‘s residence for the Vanderbilt estate. It houses security services
for all persons on all Dowling College properties and the student
newspaper The Lion‘s Voice. Campus parking permits can be obtained
here.
The Dowling Institute
The Dowling Institute presents lifelong learning programs for adults,
children, and seniors. In addition to programs at Dowling, educational
and training programs are offered to a variety of local communities,
public schools, and businesses. The administrative offices for The
Dowling Institute are located in Fortunoff Hall on the Rudolph Campus.
Classroom Building A
In 2001-2002, the facilities at Brookhaven were expanded with 15 more
classrooms, fully equipped with the latest in instructional technology, a
computer laboratory, a wireless-networked classroom, a video-conferencing
classroom, and faculty-student lounge.
Brookhaven Campus Residence Hall
The Residential Village is a 289-bed facility with one-, two-, and
three-bedroom apartments to meet individual needs. The building
features a secure lobby, comfortable lounge area, recreation/fitness area,
elevators, and laundry room on each floor. Each unit has at least one
private bath, a fully equipped kitchen, including a microwave oven, an
eating area and a lounge/common living area. Units are comfortably
furnished to allow each student to have a desk, chair, bed, dresser and
individual closet. The lounge is comfortably furnished with couches and
chairs and sufficient space for informal gatherings. Each suite is equipped
with phone and network connections for each student. On-campus
phone service is provided for free; students are encouraged to obtain
calling cards for regional and long-distance service. Students establish a
connection to the Internet by plugging their PCs into the network jack
and ―registering‖ the PC with the College‘s systems. Cable television
service also is provided. A non-optional comprehensive meal plan is
available to meet the students‘ nutritional needs. For further information,
contact the Office of Residence Life at 631-630-6000.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 6
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Learning Resources
Libraries
Dowling College‘s library is housed on the first two floors of the
Racanelli Center for Learning Resources on the Rudolph Campus in
Oakdale. The library provides access to the College's information
resources and serves as an electronic gateway to resources located in
libraries and other repositories of information around the world.
At Oakdale, the Reference and Periodical Collections and Circulation
services are on the first floor along with a group work area. Librarians
are available to assist in all phases of the research
process. Reference service is provided in person, by
phone, via email, and chat. An open stack collection
of circulating books, study facilities, Special
Collections, Archives, Annual Library Art Contest
Art Gallery, and the Curriculum Materials Center
are on the second floor. Library holdings include
books and journals, both print and electronic,
microforms, audio, film and videos, and technology such as iPads and flash
drives for student use.
The library provides hard-wired and wireless Internet access to the
Dowling College Library Catalog, through which students can find, request,
and renew items from the collection. The Library also provides online
access to the Internet and electronic resources, ranging from full-text
databases to periodical indexes to multimedia content. Students can
access these resources from on-campus or online, 24 hours-a-day, to locate
and retrieve accurate information needed for research and personal
interests.
Through resource sharing agreements with other libraries, including
memberships in the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) and the
Long Island Library Resources Council, Dowling students have access to
interlibrary loan via a global network of libraries. Through the Research Loan
Program, students are able to borrow directly from most academic
libraries on Long Island.
Reference
librarians
conduct classroom
information
instruction
sessions,
including
demonstrations of electronic databases to familiarize
students with the organization and use of general
and specialized information resources. Students also
receive individualized assistance in defining their
needs and the use of appropriate information for research or personal
interests. The Library offers a one-credit course, LIB 1101 – Introduction
to Academic Research, each semester.
The Curriculum Materials Center supports the College's K-12 teacher
education curriculum. It provides both pre-service and in-service teachers
with print and non-print curriculum resources, including K-12 textbooks,
New York State Curriculum Guidelines, and learning kits, all available for
use in the classroom or with lesson plan preparation.
The Library is a member of the Federal Depository Library Program,
serving as a partial depository with a concentration in business,
education, and aviation resources. Both federal and state published
materials are fully integrated into the collection and are shared with
other educational institutions and the general public.
Display areas within the library feature timely displays pertaining to
topics such as student course trips, faculty publications, new academic
programs, upcoming lectures, and other campus programs.
Students can find out what is going on, in and around the Library, via the
Library's "What's New" blog and on Facebook. In addition, students can
listen to podcasts that feature interviews with students and faculty,
library news, and local history. Refer to the Library homepage,
library.dowling.edu, for these and all other services
Instructional Technology Support Services
and Academic Information Services
Academic Information Services is located on the first floor of the
Racanelli Center for Learning Resources on the Rudolph Campus and in
room A201 at the Brookhaven Campus. Academic Information Services is
responsible for academic computing, media services, SMART (Shared
Multimedia Access to Resources for Teaching) classrooms, training, Help
Desk, video conferencing, servers, and both wired and wireless network
infrastructure.
The Academic Computing Center in the Racanelli Center consists of an
open computer lab and three instructional computing classrooms. There
are also two satellite instructional computer labs, one in the Kramer
Science Center, room 102A, and one in the Racanelli Center, room 331. The
Academic Computing Center at Brookhaven consists of an open computer
laboratory, room 202 in the ―A‖ building, an instructional computing lab,
room 204 in the ―A‖ building, and an instructional computing lab/laptop
classroom, room 203 in the ―A‖ building. In all instructional computer labs,
the teachers‘ workstations have the ability to project their monitor onto a
large screen via a digital data projector. There is also an area for students
with laptops to get both electricity and internet connectivity.
Academic Information Services provides and maintains all of the
media equipment that is used in the classrooms. DVDs, VCRs,
televisions, computers, and projectors (digital data, overhead
transparency, 35mm slide and video) are available for instructors to use
in their classes. Academic Information Services is also responsible for the
seventy-three SMART classrooms. Each of these rooms contains a computer
connected to the campus network and the Internet, digital data projectors,
speakers, connections for a laptop, and VCR/DVD players. Smart classrooms
allow the faculty to incorporate full motion quality video and audio into a
lesson plan, as well as incorporate remote electronic information
resources, library databases, and the Internet into their lessons.
On the Brookhaven Campus in the ―B‖ building an interactive classroom
has been designed to help math, science, and technology teachers hone
their skills. This room incorporates all of the technologies of our SMART
classrooms and more. It has two digital data projectors, with one focused on
an interactive whiteboard. This increases the level of teacher and student
interactivity. This room also has four PCs for students to work together on
group projects. Digital video cameras are also installed in this room. This
allows faculty to record students while they teach to help them develop
and improve their teaching skills through deep reflection.
The Instructional Technologist promotes improved student learning
through facilitating excellence in teaching practices and supporting a
wide range of faculty professional development activities. The objectives
of Instructional Technology Support Services are to further the creativity,
risk-taking, collaboration, and professional renewal among faculty members.
Specifically, the goals are to expose faculty to current knowledge and practice
regarding teaching and learning; provide a forum for formal and informal
exchanges of ideas and expertise; and stimulate, support, and reinforce
techniques that optimize student learning. The Instructional Technologist
provides direct training for faculty, staff, and students in the effective use
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 7
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of the software available to the college community while promoting best
practices in online education utilizing the Learning Management System.
The Instructional Technology Lab located in Racanelli 313A has eight
computers and an interactive whiteboard for facilitating this mission.
Wired and wireless network access is provided to all faculty and
students on both campuses and in the residence halls.
Admissions
Admission Philosophy
Dowling College welcomes applications from high school seniors,
transfer students, and adults either beginning or returning to college. We
recognize the variety of options available to students seeking high
school diplomas and welcome applicants from all high schools, who are
home schooled and holders of high school equivalency certificates
such as the GED. In making admission decisions, we use a holistic view of
you and your potential for success at Dowling.
Visits to Campus
Prospective students and their parents are encouraged to visit the
campus and talk to an admissions counselor about their educational
plans. Appointments are encouraged, but not required as advanced notice
is needed to make sure all aspects of the visit are planned for.
Enrollment Services
The Office of Enrollment Services is responsible for the admission
process. The office is located in Fortunoff Hall on the Rudolph Campus
in Oakdale and is open Monday through Saturday. To arrange for an
appointment,
call
1-631-244-3303
or
visit
http://www.dowling.edu/admissions/schedule-campus-tour/.
Application Process
Our rolling admissions process is designed to ensure that all
applicants are given personal attention. Applications are typically
acknowledged within one week and decisions are made within a month of
receipt of your application and all required documentation. High school
students are urged to apply as early as possible in the senior year to ensure
ample time for consideration as well as priority in the housing and
financial aid processes. Community college students can apply anytime.
However, we suggest applying after completing at least 24 semester
hours of study. Application forms, whether for admission as a freshman or
as a transfer student, can be found online at www.dowling.edu. A nonrefundable application fee of $35 must accompany the application.
Freshman Admissions
We consider freshman applicants for admission based on the grade
point average, recommendation letters, a personal essay, academic rigor
of courses taken, and an activity sheet. We do require the SAT or ACT,
but students may submit scores.
In high school, you should have completed:
• Four years of English
• Four years of social studies
• Three years of mathematics
• Two years of science (at least one of which is with a lab)
• Two years of foreign language
• One additional year of math, science, or college preparatory Coursework
When reviewing grades, we also consider factors such as class rank,
honors and AP courses. We require a letter of recommendation from a
guidance counselor or teacher and an essay or personal statement of a
minimum of 250 words. We are also very interested in personal
qualities that will offer us a complete view of you as an applicant,
including extracurricular activities, employment, community service,
and special interests. All official transcripts, standardized test scores and
other application materials must be received before the beginning of the
enrollment period for which the student has applied.
Placement Tests
In order to access your proficiency in writing and mathematics, all
admitted students may be required to take placement examinations in
writing and mathematics. This requirement may be waived pending a
review of supporting documents, which include your transcript(s) and
SAT/ACT scores. You will receive notification as to whether either or
both tests are required with your letter of admission.
High School Transition Program
High school juniors and seniors can get an early start on their college
education by enrolling in Dowling‘s High School Transition Program.
Required are a non-matriculated student application, high school
transcripts, and a letter of recommendation from a high school guidance
counselor. Classes are offered evenings and weekends, including summer.
Transfer Student Admissions
Transfer students may be admitted based upon receipt of an
unofficial transcript, but official transcripts of work done at other postsecondary institutions must be received by the College before the first
semester of enrollment at Dowling. Advanced standing will only be
awarded upon receipt of official college transcripts.
The Office of Enrollment Services evaluates transcripts. Transfer
credit toward undergraduate degrees is granted, in general, for
appropriate work done at accredited two-year and four-year colleges with
a grade of C or better. The last 30 credits earned prior to graduation must
be taken in registered course work at Dowling College.
Students who plan to transfer to Dowling College from Nassau
Community College or Suffolk County Community College should consult
the Dowling College Transfer Guide for their respective institution to
determine the applicability of specific courses to Dowling degree programs.
Credit for Learning Outside the College
Classroom
College credit, in lieu of course work normally required for
undergraduate degrees offered by Dowling College, may be awarded to
students who have successfully completed: (1) examinations administered
by recognized educational agencies (i.e., AP, CPE, CLEP, and DANTES);
(2) Dowling College administered examinations in lieu of course work;(3)
non-collegiate programs that have been evaluated for college credit by
recognized educational agencies; (4) non-collegiate programs that have
been evaluated by Dowling College faculty for college; and, (5) portfolio
assessment.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 8
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The Office of Admissions will assist students with the process of
defining, demonstrating and documenting learning acquired through
formal and informal college-level learning outside the classroom.
Student‘s requests for proficiency credit should be made to the
Committee on Academic Standards and must be accompanied by
appropriate documentation, i.e., certificates, licenses, test scores, etc.
The student will receive up to a maximum of 30 proficiency credits
and must apply for such credits prior to the completion of 18 credits
at the College. In no case may proficiency credits be used to waive the
institutional requirement for the last 30 credits in residence. The 30credit residency requirement can be fulfilled only by satisfactory
completion of Dowling College credit courses.
International Student Admissions
Dowling College has a strong commitment to international education
and welcomes students from all over the world. The College serves a
student body that is diverse in scholars, ethnicity, beliefs, culture,
geographic origin and age. Dowling College currently has certification to
accept students who require F-1 Visas and M Visas. Dowling College has
U.S. Department of State approval to engage in exchange programs to
host international students, faculty and researchers with J-1 Visas. This
program enhances the College‘s cultural and academic diversity. For more
information, contact the International Student and Scholar Services Office
at 631-244-5097 or [email protected]
Required Documents
The College requires that international students applying for
admission must supply copies of the following documents.
For all applicants, the requirements are:
• A Dowling College application for admission. International students must
select a major in advance of admission.
• A bank statement showing enough money available for the first year of
study. Financial statements will be required by the U.S. Consulate when
applying for a Visa. The amount required for the 2012-2013 school year is
approximately $40,000 in United States Dollars (USD). If the bank statement
is not in the applicant‘s name, it must also include a notarized statement of
support from the owner of the bank account, promising to pay all expenses
during the study period.
• A translated high school transcript and diploma and transcripts of all
previous college study, including proof of graduation, with a certified
translation.
1.) A student has attended an English-speaking high school, college or
university for at least one year, taking credit-bearing academic courses in
English.
Or
2.) As an Undergraduate student, you have achieved at least an iBT
TOEFL score of 60, PTE 44 or IELTS band 5.0. Applicants scoring between
TOEFL 60-79, PTE 44 – 57, IELTS bands 5.0 – 6.0 will be required to take
Dowling non-credit ESL courses. Please see the Dowling College English
Language Competency Requirements page for details.
Or
3.) A student must complete an English proficiency test upon arrival at
Dowling College. If the student passes the test with a minimum composite
score of 94 on our ACT COMPASS ESL placement exam, they will able to
register for degree-seeking undergraduate classes at Dowling College.
Students who do not score a minimum composite score of 94, on our ACT
COMPASS ESL placement, will be required to enroll in English Language
courses through Dowling College‘s ESL program offered to non-native
English speakers. Upon successful completion of the English Language
program, they will then be able to register for degree seeking
undergraduate classes at Dowling College.
• To be considered for an athletic scholarship, an applicant must have
his/her athletic coach contact the Athletic Department at Dowling College
and indicate the relevant sport. For more information, there is a directory on
our website: http://www.dowlingathletics.com/.
Additional requirements for graduate study:
• Two letters of recommendation
• Resume
• Any special requirements necessary for proposed degree. See the Catalog
for Graduate Studies.
English as a Second Language
International students, whose native language is not English, are
expected to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and
have a copy sent directly to Dowling College (cod #2011). Individuals who
have already taken the TOEFL should send a photocopy with their
application and then contact Educational Testing Service
(www.ets.org/toefl) to send an official copy to Dowling College.
Required TOEFL score: 550 (paper-based), 213 (computer-based), or
80 on the Internet-based version. Dowling also accepts IELTS and
Pearson ELT evaluations.
Applicants can be accepted to Dowling College with less than the
required TOEFL score, or even without a TOEFL score, but will be
required to take an ESL placement test and based on results of the test
may be required to take ESL classes for at least the first semester at
Dowling College.
Transcript Translation
All academic documents (transcripts, diplomas, certifications, etc.) not
originally written in English must be translated and certified as correct
before submission to Dowling.
If you have previously attended a college outside the United States, you
may be required to have the transcripts analyzed so that we can compare
your courses to U.S. equivalents. (There are several acceptable analysis
services: two examples are the American Association of Collegiate
Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO) and the World Education
Service (WES). Please review the requirements and fill out the AACRAO form at
http://www.aacrao.org/
or
the
WES
form
at
http://www.wes.org/application/apply_now.asp.) You will be notified if
you are being asked to have this review take place.
Study Abroad
Dowling is committed to international education and study abroad.
The International Student and Scholar Services Office assists students to
find a study abroad program that best meets their needs. We also offer
exchange programs for Dowling students. All study abroad applicants
must apply for their program and obtain approval by the college. Prior
school authorization is necessary so that academic credit transfer can be
reviewed and evaluated. Please contact the International Student and
Scholar Services Office at 631-244-5097 or [email protected] for
more information.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 9
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Honors Program
The Honors Program is for highly motivated, academically superior, and
creative students. The classes shared by students in the Honors Program
are specifically developed versions of
the
general
education
core
requirements.
The
educational
experience of Honors Program students
is enhanced with intellectual and
cultural opportunities that extend
beyond the classroom. These may
include lectures, debates, films and excursions to New York City for
theatre productions, museum visits, dance and musical performances.
Honors Program students will be expected to develop and carry out projects
that serve the public good within the College and beyond, usually within the
context of a community service project.
Entrance Criteria
Students are invited by letter to participate in the Program if they
meet any of the following criteria:
• a 3.6 grade point average or a 96 average at the high school level;
• placement in the upper 5% of their graduating class;
• achieve a minimum of 1200 on the SAT or an equivalent score on the ACT;
or
• demonstrate exceptional promise as determined by the Honors Advisory
Council.
For more information about the Honors Program, call 1-800DOWLING
(369-5464)
or
visit
our
website
at
www.dowling.edu/academics/department-honors/.
Financial Information
Tuition and Fees*
Tuition (effective Fall 2014)
Tuition, per semester, 12-15 credits, Undergraduate ....................... $ 14,550
Tuition, High School Transition Program: credit-hour ........................ $ 219
Tuition, undergraduate, each credit-hour ........................................... $ 1,215
Tuition, graduate, each credit-hour ...................................................... $ 1,220
Tuition, post-Baccalaureate Certificate, each credit-hour ................. $ 1,220
Tuition, post-M.B.A. Advanced Certificate, each credit hour .......... $ 1,220
Tuition, Online M.B.A. Program, each credit/credit-hour .................. $ 857
Tuition, Accelerated M.B.A., Saturday Cohort ................................. $ 39,000
Tuition, Doctoral Program................................................................................ $
General Fees
Application fee - Undergraduate (non-refundable) ................................ $ 35
Application fee - Graduate (non-refundable)....................................................... $ 50
Application fee - Doctoral (non-refundable) ...............................................$ 100
Campus Housing Rates
Rudolph Campus Residence Hall: Room and Board
Fall or Spring
Per Summer
Winter Semester
4 Bed/1 Bath .................... $ 5,385 .................... $ 1,645 ............................ $1,645
Brookhaven Campus Residential Village: Room and Board
Fall or Spring
Per Summer
Winter
Semester
Session
Session
Studio - 1 Student ............ $ 6,690.......................... $ 2,080...................................$ 2,080
4 Bed/2 Bath ..................... $ 5,535.......................... $ 1,695...................................$ 1,695
4 Bed/1 Bath ..................... $ 5,385.......................... $ 1,645...................................$ 1,645
6 Bed/2 Bath ..................... $ 5,265.......................... $ 1,605...................................$ 1,605
Triple................................... $ 4,965.......................... $ 1,505...................................$ 1,505
Campus Meal Plans Included in Above Fees
All Residence Hall students are enrolled in Dowling College‘s oncampus meal plan. The meal plan works on a declining balance system
and any unused funds are forfeited at the end of each semester.
Rudolph & Brookhaven Campuses
Fall or Spring
Per Summer
Winter Session
Semester
Session
Session
$1,200..............................$ 250...................................... $ 250
The Commuter Meal Plan
A commuter meal plan is a tax-exempt declining balance meal plan.
Students have a choice of adding any amount to their meal plan.
When a food or beverage purchase is made, the amount is automatically
deducted from your meal plan. The commuter meal plan is good for
the academic year and can be purchased online. For more information,
email [email protected]
Deposits
Tuition deposit (non-refundable) ............................................................. $ 225
Newly admitted students are required to pay the tuition deposit.
Tuition deposits are credited to the student‘s account and are
refundable in full, provided that written notification of withdrawal is
received before May 1.
Residence Hall Room Deposit (non-refundable) (per semester).......... $200
Residence Hall Activity fee - (non-refundable) (Fall and Spring only).....................$40
Residence Hall Security/Damage Deposit
(one-time deposit per academic year) .................................................... $200
Other Fees
Application for Graduation Processing Fee
Undergraduate ................................................................................................... $100
Graduate (See page 41 for details.)............................................................. $100
Senior Citizen Audit*, each course .................................................... $114
Alumni Audit................................................................................................. no charge
Maintain Matriculation (per semester) ...................................................... $ 60
Music 1101N.-1104N. Instrumental or Vocal Study each course, each semester ................................................................. $ 200
Proficiency Examination Fee (per corresponding course).................. varies
Transcripts.......................................................................................................................$ 10
On-the-spot transcripts service .................................................................... $ 10
Monthly Installment Plan Enrollment Fee ................................................ $ 60
*Senior Citizens (age 62 and older) may audit courses (not receive credit).
Registration forms are available in the Office of Registrar.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 10
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Note: Tuition and Fees listed are based on 2012-2013 rates. Dowling
College reserves the right to make changes in the schedule of tuition and
fees.
Penalties and Fines*
Checks returned by bank, first item ........................................................... $ 50
Fines, Residence Halls, Vehicular and Library .............................as assessed
Late Payment Fee (see below).................................................................... $ 250
Late Registration Fee..................................................................................... $ 25
Program changes, other than College-initiated (Drop/Add)...................... $ 25
Reinstatement Fee ......................................................................................... $ 50
Replace Golden Lion One Card ......................................................................... $ 20
Replace Student I.D. Card ........................................................................... $ 15
*Each returned check thereafter will be charged at additional $10
increments for each returned item.
*Late Payment Fees
Payments made after the bill due date will be subject to a late
payment fee of $500 until paid in full or acceptable payment
arrangements are made. It is the responsibility of the student to check
their account balance online and remit timely payment.
School of Aviation Flight School
Aeronautics Flight Lab estimated
average cost*
AER 2061 Private Pilot...........................................................................$10, 000
AER 3062 Commercial Pilot................................................................ $18, 000
AER 3063 Instrument Pilot.................................................................... $ 7, 500
AER 4064 Flight Instructor .................................................................... $ 3, 000
AER 4065 Multi-Engine.......................................................................... $ 3, 500
AER 4166 Flight Instructor – Instrument ........................................... $ 2, 000
AER 4167 Flight Instructor - Multi-Engine........................................ $ 3, 500
Flight Exam Fee............................................................................................... (varies)
Air Traffic Control Labs,
each additional Aircraft Time (per hour) ............................................... $ 500
Hourly aircraft rental charges outlined below include fuel. Package prices are
available:
Cessna 172 .................................................................................................... $ 152
Piper Warrior .........................................................................................................................$ 187
Piper Arrow ............................................................................................................................$ 207
Piper Seminole ........................................................................................ $ 250
Additional Simulator Time (per hour)
Warrior Simulator................................................................................................$ 55
Seminole Simulator ............................................................................... $ 85
Redbird Simulator ............................................................................ $ 80
Additional Charge for Instructor (per hour) ................................................... $ 60
No-show Penalty Fee (varies)
Note: Initial deposit for each flight lab is 50% of the estimated
average cost. A fuel surcharge may be imposed.
* These estimated average costs for flight labs are based on the
minimum FAA time requirements.
Paying Tuition and Fees
All charges must be paid, or acceptable arrangements made with the Office of
the Bursar, by the due date. Payments may be made at the Office of the
Bursar, or the Office of the Registrar. Dowling‘s policy does not permit a
student to register for a subsequent semester when in arrears for a prior
semester.
Dowling College offers several convenient ways to make payment. We
accept Cash, American Express, MasterCard, Visa and Discover. Checks and
money orders should be made payable to Dowling College. It is College
policy to write the student ID# on the face of the check or money order to
ensure accurate posting.
For your convenience, pay online safely and securely with a credit card
or check at:
https://bannerweb.dowling.edu/pls/PROD/twbkwbis.P_WWWLogin.
Please be aware that bill reminders will be emailed to your Dowling email
account. As a new Dowling student, you have an email account the day after you
register for classes. For more information on email accounts, visit
username.dowling.edu.
The Office of the Bursar can assist you with any questions
pertaining to your payment needs. The Office of the Bursar is located in
Fortunoff Hall, Room 101. You can contact the Office of the Bursar by email
at [email protected] or by calling 631-244-3013.
Payment Plan Options
Dowling College Monthly Installment Plan
Dowling College is happy to offer a monthly installment plan to assist
students who would like to spread out their payment of tuition, fees and
housing expenses over several months. The installment plan is a written
agreement between you and Dowling College. There is no interest charged
and your payments are made directly to the College. An agreement must
be signed for each semester a student participates and there is an
enrollment fee.
Credit Card authorization is required when you enroll in the Monthly
Installment Plan. You are authorizing the College to charge a designated
credit card on a monthly basis. Debit Cards with a credit card logo are
also accepted.
Please be aware that the final monthly payment will be charged for the
remaining balance on a student account, whether it is more or less than
the agreed upon installment amounts.
Employer Sponsored Plan
If your employer offers tuition reimbursement, you may apply for
the Employer Sponsored Plan. The following is necessary each semester
in order to maintain your enrollment status:
• Signed Dowling College Tuition Payment Agreement specific to the term
being deferred;
• Letter on company stationery stating the employee‘s name, establishing
the company reimbursement policy, confirming employee eligibility, and
supplying employer contact information to verify such eligibility (if
necessary); and,
• An authorization of a major credit card must be submitted along with
the completed and signed Repayment Agreement. Only if payment is not
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 11
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received by the due date indicated on the agreement, will the credit card
be charged for the deferred amount.
When all of the above has been accepted, the College will defer
payment to the end of the term.
The student may only defer the amount of the charges the employer
has agreed to pay. Additional documentation may be requested.
Employer Voucher Program
Original vouchers must be submitted prior to the bill due date. If
voucher is not submitted by the bill due date, the student will need to
make payment arrangements with Student Financial Services.
Golden Lion One Card
Because Dowling College is dedicated to continuously enhancing
campus service, we have partnered with HigherOne, Inc. to provide
disbursement services for financial aid and tuition refunds to our
students. Each registered Dowling student will receive a Golden Lion One
Card in the mail. Please do not discard it; you will need this card in order
to activate your refund preference and receive all refunds from the
College.
The federal government encourages electronic refunding. When
you receive your card, you will need to log onto
https://goldenliononecard.higheroneaccount.com/, enter the 16-digit card
number and choose:
1. Easy Refund: Receive the money immediately into your OneAccount;
2. ACH Transfer: Have the money deposited within 2-3 days into any bank
account you designate; or
3. Receive a paper check from Higher One.
Some other benefits of the Golden Lion One Card:
• Additional funds can be electronically transferred from any other bank
account 24/7
• Work-study payroll direct deposit
• FDIC-insured online checking account and MasterCard/debit feature
• Fee-free ATM on Oakdale campus, allows a minimum withdrawal of $10.
Important: this is not a credit card. Please visit this link for more exciting
information regarding the benefits of this new and faster service for our
students!
In order to receive your Golden Lion One Card, the College must have
your accurate address. International students need to ensure that their
local address is listed, otherwise the card will be sent to the International
Student and Scholar Services Office. Students can verify the address
provided to the College at www.dowling.edu/mydowling/registration (select
Verify/Update Directory Information) or updates can be faxed to 631-2443252. Requests to re-order a card may incur a fee of $20.
Tuition Adjustments and Withdrawal Policy
Students are responsible for their registrations and withdrawals.
Once officially enrolled, students accept financial responsibility for
payment of all charges in connection with their registration. Failure to
officially withdraw from a course may result in a grade of ―WF,‖ and incur
financial obligation for the course, as well as additional collection, attorney,
late fees, and interest charges. To withdraw from a course, the student
must submit the appropriately completed form to the Office of the
Registrar. The Office of the Registrar is located in Fortunoff Hall, Room 101 on
the Rudolph Campus in Oakdale. The date of receipt of the formal
written notification will be the effective date of withdrawal used to
calculate any tuition reimbursement.
Never attending a course(s) without notifying either the Office of the
Registrar is not an acceptable means of withdrawal and will result in a full
tuition and fee liability.
Tuition deposit, fees, and room and board are not refundable.
Students should be aware that withdrawal from one or more courses may
affect some, or possibly all, financial aid awards; therefore, it is prudent
to understand the consequences of the withdrawal before formally
submitting the paperwork. Financial aid awards will be revoked upon
withdrawal should the withdrawal affect the eligibility enrollment status.
Reimbursement of tuition only will be granted in accordance with
the following schedule as of Spring 2015:
Fall & Spring Semester
Reimbursement/Reduction
of Tuition Liability
Prior to first week of class ..................................... 100% credit of Tuition & Fees
During the 1st week of the semester..................................100% credit of tuition
During the 2nd week of the semester..................................65% credit of tuition
During the 3rd week of the semester ..................................40% credit of tuition
During the 4th week of the semester ...................................20% credit of tuition
Thereafter: No adjustment of tuition/No refund
Winter & Summer Sessions
Reimbursement/Reduction
of Tuition Liability
Prior to first week of class ..................................... 100% credit of Tuition & Fees
During the 1st day of the term ............................................100% credit of tuition
During the 2nd day of the term .............................................65% credit of tuition
During the 3rd day of the term .............................................40% credit of tuition
During the 4th day of the term .............................................20% credit of tuition
Thereafter: No adjustment of tuition/No refund
Dowling College reserves the right to make changes in the
adjustment schedule (above).
Upon official withdrawal from the institution, Dowling College will
determine the amount of tuition and fee liability, if any. If the student has
received any Title IV Federal financial aid, Dowling College will determine
the percent of the enrollment period completed. If the student withdraws
prior to 60% of the term‘s completion, the student‘s eligibility for Federal
financial aid will be prorated, proportionately. If the student withdrawal
occurs after the 60% point, then the student may be eligible for 100% of
that term‘s Federal financial aid. Dowling College will return any unearned
financial aid to the government in the following order: Unsubsidized
Student Loans, Subsidized Student Loans, Federal Perkins Loans,
Federal PLUS Loans, Pell Grants, and, SEOG. The student may not be
eligible for Institutional Awards or State Grants.
Estimated Annual Expenses*
(Based on 2013-2014 Rates for Undergraduate Student enrollment in
24 credits per year)
Budget for Students Residing Off Campus
Tuition and fees ............................................................................................... $ 29,100
Maintenance at home, meals & transportation ...........................................9,143
Books and supplies ............................................................................................... 1,000
Personal Expenses ................................................................................................ 1,302
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 12
Total $ 40,545
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Budget for Resident Students
Tuition and fees............................................................................................... $ 29,100
Transportation............................................................................................................... 2,500
Books and Supplies .............................................................................................. 1,000
Room and Board ................................................................................................ 10,590
Personal Expenses ................................................................................................ 1,302
Total $ 44,492
Official Notice
Students are responsible for their registrations and withdrawals.
Once officially enrolled, students accept financial responsibility for
payment of all charges in connection to
their registration. Failure to officially
withdraw from a course may result in
a grade of "WF" and a financial
obligation for the course, as well as
additional collection, attorney, late
fees, and interest charges. To
withdraw from a course, the student
must submit the appropriately
completed form to the Office of the
Registrar, located in Fortunoff Hall,
Room 101. The date of receipt of the
formal written notification will be the
effective date of withdrawal used to
calculate any tuition reimbursement.
9. submit official transcript(s) from high school.
Students applying for funding from New York State must be legal
residents of New York State. Residency during college attendance is not
sufficient to meet New York State residency regulations. A student must be
enrolled and making academic progress in an eligible program of study to
receive State aid.
Financial Aid Application Process
Every applicant seeking Federal, State or Institutional aid must file:
1. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to determine
Eligibility for aid. Dowling College‘s school code for the FAFSA is #002667.
2. The Express Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) Application to determine
eligibility for New York State Grants. Residents of other states should
inquire about their home state‘s policies and obtain any necessary forms.
New York State residents are automatically linked from the FAFSA to TAP
on the Web to apply for state grants electronically.
Both the FAFSA and TAP applications may be filed electronically. To
do so, the student and parent must obtain a Personal Identification
Number (PIN) from the U.S. Department of Education. This may be done
by
following
the
directions
at
https://pin.ed.gov/PINWebApp/pinindex.jsp. Once the PIN is obtained for
the student and/or his/her parent, the FAFSA may be filed at
http://www.fafsa.ed.gov. The PIN serves as an electronic signature.
Filing the form electronically is faster and less error-prone.
Loan Programs
Federal Direct Stafford Loan Program
Financial Aid
Dowling College offers innovative strategies to assist students in all
aspects of financing their education. More than three out of four Dowling
students receive some form of financial aid to cover all or part of their
educational costs. Through individualized counseling, our professional
Financial Aid staff will consider the specific needs of a student and will
prepare a personalized financial aid award package for him or her. This
identifies financing options available through Institutional, Federal, State,
and private sources.
The Financial Aid Office provides financial aid guidance and
support. It is located in Fortunoff Hall, and can be reached at 631-244-1818
or [email protected]
Financial aid programs available at Dowling College include:
(1) grants and scholarships; (2) student loans; (3) part-time employment;
(4) payment plans and educational benefits.
In general, to be eligible for Federal and/or Institutional aid, a
student must:
1. be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen
2. make satisfactory academic progress in his/her program of study
3. not be in default on a Federal student loan and not have received an
overpayment on a Federal grant
4. be enrolled as a regular student in an eligible program of study
5. be enrolled in at least six (6)-degree-bearing credits per semester
6. not borrow in excess of annual or aggregate loan limits
7. not have been convicted of certain drug-related offenses
8. complete at least 50% of the degree program on an approved campus
site
Matriculated students enrolled on at least a half-time basis (six
degree-bearing credits per semester) are eligible to apply for loans under
this program. The student is eligible to borrow up to the maximum annual
loan limit or cost of education less their family contribution and other
financial aid, whichever is less. Applicants with financial need are
eligible for a direct subsidized student loan, while those without financial
need are eligible for a direct unsubsidized loan. The Federal
government pays the interest on subsidized loans, while borrowers are
responsible for interest payments under the unsubsidized loan program
while in attendance.
These funds are borrowed directly from the Federal government, not
through private lenders.
Applicants are required to file the Free Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA) to have their eligibility for a loan determined.
Undergraduate students can borrow up to $5,500 for their freshman year,
$4,500 for their sophomore year, and up to $7,500 for junior and senior
years. Independent undergraduates may be eligible for additional
unsubsidized loans.
Borrowers are charged an origination fee which is paid to the Federal
government. Loans are disbursed in multiple installments, at least one
per semester. Repayment of the Federal loans begins six months after the
borrower graduates, leaves school, or drops to below a half-time status.
There are provisions for teacher loan forgiveness if borrowers meet
specific teaching requirements. Borrowers may qualify for loan forgiveness
of up to $17,500 if employed for five consecutive years as a ―highly
qualified secondary school teacher of math, science, or
elementary/secondary school special education teacher.‖
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 13
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Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loans
For more on NYHELPs visit www.HESC.org/NYHELPs
Parents of dependent undergraduate students who are enrolled at
least on a half-time basis (six credits per semester) may be eligible for
a Federal Parent Loan. These loans are offered on the basis of the parent‘s
creditworthiness. Parents may borrow up to the cost of attendance, less any
financial aid that has been or will be awarded. The interest rate on Parent
Loans is a fixed rate.
Application: The student must have a completed FAFSA on file for
the academic year. The parent must complete the PLUS application and
Master
Promissory
Note
at
https://studentloans.gov/myDirectLoan/index.action. Instructions are
available in the Financial Aid Office.
Other Educational Loan Programs
Federal Perkins Loan
Pell Grant
This federal loan program permits a student to borrow up to a total of
$27,500 for undergraduate study, and up to a total of $60,000 for
undergraduate and graduate study combined, provided he or she is
enrolled as a matriculated student on at least a half-time basis, maintains
satisfactory progress in his or her courses of study, and demonstrates a
high level of financial need. The current interest rate is 5%. Repayment
begins nine months after the student either (1) graduates or (2) drops
below six degree-bearing credits or (3) completes a deferment period not
in excess of three years for study, service, or disability. Deferments include
(1) volunteer service in a private, non-profit VISTA or Peace Corps-type
organization; (2) service as an officer in the U.S. Public Health Service
Commissioned Corps; (3) temporary total disability; and, (4) service in any
internship preceding a professional practice. Repayment may extend over
a period of ten years, but may be further extended up to ten additional
years for low-income individuals. In addition, cancellation of the loan is
available to students who enter specific types of teaching service.
Application: The student must complete a Free Application for
Federal Student Aid. This program is awarded on a first come, first
served basis. Students will be considered based on funding availability.
Federal regulations require that upon graduation or withdrawal
from the College, the borrower schedule an exit interview with the
Perkins Loan Administrator, located in Bursar, 631-244-3013.
Undergraduate students who are enrolled for at least three credits
and demonstrate exceptional financial need according to the Federal
formula are eligible to receive monies under this Federal program. The
maximum yearly Pell Grant is established each year by Congress.
Application: Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid
(FAFSA).
State Loan Programs
New York Higher Education Loan Program (NYHELPs)
With NYHELPs, students who are New York State residents (or have
parents, guardians or sponsors who are) and attend a participating New
York college have access to a fixed-rate education loan.
NYHELPs gives students and families a low-cost way to fill the gap
between college costs and available student aid. NYHELPs:
• Bridges the gap. First, you apply, and receive all State, Federal, and
Institutional aid for which you are eligible. NYHELPs then helps pay the
remaining costs of attendance, as certified by the College, up to $10,000 per
academic year.
• Educates the consumer. NYHELPs online financial literacy education
program helps you become a better-informed borrower.
• Keeps down the costs of borrowing. NYHELPs interest rates are lower
than typical rates in the private loan market.
• Offers a fixed-rate loan. NYHELPs rates will not change over the life of the
loan.
Some families find the need to participate in other loan programs,
commonly called ―alternative loans.‖ These loans are based on
creditworthiness, rather than financial need.
Grants and Scholarships
Federal Grants
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG)
Undergraduate students who demonstrate high financial need may
be eligible to receive monies under this Federal program. Priority
consideration will be given to students eligible for Pell Grants. Awards
vary from $200 to $600 per year.
Application: The applicant must complete a Free Application for
Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). This grant is awarded on a first come, first
served basis.
TEACH Grant
The Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education
(TEACH) Grant provides up to $4,000 per year to students who maintain
a 3.25 G.P.A. and intend to serve as a full-time teacher in a high-need
field in a public or private elementary or secondary school that serves
students from low-income families. As a recipient of a TEACH grant, you
must teach for at least four academic years within eight calendar years of
completing the program of study for which you received a TEACH grant.
IMPORTANT: If you fail to complete this service obligation, all amounts
of the TEACH grant that you received will be converted to a Federal Direct
Unsubsidized Stafford Loan. You must then repay this loan to the U.S.
Department of Education. You will be charged interest from the date
the grant was disbursed.
Application: Complete a FAFSA, a TEACH grant online, Entrance
counseling session and sign a TEACH Grant Agreement to Serve.
State Grants and Scholarships
Higher Education Services Corp. (HESC) is a leading guarantor of
student loans and the only guarantor based in New York. HESC
manages more than 25 grant, scholarship, and loan programs, including
the Tuition Assistance Program (TAP), the nation's largest state grant.
Tuition Assistance Program (TAP)
The New York State Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) helps eligible
New York residents pay tuition at approved schools in New York State.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 14
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Depending on the academic year in which you begin study, an annual
TAP award can be up to $5,165.
Eligibility: The student must:
(1) Be enrolled as a matriculated student on a full-time basis
(at least 12
credits) at a college within New York State.
Please note the following:
• Only courses REQUIRED for your degree can be counted
toward the full-time study requirement.
• Courses being repeated for which you have already received a
passing grade CANNOT be counted toward the full-time study or
pursuit of program requirement.
(2) Maintain satisfactory academic progress and demonstrate pursuit of
program as defined by New York State;
(3) Be a New York State resident and a U.S. citizen or resident alien or
refugee; and,
(4) Have a total family New York State net taxable income of under
$80,000. Note: income level may increase eligibility, if there are additional
full-time, college students in household.
Application: The applicant can apply by using the Free Application for
Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and the Express TAP application link, or
directly at HESC.ny.gov.
Aid for Part-Time Study (APTS)
Dowling College participates in the New York State APTS Program.
Grants range up to $1,000 per semester, based upon the student‘s need
and available funding. Awards will be made on a first-come, first-served
basis while funding lasts. Funds are available to matriculated part-time
undergraduate students who are New York State residents and whose total
family New York State Net Taxable Income is below:
• $50,550 for a dependent student or independent student with dependents
of their own; or
• $34,250 for an independent student with no dependents. Students must
maintain satisfactory academic progress as defined by New York State.
Application: A separate APTS application must be submitted in
addition to the FAFSA.
Awards for Children of Deceased or Disabled Veterans
Grants of $450 per year are awarded to eligible students in New
York State.
Eligibility: Applicant must be (1) attending a college in New York State
on a full time basis; (2) a legal resident of New York State; (3) the child of
veteran who served in the U.S. Armed Forces during specified periods of
war or national emergency and, as a result of service, died or suffered a
40% or more disability, is classified as missing in action, or was a
prisoner of war. The veteran must currently be a New York State resident
or have been a New York State resident at the time of death, if death
occurred during or as a result of service.
Application: Applicant must file the FAFSA and Express TAP
application in addition to requesting a Child of Veteran Award
Supplement from: HESC Scholarship Unit, 99 Washington Avenue,
Albany, NY 12255; Phone: 1-888-NYS-HESC. Additional application and
eligibility criteria can be found at www.hesc.ny.gov.
Memorial Scholarships for Families of Deceased
Firefighters, Volunteer Firefighters, Police Officers,
Peace Officers, and Emergency Medical Service
Workers
This scholarship provides funds to help meet the cost of attending
college. The award covers up to four years of full-time study. The
maximum amount is equal to the annual tuition at a SUNY four-year
college and an allowance specified by HESC for room, board, books, and
transportation.
Eligibility: The applicant must be enrolled full-time as a matriculated
student and have a parent or spouse, or was a financial dependent of, a
firefighter, volunteer firefighter, police officer, peace officer, or
emergency medical services worker who has died as the result of injuries
sustained in the line of duty in service to the State of New York.
Application.: The applicant must file the FAFSA and Express TAP
application in addition to requesting a Memorial Scholarship
Supplement from: NYSHESC, 99 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12255;
Phone: 1-888-NYS-HESC. Additional application and eligibility criteria
can be found at www.hesc.ny.gov.
Military Service and Recognition Scholarship
This scholarship provides funds to help meet the cost of attending
college. The award covers up to four years of full-time study. The
maximum amount is equal to the annual tuition at a SUNY four-year
college and an allowance specified by HESC for room, board, books, and
transportation.
Eligibility: Children, spouses, and financial dependents of members of
the armed forces of the United States or state-organized militia who, at
any time on or after Aug. 2, 1990, while New York State residents, died
or became severely and permanently disabled while engaged in
hostilities or training for hostilities.
Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12255; Phone: 1-888-NYS-HESC.
Additional application and eligibility criteria can be found at
www.hesc.ny.gov.
New York State Volunteer Recruitment Service
Scholarship
Eligible students can receive scholarships equal to the annual tuition
at a SUNY four year college.
Eligibility: Applicants must be volunteer firefighters or ambulance
personnel who (1) are New York State residents; (2) enrolled at least halftime as a matriculated student; and, (3) maintain status as an active
volunteer firefighter or ambulance personnel.
Application: The applicant's volunteer organization selects and
submits the application for one eligible candidate per year to HESC by
August 1 of the award year. In addition, the applicant must complete the
FAFSA and Express TAP application. Additional application and eligibility
criteria can be found at www.hesc.ny.gov.
Vietnam Veterans/Persian Gulf Veterans Tuition
Awards
Eligible veterans may receive $1000 per semester for full-time study or
$500 per semester for part-time study. Eligibility requirements include
New York State residency, service in the U.S. Armed Forces in Indochina
between 12/22/61 and 5/7/75, or service in the Persian Gulf hostilities
between 8/2/90 and the cessation of hostilities. The veteran must have
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 15
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been discharged from the Armed Forces under other than dishonorable
conditions, must apply for financial aid by submitting the FAFSA, Express
TAP application, Veterans Tuition Award Supplement, and meet other
eligibility requirements. Applications and more information can be found
at www.hesc.ny.gov, or by calling 1-888-NYSHESC.
Regents Professional Opportunity Scholarship
Awards range from $1,000 to $5,000 per year, based upon income,
for up to four years of full-time study in approved programs.
Eligibility: Economically disadvantaged members of minority groups
must agree to practice at least 12 months in New York State for each
annual payment received. Eligible undergraduate programs have included
accounting, architecture, athletic training, engineering, nursing,
occupational therapy, ophthalmic dispensing, pharmacy, and physical
therapy.
Application: Applicant must file the FAFSA and Express TAP
application in addition to requesting a scholarship application from: NYS
Education Department, Bureau of HEOP/VATEA/Scholarships, Education
Building Addition, Room 1071, Albany, NY 12234; 518-486-1319. If you are
awarded this scholarship, you must file the FAFSA or the TAP form to
receive payment each year.
World Trade Center Scholarships
This scholarship guarantees access to a college education for the
families and financial dependents of innocent victims who died or were
severely and permanently disabled as a result of the September 11, 2001
terrorist attacks and rescue and recovery efforts. The award covers up to
four years of full-time study. The maximum amount is equal to the annual
tuition at a SUNY four-year college and an allowance specified by HESC
for room, board, books, and transportation.
Eligibility: Applicants must be enrolled full-time (12 credits) in a
matriculated program and must be a child, spouse, or financial dependent
of a deceased or severely and permanently disabled victim of the
September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks or the subsequent rescue and
recovery operations. This includes victims at the World Trade Center site,
Pentagon, or on Flights 11, 77, 93, or 175.
Application: The applicant must file the FAFSA and Express TAP
application in addition to requesting a WTC Memorial Scholarship
Application from: HESC Scholarship Unit, 99 Washington Avenue,
Albany, NY 12255; Phone: 1-888-NYS-HESC. Additional application and
eligibility criteria can be found at www.hesc.ny.gov.
Dowling College Grants & Scholarships
Dowling offers a number of merit-based scholarships to entering
freshmen and transfer students. All newly admitted full-time students will
be automatically considered for any appropriate scholarships. Eligibility
for academic scholarships is based solely upon coursework or test scores
earned prior to the student‘s admission. Scholarships are not awarded
retroactively. Students receiving Institutional scholarships should file the
Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) so that we can determine
available grant funding from the Federal or State government. Full tuition
scholarships, when combined with Federal and State grant aid, cannot
exceed tuition. In addition, scholarship awards may alter other financial
aid awards. Some scholarships are renewed annually, provided the
recipient maintains the required enrollment status, maintains a specific
minimum grade point average and meets Satisfactory Academic Progress.
Athletic Grants
A number of athletic grants, varying in amount, are made each year,
depending upon the funds available and the number of eligible
candidates.
Eligibility; The student must (1) be involved in an intercollegiate
athletic program; (2) carry at least 12 credits per semester; (3) maintain a
C (2.0) average; (4) file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid
(FAFSA); and, (5) apply for TAP and Pell each academic year, as the athletic
grant will serve to supplement all outside awards.
Recommendations for these awards are made by the Director of
Athletics.
Transfer Scholarships
Students are automatically considered for a transfer scholarship when
they are evaluated for admission. Scholarships are awarded based on
cumulative academic performance for all coursework completed at the
college level. Award values range from $3,500 to $11,000 per academic
year.
Alumni Association Scholarship
The scholarship, sponsored by the Alumni Association, is awarded
to alumni, children and grandchildren of alumni. Recipients will be
selected based upon the applicant‘s grade point average (G.P.A.),
required essay, participation in College-sponsored activities and an
interview by members of Dowling‘s Alumni Council. Further
information on requirements is available by reviewing the Application
Cover Letter/Information Page. A scholarship application needs to be
filed with Student Financial Services.
Honors Program Scholarships
Students enrolled in the Honors Program are eligible to receive up to
an additional $2,000 per year to be applied towards tuition only. This
award is for full-time study and is renewed annually, provided the
recipient maintains full-time enrollment, is registered in Honors courses,
maintains a minimum grade point average of 3.5, completes a minimum
of 30 credits per year, and participates in required community service
activities.
Alumni Sponsorship
New students registered in a degree-bearing program may be
sponsored by a Dowling College alumnus to be eligible to receive this
grant. Full-time students (12 credits or more) receive $500 for their first
year of study, while part-time students receive $100. Sponsorship forms
are available at the Alumni Relations Office and the Financial Aid
Department located in Fortunoff Hall. Completed sponsorship forms
must be submitted to the Financial Aid Department before the beginning
of the first term of attendance.
Employee Sponsorship
New students sponsored by a Dowling College employee are eligible
to receive this grant. Full-time students receive $500 for their first year of
study, while part-time students receive $100. Sponsorship forms are
available in the Financial Aid Department. Completed sponsorship
forms must be submitted to the Financial Aid Department before the
beginning of the first term of attendance.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 16
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Long Island Parent Teacher Association Recognition
Grant
Members of Long Island PTA‘s are eligible for a $100 tuition grant
and must submit proof of membership at time of payment.
Sibling Sponsorship Award
Each year, a limited number of new full-time students will be selected
and awarded $1,500 Sibling Scholarship toward their education at
Dowling College. This award is renewable annually for a maximum of
four years for freshmen, a maximum of three years for transfer students
and a maximum of 2 years for graduate students, with acceptable
academic performance. To be eligible, students must annually file a Free
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and the sibling of the new
applicant must be currently enrolled at Dowling College. The admission
application and the Sibling Scholarship Award application must be
received no later than March 1 to be considered for the upcoming
academic year.
Siblings entering as new students in the same term: Siblings must
enter the College at full-time status. If one of the siblings enters parttime, the sibling entering as a full-time student receives the $1,500
award. Both must maintain enrollment. If one leaves, the other loses the
award. If one falls to part-time status, the other may keep the award
provided the recipient maintains full-time status.
Twin Sponsorship Award
Twins (or any multiple birth siblings) must start Dowling College in
the same semester and both be full-time to receive the $1,500 award for an
academic year. If one twin is already a student and the other starts in a
different term, the award becomes a Sibling Sponsorship. If one twin
leaves after completion of the first semester, the remaining twin may
keep the award for second semester of the academic year, provided he or
she remains full-time. In this scenario, the award does not continue beyond
the first academic year.
Designated and Endowed Scholarships
Republic Aviation Corporation and helped develop the F-105 and F-84 jet
fighters and played a major role in the development of the P-47N, a
bomber escort.
The scholarship is awarded based on financial need to full-time
Aviation students with a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or better.
Priority will be placed on awarding the scholarship to a student from the
Central New York (Syracuse) area. In the event that there are no qualified
applicants from the Central New York area, students who are residents of
upstate New York shall be eligible for consideration. Applicants are
required to write a short biography and an essay requesting consideration
for the scholarship and to submit two letters of recommendation to the
Dean of the School of Aviation. Scholarship decisions are made jointly by
Dowling College and the AAEF.
Dr. Ying-wan Cheng Memorial Scholarship
The History Department will award an annual scholarship to a
rising senior history major based on academic performance in upperlevel history courses. Full-time History Department faculty will
determine the winner at the conclusion of the spring semester. This
award honors Dr. Ying-wan Cheng, one of the Department‘s founders,
and her commitment to Dowling College and the advanced study of
history.
Ernest G. Canadeo Scholarship
The scholarship will be awarded annually to a deserving Dowling
College student who has demonstrated a high level of academic
achievement and a need for financial support. The scholarship is
renewable if the student has maintained a full course of studies with a
minimum of a 3.0 G.P.A.
Commerce Bank Scholarship
The scholarship will be awarded to a Dowling College student in the
School of Business who has demonstrated a high level of academic
achievement, a need for financial support and whose interest is in banking
and finance. The scholarship is renewable if the student has maintained a
full course of studies with a minimum of a 3.0 G.P.A.
A number of scholarship funds have been established at Dowling
College through the generosity of alumni, friends, corporations, and
foundations. These scholarships are awarded annually according to the
various criteria established by the donor. Renewal of these scholarships
may vary with the condition established for that particular award. The Free
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is used to establish need and
eligibility for scholarship programs. The priority deadline for all students
is March 31st. Selection of recipients is based upon the highest level of
academic grade accomplishment and, where applicable, the greatest
financial need and student participation in College-sponsored activities.
Scholarships awarded at full tuition for full-time study allow for up to 30
credits for an academic year (September through May). All designated
and endowed scholarship awards are based upon available funding.
Scholarships are awarded for an academic year and disbursed accordingly.
Students are reminded that acceptance of these scholarships may alter
other financial aid awards.
Craig, Fitzsimmons & Michaels Accounting Scholarship
AAEF - Douglas C. Watson Scholarship
Edward J. Curtin Veterans Scholarship Fund
This scholarship, sponsored by the Aviation/Aerospace Education
Foundation, is in honor of Douglas Watson, the first African-American
aeronautical engineer. He spent most of his career with the Fairchild
Gerald Curtin, the son of Edward J. Curtin, established the Edward
J. Curtin Veterans Scholarship Fund in memory of his father. The
scholarship will be awarded annually to a deserving Dowling College
This scholarship is awarded to a full-time undergraduate student for
his or her sophomore, junior, and senior years. The recipient must
pursue a degree in Accounting and maintain a B (3.0 cumulative grade
point average) or above, with 30 or more credits having been completed
at Dowling, and must demonstrate financial need. The student must
remain a full-time matriculating student. This award includes an
internship at Craig, Fitzsimmons & Michaels accounting firm.
Gerald & Rose Mary Curtin Scholarship
Through the generosity of Trustee and Alumni Gerald J. Curtin and Rose
Mary Curtin, both of the class of 1971, a scholarship will be awarded
annually to a deserving Dowling College student majoring in special
education. This scholarship is not need based and is renewable if the student
has maintained a full course of studies with a minimum of a 2.0 G.P.A.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 17
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student who has demonstrated a high level of academic achievement
and a need for financial support. The scholarship is renewable if the
student has maintained a full course of studies with a minimum of a 3.0
G.P.A.
As an LGBT person, why the Matthew Shepard-Sakia Gunn Scholarship
is important to me. Applications will be accepted year round; the
winner will be announced in the Fall for the Spring semester or late
Summer for the Fall semester.
The Philip A. Doherty Aviation Scholarship
George F. and Elizabeth M. Harrington Scholarship
The scholarship will be awarded annually to a deserving Dowling
College student in the School of Aviation who has demonstrated a high
level of academic achievement and a need for financial support. The
scholarship is renewable if the student has maintained a full course of
studies with a minimum of a 3.0 G.P.A.
The scholarship will be awarded annually to a deserving Dowling
College student in the School of Business who has demonstrated a high
level of academic achievement and a need for financial support. The
scholarship is renewable if the student has maintained a full course of
studies with a minimum of a 3.0 G.P.A.
Dowling College Faculty Scholarship
The Henry Family Scholarship
This scholarship is awarded by faculty and is designed for students who
have excelled scholastically during the first two semesters at Dowling
and who have financial need. The recipient must maintain a grade point
average of 3.5 for each of the two freshman semesters, be enrolled full
time, have completed course work in at least three academic divisions,
and file a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to determine need.
The scholarship will be awarded annually to a deserving Dowling
College student in the School of Business or the School of Arts and
Sciences who has demonstrated a high level of academic achievement, a
need for financial support and an interest in pursuing a career writing
and/or publication. The scholarship is renewable if the student has
maintained a full course of studies with a minimum of a 3.0 G.P.A.
EESCO Foundation Scholarship
Willard L. Hogeboom Scholarship
This scholarship is for a full-time junior or senior who has completed
thirty or more credits at Dowling College in Accounting or Business, with
at least a 3.0 grade point average. Eligibility is based upon demonstrated
financial need as determined by the FAFSA.
The History Department will grant annual awards in three categories:
Best research paper, Most Improved Student and Outstanding Senior
History Major. This award honors Professor Bill Hogeboom, a History
Department adjunct faculty member and comes through the generosity of
his family and friends.
Stanley and Charlotte Gertz Scholarship
This is an annual scholarship of $500 for undergraduate women, 25
years or older, who meet the following qualifications: enrolled for at least six
credits; have a minimum G.P.A. of 3.0; demonstrate financial need as
determined by the FAFSA. This scholarship will be applied to tuition and
fees. Renewal may be forfeited if the recipient does not maintain a G.P.A. of 3.0.
Myrka Gonzalez and David Ochoa Latino Scholarship
This scholarship is available to all full-time undergraduate students
with a G.P.A. of C or greater in high school or a 2.0 or greater, or to a
graduate student with a G.P.A. of 3.0 or greater at Dowling College. Priority
will be given to a student of Latino descent who is a permanent resident
of Long Island. The recipient must also demonstrate financial need.
Ormond M. Gove Memorial Aeronautics Scholarship
An aviation scholarship of $800-$1,000 is awarded to a student who
meets the following criteria: (1) holds an F.A.A. Private Pilot license; (2) has a
B (3.0) cumulative grade-point average; (3) demonstrates financial need as
determined by the FAFSA; (4) is enrolled in a Dowling College flight
laboratory course; (5) is recommended by the Director of Flight Operations.
The award is credited toward College flight fees for the semester.
The recipient cannot concurrently be the recipient of another aviation
scholarship.
Shepard-Gunn Scholarship
Scholarship of $1,000 offered in the Fall or Spring to an incoming
LGBT Freshman student (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender) or
to an existing LGBT Dowling student. Eligibility: An LGBT student who
has an overall ―B‖ average (3.0) at the time of his or her application.
Requirements: Student must write a 300-word essay telling the
reviewers why he or she deserves an LGBT scholarship. Specific Topic:
Ingerman Smith, LLP Scholarship
Ingerman Smith, LLP was founded in 1937 by Percy Ingerman and
Bernard Smith, Ingerman Smith, LLP and was located in the waterfront
village of Northport, New York for over 70 years. The Firm has been
providing legal services to school districts for decades. Through the
generosity of this law firm this scholarship will be awarded to a student
who has demonstrated a high level of academic achievement, a need for
financial support and an interest in pursuing a career in the field of law.
This scholarship is renewable if the student has maintained a full course
of studies with a minimum of a 3.0 G.P.A.
Raymond and Catherine Jansen Scholarship
The scholarship will be awarded annually to a deserving Dowling
College student who has demonstrated a high level of academic
achievement and a need for financial support. The scholarship is
renewable if the student has maintained a full course of studies with a
minimum of a 3.0 G.P.A.
Joseph Kirk Helping Hand Scholarship
Full-time graduate students enrolled in the Master of Science
Degree Program in the School of Education, preparing to become
mathematics or science teachers are eligible for this award. Awards may
range from $1,000 - $3,000 per year for tuition, as well as textbooks.
Preference will be given to students from Lake Ronkonkoma or
Ronkonkoma area. A student must maintain a 3.5 G.P.A at the end of
each semester.
Jerry and Debra Kramer Presidential Scholarship
This scholarship is awarded to assist an entering freshman who has
demonstrated fine academic achievement on the secondary school level
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 18
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and who enrolls full-time to pursue a Baccalaureate degree at Dowling.
The recipient must demonstrate financial need.
The Leadership Scholarship
The Leadership Scholarship, established by the Student Government
Association at Dowling College, is intended to foster and encourage
involvement within student government. Full time undergraduates with
a minimum G.P.A. of 3.0 are eligible to apply. Applicants must submit an
essay no less than 300 words, demonstrating the importance of
participating in the SGA, their knowledge of the SGA, and how the SGA
can be improved, in addition to a resume and written recommendation
from any faculty, staff or administrator involved with the student
government association. Awards are non-renewable.
Norma and David Levitt Presidential Scholarship
This is a tuition scholarship awarded to assist an entering freshman
who has demonstrated fine academic achievement on the secondary
school level and who enrolls full-time as a matriculated student in the
Natural Sciences and Mathematics program at Dowling.
Long Island Mid-Suffolk Business Action (LIMBA)
Scholarships
Up to eight $1,000 scholarships are awarded to full-time
matriculated undergraduate students finishing their junior year with 90
or more credits and demonstrating high scholastic achievement and the
leadership potential to benefit Long Island‘s future economy.
Eligibility: These scholarships are based upon academic
accomplishment as determined by a minimum 3.2 G.P.A. and by
demonstrated leadership accomplishment as determined by peer election
to one or more student officer positions in clubs and organizations
sponsored by the Student Association and/or selection to a Campus
chapter of a National Honor Society.
The available scholarships are:
1. Joseph Giacalone Scholarship, endowed by ―Admirers‖
2. Lee Koppelman Scholarship, endowed by Terry Townsend, LI Business
News
3. Tex McCrary Scholarship, endowed by Stan Henry, This Week
Publications
4. Patrick Halpin Scholarship, endowed by Stan Henry, This Week
Publications
5. William Condon Scholarship, endowed by Stan Henry, This Week
Publications
6. Brookhaven Town Scholarship, endowed by Brookhaven Town IDA
7. Daniel A. Lehner Scholarship, sponsored by LIMBA members
8. Herb Schneider Scholarship, sponsored by Stan Henry, This Week
Publications
Lucien Buck Excellence in Psychology Scholarship
This scholarship is established by the Dowling College Chapter of
Psi Chi, the International Honor Society in Psychology, in honor of
Dr. Lucien Buck, the founder of the Psychology program at the
institution. The scholarship will be awarded annually to a full-time
senior who is majoring in Psychology at Dowling College. An award of
$250 will be made to the selected student during the final semester of the
senior year. The purpose of the scholarship is to recognize both
outstanding academic achievement and humanitarian concern. The
award will be based upon the following criteria:
1. Applicant must be enrolled at Dowling College as a full-time,
matriculated senior, Psychology major.
2. Applicant must have completed a minimum of 24 credits of Psychology at
Dowling College (12 credits of which must be in the upper-level psychology
courses beyond Introductory Psychology and Developmental Psychology).
The completion of Statistics and Psychological Methods & Research Design
is required.
3. Applicant may nominate himself or herself, or, nominations maybe made
by members of the Psychology Department full-time faculty.
4. Applicant for the Excellence in Psychology Scholarship should be persons
who have overall G.P.A.s above 3.65 (for all College credited work being
used to earn a B.A. in Psychology) and, in addition, should be persons with
very high G.P.A.s in all Psychology course work completed (with a
minimum of 24 credits of Psychology course work completed and a G.P.A.
in these courses of at least 3.75 or higher). Having been found eligible for
induction into the Dowling College Chapter of Psi Chi is also a factor that
weighs heavily on selection as the recipient of this award.
5. Applicant must agree to be interviewed and/or prepare an essay should
the selection process deem such information needed.
6. Applicants for the Excellence in Psychology Scholarship must be able to
demonstrate that they have engaged in efforts which serve as examples of
unselfish, humanitarian work efforts on behalf of other human beings.
Examples of such unpaid work would be hospital volunteer work, food
pantry or kitchen work (as well as food drive leadership), volunteer work in
children‘s centers, etc. It should be pointed out that independent study and
internship work do not count as humanitarian work.
7. If more than one student is determined to merit the award, the scholarship
will then be divided among those recommended. It is possible that a single
year might arise during which no Psychology major merits the award.
A call for applicants is made each year in February via a mailing to
all Psychology majors at Dowling College. Nominations are to be
forwarded to Psychology Department, Dowling College, 150 Idle Hour
Blvd., Oakdale, NY 11769-1999. The award recipient(s) is/are announced
at the Annual Spring Psychology Dinner.
Helen Manowitz Presidential Scholarship
This scholarship is awarded to a full-time student pursuing either a
B.B.A. or M.B.A. degree at Dowling. The recipient must demonstrate
financial need and have maintained a B (3.0) cumulative grade-point
average after having completed 30 or more undergraduate credits at
Dowling or a B+ (3.5) cumulative grade-point average after having
completed 12 or more graduate credits at Dowling.
Decision Women in Commerce Scholarship in
Memory of Edith Marcus
This is awarded to a full-time junior or senior, second-career student
who is a Brookhaven township resident majoring in business/management
or accounting. The recipient must demonstrate financial need and
maintain a B (3.0) cumulative grade point average for 60 or more earned
credits (24 of which must have been completed at Dowling).
Robert Mathewson Scholarship
Robert Mathewson was a biologist and former director of the Lerner
Marine Laboratory, Museum of Natural History, Bimini, Bahamas. He
received an honorary degree at Dowling College in 1972. Any student
pursuing a B.A. in Biology or a B.A. in Natural Science with a
concentration in Biology is eligible for this scholarship. To apply, students
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 19
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must be in their senior year, have a minimum grade point average of 3.0
overall, and have completed 90 credits (30 of which must be from
Dowling College). The individual will be selected by the Biology
Department on the basis of academic merit, as well as financial need.
Michelle T. Nohs Scholarship
This scholarship is awarded to full time undergraduate students
majoring in chemistry (or a related science) and who are preparing to
become chemistry (or science) teachers. Priority will be placed on
students coming from the Copiague community on Long Island. Special
consideration will be given to individuals in the Long Island communities
of Wyandanch and Brentwood. Applicants will show evidence of or
promise of being innovative teachers. Applicants must also demonstrate
financial need and service to humanity.
Mildred Mather Memorial Sport Management
Scholarship
The Mildred Mather Memorial Sport Management Scholarship is
available in the fall semester for full-time students majoring in sports
management. An award will be available for a member of the
sophomore, junior and senior class in the fall semester with a minimum
of a full academic year remaining to complete the degree. Criteria: 1. The
students selected by the sport management faculty must have achieved
an overall GPA of 3.0 and 3.3 in the major. 2. Complete a Free
Application for Federal Aid and demonstrate financial need. 3. Two
letters of recommendation and a letter describing why they are studying
sports management. 4. Resume and 5. Be of good character.
Jack O’Connor Scholarship
The scholarship will be awarded annually to a deserving Dowling
College student who has demonstrated a high level of academic
achievement and a need for financial support. The scholarship is
renewable if the student has maintained a full course of studies with a
minimum of a 3.0 G.P.A.
Sharon Olivari Memorial Scholarship
A scholarship of $250 is awarded to
a full-time senior in special education
who has demonstrated outstanding
potential for working with mentally
retarded children and who is planning to
teach in this field. Eligibility for this
scholarship is based upon 90 or more
credits, 30 of which must have been
completed at Dowling, with a B+ (3.5) cumulative grade point average.
The award is made in the final semester of the senior year.
Doris Pike Presidential Scholarship
The Doris Pike Presidential Scholarship is awarded to a full-time
junior or a first-year graduate student accepted in a Dowling College
Teacher Certification Program as an integral part of his or her degree
objective.
Eligibility: for this tuition and fees scholarship is based upon
demonstrated academic achievement, combined with the desire to achieve
professional excellence as a classroom teacher. Candidates must have a
cumulative average of 3.5 or better on a 4.0 grading scale, a minimum of
sixty (60) undergraduate credits, acceptance in a Dowling College Teacher
Certification Program, full-time study of 30 credits for the academic year
(September to May), and demonstrated promise as a teacher. When
applying for this scholarship, candidates are required to submit an essay of
no more than 500 words detailing their desire to become an excellent
classroom teacher. Financial need is not a prerequisite for this scholarship;
however, it is understood that the applicant will be required to file the
FAFSA and to apply for all available aid through Federal and State financial
aid programs.
Joseph K. & Patricia Posillico Scholarship
The scholarship will be awarded to a deserving Dowling College
student who has demonstrated a high level of academic achievement and a
need for financial support. The scholarship is renewable if the student
has maintained a full course of studies with a minimum of a 3.0 G.P.A.
Michael P. Puorro Scholarship
The scholarship will be awarded to a deserving Dowling College
student who has demonstrated a high level of academic achievement and a
need for financial support. The scholarship is renewable if the student
has maintained a full course of studies with a minimum of a 3.0 G.P.A.
Racanelli Family Presidential Scholars Program
The Racanelli Scholars Program is a series of scholarships
established by the children of Nicholas and Constance Racanelli for
qualified full-time undergraduate students in each of three categories
listed below. This scholarship provides for up to full tuition, room and
board for up to 4 years of full time attendance. Eligibility for the
Scholarship program is based upon demonstrated academic
achievement and financial need. Applicants must have filed the Free
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA); completed all application
procedures for Federal and State Financial Aid Programs; and completed
all application procedures for admissions and financial aid as required
by Dowling College. The recipient may be eligible for renewal of this
scholarship for the following year upon reapplication to Student
Financial Services. Eligibility for reapplication is based upon completion
of 30 credits in the academic year (September-May) with a 3.5 or better
cumulative grade point average and documented participation in the
mentorship responsibilities associated with the Racanelli Scholars
Program.
1. Racanelli Scholars for First-Time Entering Freshmen:
Candidates must have a combined SAT score of 1300 or better, and
have graduated in the top 10 percent of their class. In determining the
recipient, priority will be given to applicants having the following high
school sequences: English (4 years); Foreign Language (3 years); Social
Studies (3 years); Mathematics (3 years); and Natural Sciences (3 years).
2. Racanelli Scholars for Entering Sophomores and Juniors:
Candidates must have completed a minimum of 30 credits for
Sophomores or 60 credits for Juniors at an accredited two or four year
college or university with a scholastic grade average of 3.6 (4.0 grading
scale) or better. In determining the recipient, priority will be given to
applicants having completed course work in each of the following areas of
study described in the Dowling College Catalog: Humanities, Social
Sciences, Natural Sciences and Arts.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 20
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Racanelli Scholars Mentorship Responsibilities:
All Racanelli Scholars will be paired with entering freshmen to serve
as student mentors, after attending a brief mandatory summer training
program. Scholars are expected to familiarize the mentor with available
student support services. Mentors will serve as group leaders in the
Freshman Orientation Program, will meet a minimum of 45 minutes per
week with their assigned freshman, serve as tour guides, and will be
available to meet with the Racanelli family.
Charlotte Raebeck Memorial Scholarships
These scholarships of $500 are awarded to full-time students who
develop and undertake to carry out an independent study project or other
non-traditional means by which college credit may be earned, in relation
to their degree work at Dowling. Applicants who demonstrate financial
need will be given first consideration.
Mildred R. Reeves Memorial Scholarship
A scholarship of $500 is awarded each year to a full-time student who
is majoring in Mathematics or Computer Science, has demonstrated
academic achievement by maintaining a minimum B (3.0) cumulative
grade-point average with 30 or more credits having been completed at
Dowling, and demonstrates financial need.
Luis E. Rivera Scholarship Fund
This scholarship is awarded to full-time undergraduate students of
Hispanic origin majoring in finance and/or accounting. Applicants must
also demonstrate financial need and have a minimum 3.0 GPA overall and
a minimum 3.5 GPA in their major.
Eligibility: Must be a full-time undergraduate majoring in finance
and/or accounting. Must have completed at least 30 credits at Dowling
College. Minimum 3.0 GPA overall and minimum 3.5 GPA in their major.
Have demonstrated a financial need. Completed an Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA).
Requirements: Letter describing: 1. ―Financial hardships and
past/current employment‖. 2. ―Why you chose to study accounting
and/or finance‖. 3. Why you think you will be a good accountant, financial
manager, or financial analyst. Two letters of recommendation that indicate
potential for success and innovation in teaching and service to humanity.
Roslyn Savings Foundation Scholarship
This $1250 scholarship is available to an incoming freshman, with
priority placed on students majoring in Banking or Finance in the School
of Business. The recipient‘s family income must be less than $61,200, and
priority will be placed on students coming from the following areas:
Wyandanch, Shinnecock Indian Reservation, Gordon Heights, Greenport,
Calverton, New Suffolk, Riverside, Saltaire, Lake Success and East Atlantic
Beach. In the event there are no qualified applicants, consideration will
be given to other Long Island communities. The recipient must have a
high school grade point average of at least 2.5 and must have
demonstrated community involvement through such activities as Girl
Scouts or Boy Scouts of America.
Rudolph Scholarship
renewable if the student has maintained a full course of studies with a
minimum of a 3.0 G.P.A.
Kenneth C. Stellenwerf Memorial Scholarship
These scholarships are awarded to full-time students who have a B
(3.0) cumulative grade-point average after having completed 30 or more
credits at Dowling and demonstrating financial need. Preference will be
given to residents of the Town of Islip. Award amounts vary.
Dr. Dorothy A. Stracher Scholarship Fund
Academic Access Program
The ideal candidate is an individual who, in additional to being
committed to completing a college degree and pursuing a career that will
benefit the community and the greater society, has been identified as
having a learning disability and/or on the autism spectrum. This student
demonstrates perseverance, embraces new opportunities, has a wellrounded perspective shaped by experiences in school, in the community,
and with family and friends. Understands that people with learning
disabilities and/or on the autism spectrum may have different learning
styles but that does not affect their competence and intelligence and their
responsibility to serve as role models for others with learning disabilities.
• Have completed the Academic Access Program application process
• Have an overall grade point average of approximately 3.0 or higher
• Have demonstrated a financial need
• A personal statement, describing the applicant‘s triumphs in dealing with
his or her specific disability. Essays should also include how they embody
the characteristics of an ideal candidate (as described above) and should
make specific mention of how they believe a college education will enhance
their lives and society. This may be submitted as a written essay (400-700
words).
Town of Brookhaven/Industrial Development Agency
Scholarship
These two $1,000 scholarships are awarded to assist an entering
freshman that major in Aviation. Students must graduate from a Town of
Brookhaven high school with a Regents diploma, be in the top 20% of their
class and demonstrate financial need. Students must re-apply each year.
The Townsend Scholarship
This scholarship will be awarded annually to a deserving Dowling
College student in the School of Business who has demonstrated a high
level of academic achievement and a need for financial support. This
scholarship is renewable, if the student has maintained a full course of
studies with a minimum of a 3.0 G.P.A.
Waldner’s Business Environment Scholarship
This scholarship will be awarded annually to a deserving Dowling
College student who has demonstrated a high level of academic
achievement and a need for financial support. This scholarship is
renewable if the student has maintained a full course of studies with a
minimum of a 3.0 G.P.A.
Alexis Wiren Memorial Scholarship
The scholarship will be awarded to a student in the School of
Business, the School of Arts & Sciences, the School of Education or the
School of Aviation who has demonstrated a high level of academic
achievement and a need for financial support. This scholarship is
This scholarship of $300 is awarded each Spring to a full-time upper
class student who has a minimum 2.7 cumulative grade-point average,
has demonstrated leadership in the Dowling College Student
Association, and demonstrates financial need.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 21
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Dr. & Mr. A. Zolfo Scholarship
This award will be made annually to a deserving Dowling College
student in the School of Business at the undergraduate or graduate level
who has demonstrated academic achievement and financial need.
Grants/Scholarships/Fellowships Available
through Private Sources
Grants and scholarships are available from many community
organizations, corporations, unions, and churches. The key to finding this
support is research and persistence. The best way to identify private
sources of funds is to do the research yourself. Many applicants find
success through the Internet. In addition to information on our website,
www.dowling.edu, two popular websites are www.fastweb.com and
www.finaid.org.
Employment Programs
Federal Work-Study Program (FWS)
The Federal College Work-Study Program is funded by the federal
government and supplemented by Dowling College. The program
enables students to work part-time on the College campus or at local
nonprofit agencies. Graduate and undergraduate students who
demonstrate financial need may be eligible to receive monies under this
federal program. Recipients must maintain satisfactory academic process.
Students must file the FAFSA for determination of eligibility.
Whether a student is participating in the Federal Work-Study
Programs or our institutional Student Employment Program, Dowling
College allows students to have their on-campus earnings credited
directly to their student account, reducing their tuition liability. The
participating student would need to complete a Tuition Reduction Form.
The Tuition Reduction Form and job listings are available in Human
Resources.
Other Financial Resources
Veterans Administration (VA) Educational Benefits
Monthly benefits are sent directly to eligible students by the
Veterans Administration.
Eligibility: Veterans who serve their full term and are released with
an honorable discharge, disability, or discarded for a hardship are
entitled to 36-months of compensation. The military matches a month of
compensation per month served in the military, if discharged early for
many varying circumstances that include, but are not exclusive to,
disability or hardship. The life of eligibility is ten years for active duty
and fourteen years for the reserve. Spouses, children and survivors of
veterans are entitled to the VA‘s benefits if the veteran sustains 70%
total and, permanent disability. Further information and applications are
available at all Veterans Administration offices.
Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) Scholarships
The Army, Navy, and Air Force offer financial assistance to qualified
students — up to full tuition, books, and a monthly stipend may be
awarded. Students incur a four-year active duty obligation or an eightyear reserve obligation in return for a four-year scholarship.
Application: Contact high school guidance counselors for details or
call your local Army, Navy, or Air Force recruiting office (listed in local
telephone directories). Application deadlines are usually in December of
your high school senior year.
Student Life
Student Government Association
The Student Government Association (S.G.A.)
of Dowling College is composed of all matriculated
undergraduate students. Through the S.G.A.,
Dowling students govern themselves democratically.
Every member of the Association may vote for
representatives to the S.G.A., which is its
governing body, and may participate in all functions sponsored by the
S.G.A.
Student Governance
Dowling College students are self-governing through an elected
representative system in which each student has the opportunity to elect
peers as representatives in the Student Government Association (S.G.A.).
All full-time and part-time undergraduate students are automatically
members of the Students‘ Government Association of Dowling College
and are entitled to attend and participate in all of its sponsored functions
and activities.
Student activities are organized and directed by S.G.A.-sponsored
groups, clubs, or organizations, and are funded by the student activity
fee.
Benefits
All undergraduate Dowling College students are entitled to all
benefits of the Student Government Association, whose main purpose is
to address the needs of the student body.
The Executive Board, the Student Senate, and the Student Review
Board are branches of the Student Government Association and are
directly responsible to the S.G.A. for their actions. S.G.A. officers are
elected in April and serve for a one-year term. Students must maintain a
2.3 average to hold any elected office or any appointed responsibility for
any Campus club, committee, or organization.
Throughout the academic year, many social functions are sponsored
by the various clubs and classes of the Student Government Association.
A calendar of events is published on the intranet. Tickets are available at
the Student Government Association Ticket Sales Table located in the
Racanelli Lobby. Some traditional events held each year are the
Halloween Party, the Holiday Ball, and the semi-formal Spring Cotillion.
Other informal dances, as well as trips and other events, are sponsored by
different clubs throughout the year.
The Student Government Association Office is located in the Curtin
Student Center, Room 116, Extension 3068.
Executive Board
The Executive Board constitutes the official representative body of the
Student Government Association. The Board meets regularly with
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 22
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members of the College administration to discuss and act upon issues
directly affecting the welfare and policies of the students of Dowling
College.
The Executive Board consists of the President, V.P. for Administration
and Secretary, V.P. for Finance and Treasurer, and V.P. for Activities of
the S.G.A.
Student Senate
The Senate is empowered to establish, administer and maintain
responsibility for all policies and transactions of the Student Government
Association.
Senate membership consists of the Executive Board and the
presidents of each established club (defined as clubs which have been in
existence for more than one semester), and the class presidents/ review
board representatives.
Student Review Board
The Student Review Board is the judicial branch of the S.G.A. and is
comprised of five members: a chairperson, and the class president of
each class.
The Board presides over cases involving student-to-student disputes
which do not involve infractions of campus rules and regulations.
Students are required to know and abide by the rules and regulations
contained in the Handbook of Personal Safety and Fire, which can be
obtained from the Office of Security.
Student Representation on Faculty Committees
Students will be appointed to standing faculty committees by the
Dean of Students.
1. The Academic Standards Committee
This Committee develops and implements academic policy and
standards and makes recommendations on matters pertaining to
advisement, grading, and academic procedures to the FacultyAdministration Senate. There is one student representative.
2. The Curriculum Committee
Charged with developing and recommending policies regarding
the curriculum to the Faculty-Administration Senate, this
Committee recommends new courses, proposes long range
curriculum planning and scheduling, acts as a liaison for student
input, and identifies academic priorities. There is one student
representative.
Committee Appointment Criteria
1. Applicants must be a member of the Student Government Association.
2. Appointees may serve on only one committee at any given time.
3. A minimum G.P.A. of 2.3 is required.
4. Applicants must have earned at least 24 Dowling College credits prior
to appointment.
Rules for S.G.A. Elections
1. There shall be no one at the polls except Election Committee members.
2. There shall be no campaigning within the designated polling areas. If no
areas are so designated, no campaigning shall take place within 25 feet of
the polls.
3. Ballots may not be destroyed until 10 school days after an election
referendum.
4. Ballots and other voting materials must be kept in a specified area
during times when voting is not in session.
5. Signs, posters, banners, or flyers are not permitted on any painted
surface, in the lobby, on cars in the parking lots, on trees, in the Library,
or on any windows.
6. Candidates may not display more than 15 posters during their campaign.
(Posters may not be larger than 24‖ x 36‖.)
7. Positions on the ballot for all elections will be determined by the order
in which each candidate submits a nominating petition.
8. All candidates will be responsible for literature released and posters
distributed and displayed on their behalf; all campaign materials must be
approved by the Director of Student Activities before release, with $35
maximum allowed for campaign spending. Candidates may not accept
support from an outside group, and receipts for expenditures must be
presented to the Director of Student Activities.
9. Election challenges must be made in writing and presented to the Vice
President for Student Affairs within five days after the close of the election.
10. Any candidate violating these rules will be subject to review by the
Elections Committee, with penalties up to, and including, forfeiture of
election and removal from office.
Student Government Association Constitution and ByLaws
Copies of the S.G.A. Constitution and By-Laws are available to
students by contacting the S.G.A. Office in the Student Center or by
calling 631-244-3068.
Common Hour
Common Hour will take place weekly, every Wednesday from 2:30 4:00 p.m. During this time, no classes will take place. Instead, every
student will be given the opportunity to network by participating in
Student Government Association meetings and events.
Clubs and Organizations
Each year the Student Government Association allocates sums of
money to recognized clubs for use in conjunction with various cultural
and social events. Each club sponsors functions throughout the year in
service to the College and the community.
The following are examples of clubs on campus:
Agape Bible Club
American Association of Airport Executives (A.A.A.E.)
Art Club
Business Society
Cheer Team Club
Council for Exceptional Children (C.E.C.)
Commuter Council
Residence Halls Councils (Brookhaven and Oakdale)
D.C, Spirit
Drama Club
Equestrian Team
Flight Simulation and Tutoring Club
Gay Straight Alliance
History Club
Humanitarian Club
International Club
Keeping It Real
La Familia
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 23
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Overdrive Dance Project
Physical Education Club
Pre-Law Society
Psychology Club
Raven‘s Quill
Student Air Traffic Control Association
Science Exploration Club
Spoken Word Poetry Club
Sport Management Club
Student & Veterans Club
Student Air Traffic Control Association (SATCA)
Women in Aviation
If a student wishes to participate in an activity which is not already a
function of a club on Campus, it is possible for him/her to form a new
organization. Fifteen signatures of interested students on a petition
submitted to the Student Government Association constitute a request
for club status. The requesting group must file a Mission Statement for
establishment. After the Mission Statement is filed, the Student Senate
may approve or deny the request.
For information about clubs and organizations, call the Student
Activities Office at 631-244-3153.
Commuter Council
The Commuter Council hosts numerous events each year in order to
connect commuters who would otherwise not be active on campus with
other students. The Council will also act as a proponent for the needs of
commuter students.
D.C. Spirit
The purpose of D.C. Spirit is to develop a spirit among the Dowling
Community.
Drama Club
The purpose of the Drama Club is to promote knowledge and
appreciation of the dramatic arts through productions and other
performing arts-related events.
Equestrian Team
The main purpose of the Equestrian team is to develop skills related
to the sport and to compete in intercollegiate settings.
Flight Simulation and Tutoring Club
Agape Bible Club
The Flight Simulation and Tutoring Club strives to create an
environment where students can have fun while working on flight skills.
The Agape Bible Club‘s main purpose is to engage in religious
conversation and to further understand the Word of God.
Gay Straight Alliance
American Association of Airport Executives,
Dowling College Chapter
The Gay-Straight Alliance is dedicated to educating the campus
community about lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) issues,
breaking the isolation of LGBT students, and providing support to LGBT
students and their allies.
The American Association of Airport Executives‘ main purpose is to
promote professional development and to instill professional attitudes in
students engaged in the study of airport development, administration,
management and operations, or in related fields of aviation.
Art Club
The purpose of the Art Club is to stimulate the artistic talents of all
Dowling students through lectures, workshops, trips to museums,
galleries, nature preserves, demos by artists, art therapy, and art shows.
The Art Club strives to appeal to both experienced and inexperienced
artists, plus enhance appreciation for the role that art plays in our world.
Business Society
The purpose of the Business Society is to establish and maintain a
clear understanding of the world of business through various events and
activities. The Business Society also allows for students in the same field
of study to network.
Cheer Team
The main purpose of Dowling‘s Cheer Team is to stimulate interest,
involvement and support of Dowling College through fostering and
developing school spirit within the student body and support athletic
contests.
Council for Exceptional Children
The purpose of the Council for Exceptional Children is to advance the
education of exceptional children and those who will be educating them.
Residence Halls Councils (Brookhaven and Oakdale)
The Residence Halls Council is the governing body of the Residence
Hall. In addition to legislative functions, the Residence Hall Council also
plans annual athletic and social events.
History Club
The History Club promotes the love of both past and current events.
Humanitarian Club
The purpose of the Humanitarian Club is to bring together those
who strive to make a difference in the world through charities, fundraisers
and other events. The goal of the club is to better serve the school and
its community, and create a place where all feel welcomed.
International Club
The purpose of the International Club is to promote diversity and
acceptance of numerous cultures on
campus. Through annual events,
including trips to Manhattan,
International Food Festivals and
Cultural Exchange Nights, students
will come to be familiar with and
obtain knowledge of foreign
traditions and customs.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 24
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Keeping It Real
Keeping It Real (KIR) is an SGA organization designed to support
students as they transition to Dowling College, academically, socially,
and recreationally. Providing lower to upper class peer mentoring, the
goal of the organization is to create an environment contoured to
address issues of campus community, student engagement, and
academic and social persistence. Ultimately, the club offers peer- topeer assistance through the maze of the Dowling College experience.
join as the club hosts numerous events and activities throughout the
year.
Student Air Traffic Control Association
The Student Air Traffic Control
Association
(SATCA)
was
established to help support students
looking to enter the FAA as an air
traffic controller through tutoring,
peer mentoring, and social events.
La Familia
The purpose of La Familia is to promote Hispanic culture in the
Dowling community through the use of guest speakers and literary and
cultural events.
Overdrive Dance Project
The purpose of the Overdrive Dance Project is to allow students to
learn, choreograph, perform and promote different types of dance.
Student and Veteran’s Club
The Student and Veteran club assists in creating outlets for students
and veterans to collaborate. A main focus is assisting our current student
veterans with their transition to college.
National Honor and Professional Societies
Physical Education Club
The Physical Education club is open to all individuals interested in
learning more about Physical Education. The purpose of the club is to
help students develop individual growth and interest within the field of
physical education and to foster networking opportunities.
Pre-Law Society
The Pre-Law Society broadens students‘ knowledge of the law and
continuing education in the field.
Psychology Club
The purpose of the Psychology Club is to enhance student knowledge
about matters related to psychology through events, including social
activities and lectures.
Raven’s Quill
The Raven's Quill is a creative writing club that focuses on short stories
and novels. The club publishes an annual publication called The Conspiracy.
Science Exploration Club
The Science Exploration Club is geared towards students majoring in
the science field, as well as those who have a general interest in science.
The Science Exploration Club gives students an opportunity to not only
become more involved in school, but also meet fellow science
enthusiasts.
Spoken Word Poetry Club
The Spoken Word Poetry Club is meant to bring poets, rappers and
musicians together in order to focus on the art of words. With a strong
emphasis on performance, open mic nights and other performances will
be scheduled to take place throughout the school year.
Sport Management Club
The purpose of the Sport Management Club is to give students insight
concerning this field and help students majoring in this area decide
which aspect they would like to pursue their career. All are welcome to
Honor societies exist to recognize the attainment of superior
scholarship and to promote the development of leadership qualities,
character, and good Campus citizenship. Students are invited to
membership based on superior academic qualifications. For further
information about faculty sponsors and meeting dates, contact the Office
of the Provost at 631-244-3395
Alpha Chi
Alpha Chi is a national honor society whose purpose is to promote
academic excellence and exemplary character among college and
university students and to honor those who achieve such distinction. The
NY Rho chapter was established at Dowling in 1988.
Criteria for membership include completion of at least 24 credits at
Dowling College and placement in the top 10% of the Junior and Senior
class, which is approximately a 3.5 or better average.
Alpha Chi offers students the opportunity to participate at annual
conferences and compete for undergraduate and graduate scholarships.
Alpha Eta Rho
Alpha Eta Rho is an international professional
fraternity for students interested in careers in
aviation. The Zeta Chapter was established at
Dowling College in 1969.
Criteria for membership includes completion of
at least one semester at Dowling College; a 3.0 in
AER 100l; either a private pilot‘s license or a passing grade on the written
test; a minimum G.P.A. of 2.5; and an interest in aviation.
Delta Mu Delta
Delta Mu Delta, a national business honor society, established the
Delta Pi Chapter at Dowling in 1984. Criteria for membership includes:
(1) completion of all business core courses, including marketing and
management; (2) completion of 50% of the degree requirements; (3)
minimum undergraduate G.P. A. of 3.25 (minimum graduate G.P.A. of 3.6);
and (4) placement in the top 20% of one‘s class. Students must also
complete a residency of at least 24 hours at Dowling.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 25
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Kappa Delta Pi
The Xi Chi Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi,
a national honor society in education, was
established at Dowling in 1979. The
purpose of the Society is to recognize
outstanding contributions to education
and to foster high standards of preparation
for teaching. Criteria for membership
include completion of a teacher
certification program, an undergraduate
cumulative G.P.A. of 3.5, and faculty recommendations.
The Xi Chi Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi has sponsors the following
awards to undergraduate and graduate students: Dr. William J. Condon
Xi Chi chapter of Kappa Delta Pi Recognition Award; Dr. and Mrs. Ralph
H. Honsberger Scholarship; Dr. Clyde I. Payne Minority Award; and,
Dr. Bernadyn Kim Suh Award.
National Society of Collegiate Scholars (NSCS)
The National Society of Collegiate Scholars (NSCS) is an honor
society inviting high-achieving freshmen and sophomores. Members must
have a GPA of 3.4 or above and rank in the top 20 percent of their class.
courses with an ECN prefix, regardless of the number completed; and 5)
A 3.0 grade-point average in all completed courses.
Phi Alpha Theta
Phi Alpha Theta is the nation‘s largest history honor society and
offers scholarships to its members, publishes a quarterly journal, The
Historian, and awards prizes for student papers. The organization also
hosts biennial conventions, professional conferences, and local and
regional activities. Minimum requirements for membership are four courses
in history including at least one number 4000 or above; a 3.5 G.P.A. in history
courses completed at Dowling College; and a 3.3 overall G.P.A. at Dowling.
Phi Delta Kappa
Phi Delta Kappa, The International Education Society, was
established at Dowling College in 1989. Criteria for membership
includes: Career in Education (undergraduate senior or graduate
education); recommendation from a sponsor; and academic excellence.
Phi Sigma Iota
Phi Sigma Iota, the international foreign language honor society, was
established at Dowling College in 1993 as the Beta Upsilon Chapter.
Criteria for membership include academic excellence in foreign language
courses, current enrollment in foreign language courses, and overall
academic excellence.
Psi Chi
Omicron Delta Epsilon
Omicron Delta Epsilon (ODE), the International Honor Society in
Economics, established Dowling College‘s Omicron Chapter in 1969.
The minimum criteria for membership are the following: 1) Junior
standing (eligible students must have been enrolled at Dowling College
for at least one semester); 2) Completion of ECN 1001A and ECN 2002A;
3) Completion of two additional 3-credit courses in economics with an
ECN prefix that have ECN 1001A or ECN 2002A as a prerequisite (ECN
2002A is excluded for this purpose). ECN 2036A will also count as one of
these courses even though it does not have ECN 1001A or ECN 2002A as a
prerequisite. One is allowed to substitute for only one of these two
courses any two economics courses with an ECN prefix that do not have
ECN 1001A or ECN 2002A as a prerequisite (ECN 1001A is excluded for
this purpose). 4) A 3.0 grade-point average in all completed economics
The Dowling College chapter of Psi Chi, the International Honor
Society in Psychology, was founded and installed at the institution in
1977. It is the longest, continuously operating honor society at Dowling
College.
Criteria for membership are: (1) students must be Psychology
majors/minors or enrolled in a major with a psychological focus
(Gerontology, Social Science with Psychology as their 18-credit Group 1
Component); (2) students must have completed at least 36 college credits;
(3) Students who entered Dowling as Freshman must have completed 9
credits in Psychology whereas transfer students need to have earned 12
credits of Psychology at Dowling (Course Exclusions: PSY 3103C – 3105C);
(4) students must have an overall G.P.A of 3.3; (5) students must have a
G.P.A. of 3.5 in Psychology courses.
Sigma Tau Delta
Sigma Tau Delta, the national English honor society, established the
Mu Tau chapter at Dowling in 1987.
There are two types of membership, active and associate. Active
membership is open to English majors with a minimum 3.3 overall G.P.A.
and a 3.5 G.P.A. in English who have completed at least 3 semesters of
course work. Associate membership is open to currently enrolled students
with the requisite academic background, but who are not majoring or
minoring in English.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 26
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Intercollegiate Athletics
times of events will be posted at the Curtin Center, on information sent out by
the Dean of Students and at the SGA desk in the main hall of Racanelli Center.
Dowling College recognizes the physical, social, and recreational values
to be gained through participation in intercollegiate sports for both
student-athletes and spectators.
Dowling College is a proud member of the National Collegiate
Athletic Association (NCAA) Division II and the East Coast Conference
(ECC) and is guided by the standards established by these organizations.
Dowling College sponsors 15 sports which compete under the
NCAA umbrella. Men‘s sports include baseball, basketball, cross
country, golf, lacrosse, soccer, and tennis. For the women, the Golden
Lions compete in basketball, cross country, lacrosse, soccer, softball,
tennis, field hockey and volleyball. Athletic scholarship aid may be
available to qualified students.
In recent years, the Golden Lions have had success on both the
regional and national level. Men‘s Lacrosse won the NCAA National
Championship in 2012 and the Men‘s Soccer team won the National
Championship in 2006, reaching the National Final again in 2008. In
2013, the Women‘s Basketball team achieved a milestone, advancing
to the National Championship game for the first time in program
history. Other teams have also captured conference championships
along with qualifying for the NCAA and ECC playoffs, including the
women‘s volleyball team who has reached the Elite Eight 5 times
while advancing to the NCAA final four in 2010. Student-athletes
from Dowling have been recognized with many awards, including
ECC Player of the Year, ECC Rookie of the Year, and Scholar-athlete
of the Year. In addition, several student-athletes have been recognized
with All-Region, All-American, and Academic All-American honors.
Dowling Athletics was also awarded the ECC Commissioner‘s Cup
during the 2008-09, 2010-11 and 2011-12 seasons, an honor given to the
institution that excels the most throughout the year in all sports
sponsored by the Conference.
The Dowling Athletic Department is dedicated to building
champions both on and off the court or playing field. Student-athletes are
active in the community and participate in the Student-Athlete Advisory
Committee, as well as work on educational programs and take part in lifeskills workshops. Since 2007, Dowling student-athletes have assisted in
raising over $100,000 for the Make-A-Wish Foundation through a variety of
Wishmaker initiatives.
For additional information, contact the Athletics Department at 631244-3458 or by visiting us on the web at www.dowlingathletics.com.
Fit Trail
Campus Recreation and Intramural
Campus Recreation is being organized through our Student
Government Association on a voluntary basis. Campus Recreation
organizes programs for the Dowling Community including wellness
programs, sports clubs, informal open recreation, special events, intramural
sports, and gaming tournaments.
Campus Recreation‘s mission is to provide recreational and leadership
opportunities to a diverse College community that foster personal growth,
wellness, and lifelong healthy habits. Our core values include:
sportsmanship, inclusive programming, customer service, collaborative
relationships, student and staff development, personal growth, and
motivational and enjoyable exercises. Dowling students are encouraged
to participate in the many recreation programs and events. Dates and
The Dowling Fit Trail is a timber fitness trail which combines
scientifically designed exercises with walking or jogging to provide a
well-balanced physical fitness routine for the entire body. Individual
exercise stations with apparatus are spaced along the Rudolph Campus,
beginning at the main entrance around Racanelli Center, in front of
Fortunoff Hall, past the Kramer Science Center, and finishing by the
main entrance. Participants proceed from one exercise station of the
fitness trail to the next, following ―The Paw,‖ and performing the
exercises illustrated at each station.
Counseling Services
The Center for Counseling, Health and Wellness
The Center for Counseling, Health and Wellness is a confidential
program available for all enrolled Dowling College students. The center
provides individual counseling, focused problem solving, consultations
and workshops. Problems are identified, options are reviewed, and
assistance is offered. Referral services are available when needed. A safe,
confidential environment will be provided to discuss areas of life that are
troublesome or cause students‘ concern.
Confidentiality is the cornerstone of the program. Student‘s contact
with the Counseling Center program, as well as any and all information
shared by students in an individual session, will be treated by the
counseling staff with the strictest confidentiality. Nothing will be
disclosed outside the counseling program without permission. Note:
exceptions include unusual circumstances such as a court subpoena or
information regarding imminent danger to self or someone else. The
Center for Counseling, Health and Wellness is located on the Rudolph
campus. A counselor will go out to the Brookhaven campus to meet with
students if this is more convenient for them. The Center for Counseling,
Health and Wellness is located in the Racanelli Center, Room 325 on the
Rudolph Campus in Oakdale. An appointment can be arranged by calling
631-244-3455 in Oakdale. Walk-ins and emergency visits are also
welcomed.
The Center for Counseling, Health and Wellness assists with:
• Crisis Intervention
• Emotional Conflicts • Stress/Anxiety
• Self Confidence
• Relationship Difficulties
• Substance Abuse Issues
• Sexual Health Issues
• Identity Issues
• Anger/Aggression
• Depression
• Peer Pressure
• Grief/Loss Issues
• Problem Solving
• Adjustment to College
• Any and all areas that is bothersome
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 27
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Career Services
The Career Services Center at Dowling College serves as a
premier resource for students and alumni in exploring and pursuing
career aspirations. Career Services offer one-on-one appointments for
resume critiquing, cover letter development, career counseling, mock
interviews, and job search strategies. The Career Services Center
organizes two Job and Internship Fairs per academic year, and offers
various workshops and events to enhance professional development
skills.
Career Services invites students and alumni to search through
Dowling‘s free online job & internship search engine DowLink.
Dowling College encourages the community to utilize the services at
the Career Services Center and the resources located in the library on
the Oakdale campus.
The Career Services Center is located in the Fortunoff Hall, Room
102 at the Dowling College Rudolph Campus in Oakdale. For more
information, please contact Career Services directly at 631-244-3391 or visit
dowling.edu/careerservices.
Internship Program
Internship Experience
A Dowling College internship is an educational opportunity which
integrates college coursework with professional experience in public and
private sectors. Once you complete your degree requirements, you will
enter into a very competitive job market. The practical, real-life experience
acquired during an internship can give you a competitive edge and the
necessary job skills to complement your education.
Internship Eligibility Prerequisites
• You must have completed one semester of study at Dowling College.
• You must have completed at least 12 credits in your major course of study.
• You must have at least one 3-credit elective available.
• You must have an overall GPA of 2.6 and a discipline specific GPA of 3.0.
• You must have the signature of a faculty mentor in the internship‘s
discipline.
Additional Major-specific Eligibility Requirements
Psychology
• GPA of 3.2 in your major course of study.
• Minimum of 30 credits completed at Dowling College
• Junior or senior standing.
Communication Arts
• Overall accumulation of 75 credits with a GPA of 2.6.
• Discipline-specific accumulation of 12 credits with a GPA of 3.0 completed
at Dowling College.
Sport Management
You are required to complete a 12 credit practicum, which entails a
minimum of 400 hours in a full-time sport industry placement, either paid or
unpaid. You must have an overall accumulation of 100 credits and a
discipline-specific accumulation of 18 credits.
Graphic Design and Digital Arts
• Minimum of 75 credits completed at Dowling College.
• Discipline-specific accumulation of 12 credits.
• Portfolio submission containing five (5) applicable works in the specified
software to be reviewed and approved by faculty members.
You have the option to appeal if you would like to participate in an
internship but do not fully meet the eligibility prerequisites. If the internship is
required to complete the requirements of your major, then you must appeal to the
School Curriculum Committee (SCC) of your major. Speak to the faculty
member who is supervising your internship for help on such an appeal. If the
internship is not required for your major, then you must appeal to the Academic
Standards Committee. You will need the help of the faculty member who is
supervising your internship and Admissions to complete such an appeal.
For Academic Credit
Internships for academic credit require an academic component,
consisting of learning objectives, assignments and a term paper.
Requirements must be completed by the end of the semester to receive a
faculty-assigned grade. If you are in an unpaid internship, you must
work no less than 120 total hours (a minimum of 10 hours per week over a
12-week period) for academic credit to be awarded. If you are in a paid
internship, you must work no less than 180 total hours (a minimum of 15
hours per week over a 12-week period) for academic credit to be awarded.
Taking a for-credit, paid internship enables you to obtain elective and/or
major requirement credit, gain career-related experience and earn a parttime wage.
Grading
Your assigned faculty advisor awards a letter grade (A – F) after
consultation with the on-site supervisor and in cooperation with the
Career Services staff.
Not For Academic Credit
This option enables you to gain career-related experience, even if
you do not have elective credits available. You are required to work a
minimum of 10 hours per week in a paid internship. Mandatory learning
objectives and assignments must be completed and you must meet with
an Internship Coordinator throughout the internship term.
Compensation can be in the form of a temporary hourly rate, stipend
and/or travel allowance. You do not receive the traditional employee
benefits of a permanent part-time or full-time employee. You are not
eligible to apply for unemployment benefits at the conclusion or
termination of an internship. Compensation reflects the policies and
practices of the organization and industry culture, not the quality of
student candidates.
Internship Process
• Meet with an Internship Coordinator to determine eligibility.
• Complete an intake form and discuss the type of organization/industry
where you would like to gain career-related experience.
• Schedule an appointment with the Career Services to review and approve
your resume.
• Schedule an interview for an available internship opportunity. An
Internship Coordinator may assist the employer with interview coordination for prescreened candidates.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 28
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• Obtain an offer letter from the employer. This is VERY IMPORTANT. An
internship cannot be processed until an official offer letter on company letterhead is
obtained.
• Complete requisite paperwork based on the internship type.
• Register for the course when applicable. Please note that internships for
academic credit must be registered within the first six weeks of the academic term in
which the internship is arranged.
• Complete academic coursework before the conclusion of the
semester/internship. Faculty-assigned grades are only released upon verification
of completed coursework by Career Services.
Please note: All internships are required to be tracked by Dowling College.
It is imperative that the Career Services staff is informed immediately if you find
an internship on your own.
On-Campus Student Employment
Dowling College supports and encourages participation in the Work
Study Program. This program enables graduate and undergraduate
students who demonstrate a financial need to apply for employment
opportunities on campus. Participation in this program is a convenient
and excellent way to build work experience and current and credible
references for future career endeavors.
Student Employment/Work-Study Program
(on campus)
Dowling College fully supports and encourages participation in our
Student Employment Program. This program enables graduate and
undergraduate students who demonstrate a financial need to apply for
part-time student employment opportunities on campus. Participation in
this program is a convenient and excellent way to build work experience
along with current and credible references for future career endeavors.
Further information can be obtained in the Human Resources office,
located in Kramer Science Center, Room 011.
Job Location and Development Program (off campus)
Dowling College encourages participation in the federal work-study
Job Location and Development Program (JLD). Student employment
positions are available off campus at several non-profit organizations. JLD
allows our students the opportunity to gain valuable work experience
while learning the value of becoming involved with local non-profit
organizations in our community. Further information can be obtained in
the Human Resources office, located in Kramer Science Center, Room 011.
Academic Support Services
The Tutor Center is located in the Nicholas and Constance Racanelli
Center for Learning Resources. The Tutor Center provides for
individualized and group tutoring, workshops, and peer mentoring
opportunities.
Designed to develop and enhance academic skills, the Center‘s
dedicated professional staff and peer tutors offer students personalized
instruction that supplements and supports Dowling‘s formal academic
programs. To contact the Center and make a tutor appointment, call
244-3246. For more information, please see the Tutor Center webpage on
the Dowling College website.
Students with Disabilities Peter Hausman Center
The Peter Hausman Center provides reasonable accommodations to
undergraduate and graduate students who have physical or learning
disabilities. Students with appropriate documentation of a physical or
learning disability must identify themselves to The Hausman Center
during the first week of each semester in order to receive services.
The Peter Hausman Center is located in the Nicholas and Constance
Racanelli Center for Learning Resources. It is readily accessible to
students with physical disabilities, as are all of Dowling‘s main
buildings. Handicapped accessible apartments are available at the
Oakdale and Brookhaven Residence Halls.
Information concerning accommodations and services may be
obtained from the Hausman Center staff at 631-244-3144.
Student Support Services Program
Student Support Services is a one-hundred percent federally funded
program through the U.S. Department of Education whose purpose is to
increase retention and graduation rates of eligible students attending
Dowling College. Eligibility includes status as a first-generation college
student, academic requirements, and economic disadvantage. Among
the services offered are tutoring, academic advisement, assistance with
the financial aid process, and financial literacy. Additional services
include study skill strategies and career development. Students are
encouraged to participate in the social life of Dowling College and the
cultural life of the community as well as maintain good academic
standing. For further information about Student Support Services, call
631-244-3335 or visit our website at http://www.dowling.edu/studentsupport-services/.
Higher Education Opportunity Program
Student Employment Program
America Reads Challenge
Work Study students will have the opportunity to participate in a
community project that supports the America Reads Challenge goal —
that all children read well and independently by the end of third grade.
Work Study students will be trained to tutor at-risk children utilizing
specific strategies that reflect the ways that a child‘s age and
developmental level influence the acquisition of language and literacy
skills. The program is an excellent opportunity for those students who are
seeking a career in education.
Eligibility: This program is open to undergraduate as well as graduate
students. Applications are available in the Student Employment Office
located within the Human Resources Department.
Since July, 1970, Dowling College has been one of more than seventy
private institutions to develop and implement a Higher Education
Opportunity Program. The program assists selected economically and
educationally disadvantaged residents of New York State in meeting the
challenge of college. Individualized tutoring as well as academic, financial
and career counseling is offered as part of the program.
HEOP students are required to attend a college preparatory program
during the summer prior to their freshman year. The preparatory
program consists of coursework in writing, mathematics, study skills and
computer skills.
Students who want to transfer into the Dowling HEOP must have been
in an Opportunity Program, approved by the New York State Education
Department, at the college from which they are transferring.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 29
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Interested persons should write to the Director of HEOP, Dowling
College, 150 Idle Hour Blvd., Oakdale, New York 11769-1999 or call
631-244-3262. Necessary materials will be sent directly to the applicant.
Academic Access Program
The Dowling College Academic Access Program is a fee for service
program that provides intensive services for those students who: 1)
evidence the ability and desire to achieve to their maximum potential
and 2) whose needs are primarily language based, centered in reading and
writing. The Program‘s purpose is to help potentially gifted students with
learning disabilities achieve their maximum academic potential.
The services provided are:
•
One-on-One tutoring two to three hours per week
•
Priority registration
•
Assurance that all academic accommodations are met
•
Support services with subject matter specialists
•
Word processing assistance
•
Liaison between individual students and professors
•
Academic support utilizing the latest advanced software
•
Weekly writing workshops
•
Counseling services
•
Internship guidance
Students who believe they fit the above criteria should request to be
considered for the Program when they apply to Dowling College. Upon
acceptance to the College, their application to the Program is activated.
Once the student is accepted into the Program, she/he and an
individual Graduate Professional Tutor meet for a minimum of two hours
weekly to develop compensating academic strategies that lead to
independent learning and academic success. The Program constantly
monitors growth; the student remains in the Program for as long as it is
viewed as beneficial.
For further information, call the Academic Access Program at 631244-1185.
Health Services
The College maintains a Health Services office in the Curtain Student
Center, Room 110, at the Rudolph Campus in Oakdale, as well as in
Classroom Building A at the Brookhaven Campus in Shirley. A licensed
registered nurse is available on both sites. The College Health Service
provides initial care in all emergencies occurring on campus, including
triage and counseling to provide optimum health care of all College
members. The Student Health Service maintains a current listing of
medical practitioners, with their listed specialties, in the Nassau/Suffolk
area.
Policy on Student Immunization
1. New York State Public Health Law 2165, enacted in June, 1989, requires
that post-secondary students attending colleges and universities
demonstrate proof of immunity against measles, rubella, and mumps. In
accordance with the requirements of that legislation, beginning August 1,
1991 and thereafter, the College shall require proof of immunization for all
students including graduate level and part-time students, born on or after
January 1, 1957.
2. New York State Health Law 2167, effective August 15, 2003, requires all
students to read and return response regarding the meningococcal
disease & vaccine. Students who have not furnished proof of vaccination against
meningitis or turned in a signed refusal for the vaccine will not be permitted to
attend class or to live in the dormitory building.
3. Such proof shall consist of a College certificate of immunization signed
by a physician or health care provider which documents measles, mumps,
and rubella immunity. The certificate must specify the type of vaccine and
the dates (month, day, year) of administration or the date of diagnosis, if
any, or the date of serologic testing and results, if any. A student health
record from a previously attended school which properly documents the
immunization history is accept-able proof of immunity.
4. Students will be expected to provide the College with proof within 30 days
of acceptance if they are New York State residents or within 45 days for a
student transferring from out-of-state or a foreign country. Students will be
directed to provide proof of immunization to the College Nurse.
5. If a student does not comply and is not exempt for medical or religious
reasons, the College shall deny attendance after 30 days for New York
residents or after 45 days for a student transferring from out-of-state or a
foreign country. Exemption is made where immunization would be
detrimental to a person‘s health or where it is otherwise medically
contraindicated or for religious belief.
6. You can find printable versions of the Dowling College Proof of
immunization forms and Meningitis Response forms on our website at
www.dowling.edu.
Insurance Plans
All students must participate in the accident plan maintained by the
College. Accident coverage is maintained on a twenty-four-hour basis.
This policy insures students for on- and off-campus accidents. An
optional
medical
plan
is
also
available
online
at
http://www.dowling.edu/student-insurance/.
All Residence Hall students must have medical insurance coverage. A
charge will automatically be added to your student account for Gallagher
Koster Student Health Insurance. This charge can be waived if you have
your own medical insurance coverage by going online to
http://www.dowling.edu/student-insurance/ and completing the waiver
form. Please make a copy of your submission as proof of completion.
All International students are mandated to purchase the Medical
Insurance policy from Gallagher Koster Student Health Insurance. The
charge will be added to your student account. NO WAIVERS ARE
PERMITTED FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS.
Information, policies, enrollment forms and phone numbers can be
found online at www.dowling.edu/studentinsurance.
International Student and Scholar Services
The International Student and Scholar Services Office is responsible
for counseling international students and scholars on all aspects of
international student life before arrival and throughout the student‘s
academic tenure at Dowling. International students seeking assistance
should go to the International Student and Scholar Services Office
located in the Racanelli Building, Suite 209 G, on the Oakdale Campus
for assistance. The International Student and Scholar Office is open
Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The International Student
and Scholar Services Office provides counseling and assistance with
issues that are academic, social, financial and cultural in nature. The
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 30
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office also assists international students with maintaining their legal status
in the United States. Students can receive help and assistance with
immigration concerns such as curricular training, practical training, visa
renewal, and more. The office offers cultural programs which are designed
to help students have a successful Dowling experience while attaining
their educational goals. For more information, contact the International
Student and Scholar Services Office at 631-244-5097 or send an e-mail
to [email protected]
Regulations for Conduct on Campus
Regulations with Respect to Conduct on Campus and Other
College Property Used for Educational Purposes as Required by New
York State Law.
Dowling College respects the right of all members of the academic
community to explore and discuss questions which interest them, to
express opinions publicly and privately, and to join together to
demonstrate their concern by orderly means which do not disrupt in whole
or in part any operation of the institution.
The College also respects the right of each member of the academic
community to be free from coercion and harassment. The substitution of
noise for speech and force for reason is a rejection and not an application
of academic freedom. Action by individuals or groups to prevent speakers
invited to the Campus from speaking, to disrupt the operations of the
institution in the course of demonstrations, or to obstruct and restrain
other members of the academic community and Campus visitors by
physical force is destructive of the pursuit of learning and of free society.
(Adapted from the National AAUP Council Statement of October 28, 1967.)
Definition: The term ―member‖ or ―members‖ as used herein shall
be deemed to mean and include students, members of the
Administrative Staff, the Faculty, other employees of the College, and
members of the Board of Trustees.
Dowling College will not allow disruptive or disorderly conduct on its
premises or other property used by the College for educational purposes.
Such conduct includes interference with the rights and privileges of other
members of the College community, invitees, or other persons lawfully
present on College premises and the willful damage to, or destruction of,
or unlawful removal of College or other property from the Campus, or the
threat of any such action. Persons engaging in disruptive action or
disorderly conduct shall be subject to disciplinary action, including
suspension, expulsion, dismissal, or ejection, and also to charges of
violation of federal or state law.
Violation of the rules and regulations stated above will lead to
appropriate disciplinary action. Lack of prompt compliance with a cease
and desist order issued by the President, his/her representative, or
designate, will constitute an aggravation of the offense and immediate
suspension may be imposed.
Should any member of the College community have cause to believe
that an act by an individual or a group violates the rules and regulations
stated above, he/she may notify the office of the President or any
appropriate College authority.
The President, his/her representative or designate, shall determine if
the stated rules have been violated. If he/she finds such a violation, he/she
shall prescribe modifications in the conduct of the person or persons
involved and set a time limit for making such modifications.
Participants and spectators who fail to comply will be liable to College
discipline.
It should be emphasized that the primary means for dealing with
problems of students and College employees should be College
disciplinary measures. However, in the event of violence or
noncompliance, the President, his/her representative, or designate may
seek assistance from civil authorities in order to restore order and to
eject violators if necessary. Violators are subject to legal proceedings
and immediate suspension. In such cases the College shall not make
applications to the Court for reduction of charges or alter its internal
disciplinary procedures. Persons who are not members of the College
community who violate these rules and regulations are subject to civil
authority and will be promptly ejected from College premises or
authorized functions.
Student Judicial System
Dowling College is committed to providing its students with a
superior education, as well as helping its students develop character traits
essential to the fulfillment of community leadership roles in adult life.
Discipline is an integral part of this process. Discipline that is based on
natural and logical consequence is effective in training students to
become responsible for their own actions. Discipline is also an essential
part of maintaining the order necessary to permit our professors and
administrators to focus on what they do best, educate Dowling students.
A code of conduct has been designed, ultimately, to protect and
promote the interests of Dowling students, by attempting to ensure them
a safe, protective, and nurturing environment. Please refer to the Student
Handbook for additional and more detailed information.
Hazing Policy
The Rules for the Maintenance of Public Order contained in Section
6450 of the Education Law of the State of New York apply to all members
and organizations of the Dowling College community, as well as visitors
and licensees.
Hazing is both a violation of the Penal Law and other laws of the
State of New York, as well as of the general regulations of Dowling
College. Accordingly, the College reaffirms its policy that it will not
condone any action or situation involving physical or mental abuse such
as harassment, hazing, or intimidation, the forced consumption of
liquor, drugs, or any liquid or solid substance for the purpose of
initiation into, or affiliation with, any organization. Any conduct which
recklessly or intentionally endangers or threatens the health, safety, or
welfare of any person on College-owned property or at Collegesponsored activities is prohibited. To this end, persons who engage in
hazing may be ejected from the Campus and, where appropriate, shall
be subject to expulsion or other disciplinary action. Similarly, the College
may rescind permission for an organization, which authorizes hazing or
whose members engage in hazing, to operate on College property or use
the College‘s name.
Substance Abuse Policy for Students
Dowling College recognizes that the physical and psychological health of
its students is threatened by misuse and abuse of drugs and alcohol.
Commonly abused or improperly used drugs or controlled substances
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 31
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include, among others, alcohol, painkillers, sedatives, stimulants, and
tranquilizers, as well as marijuana, cocaine and heroin. It is the responsibility of
both the College and its students to maintain a safe, healthy learning
environment. In addition, as a government contractor, the College must
comply with the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended by Section 22 of
the Drug Free Schools and Communities Amendment of 1989 (Public Law
101-226). Therefore, the College has adopted a Substance Free Campus
Policy for students.
Participating as a student of Dowling College (which includes attending
classes, College functions, all activities on College property, participating
in College activities, or otherwise representing Dowling College off
premises) while under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or controlled
substances is strictly prohibited regardless of when or where the
consumption occurred. Students who are found to be under the
influence will be subject to disciplinary action up to and including
dismissal.
NOTE: Consumption or sale of alcohol in any form is expressly
prohibited on the Dowling campuses or at any Dowling-sponsored event.
Exceptions to this policy may only be authorized by the President or
his/her designee provided that the request is received in writing and no
less than 10 working days prior to the event.
Enforcement
Additionally, the College does not permit smoking within 10 feet of any
building entrance.
It is the responsibility of all members of the College community to
observe this smoke-free policy and to remind others of their
responsibility. This is a health, courtesy, and fire safety issue.
Enforcement
Any individual can voice an objection to smoke that gathers in
non-smoking areas without fear of retaliation by reporting it to their
responsibility head. In the event that disputes regarding the scope of
designated smoking areas arise and cannot be resolved, the entire College
will be designated as non-smoking. With respect to any other smokingrelated disputes which may arise under this policy, the rights of the
non-smoker will be governed by the rule of reason.
Violation of this policy may result in disciplinary action up to and
including discharge or suspension. New York State may impose a civil
penalty of $1000 per violation of the law, and the Suffolk County
Department of Health may levy a fine of $25 per violation of the law.
The College requests and expects everyone‘s assistance in helping it
to comply with its legal responsibilities under the County and State
public health laws.
Policy for acceptable use of Computing Resources
Students who violate this policy may be subject to criminal
prosecution (where applicable) and will be subject to appropriate
disciplinary action up to and including dismissal. In appropriate
circumstances, a first offense could result in dismissal.
Drug-Free Awareness Program
Dowling College has established a ―drug-free awareness program‖
to inform students about:
1. the dangers of drug abuse on Campus;
2. Dowling College‘s policy of maintaining a drug-free Campus;
3. available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and student assistance
programs; and
4. the penalties that may be imposed upon students for drug abuse
violations.
Programs for students and staff will be held on Campus during the
academic year. Look for notices of the meetings on Campus bulletin
boards.
Treatment
Dowling College recognizes drug dependency as a major health
problem. Students needing help in dealing with such problems are
encouraged to call the Center for Counseling, Health and Wellness at 631244-3455 for referral to an appropriate substance abuse treatment or
rehabilitation program. Conscientious efforts to seek such help will not
jeopardize a student‘s good standing at the College. The Center for
Counseling, Health and Wellness is located in Racanelli Center, Room 325.
No Smoking Policy
Consistent with restrictions imposed by New York State Public
Health Law Article 1 3-E, smoking is prohibited in all campus buildings.
The computing facilities at Dowling College are intended for use by
students, faculty, and administrators for the express purpose of
enhancing and supporting the educational process and function of the
College. All computer users are expected to adhere to the copyright law
of the United States (Title 17, U.S.C.), both in spirit and practice, and
follow all licensing agreements as stated by authors, vendors, and
developers.
Dowling College reserves the right to act against any person(s) who
willfully misuses College-owned computing equipment hardware,
software, and associated furnishings.
A complete copy of this policy is on file in the Center for Information
Technologies and may also be located on the Dowling College Website at
www.dowling.edu/mydowling/tech/itpolicy.html.
Intellectual Property Rights
Since the College may be legally responsible for the violation of
intellectual property rights occurring on its premises, any employee or
student who engages in conduct which directly or indirectly violates or
infringes upon licensing agreements, copyright, or trademark laws, will be
subject to disciplinary action up to and including dismissal from the
College and legal prosecution.
Privacy Rights
Since the College may be legally responsible for the violation of
privacy rights occurring on its premises, any employee or student who
engages in conduct which directly or indirectly violates or infringes upon
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 32
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the privacy rights of an employee or student will be subject to disciplinary
action up to and including dismissal from the College and legal
prosecution.
As many computer-related courses require students to submit
assignments written and debugged at computer work stations, the
possibility of plagiarism and other forms of academic dishonesty exists.
If the assignments are intended to be individually graded, then they
should result from individual effort. Computer assignments, whether they
consist of program codes or simple word-processed text, are subject to
the same policies with respect to academic honesty as any other work
submitted for grading as a written, graphic, or oral assignment. These
policies are set forth in the Dowling College Catalogs.
an aware, informed, alert campus community - student, faculty, and staff
who use reason and caution - along with a strong security presence.
The vast majority of our students, faculty, staff, and visitors do not
experience crime at Dowling College. However, despite our best efforts,
crimes sometimes occur. This information is provided because of our
commitment to campus safety and security and in compliance with the
federal law, the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and
Campus Crime Statistics Act (The Clery Act), and the New York State Campus
Safety Act of 1999. It is meant to be useful to you. If you have concerns,
questions or comments about federal or state law requirements of Dowling‘s
compliance with these laws, please contact the Director of Security and
Compliance at 631-244-3365.
All employees and students at Dowling College are responsible for
using safe work practices, for following all directives, policies and
procedures, and for assisting in maintaining a safe and secure work
environment.
Courtesy to Our Neighbors
The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security
Policy & Campus Crime Statistics Act
Plagiarism and Unauthorized Student
Collaboration
Dowling College is located within residential areas at both
the Rudolph Campus in Oakdale and the Brookhaven Campus.
Within the communities we wish to be good neighbors and
we ask for your cooperation:
1. Do not park on area roadways. Please use the parking facilities in
accordance with your designated area parking permit at all
times. This includes all campus lots on and surrounding area
streets on both campuses.
2. When driving in the Oakdale and Brookhaven community areas,
obey all traffic and parking regulations. NEVER speed, drive
recklessly, or pass vehicles on roadways.
3. When crossing streets or walking on area roadways, always use the
crosswalks. Do not impede traffic.
4. Always be courteous and considerate to area residents and
motorists.
5. Do not litter. Please respect the property of others.
6. Always be conscious that you are representing Dowling College and
that we value our reputation.
Workplace Violence/Campus Safety
Dowling College is committed to our students‘ safety and health. We
refuse to tolerate violence (zero tolerance) on the Campus and make
every effort to prevent violent incidents from occurring.
Dowling College encourages all students and College community
members to be fully aware of potential safety issues on Campus, and to
take action to prevent and report any hostile or threatening situation to
the Campus Security Department by dialing 88.
Campus Safety & Security
A Shared Responsibility: Campus Safety and Security at Dowling College is a
shared responsibility. Clearly, the best protection against campus crime is
(The Clery Act)--- Dowling’s “Right to Know”
The Clery Act requires Dowling to provide students and
employees with information on its security policies and procedures
and specific statistics for certain criminal incidents, arrests, and
disciplinary referrals and to make the information and statistics
available to prospective students and employees upon request. This
information is available by calling the Security and Compliance
department
at
631-244-3365,
or
online
at
http://www.dowling.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/right2know1.pdf
It is important to note that the crime classifications for which colleges
and universities must provide statistics differ under state and federal
law. Statistics for certain crime classifications might appear to be
different. For example, the federal statistics for motor vehicle theft differ
from the state statistics for the same category because the federal
classification includes attempted motor vehicle thefts, while state law
requires institutions to separately report attempted motor vehicle thefts.
The crime statistics reported under the Jeanne Clery Act include the
following: Criminal Homicide (murder; non-negligent manslaughter); Sex
Offenses (forcible rape; sodomy; sexual assault with an object; fondling;
non-forcible incest; statutory rape); Robbery; Aggravated Assault; Burglary;
Motor Vehicle Theft; and, Arson.
The Advisory Committee on Campus Safety will provide upon request all
campus crime statistics as reported to the U.S. Department of Education.
Individuals may request a hard copy of such crime statistics from the
College, which will be mailed to the individual within ten days by
calling 631-244-3365, Director of Security and Compliance.
These statistics can be obtained from The Dowling College Right to
Know
Report
(http://www.dowling.edu/wpcontent/uploads/2014/02/right2know1.pdf) as well as the College‘s
administrative regulations and programs to educate the college
community regarding security and crime prevention. The U.S. Department of
Education web site for campus crime statistics is: www.ope.ed.gov/security.
A copy of Dowling College‘s annual security report is available. This
report includes statistics for the previous three years concerning reported
crimes that occurred on campus; in certain off-campus buildings or property
owned or controlled by Dowling College; and on public property within, or
immediately adjacent to and accessible from, the campus. The report also
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 33
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includes institutional policies concerning campus security, such as policies
concerning alcohol and drug use, crime prevention, the reporting of crimes,
sexual assault, and other matters. You can obtain a copy of this report by
contacting Security or by accessing the following website:
www.dowling.edu/security/right2know.pdf.
Hate Crimes
The law requires the release of statistics by category of prejudice
concerning the occurrence of hate crimes in the crime classifications listed in
the preceding section and for other crimes involving bodily injury to any
person in which the victim is selected because of the actual or perceived race,
gender, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, or disability of the victim. In
August of 2008 HEOA S 488, 20 U.S.C. S1092 (f) (1) F (ii) modified the
above hate crimes to include the following additional crimes under the hate
crimes category:
Larceny Theft: The unlawful taking, carrying, leading, or riding away
of property from the possession, or constructive possession, of another.
Threats: Intimidation (includes Stalking) To unlawfully place
another person in reasonable fear of bodily harm through the use of
threatening words and/or other conduct, but without displaying a weapon
or subjecting the victim to actual physical attack.
Vandalism: To willfully or maliciously destroy, damage, deface, or
otherwise injure real or personal property without the consent of the
owner or the person having custody or control of it.
Simple Assault: An unlawful physical attack by one person upon
another where neither the offender displays a weapon, nor the victim
suffers obvious severe or aggrieved bodily injury involving apparent
broken bones, loss of teeth, possible internal injury, severe laceration, or
loss of consciousness.
Timely Warnings
When the Security Department becomes aware of criminal incidents
that, in the judgment of Dowling College‘s senior leadership constitute
an ongoing or continuing threat to the campus community, the security
department issues a Crime Alert to notify the community. These Crime
Alerts are disseminated by using one or a combination of the following;
email distribution; various campus publications; or, activation of the
Dowling College Emergency Notification Alert System, to advise the community of the situation.
Dowling College Emergency
Notification System
Dowling College‘s Emergency Notification Alert System enables the
College to quickly notify the Dowling Community of critical information
during a major emergency. This is accomplished through two (2) key
delivery methods: Personal Electronic Devices and Digital Displays.
Currently the College can notify Dowling faculty, staff, and students
via personal electronic devices (e.g., cell phones, PDA handhelds, etc.)
through text messaging, voicemail and email.
When a Dowling Alert is sent, the emergency coordinator uses it to
provide current and continuous updates, acting as a central reference
point for accurate information. This method is useful for those both on
and off-campus.
The Dowling Alert is only activated for serious emergencies which are
confirmed by security personnel and with the approval of the College‘s
senior leadership. Once it is determined to send the Dowling Alert, the
proper message is selected from several pre-scripted messages and sent. A
Dowling Alert can only be sent by one of several initiators who are trained
by the Administrative Information Services Department. Furthermore, the
Dowling Alert is tested at least annually to ensure all faculty, staff, and
students (who have signed into the system) are familiar with emergency
alerts and what their individual roles are during an actual situation.
Missing Resident Student & Unidentified Person
Policy
It shall be the policy of the College to thoroughly investigate all
reports of missing resident persons. Additionally the College holds that
every person reported as missing will be considered at risk until
significant information to the contrary is confirmed.
All reports of missing or suspected missing resident students should
be reported to the Security Department at (631) 244 3060 or 88 on the
Rudolph Campus; 631-630-6199 or 88 on the Brookhaven Campus, or
directly to the Suffolk County Police Department‘s 911. In effort to avoid
jurisdictional conflicts when an off-campus, non-campus and/or
commuter student is reported missing to the Dowling Security
Department, an immediate notification will be made to the appropriate
jurisdiction. The Security Department will assist external authorities with
these investigations.
Dowling College strongly recommends all students register
confidential contact information in the event that a student over the age
of 18 years is determined missing for a period of more than 24 hours. This
person would only be contacted if you are reported missing. This
information will be kept confidential and will be accessible only to
authorized campus and law enforcement officials.
This policy was developed based on the New York State Campus
Safety Act of 1999 and on recommendations provided by the National
Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) ―Model Policy‖ 2006.
Personal Safety Suggestions
It is vital for us as members of a community to be concerned about
the welfare of others.
Personal Safety at Night
1. Never wait or walk alone unless it is absolutely necessary. Use the safety
escort services!
2. Avoid shortcuts.
3. If you feel you are being followed, walk to the nearest group of people or
to a well-lighted area.
4. Immediately report any suspicious person or misconduct to the 24-hour
Campus Safety Command Center or the guard booth by dialing extension
88 or 631-244-3330 in Oakdale or in Brookhaven.
When Driving
1. Look into your vehicle before entering it and park it in a well-lighted area
designated for parking.
2. Lock all doors and roll up all windows.
3. Never pick up hitchhikers.
4. Drive on well-lighted and traveled streets.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 34
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5. If someone attempts to get into your vehicle while you are stopped,
accelerate and leave the area immediately.
6. If stopped by another vehicle, lock all doors and BLOW YOUR HORN
repeatedly for help.
When Walking
1. Wait for vehicles to pass before crossing intersections.
2. Stay within walkways and crosswalks where provided.
3. Minimize walking on roadways.
On-campus Housing
The members of our community who live in the Student Residence
Halls have a particular responsibility to one another. Please remember to
keep all doors locked, do not leave doors or windows propped open, and
do not admit anyone you don‘t know to your apartment.
To Protect Yourself and College Property
1. Record all serial numbers, brand names, and description of valuable
items and keep a duplicate copy in a separate location.
2. Keep your pocketbook or wallet out of sight and locked in a drawer.
3. Make certain that repairmen are truly repairmen before allowing them
to remove equipment. Ask for their I.D. cards. If they fail to show I.D. cards
or appear suspicious, notify the Security Office. Notify the Security Office if
you find unauthorized people in the Student Residence area.
Immediately report a loss, theft, or complaint to the Security Office
(Extension 3060 in Oakdale or Extension 6199 in Brookhaven; or in an
emergency, Extension 88 at either campus).
Fire Safety Rules
Fire drills are held in accordance with New York State Law. All
furniture brought into the Residence Halls should meet NYS-NFPA
requirements.
When Fire Alarm Sounds
1. IMMEDIATELY evacuate classes and offices in an orderly manner.
2. It will be the responsibility of the Faculty or Department Head to assist
in seeing that all the personnel in their area are directed to the nearest
stairway.
3. In case of an emergency, persons with disabilities shall be evacuated by
faculty, College personnel, and/or Fire Department. If you have
information, notify security of the location of persons with disabilities.
4. Elevators are not to be used for evacuation purposes during
emergencies.
In the Event of Fire
1. Activate the building fire alarm. Notify the Security Office on
Extension 88.
2. If you are aware of the location of the fire, provide the first Security
Officer at the scene with that information.
3. In the event of a heavy smoke condition, stay close to the floor. If the
hallway is filled with smoke and you cannot get out the nearest exit,
return to your room, close the door, open the window, and indicate to
people on the ground that you are there.
4. During a fire, DO NOT attempt to open any closed doors without first
feeling the door for heat. If the door feels excessively hot, do not open it.
5. For more information refer to the Dowling College Right to Know
Report
available
on
the
Dowling
College
website:
www.dowling.edu/security/right2know.pdf.
Annual Fire Safety Report
The Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) requires two (2)
new safety-related requirements on institutions that participate in
federal student financial aid programs.
Fire Log: Institutions must keep a fire log that states the nature of the
fire, date, time, and general location of each fire in on-campus student
housing facilities. Dowling College complies with this rule by including
all fire-related incidents in the Daily Crime and Fire Log. Information
will be made available within two (2) business days of a request for
public inspection.
Annual Fire Safety Report: Institutions with on-campus student
housing facilities must publish annually a fire safety report that provides
information on campus fire safety practices and standards. Dowling
College com-plies with this regulation by including all fire-related
incidents at on-campus student housing facilities as part of the Annual
Security & Fire Safety Report. Information contained in this annual fire
safety report includes: number and causes of fires at all on-campus
student housing facilities; number of fire-related deaths; related injuries;
value of fire-related property damage; information on evacuation
procedures; fire safety education and training programs; fire safety
systems in each student housing facility; number of regular mandatory
supervised fire drills; and policies on portable electrical appliance,
smoking and open flames. The Annual Security & Fire Safety Report must
include three (3) years of data. (Revisions to the Higher Education
Opportunity Act (HEOA) for Fire Safety and reporting were pro-posed in
2008. Therefore, only one year of data is currently available.)
Daily Crime and Fire Log: The security department maintains a
combined Daily Crime and Fire Log of all incidents reported to the
security department. This includes all crimes, fire-related incidents and
other incidents that occur on the campuses, in non-campus buildings
or properties, on public property or within the security patrol zone.
The daily Crime and Fire Log includes the incident type, date incident
is reported, date and time of occurrence, and general location of each
reported incident type, as well as the disposition of the incident, if this
information is known. The security department posts specific incidents in
the Daily Crime and Fire Log within two (2) business days of receiving a
report on an incident and reserves the right to exclude reports from a login certain circumstances, as permitted by law.
Vehicle and Parking Regulations
The rules and regulations regarding vehicles have been developed in
an effort to provide for the convenience and safety of all members of the
Dowling College Community. Every person driving in the local
communities and on Campus is expected to comply with these
regulations. A copy of the parking regulations is given to each student at
the time they receive their parking permit. The use of the Dowling College
parking areas (private property) is a privilege and not a right and under no
circumstances shall the College be responsible for loss or damage to any
vehicle, its contents, or equipment. All persons parking their vehicles on
Campus do so at their own risk.
For more information refer to the Dowling College Right to Know
Report,
available
at
http://www.dowling.edu/wpcontent/uploads/2014/02/right2know1.pdf.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 35
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Application for Parking Permit
Upon admission to the College or to any academic program
sponsored by the College, all individuals who will drive to the College are
responsible for obtaining a Dowling College Parking Permit for all
motor-driven vehicles including scooters, motorcycles, and motorbikes.
Parking permits may be obtained online by visiting www.dowling.edu or
through the Security Office at 121 Central Boulevard, Oakdale.
Additional stickers may be obtained and are administered on a case-bycase basis.
Academic Information
Dowling College:
A Curriculum by Design
which combines career exploration with coursework, externships, Collegesponsored extracurricular activities, and community service opportunities.
Recognizing that your career aspirations and personal interests may
develop and transform over time, students are allowed to change majors
at any time.
Minors
Broaden your knowledge base, enhance your credentials and
develop into a more marketable, well-rounded individual! Students, who
enter the College as freshmen with less than 30 credits and are not
enrolled in a "double-major" program, are expected to complete a minor
as well as a major. A minor generally requires fifteen to eighteen credits.
In keeping with its mission, Dowling allows students with a special
interest not served by any one of the minors to design their own in
consultation with an appropriate faculty member. (See page 88.)
College-Wide Requirements
Dowling College has created its own unique approach to academic
excellence, which combines your interests and career aspirations with
quality education and real-world experience. To ensure our graduates
enter the working world with confidence, all students engage in general
education courses composed of college-wide requirements and core
courses. These courses develop knowledge of yourself, your fellows
citizens, and the world as well as proficiency in reading, writing, critical
thinking, quantitative reasoning, speaking and listening. This means that,
through your Dowling experience, you will master knowledge and skills
that are essential to success, not only in college, but in life.
Beyond general education, Dowling students select a major, which is
comprised of required courses specific to their academic program, and
electives, which can be used towards specific career goals or personal
enrichment. Students are encouraged to complement that coursework
with an additional subject area, known as a minor. This winning
combination produces a challenging curriculum specific to your personal
and professional objectives.
With more than eight hundred possible major-minor combinations
available, students at Dowling have immeasurable opportunity to expand
their knowledge, tap into different fields and become candidates for
multiple professions. For instance, a student who majors in Marketing
could expand their capabilities by completing a minor in Creative Writing,
making him/herself an ideal candidate in the advertising field. The
possibilities are vast and are tailored to meet the diverse needs of our
student body.
Majors
Dowling College students have more than 40 academic programs from
which to choose, to help you develop into a more marketable, wellrounded individual. Students should select their major based on longterm goals and career aspirations.
Students are encouraged to review the academic offerings before they
begin their undergraduate program at Dowling. This is especially helpful
in highly structured majors, such as those in our School of Aviation, where
coursework is prescribed from the start of the first year. In most instances,
however, a student may defer the selection of a major until his or her
sophomore year and still have the opportunity to complete the program's
requirements within the customary eight semesters.
For students who are undecided about their educational and career
goals, we offer the Liberal Arts Leadership Development Experience,
All Dowling students must demonstrate competence in writing and
quantitative reasoning by meeting the following three course
requirements:
ENG 1001A Principles of Writing......................................................... 3 credits
MTH Any Mathematics course or NSM 2008C ................................ 3-4 credits
FYE First Year Experience Seminar (Freshmen Only) ..................... 3 credits
Note: The appropriate mathematics course to fulfill this requirement
will usually be dictated by the student‘s major. In those cases in which a
major makes no such requirement, the student will fulfill this
requirement by completing an appropriate mathematics or quantitative
skills course. Students who are candidates for Teacher Certification will
be advised by the Office of Enrollment Services in consultation with
the School of Education.
Core Requirements
In order to ensure that each Dowling student graduates with a
foundation in the liberal arts and develops a broad range of both skills
and knowledge beyond a major specialization, each Dowling graduate
must complete 33 credits of core curriculum. Students are required to
take two 3-credit core courses in each of five study areas: World
Civilizations, Modes of Artistic Expression, Dynamics of Contemporary
Societies, Nature of the Universe, and Varieties of Human Experience, as well
as a 3-credit Senior Seminar.
Students may take core courses in any order or sequence, with the
exception of the Senior Seminar and courses in a foreign language. The
Senior Seminar requires the completion of 90 credits in order to register,
and foreign language courses must be taken in sequence. There is a wide
range of course offerings within each study area, with well over 100
courses available to satisfy core requirements. These courses may count
toward major, minor, and certificate requirements, as well. Also, core
courses may be used to satisfy a prerequisite for non-core courses.
Core courses may be found in the list of course descriptions at the
end of this catalog. Core courses are indicated by a ―C‖ following the 4digit course number. Please note that some core courses have
prerequisites.
Students should consult the schedule of classes for course availability.
World Civilizations
6 credits
Any courses in English, French, History, Italian, Mandarin, Philosophy,
Religious Studies and Spanish whose 4-digit course number is followed by a
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 36
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―C.‖ Please note that if more than one foreign language course is selected,
the courses must be taken in sequence. A student may opt, however, to take
one foreign language course and combine that course with a HST, PHL, or
REL course.
Modes of Artistic Expression
6 credits
Any courses in Dance, Dramatic Arts, Media Studies, Music, Speech, and
Visual Arts whose 4-digit course number is followed by a ―C.‖
Dynamics of Contemporary Societies
6 credits
One course from among the following:
ECN 2103C
Great Ideas in Economics
POL 2101C
Modern Political Thought
POL 2102C
American Political Thought
SOC 2101C
Self and Society I: Foundations of Social Theory
Additionally, any course in Economics, Political Science or Sociology whose
4-digit course number is followed by a ―C‖ and that has not already been
taken to satisfy the requirement indicated above.
Nature of the Universe
6 credits
Any courses in Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, Marine Studies, Natural
Science, and Physics whose 4-digit course number is followed by a ―C.‖
Varieties of Human Experience
6 credits
Any courses in Anthropology and/or Psychology whose 4-digit course
number is followed by a ―C.‖
Senior Seminar
Any ASC XXXXC course.
3 credits
Every student is required to take a Senior Seminar after having completed 90
credits. Please consult the schedule of classes for seminar availability.
Core Curriculum Requirements
Total: 33 Credits
Transfer Students:
At the time of admission to the College, a transfer student‘s transcript
will be evaluated and a special Core Program developed for that student.
The resulting personalized requirements will provide a general
education program that meets the College‘s goals for the transfer student
as they relate to the five areas of the Core curriculum. This will include a
Senior Seminar and whatever Core courses are required to meet the
core curriculum goals.
First Year Experience Program
All freshmen (i.e., students admitted with fewer than thirty college
credits) are required to complete a three-credit First Year Experience (FYE)
content-based course. Topics are offered in a wide range of subject areas.
The course provides academic guidance helping students make the
transition from high school to college.
The program encourages students to develop reading, writing, and
research skills.
The course enhances the benefits of a liberal arts education by
preparing students to become critical thinkers.
Honors Program Requirements
All students who enter as freshmen and wish to graduate in the
Honors Program must enroll in and complete 33 credits of the Honors
Program Core Curriculum and 3 credits of Honors Freshman Seminar.
Students who transfer to Dowling after the freshman year will be required
to enroll in honors classes that complement the coursework they have
previously completed. To remain in the Honors Program, students must
maintain a cumulative G.P.A. of 3.5 and complete 30 credits each year.
Students who fall below this minimum who wish to remain in the program
may apply to the Honors Program Advisory Council which determines the
merit of the application.
Honors Program students are expected to engage in original
thinking about, independent inquiry into, and articulate commentary on
topics that have been determined appropriate for each aspect of the Core.
For further information, please contact the Director of the Honors
Program.
• The Honors Program Forum: The main objective of the Forum is for
Honors students to share their research projects with the faculty the
other Honors students and the Dowling College community at large.
Students are nominated to participate in this annual event by their faculty.
• Honors Senior Seminar: This seminar is an enhanced version of the
required seminar and involves an Honors Thesis, which will be the result of
research carried out under the mentorship of a thesis advisor, usually the
faculty member teaching the course.
• The Honors Program Experience: Honors Program students have the
opportunity to work with specially selected faculty and librarians on their
research projects and to participate in extracurricular activities and field
excursions. Most recently these have included a Presidential Breakfast, an
overnight stay at a mansion on the Upper East Side, a tour of The Cloisters,
and the viewing of the space show projected from the planetarium in the sky
dome of the Rose Center for Earth and Space Science. (See Entrance Criteria
on page 10.)
Skills
Dowling College assigns a high priority to affording its students
ample opportunity to improve their abilities in the areas of reading,
writing, critical thinking, speaking, listening, and quantitative reasoning.
Experience evidences that students who are weak in basic skills are at
greater risk of finding themselves in academic difficulty and,
consequently, of failing to achieve their degree. While at Dowling College,
every course offers students the opportunity to develop and improve
their proficiency in these essential skills by affording them ample
exercise. Some students require more assistance than can be provided in
class. To assist such students and thus help them to protect the
investment that they are making in their education, the College provides
developmental assistance tailored to each student‘s need. In some
instances, this may result in students being limited in the number of
courses that they may take their freshman year. By imposing this
restriction, the College seeks to assure that students are adequately
prepared for the courses they attempt and so enjoy the best possible
prospects for success.
Electives
For any Baccalaureate degree, there may be elective credits. Students
may utilize these elective credits to take any courses they wish,
providing they have met prerequisite requirements for their elective
credit choices.
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Many students use their electives to take additional courses in their
major or to satisfy Teacher Certification requirements. Other students use
their electives to explore personal interests, like music or art. Foreign
language study is an increasingly popular and valuable use of one‘s electives.
Electives may also be utilized to accommodate courses transferred
from another college or university where there is no equivalent Dowling
College course.
not take the place of students‘ individual responsibility to assure that they
have fulfilled their individual curriculum requirements as outlined in the
College Catalog. Therefore, it should be understood that, notwithstanding
participation in the advising program, the College disclaims any
responsibility to ensure that each student has fulfilled his or her
curriculum requirements. Nothing herein shall relieve the student of this
responsibility. Primary responsibility for knowing and fulfilling all degree,
program, and certification requirements rests on the individual student.
Matriculation
Academic Advisement
An expert faculty is any college‘s principal resource. The quality of
the students‘ experience at an institution is largely determined by the
caliber of its faculty. Dowling is exceedingly proud of its faculty, among whom
one finds nationally known poets, pianists and painters; scientists
pioneering in their field; aeronautical engineers who worked on the lunarlanding; management experts who have themselves built successful
corporations. Of course, for students to experience the benefits that derive
from association with the faculty, they must have the opportunity to meet
and to know them. That opportunity exists at Dowling.
Unlike many other institutions where classes of several hundred
students are common, the typical class-size at Dowling is fewer than
twenty. Thus, there is ample opportunity for faculty and students to know
one another and for them to become partners in learning.
Each student, moreover, is assigned a specific faculty advisor who,
throughout the period of the student‘s stay at Dowling, will be available to
assist the student to identify and achieve his or her individual goals and
objectives. Though continuity of advisement is important, students may
change their advisor whenever and as often as they wish.
The advisor—generally a professor in the student‘s major area of
interest—will assist students to clarify their personal goals and to develop a
strategy for their accomplishment. The advisor will work with the student to
plan a course of study consistent with those goals and will review that plan
with the student at least twice each year. In doing so, the advisor draws on
his considerable knowledge of the curriculum and of the career-field that the
student proposes to enter. Students pursuing Secondary Education
Certification should request two advisors - one in their primary subject area,
and one in secondary education. Students with dual majors/programs should
be assigned faculty advisors from each major.
The faculty advisor can also be useful in directing students who are
experiencing academic difficulties to needed assistance. The advisor is in
a position to guide a student who wishes to go beyond the content of her
or his courses to independent avenues of inquiry.
For many students, the principal obstacles to success are not
academic but rather personal or financial. The advisor is equally
concerned to assist the student in the resolution of those problems and,
if not always in a position to do so him or herself, is able to refer students
to appropriate sources of assistance.
At Dowling, each member of the faculty and staff is concerned for the
success and well-being of the Dowling student. Most often, however, it will be
the student‘s faculty advisor who knows him or her best and so will be best
able to understand that student‘s needs and concerns and thus be best
positioned to assist. Students should look upon their advisor as a personal
resource and should feel free to call upon his or her experience, expertise, and
concern to assist them to achieve their own goals and objectives.
Although the College will make every effort to inform students as to
their curriculum requirements, it should be noted that advisement does
The term ―matriculation‖ designates the enrollment status of those
students who have made application to the College and meet the criteria
established for acceptance to the College as degree candidates, (see
Admissions Criteria). Matriculated students need not have declared a
major.
Non-Matriculation
A non-matriculated student is one who has applied to Dowling
College and either does not meet criteria for matriculation or is not
interested in pursuing a degree.
Auditing classes
A student who is qualified to enroll in a regular college course may
audit the class and receive no college credit. Auditors are expected to
attend class regularly and may participate in class discussions, but they
write no papers and take no examinations. A grade of AU for the course
will be noted on the transcript.
A student may not change from audit to credit status or vice versa
after the first class meeting.
Audit registrations will not be processed until two weeks prior to the
start of each term. Auditors may register during the first or second week
of classes without paying the late registration fee. If a course becomes
oversubscribed, students registered as auditors may be removed from the
class with a full refund.
Grading
Grades of A, B, C, D, or F are awarded upon completion of all courses,
except those designated for P/F (pass/fail) grades, such as field and
work-shop courses. The numerical equivalent and quality points per
credit for letter grades are as follows:
Numerical
Quality Points
Grade
Equivalent
each credit
A+
(97-100)
4.00
A
(93-96)
4.00
A(90-92)
3.67
B+
(87-89)
3.33
B
(83-86)
3.00
B(80-82)
2.67
C+
(77-79)
2.33
C
(73-76)
2.00
C(70-72)
1.67
D+
(67-69)
1.33
D
(63-66)
1.00
D(60-62)
0.67
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 38
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F
(Fail)
0
WF
(Fail)
0
P
(Pass)
Credits for P grades are not included in the determination of a student‘s
grade point average.
I
(Incomplete)
W
(Withdrawal in good standing)
WF
(Withdrawal Failing)
Withdrawal without proper notification. WF grades are computed in the
grade point average.
Repeating Courses
Undergraduate students may only repeat a course in which a grade of
C- or lower has been obtained. Under extraordinary circumstances,
students may appeal to the Academic Standards Committee if they wish
to repeat a course in which a grade of C or higher was received. The
repetition must be the same course and must be taken at Dowling
College. All grades earned, including repeated courses, will remain on
the student's transcript.
Students who repeat a course once will have their first grade (C- to F)
excluded from their G.P.A. calculation, provided that they earn a passing
grade (A to D-) in the repeated course.
Please note that students who repeat a course more than once will
have only their first grade excluded from their G.P.A. calculation upon
earning a passing grade.
A course can be used only once towards a degree. A student's
academic standing will not be recomputed for the term in which the first
grade was issued. Repeated courses that have already received a passing
grade cannot be counted toward New York State financial aid eligibility for
full-time study or pursuit of program requirements.
Pass/No Credit Option
Within the specific limits noted below, a student may elect to have the
final grade in any course recorded on the official academic record either as
P (Pass) if the reported letter grade is A through D, or as NC (No Credit) if
the reported letter grade is F. Neither P nor NC is calculated into the grade
point average (G.P.A.). This option is intended to encourage students to
explore other and sometimes less familiar areas of study.
1. Courses graded P may not be used to satisfy college-wide
requirements (e.g. ENG 1001A and FYE). Any Mathematics
course or NSM 2008C graded P cannot be used to satisfy collegewide requirements. Courses graded P may be used to satisfy
one 3-credit Core course, but not senior seminar. Courses graded
P can satisfy minor requirements if permitted by the student‘s
minor department, but cannot satisfy major requirements.
2. Students may take up to 6 credits with the Pass/No Credit
Option (at most 3 of which can be used for Core as stated above)
over the course of their matriculation at the college.
3. Election of the P/NC option must be made before the 8th
week of any traditional semester (Fall or Spring) or by midpoint
of any non-traditional semester. After that date, no changes
either to or from the P/NC option may be made.
4. Courses taken P/NC may be repeated for a letter grade.
However, financial aid will not cover the repetition of a passing
grade.
5. The Registrar will communicate to the instructor of a course
the names of students who elect the P/NC option.
6. A grade of NC, like a grade of W, has a negative impact on
progress towards graduation and should not be chosen by a
student who has withdrawn from many courses previously.
Incomplete Grades
To be used in instances where a student has attended for the ENTIRE
SEMESTER and who has otherwise been doing passing work, but is prevented from completing the work of the course due to extenuating or
circumstances beyond his or her control.
At the time the incomplete grade is submitted to the Registrar, the
instructor must submit a description of the academic work necessary for
completion of the course. It is important to note that if the incomplete
grade has not been converted to a passing or failing grade by the
instructor within six weeks after the beginning of the next regular term
(i.e., fall or spring), the incomplete grade becomes an F.
Failing Grades
A student who receives a final grade of F in a course may be granted
credit for the course only by repeating it with a passing grade.
Grade Changes
No grade changes will be allowed after one year from the end of the
semester in which the course was taken.
Academic Clemency Policy
Academic clemency allows a student returning to Dowling College
after a period of at least three years the option of having his/her grade
point average calculated from the point of re-admission. Upon readmission, the student must complete one full time semester of study or
its equivalent, i.e. the completion of a minimum of 12 credits, and
maintain an overall minimum G.P.A. of 3.0. All previous course work done
at the institution prior to re-admission is disallowed toward the student‘s
graduation requirements. Thus the student is granted a ―clean slate‖. All
coursework remains on the transcript with a notation of ―Academic
Clemency.‖ A request for academic clemency to the Academic Standards
Committee must occur within one year after re-admission and applies
only to courses taken before re-admission.
Class Standing
Students are classified according to the number of credits earned:
Freshman
Sophomore
Junior
Senior
0-29.99 credits
30-59.99 credits
60-89.99 credits
90 or more credits
Registration
Students may not attend and will not receive credit for any course
for which they are not properly registered. To be registered, a student
must file a registration form with the Registrar during the period
designated for that purpose and must, in addition, make appropriate
arrangements with Student Financial Services to meet his or her
financial obligations to the College. Graduate or upper level
undergraduate students may register by fax, phone, or through our web
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 39
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page. Full-time status is twelve (12) credits on the undergraduate level,
nine (9) credits on the graduate level, and six (6) credits on the doctoral
level.
Course Load
During the Fall and Spring semesters, the normal course load for a
full-time student is 12 to 15 credits. An advisor may recommend that a
student carry more or less than a normal course load. Loads of more than
19 credits are subject to approval of the Dean, or Associate Provost of the
School in which the student is majoring, in accordance with the policies of
the Committee on Academic Standards.
The maximum course load during the accelerated terms is eight
credits, unless an exception is granted.
Attendance
All students are expected to attend classes regularly. Responsibility
for making up work missed through absence rests entirely with the
student. Students absent for more than one week have the responsibility
of reporting their absence to the Dean of Students.
Endowed Chairs
Endowed Chairs enhance the quality of programs in higher education
through both the recognition and contribution of the Chair holders.
These are regarded as the most prestigious appointments in academe,
and they honor significant scholarly or creative achievement and
academic excellence. Distinguished scholars who hold these positions
make significant contributions to the mission of the College.
Giambattista Vico Chair of Italian Culture
This interdisciplinary chair is designated to add to the courses and
teaching curriculum of the Humanities and Social Sciences departments.
The Chair is responsible for lectures, seminars, exchanges and other
activities with Italian universities and cultural institutions of other
countries relating to Italian culture. The chair was established in 1998.
Independent Study
An independent study must be a well-thought-out project between a
student and a faculty member. Independent study work is intended to give
a student opportunity to pursue an academic project under close faculty
supervision. The standards for independent studies are designed to
maintain a high level of quality in the work undertaken.
Student Qualifications
1. An undergraduate student must have at least a 3.0 overall G.P.A. and
have earned at least 60 credits (at least six (6) of which have been earned at
Dowling College) at the time of registration, in order to be eligible to pursue
independent study work.
2. Students can only do independent study work in a discipline in which
they have already completed at least six (6) earned credits of work and
overall have completed a minimum of 60 earned credits. Students must have
completed at least one semester at Dowling, with at least six (6) credits of
coursework.
3. Written approval from Academic Standards must accompany the
Application for Independent Study form, if all the requirements in Part
II of the form have not been met.
Tutors for Independent Studies
1. A student‘s tutor for an independent study must be a faculty member in
the discipline in which credit for the work is to be issued.
2. Adjunct faculty members may serve as tutors for independent study
work only if they have the approval of their Department Chair and the
Dean. Administrators cannot serve as either tutor, advisors or sponsors of
independent study work.
Nature of Independent Study Work
1. Independent study work cannot duplicate course work, nor can it
duplicate any previous work for which a student has already received credit.
2. Independent study work cannot be used as a substitute for any course or
any course requirements without the prior approval of the appropriate
Department Chair.
3. A student may register for only one independent study, and for a
maximum of three (3) credits of work during any semester or term. A student
may not apply more than six (6) credits of independent study toward
graduation requirements.
4. Students doing a 3-credit independent study involving selected readings,
research of a topic or investigation of any kind are expected to submit a
minimum 15 page paper. Students doing independent studies for either 1
or 2 credits are expected to produce a minimum 10-page typed paper. Papers
are to be typed in 12 point Times New Roman Font, double spaced, with 1 inch
margins and enumeration of pages. Pictures, tables, diagrams, endnotes and the
bibliography do not count towards the minimum page counts previously stated.
The independent study will be reviewed and graded by the faculty mentor
with the student prior to its being placed on file in the College Library.
5. Independent studies in areas where a faculty mentor considers a paper to
be inappropriate must be accompanied (when proposed) by an alternate
plan as to how the student work will be assessed. The appropriate
Department Chair must approve projects which fall into this category
before the student may begin work. In cases where a project is approved
without a paper due, the faculty mentor must submit a 2-3 page typed
description of the specific work to be completed by the student. This
―Abstract,‖ (which may be written by the student), must be filed with the
faculty member before a grade can be entered for the student.
6. A student and his or her faculty mentor are expected to meet at least
once a week for at least one hour during the course of the term in which the
work is being done.
To Register for an Independent Study, the Student Must:
1. Obtain an application and academic information from the Registrar‘s
Office.
2. Identify the faculty mentor appropriate to the independent study project
the student wishes to complete.
3. Meet with the faculty mentor and design the independent study project
in detail.
4. Complete the independent study application and appropriate registration
form, including all required signatures, and return it to the Registrar‘s Office
with the Independent Study course outline and preliminary bibliography.
5. If all requirements have not been met, written approval from the
Academic Standards Committee must accompany the Application for
Independent Study form when being submitted to the Registrar‘s Office for
registration.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 40
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Enrollment by Undergraduates in
Graduate Courses
Students who have earned a minimum of 90 undergraduate credits
with a 3.0 average overall and a 3.4 average in their major may, with the
approval of their advisor and the Provost, earn a maximum of six graduate
credits. Graduate credits may not be applied toward a Baccalaureate
degree.
This option is intended to provide recognition and opportunity for
those students who have displayed their intelligence and dedication in
pursuing their educational goals. It is directed toward those special
students who are most desirous of enhancing their education and career
opportunities by providing a direct path toward graduate education. As
undergraduates, they are limited to participating only in preparatory and
basic courses.
Participating students may take only one graduate course in any given
term and may not attempt more than fifteen credits in the Fall or Spring
terms, three credits in the Winter or Summer terms. Students must earn a
B or better in the first course taken to be eligible to attempt a second
course.
Transfer Credit
Transfer credit is awarded for appropriate work completed, with a
grade of C or better, at another accredited college or university. A
student who transfers from a two-year college must ordinarily take his or
her final 60 credits at a four-year institution. The last 30 credits earned
prior to graduation must be taken at Dowling College.
Study at Other Colleges
accounts pertaining to veterans as well as those of other students shall be
available for examination by government representatives.
If a student wishes to inspect or review his or her records, he or she
may contact the office concerned. Complete information concerning this
policy is available in the office of the Dean of Students. Inquiries
concerning compliance with the F.E.R.P.A. may be directed to the Dean
of Students, Dowling College, Rudolph Campus, Oakdale, Long Island,
New York, 11769; or call 631-244-3362.
Mid-Term Grades
Faculty submit to the Registrar, immediately after mid-term, the
names of students at risk of failure, either as a result of poor performance
or poor attendance. These reports are forwarded to the student, the
student‘s advisor, and to Academic Support Services.
Honors
The student with the highest average in the graduating class and who
has completed at least 60 credits at Dowling as a full-time student will be
Valedictorian. In case of a tie, the student who meets the first criteria and
has completed the most credits at Dowling will be the Valedictorian.
The full-time student who is ranked second in the consideration for
Valedictorian shall be the Salutatorian.
A student may be graduated with honors if the requirements for
graduation have been met and if the following stipulated grade point
average has been achieved. To graduate with honors, a student having
completed fewer than 60 credits at Dowling College must also have earned
the cumulative grade point average of 3.7 or better on all college course
work taken outside of Dowling College.
Average
Matriculated students must receive permission from their faculty
advisor in order to take courses at other institutions. Once a student has
attained junior status at Dowling College, credit will only be accepted for
any subsequent courses taken at a four-year college. Freshmen and
sophomores, however, may be given credit, with the approval of their
advisor for summer work taken at a two-year college.
Transcripts of Record
Requests for transcripts must be submitted to the Registrar in
writing. For each transcript, a fee of $10 is charged.
Confidentiality of Student Records
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended,
grants all eligible students or parents of financially-dependent students
the right of access to their own educational records as defined in this law.
The law prohibits access to release of personally identifiable information,
other than directory information, without written consent.
Dowling College policy does not permit access to release of student
records to any third party except as authorized by this law.
It should be noted, however, that this legislation concerning privacy is
affected by Section 510 of the Veterans Education and Employment Act
of 1976 which provides that notwithstanding P.L. 93-568, records and
Honors
3.9 - 4.00 ..................................... Summa Cum Laude
3.8 - 3.89 .......................................Magna Cum Laude
3.7 - 3.79 ................................................... Cum Laude
Dean’s List
Students who receive grade point averages of 3.5 or better for the
semester while taking a minimum of 12 graded credits (pass/fail courses
are not included) will be appointed to the Dean‘s List. Students taking at
least 12 credits across any combination of the three summer terms with a
combined grade point average of 3.5 or better for all summer coursework
(subject to any current restriction regarding academic progress) will also
be appointed to the Dean‘s List. Part-time students who complete 6-11
credits in each of two consecutive Spring/Fall or Fall/Spring semesters
(pass/fail courses are not included) with grade point averages of 3.5 or
better will be appointed to the Dean‘s List.
Departmental Honors
Departmental Honors gives students with senior status the
opportunity to participate in advanced work under the supervision of a
faculty member in the department of their major or program.
Departments that have criteria that meet College-wide standards are able
to offer Departmental Honors to academically qualified students (overall
G.P.A. of 3.7). Departmental Honors involves substantial original
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 41
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independent research, creative endeavor, and/or other scholarly activity in
the field. The honors work should provide deeper engagement in the
major field of study.
Departmental Honors involves a six-credit Honors Project sequence,
generally taken over the fall and spring semesters. A student must earn at
least an A- in each course in order to receive Departmental Honors. The
first three-credit course must normally be completed with at least an A- in
order to continue.
A list of programs offering Departmental Honors and the specific
requirements of their Honors Projects is available at the Office of the
Registrar.
Academic Progress Requirements
All students are required to maintain good academic standing as a
condition of enrollment at Dowling College and to receive Federal, State
and institutional aid. The guidelines vary, depending upon the student‘s
grade level and depending upon which form(s) of aid they are receiving.
Good academic standing is measured by reviewing a student‘s
quantitative and qualitative progress. The quantitative measurement
ensures that students are making progress toward their degree goals,
while the qualitative measurement ensures that students are succeeding
in their coursework.
Undergraduate students are required to have a cumulative average of 2.0
or higher, while earning a minimum number of credits to demonstrate good
academic standing. A student failing to meet that minimum standard would
be placed on ―Academic Probation‖ for the subsequent semester. A student
who is placed on academic probation is required to complete the College
Success Self-Assessment Survey and meet with the Admissions staff as
recommended by the assigned associate. A student who does not meet with
an associate during the first semester of probation as recommended will have
his/her case reviewed at the end of the semester by the Academic Standards
Committee and will likely be dismissed from the college rather than be
granted a second semester of probation. A student who satisfies the
stipulations set forth in any academic success plan that is established will be
granted a second semester of academic probation if applicable. At the end of
the second semester of probation, a student whose performance is still not
satisfactory for removal from probation will be granted a third semester of
probation only if it is deemed appropriate by the Academic Standards
Committee in consultation with Admissions. Any student still
underachieving at the end of the third semester of probation will be
dismissed from the college. However, students who have made acceptable
progress will have a better chance of being readmitted to the college on
appeal; while a student who does not make acceptable progress will likely be
denied readmission. Only after a period of at least one semester away from
college will a student be permitted to apply for readmission.
The chart below is used to determine satisfactory academic progress:
Credits Attempted
>11 >23 >35 >47 >59
6
12 20 28 38
>71
48
>83
60
>95 >107 >119 >131 >144
72
84
96 108 120
Academic Progress Requirements for New York
State Aid
To receive State scholarships or grants, a student must be in good
academic standing. For financial aid purposes, good academic standing
consists of two components:
• Pursuit of Program* - a requirement that a student receive a passing or
failing grade (grades of A-F) in a certain percent of courses each semester;
and,
• Satisfactory Academic Progress - a requirement that a student
accumulate a specific cumulative grade point average each term.
The minimum standards vary, depending upon the number of State
payments a student has received. Students who have received two or more
full years of State financial aid must maintain a 2.0 average.
*Credits can include non-credit remedial coursework; completed
coursework requires grades of ‗A‘ - ‗F‘. Grades of ‗I‘, ‗W‘, ‗WF‘ do not meet
the requirements.
TAP Satisfactory Academic Progress Table
Payment
Number
#1
#2
#3
#4
#5
#6
#7
#8
#9
#10
Credits Completed
Previous Semester
0
6
6
9
9
12
12
12
12
12
Credits
0
6
15
27
39
51
66
81
96
111
GPA
0.00
1.50
1.80
1.80
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
Academic progress for New York State aid is checked at the end of
each semester.
Most students are eligible for up to 8 semesters of TAP. Students in
approved five year programs and students enrolled in the Higher
Education Opportunity Program (HEOP) are eligible for up to 10
semesters of TAP.
The academic progress guidelines for part-time students are prorated.
Academic Progress Requirements for Federal &
Institutional Aid
Undergraduate recipients of Federal and Institutional financial aid
must also maintain good academic progress as a condition of aid receipt.
This is also measured by reviewing a student‘s quantitative and
qualitative progress toward their degree goals. The chart below is used to
determine satisfactory academic progress for Federal and institutional
aid.
For full time students:
Credits
Attempted
1-24
25-48
49-72
73-96
97-180
Must have learned
at least
55% of attempted credits
63% of attempted credits
72% of attempted credits
80% of attempted credits
85% of attempted credits
With a GPA of
at least
1.7
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
The standards are prorated for part-time students.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 42
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Academic progress for Federal aid is checked at least once annually,
usually in the summer preceding the following academic year.
Appeal to Reinstate Federal Financial Aid
Federal Waiver Appeals
A student who is not considered in good academic standing for
financial aid purposes may submit a written appeal. This appeal, along with
any supporting documentation, must be submitted to the Director of
Financial Aid and should explain the reasons for poor academic
performance. Appeals are reviewed on a case-by-case basis, and the student
will be notified, in writing, of the decision. Generally, regulations dictate that
the appeal should be granted for a failure to meet standards for an otherwise
academically successful student. Extenuating circumstances might include
death of a family member or friend, illness of the student, or other
circumstances that prohibited the student from successfully completing his/her
coursework.
TAP Waiver Appeals
A student who is not considered in good academic standing for
financial aid purposes may apply for a one time TAP waiver. This appeal,
along with any supporting documentation, must be submitted to the
Director of Financial Aid and should explain the reasons for poor academic
performance. Appeals are reviewed on a case by case basis, and the student
will be notified, in writing, of the decision. Generally, regulations dictate
that the appeal should be granted for a one-time failure to meet standards
for an otherwise academically successful student. Extenuating
circumstances might include death of a family member or friend, illness of
the student, or other circumstances that prohibited the student from
successfully completing his/her coursework.
Withdrawal from Courses
A withdrawal is made on the appropriate form with the signatures of
both the instructor and the faculty advisor and filed in the Registrar‘s
Office.
A student may withdraw from a course during the period allotted for
course changes (see academic calendar) with no notation of enrollment in
the course being recorded on the student‘s record.
Students are permitted to withdraw from a course with a grade of W
any time after the last day of course changes and before midterm (see
academic calendar). After midterm, but prior to the final examination, a
grade of W or WF will be given as determined by the instructor based on
the student‘s work to that time.
Leaving a course without notifying the instructor and filing the
appropriate form may result in having a grade of WF reported for that
course. WF grades will be included in the computation of the student‘s
grade point average.
Never attending a course(s) without notifying the Office of the
Registrar is not an acceptable means of withdrawal and will result in a
full tuition and fees liability.
Withdrawal from College
official transcript. Refer to Refunds for schedule or tuition refunds for
withdrawing students.
Students who discontinue attendance without notification will be
recorded as having unofficially withdrawn, which may result in having
grades of WF reported for that semester. These students are responsible
for their total tuition and fees. Students who withdraw from all their
classes, either officially or unofficially, may lose a percentage of their
financial aid. Refer to the refund section of this catalog for more detailed
information.
Maintenance of Matriculation
Students in good academic standing may take a leave of absence from
the College of up to one year without forfeiting their status as a
matriculating student. They do this by completing and filing a
Maintenance of Matriculation form with the Office of the Registrar.
As nonregistered but matriculated students, they are eligible to use the
facilities of the College on the same basis as other students. Students who
maintain matriculation may return at will and continue throughout their
career at Dowling to be governed by the Catalog effective at the time of
original entry.
Students who maintain matriculation pay a maintenance fee of $60.00
per semester. Students who fail to maintain matriculation but who
subsequently reapply for admission will be charged a $50 readmission fee.
Readmission
Students who fail to maintain matriculation for more than one
semester must apply for readmission. Readmission will be granted or
denied on the basis of then current circumstances and will be governed by
the Catalog in effect at the time of readmission.
A student dismissed for reasons of poor scholarship may apply for
readmission after one calendar year. Applications for readmission must be
approved by the Academic Standards Committee. If readmitted, the
student is placed on academic probation for the returning semester.
All students readmitted to the College are subjected to the Catalog
requirements in effect at the time of readmission.
Graduation
To be eligible for graduation, every
candidate for an undergraduate degree must (a)
have completed the final 30 credits at Dowling
College in registered coursework; (b) have a
grade point average of not less than 2.0; (c) have
fulfilled the requirements of the program in
which he or she is enrolled. During a student‘s
next-to-last semester at Dowling, he or she must file an application for
graduation with the Office of Degree Audit so that a preliminary
evaluation of eligibility for graduation may be completed. Degrees are
conferred on the first conferral date following completion of all degree
requirements.
A student voluntarily withdrawing from the College must
immediately notify the Registrar. Notification must be in writing,
indicating the reason for the withdrawal. Grades for the semester from
which the student has properly withdrawn will be reported as W‘s on the
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 43
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Academic Honesty Policy
Each Dowling College student shares with the College the
responsibility for promoting and maintaining the academic integrity of the
College community. The College views all forms of academic dishonesty,
including but not limited to, plagiarism and cheating, as very serious
matters punishable by penalties that may include failure in a course or
expulsion from the College.
Plagiarism
Plagiarism is the act of representing someone else‘s ideas, products,
or words as one‘s own. It is a violation of legal, moral, and educational
codes of behavior. Allowing another student to falsely represent one‘s own
work as his or her own is likewise to engage in plagiarism. Materials and
works submitted as fulfillment of course requirements must be the
student‘s own work. Students are expected to know and use proper forms
of citation when making use of the ideas or products of another. Any direct
quotation regardless of how long must be accompanied by a reference
citation. Paraphrasing another‘s ideas requires similar documentation.
Using ―ghost written‖ or purchased term papers is a form of plagiarism.
Plagiarism might result in a penalty that may include a grade of ―F‖ for the
paper and a failing grade for the course for the student involved.
Cheating
Cheating of any kind is a violation of the Dowling College policy on
academic honesty. This includes, but is not limited to, the unauthorized
receiving or giving of information or assistance during examinations,
quizzes, or any other evaluative instrument, as well as the use of any
unauthorized information or assistance during such tests. Unless otherwise
stated by the instructor, students are prohibited from using any electronic
devices while taking an exam. The use of an unapproved electronic device
shall be construed as cheating and may be appropriately penalized by the
instructor.
Submitting work in one course which has already been submitted for
another course, without the consent of the instructor, is also considered
academic dishonesty. Any act which improperly deprives other students
from equal access to library, media, computer, or other course related
materials is an act of academic dishonesty.
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty may be questioned
by the course instructor. In some cases, academic dishonesty by a student
may be handled between the faculty member and the student involved. In
other cases, the matter may be brought before the Assistant Vice President
for Admissions. It is College policy to encourage faculty members to
report instances of academic dishonesty to the Assistant Vice President for
Admissions. The Academic Standards Committee will serve as the
appeals body for resolution of such matters, including the extent of the
penalties involved. Appeals must be made in a timely manner.
Students who observe cheating are encouraged to report to the
faculty member involved that there are instances of cheating taking place
in his or her course.
Recommendations to Faculty Concerning
Plagiarism and Cheating
In order to be able to deal with repeat offenders in the matter of
academic dishonesty, the faculty is encouraged to report to the Dean of
Students all instances of cheating on which some action has been taken.
This report should be made in writing, with a copy provided to the student
involved. The student will have the right to append a statement to the
report. Such reports will be kept confidential, and will be used by the
Dean of Students and the Academic Standards Committee only for the
purposes of dealing with instances of academic dishonesty. Plagiarism
might result in a penalty that may include a grade of ―F‖ for the paper
and a failing grade for the course for the student involved. The policy
for each course should be specified on the syllabus.
Procedure in Matters of Violation of the Dowling
College Policy on Academic Honesty
1. Students subjected to penalties for violation of the Dowling College Policy
on Academic Honesty as determined by a faculty member and/or the Dean
of Students may appeal the matter to the Academic Standards Committee.
Students wishing to appeal to the Academic Standards Committee must
file that appeal in writing within ten (10) calendar days following the
action taken by the faculty member or the Dean of Students.
2. Faculty members electing to impose penalties for violation(s) of the Policy
on Academic Honesty may impose penalties ranging from a warning to a
failing grade of the particular paper, project, or work in question to a
failing grade for the course. Faculty are encouraged to report these actions
to the Office of the Dean of Students in order that a confidential file be
established for the purpose of tracking possible repeat be no additional
violation of this policy, the student may, upon graduation, appeal directly
to the Dean of Students to have this note file expunged.
3. The Academic Standards Committee may initiate proceedings in the
case of a very serious violation or an accumulation of reports of academic
dishonesty by a student.
4. a. The Academic Standards Committee will, upon student or faculty
appeals, within thirty (30) calendar days of notice to the individuals
involved that the committee is conducting such investigation, request
written statements from all individuals involved. Such statements will be
provided to the individuals involved for comment.
b. After the receipt of such written statements and comments, the
Committee will make every effort to interview the concerned
individuals, as well as others who may have relevant information.
5. Within thirty (30) calendar days after the receipt of all information
concerning the matter, the Committee will issue its report containing its
findings in writing to the parties involved, with a copy to the President. In
rendering its judgment, the Committee shall examine the evidence, hear
witnesses, and review all relevant documents.
6. The Committee may revoke, mitigate, or increase earlier imposed
penalties by the faculty member and/or the Dean of Students. The
Committee may also initiate penalties. In case of serious or repeated
violations, the Committee may impose a penalty of suspension or expulsion
from the College.
7. Records of proceedings will be held confidential by the Dean of Students
and/or the Chairperson of the Academic Standards Committee.
8. All decisions of the Academic Standards Committee pertaining to cases of
academic dishonesty may be appealed to the President. Such appeals must
be submitted, in writing, within ten (10) calendar days after issuance of the
decision of the Academic Standards Committee. Such appeal must state the
reasons why the Academic Standards Committee should be reversed. The
President shall review the decision of the Academic Standards Committee
and determine whether it is reasonable to conclude that its decision was
based upon the evidence presented to it and consistent with the standards
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 44
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set forth in the Dowling College Policy on Academic Honesty. The President
shall issue a decision within thirty (30) calendar days of the date of receipt by
him or her of such appeal. The decision of the President shall be final and
binding on all parties.
Right of Appeal in Academic Matters
A student who believes that he or she has reason for consideration or
redress of a College-wide academic issue may appeal to the Academic
Standards Committee.
Academic Waivers
A student may submit a request for waiver of degree requirements
for majors, disciplines, and minors, including a custom-designed minor,
as well as core requirements. Instructions and forms may be found at the
Dowling College website at http://www.dowling.edu, and navigate to
―Current Students;‖ ―Forms and Policies;‖ ―Academics;‖ ―Academic
Appeal Students;‖ ―Forms and Policies;‖ ―Academics;‖ ―Academic Appeal
Forms.‖
School of Aviation
Aviation
School of Business
Accounting, Computer Information Systems, Finance, Management,
Marketing
School of Education
Human Development and Learning (Elementary, Early Childhood and
TESOL), Secondary Education (Adolescence and Middle Childhood),
Special Education, Literary Education, Sport Management and
Physical Education, Educational Administration, Leadership and
Technology
The degree programs described on the following pages have been
approved by and duly registered with the New York State Education
Department, as indicated by the Higher Education General Information
Survey (HEGIS) code number that appears in parentheses after the
program title. Students are advised that enrollment in other than
registered or otherwise approved programs may jeopardize their
eligibility for certain student aid awards.
Teacher Education Program
Degree Programs
Degree Requirements
To qualify for a baccalaureate degree from Dowling College, a student
who enters the college with fewer than 90 credits completed must satisfy
the following requirements:
• Complete an approved major.
• Complete an approved minor.*
• Complete required sections of the core curriculum.
• Earn a minimum grade point average of not less than 2.0 on a 4.0
system.
Academic Structure
The basic academic structure at Dowling College forms the framework
within which degree programs are developed. Each area of inquiry
constitutes a department, e.g., English, Political Science, or Biology.
Related departments are grouped to constitute academic divisions.
Divisions are grouped in four schools: The School of Arts and
Sciences, the School of Aviation, the School of Business, and the School
of Education.
The four Schools with their constituent divisions and departments are
as follows:
School of Arts and Sciences
Division of Arts and Humanities
Visual Arts, Graphic Design and Digital Arts, Music, English, Foreign
Languages & Literature, Philosophy and Religious Studies, and
Speech/Media Studies/ Dramatic Arts/Dance
Division of Social Sciences
Anthropology, Sociology, History, Psychology, Economics,
Political Science
Division of Natural Science and Mathematics
Mathematics and Computer Science, Biology, Chemistry and
Physics, Earth and Marine Sciences
The Teacher Education Program at Dowling College offers a course
of study leading to New York State initial certification in the following
areas:
Early Childhood Education (Birth - Grade 2)
Childhood Education (Grade 1 - Grade 6)
Middle Childhood Education (Grade 5 - Grade 9)
Adolescence Education (Grade 7 - Grade 12)
Special Education (and Childhood or Adolescence Education)
Physical Education (Grade Pre-K - Grade 12)
Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) (K12)
Theatre Arts Education (Grade 1 - Grade 12)
Middle Childhood or Adolescence Education teachers may
specialize in the following content areas:
Biology
Business and Marketing
Chemistry and Physics
Earth Science
English
French
Mathematics
Music
Social Studies
Spanish
Theatre Arts
Visual Arts
All are New York State approved competency-based teacher
education programs.
Dowling offers the Master of Science in education with programs in
Adolescence, Childhood, Early Childhood, Educational Technology
Leadership, Gifted Education, Literacy, Middle Childhood, Special
Education, and Sport Management.
Students accepted into an education program will continually
demonstrate competence in oral and written expression and critical
thinking; maintain a 3.0 grade point average in both liberal arts courses
and education courses; and satisfactorily complete part-time field - based
experiences and seminars prior to student teaching. Students‘
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 45
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competencies will be monitored on a regular basis by the Education
faculty and the Teacher Assessment Competency Team (TACT) of the
School of Education. Students will be notified if a problem has been
identified and advised of appropriate action.
*Students majoring in Accounting, Aviation Management, Biology,
Computer Information Systems, Finance, Management, Marketing, Natural
Sciences and Mathematics, Physical Education, Professional and Liberal
Studies, or Sport Management are exempt from this requirement. For
students entering with 30 or more credits completed, the minor is optional.
Student Teaching Placement and Teacher
Certification
The Student Teacher Placement and Teacher Certification Office
provides undergraduate and graduate students with services relating to
student teacher field placements and New York State Certification.
All undergraduate and graduate candidates seeking certification
should meet with both their education and subject area major advisors to
discuss their programs.
Candidates are required to register with the Director of Student
Teaching Placement one semester prior to any field placement. Reference
is made to this stipulation in both the undergraduate and graduate
catalogs under the listing of required program courses. Student teachers are
required to present and maintain a grade point average of 3.0 to qualify for
student teaching.
Higher Education Act, Title II Reporting
All United States higher education institutions enrolling students
who receive federal assistance and have teacher education programs must
report their teacher certification test pass rates in school catalogs and
other promotional materials for the first time beginning April 9, 2001 as a
public accountability measure mandated by Congress through its passage
of the Title II of the Higher Education Act of 1998.
Annual Institution Report for Dowling College Program Year 2011-2012
Individuals seeking a New York State certificate for teaching the
common branch subjects in pre-kindergarten through grade 6 or
academic subjects in the secondary grades 7 through 12, i.e., English, a
science (biology, chemistry, earth science, physics) or social studies, must
achieve qualifying scores on a set of assessments called the New York
State Teacher Certification Examinations (NYSTCE) as part of the
requirements for certification.
The purpose of these examinations is to help ensure that certified
teachers have the knowledge and skills that are important for the job of a
teacher in New York State public schools.
NYSTCE
Dowling College
Test Field/Category
Tested Passed Pass Rate
Professional Knowledge/Pedagogy Assessment
of Teaching Skills - Written
323
317
99%
Multi subject
167
158
94%
Liberal Arts & Sciences Test
308
302
98%
Teaching Special Populations
156
151
97%
Statewide
Pass Rate
100%
95%
99%
94%
Program Information for Academic Year 2014-2015
There were 551 students in the undergraduate and graduate teacher
preparation program. There were 126 students in programs of
supervised student teaching. The supervising faculty was composed of
three full-time faculty in professional education and 31 field supervisors
also were employed.
In programs of supervised teaching, Dowling provides one faculty
member or field supervisor for six students.
Student Teacher Field Experience Statistics for
Academic Year 2012-2014
The average number of hours per week required of student
participation in supervised student teaching in these programs was 30
hours per week. The total number of weeks of supervised student
teaching required is 15. The total number of hours required is 450.
Degree Programs in Education
Students have the option of majoring in education at Dowling or
majoring in any one of the disciplines of the College. Students interested
in a specific field of specialization in secondary education are advised to
develop their programs of study in consultation with an advisor in their
major as well as an advisor in Education.
Dowling College offers the following degrees in education: B.A. in
Early Childhood Education, B.A. in Elementary Education, B.A. in
Physical Education, B.S. in Special Education, and a B.S. in Teaching
English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). Students interested in
one of the thirteen Secondary Education subject areas must major in that
discipline and at the same time fulfill the Secondary Teacher
Certification requirements.
In addition to successful completion of required coursework, students
seeking Teacher Certification must pass the New York State Teacher
Certification Examinations, the Child Abuse and Neglect Workshop, the
Violence Prevention Workshop, the Drug Abuse Workshop, the DASA
Workshop, and the Fingerprinting Workshop. Students are advised to
see their assigned Education advisor for assistance regarding Teacher
Certification requirements.
Secondary Teacher Certification Program
For the purpose of teacher certification by the State of New York,
Secondary Education is categorized as Middle Childhood Education for
grades 5 through 9, and Adolescence Education for grades 7 through 12.
The emphasis of the Secondary Teacher Certification program is on the
subject the student plans to teach, on a series of sequential education
courses that prepare the teacher candidate to successfully confront the
challenges of teaching, and on two practical supervised student teaching
experiences at both the Middle School and High School levels.
Students, in conjunction with Education and Content Area advisors,
design a program that will provide them with necessary instructional and
classroom management skills, as well as content area courses required for
the Dowling College degree and for New York State Teacher Certification.
Students are requested to meet with their Secondary Education advisors
early in their program in order to keep informed about change in New
York State Teacher Certification and Dowling degree requirements.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 46
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Certification Areas
Students may be certified in the following areas:
Biology*
Chemistry*
Earth Science*
English*
French*
Mathematics*
Music
Physics*
Social Studies*
Spanish*
Theatre Arts
Visual Arts
Business and Marketing
*Students wishing to pursue dual certification in Adolescence
Education with Special Education in one of these subject areas should
refer to the B.S. in Special Education requirements on page 80.
In addition to meeting the academic area requirements for certification
in their respective departments, students must demonstrate competency in
a language other than English and have taken a broad background of
course work in Arts, Humanities, Sciences, Mathematics, and Social
Sciences.
When students complete this program they will have acquired
knowledge, skills, and dispositions in four domains:
Domain 1: Planning and Preparation
Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of content and
pedagogy, demonstrate knowledge of students, be able to select
instructional goals, demonstrate knowledge of resources, design coherent
instruction and assess student learning.
Domain 2: The Classroom Environment
Students will be able to create an environment of respect and rapport
among the students and teacher, establish a culture for learning, manage
classroom procedures and manage student behavior.
Domain 3: Instruction
Students will be able to communicate clearly and accurately, use
question and discussion techniques effectively, engage students in
learning, provide proper feedback and demonstrate flexibility and
responsiveness.
Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities
Students will be able to reflect on teaching, maintain accurate
records, communicate effectively with families, and contribute to the
school, the district, and the community.
Academic Benchmarks
All Students seeking Secondary Teacher Certification have their
academic progress evaluated at three stages:
Entry Stage:
Students seeking entry into the Secondary Teacher Certification
Program must apply for admission through the Office of Enrollment
Services. The office evaluates such student credentials as transcripts from
high school and/or post-secondary institutions, scores on the SAT, letters
of recommendation, etc. (See Admissions).
Midpoint Stage:
Students reach the midpoint stage of the program immediately prior
to enrolling in EDA 3127. At this stage students must have met the
following requirements:
• Satisfactory completion of the following courses: EDA 2139N, EDA 3152N,
EDS 1081A, EDL 4149N, EDL 4150A, LIB 1101N, PSY 2016A, and EDA 1160
• Completion of a minimum of 24 credits of content courses
• Earned a minimum G.P.A. of 3.0
Exit Stage:
Students reach the exit stage immediately prior to applying for the
Initial Teaching Certificate. At this stage students must have met the
following requirements:
• Satisfactory completion of the following courses:
EDA 4195N, and
EDA 4196N
• Completion of all required content courses
• Satisfaction of the language requirement • Awarded a Baccalaureate
Degree
• Passed the required New York State Teacher Certification Exams (edTPA ,
EAS, ALST, and CST)
• Attended the required workshops (Child Abuse, Violence Prevention,
Drug Abuse, and DASA)
• Fingerprinting
• Minimum G.P.A. of 3.0
Core Requirements
Middle Childhood (5-9) and Adolescence (7-12)
Upper Sophomore Year
Course Number and Title
PSY 2016A
Developmental Psychology II
EDA 2139N
Culture & Diversity: Educational Issues
& Influences
Lower Junior Year
Course Number and Title
EDA 3152N
Foundations of Teaching and Learning
in Inclusive Adolescence Education
EDA 1160A
The Middle School and the
Middle School Child
EDL 4149N
Literacy Acquisition II
Upper Junior Year
EDS 1081A
Introduction to Exceptional Children
EDL 4150N
Teaching Reading in the Content Areas
(prerequisite EDL 4149N)
LIB 1101N
Introduction to Academic Research
Credits
3
3
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
1
Middle Childhood and Adolescence Pedagogy
Lower Senior Year (Minimum 24 credits in content and 3.0 GPA)
Course Number and Title
Credits
EDA 3127N
Curriculum Development, Grades 5-12
3
(10 hours field experience per week at grades 5 & 6 in middle childhood
program, or grades 7-9 in adolescence program)
EDA 3128N
Instructional Methods & Classroom Management
Strategies*; Grades 5-12 (co-requisite EDA 3127N)
3
Upper Senior Year
Note: EDA 4195N, and 4196N must be taken together. (Students need 30
credits minimum in content, 6 credits in foreign language, 3.0 GPA)
EDA 4195N
Subject Methods Seminar; Grades 5-12
3
EDA 4196N
Supervised Student Teaching; Grades 5-12*
3
*In addition to course registration, students are required to register with
the Director of Educational Placements by November 15 for Spring
semester student teaching, and by May 1 for Fall semester student
teaching. Field placements will be at the discretion of the Director of
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 47
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Educational Placements. The student must maintain a minimum Grade
Point Average of 3.0 or better in the subject area for which he/she seeks
Teacher Certification.
Note: Students seeking Middle Childhood or Adolescence certification
must also complete 6 credits in one foreign language, not American Sign
Language, prior to student teaching (EDA 4195N, EDA 4196N). Sign
Language may only be used by students requiring special
accommodations.
Academic Area Requirements for Initial
Certification
(If a teacher track is offered in the major, Secondary students should take
those courses.)
Biology 5-9 & 7-12 (HEGIS 0838)
36 credits in Science needed for certification,
24 of which must be in Biology
The student is expected to demonstrate knowledge of botany,
zoology, ecology, embryology, genetics, algebra, general chemistry, and
general physics. Where appropriate, the student will be expected to
demonstrate laboratory skills. The B.A. in Biology is recommended for
certification in Biology (see page 49).
Business and Marketing 5-9 & 7-12 (HEGIS 0501)
36 credits in Business needed for certification
Students who wish certification in Business usually come to Dowling
with an A.A.S. degree in Secretarial Science, Accounting, Business
Administration, Business Marketing, or Business Retail Management,
and work for certification within the framework of the degree of
Bachelor of Science in Professional and Liberal Studies. Degree and
certification requirements are determined on the basis of the student‘s
educational background by the Education advisor. The B.B.A. in
Management & Leadership or the B.B.A. in Marketing is recommended for
certification in Business and Marketing (see pages 86 and 86).
Chemistry 5-9 & 7-12 (HEGIS 1905)
36 credits in Science needed for certification,
24 of which must be in Chemistry
The student is expected to demonstrate knowledge of general
chemistry, organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, physical chemistry,
qualitative and quantitative analysis, general physics, and mathematics
through calculus. Where appropriate, the student will be expected to
demonstrate laboratory skills. The B.A. in Chemistry is recommended for
certification in Chemistry (see page 50 and 73).
Earth Science 7-12 (HEGIS 27500)
36 credits in science needed for certification,
24 of which must be in Earth Science
The student is expected to demonstrate knowledge of the dynamic
changes of the earth from inner space (geology, volcanism, oceanography,
meteorology) to outer space (astronomy, eunomental science). The B.A.
in Earth Science is recommended for certification in Earth Science (see
page 56).
English 5-9 & 7-12 (HEGIS 1501)
36 credits in English needed for certification
The student is expected to demonstrate knowledge of listening and
speaking skills; oral reading skills; critical and interpretive reading skills;
the structure and function of language including history, semantics, and
usage; genre, period, and author works including Shakespeare; creative
writing, journalism, and dramatics. The B.A. in English is recommended
for certification in English (see page 58).
French 5-9 & 7-12 (HEGIS 1102)
36 credits in French needed for certification
The student is expected to demonstrate the following: fluency in
reading, writing, and speaking French; an ability to analyze the French
language; and knowledge of the various French cultures. The B.A. in
Romance Languages with 30 credits in French is recommended for
certification in French (see page 64).
Mathematics 5-9 & 7-12 (HEGIS 1701)
36 credits in Mathematics needed for certification,
12 of which must be in Calculus
The student is expected to demonstrate the following: knowledge of
the historical development of mathematics, number theory and concepts,
ability to utilize mathematical systems of algebra including linear and
abstract, geometry, trigonometry, and calculus; ability to solve problems
involving data analysis, mathematical modeling, probability, statistics and
discrete mathematics. Students are expected to demonstrate their ability
to apply numerical computation and estimation techniques, extend them
to algebraic expressions, and apply measurement to two and threedimensional objects. Most importantly, students are expected to
demonstrate their ability to communicate mathematically and use
language skills to explain mathematical concepts and processes and apply
mathematics in real-world settings. Required courses include: CSC 1009N,
MTH 1017A, MTH 1021A, MTH 1022A, MTH 2023A, MTH 2103A, MTH
2115A, MTH 3104A, MTH 3111A, MTH 4109A, MTH 4171A. The B.A. in
Mathematics is recommended for certification in Mathematics (see page
61 and 70.)
Music 1-12 (HEGIS 0832)
36 credits in Music needed for certification
Students seeking certification in music must see both an Education
advisor, for Education degree, and Teacher Certification advisement, and
the Music Department Coordinator, for music coursework requirements.
The B.A. in Music is recommended for certification in Music (see page 62).
Physics 5-9 & 7-12 (HEGIS 1902)
36 credits in Science needed for certification,
24 of which must be in Physics
The student is expected to demonstrate knowledge of mechanics,
electricity/magnetism, atomic theory, instrumentation, biophysics,
thermodynamics, wave phenomena, electronics, electrochemistry, general
chemistry, and mathematics through calculus. When appropriate, the
student is expected to demonstrate laboratory skills. The student is also
expected to know the way in which models are used to describe and interpret
how the physical world came into being. The B.S. in Natural Sciences
and Mathematics is recommended for certification in Physics (see page 78).
Social Studies 5-9 & 7-12 (HEGIS 2201)
36 credits in Social Sciences needed for certification
The student is expected to demonstrate knowledge of world history
and American history, anthropology, sociology, economics, political
theory, geography, and government. Advanced knowledge of at least
one of the above cited disciplines must be demonstrated. Further, the
student will be required to explain the characteristics of the social
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 48
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science disciplines and their points of convergence and divergence. The
B.A. in Social Sciences (Broad Option) is recommended for certification
in Social Studies (see page 66). The B.A. in Economics, B.A. in History,
B.A. in Political Science and B.A. in Sociology-Anthropology are
alternatives that may also lead to certification in Social Studies (see pages
56, 60, 63, and 67, respectively).
Spanish 5-9 & 7-12 (HEGIS 1105)
36 credits in Spanish needed for certification
The student is expected to demonstrate the following: fluency in
reading, writing, and speaking Spanish; an ability to analyze the Spanish
language; and knowledge of the various Spanish cultures. The B.A. in
Romance Languages with 30 credits in Spanish is recommended for
certification in Spanish (see page 64).
Theatre Arts 1-12 (HEGIS 1007)
36 credits in Theatre needed for certification
Students seeking certification in theatre must see both an education
advisor for the education program, and the theatre department chair for
theatre coursework requirements. The B.A. in Communication Arts is
recommended for certification in Theatre Arts (see page 53).
Visual Arts 1-12 (HEGIS 0831)
36 credits in the Arts needed for certification
The student is expected to demonstrate the following: knowledge of
the history of Western visual arts, with special emphasis on modern
concepts of vision; an ability to analyze the elements of the visual arts; an
ability to understand the relationships between art elements and their
expressive characteristics; an ability to comprehend contemporary
concepts of space; the creative use of elements and use of space, e.g.,
composition; a broad background in the relationship of all arts-visual,
theatre, dance, and music. Students are strongly advised to take VIS
1001C and VIS 1002C in fulfilling their core requirements. The B.A. in Visual
Arts is recommended for certification in Visual Arts (see page 67).
Note: Students wishing to pursue dual certification in Middle Childhood or
Adolescence Education in one of these subject areas along with Special
Education should refer to the B.S. in Special Education requirements on
pages 80.
Graduate Education
Applicants who have a Baccalaureate degree from an accredited
institution are eligible to apply for acceptance in the Master of Science in
Adolescence Education, Adolescence/Middle Childhood Education,
Childhood Education, Childhood/Early Childhood Education,
Childhood/Gifted Education, Early Childhood Education, Educational
Technology Leadership, Literacy Education, Special Education, and Sport
Management.
Students develop an individual course of study to satisfy
requirements for the degrees to reflect his or her professional needs.
Interested students are urged to come to the Office of Enrollment
Services at the Rudolph Campus in Oakdale for graduate advisement.
Graduate advisement is provided year round on a drop-in basis: MondayThursday, 4:00-7:30 p.m.
A complete description of the graduate education program, including
specific requirements and course descriptions is published in the
Graduate Catalog, available from the Office of Enrollment Services at
Dowling College.
Bachelor of Arts Degrees
The Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degrees require a minimum of 120 credits
of course work, at least three-quarters of which must be in the liberal arts
and sciences.
B.A. in Biology
(HEGIS 0401)
Dowling‘s Biology degree programs are constructed upon a wellrounded core curriculum of biology, chemistry and mathematics. These
are building blocks that ensure career versatility in an ever-changing
world. The B.A. in Biology degree program at Dowling has three tracks:
a General Track for science-related and teaching careers, a Pre-Medical
Track for medical school preparation, and a Pre-Physician‘s Assistant
Track for PA school preparation and other related health fields.
Career Outcomes for Biology Majors
Your Dowling Biology degree prepares you to enter a science-related
career or post-graduate program leading to becoming a physician,
veterinarian, physician‘s assistant, nurse, physical therapist, occupational
therapist, dentist, or other allied health professional. The Biology degree
will also prepare students for the pursuit of a career in biology teaching,
field or laboratory research biologist, pharmaceutical research or sales, or
laboratory technician. Finally, the Biology degree is excellent for students
wishing to continue their studies at post-graduate level in biology.
Students seeking certification to teach Biology at the secondary level
must consult an education advisor (also see page 38).
B.A. in Biology - General Track
College-Wide Requirements
6 credits
See page 36. (Mathematics requirement is satisfied under major
requirements.)
Core Requirements
33 credits
See pages 36-37.
Major Requirements
58 credits
BIO 1001A
Introduction to Biology I
3
BIO 1002A
Introduction to Biology II
3
BIO 1003A
Introduction to Biology Laboratory I
1
BIO 1004A
Introduction to Biology Laboratory II
1
BIO 2051C
Botany
4
BIO 2071C
Ecology
4
BIO 2113C
Evolution
3
BIO 3150C
Genetics
4
BIO 4170C
Cell Biology
4
BIO
Electives
12
MTH 1006A
Statistics
3
MTH 1014A
Pre-Calculus or
3
MTH 1021A
Calculus I; or
4
CSC 1023N
Introduction to Computer Science
3
CHM 1001C
General Chemistry I
3
CHM 1002C
General Chemistry II
3
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 49
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CHM 1003C
CHM 1004C
CHM 3025A
CHM 3026A
CHM 3027A
CHM 3028A
General Chemistry Laboratory I
General Chemistry Laboratory II
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
Organic Chemistry Laboratory II
1
1
3
3
1
1
Minor/Electives Requirements
20 credits
Total: 120 credits
Note: Students majoring in Biology are not required to complete a minor.
B.A. in Biology - Pre-Medical Health Track
College-Wide Requirements
6 credits
See page 36. (Mathematics requirement is satisfied under major
requirements)
Core Requirements
33 credits
See pages 36-37.
Major Requirements
62 credits
BIO 1001A
Introduction to Biology I
3
BIO 1002A
Introduction to Biology II
3
BIO 1003A
Introduction to Biology Laboratory I
1
BIO 1004A
Introduction to Biology Laboratory II
1
BIO 2061C
Vertebrates
4
BIO 3081C
Microbiology
4
BIO 3140C
Physiology
4
BIO 3150C
Genetics
4
BIO 4170C
Cell Biology
4
BIO/CHM 4101C
Biochemistry
3
CHM 1001C
General Chemistry I
3
CHM 1002C
General Chemistry II
3
CHM 1003C
General Chemistry Laboratory I
1
CHM 1004C
General Chemistry Laboratory II
1
CHM 3025A
Organic Chemistry I
3
CHM 3026A
Organic Chemistry II
3
CHM 3027A
Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
1
CHM 3028A
Organic Chemistry Laboratory II
1
MTH 1014A
Pre-Calculus
3
MTH 1021A
Calculus I
4
PHY 1001C
General Physics I
3
PHY 1002C
General Physics II
3
PHY 1003C
General Physics Laboratory I
1
PHY 1004C
General Physics Laboratory II
1
BIO 1001A
Introduction to Biology I
BIO 1002A
Introduction to Biology II
BIO 1003A
Introduction to Biology Laboratory I
BIO 1004A
Introduction to Biology Laboratory II
BIO 2011A
Human Anatomy
BIO 3077C
Developmental Biology
BIO 3081C
Microbiology
BIO 3139C
Human Anatomy & Physiology I
BIO 3140C
Human Anatomy & Physiology II
BIO 3150C
Genetics
Two of the following four courses:
BIO 4197N
Internship/Co-op
BIO 4198N
Internship/Co-op
BIO 4170C
Cell Biology
BIO 4250C
Medical Microbiology
MTH 1006A
Statistics
MTH 1014A
Pre-Calculus
CHM 1001C
General Chemistry I
CHM 1002C
General Chemistry II
CHM 1003C
General Chemistry Laboratory I
CHM 1004C
General Chemistry Laboratory II
CHM 3025A
Organic Chemistry I
CHM 3026A
Organic Chemistry II
CHM 3027A
Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
CHM 3028A
Organic Chemistry Laboratory II
PSY 1001A
Introduction to Psychology
Minor/Electives Requirements
3
3
1
1
4
4
4
4
4
6-7
3
3
4
4
3
3
3
3
1
1
3
3
1
1
3
21-22 credits
Total: 120 credits
Note: Students majoring in Biology are not required to complete a minor
but the Medical Ethics minor is recommended for the Pre-PA track.
B.A. in Chemistry
(HEGIS 1905)
Note: Students majoring in Biology are not required to complete a minor
but the Medical Ethics minor is recommended for the Pre-Medical track.
Dowling‘s chemistry degree programs provide a solid foundation in
each of the fundamental areas of chemistry: inorganic, organic, physical,
analytical, instrumental, and biological chemistry. Modern and
traditional instrumentation and techniques are utilized in laboratories,
classwork, and field experiences. Instrumentation includes high pressure
liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, atomic absorption
spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy,
fluorometry, and mass spectrometry. Students gain ample hands-on
experience with instrumentation in coursework and are encouraged to
conduct chemistry research or to participate in the Chemistry
Cooperative Internship Program. Research opportunities are available on
campus with Dowling faculty and off campus with Dowling partners
from industry and governmental entities.
B.A. in Biology - Pre-Physician’s Assistant Track
Career Outcomes for Chemistry Majors
Electives
19 credits
Total Credits Required for Graduation: 120
College-Wide Requirements
6 credits
See page 36. (Mathematics requirement is satisfied under major
requirements)
Core Requirements
33 credits
See pages 36-37.
Major Requirements
59-60 credits
The Bachelor of Arts degree in chemistry gives students flexibility to
pursue varied career goals. It prepares students for employment in
government or industries such as pharmaceutical and environmental
testing, and exceeds the minimum chemistry content required for
secondary school teaching. Students are qualified to pursue advanced
degrees in the sciences and engineering or in professional schools. The
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 50
Back to Table of Contents
B.A. is recommended for students interested in teaching or attending
medical school since it allows more electives that students may use to
fulfill education requirements for New York State Teacher Certification
or to meet medical school requirements. Students interested in chemistry
Ph.D. programs should select the B.S. in Chemistry.
B.A. in Chemistry - General Track
College-Wide Requirements
6 credits
See page 36. (Mathematics requirement is satisfied under major
requirements)
Core Requirements
33 credits
See pages 36-37.
Major Requirements
55-56 credits
CHM 1001C
General Chemistry I
3
CHM 1002C
General Chemistry II
3
CHM 1003C
General Chemistry I Laboratory
1
CHM 1004C
General Chemistry II Laboratory
1
CHM 3025A
Organic Chemistry I
3
CHM 3026A
Organic Chemistry II
3
CHM 3027A
Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
1
CHM 3028A
Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
1
CHM 3035A
Analytical Chemistry
3
CHM 3037A
Analytical Chemistry Laboratory
1
CHM 3045A
Inorganic Chemistry
3
CHM 3047A
Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory
1
CHM/PHY 4169A
Physical Chemistry: Quantum Mechanics
3
CHM/PHY 4170A
Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics
3
CHM Electives
Any courses numbered 2000 and above
6
MTH 1006A
Statistics or
MTH 2023A
Calculus III or
MTH 3111A
Probability & Mathematical Statistics
3-4
MTH 1021A
Calculus I
4
MTH 1022A
Calculus II
4
PHY 1001C
General Physics I
3
PHY 1002C
General Physics II
3
PHY 1003C
General Physics I Laboratory
1
PHY 1004C
General Physics II Laboratory
1
Minor/Electives Requirements
25-26 credits
Total: 120 credits
Note: Students majoring in Chemistry are not required to complete a minor.
Suggested Sequence of Course Work for the
Chemistry General Track
Credits
Semester 1
CHM 1001C
General Chemistry I Lecture
3
CHM 1003C
General Chemistry I Laboratory
1
FYE
First Year Experience Seminar (Freshmen only)
3
MTH 1021A*
Calculus I
4
Core Requirement
3
Total: 14
Semester 2
CHM 1002C
General Chemistry II Lecture
3
CHM 1004C
General Chemistry II Laboratory
1
ENG 1001A
Principles of Writing
3
MTH 1022A
Calculus II
4
Core Requirement
3
Total: 14
Semester 3
CHM 3025A
CHM 3027A
MTH 1006A
MTH 2023A
MTH 3111A
PHY 1001C
PHY 1003C
Core Requirement
Organic Chemistry I Lecture
Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
Statistics or
Calculus III or
Probability & Mathematical Statistics
General Physics I Lecture
General Physics I Laboratory
Semester 4
CHM 3026A
CHM 3028A
PHY 1002C
PHY 1004C
Core Requirements
Organic Chemistry II Lecture
Organic chemistry II Laboratory
General Physics II Lecture
General Physics II Laboratory
Semester 5**
CHM 3035A
Analytical Chemistry
CHM 3037A
Analytical Chemistry Laboratory
CHM 3045A
Inorganic Chemistry
CHM 3047A
Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory
Core Requirements
Electives (Chemistry or General)
Semester 6
Core Requirements
Electives (Chemistry or General)
3
1
3-4
3
1
3
Total: 14-15
3
1
3
1
6
Total: 14
3
1
3
1
6
2
Total: 16
6
9-10
Total: 15-16
Semester 7
CHM 4169A
Physical Chemistry: Quantum Mechanics
Core Requirement
Electives (Chemistry or General)
3
3
10
Total: 16
Semester 8
CHM 4170A
Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics
Senior Seminar
Electives (Chemistry or General)
3
3
10
Total: 16
*Students who do not pass the placement exam for MTH 1021A-Calculus I
should take MTH 1014A Pre-calculus in Semester 1. The prerequisite for
CHM 1001C is a grade of C or better in MTH 1014A, such students must
postpone enrollment in CHM 1001-1004C until Semesters 3 and 4.
**Chemistry courses taken in Semesters 5-8 are offered on an alternate year
cycle and have prerequisites that should be completed in Semesters 1-4.
Note: Students majoring in Chemistry are not required to complete a minor.
Students seeking certification to teach Chemistry at the secondary level must
consult an education advisor (also see page 38).
B.A. in Chemistry - Professional Health Track
College-Wide Requirements
6 credits
See page 36. (Mathematics requirement is satisfied under major
requirements)
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 51
Back to Table of Contents
Core Requirements
33 credits
See pages 36-37.
Major Requirements
63-64 credits
BIO 1001A
Introduction to Biology I
3
BIO 1002A
Introduction to Biology II
3
BIO 1003A
Introduction to Biology I Laboratory
1
BIO 1004A
Introduction to Biology II Laboratory
1
BIO/CHM 4101C
Biochemistry
3
CHM 1001C
General Chemistry I
3
CHM 1002C
General Chemistry II
3
CHM 1003C
General Chemistry I Laboratory
1
CHM 1004C
General Chemistry II Laboratory
1
CHM 3025A
Organic Chemistry I
3
CHM 3026A
Organic Chemistry II
3
CHM 3027A
Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
1
CHM 3028A
Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
1
CHM 3035A
Analytical Chemistry
3
CHM 3037A
Analytical Chemistry Laboratory
1
CHM 3045A
Inorganic Chemistry
3
CHM 3047A
Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory
1
CHM/PHY 4169A
Physical Chemistry: Quantum Mechanics
3
CHM/PHY 4170A
Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics
3
CHM Elective
Any course(s) numbered 2000 and above
3
MTH 1006A
Statistics or
MTH 2023A
Calculus III or
MTH 3111A
Probability & Mathematical Statistics
3-4
MTH 1021A
Calculus I
4
MTH 1022A
Calculus II
4
PHY 1001C
General Physics I
3
PHY 1002C
General Physics II
3
PHY 1003C
General Physics I Laboratory
1
PHY 1004C
General Physics II Laboratory
1
Minor/Electives Requirements
17-18 credits
Total: 120 credits
Suggested Sequence of Course Work for the Chemistry
Professional Health Track
Credits
Semester 1
CHM 1001C
General Chemistry I Lecture
3
CHM 1003C
General Chemistry I Laboratory
1
MTH 1021A*
Calculus I
4
FYE
First Year Experience Seminar (Freshmen only)
3
Core
3
Total: 14
Semester 2
CHM 1002C
General Chemistry II Lecture
3
CHM 1004C
General Chemistry II Laboratory
1
ENG 1001A
Principles of Writing
3
MTH 1022A
Calculus II
4
Core
3
Total: 14
Semester 3
CHM 3025A
Organic Chemistry I Lecture
3
CHM 3027A
Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
1
MTH 1006A
Statistics or
MTH 2023A
Calculus III or
MTH 3111A
Probability & Mathematical Statistics
3-4
PHY 1001C
General Physics I Lecture
3
PHY 1003C
Core
General Physics I Laboratory
1
3
Total: 14-15
Semester 4
CHM 3026A
CHM 3028A
PHY 1002C
PHY 1004C
Core
Organic Chemistry II Lecture
Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
General Physics II Lecture
General Physics II Laboratory
3
1
3
1
6
Total: 14
Semester 5**
BIO 1001A
BIO 1003A
CHM 3035A
CHM 3037A
CHM 3045A
CHM 3047A
Core
Introduction to Biology I Lecture
Introduction to Biology I Laboratory
Analytical Chemistry
Analytical Chemistry Laboratory
Inorganic Chemistry
Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory
3
1
3
1
3
1
6
Total: 18
Semester 6
BIO 1002A
Introduction to Biology II Lecture
BIO 1004A
Introduction to Biology II Laboratory
CHM Elective
Any course(s) numbered 2000 and above
Core
Elective (Chemistry or General)
Semester 7
ASC
Senior Seminar
CHM 4169A
Physical Chemistry: Quantum Mechanics
Core
Electives (Chemistry or General)
3
1
3
6
3
Total: 16
3
3
3
6
Total: 15
Semester 8
CHM 4101A
Biochemistry
CHM 4170A
Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics
Electives (Chemistry or General)
3
3
8-9
Total: 14-15
*Students who do not pass the placement exam for MTH 1021A-Calculus I
should take MTH 1014A Pre-calculus in Semester 1. The prerequisite for CHM
1001C is a grade of C or better in MTH 1014A, such students must postpone
enrollment in CHM 1001-1004C until Semesters 3 and 4.
**Chemistry courses taken in Semesters 5-8 are offered on an alternate year
cycle and have prerequisites that should be completed in Semesters 1-4.
Five-Year Degree Sequencing for the B.A. in
Chemistry and M.B.A. in General Management &
Leadership (with business minor for science
majors)
The College offers a five-year B.A. in Chemistry and M.B.A. in General
Management & Leadership (with a business minor for science majors) to
provide a strong foundation for chemistry majors whose career path may
lead into private industries, such as pharmaceutical or cosmetic. This
sequence positions the graduate to enter these private industries and to
progress into managerial positions. Contact the School of Arts and Sciences
at 631-244-3232 for further information.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 52
Back to Table of Contents
Recommended Sequence of Courses for the B.A. in Chemistry and
M.B.A. in General Management (with business minor for science majors)
Semester 1
Credits
CHM 1001C
General Chemistry I Lecture
3
CHM 1003C
General Chemistry I Laboratory
1
ENG 1001A
Principles of Writing
3
FYE
First Year Experience Seminar (Freshmen only)
3
MTH 1021A*
Calculus I
4
Core
3
Semester - Summer
MGT 6301N
Strategic Management
MGT 6373N
Leadership, Business Ethics and
Quality Management or
MGT 63XX
Graduate Management course
Semester 2
CHM 1002C
CHM 1004C
Core
MGT 6233N
MGT 6308N
Semester 3
CHM 3025A
CHM 3027A
Core
Semester 4
ACC 2001N
CHM 3026A
CHM 3028A
CHM Elective
PHY 1002C
PHY 1004C
Core
Semester - Summer
MGT 1011N
Semester 5
ACC 2002N
CHM 3037A
CHM 3045A
CHM Elective
Core
General Chemistry II Lecture
General Chemistry II Laboratory
3
1
6
Organic Chemistry I Lecture
Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
3
1
6
Introduction to Financial Accounting I
Organic Chemistry II Lecture
Organic chemistry II Laboratory
3
3
1
3
3
1
3
General Physics II Lecture
General Physics II Laboratory
Introduction to Management Theory and Practice
3
Introduction to Financial Accounting II
Analytical Chemistry Laboratory
Inorganic Chemistry
3
1
3
3
6
Semester 6
FIN 3087N
Principles of Finance
MTH 1006A
Statistics
CORE
CHM/General Elective
3
3
6
3
Semester - Summer
ACC 6241N
Managerial Accounting (Graduate)
3
Semester 7
CHM 4169A
Physical Chemistry: Quantum Mechanics
FIN 6212N
Financial Management (Graduate)
CHM/General Electives
Senior Seminar
3
3
6
3
Semester 8
CHM 4170A
Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics
MGT 2075N Personnel Management
CHM/General Electives
3
3
9
Semester 9
CIS 6261N
MGT 6204N
Semester 10
MGT 6304N
MGT 6392-6393N
MGT 6395-6396N
MKT 6252N
3
3
Information Technologies for Managers
Excellence in Organizations: Behavior,
Leadership and Quality
Quantitative Methods in Business
Labor Relations
Organizational Life: Managing Individual
and Group Behavior
Management Internship or
The Management Consulting Experience Course
Marketing Management
3
3
3
3
3
3-3
3
*Students who do not pass the placement exam for MTH 1021A-Calculus I
should take MTH 1014A Pre-calculus in Semester 1. The prerequisite for CHM
1001C is a grade of C or better in MTH 1014A, such students must postpone
enrollment in CHM 1001-1004C until Semesters 3 and 4.
**Chemistry courses taken in Semesters 5-8 are offered on an alternate year
cycle and have prerequisites that should be completed in Semesters 1-4.
***Departmental Honors in Chemistry: A Departmental Honors Project is
available to students in this program in their senior year (90 credits overall).
The project requires substantial original independent research and the
successful completion of both CHM 4291A and CHM 4292A, generally taken
over the fall and spring semesters. (See page 41 or contact the School of Arts
and Sciences at 631-244-3232 for further information.)
B.A. in Communication Arts
(HEGIS 0601)
Dowling‘s School of Arts and Sciences degree programs are
constructed upon a well-rounded core curriculum of arts and humanities,
natural science, math and social sciences. These are classic building blocks
that ensure career versatility in an ever-changing world. The
communication arts degree offers a broad curriculum encompassing tracks
in media studies, dramatic arts, and speech communication to prepare
students for exciting careers in the expanding field of communications.
Career Outcomes for Communication Arts Majors
Dowling‘s communication arts degree offers three concentrations:
speech communication, dramatic arts, and media studies. The
concentration in dramatic arts prepares you for careers in acting,
educational theatre, performance and other aspects of theatre. The
concentration in media studies enables you to pursue careers in television,
radio, film, or other media, be that in mass or new media. Finally, the
concentration in speech communication prepares you for positions that
require excellent public speaking skills such as politics, law, and business.
Students interested in pursuing this degree must complete: (1) a
common 18-credit core of Communication Arts courses; (2) an 18-credit
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 53
Back to Table of Contents
sequence of courses in one of the three tracks: Dramatic Arts, Media
Studies, or Speech Communication.
Students seeking certification to teach Theatre at the secondary level
must consult an education advisor (also see page 38).
College-Wide Requirements
See page 36.
9 credits
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
33 credits
Major Requirements
36 credits
MED 1001A
Introduction to Mass Communication
3
SPH 1004C
Fundamentals of Speech Communication
3
ENG 2066A
Newswriting and Reporting
3
DRM 1003A
Introduction to Theatre
3
SPH 4170A
Seminar on Critical Issues in Communication
3
DRM/MED/ SPH 4195N Internship in Communication
3
Students must also complete an 18-credit sequence in ONE of these tracks:
Media Studies
Credits
ENG 3170A
Advanced News Preparation
3
ENG 2078A
Writing for Television
3
ENG 2077A
Film Writing
3
ENG 2076A
Nonfiction Writing Workshop
3
MED 1039C
Introduction to Film
3
MED 1069A
Video Fieldwork and Editing
3
MED/REL 2001A
Religion in Film, Television and News Media
3
MED 2010A
Horror Films: Art, History, Criticism
3
MED 2041A
The Films and Telefilms of Alfred Hitchcock
3
MED 2069A
Advanced Videography and Editing
3
MED 2150A
New Media
3
MED 3040A
Modern World Cinema
3
MED 3160A
Entertainment and Media Law
3
MED 4180-4189A
Special Topics in Media Studies
3
SOC 3176A
Mass Media and Society
3
VIS 1023C
Photography I
3
Speech Communication
DRM 1011A
Oral Interpretation of Literature
DRM 1018A
Improvisation
PHL 1005C
Critical Thinking
SPH 1001A
Voice and Articulation
SPH 2011A
Public Speaking
SPH 2022A
Interpersonal Communication
SPH 3013A
Argumentation and Debate
SPH 3102A
Group Communication
SPH 3162A
Intercultural Communication
SPH 2106A
Nonverbal Communication
SPH 4180-4189A
Special Topics in Speech
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Dramatic Arts
DAN 2011A
DAN 2015A
DAN 2020C
DAN 4180-4189A
DRM 1011A
DRM 1013A
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
3
Improvisational Dance and Composition
Theatre Dance
World Dance
Special Topics in Dance
Oral Interpretation of Literature
Acting I
DRM 1018A
DRM 1117A
DRM 2121A
DRM 1131A
DRM 2004A
DRM 2014A
DRM 2131A
DRM 3160A
DRM 4180-4189A
ENG 2075A
SPH 1001A
SPH 2106A
Improvisation
Directing for the Stage
Creative Dramatic Workshop
Theatre in New York City
Theatre in the United States
Acting II
Theatre in England
Entertainment and Media Law
Special Topics in Drama
Playwriting
Voice & Articulation
Nonverbal Communication
Minor Requirements
Electives
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
18 credits
24 credits
Total: 120 credits
Suggested Sequence of Course Work for Communication Arts Majors
Semester 1
Core
Core
FYE
DRM 1003A
SPH 1004C
Semester 2
MED 1001A
ENG 1001A
MTH
Core
Core
Credits
3
3
First Year Experience Seminar (Freshmen only)
3
Introduction to Theatre
3
Fundamentals of Speech Communication
3
Total: 15
Introduction to Mass Communication
Principles of Writing
Semester 3
Communication Art Major Elective (Drama, Media, Speech)
ENG 2066A
Newswriting and Reporting
Core
Core
Minor
Semester 4
Communication Art Major Elective (Drama, Media, Speech)
Core
Core
Minor
Open Electives
Semester 5
Communication Art Major Elective (Drama, Media, Speech)
Core
Minor
Open Electives
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 54
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
3
3
3
6
Total: 15
Back to Table of Contents
Semester 6
Communication Art Major Elective (Drama, Media, Speech)
Core
MED/SPH/DRM 4195A
Internship*
Minor
Open Electives
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
Suggested Sequence of Course Work for Communication Arts Majors
-continued
Credits
Semester 7
ASC
Senior Seminar
3
Communication Art Major Elective (Drama, Media, Speech)
3
Minor
3
Open Electives
6
Total: 15
Semester 8
SPH 4170A
Seminar on Critical Issues in Communication
Communication Art Major Elective (Drama, Media, Speech)
Minor
Open Electives
3
3
3
6
Total: 15
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
Major Requirements
48 credits
EDH 1021A
Education in Society
3
EDS 1081A
Introduction to Exceptional Children
3
EDH 1131A
Human Development & Learning
3
EDH 3160N
Introduction to Early Childhood Education
3
EDL 3146N
Literacy Acquisition I
3
EDH 4106N
Field Experience II: Grades 1 - 2
3
EDL 4149N
Literacy Acquisition II
3
EDH 4160N
Curriculum Development for Young
Children (Birth - Grade 2)
3
EDH 4161N
Creative Arts, Movement & Non-formal Learning
3
EDH 4200N
Supervised Student Teaching: Birth - Grade 2
6
EDH 4201N
Early Childhood Student Teaching Seminar
3
Foreign Language (six credits in the same language,
not including American Sign Language.
Sign language may be used only by students
requiring special accommodations)
6
PSY 1001A
Introduction to Psychology
3
PSY 2015A
Developmental Psychology
3
*Internship may possibly be taken in summer term.
B.A. in Early Childhood Education
(HEGIS 0823)
Students seeking a B.A. in Early Childhood Education (Birth through
Grade 2) must also complete the requirements for a second major in arts
and sciences, resulting in a dual major.
The Early Childhood Education student‘s plan of study will include
professional education courses, three field experiences, and a major in the
School of Arts and Sciences, plus College degree requirements. Students
should meet with an Education advisor to fulfill the departmental
requirements of all teaching candidates. Students majoring in Early
Childhood Education are not required to complete a minor. To be eligible
for student teaching, pre-service student teachers must present and
maintain a Grade Point Average of 3.0 in their course work.
When candidates complete this program they will be able to
demonstrate their knowledge and skills in (1) subject matter; (2) pedagogy;
and, (3) pedagogical content knowledge at levels commensurate with new
teachers as articulated by key professional organizations and agencies
including the National Association for the Education of Young Children
and the New York State Education Department.
To be eligible to apply for initial certification, students must complete
all the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in Early Childhood Education;
obtain a passing score on all required New York State teacher certification
exams; complete the Drug Abuse, Violence Prevention, Child Abuse,
Dignity for All Students Act (DASA) and Fingerprinting workshops;
maintain a G.P.A. of 3.0 or above; and, have satisfactorily met the
competencies established by the Human Development and Learning
Department.
Certification Requirements
4-7 credits
LIB 1101N
Introduction to Academic Research
1
ENG 31XXA
300 Level English
3
MTH
MTH 1003A or MTH 1004A recommended
3
Major in Liberal Arts & Sciences
30-45 credits
Students are required to complete one of the following majors:
Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, English, Humanities,
Mathematics, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Social Science,
Sociology/Anthropology, Spanish, Theatre or Visual Arts
30-45
Total: 123-132 credits
B.A. in Early Childhood Education Recommended Course
Sequence
To this course sequence will be added the Major in Liberal Arts and
Sciences – 30-45 credits
Credits
Lower Freshman Year
ENG 1001A
Principles of Writing
3
FYE
First Year Experience Seminar
3
Core Requirements
6
Upper Freshman Year
MTH
College-Wide Requirements
3
ENG 31XXA
300 Level English
3
ENG 3116A
Classic Children‘s Literature
3
LIB 1101N
Introduction to Academic Research
1
Core Requirements
6
Lower Sophomore Year
Core Requirements
PSY 1001A
Introduction to Psychology
EDH 1021A
Education in Society
6
3
3
College-Wide Requirements
See page 36.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 55
Back to Table of Contents
Upper Sophomore Year
PSY 2015A
Developmental Psychology
EDS 1081A
Introduction to Exceptional Children
Core Requirements
Lower Junior Year
EDS 1081A
Introduction to Exceptional Children
EDS 1131A
Human Development & Learning
MTH
Certification Requirement (1003A or 1004A)
Core Requirements
Upper Junior Year
EDL 3146N
EDH 3160N
Lower Senior Year
EDH 4106N
EDL 4149N
EDH 4160N
EDH 4161N
Upper Senior Year
EDH 4200N
EDH 4201N
Senior Seminar
Foreign Language
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Literacy Acquisition I
Introduction to Early Childhood Education
– Field Experience I Pre-K/K
3
Field Experience II: Grades 1 - 2
Literacy Acquisition II
Curriculum Development for Young
Children (Birth - Grade 2)
Creative Arts, Movement & Non-formal Learning
3
3
Supervised Student Teaching: Birth - Grade 2
Early Childhood Student Teaching Seminar
6
3
3
Six credits in the same language, not including
American Sign Language. Sign Language may be
used only by students requiring
special accommodations.
3
3
3
6
When the requirements for a B.A. in Education overlap with the
requirements for the second major in Arts and Science, the credits made
available by this overlap should be taken as electives in the Arts and
Science. This is in accord with the College policy that, ―A course may not be
used to fulfill requirements in more than one component of the curriculum
(e.g. major, minor, core, electives).‖ All students seeking elementary
education New York State initial certification must have six credits of
mathematics, science, history, English, and foreign language in order to
meet New York State requirements.
* In addition to course registration, students are required to register with the
Director of Student Teaching Placements and Certification by November 15 for
Spring semester student teaching and by May 1 for Fall semester student
teaching. A G.P.A. of 3.0 is required for placement and continued enrollment in
field experiences or student teaching. Field placement will be at the discretion
of an administrator of Student Teaching Placements and Certification.
B.A. in Earth Science
(HEGIS 1917)
Dowling‘s School of Arts and Sciences degree programs are all constructed
upon a well-rounded core curriculum of arts and humanities, natural
science, math, and social sciences. The Earth Science degree provides
students with an enhanced ability to analyze, inquire into, and design
solutions to the myriad concerns affecting our global environment.
Students will better understand the dynamic changes of the earth, from
out space to inner space, through coursework in meteorology,
oceanography, astronomy, and geology. Students take a hands-on
approach in applying the scientific methods and principles learned in the
classroom with laboratory experiments and field studies at local
mainland beaches.
Career Outcomes for Earth Science Majors
Dowling‘s Earth Science degree will prepare you for diverse careers in
the physical sciences. The degree can also be applied to the requirements
for teacher certification in Earth Science. Exciting career options include
those of environmental and resource analyst, regional or city planner,
science editor, park naturalist, oceanographer, water resource specialist and
others. Students seeking certification to teach Earth Science at the secondary
level must consult an education advisor (also see page 38).
College-Wide Requirements
6 credits
See pages 36. (Math requirement satisfied under major requirements)
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
33 credits
Major Requirements
CHM 1001C
CHM 1002C
CHM 1003C
CHM 1004C
ESC/MSC 1006C
ESC 1010C
ESC 1021C
ESC 1022A
ESC 1027C
ESC 1028A
ESC 1062C
ESC/CHM 2071A
ESC/CHM 2072A
ESC/MSC 4181-4189A
MTH 1006A
CSC 1009N
MTH 1014A
Minor Requirements
Electives
50 credits
General Chemistry I
3
General Chemistry II
3
General Chemistry I Laboratory
1
General Chemistry II Laboratory
1
Elements of Oceanography
3
Elements of Meteorology
3
Planetary Astronomy
4
Stellar and Galactic Astronomy
4
Geology I
4
Geology II
4
Geographic Information Systems
3
Environmental Pollution I
4
Environmental Pollution II
4
Special Topics in Earth and Marine Sciences
3
Statistics or
Introduction to Spreadsheets & Data Analysis
3
Pre-Calculus
3
18 credits
13 credits
Total: 120 credits
B.A. in Economics
(HEGIS 2204)
It is the mission of the Bachelor of Arts in Economics to be
recognized as a high quality program evidenced by the training and
professional accomplishments of the economics faculty, the high quality
of instruction, and the success of economics majors gauged by their
abilities to realize their professional goals. This program endeavors to
achieve the following objectives: developing basic economic literacy that
will enable majors to understand and interpret economic events
regularly making headlines in the media at the local, national, and global
levels; and, providing a solid grounding in economic theory,
applications, numerous specializations within economics, and statistics,
thereby enabling students to understand effectively how limited
resources are utilized most efficiently, the strategic behavior of
consumers and firms, the costs and benefits of globalization, methods of
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 56
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assessing economic performance, and the formulation and impact of
governmental economic policies in helping to solve socioeconomic
problems.
Career Outcomes for Economics Majors
This degree program will sharpen the major‘s analytical, critical
thinking, and decision-making skills that will, in turn, effectively prepare
them for a myriad of career opportunities available in private sector
companies, non-profit and international organizations, the government at
all levels — town, city, state, and federal — and educational institutions in
areas such as banking, criminal justice, economic consulting, environmental
regulation, health care administration, industrial analysis, international
trade, insurance, journalism, law, public policy, real estate, teaching, and
urban and transportation planning; preparing majors for graduate degree
programs in a variety of fields including economics, business, international
studies, law, and public policy; providing opportunities to be exposed to
the original ideas, writings, and analyses of leading economic philosophers
with diverse economic/political ideologies; and enabling majors to conduct
original economic research.
Students seeking certification to teach Social Studies at the secondary
level must consult an education advisor (also see page 38).
College-Wide Requirements
See page 36.
9 credits
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
33 credits
Major Requirements
36 credits
ECN 1001A
Introductory Macroeconomics
3
ECN 2002A
Introductory Microeconomics
3
ECN 2036A
Economic Statistics
3
ECN 3171A
Intermediate Microeconomics
3
ECN Capstone Experience
6
Economics majors are required to select one of the following four six-credit
ECN Electives*
18
Economics capstone course sequences (three credits per course)
ECN 4191A & ECN 4192A Independent Study or
ECN 4195N & ECN 4196N Economics Internship or
ECN 4197N & ECN 4198N Economics Cooperative Education
Internship or
ECN 4291A & ECN 4292A Honors Project (for Departmental
Honors in Economics)**
Electives
42 credits
Total: 120 credits
*Students may not satisfy the economics electives requirements with any of the
economics capstone experience courses.
Suggested Sequence of Course Work for the
B.A. in Economics
Semester 1
FYE
First Year Experience Seminar (Freshmen only)
ECN 1001A
Introductory Macroeconomics
ENG 1001A
Principles of Writing
Core
Core
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
Semester 2
ECN 2002A
MTH
Core
Core
Introductory Microeconomics
MTH 1002A or MTH 1014A
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
Open Elective
Semester 3
ECN 3171A
Core
Core
ECN
Semester 4
ECN 2036A
Core
Core
ECN
Semester 5
Core
ECN
Semester 6
Core
ECN
Semester 7
ASC
ECN
Semester 8
ECN
Intermediate Microeconomics
Elective
Open Elective
Economic Statistics
Elective
Open Elective
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
Electives
Open Electives
3
6
6
Total: 15
Electives
Open Electives
3
6
6
Total: 15
Senior Seminar
Capstone Experience
Open Electives
3
3
9
Total: 15
Capstone Experience
Open Electives
3
12
Total: 15
**Departmental Honors in Economics: A Departmental Honors Project is
available to students in this program in their senior year (90 or more credits
completed). The successful completion of both ECN 4291A and ECN 4292A
requires substantial original independent economic research. ECN 4291A and
ECN 4292A will be taken during the fall and spring semesters, respectively, of
a single academic year. (See page 41 or contact the School of Arts and Sciences
at 631-244-3232 for further information.)
B.A. in Elementary Education
(HEGIS 0802)
Students seeking a B.A. in Elementary Education must also complete
the requirements for a second major in arts and sciences, resulting in a dual
major.
The Elementary Education student‘s plan of study will include
professional education courses, three field experiences, and a major in the
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 57
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School of Arts and Sciences, plus college degree requirements. Students
should meet with an Education advisor to review departmental
requirements. Students majoring in Elementary Education are not required
to complete a minor. To be eligible for student teaching, pre-service student
teachers must present and maintain a Grade Point Average of 3.0 in their
course work.
When candidates complete this program they will be able to
demonstrate their knowledge and skills in (1) subject matter, (2) pedagogy,
and, (3) pedagogical content knowledge at levels commensurate with new
teachers as articulated by key professional organizations and agencies
including the Association for Childhood Education International, the
National Association for the Education of Young Children, and the New
York State Education Department.
To be eligible to apply for initial certification, students must complete
all the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in Elementary Education;
obtain a passing score on all required New York State teacher certification
exams; complete the Drug Abuse, Violence Prevention, Child Abuse,
Dignity for All Students Act (DASA) and Fingerprinting workshops;
maintain a G.P.A. of 3.0 or above; and, have satisfactorily met the
competencies established by the Human Development and Learning
Department.
College-Wide Requirements
See page 36.
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
Major Requirements
48 credits
EDH 1021A
Education in Society
3
EDS 1081A
Introduction to Exceptional Children
3
EDH 1131A
Human Development and Learning
3
EDH 3104N
Teaching Social Studies
3
EDH 3129N
Assessment in Inclusive Classrooms K-12
3
EDL 3146N
Literacy Acquisition I
3
EDH 4113N*
Field Experience II: Grades 4-6
3
EDH 4114N
Teaching Science in the Elementary School
3
EDH 4115N
Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School
3
EDL 4149N
Literacy Acquisition II
3
EDH 4197N*
Supervised Student Teaching: Elementary
3
EDH 4199N
Childhood Student Teaching Seminar
3
Foreign Language (six credits in the same language, not including
American Sign Language. Sign language may
be used only by students requiring
special accommodations)
6
PSY 1001A
Introduction to Psychology
3
PSY 2015A
Developmental Psychology
3
Certification Requirements
LIB 1101N
Introduction to Academic Research
ENG 31XXA
300 Level English
Mathematics
MTH 1003A or MTH 1004A recommended
4-7 credits
1
3
3
Major in Liberal Arts and Sciences
30-45 credits
Students are required to complete one of the following majors:
Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, English, Humanities,
Mathematics, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Social Science,
Sociology/Anthropology, Spanish, Theatre, or Visual Arts
30-45
Total: 124-132 credits
Recommended Course Sequence for the B.A. in
Elementary Education
Credits
Upper Sophomore Year
PSY 1001A
Introduction to Psychology
3
PSY 2015A
Developmental Psychology
3
EDH 1021A
Education in Society
3
Lower Junior Year
EDS 1081A
Introduction to Exceptional Children
3
EDH 1131A
Human Development and Learning
3
EDH 3146N
Literacy Acquisition
3
Upper Junior Year
EDH 3104N
Teaching Social Studies
3
EDH 3129N
Assessment in Inclusive Classrooms K-12
3
EDL 4149N
Literacy Acquisition II
3
Lower Senior Year
EDH 4113N*
Field Experience II: Grades 4-6
3
EDH 4114N
Teaching Science in the Elementary School
3
EDH 4115N
Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School
3
Upper Senior Year
EDH 4197N*
Supervised Student Teaching: Elementary
3
EDH 4199N
Childhood Student Teaching Seminar
3
Foreign Language (six credits in the same language, not including
American Sign Language. Sign language may be used only
by students requiring special accommodations)
6
When the requirements for a B.A. in Education overlap with the
requirements for the second major in arts and science, the credits made
available by this overlap should be taken as electives in the arts and science.
This is in accord with the College policy that, ―A course may not be used to
fulfill requirements in more than one component of the curriculum (e.g.
major, minor, core, electives).‖ All students seeking elementary education
New York State initial certification must have six credits of mathematics,
science, history, English, and foreign language in order to meet New York
State requirements. In addition, students are urged to take MTH 1003A and
MTH 1004A.
* In addition to course registration, students are required to register with the
administrator of Student Teaching Placements and Certification by November
15 for Spring semester student teaching and by May 1 for Fall semester student
teaching. A G.P.A. of 3.0 is required for placement and continued enrollment in
field experiences or student teaching. Field placement will be at the discretion
of the administrator of Student Teaching Placements and Certification.
B.A. in English
(HEGIS 1501)
Dowling‘s School of Arts and Sciences degree programs are
constructed upon a well-rounded core curriculum of arts and humanities,
natural science, math and social sciences. These are classic building blocks
that ensure career versatility in an ever-changing world. The B.A. in English
requires study in English and American literature. It calls for
comprehensive coverage of the field, including related work in history,
philosophy, and the arts. Students have their choice of three different
tracks: Literature, Creative Writing, or Secondary English Education. All
offer comprehensive coverage of their respective fields, including related
work in history, philosophy, and the arts.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 58
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Career Outcomes for English Majors
Your Dowling English degree prepares you for diverse careers in
media, the arts, and education. Your exceptional writing, communications,
and research skills will qualify you for exciting work as a teacher,
copywriter, critic, playwright, poet, screenwriter, journalist, librarian,
archivist, technical or freelance writer, editor, or other careers.
Students interested in teaching English in the secondary schools
should complete the requirements for the B.A. in English and take those
education courses necessary for certification.
Students seeking certification to teach English at the secondary level
must consult an education advisor (also see page 38).
College-Wide Requirements
See page 36.
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
9 credits
33 credits
B.A. in English - Literature Track
Major Requirements
36 credits
Required Courses
21
Any 2 of the following (totaling 6 credits)
6
ENG 2033A
English Literature I (3 credits)
ENG 2034A
English Literature II (3 credits)
ENG 2041A
American Literature I (3 credits)
ENG 2042A
American Literature II (3 credits)
ENG 2069A
The English Language: History, Grammar & Usage
3
ENG 3103A
Comedies and Histories of Shakespeare or
ENG 3104A
Tragedies of Shakespeare
3
ENG 3155A
Art of Poetry
3
Elective ENG Courses
21
Student may select any seven (7) literature courses (3 credits each)
numbered ENG 3101A or higher, excluding ENG 4090A. In lieu of one of
these literature courses, a student may, instead, enroll in ENG 4197-8N,
English Cooperative Education Internship or ENG 4194 Journalism
Internship.
B.A. in English - Creative Writing Track
Major Requirements
45 credits
Required Literature & Grammar Courses
15
Any 2of the following (totaling 6 credits)
6
ENG 2033A
English Literature I (3 credits)
ENG 2034A
English Literature II (3 credits)
ENG 2041A
American Literature I (3 credits)
ENG 2042A
American Literature II (3 credits)
ENG 2069A
The English Language: History, Grammar & Usage
3
ENG 3103A
Comedies and Histories of Shakespeare or
ENG 3104A
Shakespeare Tragedies
3
ENG 3155A
Art of Poetry
3
Creative Writing Electives
18
Student may select any six (6) creative writing courses
numbered ENG 2066A - ENG 2078A (3 credits each)
Literature Electives
9
Student may select any three (3) literature courses
numbered ENG 3101A or higher (3 credits each)
In lieu of one of these literature courses, a student may, instead, enroll in
ENG 4197-8N, English Cooperative Education Internship or ENG 4194
Journalism Internship.
Project Seminar
ENG 4090A
Project Seminar in Creative Writing
3
3
B.A. in English - Secondary English Education Track
Major Requirements
36 credits
Required Courses
24
Any 2of the following (totaling 6 credits)
6
ENG 2033A
English Literature I (3 credits)
ENG 2034A
English Literature II (3 credits)
ENG 2041A
American Literature I (3 credits)
ENG 2042A
American Literature II (3 credits)
ENG 2069A
The English Language: History, Grammar & Usage
3
ENG 2010A
Composition Workshop or
ENG 2071A
Introduction to Creative Writing
3
ENG 3103A
Comedies and Histories of Shakespeare or
ENG 3104A
Shakespeare Tragedies
3
ENG 3155A
Art of Poetry
3
Literatures of Diversity Courses
6
Select two of the following courses:
ENG 3113A
Topics in Post-Colonial Fiction
3
ENG 3140A-3142A Topics in the Literature of Women
3
ENG 3143A-3145A Topics in African-American Literature
3
ENG 3146A-3148A Topics in the Literature of Diversity
3
Literature or Creative Writing Electives
12
Student may select any four (4) literature or creative writing courses
numbered ENG 2066A or higher (3 credits each) . In lieu of one of these
literature or creative writing courses, a student may, instead, enroll in
ENG 4197-8N, English Cooperative Education Internship or ENG 4194
Journalism Internship.
B.A. in Gerontology
(HEGIS 2299.10)
Dowling‘s Gerontology program offers students a rich educational
experience in the field of aging from a multi-disciplinary perspective with a
liberal arts foundation. Courses about the elderly focus on the social,
psychological, and health issues of this population. Interpersonal and
research skills are developed in order to prepare students for graduate
school and for entry level jobs working with senior citizens in a variety of
settings. Fieldwork is a required component of the degree. The focus will
emphasize the development of critical, analytical and integrative thinking
skills supplemented by professional practice skills. Students will help
develop programs in health promotion, among other topics, in community
agencies, retirement communities, and senior recreational groups; provide
direct care to frail, ill, or impaired older people in hospitals, clinics, nursing
homes, adult day care, or home programs; counsel older people and their
families about issues of caregiving, employment, death and dying, and
mental health; and, act as liaison and advocate for the elderly to agencies
providing medical, social service, insurance, and financial advice about
estate planning, financing long-term care, and housing options.
Career Outcomes for Gerontology Majors
The gerontology bachelor of arts degree gives students flexibility to
pursue varied career goals. It prepares students for employment in federal,
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 59
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state and local government agencies; health care and long-term care
institutions; community, human service and religious organizations;
retirement communities; public policy organizations; business and
industry; and research and education settings. Upon the completion of this
degree, students can continue their education at the graduate level in health
care administration, business, gerontology, policy studies, psychology,
sociology, and social work.
College-Wide Requirements
See page 36.
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
9 credits
33 credits
Major Requirements
45 credits
Introductory Courses
12 credits
GER/SOC 1003A
Introduction to Gerontology
3
PSY 1001A
Introduction to Psychology
3
SOC 1001A
Introduction to Sociology I
3
SWK 1010N
Introduction to Social Work
3
Gerontology Coursework
21 credits
PSY 2017A
Psychology of Aging
3
SOC 2116A
Sociology of Aging
3
SOC 2129C
Healthcare in the U.S.
3
GER/SOC 2130A
Global Health Systems: Social Approach or
SWK 2115N
Social Welfare Policy
3
GER/SWK 3116N
Gerontology: Legal and Financial Issues
3
SMP 2061N
Wellness, Exercise and Older Adults
3
SMP 2062N
Nutrition and the Aging Adult
3
Research and Practica Coursework
12 credits
SOC 3021A
Research Methods
4
SWK 4195N
Practicum in Social Work I
4
SWK 4196N
Practicum in Social Work II
4
Electives
33 credits
Total: 120 credits
Note: A minor is not required for this degree.
B.A. in Graphic Design and Digital Arts
(HEGIS 1009)
Dowling‘s School of Arts and Sciences degree programs are
constructed upon a well-rounded core curriculum of arts and humanities,
natural science, math, and social sciences. These are the classic building
blocks that ensure career versatility in an ever-changing world. Your
graphic design and digital arts degree is oriented toward commercial art
fields, and your study of art will focus on practical applications and
standards in the field. Using current multi-platformed software, students
will learn professional layout and design, concept development, designoriented problem-solving, and the history of the medium.
Career Outcomes for Graphic Design and Digital
Arts Majors
Your Dowling graphic design and digital arts degree prepares you for
diverse careers in commercial art: fields such as advertising, computer
graphics, publishing design, and animation. Exciting career options include
graphic designer, art director, creative director, editorial art director,
illustrator, animator, and others.
All Graphic Design and Digital Arts majors should consult a Visual
Arts-Department advisor for course scheduling prior to registration.
Students interested in pursuing Education Certification tracks in
Elementary, Secondary, or Special Education in addition to the
requirements for the B.A. in Graphic Design and Digital Arts should see
pages 57-58.
College-Wide Requirements
See page 36.
Core Requirements*
See pages 36-37.
9 credits
33 credits
Major Requirements
42 credits
VIS 1003A
Two-Dimensional Design
3
VIS 1009C
Basic Drawing
3
VGD 1064N
Digital Imaging I
3
VGD 1075N
Introduction to Graphic Design
3
VGD 2065N
Digital Imaging II
3
VGD 2066A
History of Graphic Design
3
VIS 4104A
Contemporary Art and Theory
3
VGD 4170A
Professional Practices Seminar
3
VGD 4197N-4198N Visual Arts Cooperative Education Internship
3
Students must also complete a 15-credit sequence in ONE of these tracks:
Publication Design
Credits
VGD 2024A
Digital Illustration
3
VIS 2069N
Advanced Graphic Design
3
ENG 2071A
Introduction to Creative Writing
3
VIS 2140C
Digital Photographic Manipulations
3
VGD 3000A
Typography I
3
Animation and Web Design
VGD 2024A
Digital Illustration
3
VIS 2140C
Digital Photographic Manipulations
3
VGD 2150A
Advanced Web Design
3
VGD 3082A
3-D Animation
3
VGD 4073A
3-D Modeling on the Computer
3
Product and Packaging Design
VIS 1010A
Basic Product and Packaging Design
3
VIS 2069N
Advanced Graphic Design
3
VGD 3000A
Typography I
3
VIS 3060A
Advanced Product and Packaging Design
3
VGD 4073A
3-D Modeling on the Computer
3
Minor Requirements
Electives
18 credits
18 credits
Total: 120 credits
*VIS 1001C, 1002C, World Art I, II are strongly recommended and are
prerequisites for VIS 4104A - Contemporary Art and Theory.
B.A. in History
(HEGIS 2205)
Dowling‘s School of Arts and Sciences degree programs are
constructed upon a well-rounded core curriculum of arts and humanities,
natural science, math, and social sciences. These classic building blocks
ensure career versatility in an ever-changing world. Dowling‘s history
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 60
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degree emphasizes American, European, and Asian history, with studies in
Latin American civilizations as well. Trips to historic sites round out the
curriculum. The Department also offers two memorial scholarships to
students, named after Dr. Ying-wan Cheng and Professor Bill Hogeboom.
Career Outcomes for History Majors
Dowling‘s history degree prepares you for diverse careers in
education, research, law, and government. Your research, writing, and
communications skills and perspective on world history will qualify you
for a career as a biographer, genealogist, research director, archivist,
librarian, textbook writer, museum supervisor, and more.
Students seeking certification to teach Social Studies at the secondary
level must consult an education advisor (also see page 38).
College-Wide Requirements
See page 36.
9 credits
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
33 credits
Major Requirements
HST
United States History
HST
European History
HST
Asian History
HST
History Electives
*at least 12 of the 36 credits must be at the 3000 level or higher
Minor Requirements
Electives
36 credits*
9
9
9
9
18 credits
24 credits
Total: 120 credits
B.A. in Marine Studies
(HEGIS 0418)
The program in Marine Studies enables a student to combine study in
the marine sciences with study in another field, such as business,
government, or education, of the student‘s own choosing. The purpose is to
provide students with a broad knowledge of the world‘s waters and their
importance − with special attention being given to Long Island‘s marine
environment − while at the same time equipping them to assume
responsibility for the administration and management of our global marine
resources.
College-Wide Requirements
6 credits
See page 36. (Math requirement satisfied under major requirements)
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
33 credits
Major Requirements
BIO 1001A
Introduction to Biology I
BIO 1002A
Introduction to Biology II
BIO 1003A
Introduction to Biology I Laboratory
BIO 1004A
Introduction to Biology II Laboratory
CHM 1001C
General Chemistry I
CHM 1002C
General Chemistry II
59 credits
3
3
1
1
3
3
CHM 1003C
General Chemistry I Laboratory
CHM 1004C
General Chemistry II Laboratory
CSC 1023N
Introduction to Computer Science
ESC 1062C
Geographic Information Systems
MSC/ESC 1006C
Elements of Oceanography
MSC/ESC 1007C
Marine Oceanography Laboratory
MSC/CHM 2074A Chemical Oceanography
MSC 2010A
Mariculture/Aquaculture
MSC/PHY 2106A
Physical Oceanography
MSC 2131C
Coastal Oceanography
MSC/BIO 3055C
Marine Biology
MTH 1006A
Statistics
MTH 1014A
Pre-Calculus
PHY 1001C
General Physics I
PHY 1002C
General Physics II
PHY 1003C
General Physics I Laboratory
PHY 1004C
General Physics II Laboratory
Minor/Electives Requirements
1
1
3
3
3
1
4
3
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
1
1
22 credits
Total: 120 credits
Note: Students majoring in Marine Studies are not required to complete a
minor.
B.A. in Mathematics
(HEGIS 1701)
Dowling‘s School of Arts and Sciences degree programs are built on a
well-rounded core curriculum of arts and humanities, natural science,
mathematics and social sciences. These are the classic building blocks that
ensure career versatility in an ever-changing world. The mathematics
program offers two options. Students may pursue a traditional
mathematics major course of study in theoretical mathematics in
preparation for further graduate study in mathematics or a Secondary
Mathematics Education track for preparation and certification for teaching
mathematics at the secondary school level.
Students seeking certification to teach Mathematics at the secondary
level must consult an education advisor.
Career Outcomes for Mathematics Majors
Your Dowling mathematics degree prepares you for exciting career
options including those of mathematician, operations research analyst,
budget officer, computer programmer, systems analyst, financial analyst,
mathematics teacher, and others.
Students seeking certification to teach Mathematics at the secondary
level must consult an education advisor (also see page 38).
College-Wide Requirements
6 credits
See page 36. (Math requirement satisfied under major requirements)
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
33 credits
B.A. in Mathematics - Mathematics Major Track
Major Requirements
CSC 1009N
Introduction to Spreadsheets
and Data Analysis
MTH 1017A
Discrete Mathematics
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 61
36 credits
3
3
Back to Table of Contents
MTH 1021A
Calculus I
MTH 1022A
Calculus II
MTH 2023A
Calculus III
MTH 2103A
Linear Algebra
MTH 3111A
Probability and Mathematical Statistics
MTH 4109A
Abstract Algebra
MTH 4131A
Advanced Calculus
Two additional upper level mathematics courses
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
6
B.A. in Mathematics - Secondary Mathematics Education
Track
Major Requirements
36 credits
CSC 1009N
Introduction to Spreadsheets and Data Analysis
3
MTH 1017A
Discrete Mathematics
3
MTH 1021A
Calculus I
4
MTH 1022A
Calculus II
4
MTH 2023A
Calculus III
4
MTH 2103A
Linear Algebra
3
MTH 2115A
History of Mathematics; or
MTH 4131A
Advanced Calculus
3
MTH 3104A
Number Theory
3
MTH 3111A
Probability and Mathematical Statistics
3
MTH 4109A
Abstract Algebra
3
MTH 4171A
College Geometry
3
Minor Requirements
Electives
18 credits
27 credits
Total: 120 credits
Students may seek advanced placement by having their academic history
reviewed by the Mathematics and Computer Science Department Chair.
B.A. in Music
(HEGIS 1005)
Dowling‘s School of Arts and Sciences degree programs are
constructed upon a well-rounded core curriculum of arts and
humanities, natural science, math, and social sciences. These are the
classic building blocks that ensure career versatility in an ever-changing
world. To this end, the music program emphasizes a cross-cultural
approach to the study of music.
Music majors are required to participate, without credit, in an
instrumental or vocal ensemble for five semesters. Those whose interests
are in string, wind, or percussion instruments are required to participate in
an appropriate instrumental ensemble. Students whose interests are in
vocal or keyboard music are required to participate in the choir.
Career Outcomes for Music Majors
Your Dowling music degree prepares you for diverse careers in music,
education, and the arts. Exciting career options include choral director,
singer, composer, music arranger, music therapist, music librarian, and a
wide variety of positions in the music industry.
College-Wide Requirements
See page 36.
9 credits
Core Requirements*
See pages 36-37.
33 credits
Major Requirements
36 credits
MUS 1001C
Music in the Western World: Antiquity-1750
3
MUS 1002C
Music in the Western World: 1750-Present
3
MUS 1008C
World Music
3
MUS 1013C
Music of Asia or
MUS 1014C
African Music Cultures
3
MUS 1011A
Survey of Vocal Literature
3
MUS 1012A
Survey of Instrumental Literature
3
MUS 1031A
Music Theory I
3
MUS 2032A
Music Theory II
3
MUS 3133A
Music Theory III
3
MUS 4134A
Music Theory IV
3
MUS 4180A-4189A Seminar in Music (2)
6
5 semesters of ensemble participation (no credit)
Electives/Minor
42 credits
Total: 120 credits
B.A. in Philosophy
(HEGIS 1509)
Dowling‘s School of Arts and Sciences degree programs are
constructed upon a well-rounded core curriculum of arts and humanities,
natural science, math, and social sciences. These are the classic building
blocks that ensure career versatility in an ever-changing world. Your
philosophy degree will cultivate your ability to think for yourself, assess
the arguments of others, and express yourself clearly and convincingly.
You will study ideas from the past as well as the present and will achieve a
wider perspective of history and a variety of cultures.
Career Outcomes for Philosophy Majors
Your Dowling philosophy degree prepares you for diverse careers in
law, education, civil service, medicine, journalism, and business or for
graduate-level study. Your communications, analytical, and research skills
will qualify you for exciting work in virtually any field.
College-Wide Requirements
See page 36.
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
9 credits
33 credits
Major Requirements
36 credits
Student may select any seven (7) courses in PHL* (3 credits each)
21
*may substitute up to two (2) REL courses
At least three (3) PHL 2000 or 3000 level courses
9
At least one (1) PHL 4000 level course
3
Research Project
3
PHL 4181A or 4182A
Seminars in Philosophy
3
Minor Requirements
15-18 credits
Electives
24-27 credits
Total: 120 credits
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 62
Back to Table of Contents
B.A. in Political Science
POL 4184C
Seminar on Political Theory
Choose Three (3) Elective Political Science courses (any number)*
Minor Requirements
(HEGIS 2207)
Dowling‘s School of Arts and Sciences degree programs are
constructed upon a well-rounded core curriculum of arts and humanities,
natural science, math, and social sciences. These are the classic building
blocks that ensure career versatility in an ever-changing world. Dowling‘s
political science degree is designed to offer a thorough background in the
discipline, including an understanding of American politics and public
policy, political theory, world politics and comparative politics, and a
working knowledge of political principles.
Career Outcomes for Political Science Majors
Besides the obvious careers in politics, Dowling‘s political science
degree prepares you for diverse careers in law, administration, civil service,
education, public policy, social sciences, nongovernmental organizations,
journalism, law enforcement, the military, and business. The
communications, writing, research, analytical, and problem-solving skills
acquired through the major are valuable in almost any profession.
Students seeking certification to teach Social Studies at the secondary
level must consult an education advisor (also see page 38).
College-Wide Requirements
See page 36.
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
9 credits
33 credits
Major Requirements
36 credits
POL 1011C
American Government and Politics
3
POL 2021C
World Politics or
POL 2022C
Comparative Politics
3
PSY 3170A
Statistics for Psychological Research
3
POL 4195N
Internship in State Government or
POL 4196POL 4198N
Internship in Political Science
3
One intermediate level course from each of the following three fields (9 credits):
Field One:
3
POL 3111A
State and Local Politics or
POL 3112A
Public Policy and Administration or
POL 3113A
Political Parties and Elections or
POL 3114A
The Presidency or
POL 3115A
Congress
Field Two:
3
POL 3124A
West European Politics or
POL 3125C
American Foreign Policy or
POL 3127A
Russian Government and Politics or
POL 3128A
Third World Politics or
POL 3129C
Politics of the Middle East
Field Three:
3
POL 3130C
Civil Liberties or
POL 3131A
Introduction to Constitutional Law
And choose two of the following:
6
POL 4181A
Seminar on the United Nations or
POL 4182A
Seminar on American Politics or
POL 4183A
Politics of Latin America or
9
18 credits
Electives**
24 credits
Total: 120 credits
It is strongly recommended that all majors considering graduate school
take one of the following three credit courses:
PSY 3171A Psychological Methods and Research Design
SOC 3021A Research Methods
ECN 4136A Introduction to Applied Econometrics (Prerequisites: ECN
2002A, and ECN 2036A or MTH 1006A)
* Students pursuing Internships or Cooperative Education in Political Science
may not apply more than six of these credits toward Political Science elective
credits (the remaining credits will be applied toward college elective credits).
**Recommended Courses: We strongly encourage students to develop
Intermediate-level competency in a foreign language (six college credits at the
introductory and six college credits at the intermediate level or intermediate
level equivalency examination results).
We also encourage political science majors to take a broad selection of
other social science courses (psychology, sociology, anthropology,
economics, and history) to enhance their major program. Students are
encouraged to discuss appropriate course selections with their advisor.
Departmental Honors in Political Science: A Departmental Honors
Project is available to students in the program their senior year (90 or more
credits completed). The successful completion of both POL 4291A and POL
4292A requires substantial original research and analysis. POL 4291A and
POL 4292A should be taken within a single academic year.
B.A. in Psychology
(HEGIS 2001)
Dowling‘s School of Arts and Sciences degree programs are
constructed upon a well-rounded core curriculum of arts and humanities,
natural science, math, and social sciences. These are the classic building
blocks that ensure career versatility in an ever-changing world. Psychology
students are prepared for direct work in the field or for more advanced
professional training in graduate studies. Students will develop a critical
understanding of the scientific study of behavior and a practical knowledge
of the forces that shape human interaction. This program offers students the
opportunity to engage in learning via the classroom, the laboratory,
seminar, internship, and independent study.
Career Outcomes for Psychology Majors
Dowling‘s psychology degree prepares you for diverse careers in
business, social work, biology, aeronautics, law enforcement, education,
civil service, and the military, or for further graduate study. Your
communications, analytical and research skills will qualify you for a career
as an employment counselor, marketing representative, occupational
analyst, and more.
College-Wide Requirements
See page 36.
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 63
9 credits
33 credits
Back to Table of Contents
Major Requirements
36 credits
Component 1: Experimental Component (choose 3 or 4)
9 or 12 credits
PSY 1001A
Introduction to Psychology*
3
PSY 3170A
Statistics for Psychological Research*
3
PSY 3171A
Psychological Methods and Research Design*
3
PSY 3172A
Research in Psychology**
3
Component 2: Major Content Area Component (choose 4)
12 credits
PSY 2015A
Developmental Psychology I
3
PSY 2016A
Developmental Psychology II
3
PSY 2030A
Cognitive Psychology
3
PSY 2120A
Social Psychology
3
PSY 3112C
Theories of Personality
3
PSY 3165A
Physiological Psychology**
3
Component 3: Clinical Component (choose 2)
6 credits
PSY 2135A
Psychological Testing**
3
PSY 3125A
Abnormal Child & Adolescent Psychology
3
PSY 3140C
Abnormal Psychology
3
PSY 3155A
Applied Behavioral Analysis
3
Component 4: Psychology Electives (choose 2 or 3)
6 or 9 credits
All students must take at least one (1) course at the 4000 level to satisfy
Component 4 requirements. Students who take 12 credits from Component
1 need only 6 credits from Component 4 selections. Students who take 9
credits from Component 1 need 9 credits from Component 4 selections.
PSY 2017A
PSY 2145A
PSY 2150A
PSY 3175A
PSY 3190C
PSY 3300A
PSY 4171C
PSY/PHL 4172A
PSY 4173A
PSY 4174C
PSY 4175A
PSY 4176A
PSY 4177C
PSY 4178A
PSY 4179A
PSY 4188C
PSY 4180A-4189A
Psychology of Aging
Industrial/Organizational Psychology
Interpersonal Adjustment
Theories of Learning
History and Systems in Psychology**
Counseling of the Aging & Their Families
Media Psychology
Philosophy of Psychiatry & Psychology
School Psychology
Psychology of Women
Psychology of Religion
Interpersonal Relationships
Human Sexuality
Forensic Psychology and Law
Health Psychology
Psychological Science Fiction in Film
Selected Topics Seminars
Minor & General Electives Requirements
Minor Requirements
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
42 credits
15-18
Total: 120 credits
*Required for all students.
**Recommended if planning on pursuing psychology in graduate school.
Note: PSY 4191A & 4192A (Independent Study), 4195N & 4196N (Internship),
4198N & 4199N (Applied Internship), 4291A & 4292A (Honors Project), 4391N
(Instructional Mentorship), and 4491N (Research Assistantship) are intended to
be used by a small number of above average students as ―general electives
credit,‖ and shall not count as part of the 36 credit Psychology Major
Requirements. One or more of these are most strongly recommended for
students planning on pursuing psychology in graduate school.
In addition, PSY 3103C, 3104C, and 3105C shall not count as part of the
36 credit Psychology Major Requirements (they can count as ―general
elective credits‖ or Core Requirements credits).
Departmental Honors in Psychology: A Departmental Honors Project
is available to students in this program in their senior year (90 credits overall). The project requires substantial original independent research and the
successful completion of both PSY 4291A and PSY 4292A. (See page 41 or
contact the School of Arts and Sciences at 631-244-3232 for further
information.)
B.A. in Romance Languages
(HEGIS 1101)
Dowling‘s School of Arts and Sciences degree programs are
constructed upon a well-rounded core curriculum of arts and humanities,
natural science, math, and social sciences. These are the classic building
blocks that ensure career versatility in an ever-changing world. Your
romance languages degree prepares you for work in which knowledge of
French, Italian, or Spanish language and culture is central. A degree in
romance languages is frequently sought by those planning to attend
graduate or professional schools.
Career Outcomes for Romance Languages Majors
Your Dowling romance languages degree prepares you for exciting
careers in teaching, foreign language communications such as translating or
interpreting and government work such as Foreign Service. Other options
include import/export manager, banking manager, and various positions
in the travel and hospitality industries.
Students seeking certification to teach a language other than English at
the secondary level must consult an education advisor (also see page 38).
College-Wide Requirements
See page 36.
9 credits
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
33 credits
Major Requirements
Primary Language
A student must complete 30 credits in French, Italian or Spanish
Secondary Language
A student must complete 12 credits in a second language
(French, Italian, or Spanish)
42 credits
30
12
12
Minor/Electives Requirements
Electives
18 credits
18 credits
Total: 120 credits
Note: Candidates for secondary teacher certification in French or Spanish must
complete 36 credits in the language for which certification is sought.
These suggested courses of study are for four-year students who do
not transfer in any college credits. Track 1 is for students majoring in
Romance Languages. Track 2 is for students planning to graduate with
provisional Adolescent Certification in Spanish or French.
Suggested Sequence of Course Work for Romance Languages - Track 1
Track 1: This track is for students entering as freshmen with no college
credits. Students in this track complete 30 credits of a primary language
and 12 credits of a secondary language. In addition, the student will
complete all other college-wide requirements.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 64
Back to Table of Contents
Semester 1
FYE
First Year Experience Seminar (Freshmen only)
Core
ENG 1001A
Principles of Writing
Primary Language FRN , ITL, or SPN 1005
Semester 2
Core
Mathematics
Library
Primary Language FRN , ITL, or SPN 2006, 2xxx
Semester 3
Core
Primary Language
Credits
3
6
3
3
Total: 15
Credits
6
3
1
3-6
Total: 13-16
Credits
6
FRN, ITL, or SPN 2xxx and
FRN, ITL, or SPN 3xxx
Secondary Language FRN or ITL or SPN 1005
Semester 4
Core
Primary Language
6
3
Total: 15
Credits
6
FRN, ITL, or SPN 3xxx and
FRN, ITL, or SPN 4xxx
Secondary Language FRN or ITL or SPN 2006
Semester 5
Core
Primary Language
6
3
Total: 15
Credits
3
FRN, ITL, or SPN 3xxx and
FRN, ITL, or SPN 4xxx
Secondary Language FRN or ITL or SPN 2xxx
Elective
6
3
3
Total: 15
Semester 6
Core
Primary Language FRN, ITL, or SPN 4xxx (as Capstone)
Secondary Language FRN or ITL or SPN 3xxx
Electives
Credits
3
3
3
6
Total: 15
Semester 7
Electives
Senior Seminar
Credits
9
3
Total: 12
Semester 8
Electives
Credits
12
Total: 12
Suggested Sequence of Course Work for Romance Languages - Track 2
Track 2: This track is for students who plan to graduate with
provisional Adolescent Education Certification in French or Spanish.
Students in this track complete 36 credits in the primary foreign language
for which they are seeking provisional certification, 12 credits in a second
foreign language, and 36 credits in Adolescent Education. In addition,
the student will complete all other college-wide requirements.
Semester 1
FYE
Core
ENG 1001A
Primary Language
Credits
First Year Experience Seminar (Freshmen only)
3
6
Principles of Writing
3
FRN or SPN 1xxx or higher
3
Total: 15
Semester 2
Core
Mathematics
Library
Primary Language
Credits
6
3
1
3-6
Total: 13-16
FRN or SPN 2xxx or higher
Semester 3
Core
Primary Language
FRN or SPN 2xxx or higher
Secondary Language
FRN or ITL or SPN 1xxx
Adolescent Education Requirement
Credits
6
6
3
3
Total: 18
Semester 4
Core
Primary Language
FRN or SPN 3xxx or higher
Secondary Language
FRN or ITL or SPN 2xxx
Adolescent Education Requirement
Credits
6
6
3
3
Total: 18
Semester 5
Core
Primary Language
FRN or SPN 3xxx or higher
Secondary Language
FRN or ITL or SPN 2xxx or higher
Adolescent Education Requirement
Credits
3
6
3
6
Total: 18
Semester 6
Core
Primary Language
FRN or SPN 3xxx or higher
Secondary Language
FRN or ITL or SPN 2xxx or higher
Adolescent Education Requirement
Credits
3
6
3
6
Total: 18
Semester 7
Primary Language
FRN or SPN 4xxx (as Capstone)
Senior Seminar
Adolescent Education Requirement
Credits
3
3
9
Total: 15
Semester 8
Adolescent Education Requirement
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 65
Credits
12
Total: 12
Total: 129 credits
Back to Table of Contents
B.A. in Social Sciences
Minor Requirements
Electives
15-18 credits
18-21 credits
Total degree requirement: 120 credits
(HEGIS 2201)
The social sciences degree offers students a comprehensive
understanding of their place in contemporary society, and the principles
that govern its functioning. Students learn models for analyzing social
issues and apply them to the real world. For Education students
interested in teaching Social Studies, the Social Science degree will
provide the broad content training necessary to excel as classroom
instructors. Dowling‘s School of Arts and Sciences degree programs are
constructed upon a well-rounded core curriculum of Arts and
Humanities, Natural Science, Math, and Social Sciences. These classic
building blocks will ensure career versatility in an ever-changing world.
Career Outcomes for Social Sciences Majors
Dowling‘s social sciences degree program prepares you for diverse
careers in education, business, government, and non-profit
organizations, as well as for graduate study in social sciences, business,
law, education, and social work. Your communications, analytical, and
research skills will qualify you for a career as an anthropologist,
archaeologist, research worker, and more.
The student is strongly advised to seek faculty input when
developing a course plan that fulfills requirements for the major and/or
Teacher Certification that is aligned with his/her future objectives.
Teacher certification will require additional courses. If a student chooses
psychology as his or her Group 1 option (18 credits), then the student
must follow the same requirements outlined in the Psychology minor
section of this catalog.
Students seeking certification to teach Social Studies at the secondary
level must consult an education advisor (also see page 38). It is
recommended they either choose a concentration in History or the
Secondary Education track.
College-Wide Requirements
See page 36.
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
9 credits
33 credits
Major Requirements
42 credits
Group One
18
Student must take 18 credits in one of the following disciplines:
Anthropology, Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, or
Sociology.
Group Two
24
Student must select additional courses from at least four of the
following disciplines (but excluding the discipline elected in Group
One): Anthropology, Economics, History, Political Science,
Psychology, or Sociology. At least 12 of these credits must be upper
level courses beyond the introductory level.
The following courses are considered introductory level courses:
ANT 1001A, ANT 1002A, ECN 1001A, ECN 1003A, ECN 2002A,
HST 1021C, HST 1022C, POL 1001C, POL 1011C, PSY 1001A, SOC
1001A, SOC 1002A.
Social Sciences Major - Secondary Education Requirements
42 Credits
ECN 1001A
Introductory Macroeconomics
3
ECN 2002A
Introductory Microeconomics
3
HST 1001C
World History I
3
HST 1002C
World History II
3
HST 1021C
United States I
3
HST 1022C
United States II
3
ECN 2149A
Economic Geography, or
POL 1114A
Political Geography
3
HST 2129A
New York State
3
POL 2021C
World Politics
3
PSY 1001A
Introduction to Psychology
3
PSY 2016A
Developmental Psychology II
3
SOC 2102C
Self and Society 2: Class, Gender, Race, & Sexuality
3
And 6 credits of electives from History. The following courses are strongly
recommended:
6
HST 3020A
The United States, 1945-1968
HST 3123A
The Antebellum Years and the Civil War, 1840-65
HST 4181A
Revolutionary Europe, 1789-1989
In order to pass the state certification exams for Social Studies teachers, students
should replace their World Civilizations Core requirement with two additional
History electives or one History elective and POL 2022C (Comparative Politics).
They should take POL 1011C (American Politics) and POL 2102C (American
Political Thought) for their Dynamics of Contemporary Society Core. One of the
courses in Varieties of Human Experience Core should be ANT 3101C.
Note: Total degree requirement is 120 credits.
B.A. in Sociology
(HEGIS 2208.10)
Dowling‘s School of Arts and Sciences degree programs are
constructed upon a well-rounded core curriculum of arts and
humanities, natural science, math and social sciences. These are the
classic building blocks that ensure career versatility in an ever-changing
world. Students majoring in sociology explore and learn to understand
the social and personal dimensions of the human experience. The
sociological perspective provides a unique way of looking at how society
works and the intricate interrelationships between individuals and
society. Students will study the theories, concepts and research methods
that will help them understand communities, organizations,
bureaucracies, families and small groups, and the dynamics of social
change.
Career Outcomes for Sociology Majors
This degree will prepare students for diverse careers in social
science, health care development, business, community organizations
and government. Students with a BA degree in sociology are usually
employed in entry-level positions in the following areas: administration,
advertising, counseling, community planning, health services, group and
recreation work, marketing, marketing research, sales, human
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 66
Back to Table of Contents
resources/personnel work, social services and social research. With
proper advisement students are prepared to enter graduate school
pursuing such degrees as MA in sociology and gerontology, MBA, MSW,
MPH, Ph.D. and JD leading to careers in university research and
instruction, and public administration and planning.
College-Wide Requirements
See page 36.
9 credits
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
33 credit
College-Wide Requirements
See page 36.
9 credits
Students elect either the Anthropology/Sociology
Anthropology/Sociology/Social Work Track.
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
Major Requirements
Introductory Level Sociology Courses
SOC 1001
Introduction to Sociology I
SOC 1002
Introduction to Sociology II
Upper Level Sociology Courses
SOC 3021
Research Methods
SOC 3172
Sociological Theory
Upper Level Sociology Electives
Any 4 Sociology courses numbered 2000 and above
(excluding SOC 3021 and SOC 3172)
Social Sciences Electives
1 Anthropology course
1 Social Science course
33 credit
Anthropology/Sociology Track
Major Requirements
34 credits
ANT 1001A or 1002A
Introduction to Anthropology I, II
3
SOC 1001A or 1002A
Introduction to Sociology I, II
3
Four Anthropology courses above the introductory level
12
Five Sociology courses above the introductory level
16
(two of the five Sociology courses must be SOC 3021A and SOC
3172A)
Minor Requirements
Electives
31 credits
6 credits
3
3
7 credits
4
3
12 credits
6 credits
3
3
18 credits
29 credits
Degree Total 120 credits
B.A. in Sociology-Anthropology
(HEGIS 2208)
Dowling‘s School of Arts and Sciences degree programs are
constructed upon a well-rounded core curriculum of arts and humanities,
natural science, math, and social sciences. These are the classic building
blocks that ensure career versatility in an ever-changing world. Students
majoring in sociology and anthropology explore and learn to understand
the social and personal dimensions of human experience. Students in the
anthropology/sociology track learn the origins and development of social
institutions and acquire knowledge of the diversity of human cultures,
urban society, social change, and social organizations. For students
interested in a career as a social worker, the social work concentration
option will prepare you for the graduate studies required for this career.
Career Outcomes for Sociology-Anthropology
Majors
Your Dowling sociology-anthropology degree will prepare you for
diverse careers in all sectors of social science, health care development, and
community organization and governance. Graduate studies may lead to a
career in university research and instruction, public administration and
planning, or corporate management research. Other career options include
sociologist, anthropologist, archaeologist, consumer affairs director,
probation officer, social worker and others.
Students seeking certification to teach Sociology at the secondary level
must consult an education advisor (also see page 38).
Track
or
the
Anthropology/Sociology/Social Work Track
Major Requirements
36 credits
ANT 1001A or 1002A
Introduction to Anthropology I, II
3
SOC 1001A or 1002A
Introduction to Sociology I, II
3
SOC 3021A
Research Methods
4
SWK 1010N
Introduction to Social Work
3
SWK 2120N
Social Work Methods
3
SWK 4195N-4196N
Practicum in Social Work
8
Four Sociology and/or Anthropology courses above the introductory
level (i.e. for Anthropology, courses above 1002)
12
Minor Requirements
18 credits
Electives
25-27 credits*
Total: 120 credits
*Note: Students choosing the Anthropology/Sociology Track must take 27
credits of electives; students choosing the Anthropology/ Sociology/Social
Work Track must take 25 credits of electives.
It is strongly recommended that students interested in Social Work
gain proficiency in a foreign language and take Psychology courses. It is
strongly recommended that students interested in Anthropology and
Sociology take courses in statistics, computer science, history, economics,
psychology, and political science.
B.A. in Visual Arts
(HEGIS 1002)
Dowling‘s School of Arts and Sciences degree programs are
constructed upon a well-rounded core curriculum of arts and humanities,
natural science, math, and social sciences. These are the classic building
blocks that ensure career versatility in an ever-changing world. Your visual
arts program allows you to cultivate your expressive and critical skills basic
to artistic growth. You will also become familiar with the rich heritage of
the painting, sculpture, and architecture of previous and current
civilizations.
Career Outcomes for Visual Arts Majors
Your Dowling visual arts degree will prepare you to establish yourself
as a creative artist. Career options include painter, art director, sculptor, art
teacher and more.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 67
Back to Table of Contents
Students seeking certification to teach Visual Arts at the secondary
level must consult an education advisor (also see page 38). All Visual Arts
majors should consult a Visual Arts, Graphic Design and Digital Arts
Department advisor for course scheduling prior to registration.
B.A. in Visual Arts – General Track
College-Wide Requirements
See page 36.
9credits
Core Requirements*
See pages 36-37.
33 credits
Major Requirements
VIS 1003A
Two-Dimensional Design
VIS 1004A
Three-Dimensional Design
VIS 1009C
Basic Drawing
VIS 1016A
Ceramics I
VIS 1023A
Photography I
VGD 1064N
Digital Imaging I
VIS 2011A
Painting I
VIS 2015A
Silkscreening or
VIS 2019A
Introduction to Print Making
VIS 2020C
Sculpture I
VIS 2061A
Life Drawing
VIS 3180A
Modern Art Theory and Criticism
VIS 4104A
Contemporary Art and Theory
VIS 4180A
Major Studio Project I
VIS 4181A
Major Studio Project II
42 credits
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Minor Requirements
Electives
18 credits
18 credits
Total: 120 credits
*VIS 1001C and VIS 1002C are strongly recommended and are prerequisites for
VIS 4104A: Contemporary Art and Theory.
Suggested Sequence of Course Work for Visual Arts – General Track
Credits
Semester 1
FYE
Core
ENG 1001A
VIS 1001C
Art, Architecture, and the Urban Experience
Principles of Writing
World Art I (as an elective)
3
6
3
3
Total: 15
Semester 2
Core
MTH
VIS 1002C
VIS 1009C
Mathematics College-wide requirement
World Art II (as an elective)
Basic Drawing
6
3
3
3
Total: 15
Semester 3
Core
VIS 1003A
VIS 1004A
VIS 1023C
Two-Dimensional Design
Three-Dimensional Design
Photography I
6
3
3
3
Total: 15
Semester 4
Core
VGD 1064N
VGD 2024A
VIS 2011A
Minor
Semester 5
Core
VIS 2019A
VIS 2015A
VIS 1016C
Minor
Semester 6
Core
VIS 2061A
VIS 4104A
Minor
Elective
Semester 7
VIS 3180A
VIS 4180A
Minor
Electives
Semester 8
ASC
VIS 2020C
VIS 4181A
Minor
Elective
6
3
Digital Imaging I
Illustration Design
Painting I
3
3
Total: 15
3
Introduction to Printmaking or
Silkscreening or
Ceramics I
3
Life Drawing
Contemporary Art and Theory
3
6
Total: 15
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
Modern Art Theory and Criticism
Major Studio Project I
3
3
3
6
Total: 15
Senior Seminar
Sculpture I
Major Studio Project II
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
B.A. in Visual Arts – Teacher Track
College-Wide Requirements
See page 36.
Core Requirements*
See pages 36-37.
9credits
33 credits
Major Requirements
42 credits
VIS 1003A
Two-Dimensional Design
3
VIS 1004A
Three-Dimensional Design
3
VIS 1009C
Basic Drawing
3
VIS 1016A
Ceramics I
3
VIS 1023A
Photography I
3
VGD 1064N
Digital Imaging I
3
VIS 2011A
Painting I
3
VIS 2019A
Introduction to Print Making
3
VIS 2141A
Materials and Techniques in the Art Studio I
3
VIS 3142A
Materials and Techniques in the Arts Studio
3
VIS 3180A
Modern Art Theory and Criticism
3
VIS 4104A
Contemporary Art and Theory
3
VIS 4180A
Major Studio Project I
3
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 68
Back to Table of Contents
VIS 4181A
Major Studio Project II
3
Minor Requirements
Electives
18 credits
18 credits
Total: 120 credits
*VIS 1001C and VIS 1002C, World Art I and II, are strongly recommended and
are prerequisites for VIS 4104A, Contemporary Art and Theory.
Bachelor of Science Degrees
The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree requires a minimum of 120
credits of course work, at least half of which must be in the Liberal Arts and
Sciences.
Degree Programs in Aviation
The mission of the School of Aviation is to provide a liberal education
leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in a variety of aviation disciplines.
The degree programs prepare students for further research and study in
management, technology, mathematics and for entry into commercial and
military aviation, airports, air traffic control and other areas of the air
transport and aerospace industry.
Flight training courses lead to the Federal Aviation Administration
(FAA) Private and Commercial certificates, the Instrument and Multiengine ratings, the Certified
Flight Instructor (CFI) certificate
and CFI Instrument and CFI
Multi-engine ratings. Fees for
flight training are in addition to
tuition and are found in the
―Financial Information‖ section
of the catalog. Students planning to become professional pilots should
enroll in the Professional Pilot Minor and start flight training in their first
semester. Students interested in non-professional flying are encouraged to
enroll in the Executive Pilot Minor which leads to the FAA Private Pilot
certificate with the Instrument rating. Students in the other Schools of
Dowling College are encouraged to enroll in the Executive Pilot Minor.
The School of Aviation participates in the FAA Air Traffic Control
Collegiate Training Initiative (AT-CTI) program, which was established to
provide students with the basic aeronautical concepts for prospective air
traffic controllers. Prior to graduation, during their senior year, AT-CTI
students must pass a capstone examination in order to satisfy AT-CTI
standards.
The research and technology division of the School
of Aviation
The division‘s field of expertise includes aviation applied research and
technology, training, simulation, homeland security and management
services to the College and to the community of interest outside the
College. There is a Virtual Systems Laboratory, a dedicated computerbased multi-media facility. The objectives are to enhance and broaden the
educational experience of our students as well as to partner with
government agencies and private corporations to conduct mission-related
projects and programs. Currently there is an Air Traffic Control simulator.
Flight Training Registration
Registration for flight training is ongoing throughout the year. To be
eligible to register, students must meet the following criteria:
1. ―Be able to read, speak, write and understand the English language‖ - FAA
Regulations (FAR 61.83c)
2. Satisfy a security background check
3. Be matriculated in a Dowling College degree program
4. Maintain a minimum course load of six (6) credits per
semester
5. Complete appropriate prerequisite and co-requisite ground courses with a
minimum grade of ―C,‖ and complete all stage exams with a minimum grade
of ―B-―
6. Maintain a minimum G.P.A. of 2.0 each semester
7. Professional pilot minors must obtain an FAA First Class Medical Certificate.
Executive Pilot minors must obtain an FAA Third Class Medical Certificate. (A
list of FAA medical examiners is available in Flight Operations in Building B on
the Brookhaven Campus at Shirley.
8. Make a deposit equal to 50% of the flight lab cost, based on current estimated
fees listed in the ―Financial Section‖ of the catalog.
9. Flight registration is subject to review by the Director of Operations. Flight
training is certified under FAA Regulations Part 141 and Part 61.
Dowling College provides aviation students internship opportunities
with airlines, charter, corporate flight departments, flight schools, the FAA
and airports.
B.S. in Aerospace Systems Technology
(HEGIS 0799)
The faculty in the Aerospace Systems Technology Program are
dedicated to providing students with an understanding of the nature,
functions, structures and procedures of the air transportation industry from
the perspective of the use of technology in providing safe, efficient,
economical transportation. Students will develop the ability to work on
multiple complex problems in a collaborative environment developing
skills to formulate technological solutions, working alone and in teams.
Within the Dowling College environment, the students are provided a
comprehensive liberal education from selected courses in the School of Arts
and Sciences.
In addition, those who desire to become pilots will receive additional
ground and flight training leading to FAA certificates and ratings, by
registering for the Professional Pilot Minor. Those who desire to become
Federal air traffic controllers will receive training in preparation for the
FAA Air Traffic Control school.
College-Wide Requirements
6 credits
See page 36. (Math requirement satisfied under major requirements)
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
33 credits
Major Requirements
77 credits
AER 1001N
General Aeronautics I
3
AER 1002N
Commercial and Regulatory Aspects of the Air
Transportation Industry
3
AER 1003N
Aviation Weather
3
AER 2001N
General Aeronautics II
3
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 69
Back to Table of Contents
AER 2004N
AER 2015N
AER 2021N
AER 2111N
AER 3013N
AER 3114N
AER 3115N
AER 3500N
AER 4170N
AER 4175N
CSC 1023N
CSC 1024N
CSC 2025A
CSC 2281A
MTH 1014A
MTH 1006A
MTH 1007A
MTH 1017A
MTH 1021A
MTH 1022A
PHY 1001C
PHY 1002C
PHY 1003C
PHY 1004C
Electives*
Aviation Safety
Airport Management
Elements of Instrument Flying
Crew Resource Management
Air Traffic Control
Basic Air Traffic Control Laboratory
Advanced Air Traffic Control Laboratory
Air Traffic Systems Analysis & Design
Communication/Navigation Technology
Advanced Aerospace Information Systems
Introduction to Computer Science
Introduction to Programming
Data Structures
Network Design & Queuing Theory
Pre-Calculus
Statistics
Operations Research
Discrete Mathematics
Calculus I
Calculus II
General Physics I
General Physics II
General Physics I Laboratory
General Physics II Laboratory
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
3
3
1
1
9 credits
Total: 128 credits
*Pilot Training: Professional Pilot Minor fulfills Electives requirement and adds
3 credits to degree total.
Suggested Sequence of Course Work: Aerospace Systems Technology
Semester 1
AER 1001N
AER 1003N
FYE
ENG 1001A
Core
Semester 2
AER 1002N
AER 2001N
MTH 1014A
Core
Semester 3
AER 2021N
CSC 1023N
MTH 1021A
PHY 1001C
PHY 1003C
Core
Semester 4
CSC 1024N
MTH 1022A
PHY 1002C
General Aeronautics I
Aviation Weather
First Year Experience Seminar (Freshmen only)
Principles of Writing
Commercial and Regulatory Aspects of the
Air Transportation Industry
General Aeronautics II
Pre-Calculus
Elements of Instrument Flying
Introduction to Computer Science
Calculus I
General Physics I
General Physics I Laboratory
Introduction to Programming
Calculus II
General Physics II
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
3
3
3
6
Total: 15
3
3
4
3
1
3
Total: 17
3
4
3
PHY 1004C
Core
General Physics II Laboratory
1
6
Total: 17
Semester 5
AER 2015N
AER 3013N
AER 3114N
MTH 1006A
Core
Airport Management
Air Traffic Control
Basic Air Traffic Control Lab
Statistics
3
3
2
3
6
Total: 17
Semester 6
AER 2004N
AER 3115N
MTH 1007A
MTH 1017A
Core
Aviation Safety
Advanced Air Traffic Control Lab
Operations Research
Discrete Mathematics
3
2
3
3
6
Total: 17
Semester 7
AER 2111N
CSC 2025A
CSC 2281A
AER 3500N
Elective*
Crew Resource Management
Data Structures
Network Design and Queuing Theory
Air Traffic Systems Analysis and Design
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
Semester 8
AER 4170
AER 4175
Senior Seminar
Electives*
Communication/Navigation Technology
Advanced Aerospace Information Systems
3
3
3
6
Total: 15
Degree Total: 128 credits*
*Pilot Training: Professional Pilot Minor replaces electives and adds 3 credits to
degree total.
B.S. in Applied Mathematics
(HEGIS 1703)
The B.S. in Applied Mathematics is intended to provide students with
an outstanding quantitative foundation. The degree prepares students for
employment in industries that require strong analytical skills, including but
not limited to, engineering, economic analysis, pharmaceutical research,
biotechnology, aviation and scientific computer programming. The
program also does an outstanding job in preparing students for graduate
study in mathematics, both pure and applied.
The B.S. in Applied Mathematics major requirements consist of 39
credits. Each student must then choose one of the four tracks consisting of
24 credits: Computational Mathematics, Aviation Science, Mathematical
Economics or Bioengineering, for a total of 63 credits.
College-Wide Requirements
6 credits
See page 36. (Math requirement satisfied under major requirements)
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
33 credits
Major Requirements
CSC 1023N
Introduction to Computer Science
36 credits
3
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 70
Back to Table of Contents
CSC 1024N
CSC 2025A
MTH 1017A
MTH 1021A
MTH 1022A
MTH 2023A
MTH 2101A
MTH 2103A
MTH 3107A
MTH 4171A
MTH 3111A
Introduction to Computer Programming
Data Structures
Discrete Mathematics
Calculus I
Calculus II
Calculus III
Network Flows
Linear Algebra
Vector Analysis or
College Geometry
Probability and Mathematical Statistics
Track Requirements
3
3
3
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
24 credits
Computational Mathematics and Statistics Track
CSC 1009N
Introduction to Spreadsheets and Data Analysis
CSC 3171A
Algorithms
ECN 2036A
Economic Statistics
ESC 1062C
Geographic Information Systems
MGT 2171N
Introduction to Total Quality Management
MTH 1006A
Statistics
MTH 1007A
Operations Research
MTH 2121A
Differential Equations
MTH 3140A
Numerical Analysis I
MTH 4140A
Numerical Analysis II
MTH 4131A
Advanced Calculus
MTH 4172A
Complex Variables
MTH 4191A
Independent Study
MTH 4192A
Independent Study
Mathematical Economics Track
ECN 1001A
Introductory Macroeconomics
ECN 2002A
Introductory Microeconomics
ECN 2036A
Economic Statistics
ECN 3171A
Intermediate Microeconomics
ECN 3172A
Intermediate Macroeconomics
ECN 4136A
Introduction to Applied Econometrics
CSC 1009N
Introduction to Spreadsheets and Data Analysis or
MTH 2121A
Differential Equations
MTH 4131A
Advanced Calculus
One elective ECN (Economics) course numbered 3000 or higher
Bioengineering Track
BIO 1001A
Introduction to Biology I
BIO 1002A
Introduction to Biology II
BIO 1003A
Introduction to Biology Laboratory I
BIO 1004A
Introduction to Biology Laboratory II
BIO 3081C
Microbiology
BIO 3150C
Genetics
BIO 3160C
Introduction to Biotechnology
BIO 3200A
Principles of Bioengineering
MTH 2121A
Differential Equations
MTH 4191A
Independent Study
General Electives
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
B.S. in Aviation Management
(HEGIS 0599)
The faculty in the Aviation Management Program are dedicated to
providing students with an understanding of the nature, functions,
structure and procedures of the air transportation industry. Students are
educated to excel as administrators managers and operators in the variety
of businesses related to flying.
Within the Dowling College environment, the students are provided a
comprehensive liberal education from selected courses in the School of Arts
and Sciences and an understanding of the nature of business from selected
courses in the School of Business.
In addition, those who desire to become pilots will receive additional
ground and flight training leading to FAA certificates and ratings, by
registering for the Professional Pilot Minor. Students registered for the
Professional Pilot Minor, which includes AER 2021N Elements of
Instrument Flying, will select another AER elective in place of AER 1006N
Airspace Structures.* Those who desire to become Federal air traffic
controllers will receive training in preparation for the FAA Air Traffic
Control school. Prior to graduation, during their senior year, AT-CTI
students must pass a capstone examination in order to satisfy AT-CTI
requirements. It is strongly recommended that AT-CTI students replace
AER 1006N with AER 2001N to increase success on the ATC capstone
exam.
College-Wide Requirements
6 credits
See page 36. (Math requirement satisfied under major requirements)
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
4
4
3
3
3
2
18 credits
Total: 120 credits
33 credits
Major Requirements
71 credits
ACC 2001N
Introduction to Financial Accounting I
3
ACC 2002N
Introduction to Financial Accounting II
3
AER 1001N
General Aeronautics I
3
AER 1002N
Commercial & Regulatory Aspects of the
Air Transportation Industry
3
AER 1003N
Aviation Weather
3
AER 1006N*
Airspace Structures
3
AER 2001N
General Aeronautics II
3
AER 2004N
Aviation Safety
3
AER 2015N
Airport Management
3
AER 3013N
Air Traffic Control
3
AER 3106N
Concepts of International Air Transport
3
AER 3114N
Basic Air Traffic Control Lab
2
AER 3115N
Advanced Air Traffic Control Lab
2
AER 4103N
Development & Management of Flight Operations
3
CIS 1200N
Introduction to Information Systems
3
ECN 1001A
Introductory Macroeconomics
3
ECN 2001A
Introductory Microeconomics
3
FIN 3087N
Principles of Finance
3
MGT 1011N
Introduction to Management Theory & Practice
3
MGT 3146A
Organizational Behavior
3
MTH 1002A
Fundamentals of Mathematics
3
MTH 1006A
Statistics
3
MTH 1007A
Operations Research
3
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 71
Back to Table of Contents
MTH 2101A
MTH 2102A
Network Flows
Network Flows Lab
3
1
Electives*
18 credits
Total: 128 credits
Suggested Sequence of Course Work: Aviation Management
Semester 1
AER 1001N
General Aeronautics I
AER 1003N
Aviation Weather
ENG 1001A
Principles of Writing
FYE
First Year Experience Seminar (Freshmen only)
Core
Semester 2
AER 1002N
AER 2001N
MGT 1011N
MTH 1002A
Core
Semester 3
ACC 2001N
AER 1006N**
CIS 1200N
Core
Elective*
Semester 4
ACC 2002N
AER 2004N
MTH 1006N
Core
Elective**
Semester 5
AER 3013N
AER 3114N
ECN 1001A
MTH 1007A
Core
Elective*
Semester 6
AER 3106N
AER 3115N
ECN 2002A
MTH 2101A
MTH 2102A
Core
Semester 7
AER 2015N
FIN 3087N
Core
Elective*
Commercial & Regulatory Aspects of the
Air Transportation Industry
General Aeronautics II
Introduction to Management Theory & Practice
Fundamentals of Mathematics
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
Introduction to Financial Accounting I
Airspace Structures
Introduction to Information Systems
3
3
3
6
3
Total: 18
Introduction to Financial Accounting II
Aviation Safety
Statistics
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
Air Traffic Control
Basic Air Traffic Control Lab
Introductory Macroeconomics
Operations Research
3
2
3
3
3
3
Total: 17
Concepts of International Air Transport
Advanced Air Traffic Control Lab
Introductory Microeconomics
Network Flows
Network Flows Lab
3
2
3
3
1
6
Total: 18
Airport Management
Principles of Finance
3
3
6
3
Total: 15
Semester 8
AER 4103N
MGT 3146A
Senior Seminar
Elective*
Development & Management of Flight Operations
Organizational Behavior
3
3
3
6
Total: 15
Degree Total: 128 credits
*Pilot Training: Professional Pilot Minor replaces nine credits of electives, and
AER 2021N will replace AER 1006N. Students must satisfy the AER 2021N
requirement in the minor with an AER Elective.
**Students interested in AT-CTI status and FAA employment as a CPC are
strongly encouraged to replace AER 1006N with AER 2021N to increase
success on the ATC capstone exam and at FAA Academy Training. They may
keep AER 1006N and take AER 2021N as an elective.
B.S. in Biology
The B.S. in Biology degree is designed to provide students with an indepth preparation for advanced study in biology and related disciplines.
This degree is also suitable for any student taking one of the three tracks in
the BA in Biology who wishes to have a more in-depth undergraduate
experience in biology, and can be similarly tailored to the student‘s
postgraduate goals. The major requires students to complete a minimum of
39 credits of biology (20 of which are elective courses selected based on
student need), 16 credits of chemistry, 6 credits of physics, plus an
additional 10 credits of mathematics. There are three core Biology courses,
Evolution, Cell Biology and Genetics; all other Biology elective courses are
chosen in collaboration with an advising Biology faculty member to best
meet the postgraduate goals and interests of the student.
College-Wide Requirements
6 credits
See page 36. (Math requirement satisfied under major requirements)
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
33 credits
Major Requirements
BIO 1001A
Introduction to Biology I
BIO 1002A
Introduction to Biology II
BIO 1003A
Introduction to Biology I Laboratory
BIO 1004A
Introduction to Biology II Laboratory
BIO 2113C
Evolution
BIO 3150C
Genetics
BIO 4170C
Cell Biology
Bio Electives**
MTH 1014A
Pre-Calculus
Choose two of the following:
MTH 1006A
Statistics or
MTH 1021A
Calculus I or
MTH 1022A
Calculus II
73 credits
3
3
1
1
3
4
4
20
3
CHM 1001C
CHM 1002C
CHM 1003C
CHM 1004C
CHM 3025A
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II
General Chemistry I Laboratory
General Chemistry II Laboratory
Organic Chemistry I
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 72
3
4
4
3
3
1
1
3
Back to Table of Contents
CHM 3026A
Organic Chemistry II
CHM 3027A
Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
CHM 3028A
Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
PHY 1001C
General Physics I
PHY 1002C
General Physics II
PHY 1003C
General Physics I Laboratory
PHY 1004C
General Physics II Laboratory
** Only 3 credits of BIO ELECTIVES may be 1000 level biology classes.
3
1
1
3
3
1
1
B.S. in Chemistry
(HEGIS 1905)
Dowling‘s Chemistry degree programs provide a solid foundation in
each of the fundamental areas of chemistry: inorganic, organic, physical,
analytical, instrumental, and biological chemistry. Modern and traditional
instrumentation and techniques are utilized in laboratories, class work, and
field experiences. Instrumentation includes high pressure liquid
chromatography, gas chromatography, atomic absorption spectroscopy,
infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, fluorometry, and
mass spectrometry. Students gain ample hands-on experience with
instrumentation in coursework, and are encouraged to conduct chemistry
research or to participate in the Chemistry Cooperative Internship
Program. Research opportunities are available on campus with Dowling
faculty and off campus with Dowling partners from industry and
governmental entities.
Career Outcomes for Chemistry Majors
The chemistry Bachelor of Science degree enables students to pursue
varied career goals since chemistry is central to many science careers. It
prepares students for graduate study in chemistry or for employment in
government or private industries such as pharmaceutical and
environmental testing. Students are also qualified to pursue advanced
degrees in other sciences or engineering, or in law and professional schools.
Coursework exceeds the minimum chemistry content required for
secondary school teaching. Students interested in becoming a chemistry
teacher or in completing a chemistry Bachelor‘s degree and pre-medical
school requirements in four years may prefer to pursue the B.A. in
Chemistry since the Bachelor of Arts program in Chemistry allows more
elective credits.
College-Wide Requirements
6 credits
See page 36. (Math requirement satisfied under major requirements)
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
33 credits
Major Requirements
CHM 1001C
General Chemistry I
CHM 1002C
General Chemistry II
CHM 1003C
General Chemistry I Laboratory
CHM 1004C
General Chemistry II Laboratory
CHM 3025A
Organic Chemistry I
CHM 3026A
Organic Chemistry II
CHM 3027A
Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
CHM 3028A
Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
63 credits
3
3
1
1
3
3
1
1
CHM 3035A
CHM 3037A
CHM 3045A
CHM 3047A
CHM 4076A
CHM/PHY 4169A
CHM/PHY 4170A
CHM Electives
MTH 2103A
MTH 2121A
MTH 1021A
MTH 1022A
MTH 2023A
PHY 1001C
PHY 1002C
PHY 1003C
PHY 1004C
Analytical Chemistry
Analytical Chemistry Laboratory
Inorganic Chemistry
Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory
Instrumental Analysis
Physical Chemistry: Quantum Mechanics
Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics
Any courses numbered 3000 and above
Linear Algebra or
Differential Equations
Calculus I
Calculus II
Calculus III
General Physics I
General Physics II
General Physics I Laboratory
General Physics II Laboratory
3
1
3
1
4
3
3
6
3
4
4
4
3
3
1
1
Minor/Electives Requirements
18 credits
Total: 120 credits
Note: Students majoring in Chemistry are not required to complete a minor.
Suggested Sequence of Course Work: B.S. in Chemistry
Semester 1
CHM 1001C
General Chemistry I Lecture
CHM 1003C
General Chemistry I Laboratory
MTH 1021A*
Calculus I
FYE
First Year Experience Seminar (Freshmen only)
General Education Requirement
Semester 2
CHM 1002C
General Chemistry II Lecture
CHM 1004C
General Chemistry II Laboratory
ENG 1001A
Principles of Writing
MTH 1022A
Calculus II
General Education Requirement
Semester 3
CHM 3025A
Organic Chemistry I Lecture
CHM 3027A
Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
MTH 2023A
Calculus III
PHY 1001C
General Physics I Lecture
PHY 1003C
General Physics I Laboratory
General Education Requirement
Semester 4
CHM 3026A
Organic Chemistry II Lecture
CHM 3028A
Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
MTH 2103A
Linear Algebra or
MTH 2121A
Differential Equations
PHY 1002C
General Physics II Lecture
PHY 1004C
General Physics II Laboratory
General Education Requirement
Semester 5**
CHM 3035A
Analytical Chemistry
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 73
Credits
3
1
4
3
3
Total: 14
3
1
3
4
3
Total: 14
3
1
4
3
1
3
Total: 15
3
1
3
3
1
3
Total: 14
3
Back to Table of Contents
CHM 3037A
Analytical Chemistry Laboratory
CHM 3045A
Inorganic Chemistry
CHM 3047A
Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory
General Education Requirements
Electives (Chemistry or General)
Semester 6
CHM 4076A
Instrumental Analysis
General Education Requirements
Electives (Chemistry or General)
1
3
1
6
3
Total: 17
4
6
6
Total: 16
Semester 7
CHM 4169A
Physical Chemistry: Quantum Mechanics
General Education Requirement
Electives (Chemistry or General)
Semester 8
CHM 4170A
Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics
Senior Seminar
Electives (Chemistry or General)
3
6
6
Total: 15
3
3
9
Total: 15
Five-Year Degree Sequencing for the B.S. in Chemistry
and M.B.A. in General Management & Leadership (with
business minor for science majors)
The College offers a five-year B.A. in Chemistry and M.B.A. in General
Management & Leadership (with a business minor for science majors) to
provide a strong foundation for chemistry majors whose career path may
lead into private industries, such as pharmaceutical or cosmetic. This
sequence positions the graduate to enter these private industries and to
progress into managerial positions. Contact the School of Arts and Sciences
at 631-244-3232 for further information.
Recommended Sequence of Courses for the B.A. in Chemistry and
M.B.A. in General Management (with business minor for science majors)
Semester 1
CHM 1001C
CHM 1003C
ENG 1001A
FYE
MTH 1021A*
CORE
General Chemistry I Lecture
General Chemistry I Laboratory
Principles of Writing
First Year Experience Seminar (Freshmen only)
Calculus I
Semester 2
CHM 1002C
CHM 1004C
MTH 1022A
CORE
General Chemistry II Lecture
General Chemistry II Laboratory
Calculus II
Semester 3
CHM 3025A
CHM 3027A
MTH 2023A
PHY 1001C
PHY 1003C
CORE
Organic Chemistry I Lecture
Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
Calculus III
General Physics I Lecture
General Physics I Laboratory
Credits
3
1
3
3
4
3
3
1
4
6
3
1
4
3
1
3
Semester 4
ACC 2001N
CHM 3026A
CHM 3028A
MTH 1017A
MTH 2102A
MTH 2121A
PHY 1002C
PHY 1004C
CORE
Introduction to Financial Accounting I
Organic Chemistry II Lecture
Organic chemistry II Laboratory
Discrete Mathematics or
Linear Algebra or
Differential Equations
General Physics II Lecture
General Physics II Laboratory
3
3
1
3
3
1
3
Semester - Summer
MGT 1011N
Introduction to Management Theory & Practice
3
Semester 5
ACC 2002N
CHM 3037A
CHM 3045A
CHM Elective
CORE
Introduction to Financial Accounting II
Analytical Chemistry Laboratory
Inorganic Chemistry
3
1
3
3
6
Instrumental Analysis
Principles of Finance
4
3
6
3
Semester 6
CHM 4076A
FIN 3087N
CORE
CHM Elective
Semester - Summer
ACC 6241
Managerial Accounting (Graduate)
Semester 7
CHM/PHY 4169A Physical Chemistry: Quantum Mechanics
FIN 6212
Financial Management (Graduate)
CHM/General Electives
CORE
Semester 8
CHM/PHY 4170A Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics
MGT 2075N
Personnel Management
CHM/General Electives
ASC
Senior Seminar
3
3
3
3-7
3
3
3
3-6
3
Semester - Summer
MGT 6301
Strategic Management
3
MGT 6373
Leadership, Business Ethics and Quality Management or
MGT 63XX
Graduate Management course
3
Semester 9
CIS 6261
MGT 6204
MGT 6233
MGT 6308
Semester 10
MGT 6304
Information Technologies for Managers
Excellence in Organizations: Behavior,
Leadership and Quality
Quantitative Methods in Business
Labor Relations
Organizational Life: Managing Individual
and Group Behavior
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 74
3
3
3
3
3
Back to Table of Contents
MGT 6392-6393
MGT 6395-6396
Management Internship or
The Management Consulting Experience
Course
3-3
MKT 6252
Marketing Management
3
*Students who do not pass the placement exam for MTH 1021A-Calculus I
should take MTH 1014A Pre-calculus in Semester 1. The prerequisite for CHM
1001C is a grade of C or better in MTH 1014A, such students must postpone
enrollment in CHM 1001-1004C until Semesters 3 and 4.
**Chemistry courses taken in Semesters 5-8 are offered on an alternate year
cycle and have prerequisites that should be completed in Semesters 1-4.
***Departmental Honors in Chemistry: A Departmental Honors Project is
available to students in this program in their senior year (90 credits over-all).
The project requires substantial original independent research and the
successful completion of both CHM 4291A and CHM 4292A, generally taken
over the fall and spring semesters. (See page 47 or contact the School of Arts
and Sciences at 631-244-3232 for further information.)
B.S. in Computer Information Systems
(HEGIS 0701)
The computer information systems discipline is unique among other
business disciplines in that it prepares students to bridge the gap between
business processes and the information systems that are used to support
the functions of accounting, finance, marketing and management. Students
will learn how to manage the deployment and integration of information
systems as needed to support decision-making processes.
Career Outcomes for Computer Information
Systems Majors
Computer Information Systems bachelor degree graduates will be
prepared to communicate effectively identify and solve complex
information system-related problems, and quickly master new technologies
as appropriate. Students will be prepared to take on management roles in
organizations utilizing information technology as a strategic tool. The
undergraduate Computer Information Systems major will position
students to enter the workforce in many capacities such as systems analyst,
business analyst, systems support, information technologist, or help desk
administrator.
College-Wide Requirements
6 credits
See page 36. (Math requirement satisfied under major requirements)
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
33 credits
Major Requirements
63 credits
ACC 2001N
Introduction to Financial Accounting I
3
ACC 2002N
Introduction to Financial Accounting II
3
CIS 1200N
Introduction to Information Systems Management
3
CIS 2015A
Systems Analysis and Design
3
CIS 2102N
Database Management Systems
3
CIS 3012N
Programming Logic and Design
3
CIS 3013N
Advanced Programming or
CSC 1024N
Introduction to Programming
3
CIS 3300N
Advanced Database Management Systems
3
CIS 3400N
Business Data Communications
3
CIS 4090NN
CIS 4151N
CIS Elective*
ECN 1001A
ECN 2002A
FIN 3087N
MGT 1011N
MGT 2077A
MKT 1033N
MTH 1002A
MTH 1006A
MTH 1007A
Project Management
Information Systems Management Capstone
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Introductory Macroeconomics
Introductory Microeconomics
Principles of Finance
Introduction to Management Theory & Practice
Business Law I
Essentials of Marketing in the 21st Century
Basic Fundamentals of Mathematics**
Statistics
Operations Research
Electives
At least six credits must be Liberal Arts Electives.
18 credits
Total: 120 credits
*The CIS elective may be chosen from the following: CIS 2005N, CIS 4191N,
CIS 4195N, CIS 4197N, VIS 1064N.
**MTH 1002A - Basic Fundamentals of Mathematics fulfills the mathematics
requirement.
Recommended Sequence of Course Work: Computer Information Systems
Semester 1
Core
Core
FYE
ENG 1001A
MGT 1011N
MTH 1002A
Semester 2
Core
Core
CIS 1200N
ECN 1001A
MKT 1033N
World Civilizations Course
Modes of Artistic Expression Course
First Year Experience Seminar (Freshmen only)
Principles of Writing
Introduction to Management Theory & Practice
Fundamentals of Mathematics
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 18
World Civilizations Course
3
Modes of Artistic Expression Course
3
Introduction to Information Systems Management
3
Introductory Macroeconomics
3
Essentials of Marketing in the 21st Century
3
Total: 15
Semester 3
Core
Core
ACC 2001N
CIS 2102N
MTH 1006A
Dynamics of Contemporary Societies Course
Nature of the Universe Course
Introduction to Financial Accounting I
Database Management Systems
Statistics
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
Semester 4
Core
Core
ACC 2002N
CIS 2015A
ECN 2002A
MTH 1007A
Dynamics of Contemporary Societies Course
Nature of the Universe Course
Introduction to Financial Accounting II
Systems Analysis and Design
Introductory Microeconomics
Operations Research
3
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 18
Semester 5
Core
CIS 3012N
CIS 3400N
Varieties of Human Experience Course
Programming Logic and Design
Business Data Communications
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 75
3
3
3
Back to Table of Contents
FIN 3087N
MGT 2077A
Elective
Principles of Finance
Business Law I
3
3
3
Total: 18
Semester 6
Core
CIS 3013N
CSC 1024N
CIS 3300N
Elective
Varieties of Human Experience Course
Advanced Programming or
Introduction to Programming
Advanced Database Management Systems
Semester 7
Core
Electives
Core Senior Seminar
Semester 8
CIS 4120N
CIS 4151N
CIS Elective
Electives
3
3
3
3
Total: 12
3
6
Total: 9
Managing Information Systems Change
Across the Enterprise
Information Systems Management Capstone
3
3
3
6
Total: 15
Degree Total: 120 credits
B.S. in Computer Science and Mathematics
See pages 36-37.
Major Requirements
CSC 1023
Introduction to Computer Science
CSC 1024
Introduction to Programming
CSC 2025
Data Structures
CSC 2060
Computer Organization
CSC 3072
Database Systems
CSC 3084
Web Development & Programming
CSC 3971
Advanced Programming I
CSC 3981
Advanced Software Engineering I
MTH 1017
Discrete Mathematics
MTH 1021
Calculus I
MTH 1022
Calculus II
MTH 2103
Linear Algebra
MTH 3111
Probability and Mathematical Statistics
plus two other CSC electives
Available CSC Electives:
CSC 2078
Computer Graphics
CSC 2281
Network Design & Queuing Theory
CSC 3171
Algorithms
CSC 3174
Visualization
CSC 3972
Advanced Programming II
CSC 3982
Advanced Software Engineering II
Electives
(HEGIS 0701)
Dowling‘s School of Arts and Sciences degree programs are
constructed upon a well-rounded core curriculum of arts and humanities,
natural science, math, and social sciences. These are classic building blocks
that ensure career versatility in an ever-changing world. The computer
science program offers a mix of theoretical and practical courses, enabling
students to choose discipline-related electives to pursue individual interests
in preparation for computer science careers and graduate studies.
Career Outcomes for Computer Science Majors
Your Dowling computer science degree and your work on projects
inside and outside of the classroom will help prepare you for challenging
and rewarding career possibilities in computer science and information
systems engineering and in the ever-increasing number of disciplines that
require computers to solve real-world problems. If you follow up your
undergraduate degree with an appropriate graduate degree you can
become a teacher, researcher, or a key member of a business information
systems management team. If you prefer to go directly into the job market,
your options include working as a web designer, systems architect,
software designer, systems administrator, network administrator, quality
analyst, or a member of a business information systems or research team,
and more.
Students may seek advanced placement by having their academic
history reviewed by the Mathematics/Computer Science Department
Chair.
College-Wide Requirements
6 credits
See page 36. (Math requirement satisfied under major requirements)
Core Requirements
33 credits
47 credits
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
3
3
6
3
3
3
3
3
3
34 credits
Total: 120 credits
B.S. in Criminal Justice Management
(HEGIS 0599)
The Criminal Justice Management degree at Dowling College is
designed to prepare future and present professionals in the Criminal
Justice field. The program emphasizes current technology use, necessary
communication skills and recent trends in the various disciplines that
encompass the Criminal Justice professional. The program was designed
in consultation with the Dowling College Criminal Justice Management
Advisory Board made up of representatives from Homeland Security,
FBI, Nassau County Police Department, Suffolk County Police
Department, New York City Police Department, as well as private sector
security.
College-Wide Requirements
6 credits
See page 36. (Math requirement satisfied under Liberal Arts
correlatives)
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
33 credits
Business Core Requirements
See page 84.
21 credits
Major Requirements
42 credit
CJM 2100N
Current Issues in Criminal Justice
3
CJM 2110N
Introduction to Criminal Justice Forensics
3
CJM 2150N
Communication Skills for Criminal Justice or
SPH 1004C
Fundamentals of Speech
3
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 76
Back to Table of Contents
CJM 2500
CJM 4195N
MGT 3146N
PHL 1042C
POL 3131A
PSY 1001A
SOC 1001A
SOC 2102C
Choose 3 Courses
CJM 3010N
CJM 3020N
CJM 3050N
CJM 3060N
CJM 4195N/
CJM 4196N
Semester 1
MGT 1011
MGT 2075
SOC 1001A
Core
FYE
ENG 1001A
Statistics & Research for Criminal Justice
Criminal Justice Internship
Organization Behavior
Ethics
Political Parties & Elections
Introduction to Psychology
Introduction to Sociology I
Self & Society II: Race, Gender & Class
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Crime and Intelligence Analysis or
Homeland Security or
Criminal Profiling or
Intelligence Led Policing or
3
3
3
Criminal Justice Internship
3
Introduction to Management Theory & Practice or
Human Resources Management
3
Introduction to Sociology I
3
xxx (refer to catalog)
3
First Year Experience
3
Principles of Writing
3
Total: 15
Semester 2
Core
CIS 1200N
PSY 1001A
MGT 3146A
Core
xxx (refer to catalog)
Introduction to Information Systems
Introduction to Psychology
Organizational Behavior
xxx (refer to catalog)
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
Semester 3
CJM 2100N
PHL 1042C
Core
Core
MTHXXX
Current Issues in Criminal Justice
Ethics
xxx (refer to catalog)
xxx (refer to catalog)
Appropriate to the major
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
Semester 4
CJM 2110N
CJM 2150N
SPH 1004C
POL 3131A
Core
Elective/Minor
Introduction to Criminal Justice Forensics
Communication Skills for Criminal Justice
Fundamentals of Speech
Political Parties & Elections
xxx (refer to catalog)
3
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 18
Semester 5
CJM 2500N
SOC 2120A
Core
NSC Tier 1
Elective/Minor
Statistics & Research for Criminal Justice
Criminology
xxx (refer to catalog)
Nature of the Universe Course
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
Semester 6
NSC Tier II
Core
CJM 3010N
Nature of the Universe Course
xxx (refer to catalog)
Crime and Intelligence Analysis or
3
3
CJM 3020N
CJM 3050N
CJM 4195/
CJM 4196
Elective/Minor
Elective/Minor
Semester 7
CJM 3010N
CJM 3020N
CJM 3050N
CJM 3060N
CJM 4195/96
Elective/Minor
Elective/Minor
Elective/Minor
Homeland Security or
Criminal Profiling or
Criminal Justice Internship
3
3
3
Total: 15
Crime and Intelligence Analysis or
Homeland Security or
Criminal Profiling or
Intelligence Led Policing or
Criminal Justice Internship
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
Semester 8
CJM 3010N
Crime and Intelligence Analysis or
3
CJM 3020N
Homeland Security or
3
CJM 3030N
Corrections & Detention Systems and Practices or
CJM 3050N
Criminal Profiling or
CJM 3060N
Intelligence Led Policing or
Elective/Minor
3
Elective/Minor
3
Senior Seminar Core Senior Seminar
3
Total: 15
Total 120 Credits
B.S. in Environmental Sciences
(HEGIS 0420)
Dowling‘s School of Arts and Sciences degree programs are
constructed upon a well-rounded core curriculum of arts and humanities,
natural science, math, and social sciences. These are the classic building
blocks that ensure career versatility in an ever-changing world. Our
Environmental Sciences degree was designed based on the belief that
environmental issues are societal issues; consequently, its required courses
will be drawn from natural sciences, humanities, and social sciences. In this
program, students will gain an understanding of the impact of science and
technology on society and explore solutions to environmental problems
and issues. Students will learn how to define environmental problems,
gather information, and organize and interpret data. Rigorous scientific
investigation, monitoring, and mitigating will be stressed through a strong
field research component.
Career Outcomes for Environmental Sciences
Majors
Dowling‘s Environmental Sciences degree will prepare you for diverse
careers in environmental protection, remediation and restoration, including
conservationist, urban and regional planner, and agricultural scientist, and
others. Broad training, technical and analytical skills will qualify you for
rewarding positions as an environmental consultant, analyst, or scientist in
the non-profit, public, or private sectors.
College-Wide Requirements
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 77
6 credits
Back to Table of Contents
See page 36. (Math requirement satisfied under major requirements)
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
33 credits
Major Requirements
62 credits
BIO 1001A
Introduction to Biology I
3
BIO 1002A
Introduction to Biology II
3
BIO 1003A
Introduction to Biology I Laboratory
1
BIO 1004A
Introduction to Biology II Laboratory
1
BIO 1009C
Biodiversity & Conservation Biology
3
BIO 2071C
Ecology
4
CHM 1001C
General Chemistry I
3
CHM 1002C
General Chemistry II
3
CHM 1003C
General Chemistry I Laboratory
1
CHM 1004C
General Chemistry II Laboratory
1
CHM 3025A
Organic Chemistry Lecture
3
CHM 3027A
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
1
CHM 3037A
Analytical Chemistry Laboratory
1
ESC/CHM 2071A
Environmental Pollution I
4
ESC/CHM 2072A
Environmental Pollution II
4
CHM 4187A
Environmental Chemistry OR
CHM 3035A
Analytical Chemistry OR
CHM 4076A
Instrumental Analysis (4 credits) OR
CHM 4170A
Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics
3
ESC 1027C
Geology I
4
ESC 1028A
Geology II
4
ESC 1062C
Geographic Information Systems
3
ESC 2084C
Environmental Law
3
ESC 2085C
Environmental Impact Analysis Investigations
3
MTH 1006A
Statistics
3
MTH 1014A
Pre-Calculus
3
Electives
29 credits
Total: 120 credits
B.S. in Natural Sciences and Mathematics
(HEGIS 4902)
Dowling‘s School of Arts and Sciences degree programs are
constructed upon a well-rounded core curriculum of arts and humanities,
natural science, math, and social sciences. These are the classic building
blocks that ensure career versatility in an ever-changing world. The natural
sciences and mathematics degree is designed for students interested in
preparing for careers in scientific and technological services, including
teaching.
Career Outcomes for Natural Sciences and
Mathematics Majors
Your Dowling natural sciences and mathematics degree prepares you
for an exciting career as a teacher, operations researcher analyst, laboratory
technician, information specialist, and more.
College-Wide Requirements
6 credits
See page 36. (Math requirement satisfied under major requirements)
Core Requirements
33 credits
See pages 36-37.
Major Requirements
63 credits
BIO 1001A
Introduction to Biology I
3
BIO 1002A
Introduction to Biology II
3
BIO 1003A
Introduction to Biology I Laboratory
1
BIO 1004A
Introductory Biology II Laboratory
1
CHM 1001C
General Chemistry I
3
CHM 1002C
General Chemistry II
3
CHM 1003C
General Chemistry I Laboratory
1
CHM 1004C
General Chemistry II Laboratory
1
CSC 1023N
Introduction to Computer Science
3
MTH 1021A
Calculus I
4
PHY 1001C
General Physics I
3
PHY 1002C
General Physics II
3
PHY 1003C
General Physics I Laboratory
1
PHY 1004C
General Physics II Laboratory
1
Science and Mathematics Electives*
32
*Students must earn an additional 32 credits in Biology, Chemistry, Computer
Science, Earth and Marine Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, and Natural
Science.**
Electives
18 credits
Total: 120 credits
Note: Students majoring in Natural Sciences and Mathematics are not required
to complete a minor.
**Natural Science 2003/2004 or 2005/2006 may not be used to satisfy this
requirement.
B.S. in Physical Education
(HEGIS 0835)
The Physical Education Teacher Preparation Program provides and
integrates exceptional educational experiences at both public and private
school settings so that majors can receive a quality education and become
productive citizens. The objectives of the program emphasize the
knowledge, skills, and dispositions of a quality teacher as described by the
national governing agencies of Shape America, and the institution
accreditation agency, CAEP.
The program will place emphasis on:
1. a broad knowledge of human function and disease with concentration on
obesity issues;
2. a strong pedagogical core with emphasis on skills methods instruction that
stresses effective strategies to control and combat childhood obesity;
3. maximizing practical experiences with school-aged children in school
settings;
4. An emphasis on ethics, dispositions, and professionalism;
5. Opportunities involving the community in health-enhancing events; and,
6. Providing opportunities to service the needs of the community and diverse
learners.
Program completion will meet all of the NYSED requirements for
teacher certification for Physical Education K-12. It is recommended to have
a strong desire to work with diverse populations, and children with special
needs and conditions, such as obesity.
All students must present and maintain a Grade Point Average of 3.0
to qualify for part time or full time student teaching.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 78
Back to Table of Contents
College-Wide Requirements
9 credits
See page 36. (Math requirement satisfied under major requirements)
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
33 credits
Physical Education Major Requirements
SMP 1032A*
Personal Health
SMP 1033N*
First Aid and Society
SMP 1041A*
Sport in Society
SMP 1800N*
Foundations of Physical Activity, Theories
and Practice
SMP 2820N*
Human Function I (with Laboratory)
SMP 2821N*
Human Function II (with Laboratory)
SMP 3830N*
Biomechanical Analysis of Sport Skills
SMP 3831N*
Exercise Physiology
23 credits
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
Core
Artistic Expression
Core
Western Civilization
ENG 1001A
Principles of Writing
FYE
First Year Experience Seminar (Freshmen Only)
MTH or NSM 2008C*
SMP 1800N
Foundations of Physical Activity, Theories
& Practice
Semester 2
Core
Core
SMP 1801N
SMP 1032A
SMP 1041A
EDH 1131A
Pedagogy Requirements
44 credits
EDS 1081A
Introduction to Exceptional Children
3
EDH 1131A
Human Development & Learning
3
EDL 3146N
Literacy Acquisition I
3
SMP 4899N
Student Teaching Seminar – Physical Education
6
Foreign Language or Sign Language
3
LIB 1101N
Introduction to Academic Research
1
SMP 2830N*
Curriculum Analysis and Assessment for
Physical Education
3
SMP 3812N*
Instructional Strategies of Physical Education
- Elementary
3
SMP 3813N*
Physical Education Assessment Strategies - Elementary 1
SMP 3820N*
Technology Integration for Physical Education
2
SMP 3822N*
Instructional Methods for Physical Education
- Secondary
3
SMP 4832N*
Instructional Methods for Adaptive Physical
Education
3
SMP 4833N*
Physical Education Assessment Strategies – Secondary 1
SMP 4833N*
Motor Learning and Development
3
SMP 4891N
Supervised Student Teaching - Physical
Education
3
SPH 1004C
Fundamentals of Speech
3
Semester 3
Core
Core
LIB 1101N
SMP 2801N
Skills Methods Requirements
17 credits
SMP 1801N*
Sport Instruction: Team Sports: Acquisition,
Analysis & Assessment
2
SMP 2801N*
Manipulative, Net & Racquet
Sports: Acquisition, Analysis & Assessment
2
SMP 2802N*
Fitness Instruction
2
SMP 3801N*
Adventure Education
2
SMP 3811N*
Movement Education
3
SMP 3821N*
Lifetime & Leisure Activities
2
SMP 4801N*
Rhythm & Dance Activities
2
SMP 4831N*
Multicultural Modified & Inclusion Games
2
Total: 126 credits
*Courses must be completed with a C or better
SMP 3820N
SMP 3830N
Recommended Sequence of Courses: B.S. in Physical Education
Semester 1
17-18 credits
SMP 2820N
SPH 1004C
Semester 4
Core
Core
SMP 2802N
SMP 2821N
SMP 2830N
Semester 5
Core
EDL 3146N
SMP 3811N
SMP 3812N
Semester 6
Core
EDS 1081A
SMP 3801N
SMP 3821N
SMP 3822N
SMP 3831N
Artistic Expression
Western Civilization
Sport Instruction: Team Sports: Acquisition,
Analysis & Assessment
Personal Health
Sport in Society
Human Development & Learning
Contemporary Societies
Nature of the Universe
Introduction to Academic Research
Manipulative, Net & Racquet
Sports: Acquisition, Analysis & Assessment
Human Function I (with Laboratory)
Fundamentals of Speech
Contemporary Societies
Nature of the Universe
Fitness Instruction
Human Function II (with Laboratory)
Curriculum Analysis and Assessment for
Physical Education
Human Experience
Literacy Acquisition I
Movement Education
Instructional Strategies of Physical Education
- Elementary
Technology Integration for Physical Education
Biomechanical Analysis of Sport Skills
Human Experience
Introduction to Exceptional Children
Adventure Education
Lifetime & Leisure Activities
Instructional Methods for Physical Education
- Secondary
Exercise Physiology
Semester 7
Foreign Language or Sign Language**
SMP 1033N
First Aid and Society
SMP 4801N
Rhythm & Dance Activities
SMP 4831N
Multicultural Modified & Inclusion Games
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 79
3
3
3
3
3-4
2
17 credits
3
3
2
3
3
3
16 credits
3
3
1
2
4
3
15 credits
3
3
2
4
3
17 credits
3
3
3
3
2
3
16 credits
3
3
2
2
3
3
16 credits
3
3
2
2
Back to Table of Contents
SMP 4832N
SMP 4833N
Instructional Methods for Adaptive Physical
Education
Motor Learning and Development
B.S. in Special Education
3
3
Semester 8
12 credits
SMP 4899N
Student Teaching Seminar– Physical Education
6
SMP 4891N
Supervised Student Teaching – Physical Education
3
Senior Seminar
3
*Note: If NSM 2008C is used to satisfy the Mathematics College-wide
requirement, NSM 2008C cannot also be used to satisfy the sophomore year
Tier II Core requirement.
**Students taking the liberal arts core sequence for French or Italian will meet
this state requirement and have one 3-credit elective available.
B.S. in Professional and Liberal Studies
(HEGIS 4901)
Dowling‘s School of Arts and Sciences degree programs are
constructed upon a well-rounded core curriculum of arts and humanities,
natural science, math, and social sciences. These are the classic building
blocks that ensure career versatility in an ever-changing world. Dowling‘s
Professional and Liberal Studies program is designed for associate degree
holders with a technical or professional orientation. Career counseling and
personalized advisement are an integral part of the BSPLS degree.
Career Outcomes for Professional and Liberal
Studies Majors
Dowling‘s professional and liberal studies degree prepares you for a
leadership position or advancement in your profession of choice.
Students who wish to be certified to teach Business and Marketing in
grades 5-12 must take 21 credits of the Business Core as follows: ECN
1001A and 2002A, ACC 2001N and 2002N, FIN 3087N, CIS 1200N, MGT
2077A and MKT 1033N. They must take 15 additional credits in Finance
and Management as follows: FIN 3092N, MGT 1011N, 2073N and 2075N,
and other Education and Psychology courses that qualify them for middle
childhood or adolescence certification. Completion of this program may
require more than 120 credits of course work.
Major Requirements (Liberal Arts)*
60 credits
English/Philosophy/Foreign Language ............................................................ 15
HST, POL, ECN, PSY, SOC, or ANT ................................................................... 18
MTH.............................................................................................................................. 6
Science .......................................................................................................................... 6
ATS,VIS, MUS, DAN, DRM, or SPH................................................................... 15
Electives ......................................................................................................... 60 credits
Liberal Arts and Non-Liberal Arts
Total: 120 credits
*Note: Core Requirement (two sequences and Senior Seminar [15 credits]) and
College-Wide Requirements (ENG 1001A [3 credits] and MTH (other than
MTH 0001A) [3 credits]) must be taken as part of the required Liberal Arts
credits.
(HEGIS 0808) (Dual Certification)
The Bachelor of Science in Special Education program prepares
candidates to become competent educators in a variety of settings that
serve students both with and without disabilities. Graduates of the B.S.
Special Education program demonstrate knowledge and expertise in the
foundational principles of the profession; evidence-based practice; the
assessment of student performance; planning, delivering and evaluating
appropriate instructional modifications; and collaborating with school
personnel, family members, and representative members of the
community. To this end, effective oral and written communication is
essential competencies. Special educators prepared at Dowling College
appreciate and respect cultural differences and strive to include all students
and their family members in meaningful educational participation. The B.S.
Special Education program offers teacher preparation that leads to New
York State teacher certification in two areas: Students with Disabilities
(SWD) and Childhood or Adolescence Education. All education students
are required by New York State to take an arts and sciences major. Those
students seeking certification in Special Education: Adolescence should
major in Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, English, French, Math, Physics,
Social Studies, or Spanish in order to fulfill New York State teacher
certification requirements. All students must meet with both their special
education faculty advisor and their arts and sciences faculty advisor each
semester to plan their programs of study.
All students must present and maintain a Grade Point Average of 3.0
to be eligible for part time or full time student teaching.
To be eligible for initial certification, students must complete all the
requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Special Education; obtain a
passing score on all required New York State teacher certification exams;
complete the professional workshops mandated by New York State; and
maintain a minimum G.P.A. of 3.0. Students must register for field
placements by announced deadlines in both the fall and spring semesters.
A G.P.A. of 3.0 is required for placement in all field experiences
College-Wide Requirements (See page 36.)
LIB 1101N
Introduction to Academic Research
See page 36.
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
9 credits
1
33 credits
Major in Special Education
54 credits
EDH 1021A
Education in Society
3
EDS 1081A
Introduction to Exceptional Children
3
EDS 2101N
Assistive Technology for Students with Special Needs 3
EDS 2108N
Special Education Field Experience I and Seminar
3
EDS 2183N
Behavior Management and Instructional
Strategies for Diverse Learners
3
EDS 2184N
Assessment and Program Planning for
Students with Special Needs
3
EDS 3110N
Special Education Field Experience II and Seminar
3
EDL 3146N
Literacy Acquisition I
3
EDS 3186N
Integrated Practices in the Content Areas
3
EDL 4149N
Literacy Acquisition II
3
EDL 4150N
Teaching Reading in the Content Area
3
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 80
Back to Table of Contents
EDS 4190N
EDS 4193N
Supervised Student Teaching: Special Education
Student Teaching Seminar: Special Education
6
3
Foreign
Language
Six (6) credits in the same language, not including
American Sign Language. (Sign language may be
Substituted only by students requiring
special accommodations.)
6
Psychology
PSY 1001A
PSY 2015A
PSY 2016A
Introduction to Psychology
Developmental Psychology I or
Developmental Psychology II
3
3
Major in Liberal Arts and Sciences
36 credits
Students are required to complete one of the following majors: Biology,
Chemistry, Earth Science, English, French, Humanities*, Mathematics,
Physics, Political Science*, Psychology*, Social Science, Sociology/
Anthropology*, Spanish, Theatre*, or Visual Arts*
30-45
Total: 122-135 credits
*Not to be taken by students seeking Students with Disabilities: Adolescence
teacher certification.
Recommended Course Sequence: B.S. in Special Education
Upper Sophomore Year
PSY 1001A
Introduction to Psychology
PSY 2015A
Developmental Psychology I or
PSY 2016A
Developmental Psychology II
Lower Junior Year
EDH 1021A
EDS 1081A
EDS 2101N
Upper Junior Year
EDS 2108N
EDS 2183N
EDS 2184N
EDL 3146N
Lower Senior Year
EDS 3110N
EDS 3186N
EDL 4149N
Upper Senior Year
EDL 4150N
EDS 4190N
EDS 4193N
Credits
3
3
Education in Society
Introduction to Exceptional Children
Assistive Technology for Students with Disabilities
3
3
3
Special Education Field Experience I and Seminar
Behavior Management and Instructional
Strategies for Diverse Learners
Assessment & Program Planning for
Students with Special Needs
Literacy Acquisition I
3
Special Education Field Experience II and Seminar
Integrated Practices in the Content Areas
Literacy Acquisition II
3
3
3
Teaching Reading in the Content Area
Supervised Student Teaching: Special Education
Student Teaching Seminar: Special Education
3
6
3
3
3
3
B.S. in Sport Management
(HEGIS 0599)
The program combines the academic strengths of the Schools of
Education and Business, along with practical experiences under the
tutelage of top professionals in their respective fields. Students will focus
on the business aspects of the world of sport management to prepare them
for a wide variety of career opportunities.
Students are required to satisfy the College‘s core requirements.
However, because the degree is interdisciplinary, no minor is necessary.
When students complete this program, they will be able to function
effectively in the Sport Management industry. Students are required to
complete a full-time practicum to meet the degree requirements.
College-Wide Requirements
6 credits
See page 36. (Math requirement satisfied under major requirements)
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
33 credits
Major Requirements
75 credits
ACC 2001N
Introduction to Financial Accounting I
3
ACC 2002N
Introduction to Financial Accounting II
3
CIS 1200N
Introduction to Information Systems Management
3
ECN 1001A
Introductory Macroeconomics
3
ECN 2002A
Introductory Microeconomics
3
MGT 1011N
Principles in Management
3
MGT 2075N
Personnel Management
3
MGT 3108N
Labor Relations
3
MKT 1033N
Essentials of Marketing in the 21st Century
3
MTH 1002A
Fundamentals of Mathematics
3
MTH 1006A
Statistics
3
SMP 1039N*
Foundations of Sport Management
3
SMP 1041A*
Sport in Society
3
SMP 2048N*
Sport Leadership
3
SMP 2052N*
Sport Management
3
SMP 3046N*
Facility and Event Management
3
SMP 3053N*
Sport Law
3
SMP 3054N*
Sports Information, Promotion and Publicity
3
SMP 3056N*
Sport Marketing and Fund Raising
3
SMP 3057N*
Sport Finance
3
SMP 3058N*
Sport Governance
3
SMP 4195N
Practicum in Sport Management
12
Elective
3
Electives: Liberal Arts
6 credits
Total: 123 credits
*Courses must be completed with a C or better.
Note: The Sport Management degree does not require a minor. However, if a
student elected to take a minor, the following would be recommended:
Business – requires one additional course FIN 3087N Principles of
Finance, any discipline
Media Studies
Communications
Computer Systems
Recommended Sequence of Courses: B.S. in Sport Management
The Bachelor of Science degree in Sport Management is designed to
prepare students for this rapidly growing field. The goal of the program is
to develop well-educated, highly-skilled graduates who have honed their
problem-solving and decision-making skills through a challenging
educational process.
Semester 1
FYE
ENG 1001A
SMP 1039N
Core
First Year Experience Seminar (Freshmen Only)
Principles of Writing
Foundations of Sport Management
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 81
Credits
3
3
3
6
Back to Table of Contents
Semester 2
CIS 1200N
Introduction to Information Systems Management
MGT 1011N
Introduction to Management Theory and Practice
SMP 1041A
Sport in Society
Core
Semester 3
ECN 1001A
Introductory Macroeconomics
MGT 2075N
Personnel Management
MTH 1002A
Fundamentals of Mathematics
Core
Semester 4
ECN 2002A
Introductory Microeconomics
MGT 3108N
Labor Relations
MTH 1006A
Statistics
SMP 2048N
Sport Leadership
Core
Semester 5
ACC 2001N
Introduction to Financial Accounting I
MKT 1033N
Essentials of Marketing in the 21st Century
SMP 2052N
Sport Management
Core
Elective
Semester 6
ACC 2002N
Introduction to Financial Accounting II
SMP 3046N
Facility and Event Management
SMP 3053N
Sport Law
SMP 3056N
Sport Marketing and Fund Raising
Core
Elective
Semester 7
SMP 3054N
Sports Information, Promotion and Publicity
SMP 3057N
Sport Finance
SMP 3058N
Sport Governance
Senior Seminar
Elective
Semester 8
SMP 4195N
Practicum in Sport Management
Suggested Electives (Two ―A‖ electives and one ―N‖ elective):
SMP 4196N Sport Management Internship
FIN 3087N Principles of Finance
MGT 2077A Business Law I
MGT 2078A Business Law II
ECN 2029A Money and Banking
MKT 2034N Strategic Advertising and Promotion
MKT 2045N The Critical Components of Sales Management
MED 1069A Video Fieldwork and Editing
MED 2069A Advanced Videography and Editing
POL 3130C Civil Liberties
POL 3131A Introduction to Constitutional Law
POL 3132A Philosophy of Law
3
3
3
6
3
3
3
6
3
3
3
3
6
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
12
BS in Teaching English to Speakers of Other
Languages (TESOL)
(HEGIS 1508)
The TESOL program provides students with the theoretical
background, methodological training and practical experience needed to
teach speaking, reading, writing and communication in English to speakers
of other languages. The TESOL program is designed to lead to initial
certification for all grades (K – 12).
All students must present and maintain a Grade Point Average of 3.0
to be eligible for part time or full time student teaching.
The ultimate goal of the Department of Human Development and
Learning (School of Education) for the undergraduate program leading to
initial certification in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages is to
integrate and improve education at both the school and college level so that
students receive a quality education and become productive citizens. The
department believes that the central function of education is to transform
the culture and improve society and that this can only be accomplished
through a well-educated populace. Program objectives are based on the
following underlying philosophy:
• That a school-college vision of an education system in content and personnel
can best prepare teachers and students for a diverse America;
• That the heart of the enterprise is the ―quality‖ of the teacher and the new
roles he or she will need to prepare for and serve in the 21st century;
• That experimentation and innovation as well as judgment and compassion
are the prevailing themes and human traits that permeate an educational
system and the roles of the teacher;
• That formal partnerships and collaboration with schools and professional
development centers are central to preparation of quality teacher candidates.
The overall objectives of the education program which prepares
teachers for initial certification to Teach English to Speakers of Other
Languages (K – 12) are to:
1. Demonstrate acceptable levels of performance related to the New York State
standards of teaching as aligned with and directed at the ESL learning
standards for K – 12 as well as the TESOL/NCATE program standards. At the
initial level, teacher candidates will demonstrate an ability to impact student
learning positively and make evident to partner school districts and other K –
12 school settings that teacher candidates meet tenure criteria.
2. Demonstrate selected skills, competencies and dispositions associated with
the roles of teachers in the 21st century, such as serving as a facilitator of
student learning.
3. Participate in, and make contributions to, the ideals and values of a schoolcollege partnership and its vision of a collaborative education system.
4. Demonstrate a high level of commitment to, and activity in, partnership
ideals and values through specialized and experimental courses and projects,
such as action research and studies, and school-college committee work.
All students must present and maintain a Grade Point Average of 3.0
to be eligible for part time or full time student teaching.
To be eligible to apply for initial certification, students must complete
all the requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Teaching English to
Speakers of Other Languages; obtain a passing score on all required New
York State teacher certification exams; complete the Drug Abuse, Violence
Prevention, Child Abuse, Dignity for All Students Act (DASA) and
Fingerprinting workshops; maintain a G.P.A. of 3.0 or above; and, have
satisfactorily met the competencies established by the Human
Development and Learning Department
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 82
Back to Table of Contents
College-Wide Requirements
See page 36.
9 credits
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
33 credits
Major Requirements
48 credits
PSY 1001A
Introduction to Psychology
3 credits
PSY 2015A
Developmental Psychology
3
EDS 1081A
Introduction to Exceptional Children
3
ENG 2069A
The English Language: History, Grammar & Usage
3
EDH 1131A
Human Development & Learning
3
EDH 1021A
Education in Society
3
SPN 2140A
Introduction to Linguistics
3
EDH 3129N
Classroom Assessment
3
EDH 3201N
Theory, Practice & Methods of Bilingual,
Multicultural & ESL Instruction
3
EDL 3146N
Literacy Acquisition I
3
EDL 4149N
Literacy Acquisition II
3
EDH 3202N
Field Experience & Seminar: TESOL
3
EDH 4202N
Methods for Teaching Content Areas Within
Culturally & Linguistically Diverse Classrooms
3
EDL 4150N
Teaching Reading in the Content Area
3
EDH 4203N
Supervised Student Teaching & Seminar: TESOL
6
Language Other than English
12
Major in Liberal Arts and Sciences
30-45 credits
Students are required to complete one of the following majors:
Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, English, Humanities,
Mathematics, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Social Science,
Sociology/Anthropology, Spanish, Theatre, or Visual Arts
30-45
Total: 136-147 credits
B.S. in TESOL Recommended Course Sequence
Semester 1
FYE
ENG 1001A
PSY 1001A
Core
Language other than English
Credits
3
3
3
6
3
Semester 4
ANT/SPN 2140A
Linguistics
Major in liberal arts and sciences
EDH 3129N
Core
3
6
3
6
Semester 5
Language other than English
Core
EDH 3201N
EDL 3146N
Major in liberal arts and sciences
LIB 1101N
3
3
3
3
3
1
Semester 6
Language other than English
EDL 4149N
EDH 3202N
Major in liberal arts and sciences
Core
3
3
3
6
3
Semester 7
EDH 4202N
EDL 4150N
Major in liberal arts and sciences
3
3
12
Semester 8
EDH 4203
Senior Seminar
Major in liberal arts and sciences
6
3
3
* In addition to course registration, students are required to register with the
Administrator of Student Teaching Placements and Certification by November
15 for Spring semester student teaching and by May 1 for Fall semester student
teaching. A G.P.A. of 3.0 is required for placement and maintained enrollment
in field experiences or student teaching. Field placement will be at the
discretion of the Director of Student Teaching Placements and Certification.
Bachelor of Business Administration
Degree
Semester 2
ENG 1002A
Language other than English
PSY 2015A
EDS 1081A
Core
3
3
3
3
6
The Bachelor of Business Administration degree may be pursued with
a major in Accounting, Finance, Management, or Marketing. Each of these
programs requires 122 credits (including FYE First Year Experience
Seminar), at least 60 of which must be in the Liberal Arts. The B.B.A.
degrees are accredited by the International Assembly for Collegiate
Business Education (IACBE).
Semester 3
ENG 2069A
MTH
EDH 1131A
EDH 1021A
Core
3
3
3
3
6
The Business Core
The primary purpose of the undergraduate business core is to provide
students with a solid foundation in each of the functional areas of business,
including accounting, computer information systems, finance, management
and marketing. The goal of our undergraduate business core requirements
is to foster a learning environment that emphasizes the importance of
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 83
Back to Table of Contents
enhancing each student‘s ability to (a) communicate effectively, both orally
and in writing within diverse professional settings, (b) participate in teambased projects to build leadership skills while gaining a respect for diversity
within a global economy, (c) apply critical, logical and analytic reasoning to
problem-based assignments to make more informed decisions, (d) reflect
and assess the ethical values and social contributions of oneself (and others)
while gaining an appreciation for life-long learning, and (e) use technology
as a tool for learning, research and communication while participating in a
knowledge-based learning community.
The Business Core consists of the following courses:
Business Core Requirements
Credits
ACC 2001N
Introduction to Financial Accounting I
3
ACC 2002N
Introduction to Financial Accounting II
3
CIS 1200N
Introduction to Information Systems Management
3
FIN 3087N
Principles of Finance
3
MGT 1011N
Introduction to Management Theory & Practice
3
MGT 2077A
Business Law I
3
MKT 1033N
Essentials of Marketing in the 21st Century
3
Total: 21
B.B.A. in Accounting
(HEGIS 0502)
The accounting major provides students with an opportunity to
develop an appropriate mindset and value-based reasoning system as
deemed necessary for entry level accounting positions or for completion of
graduate studies. The major focuses on how to devise accounting systems
and procedures so that financial affairs of organizations can be translated
into relevant information to support decision-making processes. Students
will learn how to apply accounting concepts to solve business problems.
The major is also designed to improve critical reasoning and oral and
written communication skills. In addition, students will be exposed to a
learning environment that encourages reflectivity and supports
interpersonal relationships. Accounting graduates may pursue entry level
positions such as: auditors, controllers, bursars, treasurers, financial
analysts, public accountants, managerial accountants, loan administrators,
personal financial planners, tax specialists, financial officers, IRS
investigators, or FBI agents. Individuals interested in becoming a certified
public accountant (CPA) should contact the department chair of accounting
for additional information.
College-Wide Requirements
6 credits
See page 36. (Math requirement satisfied under Liberal Arts
correlatives)
Core Requirements
See pages 36-37.
33 credits
Business Core Requirements
See page 84.
21 credits
Major Requirements
ACC 3071N
Accounting Theory and Practice I
ACC 3072N
Accounting Theory and Practice II
ACC 3081N
Internal Decision Making Systems
ACC 3131N
Tax Law for Individuals
ACC 3132N
Tax Law for Corporations, Estates and Trusts
42 credits
3
3
3
3
3
ACC 4161N
ACC 4172N
ACC 4182N
ECN 1001A
ECN 2002A
FIN 4151N
MGT 2078A
MTH 1002A
MTH 1006A
Electives
Advanced Accounting
Auditing
Research Seminar in Financial Accounting
Introductory Macroeconomics
Introductory Microeconomics
Advanced Financial Statement Analysis
Business Law II
Fundamentals of Mathematics*
Statistics
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
18 credits
Total: 120 credits
*MTH 1002 fulfills College-wide Math requirement.
Accounting Major - Recommended Sequence of Courses
Semester 1
Core
Core
CIS 1200N
FYE
ENG 1001A
MTH 1002A
Semester 2
Core
Core
MGT 1011N
MKT 1033N
MTH 1006A
World Civilizations Course
3
Modes of Artistic Expression Course
3
Introduction to Information Systems Management
3
First Year Experience Seminar (Freshmen only)
3
Principles of Writing
3
Fundamentals of Mathematics
3
Total: 18
World Civilizations Course
3
Modes of Artistic Expression Course
3
Introduction to Management Theory and Practice
3
Essentials of Marketing in the 21st Century
3
Statistics
3
Total: 15
Semester 3
Core
Core
ACC 2001N
ECN 1001A
MGT 2077A
Dynamics of Contemporary Societies Course
Nature of the Universe Course
Introduction to Financial Accounting I
Introductory Macroeconomics
Business Law I
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
Semester 4
Core
Core
ACC 2002N
ECN 2002A
MGT 2078A
Dynamics of Contemporary Societies Course
Nature of the Universe Course
Introduction to Financial Accounting II
Introductory Microeconomics
Business Law II
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
Semester 5
Core
ACC 3071N
ACC 3131N
FIN 3087N
Elective
Varieties of Human Experience Course
Accounting Theory and Practice I
Tax Law for Individuals
Principles of Finance
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
Semester 6
Core
ACC 3072N
ACC 3081N
ACC 3132N
Elective
Varieties of Human Experience Course
Accounting Theory and Practice II
Internal Decision Making Systems
Tax Law for Corporations, Estates and Trusts
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 84
Back to Table of Contents
Semester 7
Core
ACC 4161N
FIN 4151N
Electives
Core Senior Seminar
Advanced Accounting
Advanced Financial Statement Analysis
Semester 8
ACC 4172N
ACC 4182N
Electives
Auditing
Research Seminar in Financial Accounting
3
3
3
6
Total: 15
3
3
6
Total: 12
Total 120 Credits
B.B.A. in Finance
(HEGIS 0504)
The finance major provides students with the knowledge of how to
manage the financial functions of a profit or non-profit enterprise. The
program is distinctive in nature because the curriculum incorporates the
Candidate Body of Knowledge-Level I associated with the professional
licensure requirements of becoming a chartered financial analyst. The major
builds on the foundational principles of the investment industry, from
quantitative analysis and theory and practice of the finance profession that
keeps pace with the ever-changing dynamics of the global investment
environment. Finance graduates may pursue entry-level positions such as:
bank managers, traders, brokers, investment counselors, financial
managers, financial analysts or credit managers.
College-Wide Requirements
6 credits
See page 36. (Math requirement satisfied under major requirements.)
Core Requirements (See pages 36-37.)
33 credits
Business Core Requirements (See page 84.)
21 credits
Major Requirements
39 credits
ACC
3131N Tax Law for Individuals
3
ECN 1001A
Introductory Macroeconomics
3
ECN 2002A
Introductory Microeconomics
3
ECN 2029A
Money and Banking
3
FIN 3162N
Fundamentals of Financial Analysis
(prerequisite ACC 2002N)
3
FIN 4092N
Investment Management (prerequisite FIN 4151N)
3
FIN 4151N
Advanced Financial Statement Analysis
(prerequisite FIN 3162N)
3
FIN 4163N
Advanced Corporate Finance
(prerequisites: FIN 3087N, FIN 3162N)
3
FIN 4173N
Multinational Finance (prerequisite FIN 3087N)
3
FIN 4181N
Financial Strategy and Risk Management
(prerequisite FIN 4092N)
3
MTH 1002A*
Fundamentals of Mathematics
3
MTH 1006A
Statistics
3
MTH 1007A
Operations Research
3
Electives
21 credits
Total: 120 credits
*MTH 1002A fulfills College-wide Mathematics requirement.
Recommended Sequence of Courses
Semester 1
Core
World Civilizations Course
3
Core
Modes of Artistic Expression Course
3
CIS 1200N
Introduction to Information Systems Management
3
FYE
First Year Experience Seminar (Freshmen only)
3
ENG 1001A
Principles of Writing
3
MTH 1002A
Fundamentals of Mathematics
3
Total: 18
Semester 2
Core
World Civilizations Course
3
Core
Modes of Artistic Expression Course
3
MGT 1011N
Introduction to Management Theory and Practice
3
MKT 1033N
Essentials of Marketing in the 21st Century
3
MTH 1006A
Statistics
3
Total: 15
Semester 3
Core
Dynamics of Contemporary Societies Course
3
Core
Nature of the Universe Course
3
ACC 2001N
Introduction to Financial Accounting I
3
ECN 1001A
Introductory Macroeconomics
3
MGT 2077A
Business Law I
3
Total: 15
Semester 4
Core
Dynamics of Contemporary Societies Course
3
Core
Nature of the Universe Course
3
ACC 2002N
Introduction to Financial Accounting II
3
ECN 2002A
Introductory Microeconomics
3
MTH 1007A
Operations Research
3
Total: 15
Semester 5
Core
Varieties of Human Experience Course
3
ECN 2029A
Money and Banking
3
FIN 3087N
Principles of Finance
3
FIN 3162N
Fundamentals of Financial Analysis
3
Elective
3
Total: 15
Semester 6
Core
Varieties of Human Experience Course
3
ACC 3131N
Tax Law for Individuals
3
FIN 4151N
Advanced Financial Statement Analysis
3
FIN 4173N
Multinational Finance
3
Elective
3
Total: 15
Semester 7
FIN 4092N
Investment Management
3
FIN 4163N
Advanced Corporate Finance
3
Electives
9
Total: 15
Semester 8
Core
Senior Seminar
3
FIN 4181N
Financial Strategy and Risk Management
3
Electives
6
Total: 12
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 85
Back to Table of Contents
B.B.A. in Management & Leadership
(HEGIS 0506)
The Management & Leadership major is designed to teach students
how to become competent managers and leaders who know how to make
effective decisions concerning organizational resources, goals and plans.
Students will learn how to design, operate, plan and control business
systems and procedures related to employee motivation. Students will also
learn about the social, legal, environmental, technological, organizational
and international context within which businesses operate. Graduates with
a management major may pursue entry-level careers such as: human
resource managers, manufacturing supervisors, personnel managers,
compensation specialists, sales managers, training managers, consultants,
directors, or chief executives.
College-Wide Requirements
6 credits
See page 36. (Math requirement satisfied under major requirements.)
Core Requirements (See pages 36-37.)
33 credits
Business Core Requirements (See page 84.)
21 credits
Major Requirements
ECN 1001A
Introductory Macroeconomics
ECN 2002A
Introductory Microeconomics
MGT 2073N
Innovations and Entrepreneurship
MGT 2075N
Human Resource Management
MGT 3108N
Labor Relations
MGT 3111N
Managerial Economics
MGT 3146A
Organizational Behavior
MGT 4181N
Business Policy Seminar
MTH 1002A*
Fundamentals of Mathematics
MTH 1006A
Statistics
MTH 1007A
Operations Research
Electives
33 credits
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
27 credits
Total: 120 credits
*MTH 1002 fulfills College-wide Math requirement.
Recommended Sequence of Courses
Semester 1
Core
Core
CIS 1200N
FYE
ENG 1001A
MTH 1002A
Semester 2
Core
Core
MGT 1011N
MKT 1033
MTH 1006
Semester 3
Core
World Civilizations Course
3
Modes of Artistic Expression Course
3
Introduction to Information Systems Management
3
First Year Experience Seminar (Freshmen only)
3
Principles of Writing
3
Fundamentals of Mathematics
3
Total: 18
World Civilizations Course
3
Modes of Artistic Expression Course
3
Introduction to Management Theory and Practice
3
Essentials of Marketing in the 21st Century
3
Statistics
3
Total: 15
Dynamics of Contemporary Societies Course
3
Core
ACC 2001N
ECN 1001A
MGT 2077A
Nature of the Universe Course
Introduction to Financial Accounting I
Introductory Macroeconomics
Business Law I
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
Semester 4
Core
Core
ACC 2002N
ECN 2002A
MTH 1007A
Dynamics of Contemporary Societies Course
Nature of the Universe Course
Introduction to Financial Accounting II
Introductory Microeconomics
Operations Research
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
Semester 5
Core
FIN 3087N
MGT 2073N
MGT 2075N
Elective
Varieties of Human Experience Course
Principles of Finance
Innovations and Entrepreneurship
Human Resource Management
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
Semester 6
Core
MGT 3108N
MGT 3111N
Electives
Varieties of Human Experience Course
Labor Relations
Managerial Economics
3
3
3
6
Total: 15
Semester 7
Core
MGT 3146A
Electives
Core Senior Seminar
Organizational Behavior
3
3
9
Total: 15
Semester 8
MGT 4181N***
MGT 4291N**
Business Policy Seminar or
Honors Project in Management and
Leadership (for Departmental Honors)
3
9
Total: 12
Note: **A Departmental Honors Project is available to students in this program
in their senior year (90 credits overall). The project requires substantial original
independent research and the successful completion of both MGT 4291N and
MGT 4292N. (See page 41 or contact the Townsend School of Business at 631244-3266 for further information.)
***Students eligible to apply for Departmental Honors in Management &
Leadership may replace MGT 4181N with MGT 4291N.
Electives
B.B.A. in Marketing
(HEGIS 0509)
The marketing major focuses on the study of consumer needs for
products and services and the development of strategies used to motivate
individuals to buy or subscribe to a product or service. Students will learn
about the complexity of problems associated with the distribution of
products and services from the producer to the consumer. Students will
also learn how to use technology to analyze the effectiveness of decisionmaking strategies associated with businesses that operate in a constantly
changing, global environment. Marketing graduates may pursue entrylevel positions such as: marketing managers, customer service supervisors,
product managers, retail managers, marketing researchers, or sales
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 86
Back to Table of Contents
administrators or public relations specialists. Students may decide to major
in either Marketing Management or Integrated Marketing
Communications.
College-Wide Requirements
6 credits
See page 41. (Math requirement fulfilled under major requirements.)
Core Requirements (See pages 36-37.)
33 credits
Business Core Requirements (See page 84.)
21 credits
Major Requirements Marketing Management Concentration
ECN 1001A
Introductory Macroeconomics
ECN 2002A
Introductory Microeconomics
MKT 2045N
Critical Components of Sales Management
MKT 2046N
Modern Retailing Strategies
MKT 2103N
Marketing Research and Decision Making
MKT 3144N
Customer Relationship Management
MKT 3151N
Services Marketing
MKT 4150N
Capstone: Marketing Manager
MTH 1002A
Fundamentals of Mathematics
MTH 1006A
Statistics
MTH 1007A
Operations Research
PSY 1001A
Introduction to Psychology
36 credits
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
or
Integrated Marketing Communications Concentration
42 credits
ECN 1001A
Introductory Macroeconomics
3
ECN 2002A
Introductory Microeconomics
3
MED 1001A
Introduction to Mass Communication
3
MKT 2034N
Strategic Advertising and Promotion
3
MKT 2103N
Marketing Research and Decision Making
3
MKT 2142N
Integrated Marketing and Public Relations
3
MKT 3142N
Marketing Communications
3
MKT 3152N
Direct Marketing and Internet-based Strategies
3
MKT 4150N
Capstone: Marketing Manager
3
MKT Elective
3
MTH 1002A
Fundamentals of Mathematics
3
MTH 1006A
Statistics
3
MTH 1007A
Operations Research
3
PSY 1001A
Introduction to Psychology
3
VIS 1022N
Basic Graphic Design or
VIS 1064N
Designing with the Computer I
3
Electives
18-21 credits
Total: 120 Credits
*MTH 1002 fulfills College-wide Math requirement.
Recommended Sequence of Courses
Marketing Management Concentration
Semester 1
Credits
Core
World Civilizations Course
3
Core
Modes of Artistic Expression Course
3
FYE
First Year Experience Seminar (Freshmen only)
3
ENG 1001A
Principles of Writing
3
MGT 1011N
Introduction to Management Theory and Practice
3
MTH 1002A
Semester 2
Core
Core
CIS 1200N
MKT 1033N
MTH 1006A
Fundamentals of Mathematics
3
Total: 18
World Civilizations Course
3
Modes of Artistic Expression Course
3
Introduction to Information Systems Management
3
Essentials of Marketing in the 21st Century
3
Statistics
3
Total: 15
Semester 3
Core
Core
ACC 2001N
ECN 1001A
MTH 1007A
Dynamics of Contemporary Societies Course
Nature of the Universe Course
Introduction to Financial Accounting I
Introductory Macroeconomics
Operations Research
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
Semester 4
Core
Core
ACC 2002N
ECN 2002A
PSY 1001A
Dynamics of Contemporary Societies Course
Nature of the Universe Course
Introduction to Financial Accounting II
Introductory Microeconomics
Introduction to Psychology
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
Semester 5
Core
MGT 2077A
MKT 2045N
MKT 2046N
MKT 2103N
Varieties of Human Experience Course
Business Law I
Critical Components of Sales Management
Modern Retailing Strategies
Marketing Research and Decision Making
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
Semester 6
Core
FIN 3087N
MKT 3144N
Electives
Varieties of Human Experience Course
Principles of Finance
Customer Relationship Management
3
3
3
6
Total: 15
Semester 7
Core
MKT 3151N
Electives
Core Senior Seminar
Services Marketing
3
3
9
Total: 15
Capstone: Marketing Manager
3
3
6
Total: 12
Semester 8
MKT 4150N
MKT Elective
Electives
Recommended Sequence of Courses
Integrated Marketing Communications Concentration
Semester 1
Core
Core
FYE
ENG 1001A
MGT 1011N
MTH 1002A
World Civilizations Course
3
Modes of Artistic Expression Course
3
First Year Experience Seminar (Freshmen only)
3
Principles of Writing
3
Introduction to Management Theory and Practice
3
Fundamentals of Mathematics
3
Total: 18
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 87
Back to Table of Contents
Semester 2
Core
Core
MED 1001A
MKT 1033N
MTH 1006A
World Civilizations Course
Modes of Artistic Expression Course
Introduction to Mass Communication
Essentials of Marketing in the 21st Century
Statistics
Semester 3
Core
Core
ACC 2001N
ECN 1001A
VIS 1022N
VIS 1064N
Dynamics of Contemporary Societies Course
Nature of the Universe Course
Introduction to Financial Accounting I
Introductory Macroeconomics
Basic Graphic Design or
Designing with the Computer I
Semester 4
Core
Core
ACC 2002N
ECN 2002A
MTH 1007A
Dynamics of Contemporary Societies Course
Nature of the Universe Course
Introduction to Financial Accounting II
Introductory Microeconomics
Operations Research
Semester 5
Core
CIS 1200N
MGT 2077A
MKT 2034N
MKT 2142N
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 15
Varieties of Human Experience Course
3
Introduction to Information Systems Management
3
Business Law I
3
Strategic Advertising and Promotion
3
Integrated Marketing and Public Relations
3
Total: 15
Semester 6
Core
FIN 3087N
MKT 3142N
Electives
Varieties of Human Experience Course
Principles of Finance
Marketing Communications
3
3
3
6
Total: 15
Semester 7
Core
MKT 3152N
Electives
Core Senior Seminar
Direct Marketing and Internet-based Strategies
3
3
9
Total: 15
Semester 8
MKT 4150N
MKT 2103N
Electives
Capstone: Marketing Manager
Marketing Research and Decision Making Processes
3
3
6
Total: 12
Minors, Certificates, and PreProfessional Programs
Students who enter the College as freshmen are required to complete a
minor as well as a major, with the exception of those students who elect to
major in one of the following programs: Accounting, Aeronautics and
Applied Mathematics, Aviation Management, Biology, Finance,
Management, Marketing, Natural Sciences and Mathematics and
Professional Liberal Studies. Students who enter the College as
sophomores, juniors or seniors have the option of pursuing a minor.
Students may not major and minor in the same discipline.
Students may elect a minor from among those described below.
Students pursuing a minor must complete the requisite number of credits
for that minor. Course substitution is permissible by appeal. Appeal forms
are located in the Office of the Dean. The list of majors whose students are
precluded from a given minor appears immediately following the
description of the minor.
Students may design their own minor of not fewer than fifteen credits
to serve some personal interest or objective. Students exercising this option
must work with a faculty member who agrees to design a coherent
program of study, and the proposal must then receive the approval of this
faculty member‘s Faculty Development and Curriculum Committee.
Accounting Minor
ACC 2001N
ACC 2002N
ACC 3131N
FIN 3087N
FIN 4151N
MGT 2077A
Introduction to Financial Accounting I
Introduction to Financial Accounting II
Tax Law for Individuals
Principles of Finance
Advanced Financial Statement Analysis
Business Law I
3
3
3
3
3
3
Total Credits 18
Acting Minor
DRM 1011A
Oral Interpretation of Literature
3
DRM 1013A
Acting I
3
DRM 1018A
Improvisation
3
DRM 2014A
Acting II
3
SPH 1001A
Voice and Articulation
3
One of the following courses:
3
DAN 2011A
Improvisational Dance and Competition or
3
DAN 2012A
Dance Technique I or
3
DAN 2015A
Theatre Dance
3
Total Credits 18
American Literature Minor
ENG 2041A, 2042A
ENG 4180A-4184A
ENG 3121A
ENG 3122A
ENG 3127A
ENG 3128A
Survey of American Literature I, II
3, 3
Seminars in American Literature
6
Nineteenth-Century American Prose and
American Fiction since 1900 or
3, 3
Early American Poetry and
Modern American Poetry
3, 3
Total Credits 18
Anthropology Minor
ANT 1001A
Introduction to Anthropology I
ANT 1002A
Introduction to Anthropology II
Choose 12 credits from among any other Anthropology courses
3
3
12
Total Credits 18
Exclusion: Not available to students seeking a B.A. in Sociology-Anthropology.
Art History Minor
VIS 1001C
VIS 1002C
World Art I
World Art II
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 88
3
3
Back to Table of Contents
VIS 1103C
VIS 3180A
VIS 4104A
VIS 2054A
VIS 4183-4189A/N
Art of Non-European Cultures
Modern Art Theory and Criticism
Contemporary Art and Theory
Modern Art or
Special Topics in Visual Arts
3
3
3
3
Total Credits 18
Aviation Management Minor
AER 1002N
AER 2004N
AER 2015N
AER 3106N
Commercial and Regulatory Aspects
of the Air Transportation Industry
Aviation Safety
Airport Management
Concepts of International Air Transport
Chemistry Minor
3
3
3
3
Total Credits 12
Bioethics Minor
BIO 1001A
BIO 1002A
BIO 1003A
BIO 1004A
PHL 1050C
Either:
BIO 3160C
BIO 4191A- 4192A
OR
BIO 3150C
Either:
PHL 1005C
OR
PHL 1042C
Introduction to Biology I
Introduction to Biology II
Introduction to Biology I Lab
Introduction to Biology II Lab
Medical Ethics
3
3
1
1
3
Introduction to Biotechnology
Independent Study
3
1
Genetics
4
Critical Thinking
3
Ethics
3
Total Credits 18
Biology Minor
BIO 1001A
Introduction to Biology I
BIO 1002A
Introduction to Biology II
BIO 1003A
Introduction to Biology I Laboratory
BIO 1004A
Introduction to Biology II Laboratory
Two Upper Level Biology Courses with Lab
3
3
1
1
8
Total Credits 16
Business Minor
ACC 2001N
ACC 2002N
CIS 1200N
FIN 3087N
MGT 1011N
MKT 1033N
Introduction to Financial Accounting I
3
Introduction to Financial Accounting II
3
Introduction to Information Systems Management
3
Principles of Finance
3
Introduction to Management Theory and Practice
3
Essentials of Marketing in the 21st Century
3
Total Credits 18
Ceramics Minor
Required:
VIS 1016A
Ceramics I
Select five of the following courses:
VIS 1003A
Two-Dimensional Design
VIS 1004A
Three-Dimensional Design
VIS 1009C
Basic Drawing
3
VIS 2046A
Intermediate Ceramics: Form & Surface
3
VIS 2047A
Ceramic Forming Techniques: Past to Present
3
VIS 3179A
Advanced Hand-Building & Wheel Techniques
3
VIS 4191A, VIS 4192A Independent Study (up to 2 permitted)
3
VIS 4197N, VIS 4198N Visual Arts Cooperative Education Internship
3
Total Credits 18
3
CHM 1001C
General Chemistry I
3
CHM 1002C
General Chemistry II
3
CHM 1003C
General Chemistry I Laboratory
1
CHM 1004C
General Chemistry II Laboratory
1
Select seven (7) credits minimum from upper level (2000 and above)
Chemistry courses
7
Total Credits 15
Coaching Minor
SMP 1033N
First Aid and Safety
3
SMP 1040A
Coaching Principles Health Sciences
3
SMP 2040N
Organization & Administration of Coaching
3
SMP 2042N
Coaching Seminar: Theory and Techniques
2
Select six (6) credits from the following courses:
3
SMP 1041A
Sport in Society
3
SMP 1049N
Aspects of Sport Counseling
3
SMP 2048N
Sport Leadership
3
Total Credits 17
Computer Information Systems Minor
CIS 1200N
CIS 2015A
CIS 2102N
CIS Electives
Introduction to Information Systems Management
Systems Analysis and Design
Database Management Systems
3
3
3
6
Total Credits 15
Computer Science Minor
CSC 1023N
Introduction to Computer Science
CSC 1024N
Introduction to Programming
CSC 2025A
Data Structures
CSC Three (3) courses numbered 2000 and above
3
3
3
9
Total Credits 18
Contemporary American Studies Minor
Social Sciences:
POL 1011C
American Government and Politics
HST 3020A
The United States, 1945-1968
HST 4125A
America in the 1970s
Arts and Humanities: Elect nine credits
ENG 2042A
American Literature II
ENG 3122A
American Fiction Since 1900
MUS 1006A
Survey of Contemporary Music
VIS 4104A
Contemporary Art
9
3
3
3
9
3
3
3
3
Total Credits 18
3
3
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 89
Back to Table of Contents
Creative Writing Minor
ENG 2071A
Introduction to Creative Writing
Four (4) courses chosen from the following:
ENG 2072A
Writing for Children
ENG 2073A
Short Story Workshop
ENG 2074A
Poetry Workshop
ENG 2075A
Playwriting
ENG 2076A
Nonfiction Writing Workshop
ENG 2077A
Film Writing
ENG 2078A
Writing for Television
ENG 3080A
Advanced Fiction Workshop
3
12
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Total Credits 15
Dance Minor
DAN 1001A
Introduction to Dance
3
Electives: Choose four (4) courses from the following:
12
DAN 1014A
Introduction to Ballet
3
DAN 2011A
Improvisational Dance and Composition
3
DAN 2012A
Dance Technique I
3
DAN 2015A
Theatre Dance
3
DAN 2020C
World Dance
3
DAN 3013A
Dance Technique II
3
DAN 4180A-4189A Special Topics in Dance
3
Total Credits 15
Dramatic Writing Minor
DRM 1003C
Introduction to Theatre
ENG 2075A
Playwriting
ENG 2077A
Film Writing
ENG 2078A
Writing for Television
MED 1039C
Introduction to Film
One of the following courses:
DRM 1018A
Improvisation
DRM 1117A
Directing for The Stage
DRM/MED 3160A Entertainment and Media Law
ENG 3157A
Art of The Drama
ENG 2071A
Introduction to Creative Writing
MED 1069A
Video Fieldwork and Editing
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Total Credits 18
Earth and Marine Sciences Minor
ESC/MSC 1006C
ESC 1010C
ESC 1021C
ESC 1022A
ESC 1027C
ESC 1028A
Elements of Oceanography
3
Meteorology (prerequisite MTH 1002A or 1014A)
3
Planetary Astronomy or
Stellar and Galactic Astronomy
4
Geology I - Lecture and Lab
(prerequisite MTH 1002A or MTH 1014A)
4
Geology II - Lecture and Lab (prerequisite ESC 1027C) 4
Total Credits 18
Economics Minor
ECN 1001A
Introductory Macroeconomics
ECN 2002A
Introductory Microeconomics
Choose 9 credits from among any other Economics courses
3
3
9
Total Credits 15
Exclusions: Students may not satisfy the economics electives requirements with
any of the economics capstone experience courses.
Educational Theatre Minor
DRM 1003A
Introduction to Theatre
DRM 1011A
Oral Interpretation of Literature
DRM 1117A
Directing for The Stage
DRM 1121A
Creative Dramatic Workshop
DRM 4200A
Educational Uses of Theatre
One of the following courses:
DRM 1004C
Theatre in the United States
DRM 1131A
Theatre in New York City
DRM 2131A
Theatre in England
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Total Credits 18
Elementary Education Minor
EDH 1021A
EDH 3103N
Education in Society
3
Field Experience in Special Needs Classrooms:
Grades 1-3
3
EDH 3104N
Teaching Social Studies
3
EDL 3146N
Literacy Acquisitions I
3
EDL 4149N
Literacy Acquisition II
3
PSY 2015A
Developmental Psychology I
3
Total Credits 18
This minor will not provide all of the coursework required for teacher
certification in Elementary Education.
English Literature Minor
ENG 2033A
ENG 2034A
ENG 4185A
ENG 3103A
ENG 3104A
ENG 3109A
ENG 3110A
ENG 3111A
ENG 3112A
English Literature I
3
English Literature II
3
Seminar in British Literature
3
Comedies and Histories of Shakespeare or
Tragedies of Shakespeare
3
English Romantic Movement I and
English Romantic Movement II
6 or
Early British Novel and
Modern British Novel
6
Total Credits 18
Ethics Minor
PHL 1042C
Ethics
3
PHL 3120A
Moral Theory
3
Any other 3 courses from the following:
PHL 1005C
Critical Thinking
3
PHL 1025C
Philosophy of Death and Dying
3
PHL 1050C
Medical Ethics
3
PHL 2150C
Philosophy of Sex and Love
3
PHL 2175A
Philosophy of Religion
3
PHL 3132A
Philosophy of Law
3
PHL 4172A
Philosophy of Psychiatry and Psychology
3
REL 1010C
World Religions
3
Any PHL course with ―Ethics‖ or ―Ethical ―in the title
3
Total Credits 15
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 90
Back to Table of Contents
Executive Pilot Flight Minor
AER 1001N
AER 1003N
AER 2001N
AER 2004N
AER 2021N
AER 2061N
AER 3063N
General Aeronautics I
3
Aviation Weather
3
General Aeronautics II
3
Aviation Safety
3
Elements of Instrument Flight
3
Flight Laboratory - Private Pilot
Flight Laboratory - Instrument Pilot Flight
Total Credits 15
Note: (1) This minor is particularly appropriate for any student who has an
interest in the business of aviation and flight. A Third Class (Class III) medical
certificate from an approved FAA Medical Examiner is required for all
students in the Executive Pilot Flight minor program. (2) Fees for flight training
are in addition to tuition and are found in the ―Financial Information‖ section
of the catalog.
Finance Minor
FIN 1032N
FIN 3087N
FIN 4173N
FIN Elective
Personal Financial Planning
Principles of Finance
Multinational Finance
3
3
3
3
Total Credits 12
Forensic Chemistry Minor
CHM 1001-1004C
General Chemistry I and II
Lecture and Laboratory
(Prerequisite: C- or better in
MTH 1014A Pre-calculus)
8
CHM 2181C
Forensic Chemistry
3
Two lecture and laboratory courses chosen from the following three options:
CHM 3025A and CHM 3027A Organic Chemistry I Lecture and Lab
4
CHM 3035A and CHM 3037A Analytical Chemistry Lecture and Lab
4
CHM 4076A
Instrumental Analysis Lecture and Lab
4
Total Credits 19
French Minor
FRN
3
12
3
3
3
3
3
3
Total Credits 18
History Minor
HST Any two European History courses
HST 1021C
United States I
HST 1022C
United States II
HST Electives*
6
3
3
6
Total Credits 18
*These six (6) credits must be for courses numbered 2000 or above. Exclusion:
Not available to students pursuing History as the Group One discipline within
the B.A. in Social Sciences.
Human Resource Management Minor
MGT 1011N
Introduction to Management Theory & Practice
3
MGT 2075N
Human Resource Management
3
MGT 2175N
Compensation and Benefits
3
MGT 3146A
Organizational Behavior
3
Choose one course from the following courses:
3
MGT 1018N
Contemporary Issues in Labor Management
3
MGT 2017N
Principles of Labor Law
3
MGT 3107N
Employment Law
3
MGT 3108N
Labor Relations
3
Total Credits 18
This minor provides the students with a focused view of the complexity of
managing individuals within organizations. The various viewpoints that are
covered by this minor are the legal, social, human and economic perspectives
of managing an organization‘s most valuable asset.
International Studies Minor
15
Total Credits 15*
*At least six (6) of these credits must be for courses numbered 3000 or above.
Electives
Gerontology Minor
PSY 1001A
Introduction to Psychology
PSY 2017A
Psychology of Aging
SOC 1001A
Introduction to Sociology I
SOC 2116A
Sociology of Aging
Two courses chosen from the following:
SOC 2129C
Healthcare in the U.S. or
SWK 2115N
Social Welfare Policy
SWK 4195N
Practicum in Social Work I or
SWK 4196N
Practicum in Social Work II
3
3
3
3
7
3
4
Total Credits 18-19
Graphic Design & Digital Arts Minor
VIS 1064N
VIS 2065N
Digital Imaging II
Four (4) courses chosen from the following:
VIS 1075N
Basic Graphic Design
VIS 2069N
Advanced Graphic Design
VIS 2140C
Digital Photographic Manipulation
VIS 2150A
Multimedia Web Design
VIS 3082A
Multimedia (Animation)
VIS 4073A
3-D Modeling on the Computer
Digital Imaging I
3
ECN 1003A
Introduction to the Global Economy or
ECN 3106A
International Economics
HST 3126A
United States Foreign Policy
POL 1021C
World Politics
Choose six (6) credits from the following courses:
ECN 3107A
Economic Development
HST 1051C
East Asian Civilization I
HST 2052C
East Asian Civilization II
HST 2078C
Social and Economic History of Europe
HST 2158A
Latin America
HST 3147A
Russia Since 1800
HST 3154A
Modern Japan
MGT
2178N International Business
MKT
2140N Global Marketing Environments
POL 1022C
Comparative Politics
POL 3125C
American Foreign Policy
POL 4183A
Politics of Latin America
SOC 3158A
Social Change
SOC 3164A
Sociology of the Third World
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 91
3
3
3
6
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Back to Table of Contents
SOC 3174A
Social Movements
3
Total Credits 15
Italian Minor
ITL
Electives
15
Total Credits 15*
*At least six (6) of these credits must be for courses numbered 3000 or above.
Legal Studies Minor
POL 1011C
American Government and Politics
3
POL 3130C
Civil Liberties
3
POL 3131A
Introduction to Constitutional Law
3
Elective Courses:
6-12
Choose two of the following courses. You cannot take more than one elective per
discipline.
ACC 3131N
Tax Law for Individuals
(Prerequisite: ACC 2002N)
3
ACC 3132N
Tax Law for Corporations, Estates and Trusts
(Prerequisite: ACC 3113N)
3
AER 2103N
Aviation Law
(Prerequisite AER 1002N)
3
ECN 3185A
Seminar on Law and Economics
(Prerequisite: ECN 2002 or permission of the instructor) 3
ESC 2084C
Environmental Law
3
MED 3160A
Entertainment and Media Law
3
MGT 2017N
Principles of Labor Law
3
MGT 2077A
Business Law I
3
MGT 2078A
Business Law II
(Prerequisite: MGT 1077A)
3
MGT 3107N
Employment Law
3
PHL 3132A
Philosophy of Law**
(Prerequisite: Any two courses in Philosophy
or Political Science)
3
SMP 3053N
Sport Law
(Prerequisites: SMP 1041A, SMP 2052N, EDU 1021A, and
MGT 2077A or permission of the instructor)
3
SOC 2120A
Criminology (prerequisite: SOC 1001A or
SOC 1002A or ANT 1002(A)
3
Total Credits 15-21
Students planning to enter law school must take courses beyond the
minor in order to be adequately prepared for the demands of law school. It
is imperative that students interested in the legal professions meet with the
Pre-Law advisors in the Political Science department on a regular basis. The
advisors will design a plan of study that will best fit each student‘s needs.
Management & Leadership Minor
MGT 1011N
MGT 2073N
MGT 2075N
MGT 2077A
MGT 3146A
Introduction to Management Theory
and Practice
Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Human Resource Management
Business Law I
Organizational Behavior
3
3
3
3
3
Total Credits 15
Managing in a Global Market Minor
MGT 1011N
MKT 1033N
MKT 2140N
MGT 2178N
MKT 3151N
Introduction to Management Theory
& Practice
3
Essentials of Marketing in the 21st Century
3
Global Marketing Environments
3
International Business
3
Services Marketing
3
Total Credits 15
Marketing Management Minor
MKT 1033N
MKT 2045N
MKT 2046N
MKT 3144N
MKT 3151N
Essentials of Marketing in the 21st Century
3
Critical Components of Sales Management
3
Modern Retailing Strategies
3
Customer Relationship Management
3
Services Marketing
3
Total Credits 15
Mathematics Minor
MTH 1021A
Calculus I
MTH 1022A
Calculus II
MTH Electives beyond MTH 1022A
4
4
9-10
Total Credits 17-18
Media Studies Minor
MED 1001A
Introduction to Mass Communication
3
ENG 2066A
Newswriting and Reporting
3
Choose nine (9) credits from the following courses:
9
MED 1039C
Introduction to Film
3
MED 1069A
Video Fieldwork and Editing
3
MED/REL 2001A
Religion in Film, Television and News Media
3
MED 2010A
Horror Films: Art, History, Criticism
3
MED 2041A
The Films & Telefilms of Alfred Hitchcock
3
MED 2150A
New Media
3
MED 2069A
Advanced Videography and Editing
3
MED 3040A
Modern World Cinema
3
MED/DRM 3160A Entertainment and Media Law
3
MED 4180A-4189A Special Topics as appropriate
3
MED 4195N
Internship in Communications
3
ENG 2076A
Nonfiction Writing Workshop
3
ENG 2077A
Film Writing
3
ENG 2078A
Writing for Television
3
ENG 3170A
Advanced News Preparation
3
SOC 3176A
Mass Media and Society
3
VIS 1023C
Photography I
3
Total Credits 15
Museum Studies Minor
VIS 1001C
VIS 1002C
VIS 2151A
VIS 3152A
VIS 4104A
VIS 4183A-VIS 4189A
VIS 4197N-VIS 4198N
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 92
World Art I
World Art II
Museum Studies I
Museum Studies II
Contemporary Art and Theory
Special Topics in Visual Arts OR
Visual Arts Cooperative Education
Internship
3
3
3
3
3
3
Back to Table of Contents
Total Credits 18
POL 1001C
POL 1011C
POL 1021C
POL 1022C
POL Electives
Music Minor
MUS 1005
MUS 1006A
MUS 1007A
MUS 1009A
MUS 1031A
MUS 2032A
MUS 2141A
MUS 4181A-4189A
A Survey of Symphony and/or
Survey of Contemporary Music and/or
Survey of Opera and/or
Beethoven
Music Theory I
Music Theory II
Form and Analysis
Seminar in Music
6
3
3
3
3
Total Credits 18
Music History Minor
MUS 1004A
MUS 1005A
MUS 1006A
MUS 1007A
MUS 1009A
MUS 4180A-4189A
Survey of Piano Literature
Survey of Symphony
Survey of Contemporary Music
Survey of Opera
Beethoven
One (1) Seminar in Music History
3
3
3
3
3
3
Total Credits 18
Philosophy Minor
Select three courses from the following:
9
PHL 1003C
Philosophical Problems
PHL 1005C
Critical Thinking
PHL/HUM 1026A Eastern Philosophy
PHL 1042C
Ethics
PHL Electives
Two courses numbered 2000 and above
3
3
3
3
6
Total Credits 15
Photography Minor
VIS 1023C
Photography I
3
VIS 2098A
Photography II
3
VIS 2140C
Digital Photo Manipulations
3
Select three courses from the following:
VIS 2119A
Photography: Alternative Techniques
3
VIS 2120A
History of Photography
3
VIS 4183A-VIS 4189A
Special Topics in Visual Arts
3
VIS 4191A, VIS 4192A
Independent Study (up to 2 permitted)
3
VIS 4197N, VIS 4198 N
Visual Arts Cooperative
Education Internship
3
Total Credits18
Physics Minor
PHY 1001C
PHY 1002C
Political Science Minor
General Physics I (prerequisite MTH 1014A)
3
General Physics II
(prerequisites PHY 1001C and PHY 1003C)
3
PHY 1003C
General Physics I Lab (co-requisite PHY 1001C)
1
PHY 1004C
General Physics II Lab (co-requisite PHY 1002C)
1
Select Seven (7) credits minimum from calculus-based upper level
Physics courses (numbered 2000 and above)
7
Total Credits 15
Introduction to Politics
American Government and Politics
World Politics or
Comparative Politics
3
3
3
9
Total Credits 15-18
Exclusion: Not available to students pursuing Political Science as the Group
One discipline within the B.A. in Social Sciences.
Pre-Professional Health Minor
BIO 1001A
BIO 1002A
BIO 1003A
BIO 1004A
CHM 1001C
CHM 1002C
CHM 1003C
CHM 1004C
CHM 3025A
CHM 3026A
CHM 3027A
CHM 3028A
PHY 1001C
PHY 1002C
PHY 1003C
PHY 1004C
MTH 1014A
MTH 1021A
Introduction to Biology I
Introduction to Biology II
Introduction to Biology I Laboratory
Introduction to Biology II Laboratory
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II
General Chemistry Laboratory I
General Chemistry Laboratory II
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
Organic Chemistry Laboratory II
General Physics I
General Physics II
General Physics I Laboratory
General Physics II Laboratory
Pre-Calculus
Calculus I
3
3
1
1
3
3
1
1
3
3
1
1
3
3
1
1
3
4
Total Credits 39
Note: Some health professional schools may have additional science and/or
math requirements.
Over the years a number of students who have not majored in any of
the sciences have established for themselves a career goal in one of the
health professions (e.g., medicine, dentistry, veterinary science, etc.).
Entrance into a health professional school does not require that students
major in a science. The pre-professional health minor is designed for nonscience majors who need a minor and/or the courses required to satisfy
entrance requirements into health professional schools. It will also provide
the minimum preparation needed in order to successfully take
standardized entrance exams.
For questions regarding this minor and entrance requirements to
health professional schools, contact Dr. Richard Wilkens at 631-244-3491 or
visit him in his office in the Kramer Science Center on Dowling‘s Rudolph
Campus in Oakdale.
Professional Pilot Minor
AER 1001N
AER 1003N
AER 2001N
AER 2004N
AER 2021N
AER 2120N
AER 2111N
AER 3121N
General Aeronautics I
Aviation Weather
General Aeronautics II
Aviation Safety
Elements of Instrument Flying
Advanced Operating Procedures and
Regulations for Commercial Pilots
Crew Resource Management
Air Carrier Navigation
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 93
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Back to Table of Contents
3
Total Credits 27
Note: (1) This minor contains courses already in the aviation majors at Dowling
College. (2) For professional pilots, this minor replaces all electives and adds 3
credits to the total credit count in the Aerospace Systems Technology Degree
Program. This minor also replaces 9 credits in the Aviation Management
Degree Program. Students majoring in the Aviation Management Degree
Program with the Professional Pilot Minor will replace AER 1006N with AER
2021N. Subsequently, the AER 2021N course in this minor will be replaced
with an AER Elective. (3) Students earning this minor must receive their flight
training at a Dowling College affiliated flight school in order to receive credit
for this minor. Students with acquired ratings before admittance to Dowling
College may receive credit for AER courses and flight labs on a case-by-case
basis pending evaluation. (4) Fees for flight training are in addition to tuition
and are found in the ―Financial Information‖ section of the catalog.
Sociology Minor
Psychology Minor
SPH 1004C
Fundamentals of Speech Communication
3
Select four electives from the following courses:
12
DRM 1011A
Oral Interpretation of Literature
3
DRM 1018A
Improvisation
3
PHL 1005C
Critical Thinking
3
SPH 1001A
Voice and Articulation
3
SPH 2011A
Public Speaking
3
SPH 2022A
Interpersonal Communication
3
SPH 2106A
Nonverbal Communication
3
SPH 3013A
Argumentation and Debate
3
SPH 3102A
Group Communication
3
SPH 3162A
Intercultural Communication
3
SPH 4180-4189A
Special Topics in Speech
3
Total Credits 15
AER 3122N
AER 2061N
AER 3062N
AER 3063N
AER 4065N
PSY 1001A
PSY
Air Carrier Aircraft Systems
Flight Lab - Private Pilot (certificate)
Flight Lab - Commercial (certificate)
Flight Lab - Instrument (rating)
Flight Lab - Multi-Engine (rating)
Introduction to Psychology
Electives
15*
Total Credits 18
*At least nine (9) of the elective credits must be for courses numbered 3000 or
above. It is recommended that students consult with a full-time Psychology
Department faculty member when selecting courses for this minor. Exclusion:
Not available to students pursuing Psychology as the Group One discipline
within the B.A. in Social Sciences.
Quantitative Methods Minor
MTH 1006A
MTH 1007A
MTH 1021A
MTH 1022A
MTH 2103A
Statistics
Operations Research
Calculus I
Calculus II
Linear Algebra
3
3
4
4
3
Total Credits 17
Religious Studies Minor
REL 1010C
World Religions
3
PHL 2175A
Philosophy of Religion
3
PHL 4181A-4182A
Seminar in Philosophy
3
and two courses from the following list:
6
ASC 4123C
Gods, Healers, Saviors, & Saints*
3
PHL 1026C
Eastern Philosophy
3
PHL 1071C
Philosophy of Art
3
REL 1090A
Approaches to Spirituality
3
REL 1028A
Ancient Judaism
3
REL 1029A
Ancient Christianity & New Testament
3
REL/MED 2001C
Religion in Film, Television & News Media
3
REL 4113A
Greek & Roman Mythology & Ritual
3
Total Credits 15
*Strongly recommended
SOC 1001A
SOC 1002A
SOC 3021A
SOC 3172A
SOC Electives*
Introduction to Sociology I
Introduction to Sociology II
Research Methods
Sociological Theory
3
3
3
3
6
Total Credits 18
*No more than one SOC 4181-4189 seminar may be included.
Exclusion: Not available to students seeking a B.A. in Sociology-Anthropology
or to students pursuing Sociology as the Group One discipline within the B.A.
in Social Sciences.
Spanish Minor
SPN
Electives
15
Total Credits 15*
*At least six (6) of these credits must be for courses numbered 3000 or above.
Speech Communication Minor
Video Production Minor
MED 1039C
Introduction to Film
MED 1069A
Video Fieldwork and Editing
MED 2069A
Advanced Videography and Editing
Select two electives, at least one of which must be a Writing course:
DRM 1013A
Acting I
ENG 2077A
Film Writing
ENG 2078A
Writing for Television
MED 1001A
Introduction to Mass Communication
MED 3160A
Entertainment and Media Law
MED 4195N
Internship in Communication
Total Credits
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
15
Visual Arts Minor
Select six courses from the following list:
VIS 1003A
Two-Dimensional Design
VIS 1004A
Three-Dimensional Design
VIS 1009C
Basic Drawing
VIS 1016A
Ceramics I
VIS 1023A
Photography I
VIS 1064N
Designing with the Computer I
VIS 2011A
Painting I
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 94
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Back to Table of Contents
VIS 2015A
VIS 2019A
VIS 2020C
VIS 2061A
Silkscreening, or
Introduction to Printmaking
Sculpture I
Life Drawing
Lacrosse
3
3
3
Total Credits 18
Web Design Minor
CSC/VIS 1150A
VIS 1064N
VIS 2065N
VIS 1075A
VIS 2150A
Introduction to Web Design
Digital Imaging I
Digital Imaging II
Basic Graphic Design
Multimedia Web Design
3
3
3
3
3
Total Credits 15
Certificate in Coaching
The Certificate in Coaching can be earned for non-contact/ nonendurance sports or for contact/endurance sports for boys and girls. The
requirements for each type of certification are listed below. In addition, all
coaches must successfully complete the New York State required Child
Abuse Awareness/Prevention Seminar, the Violence Prevention Workshop
and the Child Abuse and Maltreatment Workshop.
Certification for non-contact/non-endurance sports requires
completion of six (6) credits.
Certificate Requirements for Non-Contact/
Non-Endurance Sports
Credits
SMP 1033N
First Aid and Safety
3
SMP 1040A
Coaching Principles Health Sciences
3
Total Credits 6
Dowling College student athletes who are unable to complete field
work requirements for certification because of in-season commitments to
Dowling Athletic Teams, or special students with extenuating
circumstances may elect a techniques course (SMP 2044) in lieu of the field
work experience. Students may earn certification in as many sports as
desired. The first techniques course must be taken concurrently with the
Student Coaching Seminar (SMP 2042). Techniques courses may be taken
with Department Coordinator and Instructor approval only. The
techniques course will also include at least six (6) hours with an approved
college sports program.
Certificate Requirements for Contact Sports
Credits
SMP 1033N
First Aid and Safety
3
SMP 1040A
Coaching Principles Health Sciences
3
SMP 2040N
Organization and Administration of Coaching
3
SMP 2042N
Student Coaching Seminar: Theory and Techniques
2
Total Credits 11
Sports schedule for SMP 2042N:
Fall Term
Badminton
Gymnastics
Swimming and Diving
Basketball
Handball
Tennis
Fencing
Volleyball
Cross-country (indoor, outdoor)
Field Hockey
Track and Field
Wrestling
Football
Soccer
Spring Term
Baseball
Tennis
Swimming and Diving
Basketball
Track and Field
Softball
Volleyball
Certificate in Computer Information Systems
This certificate program is designed to provide students with the
cognitive and affective knowledge and abilities necessary to integrate
information systems and applications across an enterprise using
appropriate structured processes. The program is for those students who
have already acquired a bachelor‘s degree in a non-computer field.
Students must complete 18 credits of coursework, not including CIS 1200N.
Prerequisites
CIS 1200N
3 credits
Introduction to Information Systems Management
3
Major Requirements
12 credits
CIS 2015A
Systems Analysis and Design
3
CIS 2102N
Database Management Systems
3
CIS 3300N
Advanced Database Management Systems
3
CIS 3400N
Business Data Communications
3
Electives
6 credits
Choose two courses from the following:
CIS 2005N
Introduction to Web Design
3
CIS 3012N
Programming Logic and Design
3
CIS 3013N
Advanced Programming
3
CIS 4100N
Concepts of Enterprise Planning Systems
3
CIS 4120N
Managing Information Systems Change
Across the Enterprise
3
Total: 21 credits
Certificate in Supervising Employees
This certificate focuses the individual on the needed skills to supervise
employees and to optimize performance within organizations. The option
of a non-traditional delivery system recognizes the lifestyles of professional
people who desire opportunities for advancement while still meeting their
current full-time obligations. The optional blended course delivery system
combines computer-mediated technology and the traditional classroom
environment with the opportunity to meet and learn with other likeminded students. Professionals will find this program to be refreshing,
demanding, and extremely valuable. The value of this certificate is that it
brings together the essential educational components that will benefit
experienced professionals who have little or no college background.
Requirements
MGT 1011N
MGT 1015N
MGT 2075N
MGT 3107N
MGT 3108N
MGT 3146A
MGT 4181
MGT 4185N-4189N
18 credits
Introduction to Management Theory & Practice
3
Managing Conflict within a Business Organization
3
Human Resource Management
3
Employment Law or
Labor Relations
3
Organizational Behavior
3
Business Policy Seminar or
Seminars in Management
3
Total: 18 credits
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 95
Back to Table of Contents
Post-Baccalaureate
Pre-Professional Health Program
This program is designed to meet the needs of those students who
currently hold a non-health related undergraduate degree and who now
wish to pursue further studies in a health professional school (i.e.,
allopathic, osteopathic, veterinary, dentistry, podiatric, optometry, etc.).
This program also helps students prepare for the appropriate standardized
entrance exams. All courses can be completed in either two academic years
(Fall and Spring semester sequences) or in one academic year and two
summers.
BIO 1001A
Introduction to Biology I
3
BIO 1002A
Introduction to Biology II
3
BIO 1003A
Introduction to Biology I Laboratory
1
BIO 1004A
Introductory Biology II Laboratory
1
CHM 1001C
General Chemistry I
3
CHM 1002C
General Chemistry II
3
CHM 1003C
General Chemistry I Laboratory
1
CHM 1004C
General Chemistry II Laboratory
1
CHM 3025A
Organic Chemistry I
3
CHM 3026A
Organic Chemistry II
3
CHM 3027A
Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
1
CHM 3028A
Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
1
PHY 1001C
General Physics I
3
PHY 1002C
General Physics II
3
PHY 1003C
General Physics I Laboratory
1
PHY 1004C
General Physics II Laboratory
1
MTH 1014A
Pre-Calculus
3
MTH 1021A
Calculus I
4
Total Credits 39
Note: Some health professional schools may have additional science and/or
math requirements. If students have already completed the required math and
science courses, then appropriate substitute courses must be taken. For
questions regarding this program, contact Dr. Richard Wilkens, Health
Professions Advisor, at 631-244-3491.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 96
Back to Table of Contents
Course Descriptions
To view new courses and updated course descriptions please
visit the Dowling College web site, course search page.
(http://www.dowling.edu/academics/academic-resources/catalogs/)
Courses are listed alphabetically by discipline. The course title is
preceded by the discipline prefix and the course number, for example, ATS
1052. In general, the course number indicates the level of the course as
follows:
0001-0999
remedial or developmental courses not
applicable to degree requirements;
1000-1999
introductory
courses
with
no
prerequisites other than relevant basic
skills in English or mathematics;
2000-2999
lower division intermediate courses
with a prerequisite;
3000-3999
upper division intermediate or
advanced courses with prerequisites;
4000-4999
advanced courses with multiple
prerequisites or requiring senior status.
Independent study courses are numbered 4191 and 4192. Internships
are numbered 4195 to 4199. Seminars bear the numbers 4180-4189. Topics
vary from year to year and are announced each semester in the Schedule of
Classes. Specific information on the scheduling and content of seminars
may be obtained from the faculty secretaries.
Interdisciplinary Courses are those whose content spans more than one
discipline. These courses, which may be taken for credit in either of two
disciplines, are described within the offerings in each of the appropriate
disciplines.
Each degree program requires a minimum number of Liberal Arts
credits. For the exact number, please see program descriptions. Courses
that will contribute to the satisfaction of that Liberal Arts requirement are
identified with the suffix A or C. Courses identified with the suffix N may
not be used to satisfy the Liberal Arts requirement.
Please note that not every course will be offered every semester or
term. Students should plan their course schedule two or three terms in
advance with the assistance of an academic advisor.
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 97
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Board of Trustees
Mr. Gerald J. Curtin
Chief Executive Officer
State Roofing, Inc.
Dr. Myrka A. Gonzalez
Attorney
Mr. Jack O’Connor
Principal
Newmark Knight Frank
Honorary Trustees
Mr. Robert M. Curley
Mr. Stan Henry
Mr. Jerry Kramer
Mr. Stuart R. Levine
Mr. Robert E. Mitchell
Mrs. Terry Townsend
Mr. Dennis O’Doherty
Vice President, Retired, Chemical Bank
Mr. Ronald Parr
President
The Parr Organization, Incorporated
Associate Trustees
Ms. Patricia Blake
Dr. Jeffrey Block
Mr. Joseph K. Posillico
President/CEO
Posillico
Mr. Michael P. Puorro
Chairman, President & CEO
Hanover Community Bank
Mr. John Racanelli
Partner
Farrell Fritz, P.C.
Ms. Deborah K. Richman
President & CEO
DK USA Ltd.
Mr. Louis Giacalone
Mr. Arthur Gianelli
Mr. Kent Katter
Ms. Winnie Mack
Mr. Rudy Migliore
Dr. Arnold Panzer
Mr. Gregg Sarra
Mr. Brian Sozzi
Mr. Keith Werny
Mr. Bill Wisbauer
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 98
Back to Table of Contents
Administration
Dr. Albert Inserra
President
Mr. Ralph Cerullo
CFO/Treasurer
Dr. Richard Wilkens
Provost
Mr. Robert Campbell
Assistant Vice President of Safety, Facilities & Compliance
Ms. Jaclyn Carlo
Associate Vice President of Business & Finance
Ms. Melody Cope
Vice President of Athletics
Mr. Thomas Daly
Dean of Aviation and Student Affairs
Ms. Anne Dimola
Executive Director Human Resources & Administrative Services
Dr. Patrick Johnson
Dean of Assessment & Institutional Effectiveness
Dr. Robert J. Manley
Dean of the School of Education
Dr. Clyde Payne
Assistant to the President for Special Programs
Dr. Brian E. Stipelman
Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences
Mr. Jonathan White
Assistant Vice President for Enrollment Services
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 99
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Faculty
Michael J. Aloi
Associate Professor of Cataloging/Technical Services Librarian, B.S.,
M.B.A., Canisius College; M.L.S., SUNY Buffalo
Mark R. Greer
Professor of Economics, B.S., M.A., University of Denver; Ph.D.,
University of Michigan
Bruce L. Haller
Associate Professor of Management and Leadership, B.A., Adelphi
Linda S. Bausch
Associate Professor
University; J.D., Brooklyn Law School; M.B.A., Adelphi University
of Literacy Education, B.S., LIU C.W. Post; Ed.D., Hofstra
University; M.S.Ed., Dowling College
Susanne Bleiberg-Seperson
Professor of Sociology, B.A., SUNY Binghamton; Ph.D., CUNY
Graduate School and University Center
Christopher B. Boyko
Associate Professor of Biology, B.S., SUNY Binghamton; MS
University Of Massachusetts–Dartmth; Ph.D., University of Rhode
Island
Glen R. Brauchle
Assistant Professor of Accounting B.B.A., M.B.A., Hofstra University,
CPA
Susan J. Carter
Associate Professor of Special Education, B.S., Springfield College–
Maine; Ed.D., Ed.M., Columbia University; M.Ed., University of
Connecticut
George J. Cavuto
Professor of Literacy Education, B.A., St. John’s University; M.S.,
Adelphi University; Ph.D., Hofstra University
Carlos A. Cunha
Professor of Political Science, B.A., Ph.D., University of
Massachusetts; M.A., University of Connecticut
Joseph D. Donofrio
Assistant Professor of Aviation, B.A., Adelphi University; B.A.,
Dowling College; M.A.M., Embry-Riddle Aero U
Wendy J. Ehrensberger
Assistant Professor of Special Education, B.A., Dowling College;
Ed.D., Columbia University; Ed.M., Stephn F Austin St U
Diane M. Fischer
Professor of Computer Information Systems, B.A., CUNY City
Diane C. Holliday
Associate Professor/Reference Librarian, B.S., SUNY Stony Brook;
M.B.A., Dowling College; M.L.S., CUNY Queens College
William Indick
Professor of Psychology, B.A., M.A., New York
University; Ph.D., Cornell University
Patrick B. Johnson
Professor of Human Development and Learning, B.A., University of
California; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin
Suzanne M. Johnson
Professor of Psychology, B.A., Ithaca College; M.A., Ph.D., SUNY
Stony Brook
Lois J. Kahl
Instructor of Sport Management and Physical Education, B.S.,
Dowling College, M.A., Adelphi University
Andrew J. Karp
Professor of English, B.A., New York University; M.A., Ph.D.,
Joseph Kasten
Professor of Computer Information Systems, B.S., Florida Institute
of Technology; M.B.A., Dowling College; Ph.D., LIU C.W. Post
Christopher B. Kretz
Assistant Professor of Digital Resources/Reference Librarian, B.A.,
Dickinson College; M.L.S., CUNY Queens College
Stephen Lamia
Professor of Visual Arts, B.A., CUNY Brooklyn College; M.A., New
York University; Ph.D., University of Toronto
Guannan Li
Assistant Professor of History, B.A., M.A., Peking University; Ph.D.,
University of Oregon
College; M.A., University of Wisconsin; M.S., Ph.D., SUNY Buffalo
Joshua W. Gidding
Professor of English, B.A., University California-Berkeley; M.A.,
Ph.D., University of Southern California
Leo A. Giglio
Associate Professor of Management and Leadership, B.A., New York
University; M.B.A., Ph.D., CUNY Graduate School and University
Center; M.S., CUNY Baruch College
Meron Lindenfeld
Instructor of Aviation B.S., M.S.Ed, Dowling College
Sandra B. Loughran
Associate Professor of Human Development and Learning, B.S.,
College of St. Rose; M.S., CUNY City College; Ph.D., Fordham
University
Robert J. Manley
Professor of Educational Admin, Leadership and Technology, B.A.,
Iona College; M.A., Hofstra University; Ph.D., St. John's University
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 100
Back to Table of Contents
Marilyn J. Mather
Associate Professor of Sport Management and Physical Education,
B.S. University of Bridgeport, M.S., Southern Connecticut State
University; Ph.D. University of Connecticut
Michael J. Sakuma
Associate Professor of Psychology, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., SUNY Stony
Brook
Kevin T. McDonnell
Associate Professor of Computer Science and Mathematics, B.S. SUNY
Stony Brook, M.S., SUNY Stony Brook, Ph.D., SUNY Stony Brook
Francis A. Samuel
Associate Professor of Secondary Education, B.A., B.Ed., Kerala
University; M.A., M.S., University of Scranton; Ph.D., Fordham
University
Claudia C. McGivney
Assistant Professor/Reference Librarian, B.A. SUNY Stony Brook;
MLIS, LIU C.W. Post
Vishal Shah
Associate Professor of Biology, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Sardar Patel
Barry E. McNamara
Professor of Special Education, B.A.; St. Benedict's College; M.S.Ed.,
Kansas State University; M.Ed., Ph.D. Columbia University
Yanek Mieczkowski
Professor of History, B.A., Ithaca College; M.A., Columbia
University; Ph.D. Columbia University
Elsa-Sofia Morote
Professor of Educational Administration, Leadership and Technology;
B.S., University of Lima, Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh, M.P.A.,
Center Rsrch and Ecn Tchng (CIDE); M.S., Carnegie Mellon
University
Barbara J. Nolan
Associate Professor of Human Development and Learning, B.A.,
M.A., Ph.D., University of British Columbia
Christian D. Perring
Professor of Philosophy, B.A., University of Oxford; M.S., Kings
College; Ph.D., Princeton University
University
Alexander Smirnov
Assistant Professor of Earth and Marine Sciences, Ph.D. SUNY Stony
Brook
Carolyn A. Spencer
Associate Professor of Finance, B.S., Bryant University, M.B.A.,
University of Massachusetts, Ph.D., Florida Atlantic University
Brian E. Stipelman
Associate Professor of Political Science, B.A., Bowdoin College;
Ph.D., Rutgers University
Stephanie L. Tatum
Associate Professor of Educational Administration, Leadership and
Technology, B.A., Texas Southern University; M.A., Ph.D., University
of Illinois
Marcus C. Tye
Professor of Psychology, A.B., Princeton University; M.A., Ph.D.,
University of North Dakota
S. Marshall Perry
Associate Professor of Educational Administration, Leadership and
Technology, B.A., Yale University; Ph.D., Stanford University
John D. Vargas
Associate Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science, B.A.,
CUNY Hunter College; M.S., Ph.D., Adelphi University; M.S., New York
University
Laura E. Pope Robbins
Professor/Reference Librarian, B.A., SUNY Stony Brook; M.B.A.,
Dowling College; M.L.S., University of Washington
Susan C. Voorhees
Associate Professor of Literacy Education, B.S., Adelphi
Kimberly D. Poppiti
Associate Professor of Drama and Dance, B.A., SUNY Stony Brook,
M.F.A., SUNY Stony Brook; Ph.D., New York University
David M. Racanelli
Assistant Professor of Music, B.A., American University; B.A., CUNY
Queens College; M.A., CUNY Queens College; Ph.D., CUNY Graduate
School and University Center
Fred J. Rispoli
Professor of Mathematics, B.S., M.S., University of Connecticut;
Ph.D., SUNY Stony Brook
Nathalia Rogers
Associate Professor of Sociology, M.A., Ph.D., Belarus State
University; Ed.D., Hofstra University; M.S.Ed Dowling College
Parnel Wickham
Professor of Special Education, B.A., M.P.A., Ph.D., Syracuse; M.S.,
SUNY Buffalo
Richard T. Wilkens
Associate Professor of Biology, B.S., Ph.D., SUNY Binghamton
Richard F. Wolff
Professor of Speech and Media Studies and Religious Studies, B.A.
Hons., Valparaiso University; M.A., Lutheran School of Theology,
Ph.D., Ohio University
Lori Anne Zaikowski
Professor of Chemistry and Natural Science, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., SUNY
Stony Brook
University; Ph.D., McGill University
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 101
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Dowling College Virtual Resources
Undergraduate Programs and Offerings
Our Majors:
Accounting
Aerospace Systems Technology
Applied Mathematics
Aviation Management
Biology
Chemistry
Communication Arts
Computer Information Systems
Computer Science and Mathematics
Criminal Justice Management
Earth Science
Economics
Early Childhood Education
Elementary Education
English
Environmental Sciences
Finance
Gerontology
Graphic Design and Digital Arts
History
Management and Leadership
Marine Studies
Marketing
Mathematics
Music
Natural Sciences and Mathematics
Philosophy
Physical Education (K-12)
Political Science
Professional and Liberal Studies
Psychology
Romance Languages
Social Sciences
Sociology
Sociology / Anthropology
Special Education
Sport Management
TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other
Languages)
Visual Arts
Our Minors:
Accounting
Acting
American Literature
Anthropology
Art History
Aviation Management
Biology
Bioethics
Business
Ceramics
Chemistry
Coaching
Computer Information Systems
Computer Science
Contemporary American Studies
Creative Writing
Dance
Drama
Dramatic Arts Writing
Earth and Marine Sciences
Economics
Educational Theatre
Elementary Education
English Literature
Ethics
Executive Pilot Flight
Finance
Forensic Chemistry
French
Gerontology
Graphic Design and Digital Arts
History
Human Resource Management
International Studies
Italian
Legal Studies
Management and Leadership
Managing in a Global Market
Marketing Management
Mathematics
Media Studies
Museum Studies
Music
Music History
Philosophy
Photography
Physics
Political Science
Pre-Professional Health
Professional Pilot
Psychology
Quantitative Methods
Religious Studies
Sociology
Spanish
Speech Communication
Special Education
Video Production
Visual Arts
Web Design
Graduate/Doctorate Programs and Offerings
Doctorate:
School of Education
Educational Administration (Ed.D.)
Educational Administration (Ed.D.) with Concentration in Health Care and Higher Education
Graduate:
School of Business
Aviation Management (M.B.A.)
Criminal Justice Management (B.S.)
Corporate Finance (M.B.A.)
Health Care Management (M.B.A.)
Management and Leadership (M.B.A.)
Public Management (M.B.A.)
School of Education
Adolescence Education (M.S.)
Childhood/Early Childhood Education (M.S.)
Educational Technology Leadership (M.S.)
Literacy Education (M.S.)
Special Education (M.S.)
Sport Management (B.S.)
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 102
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Useful Links
Academic Calendar
Apply Now
Class Schedules
Course Catalog Search
Dowling Institute
Register Online
Request Information
Schedule a Campus Tour
The Tutor Center
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 103
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Rudolph-Oakdale Campus
1
Racanelli Center
8
Curtin Student Center
2
Fortunoff Hall
9
Residence Hall
3
Conservatory
10 Montauk Building
4
Kramer Science Center
11 Visual Arts Center and Anthony Giordano Gallery
5
Education Building
12 Music House
6
Performing Arts Center
13 Security Building
7
Protocol Building
14 Residence Life
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 104
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Brookhaven Campus
1
Brookhaven Campus Entrance
3
Stan and Pat Henry Aviation Complex
2
Security Booth
4
Residential Village
Dowling College Undergraduate Catalog — Page 105
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